Science.gov

Sample records for laboratory site specific

  1. 75 FR 24685 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... to Cleanup Idaho National Laboratory Site Wide Review--CERCLA Long-Term Ecological Program...

  2. 76 FR 53888 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its...

  3. 75 FR 56527 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act.... Overview Legacy Management--Long-Term Land Use at Idaho National Laboratory. Integrated Waste...

  4. 78 FR 58294 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory...

  5. 77 FR 76475 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Laboratory/ICP Public Involvement/ Communications Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Plant Update ICP End...

  6. 75 FR 9590 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory committee meetings and will make...

  7. 75 FR 346 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Decision. Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of...

  8. 77 FR 38276 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee... Center Status Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance...

  9. 76 FR 25682 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National ] Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory committee meetings and will...

  10. 75 FR 39008 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory committee meetings and will make...

  11. 78 FR 12747 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its...

  12. 76 FR 39080 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory (INL) 101. INL EM Budget. Calcine Path Forward. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

  13. 77 FR 53192 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Closeout Process Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance...

  14. 77 FR 65374 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory/ICP Public Involvement/ Communications Public Participation: The EM SSAB,...

  15. 75 FR 82004 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its...

  16. 76 FR 10018 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public...

  17. 77 FR 10485 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act...--Future Work Plan Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance...

  18. 76 FR 66917 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Environmental Assessment Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the...

  19. 78 FR 30910 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act...: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its...

  20. 76 FR 68179 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory (76 FR 66917). This document makes a... page at: http://inlcab.energy.gov/ . Correction In the Federal Register of October 28, 2011, in FR Doc... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of...

  1. 75 FR 11872 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ..., Idaho National Laboratory to be held on March 16, 2010 75 FR 9590. In that notice, the meeting address... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of...

  2. Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site

    SciTech Connect

    Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1983-03-01

    The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

  3. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report describes and summarizes a probabilistic evaluation of ground motions for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this evaluation is to provide a basis for updating the seismic design criteria for the INEL. In this study, site-specific seismic hazard curves were developed for seven facility sites as prescribed by DOE Standards 1022-93 and 1023-96. These sites include the: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL); Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP or CPP); Power Burst Facility (PBF); Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); Naval Reactor Facility (NRF); and Test Area North (TAN). The results, probabilistic peak ground accelerations and uniform hazard spectra, contained in this report are not to be used for purposes of seismic design at INEL. A subsequent study will be performed to translate the results of this probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to site-specific seismic design values for the INEL as per the requirements of DOE Standard 1020-94. These site-specific seismic design values will be incorporated into the INEL Architectural and Engineering Standards.

  4. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The identification of seismic sources is often based on a combination of geologic and tectonic considerations and patterns of observed seismicity; hence, a historical earthquake catalogue is important. A historical catalogue of earthquakes of approximate magnitude (M) 2.5 and greater for the time period 1850 through 1992 was compiled for the INEL region. The primary data source used was the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) catalogue for the time period from about 1800 through 1985 (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1988). A large number of felt earthquakes, especially prior to the 1970`s, which were below the threshold of completeness established in the DNAG catalogue (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1991), were taken from the state catalogues compiled by Stover and colleagues at the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) and combined with the DNAG catalogue for the INEL region. The state catalogues were those of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. NEIC`s Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the state catalogues compiled by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) were also used to supplement the pre-1986 time period. A few events reanalyzed by Jim Zollweg (Boise State University, written communication, 1994) were also modified in the catalogue. In the case of duplicate events, the DNAG entry was preferred over the Stover et al. entry for the period 1850 through 1985. A few events from Berg and Baker (1963) were also added to the catalogue. This information was and will be used in determining the seismic risk of buildings and facilities located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  5. An Approach to Industrial Stormwater Benchmarks: Establishing and Using Site-Specific Threshold Criteria at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C G; Mathews, S

    2006-09-07

    Current regulatory schemes use generic or industrial sector specific benchmarks to evaluate the quality of industrial stormwater discharges. While benchmarks can be a useful tool for facility stormwater managers in evaluating the quality stormwater runoff, benchmarks typically do not take into account site-specific conditions, such as: soil chemistry, atmospheric deposition, seasonal changes in water source, and upstream land use. Failing to account for these factors may lead to unnecessary costs to trace a source of natural variation, or potentially missing a significant local water quality problem. Site-specific water quality thresholds, established upon the statistical evaluation of historic data take into account these factors, are a better tool for the direct evaluation of runoff quality, and a more cost-effective trigger to investigate anomalous results. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a federal facility, established stormwater monitoring programs to comply with the requirements of the industrial stormwater permit and Department of Energy orders, which require the evaluation of the impact of effluent discharges on the environment. LLNL recognized the need to create a tool to evaluate and manage stormwater quality that would allow analysts to identify trends in stormwater quality and recognize anomalous results so that trace-back and corrective actions could be initiated. LLNL created the site-specific water quality threshold tool to better understand the nature of the stormwater influent and effluent, to establish a technical basis for determining when facility operations might be impacting the quality of stormwater discharges, and to provide ''action levels'' to initiate follow-up to analytical results. The threshold criteria were based on a statistical analysis of the historic stormwater monitoring data and a review of relevant water quality objectives.

  6. Comparison of on-site and laboratory toxicity tests: derivation of site-specific criteria for un-ionized ammonia in a Colorado transitional stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, Del Wayne R.; Link, Denise; Parrish, Loys P.; Rodriguez, Glenn J.; Wuerthele, William; Davies, Patrick H.

    1989-01-01

    Acute tests with fathead minnows (Pimephales prornelas Rafinesque), johnny darters (Etheostoma nigrum Rafinesque), white suckers (Catostomus commersoni Lacépède) and acute and chronic tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to evaluate whether characteristics of the St. Vrain River in Colorado would ameliorate or enhance toxicity of un-ionized ammonia compared to laboratory (well) water and LC50 values found in the literature. Concurrently, tests were conducted on dilutions of Longmont, Colorado, wastewater to evaluate its toxicity in differing ammonia concentrations. Tests were conducted at two temperatures (approximately 6 and 20°C) to simulate seasonal differences. LC50s for fishes in the St. Vrain River water were similar to LC50s in laboratory water, indicating there was no site water effect. LC50s derived for fishes tested in warm conditions were within a factor of about two or three of literature values. However, the constituents in or characteristics of the wastewater appeared to enhance ammonia toxicity. Literature values (LC50s) for resident aquatic organisms and the new LC50 value for johnny darters tested on-site were used to derive site-specific criteria for un-ionized ammonia. Greater sensitivities of species to ammonia at cold versus warm temperatures suggests that colder, low-flow conditions may be a critical period for warm-water aquatic communities with regard to ammonia toxicity.

  7. Site-specific photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplitz, Brent D.; Brum, Jeffrey L.; Deshmukh, Subhash; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhongrui; Yen, Yu-Fong

    1992-04-01

    We present results on `site-specific' H-atom production in photolysis experiments conducted under collisionless conditions. H and D atoms are used as labels to investigate the site(s) at which C-H (or C-D) bond cleavage occurs in a variety of haloalkane systems. Experiments using two photolysis lasers clearly indicate that photon absorption by an intermediate, presumably an alkyl radical, is important in many of the systems studied. The site(s) (e.g., (alpha) , (beta) , or (gamma) ) at which C-H (or C-D) bond cleavage occurs is dependent not only on the nature of the molecule, but also on the photolysis wavelength. As a diagnostic tool, H- and D-atom Doppler spectroscopy allows us to gain insight into the energetics associated with the various dissociation processes. Our overall aim is to gain a further understanding of the photolysis properties of a variety of simple molecules and their associated radicals.

  8. Standard Specifications for Language Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Administration, Raleigh.

    Specifications are presented covering the components of electronic and electro-mechanical equipment, non-electrical materials for the teacher-student positions, and other items of a miscellaneous nature to provide for a complete, workable language laboratory facility. Instructions for the use of specifications are included for the purchaser,…

  9. Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification

    SciTech Connect

    DAILY, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) has established a document hierarchy as part of its integrated management system. The Strategic Plan defines the vision, values, missions, strategic goals, high-level outcomes, and the basic strategies in achieving those outcomes. As shown in Figure 1-1, the Site Specification derives requirements from the Strategic Plan and documents the top-level mission technical requirements for the work involved in the RL Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (EM). It also provides the basis for all contract technical requirements. Since this is limited to the EM work, neither the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) nor the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) non-EM science activities are included. Figure 1-1 also shows the relationship between this Site Specification and the other Site management and planning documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this document represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  10. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standards Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, S; Spagnolo, S; Van Warmerdam, C

    2003-02-24

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A. This standard provides information on: Objectives; Applicability; Safety analysis requirements; Control selection and maintenance; Documentation requirements; Safety basis review, approval, and renewal; and Safety basis implementation.

  11. Chemicals associated with site-specific neoplasia in 1394 long-term carcinogenesis experiments in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J; Cirvello, J; Haseman, J; Bucher, J

    1991-01-01

    The carcinogenicity data base used for this paper originated in the late 1960s by the National Cancer Institute and since 1978 has been continued and made more comprehensive by the National Toxicology Program. The extensive files contain among other sets of information detailed pathology data on more than 400 long-term (most often 24 month) chemical carcinogenesis studies, comprised of nearly 1600 individual experiments having at least 10 million tissue sections that have been evaluated for toxicity and carcinogenicity. Using the current data set of 379 studies made up of 1394 experiments, we have compiled listings of chemicals having like carcinogenic target sites for each of the 34 organs or systems for which histopathology diagnoses have been recorded routinely. The most common tumor site is the liver (15% of all experiments), followed in rank order by: lung, hematopoietic system and kidneys, mammary glands, forestomach, thyroid glands, Zymbal glands, urinary bladder, skin and uterus/cervix, and circulatory system and adrenal glands. These compilations are most useful for maintaining a historic perspective when evaluating the carcinogenicity of contemporary experiments. Equally important, the chemical-tumor-organ connection permits an evaluation of how well chemically induced cancers in a particular organ in one sex or species will predict or correlate with the other sex or species. Using liver cancers as an example, the overall interspecies concordance is 80%. Likewise target site predictions can be made for chemicals selected for study that may be similar to those already evaluated; thereby experimental protocols could be adjusted to allow, for example, more extensive pathology on preselected target organs (i.e., serial sections of the kidney). Further from these observations, one could decide to use two strains of mice to evaluate a short-chain chlorinated aliphatic compound or to study a human carcinogen in a sex-species known to develop chemically induced

  12. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  13. 14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1120. Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 7 of 148; file no. 1320/58, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338 Rev. C, Date: 16 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. DOE site-specific threat assessment

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.J.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1985-07-12

    A facility manager faced with the challenges of protecting a nuclear facility against potential threats must consider the likelihood and consequences of such threats, know the capabilities of the facility safeguards and security systems, and make informed decisions about the cost-effectivness of safeguards and security upgrades. To help meet these challenges, the San Francisco Operations Office of the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has developed a site-specific threat assessment approach and a quantitative model to improve the quality and consistency of site-specific threat assessment and resultant security upgrade decisions at sensitive Department of Energy facilities. 5 figs.

  15. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  16. Development of a laboratory niche Web site.

    PubMed

    Dimenstein, Izak B; Dimenstein, Simon I

    2013-10-01

    This technical note presents the development of a methodological laboratory niche Web site. The "Grossing Technology in Surgical Pathology" (www.grossing-technology.com) Web site is used as an example. Although common steps in creation of most Web sites are followed, there are particular requirements for structuring the template's menu on methodological laboratory Web sites. The "nested doll principle," in which one object is placed inside another, most adequately describes the methodological approach to laboratory Web site design. Fragmentation in presenting the Web site's material highlights the discrete parts of the laboratory procedure. An optimally minimal triad of components can be recommended for the creation of a laboratory niche Web site: a main set of media, a blog, and an ancillary component (host, contact, and links). The inclusion of a blog makes the Web site a dynamic forum for professional communication. By forming links and portals, cloud computing opens opportunities for connecting a niche Web site with other Web sites and professional organizations. As an additional source of information exchange, methodological laboratory niche Web sites are destined to parallel both traditional and new forms, such as books, journals, seminars, webinars, and internal educational materials. PMID:23769601

  17. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: a pilot inter-laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2013-07-25

    Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular (13)C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the (13)C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic (13)C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular (13)C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic (13)C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ (13)Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ (13)Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results. PMID:23845488

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  19. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 2. LLNL Annual Site-specific Data, 1953 - 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Historical information about tritium released routinely and accidentally from all Livermore Site Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities and from the Tritium Research Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) between 1953 through 2005 has been compiled and summarized in this report. Facility-specific data (annual release rates and dilution factors) have been derived from the historical information. These facility-specific data are needed to calculate annual doses to a hypothetical site-wide maximally exposed individual from routine releases of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) to the atmosphere. Doses can also be calculated from observed air tritium concentrations, and mean annual values for one air tritium sampling location are presented. Other historical data relevant to a dose reconstruction (e.g., meteorological data, including absolute humidity and rainfall) are also presented. Sources of information are carefully referenced, and assumptions are documented. Uncertainty distributions have been estimated for all parameter values. Confidence in data post-1974 is high.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  1. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standard Revision 3 December 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, D; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, J; Ingram, C; Spagnolo, S; van Warmerdam, C

    2007-06-07

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A.

