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1

Laboratory Tests  

MedlinePLUS

... factors can affect test results, including: sex age race medical history general health specific foods drugs you are taking how closely your follow preparatory instructions variations in laboratory ...

2

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2010-07-01

3

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2014-07-01

4

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2011-07-01

5

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2013-07-01

6

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2012-07-01

7

Testing shields in the Argonne National Laboratory fuel conditioning facility support areas.  

PubMed

Testing has been completed for two lightly shielded areas that support operations in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Operational requirements dictated the use of a radiography source containing 0.44 TBq (12 Ci) of 192Ir to challenge reinforced concrete and steel shields that surround a decontamination, maintenance, and repair area for contaminated equipment used in hot cell operations. A more intense source containing 0.89 TBq (24 Ci) of 192Ir was used to test lead shot and steel shields around tanks in a radioactive liquid waste system and the boundaries of the room that contained it. Measurement procedures were developed to find design flaws and construction deficiencies while minimizing radiation exposure to test participants. While the shields are adequate to limit gamma ray deep dose equivalents to 10 mSv y(-1) (1 rem y(-1)) or less to facility personnel, several modifications were necessary to assure that the attenuation is adequate to keep dose rates less than 5 microSv h(-1) (0.5 mrem h(-1)) in normally occupied areas. PMID:8972837

Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

1997-01-01

8

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

NONE

1994-12-31

9

Confirmative laboratory tests and one example of forensic application of the probabilistic approach to the area of convergence in BPA  

E-print Network

One of the most important results in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) is the determination of the area of convergence of blood-drop trajectories. This area is directly related to the point of origin of the projections and is often indicative of the point where the main action of a crime has occurred. One of us has recently proposed a method to statistically characterize this area by mean of a probabilistic approach based on the uncertainties of the angles of impact of the stains in the pattern. In our work we present some laboratory tests that confirm the validity of the method, returning good agreement between the empirical and the theoretical data. By comparing the results of different operators, we also show the robustness of the method, in that the results are independent of the analytical approach of the single experimenter. Finally, we describe an example of application to a real forensic case.

Camana, Francesco; Gravina, Nicola; Quintarelli, Marco

2013-01-01

10

4. TEST AREA 1120 OVERVIEW, TEST AREA 1115 IN MIDDLE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. TEST AREA 1-120 OVERVIEW, TEST AREA 1-115 IN MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND TEST AREA 1-110 IN FAR DISTANCE AT EXTREME LEFT. ROGERS DRY LAKE AND THE HANGARS AT MAIN BASE ARE VISIBLE IN THE FAR RIGHT DISTANCE. TEST STANDS 2-A AND 1-A ARE NEAREST THE CAMERA. Looking west southwest. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

11

Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

Brenda R. Pace

2003-07-01

12

Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer.

Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Isotope Geology; Kuntz, M.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Branch of Central Regional Geology

1994-12-31

13

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F  

SciTech Connect

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

14

Laboratory testing in neurorheumatology.  

PubMed

Laboratory testing in cases of neuro-rheumatologic disease can be daunting, and the results can be difficult to interpret if not placed in the correct clinical context. To best help our patients and also to practice in a cost-effective environment, laboratory testing must be performed in a logical manner, guided by symptoms and clinical judgment. The authors discuss the different laboratory tests used in the diagnosis and evaluation of rheumatologic diseases often encountered in the practice of neurology. It is important to understand how the tests are performed and which methods are used at your own institution. Testing should be ordered with a specific diagnosis in mind so as not to confuse the clinical picture with possible false-positive results. Through discussion of the various testing options, the authors advocate a step-wise approach to investigation. PMID:25369433

Hickey, Meghan K; Murali, Mandakolathur

2014-09-01

15

Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

Hamilton, Jeff

2004-01-01

16

HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

2005-02-01

17

Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

Bayliss, S.C. [DanShar, Inc., Bosque Farms, NM (United States); Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project

1996-04-01

18

Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

2013-06-01

19

Comparing laboratory column test treatments with field profiles of fecal indicator bacteria and virus from concentrated source areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fecal contamination of potable water supplies is prevalent throughout the developing world. In rural Bangladesh, groundwater contamination of shallow unconfined aquifers is attributed to the infiltration of fecal organisms from sewage ponds, sewage ditches and latrines. However, few studies conclusively link sources to wells at the scale required for microbial transport to occur. We present a combined field and laboratory investigation into the transport of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enteric viral indicator F+ RNA coliphage (MS-2) using drive point piezometers and extracted sediment cores. Fieldwork and coring took place in the Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Field measurements at the 100-cm scale were made using an array of three drive-point piezometers under highly contaminated ponds and canals over a 10-day period during the peak of the monsoon season. The profiles of E. coli detected under ponds and canals by a culture-based most probable number method were consistent with a first order filtration rate over the distances studied and filtration rates ranged from 1 - 8 m-1. In order to determine possible attachment mechanisms and the influence of sediment treatments applied in laboratory testing, duplicate column transport studies at the 10-cm scale were performed on intact cores processed immediately on-site, intact cores preserved by freezing, dried repacked sediment, acid-washed repacked sediment, and a uniform silica sand. Two ionic strengths (3.5 and 20 mM) were used to encompass the range of electrical conductivity typically found in the shallow portion of the aquifer. Columns were dissected and the attached E. coli quantified by section. Even at the solution chemistry less favorable for particle attachment (low ionic strength), filtration rates for the core tested on-site predict a transport distance of 0.5m for a 4-log unit reduction in E. coli concentration. Although the filtration rates found in the field study are lower than those found from column studies, calculations using the highest initial concentration and the lowest filtration rate observed predict travel distances (4-log reduction) up to 7m within the aquifer. This finding has important implications for the microbial safety of populations relying on shallow untreated well water because it indicates that factors such as preferential flow pathways or poor well construction may be more important than transport along a hydraulic gradient, even in a relatively uniform sandy aquifer with concentrated sewage sources.

Feighery, J.; Culligan, P.; Ferguson, A. S.; Mailloux, B. J.; McKay, L. D.; Ahmed, K.; Alam, M.; Huq, M.; Emch, M.; Serre, M. L.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

2010-12-01

20

Genetic Testing Laboratory Directory  

MedlinePLUS

Genetic Testing Registry All GTR Tests Conditions/Phenotypes Genes Labs GeneReviews Advanced search for tests Search term Search ... us improve GTR! Feedback link About GTR ® The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR ® ) provides a central location for voluntary ...

21

IMPROVED LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a program to evaluate an Improved Laboratory Dispersant Effectiveness Test (ILDET) which was developed to replace EPA's Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test (RSDET). The report summarizes the development of the IL...

22

Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014  

SciTech Connect

The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

Alan Giesbrecht

2014-05-01

23

Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

Bridger Morrison

2014-09-01

24

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

2002-06-01

25

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume One - Main Text and Appendices A and B  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing in situ chemical oxidation for remediating the secondary source of groundwater contaminants at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) Site. The study involved trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated media (groundwater, soil, and sludge) from TAN. The effectiveness of the selected oxidant, potassium permanganate (KMn0(sub4)), was evaluated at multiple oxidant and contaminant concentrations. Experiments were performed to determine the oxidant demand of each medium and the rate of TCE oxidation. The experiments were performed under highly controlled conditions (gas-tight reactors, constant 12C temperature). Multiple parameter were monitored over time including MN0(sub 4) and TCE concentrations and pH.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

26

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E  

SciTech Connect

These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

27

Laboratory testing the Anaconda.  

PubMed

Laboratory measurements of the performance of the Anaconda are presented, a wave energy converter comprising a submerged water-filled distensible tube aligned with the incident waves. Experiments were carried out at a scale of around 1:25 with a 250 mm diameter and 7 m long tube, constructed of rubber and fabric, terminating in a linear power take-off of adjustable impedance. The paper presents some basic theory that leads to predictions of distensibility and bulge wave speed in a pressurized compound rubber and fabric tube, including the effects of inelastic sectors in the circumference, longitudinal tension and the surrounding fluid. Results are shown to agree closely with measurements in still water. The theory is developed further to provide a model for the propagation of bulges and power conversion in the Anaconda. In the presence of external water waves, the theory identifies three distinct internal wave components and provides theoretical estimates of power capture. For the first time, these and other predictions of the behaviour of the Anaconda, a device unlike almost all other marine systems, are shown to be in remarkably close agreement with measurements. PMID:22184668

Chaplin, J R; Heller, V; Farley, F J M; Hearn, G E; Rainey, R C T

2012-01-28

28

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01

29

Laboratory testing for platelet antibodies.  

PubMed

Laboratory testing for immune-mediated thrombocytopenias involves identification and classification of antibodies present in patient sera or attached to patient platelets. This article summarizes the available types of platelet antibody testing and applications in disorders such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, multiple platelet transfusion refractoriness, immune thrombocytopenia, and drug-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:23757218

Heikal, Nahla M; Smock, Kristi J

2013-09-01

30

42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory...

2010-10-01

31

300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-09-30

32

222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

RUELAS, B.H.

2007-03-26

33

STRUCTURES AND MATERIALS TEST LABORATORY  

E-print Network

STRUCTURES AND MATERIALS TEST LABORATORY CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY and Environmental Engineering University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin January 2008 #12;ii Abstract Shrinkage concrete highway bridge girders. A normal concrete mix from Spancrete was used as a basic reference

Russell, Jeffrey S.

34

Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

1997-11-01

35

Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)  

SciTech Connect

A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct responsibility of the specific facility manager. The specific DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, guidance documents and good industry practices that serve as the basis for each element/subelement are identified and aligned with each subelement.

Kammenzind, D.E.

1997-05-28

36

The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

Batchelor, K.

1992-01-01

37

The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

Batchelor, K.

1992-09-01

38

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing...

2010-10-01

39

Laboratory procedures for waste form testing  

SciTech Connect

The 100 and 300 areas of the Hanford Site are included on the US Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) National Priorities List under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Soil washing is a treatment process that is being considered for the remediation of the soil in these areas. Contaminated soil washing fines can be mixed or blended with cementations materials to produce stable waste forms that can be used for beneficial purposes in mixed or low-level waste landfills, burial trenches, environmental restoration sites, and other applications. This process has been termed co-disposal. The Co-Disposal Treatability Study Test Plan is designed to identify a range of cement-based formulations that could be used in disposal efforts in Hanford in co-disposal applications. The purpose of this document is to provide explicit procedural information for the testing of co-disposal formulations. This plan also provides a discussion of laboratory safety and quality assurance necessary to ensure safe, reproducible testing in the laboratory.

Mast, E.S.

1994-09-19

40

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Questions Which laboratories can test specimens for the bacteria that cause anthrax? Laboratories that are a part ... patient specimens for Bacillus anthracis , the type of bacteria that causes anthrax. LRN labs are strategically located ...

41

Ghabezloo (2010): Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling ... Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and  

E-print Network

and ultrasonic wave velocity measurements, but have been rarely validated against mechanical loading testsGhabezloo (2010): Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling ... 1 Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling for the evaluation

Boyer, Edmond

2010-01-01

42

Test Laboratory Instructions (Updated 2/12)  

E-print Network

Test Laboratory Instructions (Updated 2/12) In California, manufacturers of State- and federally Energy Commission (Energy Commission). This reported data must come from an approved test laboratory performing the test procedure prescribed by law for the appliance. These instructions will walk you through

43

A TECHNIQUE FOR LANGUAGE LABORATORY TESTING.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A TECHNIQUE FOR ORAL TESTING IN THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS OUTLINED. TO PROPERLY TEST STUDENTS' ORAL ABILITY, THE TEST SHOULD BE PREPARED LIKE THE LESSONS--CUE OR QUESTION, STUDENT RESPONSE, CORRECT RESPONSE. SO AS NOT TO REQUIRE EXCESSIVE GRADING TIME ON THE TEACHER'S PART, THE LABORATORY SHOULD HAVE FACILITIES TO START AND STOP STUDENT TAPE…

RUDE, BEN D.

44

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB. 8 AUG 57." In upper left corner, photo no. "8462 57" cropped out: "A-AFFTC 8 AUG 57, RETL TEST AREA" This photo is a high oblique view, showing the wing of the photo plane and Test Area 1-115. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

45

Relay testing at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is conducting a seismic test program on relays. The purpose of the test program is to investigate the influence of various designs, electrical and vibration parameters on the seismic capacity levels. The first series of testing has been completed and performed at Wyle Laboratories. The major part of the test program consisted of single axis, single frequency sine dwell tests. Random multiaxis, multifrequency tests were also performed. Highlights of the test results as well as a description of the testing methods are presented in this paper. 10 figs.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.

1989-01-01

46

World of Forensic Laboratory Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... Was this page helpful? Overview | Forensic Pathology | Forensic Toxicology | Genetic Tests and DNA Typing | Testing in Cases ... Michael Jackson died in 2009, results of Forensic Toxicology tests on his brain tissue took almost a ...

47

7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS FOR INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43 Laboratory testing. Fees for testing each sample shall...

2010-01-01

48

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2010-04-01

49

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2011-04-01

50

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2012-04-01

51

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2013-04-01

52

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2014-04-01

53

How Reliable Is Laboratory Testing?  

MedlinePLUS

... condition. For example, a certain test may have proven to be 90% sensitive. If 100 people are ... condition. For example, a certain test may have proven to be 90% specific. If 100 healthy individuals ...

54

Laboratory experimental testing of inerters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents experimental results from the testing of mechanical networks involving inerter devices. The tests are carried out using a hydraulic ram actuator whose displacement is controlled in a closed-loop system. A methodology is proposed for the testing of inerter devices which amounts to the design of a buffer network to be connected in series with the inerter device

Christakis Papageorgiou; Malcolm C. Smith

2005-01-01

55

Laboratory testing for enhanced undersea cable survivability  

SciTech Connect

Examples of useful testing procedures with summaries of test results gleaned from years of cable testing experience illustrate how laboratory testing has identified failure modes, uncovered design deficiencies, characterized performance and supported system design for improved at-sea survivability. Repeated test results give insight into the performance capabilities and limitations of contemporary cables with metal and aramid strength members and demonstrate that successful at-sea performance invariably depends upon the effective mating of cable, attachment hardware and handling equipment. Analysis of the potentially high cost of cable failure at sea clearly demonstrates that it pays to test in the laboratory.

Stange, W.F.

1983-01-01

56

Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

57

Laboratory tests and compliance of dermatologic outpatients  

PubMed Central

Laboratory tests, including blood tests and urine analysis, are frequently performed in the dermatology outpatient clinic, but doctors often do not consider the cognitive or psychological effect of the examinations. Based on terror management theory, we hypothesized that performing laboratory tests increases the patient’s fear of mortality, and therefore has a positive effect on the patient’s attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and willingness to accept them. The study employed a single factor between-subjects design, using a questionnaire completed by the patients. One group consisted of patients who had undergone laboratory tests 1 week before the survey, and the other group consisted of patients who had not undergone a laboratory test. Although the differences between two groups were not statistically significant, the patients who had laboratory tests had tendency to show even lower positive attitude toward the doctor’s recommendations and less intention to follow the recommendations. In contrast to our hypothesis, performing laboratory tests does not subliminally increase patients’ fears or anxieties about their disease or their compliance with doctors’ recommendations. PMID:24555101

Kim, Jaehwan

2013-01-01

58

The Mars Science Laboratory Touchdown Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Touchdown Test Program for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, a facility was developed to use a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the Skycrane landing event.

White, Christopher; Frankovich, John; Yates, Phillip; Wells Jr, George H.; Losey, Robert

2009-01-01

59

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

60

Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions.

These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011.

This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2008-01-01

61

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for  

E-print Network

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for methods used #12;Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for methods used Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for methods used by laboratory. Mehlich III by ICP only

62

Systems integration test laboratory application & experiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early in the development phase of a system—prior to committing to actual hardware/software (HW/SW)—permits early detection of system anomalies, thereby minimizing program development costs while enhancing safety. Later the laboratory can be used to train system operators (for example, pilots, ground crew) in preparation for flight/ground test. In the case of the statically unstable X-29 forward swept wing aircraft, a comprehensive real-time, hardware-in-the-loop test facility was critical in the development of the aircraft's digital fly-by-wire (FBW) flight control system. The X-29 laboratory initially was used to introduce control laws to a simulated real-time environment to verify control system characteristics. Later, actual flight hardware was introduced to the laboratory, at which point the formal system verification/validation test program began. The test program utilized detailed test plans and procedures derived from system requirements and specifications to map out all tests required. This assured that the maximum number of components of the system were exercised in the laboratory, and all components tested had traceability throughout the test program. The end-to-end hardware-in-the loop simulation provided the environment to perform critical failure modes testing, parameter sensitivity evaluation and ultimately pilot/ground crew training during normal and degraded flight control system operation. The X-29 test experience, applicable to the laboratory testing of all critical control systems, has ingrained the philosophy that successful development of complex systems requires an orderly build-up of complexity within the laboratory. By this we mean that components of the simulation are introduced to the laboratory only when previous additions are well understood and formally verified by prescribed testing procedures. First, non-real-time computer models of the system are developed (for example, stability derivatives from scale model wind tunnel data). Upon reaching a level of maturity, these non-real-time codes are implemented and verified in a real-time environment. The real-time implementation is important because it lends itself to interfacing with actual flight hardware and software for final verification/validation (V/V) and training. This philosophy of laboratory management for critical control systems test is not limited to aircraft applications. Any dynamic control system could be developed and tested in a fashion similar to the X-29 control system. The gradual buildup of complexity in the laboratory commencing with non-real-time math modeling, leading to real-time, hard-ware-in-the-loop validation and ultimately operator training is a necessary procedure for obtaining safe, reliable systems. This paper discusses the experience gained from the development of the X-29 digital flight control system, use of the laboratory for development, verification and validation, and how this test philosophy is applied to any system.

Rimer, Melvyn; Falco, Michael; Solan, Michael J.

1991-01-01

63

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR AREAS SOUTH OF PERCH AVENUE. "COLD" SERVICES NORTH OF PERCH. ADVANCED TEST REACTOR IN NEW SECTION WEST OF COLD SERVICES SECTION. NEW PERIMETER FENCE ENCLOSES BETA RAY SPECTROMETER, TRA-669, AN ATR SUPPORT FACILITY, AND ATR STACK. UTM LOCATORS HAVE BEEN DELETED. IDAHO NUCLEAR CORPORATION, FROM A BLAW-KNOX DRAWING, 3/1968. INL INDEX NO. 530-0100-00-400-011646, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

64

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01

65

Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Orndoff, Evelyne

2012-01-01

66

Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

2009-01-01

67

A performance test for laboratory fume hoods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing standards for laboratory fume hoods focus on the face velocity. The influence of room air currents is as important as face velocity in capturing contaminants in such a hood with a worker standing at the face. Further, face velocity standards are not very meaningful for auxiliary air hoods. A performance test was developed, using the measured concentration at the

KNOWLTON J. CAPLAN; GERHARD W. KNUTSON

1982-01-01

68

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and...PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and...investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers laboratory installations for...commerical laboratory facilities capable of...

2010-07-01

69

The laboratory testing of evidential breath-testing (EBT) machines.  

PubMed

Six types of evidential breath testing (EBT) machines were tested in a laboratory. The testing experiments are classified into three paragraphs: analytical performance, sampling and operating conditions. In order to characterize the analytical performance a set of parameters (repeatability, reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, specificity) was established. The results were, in general, good, although an underestimation of the actual vapour concentration was observed. Different types of EBT machines showed significant differences measuring the same vapour. PMID:3679035

Frankvoort, W; Mulder, J A; Neuteboom, W

1987-09-01

70

CTBTO Contractor Laboratory Test Sample Production Report  

SciTech Connect

In October 2012 scientists from both Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria designed a system and capability test to determine if the INL could produce and deliver a short lived radio xenon standard in time for the standard to be measured at the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria. The test included sample standard transportation duration and potential country entrance delays at customs. On October 23, 2012 scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared and shipped a Seibersdorf contract laboratory supplied cylinder. The canister contained 1.0 scc of gas that consisted of 70% xenon and 30% nitrogen by volume. The t0 was October 24, 2012, 1200 ZULU. The xenon content was 0.70 +/ 0.01 scc at 0 degrees C. The 133mXe content was 4200 +/ 155 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty). The 133Xe content was 19000 +/ 800 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty).

Bob Hague; Tracy Houghton; Nick Mann; Matt Watrous

2013-08-01

71

Iowa Central Quality Fuel Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to finalize the creation of an independent quality fuel testing laboratory on the campus of Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa that shall provide the exploding biofuels industry a timely and cost-effective centrally located laboratory to complete all state and federal fuel and related tests that are required. The recipient shall work with various state regulatory agencies, biofuel companies and state and national industry associations to ensure that training and testing needs of their members and American consumers are met. The recipient shall work with the Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship on the development of an Iowa Biofuel Quality Standard along with the Development of a standard that can be used throughout industry.

Heach, Don; Bidieman, Julaine

2013-09-30

72

Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2007-01-01

73

Direct access testing in the clinical laboratory: should laboratories offer testing services directly to the consumer?  

PubMed

This article outlines the author's views on the many issues to consider if a laboratory plans to initiate a program to offer clinical laboratory testing directly to the public. Direct access testing and why is it important are discussed in detail. The regulatory issues are outlined with some alternatives for laboratories in states with restrictive regulations. To illustrate many of the operational issues to consider, the author describes the Personal Diagnostic Center (PDC) in Kansas City. Finally, some of the key business issues are mentioned, including several approaches to promote this type of testing program. PMID:11210210

Halsey, J F

2000-01-01

74

Could light meal jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests?  