  2. NORMAL LOAD BEARING BY SITE SPECIFIC CANISTER

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-03-23

    The overall purpose of this calculation is to perform a preliminary analysis of the Site Specific Canister/Basket, subject to static gravity loads that include the self weight of the Canister Shell, the Basket, the Spent Nuclear Fuel, the Shield Plug and the related hardware, so that the loads are approximately known for sizing purposes. Based on these loads the stress levels in various components of the Site Specific Canister/Basket are evaluated.

  3. Thermodynamic basis of site-specific cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Di Cera, E

    1994-08-01

    Cooperative phenomena in biological macromolecules arise from the interaction of many distinct subsystems, such as structural domains or binding sites. Cooperative properties of the system as a whole, like protein folding or allosteric transitions, are subject to the restrictions imposed by thermodynamic stability. These restrictions, however, do not apply in the case of individual subsystems open to interactions with the rest of the macromolecule. The site-specific properties of such subsystems can be understood in general thermodynamic terms from those of a multicomponent system under particular conditions. The analogy provides a thermodynamic basis for site-specific cooperativity. PMID:8075382

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    SciTech Connect

    E. D. Sellers

    2007-03-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  6. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in studying a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and/or environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, many recent efforts have been dedicated to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural and/or environmental properties. In this Review, we highlight some recent advancements of this rapidly growing research area. PMID:25580624

  7. Dancing in Place: Site-Specific Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metal-Corbin, Josie

    2012-01-01

    In her lecture the 2012 NDA Scholar/Artist, Josie Metal-Corbin, chronicles four decades of working with artists, educators, librarians, and scientists. The kinetic language of dance and the visual impact of specific environments provide provocative opportunities for collaboration, wherein the site becomes the framework or map for the dance design.…

  8. Site-specific seismic hazard analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalva, Gonzalo Andres

    Current seismic hazard analyses are generally performed using probabilistic methods. When dealing with a specific site, the typical methodology involves using a ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) to estimate the rock outcrop ground motion and associated variability, then the ground motion is propagated to the ground surface by site response analysis. The site response process is inherently variable. Including this uncertainty in site response analyses without modifying the input ground motion uncertainty produces double counting of the uncertainty associated with site response. In this dissertation the total uncertainty is partitioned into its several contributing components, quantifying these components, and proposing methods to perform site-specific seismic hazard analyses without double counting uncertainties. Four random field models were developed, and an existing one was fitted to a different database. These models can be used to generate shear-wave velocity profiles for site response analyses. Two types of models are presented, using Gaussian random fields, and using Markov Chains. The first ones showed better performance, and among those a stationary Gaussian model (stationary on rho) showed the best performance, and it is the simplest among the five models. Three GMPE's were developed, one only from surface records, one from "at-depth" records, and a third one combining surface and "at-depth" records. The results show the iv same magnitude and distance scaling for the three equations. For stations that recorded a large number of records, total uncertainty was measured by the standard deviation of the observed minus predicted, and similarly for intra-event residuals. These statistics serve as lower bounds for site-specific seismic hazard analyses, note that these standard deviations are non-ergodic. The use of a GMPE capable of predicting bedrock and surface median ground motions, allows the partition of the components of the total uncertainty at the

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  10. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Jonathan K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG) group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling. PMID:26516849

  11. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  12. Nanoparticles for Site Specific Genome Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to coordinate the recombination of short 50-60 by "donor DNA" fragments into genomic DNA, resulting in site-specific correction of genetic mutations or the introduction of advantageous genetic modifications. Site-specific gene editing in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) could result in treatment or cure of inherited disorders of the blood such as beta-thalassemia. Gene editing in HSPCs and differentiated T cells could help combat HIV/AIDs by modifying receptors, such as CCR5, necessary for R5-tropic HIV entry. However, translation of genome modification technologies to clinical practice is limited by challenges in intracellular delivery, especially in difficult-to-transfect hematolymphoid cells. In vivo gene editing could also provide novel treatment for systemic monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor. Here, we have engineered biodegradable nanoparticles to deliver oligonucleotides for site-specific genome editing of disease-relevant genes in human cells, with high efficiency, low toxicity, and editing of clinically relevant cell types. We designed nanoparticles to edit the human beta-globin and CCR5 genes in hematopoietic cells. We show that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles can delivery PNA and donor DNA for site-specific gene modification in human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in NOD-scid IL2rgammanull mice. Nanoparticles delivered by tail vein localized to hematopoietic compartments in the spleen and bone marrow of humanized mice, resulting in modification of the beta-globin and CCR5 genes. Modification frequencies ranged from 0.005 to 20% of cells depending on the organ and cell type, without detectable toxicity. This project developed highly versatile methods for delivery of therapeutics to hematolymphoid cells and hematopoietic stem cells, and will help to

  13. Transposon-specified site-specific recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P; Symington, L; Burke, M; Reed, R; Sherratt, D

    1982-01-01

    Cointegrate DNA molecules containing two copies of a transposable element appear to be intermediates in the transposition process. These structures are resolved by site-specific recombination to yield the normal end products of transposition. The transposable element gamma delta (Tn1000) synthesizes a product interchangeable with the Tn1/3tnpR protein in promoting Tn1/3 site-specific recombination. These data support the hypothesis that cointegrates containing directly repeated copies of Tn1/3 are obligatory intermediates in interreplicon transposition of Tn1/3. In addition, we show here that the reaction is independent of the element-encoded tnpA gene product. Tn501, which specifies mercury resistance, also produces cointegrates as intermediates in interreplicon transposition. The appearance of Tn501-specified recombination activity that can act on these cointegrates requires growth of cells in the presence of Hg2+. Images PMID:6275390

  14. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  16. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  17. Site environmental report for 2008 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2009-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2008 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2008. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  18. Site environmental report for 2006 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2007-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2006 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2006. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  19. Site environmental report for 2004 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2004 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2004. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  20. Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2004-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  1. Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2006-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  2. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable

  3. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 2. LLNL Annual Site-specific Data, 1953 - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S R

    2005-03-07

    It is planned to use the tritium dose model, DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium), to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) from all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities and from the Sandia National (SNL) Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years. DCART has been described in Part 1 of ''Historical Doses From Tritiated Water And Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released To The Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'' (UCRL-TR-205083). This report (Part 2) summarizes information about annual routine releases of tritium from LLNL (and SNL) since 1953. Historical records were used to derive facility-specific annual data (e.g., source terms, dilution factors, ambient air concentrations, meteorological data, including absolute humidity and rainfall, etc.) and their associated uncertainty distributions. These data will be used as input to DCART to calculate annual dose for each year of LLNL operations. Sources of information are carefully referenced, and assumptions are documented. Confidence on all data post-1974 is quite high. Prior to that, further adjustment to the estimated uncertainty may have to be made if more information comes to light.

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  5. RESRAD. Site-Specific Residual Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1989-06-01

    RESRAD is designed to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil. A guideline is defined as a radionuclide concentration or a level of radiation or radioactivity that is acceptable if a site is to be used without radiological restrictions. Guidelines are expressed as (1) concentrations of residual radionuclides in soil, (2) concentrations of airborne radon decay products, (3) levels of external gamma radiation, (4) levels of radioactivity from surface contamination, and (5) concentrations of residual radionuclides in air and water. Soil is defined as unconsolidated earth material, including rubble and debris that may be present. The controlling principles of all guidelines are (1) the annual radiation dose received by a member of the critical population group from the residual radioactive material - predicted by a realistic but reasonably conservative analysis and averaged over a 50 year period - should not exceed 100 mrem/yr, and (2) doses should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. All significant exposure pathways for the critical population group are considered in deriving soil guidelines. These pathways include direct exposure to external radiation from the contaminated soil material; internal radiation from inhalation of airborne radionuclides; and internal radiation from ingestion of plant foods grown in the contaminated soil, meat and milk from livestock fed with contaminated fodder and water, drinking water from a contaminated well, and fish from a contaminated pond.

  6. 78 FR 75552 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... and Remediation Committee and Waste Management Committee of the Environmental Management Site-Specific... restoration, waste management, and related activities. Purpose of the Environmental Monitoring and Remediation... environmental remediation activities resulting from historical Los Alamos National Laboratory operations and,...

  7. The Connectivity Between Site-Specific Life Cycle Impact Assessment and Site-Specific Weighting

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of many LCIAs is to come to a single score with all of the impacts from a wide variety of impact assessments weighted to form this single score. My past experiences with developing site-specific impact assessment methodologies and how this can change the valuation porti...

  8. SITE-SPECIFIC RECOMBINATION FOR PLANT GENETIC ENGINEERING: STRATEGY FOR AGRO-MEDIATED GENE STACKING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The precise rearrangement of DNA in planta can be achieved through site-specific recombination. For the past decade and a half, laboratory experiments have shown that site-specific recombination can delete genomic DNA, regulate gene expression, recombine chromosomes, and target new DNA into designat...

  9. REGENERATIVE SITE LEARNING LABORATORY: A SITE INTERVENTION FOR SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will indicate strategies that can be used to mitigate the negative impact of an existing developed site on a watershed and natural habitats. Additionally, the project design will inspire interest in ecological sustainability in an educational context. The project ...

  10. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  13. Site-specific calibration of the Hanford personnel neutron dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    A new personnel dosimetry system, employing a standard Hanford thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and a combination dosimeter with both CR-39 nuclear track and TLD-albedo elements, is being implemented at Hanford. Measurements were made in workplace environments in order to verify the accuracy of the system and establish site-specific factors to account for the differences in dosimeter response between the workplace and calibration laboratory. Neutron measurements were performed using sources at Hanford`s Plutonium Finishing Plant under high-scatter conditions to calibrate the new neutron dosimeter design to site-specific neutron spectra. The dosimeter was also calibrated using bare and moderated {sup 252}Cf sources under low-scatter conditions available in the Hanford Calibration Laboratory. Dose equivalent rates in the workplace were calculated from spectrometer measurements using tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and multisphere spectrometers. The accuracy of the spectrometers was verified by measurements on neutron sources with calibrations directly traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  14. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1995. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs.

  15. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites.

    PubMed

    Medcalf, Sharon; Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O'Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network's variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  16. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C.; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O’Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network’s variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  17. Site-Specific, Climate-Friendly Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-friendly farming guidance.

  18. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  19. Health, safety and environmental criteria for siting of laboratory facilities.

    PubMed

    Lees, P S; Corn, M

    1983-04-01

    The development of applicable criteria for assessing the suitability of a site for construction of full and partial containment laboratories for the analysis of unknown and highly toxic chemicals is described. The criteria, based on considerations of health, safety and environmental factors, are used to define critical considerations in site selection to minimize the risk to non-laboratory personnel and the surrounding environment. Criteria are synthesized from several sources using the assumption of a worst-case chemical release. Mechanical failures, human failures, critical events and social/legal limitations are investigated, as are the characteristics of a site which may limit construction of such a facility. A detailed description is made of the various types of laboratories and the types of samples analyzed in them. The final recommendations are summarized for five typical laboratory settings; they are based primarily on the potential impacts on people, property and natural resources. A single occupancy building in a rural setting is recommended as the most suitable site for a full containment laboratory. A single occupancy building in an industrial park setting is acceptable, while multiple occupancy buildings and sites which are more highly developed are unacceptable. Similar recommendations are made for partial containment and conventional laboratories. PMID:6858856

  20. Ames Laboratory Site Environmental Report, Calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, L.

    1991-12-31

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. This program is a working requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5484.1, ``Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements`` and Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies several buildings owned by the DOE. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU-owned buildings. Laboratory research activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. Ames Laboratory is responsible for a small chemical burial site, located on ISU property. The site was used for the disposal of chemical and metal slags from thorium and uranium production. Samples of water from existing test wells and upstream and downstream sites on the nearby Squaw Creek show no detectable migration of the contents of the burial site. A Site Assessment plan submitted to the State of Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was approved. A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study work plan has been completed for additional studies at the site. This has been reviewed and approved by the DOE Chicago Field Office and the DNR. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the site resulted in a categorical exclusion finding which has been approved by the DOE. Ames Laboratory has an area contaminated by diesel fuel at the location of a storage tank which was removed in 1970. Soil corings and groundwater have been analyzed for contamination and an assessment written. Pollution awareness and waste minimization programs and plans were implemented in 1990. Included in this effort was the implementation of a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program.

  1. Ames Laboratory Site Environmental Report, Calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. Pollution awareness and waste minimization programs and plans implemented in 1990 are continuing to date. Ames Laboratory (AL) is responsible for a small chemical burial site, located on ISU property. The site was used for the disposal of chemical and metal slags from thorium and uranium production. Samples of water from existing test wells, and upstream and downstream sites on the nearby Squaw Creek, have not detected migration of the buried materials off site. Surface, hand auger and deep boring soil samples have been collected from the site. The analytical results are pending, Six new monitoring wells have been installed and sampled. Analytical results are pending. Ames Laboratory is responsible for an area contaminated by diesel fuel that leaked from an underground storage tank (UST) in 1970. The tank was removed that year. Soil borings and groundwater have been analyzed for contamination and a preliminary assessment written. Nine small inactive waste sites have been identified for characterization. The NEPA review for this work resulted in a CX determination. The work plans were approved by AL and CH. A subcontractor has surveyed and sampled the sites. Analytical results are pending.

  2. 29 CFR 1926.752 - Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction... Steel Erection § 1926.752 Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence. (a... strength or sufficient strength to support the loads imposed during steel erection. (c) Site layout....

  3. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific criteria for site selection. 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site selection. (a) In the selection of...

  4. Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  5. Site environmental report for 2009 : Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2009 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2009. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2009. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2009. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  6. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  8. Site Specific Evaluation of Multisensor Capacitance Probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs) are widely used for measuring soil water content (SWC) at the field scale. Although manufacturers supply a generic MCP calibration, many researchers recognize that MCPs should be calibrated for specific field conditions. MCPs measurements are typically associa...

  9. 1994 INEL site-specific plan

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, B.

    1994-05-01

    This report presents plans for environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for fiscal year 1994. This years`s plan focuses on issues affecting the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Environmental Restoration Program is concerned with all aspects of assessment and cleanup of inactive operations. It involves assessing and cleaning up (where necessary) inactive INEL waste areas that could release harmful substances into the environment, as well as safely managing surplus nuclear facilities. The Waste Management program involves treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and industrial waste by DOE activities. This program is designed to protect the safety of INEL employees, the public, and the environment in the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of INEL treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. It operates facilities in a cost-effective, environmentally sound, regulatory compliant, and publicly acceptable manner.

  10. SUPPORTING THE REDEVELOPMENT OF BROWNFIELD SITES USING SITE-SPECIFIC MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND REDEVELOPMENT TOOLS (SMART)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Site-Specific Management Approaches and Redevelopment Tools (SMART) provides potential solutions for facilitating the redevelopment of brownfield sites. The term "brownfield site" refers to previously developed property whose reuse may be complicated by the presence of hazar...

  11. Hanford Site stream-specific reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This document and the associated 33 stream-specific addenda were prepared in response to public comments received on the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The processes used to characterize the effluents and propose designations pursuant to the Washington (State) Administrative Code 173--303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, are described in this parent'' document. A combination of process knowledge and sampling data was used to accomplish these tasks. 26 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. 76 FR 38143 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L... CONTACT: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River...

  13. Site Description for the University of Nebraska's Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory is operated by the University of Nebraska. The laboratory is located in the south-central part of the Nebraska Sandhills near Tryon, Nebraska (41 deg. 37' N; 100 deg. 50' W). The laboratory is surrounded on the west and south by native rangeland vegetation, on the south by a large field of corn irrigated by a center pivot, and on the east by wheat stubble. This site is appropriate for moisture stress studies since rainfall is almost always inadequate to meet evaporative demands of agricultural crops during most of the growing season and the sandy soils (Valentine fine sand) at the site do not store large quantities of water. Various levels of water stress are achieved through irrigation from solid set sprinklers.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Condouris, R.A.; Holland, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

  15. Global and site specific multimedia (field) studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cutshall, N.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with radioactive fallout, with organic contaminants and with heavy metals has amply demonstrated that cross-media transfers are common and that understanding the transport, cycling, and fate of these contaminants requires a multimedia approach. Nonetheless, pollutants with similar physical and chemical attributes may follow markedly different pathways. The frequency of exceptions to predictions based on simplistic models is also sufficient to show that direct investigation of environmental contamination is essential to confirm validity of models used for conceptualizing a problem or for control. Modeling based on multimedia premises and regulatory controls that encompass multimedia considerations are challenged by a dilemma, however. First, the development of multimedia models or regulatory frameworks represents simplification and generalization. This is true for several reasons: (1) inadequate understanding of physical and environmental factors which control specific cross-media transfer; (2) the absence of specific data on certain multimedia pollutant concentrations; (3) even the most powerful computers do not have sufficient speed and capacity to deal with the known complexities of natural systems. On the other hand, for contaminants such as mercury, it may be necessary to include great detail; the overall distribution in the environment may be less important than the rate of some minor process. With sufficient experience and good judgment of what can be ignored, the simplifications and generalizations can be made. For the present, and for the foreseeable future, however, they absolutely must be accompanied by thorough field validation and monitoring.

  16. Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997.

  17. Development of site-specific earthquake response spectra for eastern US sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1993-08-01

    Site-specific earthquake, uniform-hazard response spectra have been defined for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites for use in evaluating existing facilities and designing new facilities. The site-specific response spectra were defined from probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard studies following the requirements in DOE-STD-1024-92, ``Guidelines for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at DOE Sites.` For these two sites, the results show that site-specific uniform-hazard response spectra are slightly higher in the high-frequency range and considerably lower in the low-frequency range compared with response spectra defined for these sites in the past.

  18. SITE-SPECIFIC CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL RADON POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a theoretical basis for measuring site-specific radon potentials. However, the empirical measurements suggest that the precision of such measurements is marginal, leaving an uncertainty of about a factor of 2 in site-specific estimates. Although this may be us...

  19. Enhancing adoption of site-specific variable rate sprinkler systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than twenty years of private and public research on site-specific variable-rate sprinkler irrigation (SS-VRI) has resulted in very limited commercial adoption of the technology. Documented and proven water conservation strategies using site-specific irrigation are quite limited, and its cost-ef...

  20. Site-Specific Weed Management: Myth or Magic?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific weed management (SSWM) is a potential method to reduce the risks of herbicide use on water quality and public health without impacting crop yield. With site-specific weed management, areas of the field are left untreated where control is not economically justified. Where control is nee...

  1. Site Specific Management of Cotton Production in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific management or precision agriculture, as it is evolving in large-scale crop production, offers promising new methods for managing cotton production for optimized yields, maximized profitability, and minimized environmental pollution. However, adaptation of site-specific theory and meth...

  2. Site-specific crop management using geophysical proximal sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Key components of site-specific crop management are (i) identifying the site-specific factors that influence within-field crop yield variation and (ii) spatially characterizing those factors. Geo-referenced measurements of apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a potential means of cha...

  3. Double clicking for site-specific coupling of multiple enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Cho, Jinhwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-09-14

    A method to site-specifically couple multiple enzymes is reported. The approach is based on the site-specific incorporation of a clickable non-natural amino acid into enzymes and two compatible click reactions. The multi-enzyme reaction system exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency over the respective free enzymes. PMID:26191550

  4. 77 FR 22772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board AGENCY: Office of Environmental Management, Department of... Administration, notice is hereby given that the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB... recommendations to the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) concerning issues affecting the......

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    B. E. Olaveson

    2006-07-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. II

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, Patrick

    1998-09-30

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 1997 is published by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and nonroutine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data). Data presented in volume II are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The list below categorizes the volume II data sections with corresponding summary result tables in volume I: Stack Air, Ambient Air, Rainwater, Creeks, Creek Baseline Study, Hydraugers, Lakes, Stormwater, Sewer, Fixed Treatment Units, Soil, Sediment, Vegetation.

  7. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the

  8. Laboratory information management system at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, W.; Barth, D.; Ibsen, T.; Newman, B.

    1994-03-01

    In January of 1994 an important new technology was brought on line to help in the monumental waste management and environmental restoration work at the Hanford Site. Cleanup at the Hanford Site depends on analytical chemistry information to identify contaminates, design and monitor cleanup processes, assure worker safety, evaluate progress, and prove completion. The new technology, a laboratory information management system (LIMS) called ``LABCORE,`` provides the latest systems to organize and communicate the analytical tasks: track work and samples; collect and process data, prepare reports, and store data in readily accessible electronic form.

  9. 76 FR 55369 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  10. 76 FR 25682 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken,...

  11. 78 FR 14088 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires that... Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken, SC 29802; Phone:...

  12. 76 FR 65706 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  13. 76 FR 11772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken,...

  14. 78 FR 26005 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463...: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office,...

  15. 78 FR 40130 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92... CONTACT: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River...

  16. 75 FR 65466 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  17. 75 FR 24684 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken,...

  18. 75 FR 9885 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken, SC...

  19. 75 FR 82001 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires that... Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken, SC 29802; Phone:...

  20. 77 FR 13104 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken,...

  1. 78 FR 54461 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... CONTACT: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River...

  2. 75 FR 57462 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92...: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office,...

  3. 78 FR 65979 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463..., Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box A, Aiken,...

  4. 77 FR 39235 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463...: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office,...

  5. 76 FR 81487 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  6. 75 FR 983 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... Smith, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  7. 77 FR 24695 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. . 92... Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, P.O. Box...

  8. 77 FR 53193 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... CONTACT: Gerri Flemming, Office of External Affairs, Department of Energy, Savannah River...

  9. 1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B.

    1995-09-01

    This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  10. Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  11. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  12. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons. PMID:26602035

  13. Uncertainty Analysis with Site Specific Groundwater Models: Experiences and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.

    2003-07-15

    Groundwater flow and transport predictions are a major component of remedial action evaluations for contaminated groundwater at the Savannah River Site. Because all groundwater modeling results are subject to uncertainty from various causes; quantification of the level of uncertainty in the modeling predictions is beneficial to project decision makers. Complex site-specific models present formidable challenges for implementing an uncertainty analysis.

  14. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site... area, including prevailing current direction and velocity, if any; (7) Existence and effects of...

  15. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site... area, including prevailing current direction and velocity, if any; (7) Existence and effects of...

  16. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site... area, including prevailing current direction and velocity, if any; (7) Existence and effects of...

  17. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site... area, including prevailing current direction and velocity, if any; (7) Existence and effects of...

  18. Site-Specific GlcNAcylation of Human Erythrocyte Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zihao; Park, Kyoungsook; Comer, Frank; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.; Saudek, Christopher D.; Hart, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is upregulated in diabetic tissues and plays a role in insulin resistance and glucose toxicity. Here, we investigated the extent of GlcNAcylation on human erythrocyte proteins and compared site-specific GlcNAcylation on erythrocyte proteins from diabetic and normal individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins or GlcNAcylated peptides were tagged and selectively enriched by a chemoenzymatic approach and identified by mass spectrometry. The enrichment approach was combined with solid-phase chemical derivatization and isotopic labeling to detect O-GlcNAc modification sites and to compare site-specific O-GlcNAc occupancy levels between normal and diabetic erythrocyte proteins. RESULTS—The enzymes that catalyze the cycling (addition and removal) of O-GlcNAc were detected in human erythrocytes. Twenty-five GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins were identified. Protein expression levels were compared between diabetic and normal erythrocytes. Thirty-five O-GlcNAc sites were reproducibly identified, and their site-specific O-GlcNAc occupancy ratios were calculated. CONCLUSIONS—GlcNAcylation is differentially regulated at individual sites on erythrocyte proteins in response to glycemic status. These data suggest not only that site-specific O-GlcNAc levels reflect the glycemic status of an individual but also that O-GlcNAc site occupancy on erythrocyte proteins may be eventually useful as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of diabetes. PMID:18984734

  19. Four Finalist Landing Site Candidates for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Out of more than 30 sites considered as possible landing targets for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, by November 2008 four of the most intriguing places on Mars rose to the final round of the site-selection process.

    The four finalists are, alphabetically: Eberswalde, where an ancient river deposited a delta in a possible lake; Gale, with a mountain of stacked layers including clays and sulfates; Holden, a crater containing alluvial fans, flood deposits, possible lake beds and clay-rich deposits; and Mawrth, which shows exposed layers containing at least two types of clay.

    The locations of these four candidates are indicated here on a background map of color-coded topographical data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. Red is higher elevation; blue is lower elevation. In latitude, the map extends from 70 degrees (north) to minus 70 degrees (south). The east-west axis is labeled at the top in degrees of east longitude, with the zero meridian at the center.

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission's capabilities for landing more precisely and at higher elevation than ever before, for driving farther, and for generating electricity without reliance on sunshine have enabled consideration of a wider range of possible landing sites than for any previous Mars mission. During the past two years, multiple observations of dozens of candidate sites by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have augmented data from earlier orbiters for evaluating sites' scientific attractions and engineering risks.

    More than 100 Mars scientists have participated in a series of open workshops presenting and assessing data that the orbiters have provided about the candidate sites. The four sites rated highest by researchers at a September 2008 workshop were the same ones chosen by mission leaders after a subsequent round of safety evaluations and analysis of terrain for rover driving.

    As a clay-bearing site where a river once flowed

  20. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, T. M.; Gomez, J. L.; Moos, L. P.

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  7. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, R.; Fergason, R.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Sun, Y.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Noe Dobrea, E.; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-09-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target "go to" areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and "go to" sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  8. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Fergason, Robin L.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Dobrea, E. Noe; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-01-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target “go to” areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and “go to” sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  10. 1958-2006 Precipitation Climatology for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore Site and Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B M

    2006-12-19

    This report contains rainfall climatology and analyses during the period from 1958 to 2006 for the two sites of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: the Livermore site and Site 300. The measurement sites are described, a regional climatology overview is provided, and the effect of topography on regional precipitation is discussed. Rainfall statistics are presented including monthly normals (30-year means) and medians; percentages of time that rainfall is less than or equal to specified amounts for given months, years, and seasons; and mean, median, and maximum numbers of days of precipitation for specified amounts by month, year, and season. The rainfall pattern is demonstrated to be typical of Mediterranean climates, with most rain falling during the cold season. Nearly 80% of seasonal rainfall occurs during November through March, with the average annual rainfall equaling 13.62 and 10.64 inches at the Livermore site and Site 300, respectively. Precipitation frequency and extreme value analyses for durations ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours, month, and rainfall season are shown in order to estimate rainfall amounts for return periods of two to 100 years at both sites. This analysis determined 100-year return periods for largest 24-hour rainfalls of 2.49 and 2.22 inches at the Livermore site and Site 300, respectively. Historical analysis of seasonal rainfall data indicates that the wettest rainfall seasons at both sites typically occurred during strong El Ninos.