PubMed Central

Background: Presently the necessity of fasting time for coagulation tests is not standardized. Our hypothesis is that this can harm patient safety. This study is aimed at evaluating whether a light meal (i.e. breakfast) can jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests. Materials and methods: A blood sample was firstly collected from 17 fasting volunteers (12 h). Immediately after blood collection, the volunteers consumed a light meal. Then samples were collected at 1, 2 and 4 h after the meal. Coagulation tests included: activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin III (AT), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS). Differences between samples were assessed by Wilcoxon ranked-pairs test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Mean % differences were determined and differences between and baseline and 1, 2 and 4h samples were compared with reference change value (RCV). Results: A significantly higher % activity of AT was observed at 1 h and 4 h after meal vs. baseline specimen [113 (104–117) and 111 (107–120) vs. 109 (102–118), respectively; P = 0.029 and P = 0.016]. APTT at 2 h was found significantly lower than baseline samples [32.0 (29.9–34.8) vs. 34.1 (32.2–35.2), respectively; P = 0.041]. The results of both Fbg and PS tests were not influenced by a light meal. Furthermore, no coagulation tests had significant variation after comparison with RCV. Conclusion: A light meal does not influence the laboratory coagulation tests we assessed, but we suggest that the laboratory quality managers standardize the fasting time for all blood tests at 12 hours, to completely metabolize the lipids intake. PMID:25351352

Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

2014-01-01

75

Laboratory Safety Survey Sec. Area of Interest  

E-print Network

/absorbent materials available for spills? (spill kit) 6 Do lab personnel have all required training with documentation shoes) 4 Is mouth pipetting prohibited? 5 Are work surfaces and equipment decontaminated after any spill for Carcinogens, Teratogens, and Other Highly Toxic Chemicals Y N N/A COS 1 Are designated work areas

Gelfond, Michael

76

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01

77

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1993-06-01

78

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

E-print Network

as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and production. The Laboratory this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. The project brings the Laboratory of a highly successful environmental cleanup project at Material Disposal Area B," said Ed Worth, federal

79

Laboratory Tests in the Rheumatic Disease  

PubMed Central

Because the pathophysiologic relationship between laboratory and clinical abnormalities in many of the rheumatologic diseases is still not clearly understood, the use of the investigations dealt with in this article is based only upon statistics. The interpretation of these tests is therefore highly dependent on the result of the initial clinical assessment. Having accepted this limitation, however, the rheumatologist has available a number of powerful tools which may be used to diagnose, classify, or prognosticate. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253052

Aaron, S.L.

1988-01-01

80

Large area damage testing of optics  

SciTech Connect

The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C. [and others

1996-04-26

81

Automation software for a materials testing laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comprehensive software system for automating much of the experimental process has recently been completed at the Lewis Research Center's high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory. The system was designed to support experiment definition and conduct, results analysis and archiving, and report generation activities. This was accomplished through the design and construction of several software systems, as well as through the use of several commercially available software products, all operating on a local, distributed minicomputer system. Experimental capabilities currently supported in an automated fashion include both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue and deformation testing capabilities. The future growth and expansion of this system will be directed toward providing multiaxial test control, enhanced thermomechanical test control, and higher test frequency (hundreds of hertz).

Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

1986-01-01

82

Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

1987-02-01

83

13. "CIVIL, SITE PLAN AND VICINITY MAP, AREA LOCATIONS." Test ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. "CIVIL, SITE PLAN AND VICINITY MAP, AREA LOCATIONS." Test Area 1-125. Specifications No. ENG (NASA)-04-35363-1; Drawing No. 60-09-34; sheet 11. Ref. No. C-l. D.O. SERIES 1597/1. Approved for siting on 24 April 1962. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

84

Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

McAtee, R.E.

1991-09-01

85

The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies  

E-print Network

- 1 - The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies for Geothermal Monitoring-Dinger Geothermal Program Office, U. S. Navy, China Lake, CA 93555-6001 Keith.Richards-Dinge@navy.mil Keywords of three-component digital seismometers at the Coso geothermal area, California, supplemented by 14

Foulger, G. R.

86

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2013-04-01

87

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2012-04-01

88

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2014-04-01

89

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2011-04-01

90

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2010-04-01

91

Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft  

SciTech Connect

Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

1981-10-01

92

DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO  

E-print Network

DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO NATIONAL University 1983 #12;DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO observations of sage grouse using the Test Reactor Area (TRA) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

93

Automation software for a materials testing laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The software environment in use at the NASA-Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory is reviewed. This software environment is aimed at supporting the tasks involved in performing materials behavior research. The features and capabilities of the approach to specifying a materials test include static and dynamic control mode switching, enabling multimode test control; dynamic alteration of the control waveform based upon events occurring in the response variables; precise control over the nature of both command waveform generation and data acquisition; and the nesting of waveform/data acquisition strategies so that material history dependencies may be explored. To eliminate repetitive tasks in the coventional research process, a communications network software system is established which provides file interchange and remote console capabilities.

Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

1990-01-01

94

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

95

Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

Teate, Anthony A.

1997-01-01

96

Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

2010-02-01

97

11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking north. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

98

18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing northwest corner. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

99

19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking toward east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, machinery, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

100

Laboratory Test Surveillance following Acute Kidney Injury  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. Methods We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ?60 L/min/1.73 m2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Results A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Conclusions Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease. PMID:25117447

Matheny, Michael E.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

2014-01-01

101

TESTING OF THE RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, nonelectrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. Positive results from initial deployment trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and the anticipated future potential use of RadBall throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further test, underpin, and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. The study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment were successful in that for each trial radiation tracks were visible. The deployment of RadBall can be accomplished in different ways depending on the size and characteristics of the contaminated area (e.g., a hot cell that already has a crane/manipulator available or highly contaminated room that requires the use of a remote control device with sensor and video equipment to position RadBall). This report also presents SRNL-designed RadBall accessories for future RadBall deployment (a harness, PODS, and robot).

Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

2010-02-10

102

Teacher Testing and the Pacific Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper was to ascertain in some measure the direction teacher testing may take in the Pacific Area states other than Guam and Hawaii. Guam and Hawaii have installed teacher testing programs and have clearly established certification requirements that make it mandatory for teacher applicants to have baccalaureates. The other…

Adachi, Mitsuo

103

Lab Tests Online and consumer understanding of laboratory testing.  

PubMed

Lab Tests Online is a "peer-reviewed, non-commercial, patient-centered" resource where patients and their relatives and caregivers can learn about the tests used to screen for, diagnose, and manage disease. Consumers are becoming increasingly involved in the management of their own health care and increasingly have access to their laboratory results through electronic health records. Research has shown that consumers have difficulty with health literacy in general and with numerical data in particular. The Lab Tests Online global websites are an important step toward helping consumers understand the complexity of the pathology process, the expertise of the people involved and the meaning of the results provided to them and their healthcare professionals. PMID:24121032

Campbell, Bruce; Linzer, George; Dufour, D Robert

2014-05-15

104

42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical...

2010-10-01

105

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing;...

2010-10-01

106

42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general...

2010-10-01

107

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology...

2010-10-01

108

42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical...

2010-10-01

109

The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

Sheldon Freid

2007-02-13

110

Report of an International Survey of Molecular Genetic Testing Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To collect data on the practices of molecular genetic testing (MGT) laboratories for the development of national and international policies for quality assurance (QA). Methods: A web-based survey of MGT laboratory directors (n = 827; response rate 63%) in 18 countries on 3 continents. QA and reporting indices were developed and calculated for each responding laboratory. Results: Laboratory setting

Margaret M. McGovern; Rob Elles; Isabella Beretta; Martin J. Somerville; Gerald Hoefler; Mauri Keinanen; David Barton; Nancy Carson; Elisabeth Dequeker; Radim Brdicka; Alena Blazkova; Ségolène Aymé; Birgit Schnieders; Clemens R. Müller; Vibeke Dalen; Armando Albert Martinez; Ulf Kristoffersson; Meral Ozguc; Hansjakob Mueller; Joe Boone; Ira M. Lubin; Jorge Sequeiros; Domenica Taruscio; Bob Williamson; Lynn Mainland; Hiroshi Yoshikura; Elettra Ronchi

2007-01-01

111

Optimizing tuberculosis testing for basic laboratories.  

PubMed

Optimal tuberculosis testing usually involves sputum centrifugation followed by broth culture. However, centrifuges are biohazardous and scarce in the resource-limited settings where most tuberculosis occurs. To optimize tuberculosis testing for these settings, centrifugation of 111 decontaminated sputum samples was compared with syringe-aspiration through polycarbonate membrane-filters that were then cultured in broth. To reduce the workload of repeated microscopic screening of broth cultures for tuberculosis growth, the colorimetric redox indicator 2,3-diphenyl-5-(2-thienyl) tetrazolium chloride was added to the broth, which enabled naked-eye detection of culture positivity. This combination of filtration and colorimetric growth-detection gave similar results to sputum centrifugation followed by culture microscopy regarding mean colony counts (43 versus 48; P = 0.6), contamination rates (0.9% versus 1.8%; P = 0.3), and sensitivity (94% versus 95%; P = 0.7), suggesting equivalency of the two methods. By obviating centrifugation and repeated microscopic screening of cultures, this approach may constitute a more appropriate technology for rapid and sensitive tuberculosis diagnosis in basic laboratories. PMID:20889887

Ramos, Eric; Schumacher, Samuel G; Siedner, Mark; Herrera, Beatriz; Quino, Willi; Alvarado, Jessica; Montoya, Rosario; Grandjean, Louis; Martin, Laura; Sherman, Jonathan M; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

2010-10-01

112

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for  

E-print Network

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable for methods used 20 15 5 0 #12;Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Phosphorus recommendations applicable by laboratory. Mehlich III by ICP only. Phosphorus Soil Fertility Recommendations for Oil Crops 0 5 10 15 20 25

113

10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking east. The control room is located in the center of the building and abuts the Test Cell 8, 9, and 10 and equipment room wings. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

114

The mass storage testing laboratory at GSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Industry-wide benchmarks exist for measuring the performance of processors (SPECmarks), and of database systems (Transaction Processing Council). Despite storage having become the dominant item in computing and IT (Information Technology) budgets, no such common benchmark is available in the mass storage field. Vendors and consultants provide services and tools for capacity planning and sizing, but these do not account for the complete set of metrics needed in today's archives. The availability of automated tape libraries, high-capacity RAID systems, and high- bandwidth interconnectivity between processor and peripherals has led to demands for services which traditional file systems cannot provide. File Storage and Management Systems (FSMS), which began to be marketed in the late 80's, have helped to some extent with large tape libraries, but their use has introduced additional parameters affecting performance. The aim of the Mass Storage Test Laboratory (MSTL) at Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop a test suite that includes not only a comprehensive check list to document a mass storage environment but also benchmark code. Benchmark code is being tested which will provide measurements for both baseline systems, i.e. applications interacting with peripherals through the operating system services, and for combinations involving an FSMS. The benchmarks are written in C, and are easily portable. They are initially being aimed at the UNIX Open Systems world. Measurements are being made using a Sun Ultra 170 Sparc with 256MB memory running Solaris 2.5.1 with the following configuration: 4mm tape stacker on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; 4GB disk device on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; and Sony Petaserve on Fast/Wide differential SCSI 2.

Venkataraman, Ravi; Williams, Joel; Michaud, David; Gu, Heng; Kalluri, Atri; Hariharan, P. C.; Kobler, Ben; Behnke, Jeanne; Peavey, Bernard

1998-01-01

115

Central Nevada Test Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Water level measurements were performed and water samples collected from the Central Nevada Test Area model validation wells in September 2006. Hydraulic head measurements were compared to previous observations; the MV wells showed slight recovery from the drilling and testing operation in 2005. No radioisotopes exceeded limits set in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan, and no significant trends were observed when compared to previous analyses.

Brad Lyles; Jenny Chapman; John Healey; David Gillespie

2006-09-30

116

Laboratory tests of short intense envelope solitons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stability of short intense nonlinear wave groups propagating over deep water is tested in laboratory runs which are performed in the facility of the Technical University of Berlin. The strongly nonlinear simulation of quasi-steady nonlinear wave groups within the framework of the Euler equations is used to generate the surface elevation time series at a border of the water tank. Besides, the exact analytic solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation is used for this purpose. The time series is then transformed to a wave maker signal with use of a designed transfer algorithm. Wave group propagation along the tank was recorded by 4 distant gauges and by an array of 6 densely situated gauges. This setup allows to consider the wave evolution from 10 to 85 m from the wave maker, and to obtain the wave envelope shape directly from the instrumental data. In the experiments wave groups were characterized by the steepness values up to kAcr < 0.32 and kAtr < 0.24, where k is the mean wavenumber, Acr is the crest amplitude, and Atr is the trough amplitude; and the maximum local wave slope was up to 0.34. Wave breaking phenomenon was not observed in the experiments. Different mean wave numbers and wave groups of different intensities were considered. In some cases the wave groups exhibit noticeable radiation in the course of propagation, though the groups are not dispersed fully. The effect of finite water depth is found to be significant on the wave group stability. Intense wave groups have shorter time of adjustment, what in some sense may help them to manifest their individuality clearer. The experimental tests confirm recent numerical simulations of fully nonlinear equations, where very steep stable single and interacting nonlinear wave groups were reported [1-3]. The quasi-stationary wave groups observed in numerical and laboratory experiments are strongly nonlinear analogues of the nonlinear Schrodinger envelope solitons. The results emphasize the importance of long-living nonlinear wave groups in dynamics of intense sea waves. [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, A.O. Prokofiev, Eur. J. Mech. B / Fluids 25, 677 (2006). [2] A.I. Dyachenko, V.E. Zakharov, JETP Lett. 88, 307 (2008). [3] A.V. Slunyaev, JETP 109, 676 (2009).

Slunyaev, A.; Clauss, G. F.; Klein, M.; Onorato, M.

2012-04-01

117

UF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

/IFAS-recommended amount of a complete fertilizer (a fertilizer that contains nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers (such as 16-4-8) 2. Follow the generic fertilizer recommendations found in UF/IFAS landscape and vegetable garden publications 3. Need only the soil pH test Test B. The Soil Fertility Test provides

Florida, University of

118

20 CFR 416.919k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. 416...examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. ...including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized...

2010-04-01

119

20 CFR 404.1519k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. 404...examinations, laboratory tests, and other services. ...including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized...

2010-04-01

120

Microbiological study of selected risk areas in dental technology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To investigate the microbiological status of certain risk areas in the dental technology laboratory, namely pumice slurry, impression agar and curing water baths.Methods: Samples were inoculated onto selective and non-selective media. Resultant fungal and bacterial colonies were counted and identified to genus or species level.Results: Pumice slurry freshly made up using disinfectant was free from contamination, but colony counts

J. Verran; S. Kossar; J. F. McCord

1996-01-01

121

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST/NVLAP); or (2) A laboratory accreditation...having a mutual recognition arrangement with NIST/NVLAP; or (3) An organization classified...as an accreditation body. (b) NIST/NVLAP is under the auspices of the...

2014-01-01

122

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST/NVLAP); or (2) A laboratory accreditation...having a mutual recognition arrangement with NIST/NVLAP; or (3) An organization classified...as an accreditation body. (b) NIST/NVLAP is under the auspices of the...

2013-01-01

123

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST/NVLAP); or (2) A laboratory accreditation...having a mutual recognition arrangement with NIST/NVLAP; or (3) An organization classified...19, as an accreditation body. (b) NIST/NVLAP is under the auspices of the...

2012-01-01

124

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST/NVLAP); or (2) A laboratory accreditation...having a mutual recognition arrangement with NIST/NVLAP; or (3) An organization classified...19, as an accreditation body. (b) NIST/NVLAP is under the auspices of the...

2010-01-01

125

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST/NVLAP); or (2) A laboratory accreditation...having a mutual recognition arrangement with NIST/NVLAP; or (3) An organization classified...19, as an accreditation body. (b) NIST/NVLAP is under the auspices of the...

2011-01-01

126

Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

Clark, Nigel

2012-01-31

127

Laboratory treatability testing of selected oil shale process wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

Gas condensate wastewaters are generated by cooling of retort offgases produced by in situ facilities. These waters are characterized by high concentrations of ammonia and alkalinity, and contain moderate concentrations of dissolved organic materials. Metallic elements are present in low concentrations. Location of retorting facilities in arid areas of the western United States is expected to increase utilization of wastewater recycle/reuse options, with treatment requirements depending upon end use quality requirements. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with an actual modified in-situ gas condensate to assess performance of steam stripping, the activated sludge process and activated carbon adsorption for upgrading the quality of this wastewater. Steam stripping experiments were carried out with a laboratory-scale, packed tower which contacted preheated, raw gas condensate with low pressure steam in a countercurrent manner. A bench-scale, continuous-flow activated sludge system was operated to evaluate the capability of this treatment technology for removal of dissolved organics. Continuous-flow tests were conducted with steam-stripped gas condensate and effluent from the activated sludge system to assess the ability of carbon adsorption for removal of dissolved organics. A field test configuration for treatment of gas condensate wastewaters has been developed, and pilot-scale units of each treatment technology will be procured during 1981. This mobile pilot equipment will be tested at retorting facilities to demonstrate control technology performance under actual retort operating conditions.

Lewis, R.C.; Rawlings, G.D.

1982-01-01

128

9. Exterior view, Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. Exterior view, Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking southwest. The enclosure discussed in CO-88-B-8 is at the right. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

129

Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV- 15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research effort of the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers was to obtain a preliminary, high quality database of far-field acoustics for terminal area operations of the XV-15 at a takeoff gross weight of approximately 14,000 lbs for various glide slopes, airspeeds, rotor tip speeds, and nacelle tilt angles. The test also was used to assess the suitability of the Crows Landing complex for full scale far-field acoustic testing. This was the first acoustic flight test of the XV-15 aircraft equipped with ATB involving approach and level flyover operations. The test involved coordination of numerous personnel, facilities and equipment. Considerable effort was made to minimize potential extraneous noise sources unique to the region during the test. Acoustic data from the level flyovers were analyzed, then compared with data from a previous test of the XV-15 equipped with Standard Metal Blades

SantaMaria, O. L.; Wellman, J. B.; Conner, D. A.; Rutledge, C. K.

1991-01-01

130

Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is in the Hot Creek Valley of south-central Nevada, approximately 70 miles northeast of Tonopah. The CNTA consists of three parcels totaling 2,560 acres. The parcels are spaced approximately 3 miles apart along a roughly north-south line. The total acreage is currently withdrawn from all forms of appropriation associated with mining laws and leasing. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), acquired the CNTA in the early 1960s to develop alternative sites to the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) for underground nuclear testing. Three emplacement boreholes (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4) were drilled on the three parcels at the CNTA for underground nuclear testing. The initial underground nuclear test at CNTA, Faultless, was conducted in borehole UC-1 at a depth of 3,199 feet below ground surface on January 19, 1968. The yield of the Faultless test was estimated to be 0.2 to 1 megaton. Its purpose was to evaluate the environmental and structural effects that might be expected if subsequent, higher-yield underground nuclear tests were conducted in this vicinity. The test resulted in a down-dropped fault block visible at land surface. In addition, seismic results supported the indication that the site was not favorable for larger detonations. The nuclear detonation created a cavity with a radius of approximately 328 feet. The Faultless test did not release any radioactivity at the surface, and no additional tests were conducted at the CNTA.

None

2009-04-01

131

Aquifer test results, Green Swamp area, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer test conducted in the Green Swamp area December 15-16 , 1975 was designed to stress the uppermost part of the Floridan aquifer so that the leakage characteristics of the overlying confining bed could be determined. A well tapping the upper part of the Floridan aquifer was pumped at a rate of about 1,040 gallons per minute for 35 hours; drawdown was measured in the Floridan aquifer and in two horizons in the confining bed. Analysis of the data indicates that the transmissivity of the uppper 160 feet of the Floridan is 13,000 square feet per day, the storage coefficient is about 0.0002.5, and the overlying confining bed leakance coefficient is about 0.02 to 0.025 per day. The vertical hydraulic diffusivity of the confining bed ranged from 610 square feet per day to 16,000 square feet per day. Results of the test indicate that, in the area of the test site, a Floridan aquifer well field would induce additional recharge to the Floridan. As a result of that increased recharge , water levels in the surficial aquifer would tend to stand lower, runoff from the area would tend to be less, and, perhaps, evapotranspiration would be less than normal.(USGS)

Tibbals, C.H.; Grubb, Hayes F.

1982-01-01

132

New technologies to improve laboratory testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several core technologies that are having, or will have, an impact on the clinical laboratory are discussed. These include instrument-related technologies such as computer technology, chemometrics, robotics, sensors, and biological technologies such as cell fusion and recombinant DNA.

Burtis, C. A.

133

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2011-04-01

134

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2014-04-01

135

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2010-04-01

136

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2013-04-01

137

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2012-04-01

138

Code labs: expediting laboratory test results during a code.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND Knowing a patient's "laboratory picture" is crucial in any code blue situation. Having no streamlined method for collecting and processing laboratory specimens during codes leads to staff frustration and critical delays in patient care. OBJECTIVE To simplify collection and testing of laboratory specimens during codes. METHODS Staff nurses led an initiative through which (1) code laboratory tests were placed in a computerized order set, thereby simplifying ordering; (2) prepackaged bags of supplies for the new order set were placed in each code cart; (3) the laboratory department supervisor began carrying a code pager to ensure that laboratory staff are prepared for incoming "code labs"; (4) a protocol was created for laboratory staff to follow after receiving code labs; and (5) processes were developed for units that are not integrated in the organization's electronic ordering system. RESULTS The mean turnaround time (the time from when laboratory tests are ordered to when results are posted) was reduced from 52.0 minutes to 31.3 minutes (P = .002). Laboratory staff improved their processing time (the time from when specimens are received by laboratory staff to when results are posted) from 34.9 minutes to 21.5 minutes (P = .01). Survey responses indicated that staff across disciplines were significantly more satisfied with the new process. CONCLUSIONS Because the changes are basic, they can be implemented easily in any hospital setting to improve turnaround time for laboratory tests during codes. PMID:21965381

Hurliman, Shannon K; Paston, Kristin

2011-10-01

139

Pyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

is conducted at Texas A&M University at the Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory. Our researchers create · Shipthefinalproducttocommercialrefineries Mobile pyrolysis system High-pressure reactor Hydrogenator http://AgriLifeResearchPyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM Pyrolysis research

140

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program proficiency testing for Thermal Insulation Materials Laboratory Accreditation Program Round 9 - August 1983. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) is a federal program which accredits testing laboratories satisfying published criteria. One Laboratory Accreditation Program (LAP) accredits laboratories for thermal insulation materials test methods. Participation in proficiency testing is required for certain test methods including: settled density, smoldering combustion, surface flammability, and thermal conductivity. Analyses and summaries of the test data returned by

Horlick

1984-01-01

141

100 area excavation treatability test plan  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01

142

Laboratory Tests - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Arabic (???????) Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Khmer (Khmer) ... Chinese Community Health Resource Center Return to top French (français) 24-Hour Urine Test Test d'urine ...