  11. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  12. Site-specific recombinases as tools for heterologous gene integration.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Nobutaka; Muroi, Tetsurou; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Site-specific recombinases are the enzymes that catalyze site-specific recombination between two specific DNA sequences to mediate DNA integration, excision, resolution, or inversion and that play a pivotal role in the life cycles of many microorganisms including bacteria and bacteriophages. These enzymes are classified as tyrosine-type or serine-type recombinases based on whether a tyrosine or serine residue mediates catalysis. All known tyrosine-type recombinases catalyze the formation of a Holliday junction intermediate, whereas the catalytic mechanism of all known serine-type recombinases includes the 180° rotation and rejoining of cleaved substrate DNAs. Both recombinase families are further subdivided into two families; the tyrosine-type recombinases are subdivided by the recombination directionality, and the serine-type recombinases are subdivided by the protein size. Over more than two decades, many different site-specific recombinases have been applied to in vivo genome engineering, and some of them have been used successfully to mediate integration, deletion, or inversion in a wide variety of heterologous genomes, including those from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Here, we review the recombination mechanisms of the best characterized recombinases in each site-specific recombinase family and recent advances in the application of these recombinases to genomic manipulation, especially manipulations involving site-specific gene integration into heterologous genomes. PMID:21822899

  13. Chromosomal fragile site expression in dogs: I. Breed specific differences.

    PubMed

    Stone, D M; Jacky, P B; Hancock, D D; Prieur, D J

    1991-08-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from clinically normal Doberman pinscher and boxer dogs were cultured for folate-sensitive and, in preliminary studies, aphidicolin-inducible fragile site expression. Both autosomal and X chromosomal fragile sites were observed in canine cells cultured under folate/thymidine depletion and in cells cultured in medium containing aphidicolin. Results from the three dogs evaluated for both folate-sensitive and aphidicolin-inducible fragile site expression showed that the frequency of fragile site expression was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater in cells cultured in medium containing aphidicolin than in cells cultured in folate/thymidine-depleted medium. Cells from the boxer dog expressed a high percentage (66.67%) of aphidicolin-inducible fragile sites in contrast to the Doberman pinscher dog in which only 21.10% of the lymphocytes expressed aphidicolin-inducible fragile sites. The frequencies of spontaneous and folate-sensitive fragile site expression did not vary significantly by breed of dog. Age of dog was significantly and positively correlated with frequency of folate-sensitive fragile site expression in dogs of the boxer breed, but not in dogs of the Doberman pinscher breed. The dog X chromosome expressed three folate-sensitive and aphidicolin-inducible fragile sites. The G-band location of these three fragile sites showed homology with three recognized constitutive common fragile sites on the human X chromosome: Xp22, Xq21, and Xq27.2. Two specific autosomal fragile sites were identified, one on the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 1 and one on the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 8. Other autosomal fragile sites were also apparent but could not be assigned reliably to specific chromosomes. PMID:1910263

  14. Evaluation of water-effect ratio methodology for establishing site-specific water quality criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, P.G.; Lipton, J.; Chapman, G.A.

    2000-06-01

    One approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for derivation of site-specific water quality criteria for metals in natural surface waters involves the development of water-effect ratios (WERs). This approach entails multiplying national water quality criteria by an experimentally derived WER, where the WER is defined as the ratio of the toxicity of the metal in the site water to the toxicity of the same metal in standard laboratory water. The authors discuss technical issues associated with test methods described in the US EPA WER guidance documents that may lead to inappropriate WERs. Critical issues include accounting for differences in calcium and magnesium concentrations (Ca:Mg ratios), alkalinity, and pH between site and laboratory waters; ensuring appropriate fish acclimation; and accounting for interspecies variability, multiple metals interactions, end-point variability, and temporal and spatial variability in the derivation of the WER. Failure to address these issues may have the unintended effect of deriving site-specific water quality criteria that are underprotective of aquatic life. The authors recommend that WER testing and future regulatory guidance for derivation of site-specific water quality criteria incorporate consideration of these potential confounding variables so that site-specific criteria can be established with greater confidence.

  15. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1994-10-21

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonoradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  16. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Site, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-12-03

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling operations with nuclear fuel or nuclear reactors. i.e., the U.S. DOE and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS). Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason. information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  17. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1993-12-14

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  18. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

    2003-02-27

    During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

  19. Specificity of site directed psoralen addition to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J; Wollenzien, P

    1989-01-01

    We describe the attachment of a psoralen derivative (site specific psoralen, SSP) to the 5' end of a DNA oligonucleotide and the hybridization and the photoreaction of this reagent with a complementary target site on an RNA molecule. SSP was coupled to a variety of DNA oligonucleotides to investigate the structural requirements for addition to the RNA. Efficient SSP photoadducts were made on specific uridines by designing an intercalation site at an unpaired nucleotide in the RNA strand within the heteroduplex region. The optimal location for this site was five nucleotides from the oligonucleotide 5' end and just 5' to the target uridine residue. Because the attachment of the SSP to the oligonucleotide is through a disulfide bond, the DNA oligonucleotide can be removed with reduction to leave SSP attached to the RNA strand. The SSP adduct made in this way will be useful for subsequent biochemical and biophysical experiments. Images PMID:2471154

  20. 77 FR 4368 - Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 24, 2011, applicable to workers of Abbott Laboratories... location of Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division. The Department has determined that these...

  1. Site-specific magnetization reversal studies of magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, A.; Haskel, D.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Srajer, G.; Ankudinov, A.; Subias, G.; Garcia, J.

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of magnetization reversal in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) single crystals was studied using site-specific magnetic sensitive diffraction anomalous near-edge structure. By exploiting the angular dependence of the cross section, we are able to show that the mechanism of reversal involves a mixture of coherent rotation and domain formation. The results reveal additional details to that provided by XMCD measurements, which average over nonequivalent sites.

  2. A Grammar Inference Approach for Predicting Kinase Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. PMID:25886273

  3. A grammar inference approach for predicting kinase specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. PMID:25886273

  4. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased... on-site at the Santa Clara, California location of Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology... International, reporting to Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including on-site...

  5. Combined Approaches to Site-Specific Modification of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Christine S.; Mahto, Santosh K.; Lamichhane, Tek N.

    2008-01-01

    Both natural and unnatural modifications in RNA are of interest to biologists and chemists. More than 100 different analogs of the four standard RNA nucleosides have been identified in nature. Unnatural modifications are useful for structure and mechanistic studies of RNA. This Review highlights chemical, enzymatic, and combined (semisynthesis) approaches to generate site-specifically modified RNAs. The availability of these methods for site-specific modifications of RNAs of all sizes is important in order to study the relationships between RNA chemical composition, structure, and function. PMID:18177002

  6. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1995-09-30

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies. i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL. which is the only area where DOE activities have been performed. While the major focus of attention is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  7. Site-specific gene modification by PNAs conjugated to psoralen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E; Glazer, Peter M

    2006-01-10

    DNA-binding molecules, including triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), can be utilized to introduce site-specific mutations or to promote recombination at selected genomic sites. To further evaluate the utility of PNAs for site-specific gene modification, we tested dimeric bis-PNAs conjugated to psoralen. These PNAs are designed to form a triplex-invasion complex within the supF reporter gene in an episomal shuttle vector and to direct site-specific photoadduct formation by the conjugated psoralen. The psoralen-bis-PNA conjugate was found to direct photoadduct formation to the intended 5'-TpA base step next to the PNA-binding site, and the photoadduct formation efficiency displayed both concentration and UVA irradiation dependence. The effect of PNA-targeted photoadducts in a mammalian system was tested by SV40-based shuttle vector assay. After in vitro binding, we found that photoadducts directed by PNAs conjugated to psoralen-induced mutations at frequencies in the range of 0.46%, 6.5-fold above the background. In a protocol for intracellular gene targeting in the episomal shuttle vector, the psoralen-PNA-induced mutation frequency was 0.13%, 3.5-fold higher than the background. Most of the induced mutations were deletions and single-base-pair substitutions at or adjacent to the targeted PNA-binding and photoadduct-formation sites. When the results are taken together, they demonstrate the ability of bis-PNAs conjugated with psoralen to mediate site-specific gene modification, and they further support the development of PNAs as tools for gene-targeting applications. PMID:16388608

  8. [Characteristics and challenges of rheumatology-specific laboratories in practice].

    PubMed

    von Hinüber, U

    2016-05-01

    In Germany rheumatological laboratory investigations are increasingly being carried out by rheumatologists in private practice. The professional and economic value is shown in association with the historical development of laboratory medicine and the current discussion on vocational politics. PMID:27048478

  9. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Ames Laboratory conducts fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, and mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the vision of DOE and, more specifically, to increase the general levels of knowledge and technical capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for the future, both academia and industry, and to develop new technologies and practical applications from our basic scientific programs that will contribute to a strengthening of the US economy. The Laboratory approaches all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. The Laboratory relies upon its strengths in materials synthesis and processing, materials reliability, chemical analysis, chemical sciences, photosynthesis, materials sciences, metallurgy, high-temperature superconductivity, and applied mathematical sciences to conduct the long term basic and intermediate range applied research needed to solve the complex problems encountered in energy production, and utilization as well as environmental restoration and waste management. Ames Laboratory will continue to maintain a very significant and highly beneficial pre-college math and science education program which currently serves both teachers and students at the middle school and high school levels. Our technology transfer program is aided by joint efforts with ISU`s technology development and commercialization enterprise and will sustain concerted efforts to implement Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, industrially sponsored Work for Others projects. and scientific personnel exchanges with our various customers.

  10. Site- and species-specific hydrolysis rates of heroin.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Levente; Orgován, Gábor; Tóth, Gergő; Kraszni, Márta; Gergó, Lajos; Hosztafi, Sándor; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-30

    The hydroxide-catalyzed non-enzymatic, simultaneous and consecutive hydrolyses of diacetylmorphine (DAM, heroin) are quantified in terms of 10 site- and species-specific rate constants in connection with also 10 site- and species-specific acid-base equilibrium constants, comprising all the 12 coexisting species in solution. This characterization involves the major and minor decomposition pathways via 6-acetylmorphine and 3-acetylmorphine, respectively, and morphine, the final product. Hydrolysis has been found to be 18-120 times faster at site 3 than at site 6, depending on the status of the amino group and the rest of the molecule. Nitrogen protonation accelerates the hydrolysis 5-6 times at site 3 and slightly less at site 6. Hydrolysis rate constants are interpreted in terms of intramolecular inductive effects and the concomitant local electron densities. Hydrolysis fraction, a new physico-chemical parameter is introduced and determined to quantify the contribution of the individual microspecies to the overall hydrolysis. Hydrolysis fractions are depicted as a function of pH. PMID:27130543

  11. Multispectral Imaging Technology for Site-Specific Crop Fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural fields are variable and require site-specific crop management. Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient required for plant growth and is a major component of the chlorophyll molecule enhancing photosynthesis. However, excessive N fertilizer leaches into groundwater and creates serious envi...

  12. Wireless Site-specific Irrigation - The Future of Intelligent Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless site-specific irrigation system was developed with a distributed wireless sensor network. The system allows growers to remotely access field conditions and an irrigation operation at the home or office via wireless radio communication, directing individual sprinklers on how much water to ...

  13. Delineating site-specific management units with proximal sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional farming uniformly manages fields with no consideration for spatial variability. This causes reduced productivity, misuse of finite resources (e.g., water and fertilizer), and detriment impacts on the environment. Site-specific management units (SSMUs) have been proposed as a means of ...

  14. Invasive Weed Management Is Site-Specific Weed Management.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific weed management in crops and invasive weed management in natural lands and rangelands appear to be unrelated research areas but there are many connections in the research problems, approaches and solutions. An obvious link is technology. The technology of precision agriculture - GPS, ...

  15. Adoption of site-specific variable rate sprinkler irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than twenty years of private and public research on site-specific variable-rate sprinkler irrigation (SS-VRI) technology has resulted in limited commercial adoption of the technology. Competing patents, liability and proprietary software have affected industry’s willingness to move into a new t...

  16. Evaluation of potential water conservation using site-specific irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the advent of site-specific variable-rate irrigation (VRI) systems, irrigation can be spatially managed within sub-field-sized zones. Spatial irrigation management can optimize spatial water use efficiency and may conserve water. Spatial VRI systems are currently being managed by consultants ...

  17. 78 FR 716 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  18. 75 FR 39007 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  19. 77 FR 60688 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  20. 75 FR 20832 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada Test Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada Test Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  1. A general approach to site-specific antibody drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Lu, Yingchun; Manibusan, Anthony; Sellers, Aaron; Tran, Hon; Sun, Ying; Phuong, Trung; Barnett, Richard; Hehli, Brad; Song, Frank; DeGuzman, Michael J.; Ensari, Semsi; Pinkstaff, Jason K.; Sullivan, Lorraine M.; Biroc, Sandra L.; Cho, Ho; Schultz, Peter G.; DiJoseph, John; Dougher, Maureen; Ma, Dangshe; Dushin, Russell; Leal, Mauricio; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Feyfant, Eric; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Sapra, Puja

    2014-01-01

    Using an expanded genetic code, antibodies with site-specifically incorporated nonnative amino acids were produced in stable cell lines derived from a CHO cell line with titers over 1 g/L. Using anti-5T4 and anti-Her2 antibodies as model systems, site-specific antibody drug conjugates (NDCs) were produced, via oxime bond formation between ketones on the side chain of the incorporated nonnative amino acid and hydroxylamine functionalized monomethyl auristatin D with either protease-cleavable or noncleavable linkers. When noncleavable linkers were used, these conjugates were highly stable and displayed improved in vitro efficacy as well as in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic stability in rodent models relative to conventional antibody drug conjugates conjugated through either engineered surface-exposed or reduced interchain disulfide bond cysteine residues. The advantages of the oxime-bonded, site-specific NDCs were even more apparent when low–antigen-expressing (2+) target cell lines were used in the comparative studies. NDCs generated with protease-cleavable linkers demonstrated that the site of conjugation had a significant impact on the stability of these rationally designed prodrug linkers. In a single-dose rat toxicology study, a site-specific anti-Her2 NDC was well tolerated at dose levels up to 90 mg/kg. These experiments support the notion that chemically defined antibody conjugates can be synthesized in commercially relevant yields and can lead to antibody drug conjugates with improved properties relative to the heterogeneous conjugates formed by nonspecific chemical modification. PMID:24443552

  2. A general approach to site-specific antibody drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Lu, Yingchun; Manibusan, Anthony; Sellers, Aaron; Tran, Hon; Sun, Ying; Phuong, Trung; Barnett, Richard; Hehli, Brad; Song, Frank; DeGuzman, Michael J; Ensari, Semsi; Pinkstaff, Jason K; Sullivan, Lorraine M; Biroc, Sandra L; Cho, Ho; Schultz, Peter G; DiJoseph, John; Dougher, Maureen; Ma, Dangshe; Dushin, Russell; Leal, Mauricio; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Feyfant, Eric; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Sapra, Puja

    2014-02-01

    Using an expanded genetic code, antibodies with site-specifically incorporated nonnative amino acids were produced in stable cell lines derived from a CHO cell line with titers over 1 g/L. Using anti-5T4 and anti-Her2 antibodies as model systems, site-specific antibody drug conjugates (NDCs) were produced, via oxime bond formation between ketones on the side chain of the incorporated nonnative amino acid and hydroxylamine functionalized monomethyl auristatin D with either protease-cleavable or noncleavable linkers. When noncleavable linkers were used, these conjugates were highly stable and displayed improved in vitro efficacy as well as in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic stability in rodent models relative to conventional antibody drug conjugates conjugated through either engineered surface-exposed or reduced interchain disulfide bond cysteine residues. The advantages of the oxime-bonded, site-specific NDCs were even more apparent when low-antigen-expressing (2+) target cell lines were used in the comparative studies. NDCs generated with protease-cleavable linkers demonstrated that the site of conjugation had a significant impact on the stability of these rationally designed prodrug linkers. In a single-dose rat toxicology study, a site-specific anti-Her2 NDC was well tolerated at dose levels up to 90 mg/kg. These experiments support the notion that chemically defined antibody conjugates can be synthesized in commercially relevant yields and can lead to antibody drug conjugates with improved properties relative to the heterogeneous conjugates formed by nonspecific chemical modification. PMID:24443552

  3. Partial characterization of specific cantharidin binding sites in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, M.J.; Pessah, I.N.; Matsuzawa, M.; Casida, J.E.

    1988-06-01

    The mode of action of cantharidin, the natural vesicant of blister beetles, is examined by radioligand binding studies with mouse tissues. (3H)Cantharidin undergoes specific and saturable binding with the liver cytosol, which is characterized as follows: Kd and Bmax values of 30 nM and 1.8 pmol/mg of protein, respectively; linearity with respect to protein concentration; pH optimum of 6.5 to 7.5; association and dissociation half-times of 20 min and 12 hr, respectively; and 50% inhibition by Mg2+ at 70 microM, Ca2+ at 224 microM, pyrophosphate at 27 microM, and nucleotide triphosphates at 52-81 microM. The binding site undergoes a loss of activity at 45 degrees or higher. The toxicological relevance of this specific (3H)cantharidin binding site of mouse liver cytosol is established in three ways. First, the potency of 15 active cantharidin analogs for inhibiting (3H)cantharidin binding is correlated with their acute toxicity to mice (r = 0.829). Second, 26 related compounds that are inactive in inhibiting (3H)cantharidin binding are also of little or no toxicity to mice. Finally, the binding of (3H) cantharidin to liver cytosol from mice poisoned with increasing amounts of unlabeled cantharidin is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. (3H)Cantharidin also specifically binds to cytosol fractions of blood, brain, heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, skin, spleen, and stomach. The characteristics of the specific binding site in brain are very similar to those determined in liver with respect to Kd, Bmax, association/dissociation kinetics, and sensitivity to inhibitors. It therefore appears that the toxicity of cantharidin and related oxabicycloheptanes, including the herbicide endothal, is attributable to binding at a specific site in liver and possibly other tissues.

  4. Rocketdyne Division annual site environmental report Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Desoto sites 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-30

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the DeSoto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The DeSoto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. SSFL consists of four administrative areas used for research, development, and test operations as well as a buffer zone. A portion of Area I and all of Area II are owned by the U.S. Government and assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A portion of Area IV is under option for purchase by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety in the Chemistry Laboratories: A Specific Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkern, Walter H.; Munchausen, Linda L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a safety program adopted by Southeastern Louisiana University. Students are given detailed instructions on laboratory safety during the first laboratory period and a test which must be completely correct before they are allowed to return to the laboratory. Test questions, list of safety rules, and a laboratory accident report form are…

  6. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI&SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI&SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations.

  7. Site-Specific Covalent Labeling of RNA by Enzymatic Transglycosylation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Seth C; Busby, Kayla N; Cole, Christian M; Zhou, Cun Yu; Devaraj, Neal K

    2015-10-14

    We demonstrate the site-specific incorporation of nucleobase derivatives bearing fluorophores or affinity labels into a short RNA stem loop recognition motif by exchange of a guanine residue. The RNA-TAG (transglycosylation at guanosine) is carried out by a bacterial (E. coli) tRNA guanine transglycosylase (TGT), whose natural substrate is the nitrogenous base PreQ1. Remarkably, we have successfully incorporated large functional groups including biotin, BODIPY, thiazole orange, and Cy7 through a polyethylene glycol linker attached to the exocyclic amine of PreQ1. Larger RNAs, such as mRNA transcripts, can be site-specifically labeled if they possess the 17-nucleotide hairpin recognition motif. The RNA-TAG methodology could facilitate the detection and manipulation of RNA molecules by enabling the direct incorporation of functional artificial nucleobases using a simple hairpin recognition element. PMID:26393285

  8. Adapter Reagents for Protein Site Specific Dye Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Darren A.; Evans, Eric G. B.; Kasza, Tomas; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    Chemoselective protein labeling remains a significant challenge in chemical biology. Although many selective labeling chemistries have been reported, the practicalities of matching the reaction with appropriately functionalized proteins and labeling reagents is often a challenge. For example, we encountered the challenge of site specifically labeling the cellular form of the murine Prion protein with a fluorescent dye. To facilitate this labeling, a protein was expressed with site specific p-acetylphenylalanine. However, the utility of this aceto-phenone reactive group is hampered by the severe lack of commercially available aminooxy fluorophores. Here we outline a general strategy for the efficient solid phase synthesis of adapter reagents capable of converting maleimido-labels into aminooxy or azide functional groups that can be further tuned for desired length or solubility properties. The utility of the adapter strategy is demonstrated in the context of fluorescent labeling of the murine Prion protein through an adapted aminooxy-Alexa dye. PMID:24599728

  9. Chemoenzymatic Methods for Site-Specific Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Rabuka, David

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous chemical technologies have been developed to allow the site-specific post-translational modification of proteins. Traditionally covalent chemical protein modification has been accomplished by the attachment of synthetic groups to nucleophilic amino acids on protein surfaces. These chemistries, however, are rarely sufficiently selective to distinguish one residue within a literal sea of chemical functionality. One solution to this problem is to introduce a unique chemical handle into the target protein that is orthogonal to the remainder of the proteome. In practice, this handle can be a novel peptide sequence, which forms a “tag” that is selectively and irreversibly modified by enzymes. Furthermore, if the enzymes can tolerate substrate analogs, it becomes possible to engineer chemically modified proteins in a site-specific fashion. This review details the significant progress in creating techniques for the chemoenzymatic generation of protein-small molecule constructs and provides examples of novel applications of these methodologies. PMID:21030291

  10. Pretargeted PET Imaging Using a Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Cook, Brendon E; Adumeau, Pierre; Membreno, Rosemery; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Brand, Christian; Reiner, Thomas; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, both site-specific bioconjugation techniques and bioorthogonal pretargeting strategies have emerged as exciting technologies with the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of antibody-based nuclear imaging. In the work at hand, we have combined these two approaches to create a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the rapid and bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between a (64)Cu-labeled tetrazine radioligand ((64)Cu-Tz-SarAr) and a site-specifically modified huA33-trans-cyclooctene immunoconjugate ((ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO). A bioconjugation strategy that harnesses enzymatic transformations and strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry was used to site-specifically append PEGylated TCO moieties to the heavy chain glycans of the colorectal cancer-targeting huA33 antibody. Preclinical in vivo validation studies were performed in athymic nude mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts. To this end, mice were administered (ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO via tail vein injection and-following accumulation intervals of 24 or 48 h-(64)Cu-Tz-SarAr. PET imaging and biodistribution studies reveal that this strategy clearly delineates tumor tissue as early as 1 h post-injection (6.7 ± 1.7%ID/g at 1 h p.i.), producing images with excellent contrast and high tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios (tumor:muscle = 21.5 ± 5.6 at 24 h p.i.). Furthermore, dosimetric calculations illustrate that this pretargeting approach produces only a fraction of the overall effective dose (0.0214 mSv/MBq; 0.079 rem/mCi) of directly labeled radioimmunoconjugates. Ultimately, this method effectively facilitates the high contrast pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma using a site-specifically modified immunoconjugate. PMID:27356886

  11. Site-specific features influence sediment stability of intertidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defew, Emma C.; Tolhurst, Trevor J.; Paterson, David M.

    The factors that influence the sediment stability and the transport of estuarine mudflats are not yet fully understood but knowledge of them is essential in coastal engineering applications and pollution ecology studies. The suggestion that variation in predictive models of sediment stability might be due to site-specific characteristics is investigated using data from four estuarine mudflats (Eden Estuary, Scotland, the Biezelingsche Ham, Zandkreek, and Molenplaat mudflats in The Netherlands). These estuaries differ in their environmental conditions, macrofaunal species composition and local features (e.g. Enteromorpha mats, migratory biofilms). Stable and unstable sediments were compared, and mean chlorophyll-a concentrations and granulometry of the sediments were significantly different between the two groups. Step-wise multiple linear regressions were applied to the sediment stability data of all sites to establish the influences on erosion threshold of microphytobenthic biomass, water content, granulometry, organic carbon content and the abundance of dominant macrofaunal species. The stability of each site was influenced by different factors. Sediment stability of the Eden Estuary was affected by the Enteromorpha bloom; Biezelingsche Ham was influenced by the highly migratory nature of the diatom biofilms and the abundance of Corophium volutator; the polychaete worm Arenicola marina had a net negative effect on sediment stability of the Zandkreek; and the Molenplaat was influenced by microphytobenthic biomass. This research highlights the need for site-specific calibration of models and suggests that a universal proxy parameter for sediment stability is unlikely to be obtained.

  12. POLYMER DELIVERY SYSTEMS FOR SITE-SPECIFIC GENOME EDITING

    PubMed Central

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Schleifman, Erica B.; Glazer, Peter M.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to coordinate the recombination of short 50–60 bp “donor DNA” fragments into genomic DNA, resulting in site-specific correction of genetic mutations or the introduction of advantageous genetic modifications. Site-specific gene editing in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) could result in the treatment or cure of inherited disorders of the blood such as β-thalassemia or sickle cell anemia. Gene editing in HSPCs and differentiated T cells could also help combat HIV infection by modifying the HIV co-receptor CCR5, which is necessary for R5-tropic HIV entry. However, translation of genome modification technologies to clinical practice is limited by challenges in intracellular delivery, especially in difficult-to-transfect hematolymphoid cells. Here, we review the use of engineered biodegradable polymer nanoparticles for site-specific genome editing in human hematopoietic cells, which represent a promising approach for ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy. PMID:21620910

  13. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions.

    PubMed

    Zope, Rajendra R; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Baruah, Tunna; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C60@C240 and C60@C180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C60 in C240 and C180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability. PMID:26328842

  14. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zope, Rajendra R.; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Baruah, Tunna; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C60@C240 and C60@C180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C60 in C240 and C180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  15. Site-specific analysis of dielectric properties of finite systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.; Yang, M.; Jellinek, J.; Chemistry; Central Michigan Univ.

    2007-12-06

    A new scheme for decomposing the total dipole moment and polarizability of a system into site-specific contributions is presented. The scheme is based on partitioning the system volume into cells associated with its atoms or groups of atoms. The site-specific dipole moments and polarizabilities are computed from the charge densities within the individual cells and the responses of these densities to an external electric field. These dipole moments and polarizabilities are further partitioned into local/dipole and charge-transfer components. The utility of the scheme is illustrated through analysis of the structure-/shape- and size-specific aspects of the dipole moments and polarizabilities of silicon clusters. It is shown that the polarizabilities associated with the individual constituent Si atoms vary considerably with the structure/shape of the cluster and the location of the atom or site within a given structure. Surface atoms, and especially those at edges, have larger polarizabilities than interior atoms. The overall contribution of the charge-transfer components to the total cluster polarizability increases with the cluster size. Finally, the anisotropy of the total polarizability correlates with the anisotropy of the cluster shape, and the charge-transfer component is the part dominantly responsible for the polarizability anisotropy.