143

Laboratory testing under managed care dominance in the USA  

PubMed Central

The uncontrolled escalation of total health care expenditure despite the government's endeavours during the past decades in the USA had led to the rapid infiltration of managed care organisations (MCOs). Traditional hospital based laboratories have been placed in a crucial situation with the advent of the managed care era. A massive reduction of in house testing urged them to develop strategies against financial difficulty. Consolidation and networking, participation in the outreach testing market, and emphasis on point of care/satellite laboratory testing in non-traditional, ambulatory settings are major strategies for the survival of hospital laboratories. Several physicians' office laboratories (POLS) have closed their doors in response both to regulatory restrictions imposed by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 and to managed care infiltration. It seems likely that POLs and hospital laboratories will continue to reduce test volumes, whereas commercial reference laboratories will thrive through contracting with MCOs. In the current climate of managed care dominance in the USA, clinical laboratories are changing their basic operation focus and mission in response to the aggressively changing landscape. Key Words: laboratory testing • managed care organisations • survival strategies PMID:11215291

Takemura, Y; Beck, J

2001-01-01

144

Predicting Test Bakery Requirements from Laboratory Mixing Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of mixer speeds and\\/or test bakery formulation on dough development times obtained from the standard farinograph and mixograph tests were studied for 28 hard wheat flour samples. Mixing curves using a test bakery formulation were also recorded in a test bakery pin mixer. Relationships between these tests and the bakery mixing requirement were determined. Each flour was test

S. Zounis; K. J. Quail

1997-01-01

145

Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems  

SciTech Connect

Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

1996-08-01

146

Unsaturated hydrologic flow parameters based on laboratory and field data for soils near the mixed waste landfill, technical area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of laboratory tests conducted on soil core samples obtained prior to an instantaneous profile test conducted west of the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The instantaneous profile test was conducted to measure in situ hydrologic parameters controlling unsaturated flow and contaminant transport in the near - surface vadose zone. Soil core samples from the instantaneous profile test plot were tested in the Sandia National Laboratory`s Environmental Restoration Project Hydrology Laboratory to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity and the relationships between moisture content and soil water tension. Data from laboratory tests and the instantaneous profile field test were then modeled using the computer code RETC to quantify moisture content, soil water tension, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity relationships. Results content, soil verified that a combination of laboratory and field data yielded a more complete definition of hydrologic properties than either laboratory or field data alone. Results also indicated that at native moisture contents, the potential for significant unsaturated aqueous flow is limited, while at saturated or near - saturated conditions, preferential flow may occur.

Roepke, C.S. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Nguyen, H.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01

147

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01

148

Contextualizing Laboratory Administered Aural Comprehension Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental test consisting of dialogue with intermittent pauses for responses and a white noise accompaniment was given to non-English speakers who were candidates for admission to the English Department at Bar Ilan University in order to evaluate aural comprehension. Development of the test and results are reported. (RM)

Seliger, Herbert W.; Whiteson, Valerie

1975-01-01

149

Name ___________________________________________ Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

limestone test) 7. R + Micro + B + Lime + Organic Matter + Sal $74 per sample (in addition to Suite 3, adds + Micronutrients (Micro) $17 per sample (in addition to Suite 1, DTPA Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) 3. R + Micro + Hot WaterH and SAR) 5. R + Micro + Sal $37 per sample (in addition to Suite 2, includes detailed salinity test) 6. R

150

Identifying and mitigating biases in EHR laboratory tests.  

PubMed

Electronic health record (EHR) data show promise for deriving new ways of modeling human disease states. Although EHR researchers often use numerical values of laboratory tests as features in disease models, a great deal of information is contained in the context within which a laboratory test is taken. For example, the same numerical value of a creatinine test has different interpretation for a chronic kidney disease patient and a patient with acute kidney injury. We study whether EHR research studies are subject to biased results and interpretations if laboratory measurements taken in different contexts are not explicitly separated. We show that the context of a laboratory test measurement can often be captured by the way the test is measured through time. We perform three tasks to study the properties of these temporal measurement patterns. In the first task, we confirm that laboratory test measurement patterns provide additional information to the stand-alone numerical value. The second task identifies three measurement pattern motifs across a set of 70 laboratory tests performed for over 14,000 patients. Of these, one motif exhibits properties that can lead to biased research results. In the third task, we demonstrate the potential for biased results on a specific example. We conduct an association study of lipase test values to acute pancreatitis. We observe a diluted signal when using only a lipase value threshold, whereas the full association is recovered when properly accounting for lipase measurements in different contexts (leveraging the lipase measurement patterns to separate the contexts). Aggregating EHR data without separating distinct laboratory test measurement patterns can intermix patients with different diseases, leading to the confounding of signals in large-scale EHR analyses. This paper presents a methodology for leveraging measurement frequency to identify and reduce laboratory test biases. PMID:24727481

Pivovarov, Rimma; Albers, David J; Sepulveda, Jorge L; Elhadad, Noémie

2014-10-01

151

National Media Laboratory media testing results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The government faces a crisis in data storage, analysis, archive, and communication. The sheer quantity of data being poured into the government systems on a daily basis is overwhelming systems ability to capture, analyze, disseminate, and store critical information. Future systems requirements are even more formidable: with single government platforms having data rate of over 1 Gbit/sec, greater than Terabyte/day storage requirements, and with expected data archive lifetimes of over 10 years. The charter of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is to focus the resources of industry, government, and academia on government needs in the evaluation, development, and field support of advanced recording systems.

Mularie, William

1993-01-01

152

Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL) User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Robinson, Neil

2011-01-01

153

Structures Test Laboratory (STL). User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the STL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Zipay, John J.

2011-01-01

154

EVALUATION OF THREE OIL SPILL LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA evaluated three laboratory Methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and currently required by regulation) in the United States, the Swirling Flask Test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-Dilution Test (used in France and other Eu...

155

NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory - Duration: 7:52.  

NASA Video Gallery

Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

156

COMPUTERIZED LABORATORY NOTEBOOK CONCEPT FOR GENETIC TOXICOLOGY EXPERIMENTATION AND TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

We describe a microcomputer system utilizing the Computerized Laboratory Notebook (CLN) concept developed in our laboratory for the purpose of automating the Battery of Leukocyte Tests (BLT). The BLT was designed to evaluate blood specimens for toxic, immunotoxic, and genotoxic e...

157

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory (left), Aerial Tramway Loading Terminal (center), and Huber Breaker (right) Photograph taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

158

76 FR 10500 - Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...the approach it uses for calculating the fees the Agency charges Nationally Recognized...and also is requiring prepayment of these fees. This adjustment increases the...

2011-02-25

159

An update for the MuCool test area  

SciTech Connect

Construction of a new facility known as the MuCool Test Area (MTA) has been completed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This facility supports research in new accelerator technologies for future endeavors such as a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. During the summer of 2004, an initial set of tests was completed for the filling of a convection-style liquid hydrogen absorber designed by KEK. The absorber contained 6.2 liquid liters of hydrogen and was tested for a range of heating conditions to quantify the absorber's heat exchanger performance. Future work at Fermilab includes the design, construction, and installation of a forced-flow absorber to be used with other components built to investigate the properties of a muon ionization cooling channel. A Tevatron-style refrigerator/compressor building is to be operational by spring of 2006 in support of the absorber tests and also to provide 5-K helium and liquid nitrogen to a 5-T solenoid magnet, an active element of the future test apparatus. The refrigerator will be configured in such a manner as to meet the 5 K and 14-20-K helium needs of the MTA. This paper reviews the challenges and successes of the past KEK absorber tests as well as looks into the future cryogenic capabilities and intentions of the site.

Bross, A.; Cummings, M.A.; Darve, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Norris, B.; Pei, L.; /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Northern Illinois U.

2006-01-01

160

Implications of laboratory tests of condom integrity.  

PubMed

This study examines the significance of test results on latex, polyurethane, and natural membrane condoms as barriers to virus passage. Data on three distinct concerns were analyzed: 1) passage of virus or microspheres through small holes or pores inherent in the material of "intact" condoms which are undetectable by the standard water leak quality assurance test; 2) passage of virus or microspheres through larger holes in "leaker" condoms detectable by the leak test but marketed because of the finite acceptable quality level of the test; and 3) passage of virus through condoms that break during use. The results showed that relative importance of breaks and holes is related to the volume of semen that contains an "infectious dose" of a sexually transmitted disease. When 0.1-1.0 ml exposures to semen are necessary for disease transmission, the risk during latex condom use primarily results not from holes but from breakage of condoms. For smaller volumes of semen exposure (0.00001 ml or less), the presence of holes can be as important as breaks. The same qualitative argument pertains to a comparison of "leaker" condoms to the large majority of "intact" condoms. PMID:10225589

Carey, R F; Lytle, C D; Cyr, W H

1999-04-01

161

Name ___________________________________________ Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

acidity titration test) 7. R + Micro + B + Lime + Organic Matter + Sal $74 per sample (In addition + Micronutrients (Micro) $17 per sample (In addition to suite 1, DTPA Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) 3. R + Micro + Hot WaterH and SAR) 5. R + Micro + Sal $37 per sample (In addition to suite 2, includes detailed salinity) 6. R

162

Descriptive profile of tuberculin skin testing programs and laboratory-acquired tuberculosis infections in public health laboratories.  

PubMed Central

The increase in numbers of cases of tuberculosis in the United States has placed greater demands on mycobacteriology laboratory workers to produce rapid and accurate results. The greater number of specimens generated by the increased emphasis on detecting the disease has placed these workers at greater risk of laboratory-acquired infection. We surveyed 56 state and territorial public health laboratories to determine the status of existing tuberculin skin testing (TST) programs and to evaluate the frequency of probable laboratory-acquired tuberculosis for each responding mycobacteriology laboratory. Probable laboratory-acquired infections were determined by each laboratory's evaluation of occupational positions, duties, and employee histories and review of medical records. Two-step TST for new employees was routinely practiced in only 33% of responding laboratories, and mycobacteriology laboratorians were found to be most frequently screened when they were compared to employees of other departments. Of 49 (88%) responding laboratories, 13 reported that 21 employees were TST converters from 1990 to 1994. Seven of these 21 employees were documented to have laboratory-acquired infections based on evaluations by their respective laboratories. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, converters are categorized on the basis of both a change in the size of the zone of induration and the age of the person being tested. By the definitions in the guidelines, 14 mycobacteriologists were identified as recent converters, 7 of whom were > or = 35 years of age and 4 of whom were exposed in the laboratory within a 2-year period. Inadequate isolation procedures, the high volume of specimen handling, and faulty ventilation accounted for these laboratory-associated infections. These results suggest that more frequent periodic evaluations based on documented TST conversions for workers in mycobacterial laboratories should be performed, since this population is at increased risk of becoming infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although general assessments are necessary to accurately and effectively evaluate the risk of tuberculosis transmission, they are especially important for those working in high-risk areas within a public health laboratory. PMID:9196206

Kao, A S; Ashford, D A; McNeil, M M; Warren, N G; Good, R C

1997-01-01

163

Laboratory Evaluation of Base Materials for Neutralization of the Contaminated Aquifer at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies were performed to support field-testing of base injection into the F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater. The general purpose of these experiments is to provide information to guide the test of base injection and to identify potential adverse effects.

Serkiz, S.M.

2001-09-11

164

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01

165

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will...

2012-01-01

166

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will...

2011-01-01

167

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will...

2014-01-01

168

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11...run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will...

2013-01-01

169

Inter-laboratory validation of bioaccessibility testing for metals.  

PubMed

Bioelution assays are fast, simple alternatives to in vivo testing. In this study, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability in bioaccessibility data generated by bioelution tests were evaluated in synthetic fluids relevant to oral, inhalation, and dermal exposure. Using one defined protocol, five laboratories measured metal release from cobalt oxide, cobalt powder, copper concentrate, Inconel alloy, leaded brass alloy, and nickel sulfate hexahydrate. Standard deviations of repeatability (sr) and reproducibility (sR) were used to evaluate the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, respectively. Examination of the sR:sr ratios demonstrated that, while gastric and lysosomal fluids had reasonably good reproducibility, other fluids did not show as good concordance between laboratories. Relative standard deviation (RSD) analysis showed more favorable reproducibility outcomes for some data sets; overall results varied more between- than within-laboratories. RSD analysis of sr showed good within-laboratory variability for all conditions except some metals in interstitial fluid. In general, these findings indicate that absolute bioaccessibility results in some biological fluids may vary between different laboratories. However, for most applications, measures of relative bioaccessibility are needed, diminishing the requirement for high inter-laboratory reproducibility in absolute metal releases. The inter-laboratory exercise suggests that the degrees of freedom within the protocol need to be addressed. PMID:24979734

Henderson, Rayetta G; Verougstraete, Violaine; Anderson, Kim; Arbildua, José J; Brock, Thomas O; Brouwers, Tony; Cappellini, Danielle; Delbeke, Katrien; Herting, Gunilla; Hixon, Greg; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Rodriguez, Patricio H; Van Assche, Frank; Wilrich, Peter; Oller, Adriana R

2014-10-01

170

Laboratory Test of CCD #1 in BOAO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An introduction to the first CCD camera system in Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (CCD#1) is presented. The CCD camera adopts modular dewar design of IfA(Institute for Astronomy at Hawaii University) and SDSU(San Diego State University) general purpose CCD controller. The user interface is based on IfA design of easy-to-use GUI program running on the NeXT workstation. The characteristics of the CCD#1 including Gain, Charge Transfer Efficiency, rms Read-Out Noise, Linearity and Dynamic range is tested and discussed. The CCD#1 shows 6.4 electrons RON and gain of 3.49 electrons per ADU, and the optimization resulted in about 27 seconds readout time guaranteeing charge transfer efficiency of 0.99999 for both directions. Linearity test shows that non-linear coefficient is 6e-7 in the range of 0 to 30,000 ADU.

Park, Byeong-Gon; Chun, Moo Young; Kim, Seung-Lee

1995-12-01

171

Sandia Laboratories' Midtemperature Systems Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four types of collector array, low- and high-temperature storage systems, a toluene heat exchanger and a turbine\\/generator set are the major components of a solar thermal power system which provides 70% of the peak heating and cooling demand of a 12,200 sq ft office building. The collector arrays in service at the test facility are a parabolic trough design, a

R. M. Workhoven

1978-01-01

172

Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

Taylor, J.M.

1993-01-01

173

Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

Taylor, J.M.

1993-06-01

174

Harmonization of laboratory testing - Current achievements and future strategies.  

PubMed

Harmonization in laboratory testing is more far-reaching than merely analytical harmonization. It includes all aspects of the total testing process from the "pre-pre-analytical" phase through analysis to the "post-post-analytical" phase. Harmonizing the pre-analytical phase requires use of standardized operating procedures for correct test selection, sample collection and handling, while standardized test terminology, and units and traceability to ISO standard 17511 are required to ensure equivalency of measurement results. Use of harmonized reference intervals and decision limits for analytes where platforms share allowable bias requirements will reduce inaccurate clinical interpretation and unnecessary laboratory testing. In the post-analytical phase, harmonized procedures for the management of critical laboratory test results are required to improve service quality and ensure patient safety. Monitoring of the outcomes of harmonization activities is through surveillance by external quality assessment schemes that use commutable materials and auditing of the "pre-pre-analytical" and "post-post-analytical" phases. Successful implementation of harmonization in laboratory testing requires input by all stakeholders, including the clinical laboratory community, diagnostics industry, clinicians, professional societies, IT providers, consumer advocate groups and governmental bodies. PMID:24001695

Tate, Jillian R; Johnson, Roger; Barth, Julian; Panteghini, Mauro

2014-05-15

175

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30

176

Laboratory tests for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare hematological disorder that is often suspected in a patient presenting with non-immune hemolytic anemia associated with pancytopenia or venous thrombosis. This disorder is a consequence of acquired somatic mutations in the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIG-A) gene in the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of patients. The presence of these mutations leads to production of blood cells with decreased glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface proteins, making red blood cells derived from the clone more sensitive to complement mediated hemolysis. The diagnosis of PNH may be difficult in some cases due a low proportion of PNH cells in the blood and occasionally due to difficulties in selecting the most appropriate diagnostic studies. The latest generation of tests allow for detection of very small populations of PNH cells, for following the natural course and response to therapy of the disease, and for helping to decide when to initiate therapy with monoclonal antibody targeting the terminal complement protein C5 (Eculizumab), anticoagulation, and in some cases allogeneic HSC transplant. In this article, we review the different diagnostic tests available to clinicians for PNH diagnosis. PMID:24127129

Preis, Meir; Lowrey, Christopher H

2014-03-01

177

Small UAS Test Area at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the areas that Dryden Flight Research Center has set up for testing small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). It also reviews the requirements and process to use an area for UAS test.

Bauer, Jeffrey T.

2008-01-01

178

Comparative analysis of routine laboratory diagnostic tests for rabies.  

PubMed

Present study was undertaken to compare various routine laboratory diagnostic tests for rabies detection. Seller's staining, mouse inoculation test (MIT), Dot-ELISA, Agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and counter immunoelectrophoresis test (CIET) were the main basic tests performed in the laboratory for the rabies diagnosis. Out of 200 brain specimens, Negri bodies were observed in 52 brain samples by Seller's staining. Rabies virus was isolated in 56 samples by intra-cerebral inoculation in newborn Swiss-albino mice. Dot-ELISA and AGPT could detect rabies antigen in 55 and 57 samples respectively. Comparative analysis revealed that the CIET is the most sensitive and rapid test among performed diagnostic tests. PMID:23637517

Kadam, S S; Sherikar, A A; Pingale, V S

2011-12-01

179

Laboratory Testing of Volcanic Gas Sampling Techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of laboratory experiments were performed designed to calibrate several commonly used methods for field measurement of volcanic gas composition. H2, CO2, SO2 and CHCl2F gases were mixed through carefully calibrated rotameters to form mixtures representative of the types of volcanic compositions encountered at Kilauea and Showa-Shinzan. Gas mixtures were passed through a horizontal furnace at 700oC to break down CHCl2F and form an equilibrium high-temperature mixture. With the exception of Giggenbach bottle samples, all gas sampling was performed adjacent to the furnace exit in order to roughly simulate the air-contaminated samples encountered in Nature. Giggenbach bottle samples were taken from just beyond the hot-spot 10cm down the furnace tube to minimize atmospheric contamination. Alkali-trap measurements were performed by passing gases over or bubbling gases through 6N KOH, NaOH or LiOH solution for 10 minutes. Results were highly variable with errors in measured S/Cl varying from +1600% to -19%. In general reduced Kilauea compositions showed smaller errors than the more oxidized Showa-Shinzan compositions. Results were not resolvably different in experiments where gas was bubbled through the alkaline solution. In a second set of experiments, 25mm circles of Whatman 42 filter paper were impregnated with NaHCO3or KHCO3 alkaline solutions stabilized with glycerol. Some filters also included Alizarin (5.6-7.2) and neutral red (6.8-8.0) Ph indicator to provide a visual monitor of gas absorption. Filters were mounted in individual holders and used in stacks of 3. Durations were adjusted to maximize reaction in the first filter in the stack and minimize reaction in the final filter. Errors in filter pack measurements were smaller and more systematic than the alkali trap measurements. S/Cl was overestimated in oxidized gas mixtures and underestimated in reduced mixtures. Alkali-trap methods allow extended unattended monitoring of volcanic gasses, but our results suggest that they are poor recorders of gas composition. Filter pack methods are somewhat better, but are more difficult to interpret than previously recognized. We suggest several refinements to the filter-pack technique that can improve accuracy. Giggenbach bottles remain the best method for volcanic gas sampling, despite the inherent difficulty and danger of obtaining samples in active volcanic environments. Relative merits of different alkali solutions and indicators are discussed.

Kress, V. C.; Green, R.; Ortiz, M.; Delmelle, P.; Fischer, T.

2003-12-01

180

Sleep laboratory testing. The important facts.  

PubMed

To test a diagnostic tool's cost effectiveness, timeliness, and accuracy, one must focus on basic information. Merely examining the end results without regard for operating characteristics creates problems for the practitioner and patient alike. If the tool is capable of diagnosing only some of the patients studied, with the disturbing possibility that patients whose diagnoses are missed will not receive care, the practitioner should look elsewhere for a diagnostic tool that performs with greater accuracy despite the additional cost. As the demand for sleep diagnostic testing increases, accuracy and efficiency of diagnostic modalities becomes increasingly important. An alternative tool to standard attended polysomnography would be desirable but is probably unlikely. The results of missing a diagnosis or of mismanaging a patient with SDB can be serious indeed. The practitioner should thoroughly assess the patient and order the appropriate diagnostic study that will provide information that gives the patient the best opportunity for a desirable outcome. Sleepy patients are counting on practitioners everywhere to help them by using all the tools available. Countless mothers driving with children on the roads with these sleepy individuals are counting on the practitioner as well. Therefore, it behooves everyone who manages or wants to manage patients with SDB to offer uncompromising care to the patient with minimal regard to the health insurance industry's cost-cutting strategies. Dentists are and should be an integral part of the team caring for a patient with SDB. As part of the team, the dentist must know what tests to order and why to order them. As a referrer, whether to an otolaryngologist, allergist, pulmonologist, neurologist, or sleep center, the dentist is critical in the early detection of a prevalent nocturnal breathing problem. Many patients will present with early warning signs before related comorbidities develop that are potentially fatal to the patient and to health care economics. As part of the treatment and management team of the patient with SDB, dentists have the opportunity to intervene on their behalf before the disorder worsens. The proper diagnostic tools, when understood and used, will facilitate patient care, minimize risk, and decrease the long-term costs associated with mismanagement or improper diagnosis. PMID:11699243

Dukes, P

2001-10-01

181

Swine influenza test results from animal health laboratories in Canada.  

PubMed

Due to its infrastructure and partnerships the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network was able to rapidly collect test results from 9 Canadian laboratories that were conducting primary testing for influenza on swine-origin samples, in response to the threat posed by the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in 2009. PMID:24155436

Kloeze, Harold; Mukhi, Shamir N; Alexandersen, Soren

2013-05-01

182

Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume  

E-print Network

- 1 - Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume May 22, 2013 Data a chromium plume in the regional aquifer. The purpose of the pumping tests is to refine understanding to remove chromium. Chromium concentrations in the plume exceed state and federal standards for groundwater

183

An Education Program to Reduce Unnecessary Laboratory Tests by Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program at an inner-city community health center involving 20 family practice residents provided an educational intervention concerning the use of laboratory tests based on quality of care, not cost containment. During the program, the use of thyroid stimulating hormone test declined, while complete blood counts ordered did not. (MSE)

Dowling, Patrick T.; And Others

1989-01-01

184

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31

185

Photovoltaic Leaf Area Meter Development and Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photovoltaic (PV) panel was used to develop a simple and practical leaf area meter. Components of the developed PV leaf area meter include a PV panel as sensor, a wooden cabinet as enclosure, a flashlight as light source, and a commercial digital multimeter for voltage measurement. The principle of projected area measurement is the voltage generated by the PV panel

C. Igathinathane; B. Chennakesavulu; K. Manohar; A. R. Womac; L. O. Pordesimo

2008-01-01

186

Good Laboratory Practices of Materials Testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An approach to good laboratory practices of materials testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility is presented. The contents include: 1) Current approach; 2) Data analysis; and 3) Improvements sought by WSTF to enhance the diagnostic capability of existing methods.

Hirsch, David; Williams, James H.

2005-01-01

187

42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public...Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. For a new clinical diagnostic...

2014-10-01

188

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or laboratory analyses...phase of the facility permit, conditions...conducting the field tests or laboratory...

2010-07-01

189

10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...licensee testing facility, or HHS-certified laboratory; (2...with negative test results and...licensee testing facility instruments...summarize any test results that...licensee testing facilities and HHS-certified laboratories; and...

2010-01-01

190

Molecular testing: improving patient care through partnering with laboratory genetic counselors.  

PubMed

The utility of molecular diagnostics in clinical practice has been steadily increasing and is expected to continue to do so as the applications of genomic medicine increase. The goal of this article was to describe the roles and responsibilities of genetic counselors who work in the customer service area of molecular diagnostics laboratories. In this role, genetic counselors provide recommendations to clinicians on issues that are specific to DNA-based testing. This article will address some issues that are specifically relevant to disease genetic tests. Many molecular diagnostic laboratories employ genetic counselors, who have extensive training in how to communicate genetic information, to provide information in the preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic stages of testing. To maximize the quality of the service, it is important to establish an understanding of what can be expected of both the practitioner and the laboratory genetic counselor. Although some complications in the laboratory cannot be anticipated, discussing the case with the laboratory genetic counselors beforehand may avert certain problems. This article discusses real cases from laboratory genetic counselors to illustrate issues that arise due to technical difficulties and the inherent limitations of molecular testing. The summary describes practical ways in which clinicians and laboratory personnel can work together to either avoid or, when unavoidable, better manage problems and delays. The responsibilities of genetic counselors working in molecular diagnostics are discussed. PMID:18496032

Scacheri, Cheryl; Redman, Joy B; Pike-Buchanan, Lisa; Steenblock, Kelle

2008-05-01

191

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01

192

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01

193

Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.  

PubMed

Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (p<.001). The implementation of the alert was shown to significantly reduce associated costs of duplicated AHP tests (p?.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency. PMID:22963261

Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

2014-01-01

194

Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods  

SciTech Connect

Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

1996-05-01

195

Laboratory testing of candidate robotic applications for space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robots have potential for increasing the value of man's presence in space. Some categories with potential benefit are: (1) performing extravehicular tasks like satellite and station servicing, (2) supporting the science mission of the station by manipulating experiment tasks, and (3) performing intravehicular activities which would be boring, tedious, exacting, or otherwise unpleasant for astronauts. An important issue in space robotics is selection of an appropriate level of autonomy. In broad terms three levels of autonomy can be defined: (1) teleoperated - an operator explicitly controls robot movement; (2) telerobotic - an operator controls the robot directly, but by high-level commands, without, for example, detailed control of trajectories; and (3) autonomous - an operator supplies a single high-level command, the robot does all necessary task sequencing and planning to satisfy the command. Researchers chose three projects for their exploration of technology and implementation issues in space robots, one each of the three application areas, each with a different level of autonomy. The projects were: (1) satellite servicing - teleoperated; (2) laboratory assistant - telerobotic; and (3) on-orbit inventory manager - autonomous. These projects are described and some results of testing are summarized.

Purves, R. B.

1987-01-01

196

Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?  

PubMed

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=?-0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=?-0.82) and bench press (rs?=?-0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.83) and bench press (rs?=?-0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=?-0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=?-0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

197

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

198

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26

199

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory based testing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching to sample memory test. Despite differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

2013-01-01

200

Physical Examination and Laboratory Testing for Men with ED.  

PubMed

Introduction.? Physical examination and laboratory evaluation of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) are opportunities to identify potentially life-threatening etiologies and comorbid conditions. Aims.? To review genital anatomy, identify any physical abnormalities, assess for comorbid conditions, and reveal significant risk factors for ED. Methods.? Expert opinion was based on evidence-based medical literature and consensus discussions between members of the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) standards committee. Results.? For men with ED, a general examination including blood pressure and pulse measurements and a focused genital exam are advised. Laboratory assessment for diabetes, serum total testosterone, prolactin levels, and a lipid profile may reveal significant comorbid conditions. Conclusions.? Though physical examination and laboratory evaluation of most men with ED may not reveal the exact diagnosis, this opportunity to identify critical comorbid conditions should not be missed. Ghanem HM, Salonia A, and Martin-Morales A. Physical examination and laboratory testing for men with ED. J Sex Med **;**:**-**. PMID:22429256

Ghanem, Hussein M; Salonia, Andrea; Martin-Morales, Antonio

2012-03-16

201

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01

202

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A SATURN I STATIC TEST. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN 1960 JUST PRIOR TO THE CHANGE OVER OF LAND, FACILITIES AND MISSION FROM ARMY/MICOM (MISSILE COMMAND) TO NASA/MSFC (MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER). MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

203

State of malaria diagnostic testing at clinical laboratories in the United States, 2010: a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

Background The diagnosis of malaria can be difficult in non-endemic areas, such as the United States, and delays in diagnosis and errors in treatment occur too often. Methods A nationwide survey of laboratories in the United States and its nine dependent territories was conducted in 2010 to determine factors that may contribute to shortcomings in the diagnosis of malaria. This survey explored the availability of malaria diagnostic tests, techniques used, and reporting practices. Results The survey was completed by 201 participants. Ninety percent reported that their laboratories had at least one type of malaria diagnostic test available on-site. Nearly all of the respondents' laboratories performed thick and thin smears on-site; approximately 50% had access to molecular testing; and only 17% had access to rapid diagnostic tests on-site. Seventy-three percent reported fewer than five confirmed cases of malaria in their laboratory during the 12-month period preceding the survey. Twenty-eight percent stated that results of species identification took more than 24 hours to report. Only five of 149 respondents that performed testing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week complied with all of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines for analysis and reporting of results. Conclusion Although malaria diagnostic testing services were available to a majority of U.S. laboratories surveyed, very few were in complete compliance with all of the CLSI guidelines for analysis and reporting of results, and most respondents reported very few cases of malaria annually. Laboratories' difficulty in adhering to the rigorous CLSI guidelines and their personnel's lack of practice and proficiency may account for delays and errors in diagnosis. It is recommended that laboratories that infrequently process samples for malaria seek opportunities for practice and proficiency training annually and take advantage of available resources to assist in species identification. PMID:22074250

2011-01-01

204

Laboratory methods for testing the performance of acoustic rail dampers  

E-print Network

Laboratory methods for testing the performance of acoustic rail dampers M. Towarda and D. J@soton.ac.uk Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3739 #12;Rail dampers with distance of vibration transmitted along the rail (decay rate). These dampers, attached to the rail between

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

A laboratory test bed for space robotics: the VES II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic interaction between a space robotic manipulator and its base in micro-gravity can make it difficult to control and lead to system performance degradation. Control and planning algorithms proposed in the past to compensate for this dynamic interaction have lacked sufficient experimental evaluation. A laboratory test bed is described which was developed and built to emulate the dynamic behavior

Steven Dubowsky; William Durfee; Thomas Corrigan; Andrew Kuklinski; Uwe Muller

1994-01-01

206

Thermal cycling procedures for laboratory testing of dental restorations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Exposure of restorations in extracted teeth to cyclic thermal fluctuations to simulate one of the many factors in the oral environment has been common in many tracer penetration, marginal gap and bond strength laboratory tests. Temperature changes used have rarely been substantiated with temperature measurements made in vivo and vary considerably between reports. Justification and standardization of regimen are

M. S Gale; B. W Darvell

1999-01-01

207

Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

2010-01-01

208

OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND LABORATORY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Discussions are presented for (1) the mechanism of action of chemical dispersants for oil spills, (2) factors affecting performance of dispersants and its measurement, (3) some common laboratory methods that have been used to test dispersant performance, (4) a brief summary of di...

209

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...with HHS-certified laboratories must include the following...requirements: (1) Laboratory facilities shall comply with the...requirements; (2) The laboratory shall make available...laboratory shall maintain test records in...

2010-01-01

210

DESCRIPTION OF RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

An onsite team of multidisciplined engineers and scientists conduct research and provide technical services in the areas of testing, design, and field implementation for both solid and hazardous waste management. Engineering services focus on the design and implementation of...

211

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

Not Available

1991-05-01

212

7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services. 91...rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services. ...rate in this section for the individual laboratory analyses cover the costs...

2010-01-01

213

Medical Databases for Assessing the Efficacy of Laboratory Tests  

PubMed Central

A system is described for monitoring the efficacy of clinical laboratory tests. A combination of electronic data retreival and manual retrospective review of medical records were used to collect information on patient diagnoses and therapeutic responses. These medical databases provide an effective method for monitoring the performance of current tests and evaluating the impact of new procedures. They also provide a quality assurance monitor for assessing the clinical utilization of the tests and provide a reference base for developing methods for interpretative reporting of test results. This program is mainly of value for tests used to diagnose or monitor patients with well-defined anatomic or physiologic lesions. Medical record reviews are of limited value when the patient diagnoses and outcomes are based predominantly on the tests being studied without independent criteria for confirming the clinical conclusions.

Klee, George; Beard, C. Mary

1987-01-01

214

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01

215

Implementing a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in an Army Corps of Engineers' Water Quality Testing Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's environmental laboratory faces numerous challenge such as enhanced regulatory oversight, decreasing costs per tests, and numerous laboratory accreditations that are offered and\\/or required. Selecting the LIMS that will “fit” your laboratory is important, but so is finding a system that has the flexibility to conform to the changes that will be required by the laboratory over the years. These

Elizabeth Turner; Christine Paszko; Don Kolva

2001-01-01

216

NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory Awarded Accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) provides a comprehensive array of acoustical testing services, including sound pressure level, sound intensity level, and sound-power-level testing per International Standards Organization (ISO)1 3744. Since its establishment in September 2000, the ATL has provided acoustic emission testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station acoustic emission requirements. The ATL consists of a 23- by 27- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic test chamber and a separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. The ATL employs a personal-computer-based data acquisition system that provides up to 26 channels of simultaneous data acquisition with real-time analysis (ref. 4). Specialized diagnostic tools, including a scanning sound-intensity system, allow the ATL's technical staff to support its clients' aggressive low-noise design efforts to meet the space station's acoustic emission requirement. From its inception, the ATL has pursued the goal of developing a comprehensive ISO 17025-compliant quality program that would incorporate Glenn's existing ISO 9000 quality system policies as well as ATL-specific technical policies and procedures. In March 2003, the ATL quality program was awarded accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for sound-power-level testing in accordance with ISO 3744. The NVLAP program is administered by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides third-party accreditation for testing and calibration laboratories. There are currently 24 NVLAP-accredited acoustical testing laboratories in the United States. NVLAP accreditation covering one or more specific testing procedures conducted in accordance with established test standards is awarded upon successful completion of an intensive onsite assessment that includes proficiency testing and documentation review. The ATL NVLAP accreditation currently applies specifically to its ISO 3744 soundpower- level determination procedure (see the photograph) and supporting ISO 17025 quality system, although all ATL operations are conducted in accordance with its quality system. The ATL staff is currently developing additional procedures to adapt this quality system to the testing of space flight hardware in accordance with International Space Station acoustic emission requirements.<

Akers, James C.; Cooper, Beth A.

2004-01-01

217

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams*  

PubMed Central

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae. A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages. In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:5296399

Jamnback, H.; Frempong-Boadu, J.

1966-01-01

218

12. "SITE PLAN." Test Area 1100. Specifications No. OC35973; Drawing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. "SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-100. Specifications No. OC359-73; Drawing No. 5841-C-1; D.O. SERIES AW1525/7 Rev. A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

219

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area FY 1999 progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results from fiscal year (FY) 1999 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) work-for-others project. This report is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL to document the migration of radionuclides and controls of radionuclide

D K Smith; G F Eaton; T P Rose; J E Moran; A Brachmann; J E McAninch; A B Kersting; V V Romanovski; R E Martinelli; J K Jr Werner

2000-01-01

220

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1983  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

221

Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

2007-02-01

222

Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested -- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1--2 Wh/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20--30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles (PSFUDS) which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4--5{degrees}C for tests that lasted 5--7 hours. 7 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Burke, A.F.

1991-10-01

223

2/24/2006 Geo-sim: Test Simulator 1 GEO-SIM: A VIRTUAL LABORATORY TEST  

E-print Network

2/24/2006 Geo-sim: Test Simulator 1 GEO-SIM: A VIRTUAL LABORATORY TEST SIMULATOR FOR GEOTECHNICAL. #12;2/24/2006 Geo-sim: Test Simulator 2 Concept of Virtual Laboratory Testing The objective of this research is to develop a multimedia software (Geo-Sim) for performing virtual laboratory experiments

Prashant, Amit

224

Hydraulic and Hydromechanical Laboratory Testing of Large Crystalline Rock Cores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, fracture stiffness in rock samples is determined by means of hydromechanical laboratory testing. The aim is three-fold: to develop a procedure for sampling, to update testing equipment and to relate fracture stiffness to the geological history (e.g., stress history and fracture infillings). The hydraulic properties of twenty rock cores (diameter 190 mm, c. 100 mm high) from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory were tested in a permeameter cell under different isotropic pressures up to 2.5 MPa. The flow rate through individual fracture samples was recorded. Four of the samples were re-tested in the permeameter cell using an updated hydromechanical procedure with deformation measurement across the fracture. Four load cycles of gradually increasing cell pressure were applied, resulting in a clearly observed hysteresis effect in the first and second cycles. Hydraulic aperture changes calculated using the cubic law were compared with their mechanical equivalents. The aperture changes followed similar trends, although these differed between the samples. Fracture stiffness was determined from the tests, and the stiffness to hydraulic aperture relationship was found to follow previously published patterns linked to the storativity of fractures. Differences in stiffness are explained in the context of the geological history of individual samples, particularly their stress history. The paper presents a conceptualisation of the stiffness behaviour, which includes flow properties, geometric properties and the geological stress history of the tested samples.

Thörn, Johan; Ericsson, Lars O.; Fransson, Åsa

2015-01-01

225

Does POCT reduce the risk of error in laboratory testing?  

PubMed

Point-of-care testing (POCT), the fastest growing segment of the current clinical laboratory testing market, is a rapid means for providing test results in different clinical settings. In theory, this tool eliminates some of the more problematic steps in the testing process, including specimen transport and result distribution. However, POCT has created new challenges, and sources of potential errors; moreover, while the upsurge in its use has generated concerns regarding the quality of test results, few data are available in the literature on errors with POCT. Nor are data available for the evaluation of errors, and the risk of errors in POCT based on all steps in the entire testing process, including test requesting and result utilization. According to a modified Kost model, which takes into account all steps of the testing process and latent conditions for error, POCT reduces errors and the risk of error in only a few steps of the testing process. There is therefore an urgent need for an evaluation of errors and risks of error in POCT that is based on the entire testing process and uses well-designed studies aiming to improve clinical outcomes and increase patient safety. PMID:19298804

Plebani, Mario

2009-06-01

226

In-flight and laboratory vacuum-friction test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coefficient of friction measurements were made for six unlubricated metal couples exposed to the space environment aboard the OV-1-13 spacecraft and exposed to laboratory vacuum. Materials studied included mutually soluble, partially soluble, and insoluble metal combinations. Two samples of each material couple were tested in space and in the laboratory using the disk and rider technique. Linear velocity was 0.10 cm/s (2.5 in/min) and rider normal load was 4.45 N (1 lb) for the gold versus silver couples and 8.90 N (2lb) for the other combinations. Results showed that friction data obtained in a clean ion-pumped laboratory vacuum of 10 to the minus 10 power materials with low mutual solubility can be correlated to operation in the vicinity of a typical scientific spacecraft that is exposed to an ambient pressure as low as 10 to the minus 12 power torr. The expected increase in coefficient of friction with solubility was shown. Material couples with high mutual solubility present the hazard of unpredictable drastic friction increase in orbit which may not be evident in laboratory testing at levels down to 10 to the minus 10 power torr. It was also shown that gross cold welding of unlubricated metals exposed to a satellite environment does not occur.

Devine, E. J.; Evans, H. E.; Leasure, W. A.

1973-01-01

227

Subject Area Test Results: Life Science and Algebra I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1982 the Dade County Public Schools (Florida) began developing test item banks for secondary subject areas, because other testing programs have limited utility for assessing the quality of curriculum, instruction, or learning in specific content areas. In May l984, the approximately 17,000 seventh graders enrolled in Life Science and the…

Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL. Office of Educational Accountability.

228

TEST PLAN FOR MONITORING COOLING COILS IN A LABORATORY SETTING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to understand and quantify the moisture removal performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. The project will include a comprehensive literature review, detailed measurement of cooling coil performance in a laboratory facility, monitoring cooling systems at several field test sites, and development/validation of engineering models that can be used in energy calculations and building simulations. This document contains the detailed test plan for monitoring cooling coil performance in a laboratory setting. Detailed measurements will be taken on up to 10 direct expansion (DX) and chilled water cooling coils in various configurations to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation.

Don B. Shirey, III

2002-04-01

229

Inflammatory bowel diseases: from pathogenesis to laboratory testing.  

PubMed

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), which comprise the two major clinical subtypes, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, incur high morbidity and potential mortality. The present study reviews data on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of IBDs. The pathogenesis depends on complex interactions between susceptibility genes, environmental factors, and innate and adaptive immunity, the understanding of which is crucial to discovering novel laboratory biomarkers. Traditional laboratory tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of disease activity of IBDs are reported on, and the biochemical properties, pre-analytical and analytical aspects and clinical utility of the fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin are described. DNA testing and established (ASCA and pANCA) and emerging (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, OmpC) serum markers are described; a further aspect to be addressed is the clinical use of pharmacogenetics for the treatment of IBDs. PMID:24108210

Basso, Daniela; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Plebani, Mario

2014-04-01

230

Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This report contains Appendix B which provides all of the laboratory summary data sheets for the Area 6 SCEPs closure activities.

NONE

1997-11-01

231

Lebost wind turbine: laboratory tests and data analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preliminary aerodynamic torque and power measurements and data analysis are presented for the Lebost Wind Turbine--a recently patented vertical-axis wind energy machine incorporating flow-focusing inlets fixed to a housing shroud surrounding blades rotating normal to the flow. Two laboratory-scale models were constructed, instrumented, and tested in a specially modified section of the NYU 30-m wind tunnel at freestream velocities (U\\/sub

M. I. Hoffert; B. A. Rugg

1978-01-01

232

GHASTLI-Gas Hydrate and Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methane hydrates exist beneath many continental margins and represent a huge potential alternate energy source. A custom-built laboratory test system is currently being used to study the formation and decomposition of gas hydrates at sea-floor pressures and temperatures and the physical, acoustic, electrical, and chemical properties of hydrate-sediment mixtures. A scanning electron microscope with a liquid-nitrogen cryogenic stage will be

W. J. Winters; J. S. Booth; W. P. Dillon; R. F. Commeau

1994-01-01

233

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2012-07-01

234

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2010-07-01

235

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2013-07-01

236

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2011-07-01

237

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2014-07-01

238

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

239

2006 Minigrant Program for UF's Natural Area Teaching Laboratory  

E-print Network

of the next two minigrants. · Make detailed soil maps of NATL's successional plots. [What areas of the successional plots have natural soils and which have clays from building sites and to what depth?] · Design

Slatton, Clint

240

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

241

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

Batchelor, K.

1990-01-01

242

Proficiency testing for thermal insulation materials in the national voluntary laboratory accreditation program. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) is administered by the Department of Commerce to accredit testing laboratories upon request. Accreditation is currently available for laboratories that test carpet, thermal insulation materials, and freshly mixed field concrete. Decisions to accredit laboratories are based on evaluation conducted by the National Bureau of Standards which include questionnaires, on-site examination and proficiency testing.

D. Kirkpatrick; J. Horlick

1983-01-01

243

The LINC-NIRVANA fringe and flexure tracker: laboratory tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LINC-NIRVANA is the NIR homothetic imaging camera for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). In close cooperation with the Adaptive Optics systems of LINC-NIRVANA the Fringe and Flexure Tracking System (FFTS) is a fundamental component to ensure a complete and time-stable wavefront correction at the position of the science detector in order to allow for long integration times at interferometric angular resolutions. In this contribution, we present the design and the realization of the ongoing FFTS laboratory tests, taking into account the system requirements. We have to sample the large Field of View and to follow the reference source during science observations to an accuracy of less than 2 microns. In particular, important tests such as cooling tests of cryogenic components and tip - tilt test (the repeatability and the precision under the different inclinations) are presented. The system parameters such as internal flexure and precision are discussed.

Tremou, Evangelia; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Lindhorst, Bettina; Moser, Lydia; Rost, Steffen; Smajic, Semir; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Bertram, Thomas

2010-07-01

244

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-05-01

245

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...determines that the laboratory: (1) Employs...qualified to conduct the test based on education...Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) or who have...2) Has adequate facilities and equipment to conduct the test; (3)...

2010-01-01

246

Performance of new space suit designs is typically tested quantitatively in laboratory tests, at both the  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Performance of new space suit designs is typically tested quantitatively in laboratory in earlier generation suits. This paper details the equipment design and test methodology for extended space suit in realistic simulations of its operating environment. INTRODUCTION Space suit design is a field

Akin, David

247

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25

248

LABORATORY SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS, SEDIMENT CHEMISTRY AND DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SEDIMENTS FROM THE KEWEENAW WATERWAY, MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Acute laboratory sediment toxicity tests using the water flea Daphnia magna and the burrowing mayfly nymph Hexagenia limbata were conducted on sediments from two areas of the Keweenaw Waterway, Michigan, to determine whether the tests reflected the condition of benthic macroinver...