  16. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    SciTech Connect

    Zope, Rajendra R. Baruah, Tunna; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C{sub 60}@C{sub 240} and C{sub 60}@C{sub 180} onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C{sub 60} fullerene, the encapsulation of the C{sub 60} in C{sub 240} and C{sub 180} fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C{sub 60} in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  17. 1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.H.; Duncan, D.; Sanchez, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

  18. Bone site-specific delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Small interfering RNAs (siRNA) have enormous potential as therapeutics to target and treat various bone disorders such as osteoporosis and cancer bone metastases. However, effective and specific delivery of siRNA therapeutics to bone and bone-specific cells in vivo is very challenging. To realize the full therapeutic potential of siRNA in treating bone disorders, a safe and efficient, tissue- and cell-specific delivery system must be developed. This review focuses on recent advances in bone site-specific delivery of siRNA at the tissue or cellular level. Bone-targeted nanoparticulate siRNA carriers and various bone-targeted moieties such as bisphosphonates, oligopeptides (Asp)8 and (AspSerSer)6, and aptamers are highlighted. Incorporation of these bone-seeking targeting moieties into siRNA carriers allows for recognition of different sub-tissue functional domains of bone and also specific cell types residing in bone tissue. It also provides a means for bone-formation surface-, bone-resorption surface-, or osteoblast-specific targeting and transportation of siRNA therapeutics. The discussion mainly focuses on systemic and local bone-specific delivery of siRNA in osteoporosis and bone metastasis preclinical models. PMID:26642236

  19. Comparisons of CAP88PC version 2.0 default parameters to site specific inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, M. A.; Courtney, J. C.; Charter, N.; Egan, T.

    2000-03-02

    The effects of varying the input for the CAP88PC Version 2.0 program on the total effective dose equivalents (TEDEs) were determined for hypothetical releases from the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Argonne National Laboratory site on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Values for site specific meteorological conditions and agricultural production parameters were determined for the 80 km radius surrounding the HFEF. Four nuclides, {sup 3}H, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 129}I, and {sup 137}Cs (with its short lived progeny, {sup 137m}Ba) were selected for this study; these are the radioactive materials most likely to be released from HFEF under normal or abnormal operating conditions. Use of site specific meteorological parameters of annual precipitation, average temperature, and the height of the inversion layer decreased the TEDE from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba up to 36%; reductions for other nuclides were less than 3%. Use of the site specific agricultural parameters reduced TEDE values between 7% and 49%, depending on the nuclide. Reductions are associated with decreased committed effective dose equivalents (CEDEs) from the ingestion pathway. This is not surprising since the HFEF is located well within the INEEL exclusion area, and the surrounding area closest to the release point is a high desert with limited agricultural diversity. Livestock and milk production are important in some counties at distances greater than 30 km from the HFEF.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory FY 1994 site development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-15

    This plan describes the mission, workload, site population, site and regional information, program projections and requirements, master plan, five-year construction plan, and management considerations.

  1. The Community School Site, A Laboratory for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Lincoln, NE. Midwest Regional Technical Service Center.

    Included are several papers presenting ideas for developing outdoor land laboratories. Included are procedures used in developing outdoor laboratories as educational laboratories, community and school uses of the facilities, landscaping, and various natural science, mathematics and art uses. Sources of help in initiating and maintaining the school…

  2. Methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Appella, Ettore; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents. More specifically, a phosphopeptide mimetic is incorporated into a polypeptide in place of a phosphorylated amino acid. The polypeptide is used as antigen by standard methods to generate either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies which cross-react with the naturally phosphorylated polypeptide. The phosphopeptide mimetic preferably contains a non-hydrolyzable linkage from the appropriate carbon atom of the amino acid residue to a phosphate group. A preferred linkage is a CF.sub.2 group. Such a linkage is used to generate the phosphoserine mimetic F.sub.2 Pab, which is incorporated into a polypeptide sequence derived from p53 to produce antibodies which recognize a specific phosphorylation state of p53. A CF.sub.2 group linkage is also used to produce the phosphothreonine mimetic F.sub.2 Pmb, and to produce the phosphotyrosine mimetic, F.sub.2 Pmp.

  3. Geological site characterization for the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of geological site characterization studies conducted from 1992 to 1994 on Pajarito Mesa for a proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (MWDF). The MWDF is being designed to receive mixed waste (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components) generated during Environmental Restoration Project cleanup activities at Los Alamos. As of 1995, there is no Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted disposal site for mixed waste at the Laboratory, and construction of the MWDF would provide an alternative to transport of this material to an off-site location. A 2.5 km long part of Pajarito Mesa was originally considered for the MWDF, extending from an elevation of about 2150 to 2225 m (7060 to 7300 ft) in Technical Areas (TAs) 15, 36, and 67 in the central part of the Laboratory, and planning was later concentrated on the western area in TA-67. The mesa top lies about 60 to 75 m (200 to 250 ft) above the floor of Pajarito Canyon on the north, and about 30 m (100 ft) above the floor of Threemile Canyon on the south. The main aquifer used as a water supply for the Laboratory and for Los Alamos County lies at an estimated depth of about 335 m (1100 ft) below the mesa. The chapters of this report focus on surface and near-surface geological studies that provide a basic framework for siting of the MWDF and for conducting future performance assessments, including fulfillment of specific regulatory requirements. This work includes detailed studies of the stratigraphy, mineralogy, and chemistry of the bedrock at Pajarito Mesa by Broxton and others, studies of the geological structure and of mesa-top soils and surficial deposits by Reneau and others, geologic mapping and studies of fracture characteristics by Vaniman and Chipera, and studies of potential landsliding and rockfall along the mesa-edge by Reneau.

  4. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  5. Site-specific group selection drives locally adapted group compositions.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Goodnight, Charles J

    2014-10-16

    Group selection may be defined as selection caused by the differential extinction or proliferation of groups. The socially polymorphic spider Anelosimus studiosus exhibits a behavioural polymorphism in which females exhibit either a 'docile' or 'aggressive' behavioural phenotype. Natural colonies are composed of a mixture of related docile and aggressive individuals, and populations differ in colonies' characteristic docile:aggressive ratios. Using experimentally constructed colonies of known composition, here we demonstrate that population-level divergence in docile:aggressive ratios is driven by site-specific selection at the group level--certain ratios yield high survivorship at some sites but not others. Our data also indicate that colonies responded to the risk of extinction: perturbed colonies tended to adjust their composition over two generations to match the ratio characteristic of their native site, thus promoting their long-term survival in their natal habitat. However, colonies of displaced individuals continued to shift their compositions towards mixtures that would have promoted their survival had they remained at their home sites, regardless of their contemporary environment. Thus, the regulatory mechanisms that colonies use to adjust their composition appear to be locally adapted. Our data provide experimental evidence of group selection driving collective traits in wild populations. PMID:25274310

  6. Isotope hydrology of the Chalk River Laboratories site, Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell; Neymark, Leonid; King-Sharp, K.J.; Gascoyne, Mel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater (fracture water) and porewater, and physical property and water content measurements of bedrock core at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in Ontario. Density and water contents were determined and water-loss porosity values were calculated for core samples. Average and standard deviations of density and water-loss porosity of 50 core samples from four boreholes are 2.73 ± 12 g/cc and 1.32 ± 1.24 percent. Respective median values are 2.68 and 0.83 indicating a positive skewness in the distributions. Groundwater samples from four deep boreholes were analyzed for strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) isotope ratios. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses and selected solute concentrations determined by CRL are included for comparison. Groundwater from borehole CRG-1 in a zone between approximately +60 and −240 m elevation is relatively depleted in δ18O and δ2H perhaps reflecting a slug of water recharged during colder climatic conditions. Porewater was extracted from core samples by centrifugation and analyzed for major dissolved ions and for strontium and uranium isotopes. On average, the extracted water contains 15 times larger concentration of solutes than the groundwater. 234U/238U and correlation of 87Sr/86Sr with Rb/Sr values indicate that the porewater may be substantially older than the groundwater. Results of this study show that the Precambrian gneisses at Chalk River are similar in physical properties and hydrochemical aspects to crystalline rocks being considered for the construction of nuclear waste repositories in other regions.

  7. Site-specific antibody drug conjugates for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Panowksi, Siler; Bhakta, Sunil; Raab, Helga; Polakis, Paul; Junutula, Jagath R

    2014-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics have revolutionized the treatment of cancer over the past two decades. Antibodies that specifically bind tumor surface antigens can be effective therapeutics; however, many unmodified antibodies lack therapeutic activity. These antibodies can instead be applied successfully as guided missiles to deliver potent cytotoxic drugs in the form of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). The success of ADCs is dependent on four factors—target antigen, antibody, linker, and payload. The field has made great progress in these areas, marked by the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of two ADCs, brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla®). However, the therapeutic window for many ADCs that are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development remains narrow and further improvements may be required to enhance the therapeutic potential of these ADCs. Production of ADCs is an area where improvement is needed because current methods yield heterogeneous mixtures that may include 0–8 drug species per antibody molecule. Site-specific conjugation has been recently shown to eliminate heterogeneity, improve conjugate stability, and increase the therapeutic window. Here, we review and describe various site-specific conjugation strategies that are currently used for the production of ADCs, including use of engineered cysteine residues, unnatural amino acids, and enzymatic conjugation through glycotransferases and transglutaminases. In addition, we also summarize differences among these methods and highlight critical considerations when building next-generation ADC therapeutics. PMID:24423619

  8. Site-specific antibody drug conjugates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Panowski, Siler; Bhakta, Sunil; Raab, Helga; Polakis, Paul; Junutula, Jagath R

    2014-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics have revolutionized the treatment of cancer over the past two decades. Antibodies that specifically bind tumor surface antigens can be effective therapeutics; however, many unmodified antibodies lack therapeutic activity. These antibodies can instead be applied successfully as guided missiles to deliver potent cytotoxic drugs in the form of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). The success of ADCs is dependent on four factors--target antigen, antibody, linker, and payload. The field has made great progress in these areas, marked by the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of two ADCs, brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla). However, the therapeutic window for many ADCs that are currently in pre-clinical or clinical development remains narrow and further improvements may be required to enhance the therapeutic potential of these ADCs. Production of ADCs is an area where improvement is needed because current methods yield heterogeneous mixtures that may include 0-8 drug species per antibody molecule. Site-specific conjugation has been recently shown to eliminate heterogeneity, improve conjugate stability, and increase the therapeutic window. Here, we review and describe various site-specific conjugation strategies that are currently used for the production of ADCs, including use of engineered cysteine residues, unnatural amino acids, and enzymatic conjugation through glycotransferases and transglutaminases. In addition, we also summarize differences among these methods and highlight critical considerations when building next-generation ADC therapeutics. PMID:24423619

  9. Measuring fluctuations in shear stretched DNAs using site specific labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Allen; Graham, Thomas; Loparo, Joseph; Eaves, Joel

    2012-02-01

    We report a new technique for measuring the internal dynamics of surface tethered DNAs in shear flow. Previous studies have used end labeling or intercolating dyes which label the entire length of the DNA. Neither prior method can resolve the internal longitudinal fluctuations of the DNA. Our technique accomplishes this by site specific labeling of five sites in lambda phage DNA using EcoRI labeled with fluorescent quantum dots. We used our technique to determine the two point cross correlation functions of the longitudinal and transverse fluctuations of the DNA under shear flow. Our technique allows us to test current models of the non-equilibrium fluctuations of DNA in shear flow in a way previously inaccessible.

  10. Thymocyte plasma membrane: the location of specific glucocorticoid binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, P.V.; Kalinin, G.V.; Dukhanin, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    In modern molecular endocrinology it is now possible to determine the localization of receptors for biologically active substances with the aid of ligands, with high affinity for the receptor, immobilized on polymers. The purpose of this paper is to study the ability of hydrocortisone (HC), immobilized on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-HC), to reduce binding of tritium-HC by thymocytes of adrenalectomized rats. It is determined that specific binding sites for HC on rat thymocytes are also accessible for PVP-HC, which, due to the fact that this immobilized version of HC does not penetrate into the cell, leads to the conclusion that the binding sites for HC itself are located in the plasma membrane.