249

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2013-03-01

250

Characterization, Testing of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. This laboratory course is a supplement to the ESC 216 Course which "examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and for controlling material fabrication and final device performance." Here, users will find a Lab Overview which provides a brief outline of the Labs, Topics and Methods, and Activities provided. Lab titles include: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Introduction to FESEM, and Magnetic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. To access this and other resources on Nano4me.org a free, quick, and simple registration process is required.

251

76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Register Volume 76, Number 128 (Tuesday, July...Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory...permitted to bill for complex laboratory tests under...Amendment certificate number of the laboratory performing...Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic...

2011-07-05

252

5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 10 (environmental), and that on the right houses Test Cell 9 (fuel) and the fuel storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

253

4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northeast. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northeast. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault, and that on the right houses Test Cell 10 (environmental). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

254

Digital Audio Radio Broadcast Systems Laboratory Testing Nearly Complete  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the completion of phase one of the digital audio radio (DAR) testing conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. This satellite, satellite/terrestrial, and terrestrial digital technology will open up new audio broadcasting opportunities both domestically and worldwide. It will significantly improve the current quality of amplitude-modulated/frequency-modulated (AM/FM) radio with a new digitally modulated radio signal and will introduce true compact-disc-quality (CD-quality) sound for the first time. Lewis is hosting the laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes. Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes each, making a total of nine systems being tested. The nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on-channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent-channel (IBAC), and new bands. The laboratory testing was conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. Subjective assessments of the audio recordings for each of the nine systems was conducted by the Communications Research Center in Ottawa, Canada, under contract to the Electronic Industries Association. The Communications Research Center has the only CCIR-qualified (Consultative Committee for International Radio) audio testing facility in North America. The main goals of the U.S. testing process are to (1) provide technical data to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) so that it can establish a standard for digital audio receivers and transmitters and (2) provide the receiver and transmitter industries with the proper standards upon which to build their equipment. In addition, the data will be forwarded to the International Telecommunications Union to help in the establishment of international standards for digital audio receivers and transmitters, thus allowing U.S. manufacturers to compete in the world market.

2005-01-01

255

Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document. 14 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Grossman, J.W.; Houser, R.M.; Erdman, W.W.

1991-01-01

256

Test Procedure for 170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010  

E-print Network

Test Procedure for §170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (h) Incorporate Laboratory Test Results This document describes the test procedure for evaluating conformance of complete EHRs or EHR modules1

257

Digesting all the options: laboratory testing for celiac disease.  

PubMed

Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated disorder that is triggered by ingestion of gluten and related proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. Under conditions of increased intestinal permeability, gluten-derived peptides can travel across the intestinal epithelium and undergo deamidation catalyzed by the tissue transglutaminase (TTG) enzyme. This renders them immunogenic in individuals expressing specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ heterodimers. The resulting immune response is characterized by the production of antibodies against both deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) and TTG, generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activation of cytotoxic T cells. This response damages the intestinal epithelium resulting in the wide range of gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms observed in those with celiac disease. Celiac disease diagnosis has traditionally been based on biopsy and histological examination of the small intestine. While this approach is still considered the gold standard, it is invasive and susceptible to both false-positive and false-negative results. Several laboratory tests have become available to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease, and are the focus of this review. These include serological tests for celiac disease-specific antibodies such as anti-endomysial antibodies, anti-TTG antibodies and anti-DGP antibodies of both the immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) class, genetic tests to elucidate HLA DQ status and ancillary tests such as total IgA. While some have suggested that laboratory tests may replace intestinal biopsy in specific circumstances, others maintain that this procedure remains a critical component of celiac disease diagnosis. We review the analytical methodology, strengths, weaknesses, diagnostic performance and clinical utility of the various laboratory tests for celiac disease. Potential future markers and tests that are now considered obsolete are also discussed. Current clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease from the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the American College of Gastroenterology and the World Gastroenterology Organisation are summarized, and important differences between these guidelines are highlighted. PMID:25244521

Barakauskas, Vilte E; Lam, Grace Y; Estey, Mathew P

2014-12-01

258

Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

2006-11-01

259

Results of Aquifer Tests Performed Near R-Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The aquifer testing described in this report was conducted in response to USEPA comments (WSRC, 1998) on the Rev. 0 R-Reactor Seepage Basins RFI/RI Report (WSRC, 1998a), Appendix G, Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling for the R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB)/108-4R Overflow Basin Operable Unit. The R-area regional flow model described in Appendix G of the RFI/RI is based on small-scale and/or indirect measures of hydraulic conductivity, including laboratory tests, slug tests, cone penetration testing (CPT) and lithologic core descriptions. The USEPA proposed and SRS- agreed that large-scale conductivity estimates from multiple well pumping tests would be beneficial for validating the model conductivity field. Overall, the aquifer test results validate the 1998 R-area regional groundwater flow model.

Hiergesell, R.A.

2001-01-31

260

Current Concepts in Laboratory Testing to Guide Antimicrobial Therapy  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is indicated for pathogens contributing to an infectious process that warrants antimicrobial therapy if susceptibility to antimicrobials cannot be predicted reliably based on knowledge of their identity. Such tests are most frequently used when the etiologic agents are members of species capable of demonstrating resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Some organisms have predictable susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ie, Streptococcus pyogenes to penicillin), and empirical therapy for these organisms is typically used. Therefore, AST for such pathogens is seldom required or performed. In addition, AST is valuable in evaluating the activity of new and experimental compounds and investigating the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Several laboratory methods are available to characterize the in vitro susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. When the nature of the infection is unclear and the culture yields mixed growth or usual microbiota (wherein the isolates usually bear little relationship to the actual infectious process), AST is usually unnecessary and results may, in fact, be dangerously misleading. Phenotypic methods for detection of specific antimicrobial resistance mechanisms are increasingly being used to complement AST (ie, inducible clindamycin resistance among several gram-positive bacteria) and to provide clinicians with preliminary direction for antibiotic selection pending results generated from standardized AST (ie, ?-lactamase tests). In addition, molecular methods are being developed and incorporated by microbiology laboratories into resistance detection algorithms for rapid, sensitive assessment of carriage states of epidemiologically and clinically important pathogens, often directly from clinical specimens (ie, presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal specimens). PMID:22386185

Jenkins, Stephen G.; Schuetz, Audrey N.

2012-01-01

261

Current concepts in laboratory testing to guide antimicrobial therapy.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is indicated for pathogens contributing to an infectious process that warrants antimicrobial therapy if susceptibility to antimicrobials cannot be predicted reliably based on knowledge of their identity. Such tests are most frequently used when the etiologic agents are members of species capable of demonstrating resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Some organisms have predictable susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ie, Streptococcus pyogenes to penicillin), and empirical therapy for these organisms is typically used. Therefore, AST for such pathogens is seldom required or performed. In addition, AST is valuable in evaluating the activity of new and experimental compounds and investigating the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Several laboratory methods are available to characterize the in vitro susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. When the nature of the infection is unclear and the culture yields mixed growth or usual microbiota (wherein the isolates usually bear little relationship to the actual infectious process), AST is usually unnecessary and results may, in fact, be dangerously misleading. Phenotypic methods for detection of specific antimicrobial resistance mechanisms are increasingly being used to complement AST (ie, inducible clindamycin resistance among several gram-positive bacteria) and to provide clinicians with preliminary direction for antibiotic selection pending results generated from standardized AST (ie, ?-lactamase tests). In addition, molecular methods are being developed and incorporated by microbiology laboratories into resistance detection algorithms for rapid, sensitive assessment of carriage states of epidemiologically and clinically important pathogens, often directly from clinical specimens (ie, presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal specimens). PMID:22386185

Jenkins, Stephen G; Schuetz, Audrey N

2012-03-01

262

DETAIL VIEW OF ELECTRONICS TEST AREA, FLIGHT KITS FACILITY, ROOM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL VIEW OF ELECTRONICS TEST AREA, FLIGHT KITS FACILITY, ROOM NO. 1N12, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

263

20. Interior view of rehabilitation area in rehabilitation and testing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Interior view of rehabilitation area in rehabilitation and testing facilities; near center of occupied portion; view to northeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

264

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

265

Laboratory test data on the stability of the STIS MAMAs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STIS has two MAMA detectors systems with distinctly different tube configurations. The first (designated BAND 1) has an opaque CsI photocathode deposited on the microchannel plate (MCP) providing wavelength coverage from 1150A to 1700A. The other MAMA (designated BAND 2) has a semitransparent CS2Te photocathode deposited on the faceplate in close proximity to the input of the MCP. It covers the 1650A to 3100A bandpass and serves as a backup for the short wavelength detector. Laboratory test data indicate that both of these detectors have good sensitivity, have good uniformity and provide stable response, making each capable of collecting data with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 100 per Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical resolution element. Over a multiyear development effort, a substantial body of laboratory test data (more than 6 GBytes spanning more than 6 years of collection) has accumulated on more than a dozen fabricated tubes. These tests even included a few destructive evaluations to examine the limitations and operating life. In addition, analyses where conducted regarding impact caused by the specified electronic tolerances and expected changes in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) thermal environment. Perhaps the simplest test of stability is to collect a sequence of images, each with a uniform illumination, and use these individual "flat fields" to remove the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity in the other flat fields. These sequences typically spanned 3-5 weeks of time. The detectors are very stable, allowing the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity to be removed with good precision. The STIS specification for stability is 1% (sufficient for data with a S/N = 100) over a 1 week period and 2% over 30 days. All Engineering Model Units as well as Flight Detectors tested exceeded this specification.

Joseph, Charles L.

1997-01-01

266

Feasibility study of an orbiting laboratory for testing CSI technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A concept for an orbiting laboratory for testing Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology is described. The CSI-Star concept reflects a lower cost, higher risk approach. The concept supports demonstration and validation testing for critical CSI technologies at a cost of $20M to $26M with a 1-year reliability of approximately 0.9. The Ball Aerospace QuickStar bus is the carrier for the CSI test article. QuickStar is launched as a secondary payload on the McDonnell Douglas Delta 2. The QuickStar/Delta 2 approach is flight proven. The CSI test article is a 20 foot, 1 Hz, truss beam which is deployed from the QuickStar bus. The test article is well instrumented for quality system identification. The laboratory provides three layers of active control consisting of global vibration suppression along the truss beam, vibration isolation between the beam and instrument platforms, and vibration compensation through the use of gimbaled platforms which point lasers relative to optical sensor targets. The configuration simulates the dynamics of multi-instrument science platforms such as those of the Earth Observation System (EOS) while maintaining strong ties to astrophysics missions such as the Optical Interferometer. Uplink/downlink services and a reprogrammable computer provide flexibility for long-term investigations by members of the CSI community (NASA, DoD, academia, and industry). CSI-Star fills the gap between short-term experiments, which have been conducted primarily on the Shuttle, and future science missions which require the technology. The on-orbit maturity of CSI technology must be established to obtain acceptance by project managers and to promote injection of the technology into future science missions.

Bicos, Andrew S.; Loboda, Gregory G.

1993-08-01

267

Feasibility study of an orbiting laboratory for testing CSI technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept for an orbiting laboratory for testing Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology is described. The CSI-Star concept reflects a lower cost, higher risk approach. The concept supports demonstration and validation testing for critical CSI technologies at a cost of $20M to $26M with a 1-year reliability of approximately 0.9. The Ball Aerospace QuickStar bus is the carrier for the CSI test article. QuickStar is launched as a secondary payload on the McDonnell Douglas Delta 2. The QuickStar/Delta 2 approach is flight proven. The CSI test article is a 20 foot, 1 Hz, truss beam which is deployed from the QuickStar bus. The test article is well instrumented for quality system identification. The laboratory provides three layers of active control consisting of global vibration suppression along the truss beam, vibration isolation between the beam and instrument platforms, and vibration compensation through the use of gimbaled platforms which point lasers relative to optical sensor targets. The configuration simulates the dynamics of multi-instrument science platforms such as those of the Earth Observation System (EOS) while maintaining strong ties to astrophysics missions such as the Optical Interferometer. Uplink/downlink services and a reprogrammable computer provide flexibility for long-term investigations by members of the CSI community (NASA, DoD, academia, and industry). CSI-Star fills the gap between short-term experiments, which have been conducted primarily on the Shuttle, and future science missions which require the technology. The on-orbit maturity of CSI technology must be established to obtain acceptance by project managers and to promote injection of the technology into future science missions.

Bicos, Andrew S.; Loboda, Gregory G.

1993-01-01

268

Hypervelocity fragment formation technology for ground-based laboratory tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cumulative jet formation was regarded aimed at the formation of hypervelocity fragments up to 14 km/s for the investigation of space debris effects on shielding screens. The basic physical problems of jet formation process are analyzed. It is shown that in process of realization of hyper-cumulation conditions for jet formation without complete stagnation point involving formation of the inner zone of constant pressure (dead zone), the flow mass is always greater than slug mass. That opens wide the possibilities for increasing fragment mass in laboratory tests.

Minin, V. F.; Minin, I. V.; Minin, O. V.

2014-11-01

269

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01

270

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01

271

Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk moduli of the samples measured using this technique were consistent with those measured using more conventional methods. The second technique involved performing triaxial tests under lateral strain control. By limiting the lateral strain to zero by controlling the applied confining pressure while loading the specimen axially in compression, one can maintain a right-circular cylindrical geometry even under large deformations. This technique is preferred over standard triaxial testing methods which result in inhomogeneous deformation or "barreling". Manifestations of the inhomogeneous deformation included non-uniform stress states, as well as unrealistic Poisson's ratios (> 0.5) or those that vary significantly along the length of the specimen. Zero lateral strain controlled tests yield a more uniform stress state, and admissible and uniform values of Poisson's ratio. Hansen, F.D., Knowles, M.K., et al. 1997. Description and Evaluation of a Mechanistically Based Conceptual Model for Spall. SAND97-1369. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

2011-12-01

272

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

273

Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments  

SciTech Connect

This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

1991-01-01

274

Passive test cell data for the solar laboratory, Winter 1980-81  

SciTech Connect

Testing was done during the 1980-81 winter in 400 ft/sup 3/ test cells at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Solar Lab. This testing was done primarily to determine the relative efficiency of various passive solar heating concepts and to obtain data that could be used to validate computer simulation programs. The passive solar systems tested were Trombe wall with and without selective absorber, water wall, phase-change wall, direct gain, a heat-pipe collector, and two sunspace geometries. The heating load coefficient of these cells was roughly 26 Btu/h /sup 0/F and the collector area was 23.4 ft/sup 2/, giving a load collector ratio of approximately 27 Btu//sup 0/F day ft/sup 2/. The test cell configurations and instrumentation are detailed herein, and the resulting data and cell efficiencies are discussed.

McFarland, R.D.

1982-05-01

275

Portable nondestructive testing and dynamic test diagnostics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the most complete NDT facilities worldwide. In addition to many fixed pieces of equipment, the Laboratory has a very wide range of NDT and dynamic test diagnostic equipment that can be taken to the job site. Most of the equipment described here was procured for a specific purpose to support a program consistent with the nuclear weapons mission of Los Alamos. However, through the years, the equipment has found use in many other applications both within and external to weapons research, development, and testing. Various combinations of these equipments form unique capabilities, as demonstrated by the applications. The portable equipment is mainly applied to problems where the process or object under study cannot be brought into an NDT laboratory.

Fry, D.A.; Brooks, G.H.; Bryant, L.E.; Guerrero, A.; Valdez, J.E.

1994-11-01

276

2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

277

3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room, and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

278

A report on methods to reduce, refine and replace animal testing in industrial toxicology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Committee to Promote Principles of Reduction, Refinement and Replacement of Animal Testing in Industrial Toxicology Laboratories was established in 1987 to work toward industrywide improvements in laboratory animal testing methods. The committee's goals are to gather information about effective nonanimal testing techniques and other methods of conserving and improving the care of laboratory animals, to work toward the systematic

Myron A. Mehlman; Emil A. Pfitzer; Robert A. Scala

1989-01-01

279

Two Years of PKU Testing in California—The Role of the Laboratory  

PubMed Central

A cooperative phenylketonuria screening program involving private nongovernmental laboratories, individual physicians and local and state health departments has been in operation for two years. The system has evolved to the point where practically all newborns are tested. The accuracy of laboratory work has been verified by an ongoing evaluation program which has resulted in continual improvement in level of performance. There are two areas in which some beneficial changes might be considered. One is the reduction of costs of the testing and follow-up by increasing volume and centralization of work. The other is greater cooperation of the medical community in collecting the data necessary to evaluate the program and expedite the final diagnosis. PMID:5762462

Cunningham, George C.

1969-01-01

280

Percolation testing and hydraulic conductivity of soils for percolation areas.  

PubMed

The results of specific percolation tests are expressed in terms of field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) of the soil. The specific tests comprise the Irish SR 6 and the UK BS 6297 standard tests and the inversed auger hole and square hole tests employed for the design of land drainage. Percolation times from these tests are converted to Kfs values using unit gradient theory and the Elrick and Reynolds (Soil Sci. 142(5) (1986) 308) model which takes into account gravitational, pressure head and matric potential gradients. Kfs is then expressed as the inverse of the percolation rate times a constant, in this way the percolation rate can be directly related to Kfs of the soil. A plot of Kfs against percolation rate for the Irish SR 6 and the UK BS 6297 standard tests is asymptotic at Kfs values less than 0.2 m/d and greater than 0.8 m/d. This behaviour creates difficulty in setting limits for percolation rates in standards. Curves are provided which enable Kfs values to be read off from percolation tests without the restrictions of head range currently enforced, for example in the Irish SR 6 and BS 6297 standards. Experimental measurements of percolation rates and Kfs were carried out on two sands in the laboratory and in the field on two soils. Kfs of these four materials was also measured using a tension infiltrometer and the Guelph permeameter. The saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the sands were also estimated in a falling head laboratory apparatus and by the Hazen formula. There was good agreement between the different tests for Kfs on each material. Because percolation time continued to increase significantly in consecutive tests in the same test hole while Kfs became constant, the latter is a better measure of the suitability of soils for percolation. PMID:12230173

Mulqueen, J; Rodgers, M

2001-11-01

281

Laboratory-scale testing of non-consumable anode materials: Inert Electrodes Program  

SciTech Connect

Development of inert anode materials for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum is one of the major goals of the Inert Electrodes Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objectives of the Materials Development and Testing Task include the selection, fabrication, and evaluation of candidate non-consumable anode materials. Research performed in FY 1987 focused primarily on the development and evaluation of cermets that are based on the two-phase oxide system NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and contain a third, electrically conductive metal phase composed primarily of copper and nickel. The efforts of this task were focused on three areas: materials fabrication, small-scale materials testing, and laboratory-scale testing. This report summarizes the development and testing results of the laboratory-scale testing effort during FY 1987. The laboratory-scale electrolysis testing effort was instrumental in partially determining electrolysis cell operating parameters. Although not optimized, NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4//endash/Cu-based cermets were successfully operated for 20 h in cryolite-based electrolytes ranging in bath ratios from 1.1 to 1.35, in electrolytes that contained 1.5 wt % LiF, and at conditions slightly less than Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ saturation. The operating conditions that lead to anode degradation have been partly identified, and rudimentary control methods have been developed to ensure proper operation of small electrolysis cells using nonconsumable anodes. 11 figs., 1 tab.

Marschman, S.C.

1989-03-01

282

New facility design and work method for the quantitative fit testing laboratory. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) tests the quantitative fit of masks which are worn by military personnel during nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare. Subjects are placed in a Dynatech-Frontier Fit Testing Chamber, salt air is fed into the chamber, and samples of air are drawn from the mask and the chamber. The ratio of salt air outside the mask to salt air inside the mask is called the quantitative fit factor. A motion-time study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the layout and work method presently used in the laboratory. A link analysis was done to determine equipment priorities, and the link data and design guidelines were used to develop three proposed laboratory designs. The proposals were evaluated by projecting the time and motion efficiency, and the energy expended working in each design. Also evaluated were the lengths of the equipment links for each proposal, and each proposal's adherence to design guidelines. A mock-up was built of the best design proposal, and a second motion-time study was run. Results showed that with the new laboratory and work procedures, the USAFSAM analyst could test 116 more subjects per year than are currently tested. Finally, the results of a questionnaire given to the analyst indicated that user acceptance of the work area improved with the new design.

Ward, G.F.

1989-05-01

283

Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 49 x 10(exp 6)/ft (1.3 x 10(exp 7)/m to 19 x 10(exp 6/ft) and 1.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 19 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.39 x 10(exp 7)/m to 62 x 10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.36 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.2 x 10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for the wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 12% or better of the experimental data.

Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

2008-01-01

284

Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

2009-01-01

285

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2012-01-01

286

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2011-01-01

287

Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) using the FRL's 6-DOF gantry system, called the Dynamic Overhead Target System (DOTS). The target vehicle for "docking" in the laboratory was a mockup that was representative of the proposed CEV docking system, with added retroreflectors for the AVGS. The multi-sensor test configuration used 35 open-loop test trajectories covering three major objectives: (1) sensor characterization trajectories designed to test a wide range of performance parameters; (2) CEV-specific trajectories designed to test performance during CEV-like approach and departure profiles; and (3) sensor characterization tests designed for evaluating sensor performance under more extreme conditions as might be induced during a spacecraft failure or during contingency situations. This paper describes the test development, test facility, test preparations, test execution, and test results of the multi-sensor series of trajectories.

Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

2007-01-01

288

SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

2011-06-09

289

77 FR 31620 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2012 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Calendar Year 2012 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment Determinations AGENCY...for new clinical diagnostic laboratory tests under Part B of title XVIII...for any clinical diagnostic laboratory test with respect to which a...

2012-05-29

290

75 FR 30041 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2010 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...2010 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment Determinations...codes for clinical laboratory tests in calendar year...which new clinical laboratory test code(s) they will...you arrive at the CMS facility between 8:15...

2010-05-28

291

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory`s 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory`s Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01

292

Interference of medical contrast media on laboratory testing  

PubMed Central

The use of contrast media such as organic iodine molecules and gadolinium contrast agents is commonplace in diagnostic imaging. Although there is widespread perception that side effects and drug interactions may be the leading problems caused by these compounds, various degrees of interference with some laboratory tests have been clearly demonstrated. Overall, the described interference for iodinate contrast media include inappropriate gel barrier formation in blood tubes, the appearance of abnormal peaks in capillary zone electrophoresis of serum proteins, and a positive bias in assessment of cardiac troponin I with one immunoassay. The interference for gadolinium contrast agents include negative bias in calcium assessment with ortho-cresolphthalein colorimetric assays and occasional positive bias using some Arsenazo reagents, negative bias in measurement of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and zinc (colorimetric assay), as well as positive bias in creatinine (Jaffe reaction), total iron binding capacity (TIBC, ferrozine method), magnesium (calmagite reagent) and selenium (mass spectrometry) measurement. Interference has also been reported in assessment of serum indices, pulse oximetry and methaemoglobin in samples of patients receiving Patent Blue V. Under several circumstances the interference was absent from manufacturer-supplied information and limited to certain type of reagents and/or analytes, so that local verification may be advisable to establish whether or not the test in use may be biased. Since the elimination half-life of these compounds is typically lower than 2 h, blood collection after this period may be a safer alternative in patients who have received contrast media for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24627717

Lippi, Giuseppe; Daves, Massimo; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

2014-01-01

293

Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 2, In vitro samples  

SciTech Connect

Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of in vitro test samples (artificial urine and fecal matter) for indirect bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

1988-11-01

294

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01

295

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31

296

Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

Morrey, E.V.

1996-03-01

297

The effects of calculator-based laboratories on standardized test scores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nationwide, the goal of providing a productive science and math education to our youth in today's educational institutions is centering itself around the technology being utilized in these classrooms. In this age of digital technology, educational software and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) have become significant devices in the teaching of science and math for many states across the United States. Among the technology, the Texas Instruments graphing calculator and Vernier Labpro interface, are among some of the calculator-based laboratories becoming increasingly popular among middle and high school science and math teachers in many school districts across this country. In Tennessee, however, it is reported that this type of technology is not regularly utilized at the student level in most high school science classrooms, especially in the area of Physical Science (Vernier, 2006). This research explored the effect of calculator based laboratory instruction on standardized test scores. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of traditional teaching methods versus graphing calculator teaching methods on the state mandated End-of-Course (EOC) Physical Science exam based on ability, gender, and ethnicity. The sample included 187 total tenth and eleventh grade physical science students, 101 of which belonged to a control group and 87 of which belonged to the experimental group. Physical Science End-of-Course scores obtained from the Tennessee Department of Education during the spring of 2005 and the spring of 2006 were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings of this research study suggested the type of teaching method, traditional or calculator based, did not have an effect on standardized test scores. However, the students' ability level, as demonstrated on the End-of-Course test, had a significant effect on End-of-Course test scores. This study focused on a limited population of high school physical science students in the middle Tennessee Putnam County area. The study should be reproduced in various school districts in the state of Tennessee to compare the findings.

Stevens, Charlotte Bethany Rains

298

GHASTLI-Gas Hydrate and Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrates exist beneath many continental margins and represent a huge potential alternate energy source. A custom-built laboratory test system is currently being used to study the formation and decomposition of gas hydrates at sea-floor pressures and temperatures and the physical, acoustic, electrical, and chemical properties of hydrate-sediment mixtures. A scanning electron microscope with a liquid-nitrogen cryogenic stage will be used to examine the hydrate crystals and sediment grains. The goals are to understand interrelationships of natural factors and the formation of gas hydrates in marine sediment. The authors will also examine hydrate dissociation characteristics and measure sediment properties before, during, and after the formation of hydrates to better understand their influence on possible methane extraction. The test system consists of a fluid-filled vessel that can apply a maximum external pressure of 25 MPa (equivalent to a 2400-m water depth) to a cylindrical sediment specimen. Because internal specimen pore pressure can also be controlled, hundreds of meters of overburden pressure can be applied. A heat exchanger on the upper surface of the test specimen not only allows application of appropriate temperatures, it also creates a unidirectional cooling from downward through the sample at the same time that methane gas is slowly percolated upward to induce hydrate formation. Hydrate formation can be quantitatively monitored by electrical resistivity sensors placed around the perimeter of the specimen. Acoustic velocity (both P- and S-wave) can also be measured vertically through the sample, as can shear strength, pore pressure, and permeability, all at in-situ conditions.

Winters, W.J.; Booth, J.S.; Dillon, W.P.; Commeau, R.F. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

1994-08-01

299

Laboratory tests of planet signal extraction in high contrast images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the formation, evolution and surprising diversity of exoplanetary system is recognized as one of the few major challenges of current astrophysics. While a large number of planets are discovered thanks to techniques like radial velocity and transits, only a few of them have clear measurements of their atmospheric components. Besides, these latter have been studied on transiting planets with very short orbits. Study of planets at larger separations requires direct imaging, which has enabled detection of a handful of exoplanets. This number will dramatically increase with the arrival in 2013 of SPHERE and GPI instruments that will give access to a large class of self-luminous young exoplanets. Characterization of mature planets or even massive rocky planets is expected for the next generation of planet finders that will be installed on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT).On ELT, even with Adaptive Optics (AO) working at their best, using smart wavefront sensor and correction strategy, it is expected that the residual speckles in the images will still be a factor 100 brighter than the planet signal. This level composed of slow quasi static speckles not detected by the wavefront sensor and the rapidly varying wavefront errors that cannot be corrected by the AO loop frequency. Solutions are actually studied to calibrate these speckles and make sure that we can differentiate them from planet signal. One of the best solution is to use the signal of focal plane wavefront sensors that can help suppressing the quasi-static speckles but also help to extract the planet signal in the final images.After describing the benefit of focal plane wavefront sensor for data extraction, we will describe our laboratory test bench which uses the Self-Coherent Camera as focal plane wavefront sensor. The principle of the data processing used to extract the planet signal will be presented together with laboratory results on very high contrast images.

Baudoz, Pierre; Mazoyer, Johan; Galicher, Raphael

2013-12-01

300

Variable area radial turbine fabrication and test program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variable area radial turbine with a moveable nozzle sidewall was experimentally evaluated. The turbine was designed for an advanced variable capacity gas turbine rotorcraft engine. The turbine has a mass flow rate of 2.27 kg/sec (5.0 lbs/sec), and a rotor inlet temperature of 1477K (2200 F). Testing was conducted at a reduced inlet temperature, but the aerodynamic parameters and Reynolds numbers were duplicated. Overall performance was obtained for a range of nozzle areas from 50% to 100% of the maximum area. The test program determined the effect on performance of: (1) Moving the hub or shroud sidewall; (2) Sidewall-vane clearance leakage; (3) Vaneless space geometry change; and (4) Nozzle cooling flows. Data were obtained for a range of pressure ratios and speeds and are presented in a number of performance maps.

Rogo, C.

1986-01-01

301

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01

302

Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

1995-02-01

303

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-05-22

304

Testing of the Semikron Validation AIPM Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- October 2004  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the electrical tests performed on the Semikron high-voltage automotive integrated power module (AIPM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Testing was performed in the 100-hp dynamometer test cell at the National Transportation Research Center.

Nelson, S.C.

2004-11-12

305

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tests - 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and supports the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 3 LLNL test locations in areas 2 and 12: Kennebec in U2af, Cumberland in U2e, and Yuba in U12b.10.

Pawloski, G A

2011-02-28

306

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...personnel to testify in an administrative or disciplinary proceeding against an individual when that proceeding is based on urinalysis results reported by the HHS-certified laboratory; (3) The laboratory shall maintain test records in confidence,...

2011-01-01

307

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...personnel to testify in an administrative or disciplinary proceeding against an individual when that proceeding is based on urinalysis results reported by the HHS-certified laboratory; (3) The laboratory shall maintain test records in confidence,...

2014-01-01

308

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...personnel to testify in an administrative or disciplinary proceeding against an individual when that proceeding is based on urinalysis results reported by the HHS-certified laboratory; (3) The laboratory shall maintain test records in confidence,...

2013-01-01

309

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...personnel to testify in an administrative or disciplinary proceeding against an individual when that proceeding is based on urinalysis results reported by the HHS-certified laboratory; (3) The laboratory shall maintain test records in confidence,...

2012-01-01

310

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for...

2013-01-01

311

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for...

2010-01-01

312

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for...

2011-01-01

313

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for...

2012-01-01

314

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for...

2014-01-01

315

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories  

Cancer.gov

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories Amie M. Deffenbaugh, BS, Lynn Anne Burbidge, BS, Julia Reid, MStat, Walter W. Noll, MD Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT

316

Development of a novel SCADA system for laboratory testing.  

PubMed

This document summarizes the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system that allows communication with, and controlling the output of, various I/O devices in the renewable energy systems and components test facility RESLab. This SCADA system differs from traditional SCADA systems in that it supports a continuously changing operating environment depending on the test to be performed. The SCADA System is based on the concept of having one Master I/O Server and multiple client computer systems. This paper describes the main features and advantages of this dynamic SCADA system, the connections of various field devices to the master I/O server, the device servers, and numerous software features used in the system. The system is based on the graphical programming language "LabVIEW" and its "Datalogging and Supervisory Control" (DSC) module. The DSC module supports a real-time database called the "tag engine," which performs the I/O operations with all field devices attached to the master I/O server and communications with the other tag engines running on the client computers connected via a local area network. Generic and detailed communication block diagrams illustrating the hierarchical structure of this SCADA system are presented. The flow diagram outlining a complete test performed using this system in one of its standard configurations is described. PMID:15272800

Patel, M; Cole, G R; Pryor, T L; Wilmot, N A

2004-07-01

317

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

318

Biodegradation of wastewater nitrogen compounds in fractures: Laboratory tests and field observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Throughout several coastal regions in the Mediterranean where rainfalls rarely exceed 650 mm per year municipal treated wastewater can be conveniently reused for soil irrigation. Where the coastal aquifer supplies large populations with freshwater in such area, an assessment of ground water quality around spreading sites is needed. In this study, the efficacy of natural filtration on nitrogen degradation in wastewater spreads on the soil covering the Salento (Southern Italy) fractured limestone was quantified by using laboratory tests and field measurements. In the laboratory, effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants was filtered through a package of fractures made by several slabs of limestone. An analysis of wastewater constituent concentrations over time allowed the decay rates and constants for nitrogen transformation during natural filtration to be estimated in both aerated and non-aerated (i.e., saturated) soil fractures. A simulation code, based on biodegradation decay constants defined in the laboratory experiments, was then used to quantify the total inorganic nitrogen removal from wastewater injected in an aquifer in the Salento region (Nardò). Here the water sampled in two monitoring wells at 320 m and 500 m from the wastewater injection site and downgradient with respect to groundwater flow was used to verify the laboratory nitrification and denitrification rates.

Masciopinto, Constantino

2007-07-01

319

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01

320

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility: research highlights and plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has served as a user facility for accelerator science for over a quarter of a century. In fulfilling this mission, the ATF offers the unique combination of a high-brightness 80 MeV electron beam that is synchronized to a 1 TW picosecond CO2 laser. We unveil herein our plan to considerably expand the ATF's floor space with an upgrade of the electron beam's energy to 300 MeV and the CO2 laser's peak power to 100 TW. This upgrade will propel the ATF even further to the forefront of research on advanced accelerators and radiation sources, supporting the most innovative ideas in this field. We discuss emerging opportunities for scientific breakthroughs, including the following: plasma wakefield acceleration studies in research directions already active at the ATF; laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), where the longer laser wavelengths are expected to engender a proportional increase in the beam's charge while our linac will assure, for the first time, the opportunity to undertake detailed studies of seeding and staging of the LWFA; proton acceleration to the 100-200 MeV level, which is essential for medical applications; and others.

Pogorelsky, I. V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

2014-08-01

321

Laboratory testing during critical care transport: point-of-care testing in air ambulances.  

PubMed

Air and ground transport are used for prehospital transport of patients in acute life-threatening situations, and increasingly, critically ill patients undergo interhospital transportation. Results from clinical studies suggest that critical tests performed during the transport of critically ill patients presents a potential opportunity to improve patient care. Our project was to identify, according to the recommendations published at this time, a model of point-of-care testing (POCT) (arterial blood gases analysis and glucose, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, hematocrit/hemoglobin measurements) in air ambulances. In order to identify the key internal and external factors that are important to achieving our objective, an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis) was incorporated into our planning model prior to starting the project. To allow the entire POCT process (pre-, intra-, and post-analytic steps) to be under the control of the reference laboratory, an experimental model of information technology was applied. Real-time results during transport of critically ill patients must be considered to be an integral part of the patient care process and excellent channels of communication are needed between the intensive care units, emergency medical services and laboratories. With technological and computer advances, POCT during critical care transport will certainly increase in the future: this will be a challenge from a laboratory and clinical context. PMID:20406127

Di Serio, Francesca; Petronelli, Maria Antonia; Sammartino, Eugenio

2010-07-01

322

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began testing small wind turbines (SWTs) through the Independent Testing project. Using competitive solicitation, five SWTs were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's NWTC is accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to conduct duration, power performance, safety and function,

A. Bowen; A. Huskey; H. Link; K. Sinclair; T. Forsyth; D. Jager; J. van Dam; J. Smith

2010-01-01

323

King County Metro Transit: Allison Hybrid Electric Transit Bus Laboratory Testing  

SciTech Connect

Paper summarizes chassis dynamometer testing of two 60-foot articulated transit buses, one conventional and one hybrid, at NREL's ReFUEL Laboratory. It includes experimental setup, test procedures, and results from vehicle testing performed at the NREL ReFUEL laboratory.

Hayes, R. R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-09-01

324

An Alternative to the Physiological Psychology Laboratory: Identification of an Unknown Drug Through Behavioral Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory project introduced physiological psychology students to research by requiring them to identify an unknown drug given to laboratory animals. Students read material about drugs and animal drug studies, designed behavioral tests, constructed the testing apparatus, conducted the tests, and wrote progress reports. (SR)

Schumacher, Susan J.

1982-01-01

325

Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

NONE

1996-07-01

326

The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing: Implications for Payment Reform  

PubMed Central

Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of the laboratory market. To inform payment policy, we analyzed the structure of the national market for Medicare Part B clinical laboratory testing, using a 5-percent sample of 2006 Medicare claims data. The independent laboratory market is dominated by two firms—Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America. The hospital outreach market is not as concentrated as the independent laboratory market. Two subgroups of Medicare beneficiaries, those with end-stage renal disease and those residing in nursing homes, are each served in separate laboratory markets. Despite the concentrated independent laboratory market structure, national competitive bidding for non-patient laboratory tests could result in cost savings for Medicare. PMID:24800143

Gass Kandilov, Amy M.; Pope, Gregory C.; Kautter, John; Healy, Deborah

2012-01-01

327

[Quantitative Sensory Testing in the facial area: a review].  

PubMed

Quantitative Sensory Testing is an established method to evaluate somatosensory function. In the facial area, the procedures depend on the localisation of disorders and the modalities of interest. The test stimuli are of thermal or mechanical nature (touch, pain, vibration, or pressure stimuli). According to the protocol of the German Neuropathic Pain Network, comprehensive information on the function of afferent nerves can be generated in the facial area as well. Standard values have been obtained for the cheek and intraoral mucosa. For various orofacial pain conditions, studies concerning the somatosensory function are available. Changed functional patterns are not limited to neuropathic pain, but also occur in other orofacial pain conditions, indicating, for example, central sensitisation. The standardised collection of QST parameters may improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of orofacial pain and effect therapeutic approaches. Comprehensive studies may lead to the development of specific screenings that are feasible in a clinical setting. PMID:23916267

Eberhard, Lydia

2013-01-01

328

Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide

Purtymun

1995-01-01

329

L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application  

SciTech Connect

The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

Wood, D.C.

2001-06-26

330

Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective enhancement of diffusion. Tailing in BTCs for sorbing tracers may provide adequate sensitivity for quantifying the fracture-matrix interface area. We discuss requirements for tracer sorption and present considerations for designing a tracer test that would determine fracture-matrix interface area.

Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

2004-05-12

331

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2014-10-01

332

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2013-10-01

333

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2012-10-01

334

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2011-10-01

335

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2010-10-01

336

Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

Yvonne Townsend

2000-05-01

337

Laboratory experiments designed to test the remediation properties of materials  

SciTech Connect

Passive treatment systems constructed to remediate mine drainage have proven to be very successful for a wide variety of drainage compositions and volumes. The construction of an anaerobic passive treatment system requires a mixture of local materials with the objective of producing a system that allows adequate water flow while supporting the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. These bacteria have the effect of reducing the oxidizing potential in the system causing many sulfide-forming metals in solution to precipitate. The focus of these experiments was the study of chemical characteristics of materials, individually and in mixtures, with the purpose of determining which would be best suited for incorporation into a treatment system. The materials of interest were manure (fresh and aged), alfalfa, limestone, and sawdust, which were all collected in close proximity to the construction site of the proposed treatment system. A variety of chemical and physical hypotheses were formulated prior to performing simple chemical characterization and anaerobic treatment tests. The hypotheses relating to the chemical nature of the single materials were carbon to nitrogen ratio, availability of low molecular weight organic acids, number of adsorption sites, and organic carbon content. In addition, hypotheses concerning the performance of mixtures were evaluated by looking at the relative amount of bacterial growth (and metal removal) seen in each mixture over a 4-week period. The results of the laboratory experiments confirmed hypotheses, and demonstrated that in the mixtures, the anaerobic bacteria flourish when alfalfa is present, up to a point. The best mixture that allowed proliferation of bacteria while also removing metals consisted of 50% limestone, 25% aged manure, 15% sawdust, and 10% alfalfa (% by weight).

Gilbert, J.S.; Wildeman, T.R.; Ford, K.L.

1999-07-01

338

Discrimination of novel bunyavirus infection using routine laboratory test.  

PubMed

The wide epidemic and high case fatality rate have made severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) a significant public health problem. The diagnosis and discrimination of SFTS virus (SFTSV) infection at an early stage of the disease is important for treatment choice. A prospective study was performed in an SFTS reference hospital during 2011-2013. Suspected SFTS patients were recruited and prospectively observed. Comparison between SFTSV-positive and -negative patients was made to identify the parameters that were related to positive detection by discriminant and classification tree analysis. A total of 538 SFTSV-positive and 396 negative patients were recruited and observed. Multiple logistic regression models demonstrated the significant parameters associated with positive detection, including decreased platelet counts and elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level during the first stage (1?4 days), decreased white blood cell and platelet counts, elevated creatine kinase (CK) and AST levels during the second stage (5?7 days), and older age, decreased consciousness and elevated CK and AST during the third stage (8-11 days). The classification trees disclosed that the significant predictors for positive SFTSV detection were AST >50.6 U/L and AST/alanine transaminase (ALT) >1.3 at the first stage, CK >257 U/L or 57.7 U/L < CK ?98.5 U/L with AST/ALT >1.6 at the second stage, as well as CK >630.7 U/L or 114.3 U/L < CK ?630.7 U/L with decreased consciousness at the third stage. In making the clinically probable diagnosis of SFTS, the supplementation of AST and CK evaluations might remarkably improve the diagnostic capacity of routine laboratory tests, while the leukopenia is of limited use. PMID:25658566

Lu, Q-B; Yang, Z-D; Wang, L-Y; Qin, S-L; Cui, N; Wang, H-Y; Li, H; Liu, K; Hu, J-G; Zhang, X-A; Liu, W; Cao, W-C

2015-02-01

339

Laboratory testing in-tank sludge washing, summary letter report  

SciTech Connect

In-tank washing is being considered as a means of pretreating high-level radioactive waste sludges, such as neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) sludge. For this process, the contents of the tank will be allowed to settle, and the supernatant solution will be decanted and removed. A dilute sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrite wash solution will be added to the settled sludge and the tank contents will be mixed with a mixer pump system to facilitate washing of the sludge. After thorough mixing, the mixer pumps will be shut off and the solids will be allowed to re-settle. After settling, the supernatant solution will be withdrawn from the tank, and the wash cycle will be repeated several times with fresh wash solution. Core sample data of double shell tank 241-AZ-101 indicate that settling of NCAW solids may be very slow. A complicating factor is that strong thermal currents are expected to be generated from heat produced by radionuclides in the sludge layer at the bottom of the tank. Additionally, there are concerns that during the settling period (i.e., while mixing pumps and air-lift re-circulators are shut off), the radionuclides may heat the residual interstitial water in the sludge to the extent that violent steam discharges (steam bumping) could occur. Finally, there are concerns that during the washing steps sludge settling may be hindered as a result of the reduced ionic strength of the wash solution. To overcome the postulated reduced settling rates during the second and third washing steps, the use of flocculants is being considered. To address the above concerns and uncertainties associated with in-tank washing, PNL has conducted laboratory testing with simulant tank waste to investigate settling rates, steam bump potential, and the need for and use of flocculating agents.

Norton, M.V.; Torres-Ayala, F.

1994-09-01

340

First imported coccidioidomycosis in Turkey: A potential health risk for laboratory workers outside endemic areas?  

PubMed Central

Coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii is endemic in arid climate zones in America, travel-related cases have been reported. We report the first documented case of coccidioidomycosis in Turkey, overviewing reported cases in Europe and underlying difficulties of differential diagnosis outside endemic regions. The patient was an otherwise healthy 41-year-old man who travelled endemic areas. Laboratory diagnosis was based on direct microscopy of two subsequent subcutaneous biopsy specimens and culture and confirmed molecularly. Laboratory personnel should become aware that BioSafety Level-3 organisms may become more frequent and widespread. PMID:24567896

Kantarcioglu, A. Serda; Sandoval-Denis, M.; Aygun, Gokhan; Kiraz, Nuri; Akman, Canan; Apaydin, Hulya; Karaman, Emin; Guarro, Josep; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Gurel, M.S.

2014-01-01

341

An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-09-07

342

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered

T. L. Ashwood; G. W. II Suter; A. J. Stewart

1992-01-01

343

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1987  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

344

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1984  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

345

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory-based testing.  

PubMed

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory-housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch-screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching-to-sample memory test. Despite the differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

2013-05-01

346

Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

1991-01-01

347

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01

348

How to plan and produce your laboratory test catalog.  