  11. Cre-mediated site-specific recombination in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Thummel, Ryan; Burket, Christopher T; Brewer, Jeffrey L; Sarras, Michael P; Li, Li; Perry, Martin; McDermott, Jeffrey P; Sauer, Brian; Hyde, David R; Godwin, Alan R

    2005-08-01

    Cre-mediated site-specific recombination has become an invaluable tool for manipulation of the murine genome. The ability to conditionally activate gene expression or to generate chromosomal alterations with this same tool would greatly enhance zebrafish genetics. This study demonstrates that the HSP70 promoter can be used to inducibly control expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) -Cre fusion protein. The EGFP-Cre fusion protein is capable of promoting recombination between lox sites in injected plasmids or in stably inherited transgenes as early as 2 hr post-heat shock induction. Finally, the levels of Cre expression achieved in a transgenic fish line carrying the HSP70-EGFP-cre transgene are compatible with viability and both male and female transgenic fish are fertile subsequent to induction of EGFP-Cre expression. Hence, our data suggests that Cre-mediated recombination is a viable means of manipulating gene expression in zebrafish. PMID:15977183

  12. The λ Integrase Site-specific Recombination Pathway.

    PubMed

    Landy, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    The site-specific recombinase encoded by bacteriophage λ (Int) is responsible for integrating and excising the viral chromosome into and out of the chromosome of its Escherichia coli host. Int carries out a reaction that is highly directional, tightly regulated, and depends upon an ensemble of accessory DNA bending proteins acting on 240 bp of DNA encoding 16 protein binding sites. This additional complexity enables two pathways, integrative and excisive recombination, whose opposite, and effectively irreversible, directions are dictated by different physiological and environmental signals. Int recombinase is a heterobivalent DNA binding protein and each of the four Int protomers, within a multiprotein 400 kDa recombinogenic complex, is thought to bind and, with the aid of DNA bending proteins, bridge one arm- and one core-type DNA site. In the 12 years since the publication of the last review focused solely on the λ site-specific recombination pathway in Mobile DNA II, there has been a great deal of progress in elucidating the molecular details of this pathway. The most dramatic advances in our understanding of the reaction have been in the area of X-ray crystallography where protein-DNA structures have now been determined for of all of the DNA-protein interfaces driving the Int pathway. Building on this foundation of structures, it has been possible to derive models for the assembly of components that determine the regulatory apparatus in the P-arm, and for the overall architectures that define excisive and integrative recombinogenic complexes. The most fundamental additional mechanistic insights derive from the application of hexapeptide inhibitors and single molecule kinetics. PMID:26104711

  13. Site Specific Analyses of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B. M.; Chen, S. Y.

    2003-02-24

    The number of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments is expected to increase significantly during the time period that the United States' inventory of SNF is sent to a final disposal site. Prior work estimated that the highest accident risks of a SNF shipping campaign to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain were in the corridor states, such as Illinois. The largest potential human health impacts would be expected to occur in areas with high population densities such as urban settings. Thus, our current study examined the human health impacts from the most plausible severe SNF transportation accidents in the Chicago metropolitan area. The RISKIND 2.0 program was used to model site-specific data for an area where the largest impacts might occur. The results have shown that the radiological human health consequences of a severe SNF rail transportation accident on average might be similar to one year of exposure to natural background radiation for those persons living a nd working in the most affected areas downwind of the actual accident location. For maximally exposed individuals, an exposure similar to about two years of exposure to natural background radiation was estimated. In addition to the accident probabilities being very low (approximately 1 chance in 10,000 or less during the entire shipping campaign), the actual human health impacts are expected to be lower if any of the accidents considered did occur, because the results are dependent on the specific location and weather conditions, such as wind speed and direction, that were selected to maximize the results. Also, comparison of the results of longer duration accident scenarios against U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines was made to demonstrate the usefulness of this site-specific analysis for emergency planning purposes.

  14. Rational Design of Antirheumatic Prodrugs Specific for Sites of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Onuoha, Shimobi C.; Ferrari, Mathieu; Sblattero, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biologic drugs, such as the anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti‐TNF) antibody adalimumab, have represented a breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Yet, concerns remain over their lack of efficacy in a sizable proportion of patients and their potential for systemic side effects such as infection. Improved biologic prodrugs specifically targeted to the site of inflammation have the potential to alleviate current concerns surrounding biologic anticytokine therapies. The purpose of this study was to design, construct, and evaluate in vitro and ex vivo the targeting and antiinflammatory capacity of activatable bispecific antibodies. Methods Activatable dual variable domain (aDVD) antibodies were designed and constructed to target intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM‐1), which is up‐regulated at sites of inflammation, and anti‐TNF antibodies (adalimumab and infliximab). These bispecific molecules included an external arm that targets ICAM‐1 and an internal arm that comprises the therapeutic domain of an anti‐TNF antibody. Both arms were linked to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–cleavable linkers. The constructs were tested for their ability to bind and neutralize both in vitro and ex vivo targets. Results Intact aDVD constructs demonstrated significantly reduced binding and anti‐TNF activity in the prodrug formulation as compared to the parent antibodies. Human synovial fluid and physiologic concentrations of MMP enzyme were capable of cleaving the external domain of the antibody, revealing a fully active molecule. Activated antibodies retained the same binding and anti‐TNF inhibitory capacities as the parent molecules. Conclusion The design of a biologic prodrug with enhanced specificity for sites of inflammation (synovium) and reduced specificity for off‐target TNF is described. This construct has the potential to form a platform technology that is capable of enhancing the therapeutic index of drugs for the treatment of

  15. Current Status: Site-Specific Antibody Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Dominik; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Helma, Jonas

    2016-05-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), a promising class of cancer biopharmaceuticals, combine the specificity of therapeutic antibodies with the pharmacological potency of chemical, cytotoxic drugs. Ever since the first ADCs on the market, a plethora of novel ADC technologies has emerged, covering as diverse aspects as antibody engineering, chemical linker optimization and novel conjugation strategies, together aiming at constantly widening the therapeutic window for ADCs. This review primarily focuses on novel chemical and biotechnological strategies for the site-directed attachment of drugs that are currently validated for 2nd generation ADCs to promote conjugate homogeneity and overall stability. PMID:27003914

  16. Chemical tags for site-specific fluorescent labeling of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Freidel, Christoph; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Peneva, Kalina

    2016-06-01

    This review focuses on the various approaches to covalently attach a chromophore to a biomolecule of interest in site-specific manner. Novel methods like inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction, Pictet-Spengler ligation and enzyme tags like SNAP and Halo-tags are critically discussed and compared to established techniques like copper-free click reaction and native chemical ligation. Selected examples in which the tags have been exploited for in vitro or in vivo imaging are reviewed and evaluated. PMID:26969255

  17. Site Specific Probable Maximum Precipitation Estimates and Professional Judgement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, B. D.; Kao, S. C.; Kanney, J. F.; Quinlan, K. R.; DeNeale, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    State and federal regulatory authorities currently rely upon the US National Weather Service Hydrometeorological Reports (HMRs) to determine probable maximum precipitation (PMP) estimates (i.e., rainfall depths and durations) for estimating flooding hazards for relatively broad regions in the US. PMP estimates for the contributing watersheds upstream of vulnerable facilities are used to estimate riverine flooding hazards while site-specific estimates for small water sheds are appropriate for individual facilities such as nuclear power plants. The HMRs are often criticized due to their limitations on basin size, questionable applicability in regions affected by orographic effects, their lack of consist methods, and generally by their age. HMR-51 for generalized PMP estimates for the United States east of the 105th meridian, was published in 1978 and is sometimes perceived as overly conservative. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is currently reviewing several flood hazard evaluation reports that rely on site specific PMP estimates that have been commercially developed. As such, NRC has recently investigated key areas of expert judgement via a generic audit and one in-depth site specific review as they relate to identifying and quantifying actual and potential storm moisture sources, determining storm transposition limits, and adjusting available moisture during storm transposition. Though much of the approach reviewed was considered a logical extension of HMRs, two key points of expert judgement stood out for further in-depth review. The first relates primarily to small storms and the use of a heuristic for storm representative dew point adjustment developed for the Electric Power Research Institute by North American Weather Consultants in 1993 in order to harmonize historic storms for which only 12 hour dew point data was available with more recent storms in a single database. The second issue relates to the use of climatological averages for spatially

  18. Site-specific variability in BTEX biodegradation under denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, C.M.; Borden, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    Laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and o-xylene (BTEX) biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. Nine different sources of inocula, including contaminated and uncontaminated soil cores from four different sites and activated sludge, were used to establish microcosms. BTEX was not degraded under denitrifying conditions in microcosms inoculated with aquifer material from Rocky Point and Traverse City. However, rapid depletion of glucose under denitrifying conditions was observed in microcosms containing Rocky Point aquifer material. TEX degradation was observed in microcosms containing Rocky Point aquifer material. TEX degradation was observed in microcosms containing aquifer material from Fort Bragg and Sleeping Bear Dunes and sewage sludge. Benzene was recalcitrant in all microcosms tested. The degradation of o-xylene ceased after toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene were depleted in the Fort Bragg and sludge microcosms, but o-xylene continued to degrade in microcosms with contaminated Sleeping Bear Dunes soil. The most probable number (MPN) of denitrifiers in these nine different inocula were measured using a microtiter technique. There was no correlation between the MPN of denitrifiers and the TEX degradation rate under denitrifying conditions. Experimental results indicate that the degradation sequence and TEX degradation rate under denitrifying conditions may differ among sites. Results also indicate that denitrification alone may not be a suitable bioremediation technology for gasoline-contaminated aquifers because of the inability of denitrifiers to degrade benzene.

  19. 78 FR 16260 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site (78 FR 14088). This document makes a correction to that notice... Federal Register of March 4, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-04875, on page 14088, please make the following... address is Hilton Garden Inn, 1065 Stevens Creek Road, Augusta, GA 30907. The reason for this change...

  20. Savannah River Site production reactor technical specifications. K Production Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    These technical specifications are explicit restrictions on the operation of the Savannah River Site K Production Reactor. They are designed to preserve the validity of the plant safety analysis by ensuring that the plant is operated within the required conditions bounded by the analysis, and with the operable equipment that is assumed to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Technical specifications preserve the primary success path relied upon to detect and respond to accidents. This report describes requirements on thermal-hydraulic limits; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance for the reactor, power distribution control, instrumentation, process water system, emergency cooling and emergency shutdown systems, confinement systems, plant systems, electrical systems, components handling, and special test exceptions; design features; and administrative controls.

  1. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  2. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  3. Comparative toxicology of laboratory organisms for assessing hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.E.; Peterson, S.A.; Greene, J.C.; Callahan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Multi-media/multi-trophic level bioassays have been proposed to determine the extent and severity of environmental contamination at hazardous waste sites. Comparative toxicological profiles for algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), daphnia (Daphnia magna), earthworms (Eisenia foetida), microbes (Photobacterium fisherii, mixed sewage microorganisms) and plants; wheat Stephens, (Triticum aestivum), lettuce, butter crunch, (Lactuca sativa L.) radish, Cherry Belle, (Raphanus sativa L.), red clover, Kenland, (Trifolium pratense L.) and cucumber, Spartan Valor, (Cucumis sativa L.) are presented for selected heavy metals, herbicides and insecticides. Specific chemical EC/sub 50/ values are presented for each test organism. Differences in standard deviations were compared between each individual test organism, as well as for the chemical subgroup assayed. Algae and daphnia are the most sensitive test organisms to heavy metals and insecticides followed in order of decreasing sensitivity by Microtox (Photobacterium fisherii), DO depletion rate, seed germination and earthworms. Higher plants were most sensitive to 2,4-D, (2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid) followed by algae, Microtox, daphnia and earthworms. Differences in toxicity of 2,4-D chemical formulations and commercial sources of insecticides were observed with algae and daphia tests.

  4. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed.

  5. Site Specific Genetic Incorporation of Azidophenylalanine in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Nan; Singh, N. Sadananda; Slade, Susan E.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of protein functions is impacted in significant part by the chemical properties of the twenty amino acids, which are used as building blocks for nearly all proteins. The ability to incorporate unnatural amino acids (UAA) into proteins in a site specific manner can vastly expand the repertoire of protein functions and also allows detailed analysis of protein function. In recent years UAAs have been incorporated in a site-specific manner into proteins in a number of organisms. In nearly all cases, the amber codon is used as a sense codon, and an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (RS) pair is used to generate amber suppressing tRNAs charged with the UAA. In this work, we have developed tools to incorporate the cross-linking amino acid azido-phenylalanine (AzF) through the use of bacterial tRNATyr and a modified version of TyrRS, AzFRS, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which is an attractive model organism for the study of cell behavior and function. We have incorporated AzF into three different proteins. We show that the majority of AzF is modified to amino-phenyl alanine, but protein cross-linking was still observed. These studies set the stage for exploitation of this new technology for the analysis of S. pombe proteins. PMID:26597962

  6. Site Specific Cleavage Mediated by MMPs Regulates Function of Agrin

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Ainsley; Xie, Irene; Overall, Christopher M.; Stetefeld, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Background Agrin is the key inducer of postsynaptic differentiations at the neuromuscular junction. The multidomain heparan sulfate proteoglycan is mediating via its N-terminal segment the interaction with laminin, whereas the C-terminal portion is responsible for Dystroglycan binding and clustering of the Acetylcholine receptor. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are known to play essential roles in matrix remodeling, degradation and regulation of extracellular signaling networks. Principal Findings Site-specific processing of Agrin provides key insight into regulatory effects of Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we present a detailed study of agrin processing by different MMPs together with a molecular understanding of binding and cleavage at both terminal fragments. The data suggest for a regulatory effect of MMP cleavage at particularly important functional sites of agrin. Cleave of agrin abolishes the agrin-laminin complex formation and the Acetylcholine receptor clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Conclusion/Significance Agrin is a target of specific MMP processing resulting in agrin subfragments with different regulatory activities. MMP processing is a powerful tool to regulate extracellular signaling networks. PMID:22984437

  7. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike

    2013-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus a Bayesian approach to

  8. A guide to writing procurement specifications for new and existing CHAWS sites

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S.A.; Fry, C.

    1991-09-01

    Turn-key Chemical Hazard Warning Systems (CHAWS) have been designed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and installed at a number of US Army sites. This document is intended to be used as a guide by those charged with writing procurement specification for both new and existing CHAWS sites. It discusses issues of system design and the functional requirements for both hardware and software. Suggestions are made for those interested in updating the computer platform and/or operating system used in older CHAWS designs. The topics of new-site installation and training are only briefly discussed. The reader is referred to the CHAWS User's Guides listed in the bibliography for user information. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  9. 1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K.

    1994-11-01

    This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  10. Site environmental report for Ames Laboratory, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, L.K.

    1990-05-01

    This report contains brief information concerning the environment and environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory. Discharges of liquid wastes, radioactive effluents and soil contamination are described. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (CBS)

  11. Viral induction of site-specific chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Elizabeth A; Spector, Deborah H

    2003-01-01

    The advent of advanced cell culture and cytogenetics techniques in the 1950s opened a new avenue for research on the pathogenic interactions between animal viruses and their hosts. Studies of many viruses revealed their ability to nonspecifically induce cytogenetic damage to their host cell's chromosomes. However, only three viruses, the oncogenic adenoviruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), have been found to cause non-random, site-specific chromosomal damage. Adenovirus (Ad) type 12 induces fragility at four distinct loci (RNU1, RNU2, RN5S and PSU1) in many different types of human cells. A common feature of these loci is that they contain a repeated array of transcriptionally active genes encoding small structural RNAs. Site-specific induction of breaks also requires the virally encoded E1B protein of M(r) 55000 and the C-terminus of the cellular p53 protein. Analysis of the induction of damage by HSV and HCMV necessitates consideration of several factors, including the strain of virus used, the timing of infection, the type of cell used, and the multiplicity of infection. Both HSV strains 1 and 2 are cytotoxic, although the former seems to be more proficient at inducing damage. At early times post infection, HSV induces breaks and specific uncoiling of the centromeres of chromosomes 1, 9 and 16. This is followed at later times by a more complete severing of all of the chromosomes, termed pulverisation. Damage by HSV requires viral entry and de novo viral protein synthesis, with immediate early viral proteins responsible for the induction of breaks and uncoiling and early gene products (most likely nucleases) involved in the extensive pulverisation seen later. HCMV has been studied primarily in permissive human fibroblasts. Its ability to induce specific damage in chromosome 1 at two loci, 1q21 and 1q42, was only recently revealed as the cells must be in S-phase when they are infected for the breaks to be observed. In contrast to

  12. Site characteristics of Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews the geology and topography of the Argonne National Laboratory, near Lemont, Illinois. It describes the thickness and stratigraphy of soils, glacial till, and bedrock in and adjacent to the laboratory and support facilities. Seismic surveys were also conducted through the area to help determine the values of seismic wave velocities in the glacial till which is important in determining the seismic hazard of the area. Borehole log descriptions are summarized along with information on area topography.

  13. Cold War Context Statement: Sandia National Laboratories, California Site

    SciTech Connect

    ULLRICH, REBECCA A.

    2003-01-01

    This document was prepared to support the Department of Energy's compliance with Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act. It provides an overview of the historic context in which Sandia National Laboratories/California was created and developed. Establishing such a context allows for a reasonable and reasoned historical assessment of Sandia National Laboratories/California properties. The Cold War arms race provides the primary historical context for the SNL/CA built environment.

  14. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Trafficking by Site-Specific Biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Liebick, Marcel; Schläger, Christian; Oppermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors undergo internalization and desensitization in response to ligand activation. Internalized receptors are either preferentially directed towards recycling pathways (e.g. CCR5) or sorted for proteasomal degradation (e.g. CXCR4). Here we describe a method for the analysis of receptor internalization and recycling based on specific Bir A-mediated biotinylation of an acceptor peptide coupled to the receptor, which allows a more detailed analysis of receptor trafficking compared to classical antibody-based detection methods. Studies on constitutive internalization of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 (12.1% ± 0.99% receptor internalization/h) and CCR5 (13.7% ± 0.68%/h) reveals modulation of these processes by inverse (TAK779; 10.9% ± 0.95%/h) or partial agonists (Met-CCL5; 15.6% ± 0.5%/h). These results suggest an actively driven internalization process. We also demonstrate the advantages of specific biotinylation compared to classical antibody detection during agonist-induced receptor internalization, which may be used for immunofluorescence analysis as well. Site-specific biotinylation may be applicable to studies on trafficking of transmembrane proteins, in general. PMID:27310579

  15. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation. PMID:24166861

  16. Structuring Historic Site-Based History Laboratories for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Providing training for pre-service teachers at historic sites necessitates a reorientation for historic site-based teacher education programs away from strict content learning towards programs that emphasize the modeling of disciplinary problem solving and transfer learning. Outlined here is a History Lab model for teacher education that uses the…

  17. Improving Satellite-Based LAI and FPAR Predictions With Simple Site-Specific Parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H. K.; Washington-Allen, R. A.; King, A. W.; Pan, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    Leaf area index (leaf area per ground surface area; LAI) and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (fPAR) are fundamental elements of hydrologic modeling. Maps of LAI and fPAR are thus critical inputs for spatially extensive hydrology models. These maps can be derived from satellite data using relationships between LAI, fPAR, and spectral vegetation indices (SVI), but establishing these relationships and associated parameters requires time consuming and expensive ground-based measurements. Consequently, calibrations established for one site are frequently transferred to another site without considering site-specific elements of the parameterization or potential error introduced by the geographic transfer. We are evaluating this error and developing simple and effective corrections as part of a multi-laboratory Department of Energy (DOE) project investigating hydrometeorological processes in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW) in southeast Kansas. We applied relationships established for the North American Great Plains and Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research sites to the WRW and developed parameterizations using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from 1km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and 30m Landsat Thematic Mapper. Ground-based reflectance, LAI, and fPAR were collected for 100+ sites on the WRW. Initial evaluation indicates that simple calibrations using site-specific satellite data to adjust parameters substantially improve predictions of the ported LAI/fPAR-SVI relationships. For example, estimating NDVI of bare ground from AVHRR data for the WRW and substituting that value into the Konza Prairie relationship greatly improved predictions of LAI for WRW grasslands. Our methods of site-specific parameterization may allow accurate use of geographically ported relationships in many different locations. This research was sponsored by the DOE Office of Science, Environmental Sciences

  18. Specific Initiation Site for Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thoren, Marilyn M.; Sebring, Edwin D.; Salzman, Norman P.

    1972-01-01

    Replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules have been isolated under conditions in which the newly synthesized DNA is uniformly labeled with 3H-thymidine. These newly synthesized strands are released from the replicative intermediate molecules by alkaline treatment, and it has been possible to isolate single-stranded SV40 DNA which varies in size from 157,000 daltons (from molecules that are 10% replicated) to 1,360,000 daltons (85% replicated). The rates of duplex formation of newly synthesized DNA have been used to relate their genetic complexity to the extent of DNA replication. As DNA replication proceeds, the time required to effect 50% renaturation of the newly synthesized DNA increases at a proportional rate. The data establish that DNA replication is not initiated at random, but rather that there is a single specific initiation site for DNA replication. PMID:4342054

  19. 2'-modified nucleosides for site-specific labeling of oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Jeremiah E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the synthesis of 2'-modified nucleosides designed specifically for incorporating labels into oligonucleotides. Conversion of these nucleosides to phosphoramidite and solid support-bound derivatives proceeds in good yield. Large-scale synthesis of 11-mer oligonucleotides possessing the 2'-modified nucleosides is achieved using these derivatives. Thermal denaturation studies indicate that the presence of 2'-modified nucleosides in 11-mer duplexes has minimal destabilizing effects on the duplex structure when the nucleosides are placed at the duplex termini. The powerful combination of phosphoramidite and support-bound derivatives of 2'-modified nucleosides affords the large-scale preparation of an entirely new class of oligonucleotides. The ability to synthesize oligonucleotides containing label attachment sites at 3', intervening, and 5' locations of a duplex is a significant advance in the development of oligonucleotide conjugates.

  20. An ensemble method approach to investigate kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most significant and well-studied post-translational modifications, and it plays an important role in various cellular processes. It has made a considerable impact in understanding the protein functions which are involved in revealing signal transductions and various diseases. The identification of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites has an important role in elucidating the mechanism of phosphorylation; however, experimental techniques for identifying phosphorylation sites are labor intensive and expensive. An exponentially increasing number of protein sequences generated by various laboratories across the globe require computer-aided procedures for reliably and quickly identifying the phosphorylation sites, opening a new horizon for in silico analysis. In this regard, we have introduced a novel ensemble method where we have selected three classifiers (least square support vector machine, multilayer perceptron, and k-Nearest Neighbor) and three different feature encoding parameters (dipeptide composition, physicochemical properties of amino acids, and protein-protein similarity score). Each of these classifiers is trained on each of the three different parameter systems. The final results of the ensemble method are obtained by fusing the results of all the classifiers by a weighted voting algorithm. Extensive experiments reveal that our proposed method can successfully predict phosphorylation sites in a kinase-specific manner and performs significantly better when compared with other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. PMID:24872686

  1. Integrated medical and behavioral laboratory measurement system engineering analysis and laboratory specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grave, C.; Margold, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Site selection, program planning, cost and design studies for support of the IMBLMS program were investigated. Accomplishments are reported for the following areas: analysis of responses to site selection criteria, space-oriented biotechnology, life sciences payload definition, and program information transfer.

  2. Flow Shear Stress and Atherosclerosis: A Matter of Site Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Patrizia; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract It is well accepted that atherosclerosis occurs in a site-specific manner especially at branch points where disturbed blood flow (d-flow) predisposes to the development of plaques. Investigations both in vivo and in vitro have shown that d-flow is pro-atherogenic by promoting oxidative and inflammatory states in the artery wall. In contrast, steady laminar blood flow (s-flow) is atheroprotective by inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation in the vessel wall. The mechanism for inflammation in endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to d-flow has been well studied and includes redox-dependent activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) that ultimately lead to the expression of adhesive molecules. In contrast, s-flow leads to the activation of the mitogen extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase 5/extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (MEK5/ERK5) pathway that prevents pro-inflammatory signaling. Important transcriptional events that reflect the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory condition of ECs in d-flow include the activation of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB), whereas in s-flow, activation of Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2) are dominant. Recent studies have shown that protein kinase c zeta (PKCζ) is highly activated under d-flow conditions and may represent a molecular switch for EC signaling and gene expression. The targeted modulation of proteins activated in a site-specific manner holds the promise for a new approach to limit atherosclerosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1405–1414. PMID:21050140

  3. Site-specific anticancer effects of dietary flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Sak, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Food-derived flavonoid quercetin, widely distributed in onions, apples, and tea, is able to inhibit growth of various cancer cells indicating that this compound can be considered as a good candidate for anticancer therapy. Although the exact mechanism of this action is not thoroughly understood, behaving as antioxidant and/or prooxidant as well as modulating different intracellular signalling cascades may all play a certain role. Such inhibitory activity of quercetin has been shown to depend first of all on cell lines and cancer types; however, no comprehensive site-specific analysis of this effect has been published. In this review article, cytotoxicity constants of quercetin measured in various human malignant cell lines of different origin were compiled from literature and a clear cancer selective action was demonstrated. The most sensitive malignant sites for quercetin revealed to be cancers of blood, brain, lung, uterine, and salivary gland as well as melanoma whereas cytotoxic activity was higher in more aggressive cells compared to the slowly growing cells showing that the most harmful cells for the organism are probably targeted. More research is needed to overcome the issues of poor water solubility and relatively low bioavailability of quercetin as the major obstacles limiting its clinical use. PMID:24377461

  4. Site-specific hydrogen diffusion rates during clinopyroxene dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriss, Elizabeth; Plank, Terry; Walker, David

    2016-06-01

    The rate of hydrogen diffusion in clinopyroxene is relevant to interpreting hydrogen ("water") concentrations in xenoliths, phenocrysts, and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions to provide insight into the deep-earth water cycle and volcanic explosivity. Here, we determine bulk and site-specific hydrogen diffusivities in two diopsides and an augite by heating initially homogeneous water-bearing samples in a 1-atm CO/CO2 gas-mixing furnace at 800-1000 °C and oxygen fugacity at the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer and observing H-loss profiles. The O-H stretching range between wavenumbers 3000 and 4000 cm-1 in FTIR spectra is resolved into 4-6 peaks, each of which is assumed to represent a distinct defect site for the hydrogen, to determine peak-specific diffusivities using our previously published whole-block method. For the diopside from the Kunlun Mts. in China, Arrhenius relations are reported for peaks at 3645, 3617, 3540, 3443, and 3355 cm-1 based on measurements at 816, 904, and 1000 °C. Bulk and site-specific diffusivities are determined for the same set of peaks at 904 °C for the second diopside (Jaipur). The augite (PMR-53) was a triangular thin slab, and hydrogen diffusivities were determined for bulk hydrogen and peaks at 3620, 3550, 3460, and 3355 cm-1 in the thickness direction at 800 °C. Bulk hydrogen diffusivity in the Jaipur diopside is consistent with previous work, and hydrogen diffusivity in augite PMR-53 is slightly lower than the fast direction diffusivities measured || [100] and [001]* in Jaipur diopside. Both diopsides show 1-2 orders of magnitude differences in the peaks-specific diffusivities, with the fastest diffusivities at 3450 cm-1 and the slowest at 3645 cm-1. However, the hydrogen diffusivities in Jaipur diopside are 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than those in Kunlun diopside for bulk hydrogen and all peaks. Thus, peak-specific differences cannot by themselves adequately explain the 5 orders of magnitude range in hydrogen

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  7. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-30

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  8. COMPARATIVE TOXICOLOGY OF LABORATORY ORGANISMS FOR ASSESSING HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-media/multi-trophic level bioassays have been proposed to determine the extent and severity of environmental contamination at hazardous waste sites. Comparative toxicological profiles for algae, daphnia, earthworms, microbes, mixed sewage and plants; wheat 'Stephens', lettu...

  9. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  10. AmeriFlux US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site)

    SciTech Connect

    Matamala, Roser

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site). Site Description - Two eddy correlation systems are installed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory: one on a restored prairie (established October 2004) and one on a corn/soybean rotation agricultural field (established in July 2005). The prairie site had been farmed for more than 100 years, but was converted to prairie in 1989. The agricultural site has likely been farmed for more than 100 years, but the first documented instance of agricultural activity dates back to a picture taken in 1952.