PubMed

Creating the lab catalog is a multi-disciplinary crash course in laboratory science, writing, publishing, marketing, business administration, and graphic design. These eight steps will take you from start to finish in completing a showcase catalog. PMID:10339258

Nordenson, N J

1998-12-01

349

Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

NONE

1997-08-18

350

Continuous Improvement in Battery Testing at the NASA/JSC Energy System Test Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas conducts development and qualification tests to fulfill Energy System Division responsibilities relevant to ASA programs and projects. EST A has historically called upon a variety of fluid, mechanical, electrical, environmental, and data system capabilities spread amongst five full-service facilities to test human and human supported spacecraft in the areas of propulsion systems, fluid systems, pyrotechnics, power generation, and power distribution and control systems. Improvements at ESTA are being made in full earnest of offering NASA project offices an option to choose a thorough test regime that is balanced with cost and schedule constraints. In order to continue testing of enabling power-related technologies utilized by the Energy System Division, an especially proactive effort has been made to increase the cost effectiveness and schedule responsiveness for battery testing. This paper describes the continuous improvement in battery testing at the Energy Systems Test Area being made through consolidation, streamlining, and standardization.

Boyd, William; Cook, Joseph

2003-01-01

351

PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2009-09-25

352

Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs.

Ellison, A.J.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-06-01

353

A comparison of relative toxicity rankings by some small-scale laboratory tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small-scale laboratory tests for fire toxicity, suitable for use in the average laboratory hood, are needed for screening and ranking materials on the basis of relative toxicity. The performance of wool, cotton, and aromatic polyamide under several test procedures is presented.

Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

1977-01-01

354

Renewable Energy System Test and Support Laboratory , T L Pryor2  

E-print Network

ACRELab Renewable Energy System Test and Support Laboratory T Spooner1 , T L Pryor2 , N Wilmot3 , G for Renewable Energy AUSTRALIA Abstract ACRELab is a new testing laboratory for Renewable Energy (RE) systems. It is located at the headquarters of the Australian CRC for Renewable Energy (ACRE) on the Murdoch University

355

COMPARISON OF P-NITROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION IN FIELD AND LABORATORY TEST SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Acclimation of microbial communities exposed to p-nitrophenol (PNP) was measured in laboratory test systems and in a freshwater pond. Laboratory tests were conducted in shake flasks with water, shake flasks with water and sediment, eco-cores, and two sizes of microcosm. The sedim...

356

Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide  

E-print Network

1 Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide Jeffrey W of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software, version 2.0. Using the VCCTL software of fine and coarse aggregates in mortar and concrete materials also can be created. The VCCTL software

Magee, Joseph W.

357

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2001-07-05

358

A rapid amphipod reproduction test for sediment quality assessment: In situ bioassays do not replicate laboratory bioassays.  

PubMed

An underlying assumption of laboratory-based toxicity tests is that the sensitivity and exposure of organisms in the laboratory is comparable to that in the field. We sought to make a comparison between field-based and laboratory-based sediment toxicity tests using a recently developed rapid amphipod reproduction test that encompasses gametogenesis, fertilization, and embryo development before hatching. The test species, Melita plumulosa, is an epibenthic, detritivorous amphipod native to Eastern Australia. Test sediments were sourced from Lake Macquarie, a large saltwater lagoon located 100 km north of Sydney (New South Wales, Australia) that has received heavy-metal pollution over many decades, primarily from a Pb/Zn smelter but also from collieries, coal-fired power stations, and urban areas. This has led to a north-south trace-metal concentration gradient, including Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu, in the sediments of Lake Macquarie. Sediments from these northern bays were demonstrated to reduce amphipod fecundity in laboratory-based tests. For the current study, the amphipod reproduction test has been modified for use in situ. In situ test chambers were deployed at the mouth of Cockle Creek, Lake Macquarie. Sediments that were demonstrated to reduce fecundity of M. plumulosa in the laboratory reproduction test were not similarly toxic when amphipods were exposed to the same sediments in situ. Factors related to the regular tidal renewal of overlying water likely altered exposure profiles in situ, including the provision of additional or alternative nutrition that obviated the need for amphipods to interact with the contaminated sediments, and a washout effect that prevented the accretion of dissolved zinc in the overlying water. PMID:20862754

Mann, Reinier M; Hyne, Ross V; Simandjuntak, Desiree L; Simpson, Stuart L

2010-11-01

359

Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.  

SciTech Connect

The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-12

360

Geochemistry of Background Sediment Samples at Technical Area 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of chemical analyses of 24 analytes in 16 background sediment samples collected from Ancho Canyon and Indio Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 39, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Preliminary upper tolerance limits (UTLS) for sediments are calculated from this data set but, because of the small sample size, these UTLs exceed the maximum values in the data set by up to 50'ZO and will require revision as more background sediment data are obtained.

Eric V. McDonald; Katherine Campbell; Patrick A. Longmire; Steven L. Reneau

1998-11-01

361

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01

362

Laboratory and on-road evaluations of cabin air filters using number and surface area concentration monitors.  

PubMed

An automotive cabin air filter's effectiveness for removing airborne particles was determined both in a laboratory wind tunnel and in vehicle on-road tests. The most penetrating particle size for the test filter was approximately 350 nm, where the filtration efficiency was 22.9 and 17.4% at medium and high fan speeds, respectively. The filtration efficiency increased for smaller particles and was 43.9% for 100 nm and 72.0% for 20 nm particles at a medium fan speed. We determined the reduction in passenger exposure to particles while driving in freeway traffic caused by a vehicle ventilation system with a cabin air filter installed. Both particle number and surface area concentration measurements were made inside the cabin and in the surrounding air. At medium fan speed, the number and surface area concentration-based exposure reductions were 65.6 +/- 6.0% and 60.6 +/- 9.4%, respectively. To distinguish the exposure reduction contribution from the filter alone and the remainder of the ventilation system, we also performed tests with and without the filter in place using the surface area monitors. The ventilation system operating in the recirculation mode with the cabin air filter installed provided the maximum protection, reducing the cabin particle concentration exponentially over time and usually taking only 3 min to reach 10 microm2/cm3 (a typical office air condition) under medium fan speed. PMID:18589976

Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Pui, David Y H; Kuehn, Thomas H

2008-06-01

363

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-OC-1-57-75, Drawing No. AF-6009-15, sheet 53 of 96, D.O. Series No. AF 1394/73, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296 Rev. C, Date: 19 NOV 59. Drawing includes plan, section, and details of track. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

364

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12

365

Source Areas Investigation Plan and Recommendation for Removal Actions at Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Source Area Investigation Plan and Recommendation for Removal Action (SAIP\\/RRA) was prepared in support of the regulatory working group for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. The purpose of the plan is to focus the investigation of and initiate potential groundwater seepage control actions for contaminant source areas at WAG 5. The SAIP\\/RRA addresses four

T. J. Newsom; S. Blair; D. S. Hicks; R. H. Ketelle

1993-01-01

366

Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01

367

Assessment of Strength and Deformation of Coarse Grained Soils by Means of Penetration Tests and Laboratory Tests on Undisturbed Samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper summarizes the activities undertaken to retrieve large size undisturbed sample of gravel and sand by in situ freezing at Licciana Nardi (Lucca, Italy). The following laboratory tests have been performed on the retrieved sampled: grain size distribution, soil density and relative density, undrained cyclic compression loading triaxial tests under strain control, undrained monotonic compression loading cyclic tests under strain control, triaxial liquefaction tests under stress control. In situ LPT and other dynamic penetration tests have been performed at the investigation site.

Pallara, O.; Froio, F.; Rinolfi, A.; Lo Presti, D.

368

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...THE SPECIAL EQUIPMENT TO BE USED FOR SUCH CARRIAGE (ATP); INSPECTION, TESTING, AND CERTIFICATION OF SPECIAL...fees for certificates. A current list of U.S. ATP testing stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for issuance of...

2010-01-01

369

HWMA\\/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO5.8 D REVISION2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Hazardous Waste Management Act\\/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604

KIRK WINTERHOLLER

2008-01-01

370

Hydraulic tests of emergency cooling system: L-Area  

SciTech Connect

The delay in L-Area startup provided an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) which will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level. ECS flow is a major input to the FLOOD code which calculates reactor ECS power limits. The FLOOD code assesses the effectiveness of the ECS cooling capacity by modeling the core and plenum hydraulics under accident conditions. Presently, reactor power is not limited by the ECS cooling capacity (power limit). However, the manual calculations of ECS flows had been recently updated to include piping changes (debris strainer, valve changes, pressure release systems) and update fitting losses. Both updates resulted in reduced calculated ECS flows. Upon completion of the current program to update, validate, and document, reactor power may be limited under certain situations by ECS cooling capacity for some present reactor charge designs. A series of special hydraulic tests (Reference 1, 3) were conducted in L-Area using all sources of emergency coolant including the ECS pumps (Reference 2). The tests provided empirical hydraulic data on the ECS piping. These data will be used in computer models of the system as well as manual calculations of ECS flows. The improved modeling and accuracy of the flow calculations will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level with respect to an ECS power limit.

Hinton, J H

1988-01-01

371

Using Routine Laboratory Tests to Detect Heavy Drinking in the General Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a new biomarker known as the Early Detection of Alcohol Consumption (EDAC) test, which has been steadily penetrating the U.S. market. The EDAC uses routine laboratory tests to make a prediction of heavy drinking in any given person. When tested in mainstream insurance populations, the EDAC has shown twice the specificity of the traditional liver enzyme tests

Jim Harasymiw; Julie Seaberg; Pamela Bean

2006-01-01

372

FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

HERTING DL

2007-11-29

373

Power donut system laboratory test and data analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory study conducted to evaluate the ability of the power donut system to accurately measure and record line current, conductor temperature, and ambient air temperature and to evaluate the system as a data gathering and communication package is presented. Although the system measures line voltage, its accuracy was not evaluated during this phase because of the difficulty in obtaining

N. D. Sadanandan; A. H. Eltom

1990-01-01

374

LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF SEAT SUSPENSION PERFORMANCE DURING VIBRATION TESTING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mining injury statistics show that a significant number of back, neck, and head injuries are linked to exposure from vehicle vibration. Use of a suspension seat is a common way to isolate the vehicle operator from the adverse effects of vibration exposure. Thus, researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 1 - Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (NIOSH -

Alan G. Mayton; Joseph P. DuCarme; Christopher C. Jobes; Timothy J. Matty

375

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

DOE Data Explorer

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

376

Laboratory test tube centrifuge with longer working cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

of the All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry [2], eliminates these deficiencies and makes it possible to carry out continuous filtration in test tubes, by continuous supply of the original suspension into the filtering test tubes and continuous withdrawal of the filtrate. Continuous precipitation into test tubes with unbroken bottoms canalso be carried out with this centrifuge. Figure 1

Z. B. Kristall; I. V. Danilenko

1968-01-01

377

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

SciTech Connect

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

2014-07-29

378

Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada  

PubMed Central

Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies.

Tsang, Raymond SW; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

2015-01-01

379

Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada.  

PubMed

Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:25798160

Tsang, Raymond Sw; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

2015-01-01

380

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01

381

Mars Science Laboratory Sample Acquisition, Sample Processing and Handling: Subsystem Design and Test Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling subsystem for the Mars Science Laboratory is a highly-mechanized, Rover-based sampling system that acquires powdered rock and regolith samples from the Martian surface, sorts the samples into fine particles through sieving, and delivers small portions of the powder into two science instruments inside the Rover. SA/SPaH utilizes 17 actuated degrees-of-freedom to perform the functions needed to produce 5 sample pathways in support of the scientific investigation on Mars. Both hardware redundancy and functional redundancy are employed in configuring this sampling system so some functionality is retained even with the loss of a degree-of-freedom. Intentional dynamic environments are created to move sample while vibration isolators attenuate this environment at the sensitive instruments located near the dynamic sources. In addition to the typical flight hardware qualification test program, two additional types of testing are essential for this kind of sampling system: characterization of the intentionally-created dynamic environment and testing of the sample acquisition and processing hardware functions using Mars analog materials in a low pressure environment. The overall subsystem design and configuration are discussed along with some of the challenges, tradeoffs, and lessons learned in the areas of fault tolerance, intentional dynamic environments, and special testing

Jandura, Louise

2010-01-01

382

Evaluation of results from the on-site audits of laboratories performing freshwater aquatic toxicity tests  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years (1992--1995), several laboratories were evaluated based on USEPA`s Manual for the Evaluation of Laboratories Performing Aquatic Toxicity Tests. Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) tests were required under NPDES permits primarily issued by the States in Region 8. The required test organisms were Pimephales promelas and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Prior to the on-site visit, a presurvey was completed by the laboratories. This visit typically lasts two days and evaluates laboratory staff, facilities, equipment, instruments, supplies, test methodologies, sample handling, QA/QC, data handling and report preparation. Audit reports were prepared listing observed deviations and recommended corrective actions. Opportunities to correct the deviations were given to the laboratories. Compilation of the observed deviations will be presented, along with a discussion of some commonly held reasons for the deviations.

Rodriguez, G.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States). Region 8

1995-12-31

383

NNWSI waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report: January-June 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project is investigating the tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste form under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and the performance of experiments designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1986. This report summarizes progress during the period January--June 1987, 19 refs., 17 figs., 20 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1988-11-01

384

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

SciTech Connect

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01

385

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1980  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne ...

386

Laboratory policies and practices for the genetic testing of children: a survey of the Helix network.  

PubMed Central

In order to discover whether laboratories have policies regarding the testing of unaffected children, we surveyed all laboratories registered with Helix, a national net-work of DNA diagnostic laboratories. Of 186 laboratories asked to respond anonymously to a four-page questionnaire, 156 (84%) replied. A screening question removed 51 laboratories that provided no clinical services. Of the remaining 105, 92% said that their requisition forms asked the person's age. Substantial minorities had policies for the testing of minors for late-onset disorders (46%), for carrier status for recessive disorders (33%), or for disorders for which the test offers no medical benefit within 3 years (33%). Most laboratories are responsive to parental requests. For 12 of 13 late-onset disorders, the majority of laboratories that offered testing had had requests to test children. The majority had tested healthy children, <12 years of age, for eight disorders. Approximately 22% had tested children, <12 years of age, for Huntington disease. Majorities had received requests to test healthy children for carrier status for 10 of 15 recessive or X-linked disorders and had tested children, <12 years of age, for 6 of these disorders, including cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, fragile X syndrome, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Approximately 45% of the laboratories occasionally had provided tests directly to consumers. In view of the possibility that the harms of presymptomatic diagnoses of children sometimes may outweigh the benefits, our results suggest a need for consistent laboratory policies designed for the best interests of the child and the family. PMID:9345088

Wertz, D C; Reilly, P R

1997-01-01

387

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01

388

Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Schaschl, Leslie

2011-01-01

389

Utilization of Laboratory Tests for Tuberculosis and Mycobacterial Disease in Korea  

PubMed Central

Objectives In Korea, a large portion of tuberculosis (TB) patients are diagnosed and treated in private institutes. Laboratory tests are crucial for TB control. There are many possible problems using laboratory tests in the private sector. In this study, we aimed to investigate the characteristics and trends of utilizing laboratory tests for TB and mycobacterial diseases in the private sector by analyzing the National Health Insurance (NHI) database. Methods After selecting TB or other mycobacteria-related test items, we searched the number and cost of each item on the website of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service using the code of each test from 2007 to 2012. Results Our data revealed that the number and cost of tests drastically increased between 2007 and 2012. Culture and molecular tests primarily contributed to the tremendous increases. For each year, concentrated smearing and fluorochrome staining were more commonly used. The number of serologic tests for latent TB infection stagnated, despite the expansion of contact investigation. Conclusion The NHI data could be considerably useful for understanding the utilization trends of laboratory tests for TB and mycobacterial diseases in Korea. Our data showed that TB laboratory systems have recently improved. In this study, many issues were noticed. Therefore, solutions to these issues are required and the continued monitoring of NHI data regarding laboratory diagnosis.

Kim, Chang-Ki; Choi, Sung Won; Park, Mi-Sun

2014-01-01

390

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

391

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Nitrogen recommendations applicable for  

E-print Network

by laboratory. Nitrogen Soil Fertility Recommendations for Texas Fiber Crop 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 updated on 3-30-2012: soiltesting.tamu.edu KENAF COTTON (DRYLAND OR LIMITED IRRIGATION , 1 BALE/A) 100 95 90 85 80 80 75 70 65 60 60 COTTON (DRYLAND OR IRRIGATION , 1.5 BALES/A) 50 45 40 35 30 30 25 20 15 10 10

392

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Potassium recommendations applicable for  

E-print Network

by laboratory. Potassium Soil Fertility Recommendations for Texas Fiber Crop 0 10 20 30 40 45 50 55 60 70 80 updated on 3-30-2012: soiltesting.tamu.edu KENAF 50 45 40 35 30 30 30 25 25 20 15 COTTON (DRYLAND OR LIMITED IRRIGATION , 1 BALE/A) 30 25 25 20 20 15 15 15 15 10 10 COTTON (DRYLAND OR IRRIGATION , 1.5 BALES

393

Maintaining data quality in an environmental testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In today's competitive and highly litigious world, it is critical that any laboratory generating data for the environmental and allied industries have a world-class Quality Assurance Program. This Plan must conform to the requirements of every agency and client with whom the lab does business. The goal of such a program is data defensibility; i.e., data validity. Data (usually qualitative analyte [compound or element] identifications and quantitative numerical results) are the end results of nearly all analytical laboratory processes, and the source of revenue. Clients pay for results. The clients expect the results to be accurate, precise, and repeatable. If their data has to go to court, the laboratory will be called upon to defend the accuracy and precision of their work. Without a strong QA program, this will be impossible. The potential implications and repercussions of non-defensible lab data are far-reaching and very costly in terms of loss of future revenues and in legal judgments.

Cohen, Roy J.

2001-03-05

394

Testing general relativity in space-borne and astronomical laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of space-based experiments and astronomical observations designed to test the theory of general relativity is surveyed. Consideration is given to tests of post-Newtonian gravity, searches for feeble short-range forces and gravitomagnetism, improved measurements of parameterized post-Newtonian parameter values, explorations of post-Newtonian physics, tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, observational tests of post-Newtonian orbital effects, and efforts to detect quadrupole and dipole radiation damping. Recent numerical results are presented in tables.

Will, Clifford M.

1989-01-01

395

Evaluation of latex-Rickettsia rickettsii test for Rocky Mountain spotted fever in 11 laboratories.  

PubMed Central

A latex-Rickettsia rickettsii test for detection of antibodies to Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) was evaluated during the 1980 RMSF season in 11 laboratories in nine states where the disease is endemic. In a double-blind study, all sera submitted to each laboratory for RMSF testing were also examined by the latex-R. rickettsii test. A portion of each specimen was then sent to the New York State laboratory for testing by latex-R. rickettsii and by the reference microimmunofluorescence test. Results were exchanged at the end of the examination period. At the usual ratio of reactive to nonreactive sera encountered in a diagnostic laboratory on a day-to-day basis, the efficiency of the latex-R. rickettsii test relative to microimmunofluorescence was 96.79% for New York and 93.30% for the collaborating laboratories. Both the latex and microimmunofluorescence tests detected antibodies to RMSF within 7 to 9 days of onset. With the latex-R. rickettsii test--but not necessarily with microimmunofluorescence--a high titer (greater than or equal to 128) on a single serum was diagnostic of active RMSF. Changes in serum titer for patients with multiple sera were similar for both tests. The test detects rickettsial antibodies in patients with active infection, but in most cases it does not detect antibody in patients with past infection. Test reactivity could not be uniquely linked to a particular immunoglobulin class. PMID:6415103

Hechemy, K E; Michaelson, E E; Anacker, R L; Zdeb, M; Sasowski, S J; Kleeman, K T; Joseph, J M; Patel, J; Kudlac, J; Elliott, L B

1983-01-01

396

Underground test area quality assurance project plan, Nevada test site, Nevada. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is one of the planning documents used for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which falls under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP). The Nevada ERP consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The UGTA Subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. The purposes of the UGTA Subproject are to define boundaries around each Corrective Action Unit (CAU), as defined by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), that establish areas containing water that may be unsafe for domestic or municipal use and to establish monitoring programs for each CAU that will verify modeling upon which the boundaries are based.

NONE

1997-04-01

397

HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

KIRK WINTERHOLLER

2008-02-25

398

Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

1984-01-01

399

PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2010-05-21

400

Laboratory Tests of Polymer Fluids at Geothermal Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work done to characterize by chemical methods the temperature\\/time degradation behavior of polymer based fluids that may be used in stimulating geothermal wells by fracturing. The polymers tested were hydroxypropylguar (HP guar), hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and XC Polymer. Also two commercially available cross-linked HP guar systems were tested. The paper covers the development of analytical techniques

Donald Tyssee; R. Caenn; O. J. Vetter

1982-01-01

401

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and [sup 137]Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

1992-09-01

402

6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 9 (fuel), and that on the right houses the equipment room. The corrugated aluminum shed that is taller than the main building in the left foreground houses a citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room), the interior of which may be seen in CO-88-A-21. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

403

Assessment of fracture-sampling techniques for laboratory tests on core  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the site characterization work to be done at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, a candidate site for the first mined-geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste, laboratory tests are proposed to evaluate fluid flow in single fractures. Laboratory and onsite tests were conducted to develop methods for collecting rock-core samples containing single fractures for the subsequent laboratory tests. Techniques for collecting rock cores with axial (parallel to the core axis) and radial (perpendicular to the core axis) fractures are discussed.

Severson, G.R.; Boernge, J.M.

1991-01-01

404

Test of a LYSO calorimeter prototype readout by large-area Silicon PhotoMultipliers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger-Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (˜ 106). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9 ˜ 18X0 LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4 × 4 mm2 SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter has been tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100-500 MeV energy range.

Guffanti, D.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Vallazza, E.; Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.

2014-06-01

405

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast from hill north of structure. The building wing in the right foreground houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. Test Cell 10 is located in the center background, Test Cell 9 is at the far left, and the equipment room is in the immediate left foreground. The control room is in the center of the structure and abuts the aforementioned test cell and equipment room wings. This structure served as a facility for testing, handling, and storage of Titan II's hydrazine- and nitrogen teteroxide-based propellant system components for compatability determinations. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

406

Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.  

PubMed

Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles. PMID:20426275

Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

2010-03-01

407

Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of serological tests (excluding point-of-care tests) for the diagnosis of syphilis in Canada  

PubMed Central

Syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, is an infection recognized since antiquity. It was first reported at the end of the 15th century in Europe. Infections may be sexually transmitted as well as spread from an infected mother to her fetus or through blood transfusions. The laboratory diagnosis of syphilis infection is complex. Because this organism cannot be cultured, serology is used as the principal diagnostic method. Some of the issues related to serological diagnoses are that antibodies take time to appear after infection, and serology screening tests require several secondary confirmatory tests that can produce complex results needing interpretation by experts in the field. Traditionally, syphilis screening was performed using either rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests, and confirmed by treponemal tests such as MHA-TP, TPPA or FTA-Abs. Currently, that trend is reversed, ie, most of the laboratories in Canada now screen for syphilis using treponemal enzyme immunoassays and confirm the status of infection using rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests; this approach is often referred to as the reverse algorithm. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, treponemal and non-treponemal tests utilized in Canada, the current status of serological tests for syphilis in Canada, the complexity of serological diagnosis of syphilis infection and serological testing algorithms. Both traditional and reverse sequence algorithms are recommended and the algorithm used should be based on a combination of local disease epidemiology, test volumes, performance of the proposed assays and available resources.

Levett, Paul N; Fonseca, Kevin; Tsang, Raymond SW; Kadkhoda, Kamran; Serhir, Bouchra; Radons, Sandra M; Morshed, Muhammad

2015-01-01

408

PORCINE EPIDEMIC DIARRHEA VIRUS (PEDV) TESTING SUMMARY REPORT This report summarizes NAHLN laboratory testing for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and covers testing through  

E-print Network

PORCINE EPIDEMIC DIARRHEA VIRUS (PEDV) TESTING SUMMARY REPORT This report summarizes NAHLN laboratory testing for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and covers testing through 2 in this report are provided at the end of this report. CRITICAL UPDATES Test Results This Week Cumulative PEDV

Blanchette, Robert A.

409

Osteoporosis in men: the value of laboratory testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Evaluation of 234 men referred for osteoporosis found many with undiagnosed secondary causes and multiple unrecognized risk\\u000a factors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  Studies in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis suggest that many have unrecognized disorders affecting bone. Men are considered\\u000a more likely to have underlying, possibly correctable causes. We studied the prevalence of risk factors, secondary causes,\\u000a and laboratory abnormalities in men with and without

C. S. Ryan; V. I. Petkov; R. A. Adler

2011-01-01

410

ChemCam for Mars Science Laboratory rover, undergoing pre-flight testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners developed a laser instrument, ChemCam, that will ride on the elevated mast of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The system allows Curiosity to "zap" rocks from a distance, reading their chemical composition through spectroscopic analysis. In this video, laboratory shaker-table testing of the instrument ensures that all of its components are solidly attached and resistant to damage from the rigors of launch, travel and landing.

None

2011-10-20

411

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

1999-01-01

412

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01

413

Laboratory and field evaluation of a new rapid test for detecting Wuchereria bancrofti antigen in human blood.  

PubMed

Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) guidelines call for using filarial antigen testing to identify endemic areas that require mass drug administration (MDA) and for post-MDA surveillance. We compared a new filarial antigen test (the Alere Filariasis Test Strip) with the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test that has been used by the GPELF for more than 10 years. Laboratory testing of 227 archived serum or plasma samples showed that the two tests had similar high rates of sensitivity and specificity and > 99% agreement. However, the test strip detected 26.5% more people with filarial antigenemia (124/503 versus 98/503) and had better test result stability than the card test in a field study conducted in a filariasis-endemic area in Liberia. Based on its increased sensitivity and other practical advantages, we believe that the test strip represents a major step forward that will be welcomed by the GPELF and the filariasis research community. PMID:23690552

Weil, Gary J; Curtis, Kurt C; Fakoli, Lawrence; Fischer, Kerstin; Gankpala, Lincoln; Lammie, Patrick J; Majewski, Andrew C; Pelletreau, Sonia; Won, Kimberly Y; Bolay, Fatorma K; Fischer, Peter U

2013-07-01

414

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-09-01

415

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-01-01

416

Laboratorial simulation on soil erosion under different vegetation coverage in Southwest Karst Area, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

n Abstract-In order to understand soil erosion characteristics on different vegetation coverage in karst mountain area in southwest of China, 12 tests of soil erosion simulation were carried out according to the land surface features and meteorological data in this region. The results showed that slop runoff ratio which was after 180 ? 300s changed little, and the average runoff

Xiongfei Cai; Ji Wang; Yulun An; Wenli Dan

2011-01-01

417

Exclusionary manipulation of carbon permit markets: a laboratory test  

E-print Network

The experiment reported here tests the case of so-called exclusionary manipulation of emission permit markets, i.e., when a dominant firm -- here a monopolist -- increases its holding of permits in order to raise its rivals' ...

Carlén, Björn.

418

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DAEN-CWE-HY) Washington, DC 20314. (g) Reports of testing results. Final reports of results will be submitted in accordance...Washington, DC 20314. Copies of reports of scientific or technical activities will be transmitted to...

2011-07-01

419

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...DAEN-CWE-HY) Washington, DC 20314. (g) Reports of testing results. Final reports of results will be submitted in accordance...Washington, DC 20314. Copies of reports of scientific or technical activities will be transmitted to...

2014-07-01

420

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DAEN-CWE-HY) Washington, DC 20314. (g) Reports of testing results. Final reports of results will be submitted in accordance...Washington, DC 20314. Copies of reports of scientific or technical activities will be transmitted to...

2012-07-01

421

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DAEN-CWE-HY) Washington, DC 20314. (g) Reports of testing results. Final reports of results will be submitted in accordance...Washington, DC 20314. Copies of reports of scientific or technical activities will be transmitted to...

2013-07-01

422

The Department of Energy Nevada Test Site Remote Area Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Area Monitoring System was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for DOE test directors at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to verify radiological conditions are safe after a nuclear test. In the unlikely event of a venting as a result of a nuclear test, this system provides radiological and meteorological data to Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) computers where mesoscale models are used to predict downwind exposure rates. The system uses a combination of hardwired radiation sensors and satellite based data acquisition units with their own radiation sensors to measure exposure rates in remote areas of the NTS. The satellite based data acquisition units are available as small, Portable Remote Area Monitors (RAMs) for rapid deployment, and larger, Semipermanent RAMs that can have meteorological towers. The satellite based stations measure exposure rates and transmit measurements to the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) where they are relayed to Direct Readout Ground Stations (DRGS) at the NTS and Los Alamos. Computers process the data and display results in the NTS Operations Coordination Center. Los Alamos computers and NTS computers are linked together through a wide area network, providing remote redundant system capability. Recently, LANL, expanded the system to take radiological and meteorological measurements in communities in the western United States. The system was also expanded to acquire data from Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS) that transmit through GOES. The addition of Portable and Semipermanent RAMs to the system has vastly expanded monitoring capabilities at NTS and can be used to take measurements anywhere in this hemisphere.

Sanders, L.D.; Hart, O.F.

1993-06-09

423

Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE\\/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed (“home-brewed”) tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and

Holger F. Rabenau; Harald H. Kessler; Marhild Kortenbusch; Andreas Steinhorst; Reinhard B. Raggam; Annemarie Berger

2007-01-01

424

Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

2009-01-01

425

Summary of well-testing activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1975-1983  

SciTech Connect

Well test data collected from various geothermal fields by the geothermal group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are presented. The type of well tests conducted, the instrumentation used and the data collected are described. Experience gained through interpretation of the data has helped identify problems in test procedures and interpretative methods.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1983-08-01

426

FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

2009-01-01

427

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

428

Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

Ludowise, J.D.

1994-05-01

429

Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the

Feiyue Wang; Richard R. Goulet; Peter M. Chapman

2004-01-01

430

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and work in a laboratory-type environment or in the field, as described...sampling, continuously extract and store a sample of raw or dilute exhaust...test engines in a laboratory-type environment or in the field. (1) This...

2012-07-01

431

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and work in a laboratory-type environment or in the field, as described...sampling, continuously extract and store a sample of raw or dilute exhaust...test engines in a laboratory-type environment or in the field. (1) This...

2013-07-01

432

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and work in a laboratory-type environment or in the field, as described...sampling, continuously extract and store a sample of raw or dilute exhaust...test engines in a laboratory-type environment or in the field. (1) This...

2011-07-01

433

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...and work in a laboratory-type environment or in the field, as described...sampling, continuously extract and store a sample of raw or dilute exhaust...test engines in a laboratory-type environment or in the field. (1) This...

2014-07-01

434

Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement  

E-print Network

Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement Vincent Vincent.garnier@univ-amu.fr ABSTRACT The evaluation of mechanical and chemical properties of concrete laws from the laboratory between non-destructive measurements and characteristics of the concrete

Boyer, Edmond

435

A Laboratory Test for the Examination of Alactic Running Performance  

PubMed Central

A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg) participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s-1. The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2), an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml), the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W), and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N). The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01) as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01). The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for any other running discipline. Key Points New testing procedure for the evaluation of alactic running performance. 10s treadmill sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity similar to a bob sleigh start. Treadmill motor is used with inverted polarity to establish mechanical resistance rather than acceleration. Highly significant correlations found between test criteria and alactic performance measures. PMID:24501570

Kibele, Armin; Behm, David

2005-01-01

436

Modeling and testing of EVs — Preliminary study and laboratory development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and

Guang-Ya Yang; Francesco Marra; Arne Hejde Nielsen; Chresten Traholt

2011-01-01

437

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01

438

The Comparative Method, Hypothesis Testing and Phylogenetic Analysis--An Introductory Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory sequence that allows students to use traditional comparative methods, scientific methodology, and modern molecular data bases to test hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. (Contains 13 references.) (ASK)

Singer, Fred; Hagen, Joel B.; Sheehy, Robert R.

2001-01-01

439

Laboratory effectiveness testing of water-in-oil emulsion breakers  

SciTech Connect

The physics and chemistry of water-in-oil emulsions dominate the development of effectiveness tests. Emulsions are variable in stability--this variability is largely dependent on oil type and degree of weathering. These factors complicate the development of a test. Emulsions which have low stability will apparently break easily with chemical emulsion breakers. Broken emulsions will form a foam-like material, called rag, which retains water which is not part of the stable emulsions. Analytical methods used to determine the final stability of the broken or unbroken emulsion were evaluated. Measurements of water content and viscosity measurements show correlation to emulsion stability. Viscosity provides a more reliable measure of emulsion stability but water content measurements are more convenient and are largely used in this study. Twelve tests were developed in the past. Two testing methods have been developed to a usable stage. These tests are described and data using them provided. The effects of mixing time, agent amount, settling time and mixing energy on effectiveness results are presented.

Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Bier, I.; Conrod, D. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Tennyson, E. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States)

1995-06-01

440

Seed dressing pesticides on springtails in two ecotoxicological laboratory tests.  

PubMed

Terrestrial ecotoxicological tests are powerful tools for assessing the ecological risks that pesticides pose to soil invertebrates, but they are rarely used to evaluate seed dressing pesticides. This study investigated the effects of seed dressing pesticides on survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola), using standardized ecotoxicological tests (after ISO guidelines with few adaptations for tropical conditions). Commercial formulations of five seed dressing pesticides were tested individually in Tropical Artificial Soil (TAS): the insecticides imidacloprid, fipronil, thiametoxam, and the fungicides captan and carboxin+thiram. Thiametoxam, captan, and carboxin+thiram were only lethal to F. candida at the highest concentration tested (1000mg of active ingredient kg(-1) of dry soil). Imidacloprid and fipronil were lethal at lower concentrations (100 and 10mg a.i. kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively), however, these concentrations were much higher than those predicted (PEC) for soil. Imidacloprid and fipronil were the most toxic pesticides in both tests, reducing significantly collembolan reproduction (EC20=0.02 and 0.12mga.i.kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively). Further studies under more realistic conditions are needed, since imidacloprid and fipronil reduced collembolan reproduction at concentrations below or close to their respective PECs. PMID:24785712

Alves, Paulo Roger L; Cardoso, Elke J B N; Martines, Alexandre M; Sousa, José Paulo; Pasini, Amarildo

2014-07-01

441

Ecotoxicological characterisation of 12 incineration ashes using 6 laboratory tests.  

PubMed

In the European Waste List (2000/532/EC as amended) the ash of municipal waste incineration is defined as a so called mirror entry. This waste can be classified as hazardous or non-hazardous depending on the content of hazardous substances and other risk properties. For the assignment of waste in mirror entries, 14 criteria are defined. One of the criteria is H14 "ecotoxic". In the presented study, the ecotoxicological potential of 12 ashes from different incineration plants has been assessed using biological test systems. The test battery included aquatic tests with eluates (algae, daphnids, and luminescent bacteria) and terrestrial tests with solid waste (plants, earthworms and bacteria). The test results revealed a clear ecotoxicological hazard potential for some of the MWI ashes. Despite the fact that fresh ashes were several times more toxic than aged ashes both groups did not differ consistently in terms of toxicity. The results show also that there is no correlation between the biological effects and the analyzed chemical compounds of the ash samples. PMID:19442505

Römbke, J; Moser, Th; Moser, H

2009-09-01

442

ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

2014-07-01

443

Corrective action unit modeling approach for the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The modeling approach serves as a template for the development, application, and interpretation of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) - scale saturated groundwater flow and transport model (herein called the CAU model) to be used for forecasting radionuclide migration in all Nevada Test Site (NTS) CAUs, consistent with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy. A summary of the project background, the FFACO and strategy, and the roles of participating agencies, is provided followed by a description of the contents of the document.

NONE

1998-03-01

444

Visual acuity testing. From the laboratory to the clinic.  

PubMed

The need for precision in visual acuity assessment for low vision research led to the design of the Bailey-Lovie letter chart. This paper describes the decisions behind the design principles used and how the logarithmic progression of sizes led to the development of the logMAR designation of visual acuity and the improved sensitivity gained from letter-by-letter scoring. While the principles have since been adopted by most major clinical research studies and for use in most low vision clinics, use of charts of this design and application of letter-by-letter scoring are also important for the accurate assessment of visual acuity in any clinical setting. We discuss the test protocols that should be applied to visual acuity testing and the use of other tests for assessing profound low vision when the limits of visual acuity measurement by letter charts are reached. PMID:23685164

Bailey, Ian L; Lovie-Kitchin, Jan E

2013-09-20

445

Laboratory testing of sealants with a marble substrate  

SciTech Connect

Polyurethane and silicone sealants are widely specified for installations with porous substrates such as some stones. However, when a sealant is used against such surfaces, there is a potential for a lack of adequate adhesion, or staining of the tone by misapplication or migration of the liquid components of the sealant system, such as primers or plasticizers in the formulation. Some varieties of marble in particular have been reported to be susceptible to staining and discoloration over time from sealants. Application of new sealant over existing sealants is also of great concern for remedial applications. Determining the level of substrate preparation necessary to achieve adequate bond is critical to the success of the remedial construction project. This paper discusses the development and results of a test program conducted to determine the relative performance of sealants installed on a white marble substrate. The tests performed included wet adhesion tests, accelerated weathering studies, and staining due to plasticizer migration.

Farmer, M.C. [Wiss, Janney Elstner Associates, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Cechner, R.A. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., Northbrook, IL (United States)

1996-12-31

446

Laboratory tests of polymer fluids at geothermal temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes work done to characterize by chemical methods the temperature/time degradation behavior of polymer based fluids that may be used in stimulating geothermal wells by fracturing. The polymers tested were hydroxypropylguar (HP guar), hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and XC Polymer. Also two commercially available cross-linked HP guar systems were tested. The paper covers the development of analytical techniques for characterizing the polymers and the results of static and dynamic high temperature aging of the polymers in various salt water environments. The fluids were tested at 150, 200 and 250 degreees C. The paper covers the implications of these results based on the time/temperature degradation of the polymers and the relative ease of removing the degraded polymer from sandpacks. 4 refs.

Tyssee, D.A.; Caenn, R.; Vetter, O.J.

1982-01-01

447

An in situ moisture monitoring system for a solid low-level radioactive disposal pit at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G  

SciTech Connect

At the end of the 1950's, Los Alamos National Laboratory began to develop a Laboratory-wide, shallow-land, solid low-level radioactive waste disposal area on top of Mesita del Buey at TA-54, Area G. An in situ hydrologic monitoring system in the zone of aeration was developed in early 1990 to detect the presence of the infiltration of meteoric water into Pit 37 at Area G. Monitoring the water movement through the pit cap into the waste with leaching and transport the containment rock and possible contamination of the main aquifer is of primary concern. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Purtymun, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Geology)

1990-01-01

448

Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

2012-01-01

449

Origins and development of the National Laboratory System for public health testing.  

PubMed

Although not recognized as such, a National Laboratory System (NLS) has existed since the inception of public health laboratory (PHL) testing more than a century ago. The NLS has always relied upon the participation of clinical laboratories, both to report test results that represent public health threats and to submit specimens and isolates to PHLs for additional or confirmatory testing. Historically, a number of factors have hindered the strengthening of the relationships between clinical laboratories and PHLs, but the reality of bioterrorism and subsequent focus on strengthening public-private relationships has stimulated the development of a more robust NLS. Since 2002, there has been substantial strengthening of the NLS through the sharing of lessons learned from several demonstration projects. There is a growing emphasis on defining critical elements of the NLS, including the State Public Health Laboratory System (SPH Laboratory System) and the functions of the Laboratory Program Advisor, a position that every state should have at the center of its laboratory system's capacity-building. Additional strengthening of the NLS is occurring through (1) national biennial measurement of state PHLs' abilities to meet the Core Functions and Capabilities of State PHLs, (2) the new Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP) for the SPH Laboratory System, and (3) sharing ideas to integrate and improve the SPH Laboratory System (e.g., using the L-SIP Online Resource Center). Public health emergencies, such as the recent H1N1 epidemic, illustrate and reinforce the need for a strong NLS within which federal, public health, and clinical (i.e., hospital and private reference) laboratories function in close collaboration. PMID:20518442

Astles, J Rex; White, Vanessa A; Williams, Laurina O

2010-01-01

450

A proposed test to support the clinical movement analysis laboratory accreditation process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a testing methodology and resultant set of four variables that can be used to quickly and easily document the correct installation, configuration, and combined working status of force platform (FP) and three-dimensional (3D) motion capture components of a clinical movement analysis (CMA) laboratory. Using a rigid, rod-shaped testing device, CMA laboratory data are collected simultaneously from the

John P. Holden; W. Scott Selbie; Steven J. Stanhope

2003-01-01

451

Results of ground-water tracer tests using tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water tracer test were conducted at two sites in the radioactive-waste disposal area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1977 to 1982. The purpose of the tests was to determine if the regolith beds had weathered sufficiently to permit the substantial flow of water across them. About 50 curies of tritium dissolved in water were used as the tracer in one site, and about 100 curies at the other. Results demonstrated that ground water is able to flow through joints in the weathered bedding and that the direction of the water-table gradient is the primary factor governint flow direction. Nevertheless, the substantial lateral spread of the plume as it developed showed that bedding-plane openings can still exert a significant secondary influence on flow direction in weathered rock. About 3,500 water samples from the injection and observation wells were analyzed for tritium during the test period. Concentrations detected spanned 11 orders of magnitude. Measurable concentrations were still present in the two injection wells and most observation wells 5 years after the tracer was introduced. Matrix diffusion may have played a significant role in these tests. The process would account for the sustained concentrations of tritium at many of the observation wells, the long-term residual concentrations at the injection and observation wells, and the apparent slow movement of the centers of mass across the two well fields. The process also would have implications regarding aquifer remediation. Other tracer tests have been conducted in the regolith of the Conasauga Group. Results differ from the results described in this report.

Webster, D.A.

1996-01-01

452

Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

NONE

1996-02-09

453

Biochemical laboratory tests in viral hepatitis and other hepatic diseases  

PubMed Central

The differential diagnosis between viral hepatitis and other liver diseases (particularly obstructive jaundice) is often difficult on purely clinical grounds. Damage to the liver causes changes in the pattern of the serum enzymes and this has led to the development in recent years of a number of enzyme tests. The authors have amassed evidence to show that the most useful of these is determination of the levels of serum glutamic oxalacetic and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGOT and SGPT), coupled with calculation of the SGOT/SGPT ratio. It is characteristic of viral hepatitis that both levels are greatly increased, but the SGOT/SGPT ratio, normally greater than one, falls considerably below his figure. In a few cases of obstructive jaundice, the serum transaminase picture may initially resemble that in viral hepatitis, but the differential diagnosis can be established by repeating the determinations at intervals. Other enzyme tests, such as determination of alkaline phosphatase and leucylaminopeptidase, may be used to confirm the biliary obstruction. Flocculation tests and electrophoretic determination of the plasma protein picture, while of limited value in the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis, are useful in conjunction with the serum transaminase test for assessing the activity of the disease and any tendency to progress towards “active” chronic hepatitis or post-hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:14292063

De Ritis, Fernando; Giusti, Giuseppe; Piccinino, Felice; Cacciatore, Luigi

1965-01-01

454

NEUROMUSCULAR CLINICAL LABORATORY: Antibody Testing Neuromuscular Disease Center  

E-print Network

________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ ================================================================== ANTIBODY TESTS & INTERPRETATIONS REQUESTED Syndrome Panels Antibody Panels: Individual [ ] Motor Neuropathy-Kleffner variant (IgM & IgG) Other: [ ] _________________________ [ ] Sensory (± Motor) Neuropathy: IgG vs: Sulfatide & GM1 IgM vs: MAG, GD1b, TS-HDS, Sulfatide, HH3 [ ] Peripheral Neuropathy: Sensory Neuropathy + GM

Baloh, Bob

455

An aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and surrounding area, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over four areas in the California cities of Dublin, Livermore, and Tracy from 8 through 29 April 1986. Although a similar aerial survey had been previously conducted over Livermore and Tracy in 1975, this was the first such survey performed over the city of Dublin. The surveyed areas included the Camp Parks training facility in Dublin; the Las Positas Golf Course and the Livermore sewage treatment plant in west Livermore; the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities in east Livermore; and the LLNL facilities at Site 300 located three miles southwest of the city of Tracy, California. Only naturally-occurring radiation was detected over the Camp Parks area in Dublin and over the golf course and sewage treatment plant in west Livermore. Man-made radionuclides were detected over the LLNL facilities in east Livermore and over Site 300. These man-made sources were typical of source storage and radiological activities conducted at the facilities. In areas where only naturally-occurring gamma emitters were detected, the observed range of activity was essentially the same in both the 1975 and 1986 surveys. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

456

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

2010-07-01

457

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

2014-07-01

458

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

2011-07-01

459

Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Bartholomay, R.C.

1990-08-01

460

Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk,