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1

Testing of large area drift chambers at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large area (0.5 m×0.5 m) drift chambers developed for the imaging system for the Advanced Gamma Ray Astronomy Telescope Experiment (AGATE), sensitive in the energy range 20 MeV to 100 GeV, have been tested at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (SAL) in March 1995. Testing was performed with the instrument configured in 3 different angles relative to the incident photon beam

R. Cuddapah; D. L. Bertsch; J. R. Catelli; B. L. Dingus; J. A. Esposito; C. E. Fichtel; R. C. Hartman; S. D. Hunter; R. Mukherjee; D. J. Thompson; J. M. Vogt

1995-01-01

2

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2013-07-01

3

Testing shields in the Argonne National Laboratory fuel conditioning facility support areas.  

PubMed

Testing has been completed for two lightly shielded areas that support operations in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Operational requirements dictated the use of a radiography source containing 0.44 TBq (12 Ci) of 192Ir to challenge reinforced concrete and steel shields that surround a decontamination, maintenance, and repair area for contaminated equipment used in hot cell operations. A more intense source containing 0.89 TBq (24 Ci) of 192Ir was used to test lead shot and steel shields around tanks in a radioactive liquid waste system and the boundaries of the room that contained it. Measurement procedures were developed to find design flaws and construction deficiencies while minimizing radiation exposure to test participants. While the shields are adequate to limit gamma ray deep dose equivalents to 10 mSv y(-1) (1 rem y(-1)) or less to facility personnel, several modifications were necessary to assure that the attenuation is adequate to keep dose rates less than 5 microSv h(-1) (0.5 mrem h(-1)) in normally occupied areas. PMID:8972837

Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

1997-01-01

4

Summary of the 1987 soil sampling effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Test Reactor Area Paint Shop Ditch.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sampling of the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Paint Shop Ditch at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was initiated in compliance with the Interim Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sampling of ...

T. R. Wood J. L. Knight C. L. Hertzler

1989-01-01

5

3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

6

Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

Brenda R. Pace

2003-07-01

7

Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer.

Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Isotope Geology; Kuntz, M.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Branch of Central Regional Geology

1994-12-31

8

Laboratory research on effective test area of short-crested waves generated by two-sided segmented wavemakers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The size and shape of the effective test area are crucial to consider when short-crested waves are created by segmented wavemakers. The range of the effective test area of short-crested waves simulated by two-sided segmented wavemakers is analyzed in this paper. The experimental investigation on the wave field distribution of short-crested waves generated by two-sided segmented wavemakers is conducted by using an array of wave gauges. Wave spectra and directional spreading function are analyzed and the results show that when the main direction is at a certain angle with the normal line of wave generators, the wave field of 3D short-crested waves generated by two-sided segmented wavemakers has good spatial uniformity within the model test area. The effective test area can provide good wave environments for seakeeping model tests of various ocean engineering structures in the deep ocean engineering basin.

Li, Jun; Chen, Gang; Yang, Jian-min; Peng, Tao

2014-04-01

9

Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

Hamilton, Jeff

2004-01-01

10

1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE TESTING AREA, AND PUMP TESTING TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

11

Selected stratigraphic contacts for drill holes in LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) use areas of Yucca Flat, NTS (Nevada Test Site)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a compilation of selected stratigraphic contacts in drill holes in areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site (NTS), used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data presented for each drill hole includes the following: (1) hole name; (2) total depth (TD) of drill hole at completion of drilling; (3) depth below surface to selected stratigraphic contacts;

S. L. Jr. Drellack; A. P. Cavazos

1986-01-01

12

Lithology and stratigraphy of drill holes completed during 1986 in LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) use areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: Volume 8  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a compilation of data from drill holes completed during the calendar year 1986 in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Data presented in this report include hole locations, drilling statistics, a supplemental data sheet, stratigraphy and lithology penetrated, and selected geophysical logs including a log of drilling penetration rate. Lithologic

A. P. Cavazos; S. L. Jr. Drellack; W. T. Hughes; P. H. Thompson

1987-01-01

13

Lithology and stratigraphy of drill holes completed during 1988 in LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) use areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Volume 10: Geologic report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a compilation of data from drill holes completed during calendar year 1988 in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Data presented include: Hole locations and other pertinent physical data; lithologic descriptions and stratigraphy for each hole; a graphic presentation for each hole (except UE-3e No. 3 and U-4u No. 1)

S. L. Jr. Drellack; P. H. Thompson; C. J. Rayburn

1989-01-01

14

Laboratory testing in pharmacies.  

PubMed

Point-of-care testing (POCT) is traditionally defined as laboratory diagnostics performed at or near the site where clinical care is delivered. POCT thereby combines sample collection, analysis, and reporting of results into a robust integrated testing structure, with a simple user interface. The availability of reliable devices and consolidated tests for patient screening, diagnosis and monitoring has allowed broad diffusion of POCT to the patient's bedside, physician offices, pharmacies, other healthcare facilities, supermarkets, and even into the patient's home. However, current evidence clearly shows that POCT can be subjective, and might even amplify the traditional problems encountered in the preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical phases of the total testing process. This may especially be seen in inappropriateness of the test request, collection of unsuitable biological materials, inaccurate test performances, larger analytical imprecision, unsuitable report formatting, delayed reporting of critical value, and report recording/retrieval. POCT patient care service in the pharmacy can be regarded as a valuable option for the present and future since it might be beneficial for all parties. However, several economic, clinical and regulatory issues should also be addressed before this opportunity can turn into a real advantage for patients and the entire healthcare system. The most appropriate allocation of POCT within the diagnostic pathway, as well as its adjuvant role in screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diseases should also be clearly established in order to prevent widespread and deregulated implementation. PMID:20441470

Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Trenti, Tommaso

2010-07-01

15

Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

Bayliss, S.C. [DanShar, Inc., Bosque Farms, NM (United States); Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project

1996-04-01

16

Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

2013-06-01

17

Comparing laboratory column test treatments with field profiles of fecal indicator bacteria and virus from concentrated source areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fecal contamination of potable water supplies is prevalent throughout the developing world. In rural Bangladesh, groundwater contamination of shallow unconfined aquifers is attributed to the infiltration of fecal organisms from sewage ponds, sewage ditches and latrines. However, few studies conclusively link sources to wells at the scale required for microbial transport to occur. We present a combined field and laboratory investigation into the transport of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enteric viral indicator F+ RNA coliphage (MS-2) using drive point piezometers and extracted sediment cores. Fieldwork and coring took place in the Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Field measurements at the 100-cm scale were made using an array of three drive-point piezometers under highly contaminated ponds and canals over a 10-day period during the peak of the monsoon season. The profiles of E. coli detected under ponds and canals by a culture-based most probable number method were consistent with a first order filtration rate over the distances studied and filtration rates ranged from 1 - 8 m-1. In order to determine possible attachment mechanisms and the influence of sediment treatments applied in laboratory testing, duplicate column transport studies at the 10-cm scale were performed on intact cores processed immediately on-site, intact cores preserved by freezing, dried repacked sediment, acid-washed repacked sediment, and a uniform silica sand. Two ionic strengths (3.5 and 20 mM) were used to encompass the range of electrical conductivity typically found in the shallow portion of the aquifer. Columns were dissected and the attached E. coli quantified by section. Even at the solution chemistry less favorable for particle attachment (low ionic strength), filtration rates for the core tested on-site predict a transport distance of 0.5m for a 4-log unit reduction in E. coli concentration. Although the filtration rates found in the field study are lower than those found from column studies, calculations using the highest initial concentration and the lowest filtration rate observed predict travel distances (4-log reduction) up to 7m within the aquifer. This finding has important implications for the microbial safety of populations relying on shallow untreated well water because it indicates that factors such as preferential flow pathways or poor well construction may be more important than transport along a hydraulic gradient, even in a relatively uniform sandy aquifer with concentrated sewage sources.

Feighery, J.; Culligan, P.; Ferguson, A. S.; Mailloux, B. J.; McKay, L. D.; Ahmed, K.; Alam, M.; Huq, M.; Emch, M.; Serre, M. L.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

2010-12-01

18

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Four - Appendix G  

SciTech Connect

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix G. Appendix G is a presentation of VOC chromatography data collected during the study. Information on the calibration curves and calibration checks used as well as the sample GC reports themselves are included here. The concentration values presented on the GC reports are calculation using the data from the applicable calibration curve and any necessary dilutions which were made.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

19

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

2002-06-01

20

Laboratory Testing of Marble.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effect of the thermal cycling was studied with four types of marble. The tested marble types were Altissimo (APA), Lorano pradetta 1 (LPA), Lorano Pradetta 2 (LPE), and Gioia (GPE). The samples were sawn from a large marble plate and the cross section...

T. Kirkkomaeki

2001-01-01

21

Misleading biochemical laboratory test results  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients.

Nanji, Amin A.

1984-01-01

22

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume One - Main Text and Appendices A and B  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing in situ chemical oxidation for remediating the secondary source of groundwater contaminants at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) Site. The study involved trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated media (groundwater, soil, and sludge) from TAN. The effectiveness of the selected oxidant, potassium permanganate (KMn0(sub4)), was evaluated at multiple oxidant and contaminant concentrations. Experiments were performed to determine the oxidant demand of each medium and the rate of TCE oxidation. The experiments were performed under highly controlled conditions (gas-tight reactors, constant 12C temperature). Multiple parameter were monitored over time including MN0(sub 4) and TCE concentrations and pH.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

23

Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University.

Murad, C.; Rubio, D.; Ponce, S.; Álvarez Abri, A.; Terrón, A.; Vicencio, D.; Fascioli, E.

2007-11-01

24

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01

25

A/M Area Metallurgical Laboratory: Summary of Phase I Characterization Well Installation, Cone Penetrometer Testing and Soil Coring for Soil Headspace Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Phase I characterization of chlorinated solvent contamination in the regulatory-defined uppermost aquifer (includes the M Area, Lost Lake and middle sand aquifer zones) within the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) of the A/M Area.

Van Pelt, R.S.

1999-11-05

26

5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE EAST TEST AREA. 1955, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

27

300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-09-30

28

Laboratory testing for factor inhibitors.  

PubMed

Inhibitor assays are performed when patients present with unexplained prolonged routine coagulation test times and unexpected and/or unusual bleeding (potential for acquired haemophilia) as well as being a part of normal congenital haemophilia management and monitoring, particularly when bleeding occurs on therapy, or when increments in factor levels post-factor replacement remain lower than expected. In this article, we will describe the assays used, as well as their development, pitfalls in testing such as inter-laboratory variability and false negative/positive results, as well as some strategies for overcoming these pitfalls and potential alternative test approaches. The inter-laboratory coefficient of variation often approaches (and sometimes exceeds) 50%, as evidenced by various external quality assessment groups, and this variability has not improved over recent years. Additional important considerations include appropriate interpretation of test results, repeat testing for confirmation, and assessment of recovery as part of the diagnostic process. PMID:24762283

Favaloro, E J; Verbruggen, B; Miller, C H

2014-05-01

29

Laboratory test system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to develop a laboratory test capability for evaluating new and existing digital product designs. In recent years, Bendix Kansas City has become more active in syppling early development hardware to the design laboratories for evaluation. Because of the more complex electronic designs being used in new components, more highly automated test systems are needed to evaluate development hardware. To meet this requirement, a universal test system was developed to provide both basic test capabilities and flexibility to adapt easily to specific product applications. This laboratory evaluation system will reduce the need to develop complex dedicated test systems for each new product design, while still providing the benefits of an automated system. A special purpose interface chassis was designed and fabricated to permit a standardized interface between the test system and the product application. Connector assignments by system functions provide convenience and function isolation. Standard cables were used to reduce the need for special purpose hardware. Electrical testing of a developmental electronics assembly demonstrated the adaptability of this system for a typical product application. Both the interface hardware and the software were developed for this application.

Asher, G.L.

1980-03-01

30

Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

1997-11-01

31

222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

RUELAS, B.H.

2007-03-26

32

Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)  

SciTech Connect

A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct responsibility of the specific facility manager. The specific DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, guidance documents and good industry practices that serve as the basis for each element/subelement are identified and aligned with each subelement.

Kammenzind, D.E.

1997-05-28

33

Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures which were prepared for use in the national terminal waste storage program are presented. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and quality assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. The procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state of the art.

Shuri, F. S.; Cooper, J. D.; Hamill, M. L.

1981-10-01

34

Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.  

PubMed

The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006). PMID:19045633

Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

2008-09-01

35

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Confirming Anthrax Through the Laboratory Response Network Laboratory Testing - FAQs Collecting Specimens Recommended Specimens Information for Specific Groups Laboratory Professionals People Who Work with Animal Products Exposure to Hides/Drums Treatment of Products ...

36

Laboratory Testing of Prosthetic Heart Valves  

Microsoft Academic Search

A whole range of laboratory testing methods for prosthetic heart valves, such as steady flow testing, pulsatile flow testing, and fatigue testing, are presented. Comparative test results for various valve types are given and relative valve performance is discussed.

H Reul; M Giersiepen; E Knott

1987-01-01

37

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

2009-06-18

38

Unique test capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive testing capability has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories over the last three decades. This capability is primarily dedicated to obtaining test response data to substantiate analytical methods employed at the Laboratories. Unique instrumentation and data transmission techniques have been developed to recover test data. Emphasis has been placed on expeditious processing of test results for correlation with the

J. C. Bushnell; D. C. Bickel

1981-01-01

39

Testing in Nontraditional Curriculum Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Achievement testing in nontraditional curriculum areas (such as industrial arts, physical education, or music) provides an ideal opportunity for developing students' self-evaluation skills. While applying testing procedures, teachers demonstrate what skills deserve evaluation and how to evaluate them. This article describes objective approaches to…

Strathe, Marlene; Krajewski, Robert J.

1982-01-01

40

Testing containment of laboratory hoods  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory fume hoods often do not adequately provide protection to a chemist or technician at the hood. The reason for failure of the hoods to perform adequately are varied and, in many instances, difficult to determine. In some cases, the laboratory hood manufacturer has provided equipment that does not reflect the state of art in controlling laboratory exposures. In other cases, the architect or engineer has disregarded the function of the hood thus the design of the installation is faulty and the hood will not work. The contractor may have installed the system so poorly that it will not adequately function. Finally, the chemist or technician may misuse the hood, causing poor performance. This paper considers a method of evaluating the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Using the method, the paper examines several instances where the laboratory fume hood performed inadequately, quantifies the performance and identifies the cause of poor performance.

Knutson, G.W.

1987-06-01

41

Laboratory tests, interpretation, and use of resources  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed The overuse of laboratory testing has increased rapidly and is contributing to the financial strain on the health care system in Canada. Moreover, a substantial proportion of ordered tests are unnecessary. In a search of all the Canadian family physician residency programs, none lists laboratory training as mandatory or as an optional elective in its curriculum. Objective of program To introduce family medicine residents to appropriate and efficient use of laboratory tests. Program description The program was run as a series of identical 4-hour small group sessions to facilitate discussion and laboratory tours. The curriculum focused on 7 key topics: problems associated with laboratory testing, sources of laboratory errors, definitions of normal and abnormal test results, appropriate use of laboratory requisition forms, laboratory quality assurance methods, laboratory collection processes, and costs of common laboratory tests. Residents were taken to a patient specimen collection site for a tour and introduction, followed by approximately 2 hours of didactic sessions, and ending with a tour of a large tertiary care testing facility. Conclusion The program was very well received by family medicine residents and resulted in a substantial increase in residents’ self-assessed knowledge of the 7 topics covered in the curriculum. It is hoped that this program will fill an important gap in residency training and support residents’ competency in the “selectivity” domain of training.

Abbott, Marcia; Paulin, Heidi; Sidhu, Davinder; Naugler, Christopher

2014-01-01

42

Relay testing at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is conducting a seismic test program on relays. The purpose of the test program is to investigate the influence of various designs, electrical and vibration parameters on the seismic capacity levels. The first series of testing has been completed and performed at Wyle Laboratories. The major part of the test program consisted of single axis, single frequency sine dwell tests. Random multiaxis, multifrequency tests were also performed. Highlights of the test results as well as a description of the testing methods are presented in this paper. 10 figs.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.

1989-01-01

43

Laboratory Tests of Power Train Components.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of laboratory dynamometer testing of engine and power train components is to determine performance and endurance characteristics. The information desired is basically the same as that derived from engine testing. (Author)

1966-01-01

44

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2010-04-01

45

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2012-04-01

46

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2014-04-01

47

Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice  

MedlinePLUS

... this website will be limited. Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this page helpful? Introduction | Why develop new tests | Regulation | Gaining acceptance | Conclusion | Article Sources Overview ...

48

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2011-04-01

49

Genomic testing: the clinical laboratory perspective.  

PubMed

The expansion of genetic testing in the clinical laboratory is well under way, with many clinically validated genetic tests already in use. As sequencing technology becomes more efficient and less costly, clinical laboratories will make the transition from single-gene testing to multigene panels. Early, more targeted applications will gradually be replaced by more comprehensive genomic offerings, including exome and whole-genome analysis. Despite significant technological advancements, many obstacles remain for full incorporation of whole-genome testing. PMID:23872833

Faruki, H

2013-08-01

50

Evaluation of Mycology Laboratory Proficiency Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes over the last decade in overt proficiency testing (OPT) regulations have been ostensibly directed at improving laboratory performance on patient samples. However, the overt (unblinded) format of the tests and regulatory penalties associated with incorrect values allow and encourage laboratorians to take extra precau- tions with OPT analytes. As a result OPT may measure optimal laboratory performance instead of

ANDREW A. REILLY; IRA F. SALKIN; MICHAEL R. MCGINNIS; SALLY GROMADZKI; LESTER PASARELL; MAGGI KEMNA; NANCY HIGGINS; MAX SALFINGER

1999-01-01

51

Laboratory coal ash corrosion tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a program to provide complete, reliable corrosion data for selected superheater and reheater tube alloys, Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, conducted materials tests in simulated coal-ash environments. Test coupons were made from 11 base alloys, 7 cladding alloys (typically for coextruded tubes), chromizings, plasma spray coatings, and weld metals. The coupons were coated with synthetic ashes mirroring

Wolowodiuk

1989-01-01

52

NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory  

NASA Video Gallery

Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

53

Laboratory coal ash corrosion tests  

SciTech Connect

In a program to provide complete, reliable corrosion data for selected superheater and reheater tube alloys, Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, conducted materials tests in simulated coal-ash environments. Test coupons were made from 11 base alloys, 7 cladding alloys (typically for coextruded tubes), chromizings, plasma spray coatings, and weld metals. The coupons were coated with synthetic ashes mirroring actual deposits and were exposed to synthetic gas containing sulfur dioxide, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, and nitrogen. They were exposed for 100 hours at 600 to 750/degree/C (1112 to 1382/degree/F) and then were weighed to determine metal loss. Based on the results of testing, three commercial alloys (Alloy 800H, HR3C, and Tempaloy CR30A) as single-walled tubes and Type 310SS and 35Cr-45Ni as clad or co-extruded tubes are recommended for aggressive, corrosive atmospheres. However, co-extruded tubes are expensive; thus there is an economic advantage to using HR3C and Alloy 800H in the corrosive atmospheres encountered in Phases 0 and 1. Materials are discussed for these advanced boilers as well as for boilers currently experiencing coal-ash corrosion.

Wolowodiuk, W.

1989-07-01

54

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB. 8 AUG 57." In upper left corner, photo no. "8462 57" cropped out: "A-AFFTC 8 AUG 57, RETL TEST AREA" This photo is a high oblique view, showing the wing of the photo plane and Test Area 1-115. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

55

Recent results from the National Battery Test Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The testing of EV batteries is the demanding and requires the most versatile test program. The National Battery Test Laboratory was established in 1977 and became operational in 1978. It is computer automated and operates around-the-clock. The facility has room for the simultaneous testing of about 76 batteries, each independently operated, under various environmental conditions and over a wide range of voltages and currents. The NBTL has four major components as follows: (1) The control room and main test area where ambient and elevated temperature testing are conducted. (2) The environmental annex where low temperature chambers and a Zn/Cl test facility (with halogen scrubber) exist. (3) The Battery Components Technology Laboratory where special instrumentation and software are installed to allow systematic parametric variation and optimization and other refined studies. (4) The recently added high temperature test area where Li/S and Na/S cells are under evaluation.

Hornstra, F.; Yao, N. P.

56

Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

NONE

1995-04-01

57

Crush Testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic crush test is required in the certification testing of some small Type B transportation packages. International Atomic Energy Agency regulations state that the test article must be subjected to a dynamic crush test by positioning the specimen on the target so as to suffer maximum damage. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Transportation Technologies Group performs testing of Type B transportation packages, including the crush test, at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee (United States). This paper documents ORNL s experiences performing crush tests on several different Type B packages.

Feldman, Matthew R [ORNL

2011-01-01

58

Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions.

These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011.

This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2008-01-01

59

Unique test capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive testing capability has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories over the last three decades. This capability is primarily dedicated to obtaining test response data to substantiate analytical methods employed at the Laboratories. Unique instrumentation and data transmission techniques have been developed to recover test data. Emphasis has been placed on expeditious processing of test results for correlation with the analytical processes. Numerous facilities address the general environments of acceleration, climate, shock, and vibration. Nondestructive testing includes acoustic emission detection, laser holography, ultrasonics, and radiography. More specific testing exists in the fields of aerodynamics, materials characterization, radiation effects, and energy research. Much of the capability is classical and can be found with degrees of similarity at other laboratories. However, there are certain unique testing capabilities that have been developed to satisfy special requirements. The unique testing facilities described include: rocket sled tracks for ballistics tests and impact tests; aerial cable facilities for free-drop tests of payloads up to 3000 lb from heights up to 600 ft.; explosives testing facilities; large centrifuges; equipment for simulating heating conditions such as reentry heating; a lighting simulator; and an electromagnetic environment simulator. (LCL)

Bushnell, J.C.; Bickel, D.C.

1981-05-01

60

1. EAST ENTRANCE FROM LOADING AREA. CONCRETE TUNNEL TO TEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. EAST ENTRANCE FROM LOADING AREA. CONCRETE TUNNEL TO TEST STAND 1-3 IS AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

61

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

62

High voltage laboratory tests and lightning phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Attention is given to the similarities and differences which exist between the laboratory long spark and an actual lightning stroke. The feasibility of using simulation to evaluate the consequences of natural lightning on aircraft and grounded structures is assessed. Laboratory test facilities and measuring techniques are reviewed, the main features of the long spark are presented, and the influence rendered by experimental conditions is discussed. The final stage of the discharge is described as it relates to the striking of grounded structures; discharge characteristics upon interaction with a free potential electrode inside the gap are given. It is concluded that the study of RF signals radiated by a laboratory spark could lead to a better understanding of those emitted by natural lightning. It is noted that the striking of grounded structures is satisfactorily reproduced by laboratory tests.

Hutzler, B.; Riquel, G.; Riu, J.-P.

63

222-S Laboratory Fume Hood Testing Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing che...

B. H. Ruclas

2007-01-01

64

Evaluation of Mycology Laboratory Proficiency Testing  

PubMed Central

Changes over the last decade in overt proficiency testing (OPT) regulations have been ostensibly directed at improving laboratory performance on patient samples. However, the overt (unblinded) format of the tests and regulatory penalties associated with incorrect values allow and encourage laboratorians to take extra precautions with OPT analytes. As a result OPT may measure optimal laboratory performance instead of the intended target of typical performance attained during routine patient testing. This study addresses this issue by evaluating medical mycology OPT and comparing its fungal specimen identification error rates to those obtained in a covert (blinded) proficiency testing (CPT) program. Identifications from 188 laboratories participating in the New York State mycology OPT from 1982 to 1994 were compared with the identifications of the same fungi recovered from patient specimens in 1989 and 1994 as part of the routine procedures of 88 of these laboratories. The consistency in the identification of OPT specimens was sufficient to make accurate predictions of OPT error rates. However, while the error rates in OPT and CPT were similar for Candida albicans, significantly higher error rates were found in CPT for Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and other common pathogenic fungi. These differences may, in part, be due to OPT’s use of ideal organism representatives cultured under optimum growth conditions. This difference, as well as the organism-dependent error rate differences, reflects the limitations of OPT as a means of assessing the quality of routine laboratory performance in medical mycology.

Reilly, Andrew A.; Salkin, Ira F.; McGinnis, Michael R.; Gromadzki, Sally; Pasarell, Lester; Kemna, Maggi; Higgins, Nancy; Salfinger, Max

1999-01-01

65

A performance test for laboratory fume hoods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing standards for laboratory fume hoods focus on the face velocity. The influence of room air currents is as important as face velocity in capturing contaminants in such a hood with a worker standing at the face. Further, face velocity standards are not very meaningful for auxiliary air hoods. A performance test was developed, using the measured concentration at the

KNOWLTON J. CAPLAN; GERHARD W. KNUTSON

1982-01-01

66

SINGLE LABORATORY EVALUATION OF PHYTOTOXICITY TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The phytotoxicity method is a screening test used to predict the potential impact of chemicals on seed germination and early seedling growth. An evaluation of the procedure was conducted in order to establish the data quality that could be achieved within a single laboratory and ...

67

Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

2009-01-01

68

Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Orndoff, Evelyne

2012-01-01

69

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01

70

Problems and solutions in laboratory testing for hemophilia.  

PubMed

A diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B begins with clinical assessment of the patient and is facilitated by laboratory testing. The influence of the latter on a diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B is clear-a diagnosis cannot be made without laboratory confirmation of a deficiency of factor FVIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. Moreover, the degree of hemophilia severity is specifically characterized by laboratory test results. In turn, patient management, including choice and application of therapies, is influenced by the diagnosis, as well as by identification of respective disease severity. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to inappropriate management and unnecessary therapy, and thus to adverse outcomes. Moreover, identification of factor inhibitors in hemophilia will lead to additional and differential treatments, and incorrect identification of inhibitors or inhibitor levels may also lead to inappropriate management. Problems in hemophilia diagnosis or inhibitor detection can occur at any stage in the clinical diagnosis/laboratory interface, from the "pre-preanalytical" to "preanalytical" to "analytical" to "postanalytical" to "post-postanalytical." This report outlines the various problems in laboratory testing for hemophilia and provides various strategies or solutions to overcome these challenges. Although some outlined solutions are specific to the potential errors related to hemophilia, others are general in nature and can be applied to other areas of laboratory hemostasis. Key to improvement in this area is adoption of best practice by all involved, including clinicians, phlebotomists, and laboratories. Also key is the recognition that such errors may occur, and thus that clinicians should assess laboratory test results in the context of their patient's clinical history and follow-up any potential errors, thus avoid misdiagnoses, by requesting repeat testing on a fresh sample. PMID:24026910

Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Meijer, Piet; Jennings, Ian; Sioufi, John; Bonar, Roslyn A; Kitchen, Dianne P; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Lippi, Giuseppe

2013-10-01

71

Iowa Central Quality Fuel Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to finalize the creation of an independent quality fuel testing laboratory on the campus of Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa that shall provide the exploding biofuels industry a timely and cost-effective centrally located laboratory to complete all state and federal fuel and related tests that are required. The recipient shall work with various state regulatory agencies, biofuel companies and state and national industry associations to ensure that training and testing needs of their members and American consumers are met. The recipient shall work with the Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship on the development of an Iowa Biofuel Quality Standard along with the Development of a standard that can be used throughout industry.

Heach, Don; Bidieman, Julaine

2013-09-30

72

Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2007-01-01

73

Extracting laboratory test information from biomedical text  

PubMed Central

Background: No previous study reported the efficacy of current natural language processing (NLP) methods for extracting laboratory test information from narrative documents. This study investigates the pathology informatics question of how accurately such information can be extracted from text with the current tools and techniques, especially machine learning and symbolic NLP methods. The study data came from a text corpus maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, containing a rich set of information on laboratory tests and test devices. Methods: The authors developed a symbolic information extraction (SIE) system to extract device and test specific information about four types of laboratory test entities: Specimens, analytes, units of measures and detection limits. They compared the performance of SIE and three prominent machine learning based NLP systems, LingPipe, GATE and BANNER, each implementing a distinct supervised machine learning method, hidden Markov models, support vector machines and conditional random fields, respectively. Results: Machine learning systems recognized laboratory test entities with moderately high recall, but low precision rates. Their recall rates were relatively higher when the number of distinct entity values (e.g., the spectrum of specimens) was very limited or when lexical morphology of the entity was distinctive (as in units of measures), yet SIE outperformed them with statistically significant margins on extracting specimen, analyte and detection limit information in both precision and F-measure. Its high recall performance was statistically significant on analyte information extraction. Conclusions: Despite its shortcomings against machine learning methods, a well-tailored symbolic system may better discern relevancy among a pile of information of the same type and may outperform a machine learning system by tapping into lexically non-local contextual information such as the document structure.

Kang, Yanna Shen; Kayaalp, Mehmet

2013-01-01

74

Histology: a unique area of the medical laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fundamental differences in samples, procedures, nature of results, automation, productivity, staffing levels, and background decision making along work flow and turnaround times characterize histology as a unique area within the medical laboratory. For histology laboratories to function successfully, individual and collective training, well-defined goals, and implemented accountabilities with effective supervision are required. The pathologist, as immediate client of the histology

René J. Buesa

2007-01-01

75

11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1-A IN FOREGROUND. LIGHTS OF MAIN BASE, EDWARDS AFB, IN THE BACKGROUND. EDWARDS AFB." Test Area 1-120. Looking west past Test Stand 1-A to Test Area 1-115 and Test Area 1-110. Photo no. "12,401 57; G-AFFTC 12 DEC 57; TS 1-A Aux #1". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

76

Test Pool Questions, Area III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual contains multiple choice questions to be used in testing students on nurse training objectives. Each test includes several questions covering each concept. The concepts in section A, medical surgical nursing, are diseases of the following systems: musculoskeletal; central nervous; cardiovascular; gastrointestinal; urinary and male…

Sloan, Jamee Reid

77

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test io...

C. Darvae B. Norris L. Pei

2006-01-01

78

The laboratory test utilization management toolbox  

PubMed Central

Efficiently managing laboratory test utilization requires both ensuring adequate utilization of needed tests in some patients and discouraging superfluous tests in other patients. After the difficult clinical decision is made to define the patients that do and do not need a test, a wealth of interventions are available to the clinician and laboratorian to help guide appropriate utilization. These interventions are collectively referred to here as the utilization management toolbox. Experience has shown that some tools in the toolbox are weak and other are strong, and that tools are most effective when many are used simultaneously. While the outcomes of utilization management studies are not always as concrete as may be desired, what data is available in the literature indicate that strong utilization management interventions are safe and effective measures to improve patient health and reduce waste in an era of increasing financial pressure.

Baird, Geoffrey

2014-01-01

79

1. TEST AREA 1115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. TEST AREA 1-115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING TO EAST FROM ABOVE BUILDING 8655, THE FUEL STORAGE TANK FARM, IN FOREGROUND SHADOW. AT THE RIGHT IS BUILDING 8660, ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION; TO ITS LEFT IS BUILDING 8663, THE HELIUM COMPRESSION PLANT. THE LIGHT TONED STRUCTURE IN THE MIDDLE DISTANCE, CENTER, IS THE MACHINE SHOP FOR TEST STAND 1-3. IN THE FAR DISTANCE IS TEST STAND 1-A, WITH THE WHITE SPHERICAL TANKS, AND TEST STAND 2-A TO ITS RIGHT. ALONG THE HORIZON FROM FAR LEFT ARE TEST STAND 1-D, TEST STAND 1-C, WATER TANKS ABOVE TEST AREA 1-125, AND TEST STAND 1-B IN TEST AREA 1-120. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

80

Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

81

A Method for Choosing Meaningful Test Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper deals with the problem of choosing meaningful test areas for environmental studies. It examines the concept of areal differentiation. It utilizes the unit area method of classifying phenomena and applies this concept to the separate categories ...

T. M. Griffiths

1964-01-01

82

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the

T. E. Kent; P. A. Taylor

1992-01-01

83

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1993-06-01

84

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

85

Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

1987-02-01

86

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

Situ, Cindy H.

2010-01-01

87

Large area damage testing of optics  

SciTech Connect

The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C. [and others

1996-04-26

88

Laboratory tests for live attenuated poliovirus vaccines.  

PubMed

A new generation of tests to control live attenuated poliovirus vaccines are under development based on major advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of attenuation and reversion to virulence of polioviruses. These include an alternative in vivo neurovirulence test in transgenic mice that express the human poliovirus receptor and a new in vitro test, the MAPREC (mutant analysis by polymerose chain reaction and restriction enzyme cleavage assay, that assesses consistency of production at a molecular level. Excellent progress is being made with both methods but neither is sufficiently developed yet for regulatory use. Critical review of existing control tests shows that the WHO neurovirulence test is well standardized and contributes significantly to the assessment of each batch. On the other hand, the current rct40 test is neither standardized nor particularly informative, though improvements could be made in both areas. The continued relevance of other marker tests such as the d or antigenic marker is doubtful. Potency, identity and thermal stability tests are crucial for control of the final trivalent vaccine. PMID:9167004

Wood, D J; Macadam, A J

1997-03-01

89

Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

Teate, Anthony A.

1997-01-01

90

Quality control assessment of Canadian laboratories testing for Lyme disease.  

PubMed

In June 1990 a quality control assessment was undertaken of Canadian public health laboratories testing for antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. Twenty sera were distributed to nine laboratories, including 12 obtained from patients in Lyme endemic areas and presumed to be serological positives, and eight prescreened negative controls. Seventeen serological reports were submitted, comprising nine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (elisa), six immunofluorescent assays and two Western blot assessments. Antibodies were detected in 11 of the 12 sera which had been presumed to be positive. Assuming 11 positive sera had been submitted, the test sensitivities varied from 88.9 to 100% by elisa, and 54.5 to 90.1% by immunofluorescent assay. Specificities were 100% for all but one elisa and one immunofluorescent assay assessment. The results indicate a satisfactory performance by elisa but a need for upgrading or replacement of some immunofluorescent assay tests. PMID:22451751

Artsob, H; Garvie, M

1991-01-01

91

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2013-04-01

92

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident...

1996-01-01

93

Tests of Rock Cores, Warren II Study Area, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were conducted on rock core samples received from five holes from Natrona and Fremont Counties, Wyoming (Warren II Study Area). Results were used to determine the quality and uniformity of the rock to depths of 200 feet below ground surfa...

K. L. Saucier

1970-01-01

94

Tests of Rock Cores, Pembine Study Area, Michigan and Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were conducted on rock core samples received from six core holes in the Pembine Area of Dickinson County, Michigan, and Marinette and Oconto Counties, Wisconsin. Results were used to evaluate the quality and uniformity of the rock to dept...

R. W. Crisp

1970-01-01

95

Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in

T. L. Patton; R. H. Pearl; S. Y. Tsai

1990-01-01

96

Comparison of the Babesia duncani (WA1) IgG detection rates among clinical sera submitted to a reference laboratory for WA1 IgG testing and blood donor specimens from diverse geographic areas of the United States.  

PubMed

All reported cases of WA1 babesiosis have occurred in the Pacific coast region of the United States, suggesting that WA1 is limited to this geographic area. However, we detected WA1 IgG in 27% of clinical sera sent to our laboratory for WA1 IgG testing from across the United States over a 2-year period, suggesting that exposure to WA1 or a closely related organism occurs outside Pacific coast states. We sought to determine if this high WA1 IgG detection rate among clinical specimens merely reflects WA1 seroprevalence outside the Pacific region. WA1 IgG, as well as Babesia microti IgG, was measured in 900 blood donor specimens from 9 states. Overall seroprevalence was 2.0% for WA1 and 0.4% for B. microti; regional seroprevalences ranged from 0 to 4% and 0 to 2%, respectively. Additional studies were performed to determine if WA1 IgG reactivity was attributable to polyclonal B-cell activation associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; 40 WA1 IgG-positive clinical sera and the 18 WA1 IgG-positive blood donor specimens were all negative for EBV capsid antigen (EBVCA) IgM (a marker of acute EBV infection), and 40 EBVCA IgM-positive sera were all negative for WA1 IgG. These findings indicate that the high WA1 IgG detection rate among clinical specimens does not simply reflect the national WA1 seroprevalence among blood donors or nonspecific reactivity due to acute EBV infection. Rather, the findings suggest that infection with WA1 or a related organism is more common than indicated by the literature and is not limited to Pacific coast states. PMID:20861326

Prince, Harry E; Lapé-Nixon, Mary; Patel, Hemlata; Yeh, Cindy

2010-11-01

97

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown....

C. H. Situ

2010-01-01

98

Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

1994-06-01

99

Circannual Rhythm of Laboratory Test Parameters among Chronic Haemodialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Seasonal variations in laboratory test results have been pointed out in dialysis patients. Although the mechanism for this phenomenon is not clear, this could result in changes in dialysis and medication prescriptions. We investigated the effect of the circannual rhythm on laboratory test parameters in chronic haemodialysis patients. Methods: Data of 38 laboratory test parameters were collected every month

Mitsuru Yanai; Atsushi Satomura; Yuki Uehara; Masaya Murakawa; Makoto Takeuchi; Kazunari Kumasaka

2008-01-01

100

TESTING OF THE RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, nonelectrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. Positive results from initial deployment trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and the anticipated future potential use of RadBall throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further test, underpin, and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. The study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment were successful in that for each trial radiation tracks were visible. The deployment of RadBall can be accomplished in different ways depending on the size and characteristics of the contaminated area (e.g., a hot cell that already has a crane/manipulator available or highly contaminated room that requires the use of a remote control device with sensor and video equipment to position RadBall). This report also presents SRNL-designed RadBall accessories for future RadBall deployment (a harness, PODS, and robot).

Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

2010-02-10

101

Optimizing tuberculosis testing for basic laboratories.  

PubMed

Optimal tuberculosis testing usually involves sputum centrifugation followed by broth culture. However, centrifuges are biohazardous and scarce in the resource-limited settings where most tuberculosis occurs. To optimize tuberculosis testing for these settings, centrifugation of 111 decontaminated sputum samples was compared with syringe-aspiration through polycarbonate membrane-filters that were then cultured in broth. To reduce the workload of repeated microscopic screening of broth cultures for tuberculosis growth, the colorimetric redox indicator 2,3-diphenyl-5-(2-thienyl) tetrazolium chloride was added to the broth, which enabled naked-eye detection of culture positivity. This combination of filtration and colorimetric growth-detection gave similar results to sputum centrifugation followed by culture microscopy regarding mean colony counts (43 versus 48; P = 0.6), contamination rates (0.9% versus 1.8%; P = 0.3), and sensitivity (94% versus 95%; P = 0.7), suggesting equivalency of the two methods. By obviating centrifugation and repeated microscopic screening of cultures, this approach may constitute a more appropriate technology for rapid and sensitive tuberculosis diagnosis in basic laboratories. PMID:20889887

Ramos, Eric; Schumacher, Samuel G; Siedner, Mark; Herrera, Beatriz; Quino, Willi; Alvarado, Jessica; Montoya, Rosario; Grandjean, Louis; Martin, Laura; Sherman, Jonathan M; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

2010-10-01

102

49 CFR 199.107 - Drug testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug testing laboratory. 199.107 Section 199...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.107 Drug testing...

2013-10-01

103

The mass storage testing laboratory at GSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Industry-wide benchmarks exist for measuring the performance of processors (SPECmarks), and of database systems (Transaction Processing Council). Despite storage having become the dominant item in computing and IT (Information Technology) budgets, no such common benchmark is available in the mass storage field. Vendors and consultants provide services and tools for capacity planning and sizing, but these do not account for the complete set of metrics needed in today's archives. The availability of automated tape libraries, high-capacity RAID systems, and high- bandwidth interconnectivity between processor and peripherals has led to demands for services which traditional file systems cannot provide. File Storage and Management Systems (FSMS), which began to be marketed in the late 80's, have helped to some extent with large tape libraries, but their use has introduced additional parameters affecting performance. The aim of the Mass Storage Test Laboratory (MSTL) at Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop a test suite that includes not only a comprehensive check list to document a mass storage environment but also benchmark code. Benchmark code is being tested which will provide measurements for both baseline systems, i.e. applications interacting with peripherals through the operating system services, and for combinations involving an FSMS. The benchmarks are written in C, and are easily portable. They are initially being aimed at the UNIX Open Systems world. Measurements are being made using a Sun Ultra 170 Sparc with 256MB memory running Solaris 2.5.1 with the following configuration: 4mm tape stacker on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; 4GB disk device on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; and Sony Petaserve on Fast/Wide differential SCSI 2.

Venkataraman, Ravi; Williams, Joel; Michaud, David; Gu, Heng; Kalluri, Atri; Hariharan, P. C.; Kobler, Ben; Behnke, Jeanne; Peavey, Bernard

1998-01-01

104

CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

Farfan, E.

2009-11-23

105

Test procedure for prism compression testing of laboratory built prisms. Hollow clay tile wall testing program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This procedure describes the fabrication and testing of hollow clay tile (HCT) prisms under laboratory conditions. Objective of the HCT prism compression tests is to determine the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poissons's ratio of the HC...

K. E. Fricke M. B. Butala

1992-01-01

106

The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

Sheldon Freid

2007-02-13

107

Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic System Components Dept.

1997-04-01

108

The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas;\\u000awith a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests

Sheldon Freid

2007-01-01

109

Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will serve, with appropriate modifications, as the engineering development model (EDM) and will be fielded aboard a U.S. Navy ship. This paper summarizes the process of developing and fielding IRSS, describes test results accomplished at sea during 1996, and discusses the technical and engineering lessons associated with design, development and testing of IRSS. Results are presented covering the areas of sensor component and overall system radiometrics (e.g., sensitivity and dynamic range), channel uniformity, stabilization, and optical, electrical and information (i.e., signal processing/track) resolution.

Ax, George R.; Buss, James R.

1997-08-01

110

Laboratory chemosensitivity testing of human bladder carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variable sensitivity of similar tumors to cytotoxic drugs from patient to patient would suggest a potential role for a reliable laboratory method to identify effective as well as ineffective chemotherapeutic agents. While the known moderately responsive nature of bladder carcinoma to available chemotherapeutic regimens would seem to make it an ideal model tumor to apply such laboratory approaches in

Philip J. Walther; David F. Paulson

1985-01-01

111

Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Consortium Annual Report, 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) consortium was formed in January 2001. Headquartered in the Building and Fire Research Laboratory (BFRL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the consortium currently cons...

D. P. Bentz

2001-01-01

112

Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on...

W. L. Ebert J. J. Mazer

1993-01-01

113

Estimating Abrasivity of Rock by Laboratory and In Situ Tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The degree to which a rock abrades another rock is called its "abrasivity". Laboratory tests of abrasivity can be broadly divided into four kinds: drilling, rubbing, turning-operation and tumbling tests. The present study was initiated 30 years ago with the objective of investigating and developing methods for measuring rock abrasivity, and making some contribution towards understanding the relationships between the above test methods. Within the range of tests conducted, the turning-operation test turned out to be superior to the drilling test, albeit slightly, in terms of practicality. We have also conducted in situ tests using rock drills for the last 20 years. The results of those tests have been investigated and compared with the results of laboratory tests. There is a large degree of scatter in the data on gauge loss in button bits, which has obscured any correlations with laboratory data. Some correlations were found between height loss in button bits and laboratory findings.

Okubo, S.; Fukui, K.; Nishimatsu, Y.

2011-03-01

114

Laboratory Test for Fuel Injector Deposit Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Port Fuel Injector Deposit (PFID) test has been developed which provides repeatable results. The test can discriminate gasolines with differing fuel injector fouling tendencies in vehicles. Results confirm previous work that added mono- and diolefins in...

1989-01-01

115

78 FR 21145 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commercial Testing Laboratories and Approval...Reduction Act: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and Approval...electronic, mechanical, or other...Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...

2013-04-09

116

Measurements in an electromagnetic test laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electromagnetic compatibility test equipment and the specially built strong electromagnetic pulses immunity test system, developed in order to control the characteristics of aerospace communication systems, are described. The compatability tests are carried out at frequencies from 10KHz to 10GHz in a Faraday cage. Measurement is implemented with an optical transmission bus. The extremely high voltage pulse generator assembled for immunity testing is based on Marx generators. Measurement and command are made via optical circuits.

Raveu, Bernard

1987-01-01

117

Laboratory Testing of Volcanic Gas Sampling Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of laboratory experiments were performed designed to calibrate several commonly used methods for field measurement of volcanic gas composition. H2, CO2, SO2 and CHCl2F gases were mixed through carefully calibrated rotameters to form mixtures representative of the types of volcanic compositions encountered at Kilauea and Showa-Shinzan. Gas mixtures were passed through a horizontal furnace at 700oC to break

V. C. Kress; R. Green; M. Ortiz; P. Delmelle; T. Fischer

2003-01-01

118

Laboratory testing of dispersants under Arctic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of relevant dispersants for use under Arctic conditions has been tested with the IFP dilution test. Arctic conditions in this context are defined as low temperature (0 C) and water salinities varying between 0.5% and 3.5%. The study was performed in three steps with a screening activity first, where 14 dispersants were tested on water-in-oil (w\\/o) emulsions from

P. J. Brandvik; O. O Knudsen; M. O. Moldestad; P. S. Daling

1995-01-01

119

Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV- 15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research effort of the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers was to obtain a preliminary, high quality database of far-field acoustics for terminal area operations of the XV-15 at a takeoff gross weight of approximately 14,000 lbs for various glide slopes, airspeeds, rotor tip speeds, and nacelle tilt angles. The test also was used to assess the suitability of the Crows Landing complex for full scale far-field acoustic testing. This was the first acoustic flight test of the XV-15 aircraft equipped with ATB involving approach and level flyover operations. The test involved coordination of numerous personnel, facilities and equipment. Considerable effort was made to minimize potential extraneous noise sources unique to the region during the test. Acoustic data from the level flyovers were analyzed, then compared with data from a previous test of the XV-15 equipped with Standard Metal Blades

SantaMaria, O. L.; Wellman, J. B.; Conner, D. A.; Rutledge, C. K.

1991-01-01

120

Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is in the Hot Creek Valley of south-central Nevada, approximately 70 miles northeast of Tonopah. The CNTA consists of three parcels totaling 2,560 acres. The parcels are spaced approximately 3 miles apart along a roughly north-south line. The total acreage is currently withdrawn from all forms of appropriation associated with mining laws and leasing. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), acquired the CNTA in the early 1960s to develop alternative sites to the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) for underground nuclear testing. Three emplacement boreholes (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4) were drilled on the three parcels at the CNTA for underground nuclear testing. The initial underground nuclear test at CNTA, Faultless, was conducted in borehole UC-1 at a depth of 3,199 feet below ground surface on January 19, 1968. The yield of the Faultless test was estimated to be 0.2 to 1 megaton. Its purpose was to evaluate the environmental and structural effects that might be expected if subsequent, higher-yield underground nuclear tests were conducted in this vicinity. The test resulted in a down-dropped fault block visible at land surface. In addition, seismic results supported the indication that the site was not favorable for larger detonations. The nuclear detonation created a cavity with a radius of approximately 328 feet. The Faultless test did not release any radioactivity at the surface, and no additional tests were conducted at the CNTA.

None

2009-04-01

121

Laboratory effectiveness testing of oil spill dispersants  

SciTech Connect

Dispersant effectiveness tests are reviewed. Studies have been conducted of the variances among several standard regulatory tests. Three main causes of differences have been identified, oil-to-water ratio, settling time and energy. Energy can be partially compensated for in high energy tests by correcting for natural dispersion. With this correction and with high oil-to-water ratios and a settling time of at least 10 minutes, five apparatuses yield very similar results for a variety of oils and dispersants. Recent studies into the energy variation of dispersant tests show that the energy level varies in many apparatuses. The repeatability of energy levels in apparatus is largely responsible for the variation in dispersant effectiveness values in certain apparatus. Studies of analytical procedures show that traditional extraction and analysis methods cause a bias to results. Methods to overcome these difficulties are presented.

Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.A.; Wang, Z.; Handfield, D.; Ianuzzi, D.; Ackerman, F. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01

122

Pulmonary function testing in small laboratory mammals.  

PubMed Central

The lung is the primary organ likely to be exposed by inhalation studies and, therefore, measurement of changes in lung function are of particular interest to the pulmonary physiologist and toxicologist. Tests of pulmonary function have been developed which can be used with small animals to measure spirometry (lung volumes), mechanics, distribution of ventilation, gas exchange or control of ventilation. These tests were designed on the basis of similar tests which are used in humans to diagnose and manage patients with lung disease. A major difference is that many of the measurements are performed in anesthetized animals, while human pulmonary function is usually measured in awake cooperating individuals. In addition, the measurement of respiratory events in small animals requires sensitive and rapidly responding equipment, because signals may be small and events can occur quickly. In general, the measurements described provide information on the change in normal lung function which results primarily from structural changes. These tests of pulmonary function can be repetitively and routinely accomplished and the results appear to be highly reproducible. Although some are quite sophisticated, many can be undertaken with relatively inexpensive equipment and provide useful information for toxicological testing.

O'Neil, J J; Raub, J A

1984-01-01

123

Laboratory Load Tests on Buried Flexible Pipe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of a study on soil factors affecting the behavior of buried pipe, research is being conducted on the soil-structure interaction of buried flexible pipe; earlier tests dealt with rigid pipe. The main items of investigation on flexible pipe are soil...

A. K. Howard

1968-01-01

124

Laboratory Load Tests on Buried Flexible Pipe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an effort to lower construction costs of closed conduit systems, the Bureau of Reclamation has been investigating the soil-structure interaction of buried flexible pipe. The test pipes are buried in a large container by placing a lean clay soil at opti...

A. K. Howard

1970-01-01

125

PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING IN SMALL LABORATORY MAMMALS  

EPA Science Inventory

The lung is the primary organ likely to be exposed by inhalation studies and, therefore, measurement of changes in lung function are of particular interest to the pulmonary physiologist and toxicologist. Tests of pulmonary function have been developed which can be used with small...

126

Laboratory testing of dispersants under Arctic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of relevant dispersants for use under Arctic conditions has been tested with the IFP dilution test. Arctic conditions in this context are defined as low temperature (0 C) and water salinities varying between 0.5% and 3.5%. The study was performed in three steps with a screening activity first, where 14 dispersants were tested on water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions from two weathered oil types. In the next step five dispersants were tested on both weathered water free oils and w/o emulsions from four different oil types. As a third step, dispersant effectiveness as a function of salinity (0.5 to 3.5%) was tested with the most effective dispersants at high and low salinity. The results from this study shows that many of the most used dispersants which previously have shown an excellent effectiveness at high sea water salinity (3.5%) may give a very low effectiveness at low salinity (0.5%). Recently developed products especially designed for low salinity use (e.g. Inipol IPF) are very effective at low salinities, but suffer from a rather poor effectiveness at higher salinities. This is of significant operational importance in Arctic oil spill combat operations since the salinity of the surface water may vary due to ice melting. This study of dispersant`s effectiveness under Arctic conditions shows the need for development of dispersants with high effectiveness both at low temperature (0 C) and over a wide range of salinities (3.5% to 0.5%). Dispersant development has been a limited but important activity at IKU for the last five years and one of the objectives for an ongoing Arctic program at IKU is to develop such new dispersants for use under Arctic conditions.

Brandvik, P.J.; Knudsen, O.O; Moldestad, M.O.; Daling, P.S. [IKU Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway)

1995-06-01

127

Structures Test Laboratory (STL). User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the STL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Zipay, John J.

2011-01-01

128

Laboratory Test of CCD #1 in BOAO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An introduction to the first CCD camera system in Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (CCD#1) is presented. The CCD camera adopts modular dewar design of IfA(Institute for Astronomy at Hawaii University) and SDSU(San Diego State University) general purpose CCD controller. The user interface is based on IfA design of easy-to-use GUI program running on the NeXT workstation. The characteristics of the CCD#1 including Gain, Charge Transfer Efficiency, rms Read-Out Noise, Linearity and Dynamic range is tested and discussed. The CCD#1 shows 6.4 electrons RON and gain of 3.49 electrons per ADU, and the optimization resulted in about 27 seconds readout time guaranteeing charge transfer efficiency of 0.99999 for both directions. Linearity test shows that non-linear coefficient is 6e-7 in the range of 0 to 30,000 ADU.

Park, Byeong-Gon; Chun, Moo Young; Kim, Seung-Lee

1995-12-01

129

Laboratory Sediment Toxicity Tests, Sediment Chemistry and Distribution of Benthic Macroinvertebrates in Sediments from the Keweenaw Waterway, Michigan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Acute laboratory sediment toxicity tests using the water flea Daphnia magna and the burrowing mayfly nymph Hexagenia limbata were conducted on sediments from two areas of the Keweenaw Waterway, Michigan, to determine whether the tests reflected the condit...

K. W. Malueg G. S. Schuytema D. F. Krawczyk J. H. Gakstatter

1984-01-01

130

Accredited testing laboratory at the Institute of Optoelectroncis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Characteristics of a quality system accredited in optoelectronic testing laboratory are presented. The scope of accreditation is shown and all measurement procedures are listed. Performing with measuring equipment and basic measurement instruments are given. Some details of calibration laboratory and main characteristics of two standards of Joule and Watt of laser radiation are also presented.

Dlugaszek, Andrzej; Janucki, Jacek; Nowakowski, Miroslaw; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech

1999-12-01

131

Laboratory Testing of Volcanic Gas Sampling Techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of laboratory experiments were performed designed to calibrate several commonly used methods for field measurement of volcanic gas composition. H2, CO2, SO2 and CHCl2F gases were mixed through carefully calibrated rotameters to form mixtures representative of the types of volcanic compositions encountered at Kilauea and Showa-Shinzan. Gas mixtures were passed through a horizontal furnace at 700oC to break down CHCl2F and form an equilibrium high-temperature mixture. With the exception of Giggenbach bottle samples, all gas sampling was performed adjacent to the furnace exit in order to roughly simulate the air-contaminated samples encountered in Nature. Giggenbach bottle samples were taken from just beyond the hot-spot 10cm down the furnace tube to minimize atmospheric contamination. Alkali-trap measurements were performed by passing gases over or bubbling gases through 6N KOH, NaOH or LiOH solution for 10 minutes. Results were highly variable with errors in measured S/Cl varying from +1600% to -19%. In general reduced Kilauea compositions showed smaller errors than the more oxidized Showa-Shinzan compositions. Results were not resolvably different in experiments where gas was bubbled through the alkaline solution. In a second set of experiments, 25mm circles of Whatman 42 filter paper were impregnated with NaHCO3or KHCO3 alkaline solutions stabilized with glycerol. Some filters also included Alizarin (5.6-7.2) and neutral red (6.8-8.0) Ph indicator to provide a visual monitor of gas absorption. Filters were mounted in individual holders and used in stacks of 3. Durations were adjusted to maximize reaction in the first filter in the stack and minimize reaction in the final filter. Errors in filter pack measurements were smaller and more systematic than the alkali trap measurements. S/Cl was overestimated in oxidized gas mixtures and underestimated in reduced mixtures. Alkali-trap methods allow extended unattended monitoring of volcanic gasses, but our results suggest that they are poor recorders of gas composition. Filter pack methods are somewhat better, but are more difficult to interpret than previously recognized. We suggest several refinements to the filter-pack technique that can improve accuracy. Giggenbach bottles remain the best method for volcanic gas sampling, despite the inherent difficulty and danger of obtaining samples in active volcanic environments. Relative merits of different alkali solutions and indicators are discussed.

Kress, V. C.; Green, R.; Ortiz, M.; Delmelle, P.; Fischer, T.

2003-12-01

132

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some

L. D. Bustard; F. J. Wyant; L. L. Bonzon; K. T. Gillen

1986-01-01

133

System Integration Laboratory Test Plan (RADL Item 6-4).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A general demonstration test plan is provided for the activities to be accomplished at the SFDI Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) at Huntington Beach. The Master Control System (MCS), the Subsystem Distributed Process Control (SDPC), the Signal Conditi...

1980-01-01

134

Evaluation of Four Quantitative Laboratory Fume Hood Performance Test Methods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Four quantitative laboratory fume hood performance test methods were evaluated, including: EPA uranine dye; ASHRAE Freon; EPA SF sub 6 ; and modified EPA SF sub 6 . Each of these methods were evaluated, based on: variability and reproducibility; practical...

L. M. Woodrow

1987-01-01

135

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Construction Materials Testing, August 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NIST Handbook 150-5 specifies technical requirements and provides guidance for NVLAP accreditation of laboratories that provide construction materials testing. This handbook supplements the NVLAP procedures and general requirements found in NIST Handbook ...

B. A. Torres

2005-01-01

136

MANUAL FOR THE EVALUATION OF LABORATORIES PERFORMING AQUATIC TOXICITY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This manual describes guidelines and standardized procedures for conducting on-site audits and evaluations of laboratories performing toxicity tests. ncluded are pre-survey information activities, on-site evaluation activities, evaluation criteria, organizational history and labo...

137

Review of Field and Laboratory Tests on Riprap.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two earlier documents (CIRIA Technical Note 101 and Hydraulics Research Station Report IT213) are reviewed with regard to design implications. Both the extent of agreement and anomalies in behavior between the field and laboratory tests in these publicati...

J. D. Pitt P. Ackers

1982-01-01

138

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory (left), Aerial Tramway Loading Terminal (center), and Huber Breaker (right) Photograph taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

139

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These completed operational testing activities demonstrated the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-03-01

140

Results of common laboratory tests in solvent-exposed workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives The screening and identification of occupational liver or other organ-system injury related to long-term, low-level solvent exposure are difficult in clinical practice. We studied the feasibility of the use of common laboratory tests combined with a detailed exposure history. Methods The relationships between laboratory tests and exposure to organic solvents were studied in regression modelling adjusted to age, alcohol

Ari Kaukiainen; Tapio Vehmas; Kaarina Rantala; Markku Nurminen; Rami Martikainen; Helena Taskinen

2004-01-01

141

Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 3, In vivo test phantoms  

SciTech Connect

Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard describes the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay performance-testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of test phantoms used for calibration of measurement systems for direct bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented.

MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.

1988-11-01

142

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some insights and conclusions extracted from these testing experiences are summarized in this report.

Bustard, L.D.; Wyant, F.J.; Bonzon, L.L.; Gillen, K.T.

1986-01-01

143

Laboratory Evaluation of Base Materials for Neutralization of the Contaminated Aquifer at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies were performed to support field-testing of base injection into the F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater. The general purpose of these experiments is to provide information to guide the test of base injection and to identify potential adverse effects.

Serkiz, S.M.

2001-09-11

144

78 FR 6128 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...collection requirement concerning the Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...following information collection: Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing...

2013-01-29

145

NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment

Beth A. Cooper; James C. Akers; Paul J. Passe

2005-01-01

146

An Education Program to Reduce Unnecessary Laboratory Tests by Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program at an inner-city community health center involving 20 family practice residents provided an educational intervention concerning the use of laboratory tests based on quality of care, not cost containment. During the program, the use of thyroid stimulating hormone test declined, while complete blood counts ordered did not. (MSE)

Dowling, Patrick T.; And Others

1989-01-01

147

Laboratory Wear Testing Capabilities of the Bureau of Mines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The laboratory wear testing capabilities of the Bureau of Mines are described. Wear tests are used to support the Bureau's research efforts towards reducing the wear of equipment used for mining and minerals processing and any wear involving a loss of str...

R. Blickensderfer J. H. Tylczak B. W. Madsen

1985-01-01

148

Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented.

Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I. [and others

1994-09-01

149

Identification procedures for strapdown-sensor-parameters by laboratory testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes laboratory test procedures to determine static and dynamic parameters of the gyro and accelerometer performance model. The error models for dynamically dry tuned two-axes gyros and for single-axis accelerometers are considered. These models represent the basis for various system tests during which the model parameters can be determined. The output signals of sensors have to be compensated

U. Krogmann

1979-01-01

150

Swine influenza test results from animal health laboratories in Canada  

PubMed Central

Due to its infrastructure and partnerships the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network was able to rapidly collect test results from 9 Canadian laboratories that were conducting primary testing for influenza on swine-origin samples, in response to the threat posed by the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in 2009.

Kloeze, Harold; Mukhi, Shamir N.; Alexandersen, Soren

2013-01-01

151

Closing the brain-to-brain loop in laboratory testing.  

PubMed

Abstract The delivery of laboratory services has been described 40 years ago and defined with the foremost concept of "brain-to-brain turnaround time loop". This concept consists of several processes, including the final step which is the action undertaken on the patient based on laboratory information. Unfortunately, the need for systematic feedback to improve the value of laboratory services has been poorly understood and, even more risky, poorly applied in daily laboratory practice. Currently, major problems arise from the unavailability of consensually accepted quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing. This, in turn, does not allow clinical laboratories to calculate a budget for the "patient-related total error". The definition and use of the term "total error" refers only to the analytical phase, and should be better defined as "total analytical error" to avoid any confusion and misinterpretation. According to the hierarchical approach to classify strategies to set analytical quality specifications, the "assessment of the effect of analytical performance on specific clinical decision-making" is comprehensively at the top and therefore should be applied as much as possible to address analytical efforts towards effective goals. In addition, an increasing number of laboratories worldwide are adopting risk management strategies such as FMEA, FRACAS, LEAN and Six Sigma since these techniques allow the identification of the most critical steps in the total testing process, and to reduce the patient-related risk of error. As a matter of fact, an increasing number of laboratory professionals recognize the importance of understanding and monitoring any step in the total testing process, including the appropriateness of the test request as well as the appropriate interpretation and utilization of test results. PMID:21663564

Plebani, Mario; Lippi, Giuseppe

2011-07-01

152

Laboratory abrasive wear tests: investigation of test methods and alloy correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

When screening materials, laboratory abrasive wear testing is a quick and inexpensive way of obtaining large quantities on information on wear rates and wear mechanisms. Typical laboratory abrasive wear tests approximate two- and three-body abrasion. The Albany Research Center, however, uses a suite of four laboratory abrasion, gouging–abrasion, and impact–gouging abrasion wear tests to rank materials for wear applications in

J. A. Hawk; R. D. Wilson; J. H. Tylczak; Ö. N. Do?an

1999-01-01

153

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01

154

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-02

155

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-01-12

156

Evaluation of three oil spill laboratory dispersant effectiveness tests  

SciTech Connect

EPA evaluated three laboratory methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and currently required by regulation) in the United States, the Swirling Flask Test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-Dilution Test (used in France and other European countries). Six test oils and three dispersants were evaluated; dispersants were applied to the oil at an average 1:10 ratio (dispersant to oil) for each of the three laboratory methods. A screening criterion was established that required a combination that gave at least 20 percent effectiveness results. The selected combination turned out to be Prudhoe Bay crude oil (an EPA-American Petroleum Institute Standard Reference Oil) and the dispersant Corexit 9527. EPA's evaluation concluded that the three tests give similar precision results, but that the Swirling Flask Test was fastest, cheapest, simplest, and required least operator skill.

Sullivan, D.; Farlow, J.; Sahatjian, K.A.

1993-01-01

157

Laboratory tests for diagnosis of gastrointestinal and pancreatic diseases.  

PubMed

The panel of laboratory tests available for diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in dogs and cats is wide, and, recently, several new tests have been developed. This article will focus on advances in laboratory tests that are available for the general practitioner for diagnosis of GI diseases. Laboratory tests for diagnosis of gastric and intestinal infectious diseases include fecal parasite screening tests, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for parvoviral enteritis, and some specific bacterial tests like fluorescent in situ hybridization for identification of specific bacteria attached to the intestinal epithelial cells. Serum concentrations of folate and cobalamin are markers of intestinal absorption, but are also changed in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Hypocobalaminemia is common in GI and pancreatic disease. Decreased serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity is a very sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in dogs and cats. Serum pancreatic lipase is currently the most sensitive and specific test to identify pancreatic cell damage and acute pancreatitis. However, serum canine pancreas-specific lipase is less sensitive in canine chronic pancreatitis. Increased serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity is also specific for pancreatic damage but is less sensitive. It is very likely that further studies will help to better specify the role of these new tests in the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatic diseases. PMID:21596348

Dossin, Olivier

2011-05-01

158

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30

159

Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods  

SciTech Connect

Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

1996-05-01

160

Five Proficiency Testing Programs for the Jcss Weight Calibration Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Japan Calibration Service System (JCSS) organized in 1993 accredits the measurement capability of calibration laboratories and ensures the traceability to the national measurement standards. As an essential part of accreditation of the measurement capability of calibration laboratories for the weights, the International Accreditation Japan (IAJapan) of National Institute of Technology and Evaluation has been operating the JCSS proficiency testing programs with the technical support of the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST). Up to now, five proficiency testing programs have been carried out for the JCSS weight calibration laboratories in the range of 2 mg to 10 kg. The proficiency testing programs organized by the IAJapan were carried out in accordance with ISO/IEC Guide 43 (JIS Q 17043), and the NMIJ was responsible for the technical aspect as a reference laboratory. This paper describes the methods of the five proficiency testing programs during the period from 1997 to 2009, and outlines assessment of the measurement capability of the JCSS weight calibration laboratories.

Ueki, Masaaki; Sun, Jianxin; Ueda, Kazunaga

161

Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.  

PubMed

Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (p < .001). The implementation of the alert was shown to significantly reduce associated costs of duplicated AHP tests (p ? .001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency. PMID:22963261

Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

2014-05-01

162

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity.

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

163

Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?  

PubMed

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=?-0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=?-0.82) and bench press (rs?=?-0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.83) and bench press (rs?=?-0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=?-0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=?-0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

164

Visual tests for urinary amylase investigated in the routine laboratory.  

PubMed

Ninety-seven fresh urine specimens were tested in the routine laboratory with the Rapignost Amylase test strip, and the results were compared to those obtained using Phadebas Amylase test tablets to investigate the transferability of the results obtained by the Rapignost method to those of the Phadebas method under routine conditions. The fraction of conflicting negative results of Phadebas-positive specimens was 9% and the corresponding fraction of conflicting positive results was 13%. An attempt to improve the transferability by changing the comparison scale slightly did not succeed. However, a visual binary test based on 180 s incubation at 37 degrees C of 400 microliters urine in a suspension of a Phadebas Amylase test tablet seemed more suitable in selection of specimens with Phadebas amylase activity less than 2000 U/l (upper limit of the reference interval). These specimens amounted to approximately 75% of all amylase specimens in our laboratory. PMID:2408318

Uldall, A

1985-04-01

165

29 CFR 1910.7 - Definition and requirements for a nationally recognized testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nationally recognized testing laboratories by the Assistant Secretary...1993: (i) Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, Illinois 60062...two temporarily recognized laboratories shall apply for renewal...

2010-07-01

166

29 CFR 1910.7 - Definition and requirements for a nationally recognized testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nationally recognized testing laboratories by the Assistant Secretary...1993: (i) Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, Illinois 60062...two temporarily recognized laboratories shall apply for renewal...

2009-07-01

167

Laboratory testing of the Sonnenschein charger, Part number DTL 12040  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing the Sonnenschein DTL 12040 battery charger in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) battery laboratory. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the suitability of this charger for charging electric vehicle battery packs made up of Sonnenschein sealed lead acid batteries or possibly other similar batteries. This evaluation consists primarily of identifying the charge algorithm used and evaluating the resulting charge behavior. Other characteristics of the charger that could be significant are also noted. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Hardin, J.E.; Martin, M.E.

1990-09-01

168

Relationship of Field Tests to Laboratory Tests of Muscular Strength and Endurance, and Maximal Aerobic Power.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study evaluate the relationship between established laboratory tests of selected physical fitness components and a field tests battery (EXPRES) presently used annually to evaluate the physical fitness of Canadian Force personnel. Muscular strength, m...

D. G. Bell I. Jacobs

1986-01-01

169

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31

170

Site Characterization and Monitoring of Technical Area 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In 1959-1961, subcritical hydronuclear safety experiments were conducted at Technical Area (TA) 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These underground experiments were designed and conducted to investigate safety issues. Seventy hydronuclear safety, tracer, and containment test experiments were conducted in 1-m or 2-m diameter shafts at depths ranging between 9 m and 33 m. The subsurface radiological and metals inventory consists of about 40 kg of plutonium, 93 kg of uranium-235, 170 kg of uranium-238, 11 kg of beryllium, and possibly more than 90,000 kg of lead. Explosives used in the experiments consisted largely of TNT, RDX, HMX, and barium nitrate. It is highly likely that the explosives, except for the barium component, were completely consumed by the detonations. Hydronuclear safety test shafts were drilled, test materials were placed at the bottom of the shafts, shafts were backfilled with sand or local crushed tuff, tests were detonated, subsidence in the shafts were backfilled, and cement caps were poured over the test shafts. The diameter of the affected detonation zones is believed to be less than 6 m. Most test shafts were drilled on an 8-m grid spacing in four main areas within TA-49.

Levitt, D. G.; Kisiel, K. C.; Newell, D. L; Hopkins, J. K.; Criswell, C. W.; Woodworth, L. A.

2003-02-25

171

78 FR 22536 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...publication of Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...public comment period on EAC Web site...for becoming an EAC accredited test laboratory and guidelines...

2013-04-16

172

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the field test or laboratory analyses, or as...the field tests, or laboratory analyses, and design, construction operation...the field tests or laboratory analyses. These permit...conditions will include design and operating...

2010-07-01

173

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the field test or laboratory analyses, or as...the field tests, or laboratory analyses, and design, construction operation...the field tests or laboratory analyses. These permit...conditions will include design and operating...

2009-07-01

174

Field Results of an In-Place, Quantitative Performance Test for Laboratory Fume Hoods  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method for testing fume hood performance was developed and previously reported. It involves measurement of tracer chemical concentrations outside a hood that result from a steady release of sulfur hexafluoride tracer chemical inside the hood. The tracer chemical is released through a hollow rectangular diffuser that encloses the entire work area. Field surveys on 50 laboratory fume hoods

Louis J. Diberardinis; Melvin W. First; Raymond E. Ivany

1991-01-01

175

Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by {approx}50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with {sup 241}Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy.

D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

1999-10-01

176

Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

2010-01-01

177

Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will

M. W. Grant; C. A. Langton; S. B. Oblath; D. W. Pepper; R. M. Wallace; E. L. Wilhite; W. W. F. Yau

1987-01-01

178

Integration of laboratory testing and constitutive modeling of soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

A soil constitutive model that correctly captures soil behavior under general loading modes is requisite to solving complex boundary value geotechnical engineering problems. Available laboratory tests provide information on material behavior within a very limited range of stress–strain paths and do not cover the full range of loading paths experienced in a boundary value problem. Soil behavior information developed from

Qingwei Fu; Youssef M. A. Hashash; Sungmoon Jung; Jamshid Ghaboussi

2007-01-01

179

Laboratory Oil-Recovery Tests with Ultrasonically Formed Emulsions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oil-displacement tests were conducted in the laboratory with three water-in-oil and five oil-in-water emulsions that were created with ultrasonic energy at a frequency of 20 kHz and an acoustic intensity of approximately 100 watts per sq cm. Emulsions of ...

C. A. Komar H. A. W. Moore

1969-01-01

180

OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND LABORATORY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Discussions are presented for (1) the mechanism of action of chemical dispersants for oil spills, (2) factors affecting performance of dispersants and its measurement, (3) some common laboratory methods that have been used to test dispersant performance, (4) a brief summary of di...

181

Field and laboratory tests of a high volume cascade impactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of three different configurations of a recently developed high volume cascade impactor (HVCI) system was tested in both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, the HVCI was run simultaneously with a virtual impactor and a low pressure impactor using a 3- or 4-day sampling duration. The study was carried out in downtown Helsinki between June and September

Markus Sillanpää; Risto Hillamo; Timo Mäkelä; Arto S Pennanen; Raimo O Salonen

2003-01-01

182

Correlation Between Laboratory Test & Field Part Failure Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Japan, failure rates for non high-reliability electronic parts, obtained from laboratory tests, are generally about ten times those obtained in the field. The reasons for this difference have been analysed by using part failure-rate data collected from major part suppliers, equipment manufacturers, and public users in Japan. This paper numerically analyses transistor data. The two main causes of the

Joji Yasuda

1977-01-01

183

The Ocean Technology Test Bed - An Underwater Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ocean technology test bed (OTTB) will be an engineering laboratory, located on the sea floor. The OTTB will be integrated with the VENUS (Victoria Experimental Network Under the Sea) observatory in Saanich Inlet, on Vancouver Island. It will enable scientific instrument prototyping, ocean technology development and systems engineering. More specifically, it will facilitate research into the technologies required to

Alison A. Proctor; Colin Bradley; Emmett Gamroth; Jeff Kennedy

2007-01-01

184

Results of Sandia National Laboratories grid-tied inverter testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a definition for a Non-Islanding Inverter. This paper also presents methods that can be used to implement such an inverter, along with references to prior work on the subject. Justification for the definition is provided on both a theoretical basis and results from tests conducted at Sandia National Laboratories and Ascension Technology, Inc.

Kern, G.A. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.; Gonzalez, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01

185

SRNL Engineering Development Laboratory Pulse Jet Testing Capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Engineering Development Laboratory recently performed pulse jet mixer development studies related to Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Concentrate Receipt Vessel. These were performed on a wide variety of pulse jet arrangements, pulse jet sizes, nozzle diameters, nozzle configurations, nozzle velocities, pulse jet firing orders, and waste simulant rheologies. This paper describes the EDL Pulse Jet Mixing Test Stand capabilities,

2004-01-01

186

Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: In vivo measurements, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A study of two rounds of in vivo laboratory performance testing was undertaken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the appropriateness of the in vivo performance criteria of draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard ANSI N13.3, Performance Criteria for Bioassay.'' The draft standard provides guidance to in vivo counting facilities regarding the sensitivity, precision, and accuracy of measurements for certain categories of commonly assayed radionuclides and critical regions of the body. This report concludes the testing program by presenting the results of the Round Two testing. Testing involved two types of measurements: chest counting for radionuclide detection in the lung, and whole body counting for detection of uniformly distributed material. Each type of measurement was further divided into radionuclide categories as defined in the draft standard. The appropriateness of the draft standard criteria by measuring a laboratory's ability to attain them were judged by the results of both round One and Round Two testing. The testing determined that performance criteria are set at attainable levels, and the majority of in vivo monitoring facilities passed the criteria when complete results were submitted. 18 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.; Olsen, P.C.

1990-04-01

187

How to achieve harmonisation of laboratory testing -The complete picture.  

PubMed

Harmonisation is likely to be an important contributor to ensure high quality laboratory testing, thus potentially improving patient outcome. Efforts for harmonisation must be made in the total testing process, from test requesting to communication of the laboratory test results and its consequences to the patient. In this article, suggestions are given about what level of harmonisation is possible at the various steps of the testing process, who could be responsible for facilitating and monitoring the effects of harmonisation, and what are likely barriers to achieving harmonisation. Harmonisation can be achieved at local, national and international levels, and will be most challenging when it involves more than one profession as in the extra-analytical phases. Key facilitators will be laboratory associations, regulatory bodies and accreditation systems, whereas barriers are likely to be reimbursement systems or economic factors, opinion leaders and manufacturers. A challenge is to try to turn barriers into facilitators. Harmonisation effects can in most settings be monitored by external quality assurance organisations provided that schemes are expanded to cover all relevant steps and phases. We must combine our efforts, both within our profession as well as in cooperation with others, to achieve harmonisation of the total testing process, in the best interests of the patient. PMID:24326129

Aarsand, Aasne K; Sandberg, Sverre

2014-05-15

188

10. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA. DODD ROAD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA. DODD ROAD RUNS TOP TO BOTTOM, JUST LEFT OF CENTER. THE STATIC TEST TOWER IS TOWARD THE BOTTOM RIGHT, THE REDSTONE INTERIM TEST STAND IS TOWARD THE TOP LEFT. 1961, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

189

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Tested Disposal Methods for Chemical Wastes from Academic Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes procedures for disposing of dichromate cleaning solution, picric acid, organic azides, oxalic acid, chemical spills, and hydroperoxides in ethers and alkenes. These methods have been tested under laboratory conditions and are specific for individual chemicals rather than for groups of chemicals. (JN)

Armour, M. A.; And Others

1985-01-01

190

Proficiency Testing Program for Clinical Laboratories Performing Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Pathogenic Yeast Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antifungal susceptibility testing is expected to facilitate the selection of adequate therapy for fungal infec- tions. The general availability of antifungal susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories is low, even though a number of standard methods are now available. The objective of the present study was to develop and evaluate a proficiency testing program (PTP) for the antifungal susceptibility testing of

Rama Ramani; Vishnu Chaturvedi

2003-01-01

191

Proficiency Testing Program for Clinical Laboratories Performing Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Pathogenic Yeast Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antifungal susceptibility testing is expected to facilitate the selection of adequate therapy for fungal infec- tions. The general availability of antifungal susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories is low, even though a number of standard methods are now available. The objective of the present study was to develop and evaluate a proficiency testing program (PTP) for the antifungal susceptibility testing of

Rama Ramani; Vishnu Chaturvedi

192

76 FR 39110 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services...Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The Demonstration is mandated by section 3113 of the...

2011-07-05

193

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01

194

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01

195

[Point-of-care-testing--the intensive care laboratory].  

PubMed

After successful centralization of laboratory analyses since more than 30 years, advances in biosensors, microprocessors, measurement of undiluted whole blood and miniaturization of laboratory analyzers are leading nowadays more and more to a re-decentralization in the laboratory medicine. Point-of-care-testing (POCT), which is defined as any laboratory test performed outside central or decentralized laboratories, is becoming more and more popular. The theoretical advantages of POCT are faster turn-around-times (TAT), more rapid medical decisions, avoidance of sample identification and sample transport problems and the need of only small specimen volumes. These advantages are frequently mentioned, but are not associated with a clear clinical benefit. The disadvantages of POCT such as incorrect handling and/or maintenance of the analyzers by nontrained clinical staff, inadequate or even absent calibrations and/or quality controls, lack of cost-effectiveness because of an increased number of analyzers and more expensive reagents, insufficient documentation and difficult comparability of the obtained POCT-results with routine laboratory results, are strongly evident. According to the authors' opinion the decision for the establishing of POCT has only to be made in a close co-operation between physicians and laboratorians in order to vouch for necessity and high quality of the analyses. Taking the local situation into consideration (24-h-central laboratory, etc.) the spectrum of parameters measured by means of POCT should be rigorously restricted to the vital functions. Such analytes should be: hemoglobin or hematocrit, activated whole blood clotting time, blood gases, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, creatinine, ammonia and lactate. PMID:10073241

Müller, M M; Hackl, W; Griesmacher, A

1999-01-01

196

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Electrical Power Systems Test Operations: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Electrical Power Systems Test Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Salinas, Michael J.

2012-01-01

197

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory based testing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching to sample memory test. Despite differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments.

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

2013-01-01

198

Field and laboratory testing in young elite soccer players  

PubMed Central

Aim: To determine if there are correlations between the physical fitness of young soccer players assessed by field and laboratory testing. Methods: Thirty four male soccer players took part in the study (mean (SD) age 17.5 (1.1) years, height 177.8 (6.7) cm, weight 70.5 (6.4) kg). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2MAX) during treadmill running and vertical jump height on a force platform were measured in the laboratory. Field tests consisted of a soccer specific endurance test (Bangsbo test) and 30 m sprint with 10 m lap times. Results: The Bangsbo test correlated with the lowest velocity associated with VO2MAX (vVO2MAX; R2 = 0.55, p<0.001), but not with VO2MAX. Sprint times at 30 m and 20 m were related to peak extension velocity and peak extension force measured during vertical jumping, but not to vertical jump height per se. The jumping force and velocity could explain 46% of the 30 m sprint performance (R2 = 0.46, p<0.001). Conclusion: The Bangsbo test and 30 m sprint test correlate with vVO2MAX and vertical jump force and velocity respectively. The Bangsbo test does not give a good estimate of VO2MAX in young soccer players.

Chamari, K; Hachana, Y; Ahmed, Y; Galy, O; Sghaier, F; Chatard, J; Hue, O; Wisloff, U

2004-01-01

199

Testing Rtk GPS System In Urban Areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RTK GPS is provided with cm accuracy and real time surveying system. For providing this conditions, the reference is necessary for high accuracy position. Because this sta- tion is transmitted the corrections to the other receivers. At the some time this system is required common satellites on the receiver to compute integer ambiguity solution. In addition to the conditions, the data transmission device's range is very important. Although RTK GPS technique has a lot of advantages, many problems meet in prac- tice. One of the most important problem in RTK system, which is very useful and reliable in the rural areas, uses in the urban areas. We search this article, how influence RTK GPS applications on satellite numbers, multipath, data transmission device's range capability and etc. in the urban areas.

Pirti, A.; Ata, E.

200

Comparison of Recuperator Alloy Degradation in Laboratory and Engine Testing  

SciTech Connect

In order to increase the efficiency of advanced microturbines, durable alloy foils are needed for their recuperators to operate at 650-700 C. Prior work has demonstrated that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr from austenitic alloys, leading to a reduction in lifetime for the thin-walled components in this application. New commercial alloy foils are being tested in both laboratory tests in humid air and in the exhaust gas of a modified 60 kW microturbine. Initial results are presented for a commercial batch of 80 {micro}m alloy 120 foil. The Cr consumption rates in laboratory testing were similar to those observed in previous testing. The initial results from the microturbine indicate a faster Cr consumption rate compared to the laboratory test, but longer term results are needed to quantify the difference. These results will help to verify a Cr consumption model for predicting lifetimes in this environment based on classical gas transport theory.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2006-01-01

201

Use of laboratory tests in out-of-hours services in Norway  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the use of laboratory tests and which factors influence the use in Norwegian out-of-hours (OOH) services. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting Out-of-hours services in Norway. Subjects All electronic reimbursement claims from doctors at OOH services in Norway in 2007. Main outcome measures Number of contacts and laboratory tests in relation to patients’ and doctors’ characteristics. Results 1 323 281 consultations and home visits were reported. Laboratory tests were used in 31% of the contacts. C-reactive protein (CRP) was the most common test (27% of all contacts), especially in respiratory illness (55%) and infants (44%). Electrocardiogram and rapid strep A test were used in 4% of the contacts. Young doctors, female doctors, and doctors in central areas used laboratory tests more often. Conclusion CRP is extensively used in OOH services, especially by young and inexperienced doctors, and in central areas. Further investigations are required to see if this extensive use of CRP is of importance for correct diagnosis and treatment.

Rebnord, Ingrid Keilegavlen; Sandvik, Hogne; Hunskaar, Steinar

2012-01-01

202

NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory Awarded Accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) provides a comprehensive array of acoustical testing services, including sound pressure level, sound intensity level, and sound-power-level testing per International Standards Organization (ISO)1 3744. Since its establishment in September 2000, the ATL has provided acoustic emission testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station acoustic emission requirements. The ATL consists of a 23- by 27- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic test chamber and a separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. The ATL employs a personal-computer-based data acquisition system that provides up to 26 channels of simultaneous data acquisition with real-time analysis (ref. 4). Specialized diagnostic tools, including a scanning sound-intensity system, allow the ATL's technical staff to support its clients' aggressive low-noise design efforts to meet the space station's acoustic emission requirement. From its inception, the ATL has pursued the goal of developing a comprehensive ISO 17025-compliant quality program that would incorporate Glenn's existing ISO 9000 quality system policies as well as ATL-specific technical policies and procedures. In March 2003, the ATL quality program was awarded accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for sound-power-level testing in accordance with ISO 3744. The NVLAP program is administered by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides third-party accreditation for testing and calibration laboratories. There are currently 24 NVLAP-accredited acoustical testing laboratories in the United States. NVLAP accreditation covering one or more specific testing procedures conducted in accordance with established test standards is awarded upon successful completion of an intensive onsite assessment that includes proficiency testing and documentation review. The ATL NVLAP accreditation currently applies specifically to its ISO 3744 soundpower- level determination procedure (see the photograph) and supporting ISO 17025 quality system, although all ATL operations are conducted in accordance with its quality system. The ATL staff is currently developing additional procedures to adapt this quality system to the testing of space flight hardware in accordance with International Space Station acoustic emission requirements.<

Akers, James C.; Cooper, Beth A.

2004-01-01

203

Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

2002-01-01

204

Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s waste area group 2  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report.

Burns, D.E.

1995-11-01

205

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26

206

State of malaria diagnostic testing at clinical laboratories in the United States, 2010: a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

Background The diagnosis of malaria can be difficult in non-endemic areas, such as the United States, and delays in diagnosis and errors in treatment occur too often. Methods A nationwide survey of laboratories in the United States and its nine dependent territories was conducted in 2010 to determine factors that may contribute to shortcomings in the diagnosis of malaria. This survey explored the availability of malaria diagnostic tests, techniques used, and reporting practices. Results The survey was completed by 201 participants. Ninety percent reported that their laboratories had at least one type of malaria diagnostic test available on-site. Nearly all of the respondents' laboratories performed thick and thin smears on-site; approximately 50% had access to molecular testing; and only 17% had access to rapid diagnostic tests on-site. Seventy-three percent reported fewer than five confirmed cases of malaria in their laboratory during the 12-month period preceding the survey. Twenty-eight percent stated that results of species identification took more than 24 hours to report. Only five of 149 respondents that performed testing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week complied with all of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines for analysis and reporting of results. Conclusion Although malaria diagnostic testing services were available to a majority of U.S. laboratories surveyed, very few were in complete compliance with all of the CLSI guidelines for analysis and reporting of results, and most respondents reported very few cases of malaria annually. Laboratories' difficulty in adhering to the rigorous CLSI guidelines and their personnel's lack of practice and proficiency may account for delays and errors in diagnosis. It is recommended that laboratories that infrequently process samples for malaria seek opportunities for practice and proficiency training annually and take advantage of available resources to assist in species identification.

2011-01-01

207

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams*  

PubMed Central

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae. A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages. In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3

Jamnback, H.; Frempong-Boadu, J.

1966-01-01

208

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams.  

PubMed

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae.A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages.In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. PMID:5296399

Jamnback, H; Frempong-Boadu, J

1966-01-01

209

Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

1995-12-31

210

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessm...

W. R. Peters

1993-01-01

211

Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV- 15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research effort of the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers was to obtain a preliminary, high quality database of far-field acoustics for terminal

J. B. Wellman; Aeroflightdynamics Directorate

212

In-flight and laboratory vacuum-friction test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coefficient of friction measurements were made for six unlubricated metal couples exposed to the space environment aboard the OV-1-13 spacecraft and exposed to laboratory vacuum. Materials studied included mutually soluble, partially soluble, and insoluble metal combinations. Two samples of each material couple were tested in space and in the laboratory using the disk and rider technique. Linear velocity was 0.10 cm/s (2.5 in/min) and rider normal load was 4.45 N (1 lb) for the gold versus silver couples and 8.90 N (2lb) for the other combinations. Results showed that friction data obtained in a clean ion-pumped laboratory vacuum of 10 to the minus 10 power materials with low mutual solubility can be correlated to operation in the vicinity of a typical scientific spacecraft that is exposed to an ambient pressure as low as 10 to the minus 12 power torr. The expected increase in coefficient of friction with solubility was shown. Material couples with high mutual solubility present the hazard of unpredictable drastic friction increase in orbit which may not be evident in laboratory testing at levels down to 10 to the minus 10 power torr. It was also shown that gross cold welding of unlubricated metals exposed to a satellite environment does not occur.

Devine, E. J.; Evans, H. E.; Leasure, W. A.

1973-01-01

213

TEST PLAN FOR MONITORING COOLING COILS IN A LABORATORY SETTING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to understand and quantify the moisture removal performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. The project will include a comprehensive literature review, detailed measurement of cooling coil performance in a laboratory facility, monitoring cooling systems at several field test sites, and development/validation of engineering models that can be used in energy calculations and building simulations. This document contains the detailed test plan for monitoring cooling coil performance in a laboratory setting. Detailed measurements will be taken on up to 10 direct expansion (DX) and chilled water cooling coils in various configurations to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation.

Don B. Shirey, III

2002-04-01

214

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2013-10-01

215

Polychromatic laboratory test bench for DARWIN/TPF: first results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The validation of nulling interferometry principle is a crucial step on the way to space missions DARWIN/TPF concepts that aim at detecting and analysing extrasolar planets. In this context, different laboratory techniques of recombination are currently under development. We present in this poster the new polychromatic test bench at IAS and its very brst results in the 2 to 2.5 ?m band.

Brachet, F.; Labèque, A.; Sekulic, P.; Leger, A.; Ollivier, M.; Lepine, T.; Valette, C.; Lizambert, C.; Hervier, V.

2003-10-01

216

SRNL Engineering Development Laboratory Pulse Jet Testing Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Engineering Development Laboratory recently performed pulse jet mixer development studies related to Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Concentrate Receipt Vessel. These were performed on a wide variety of pulse jet arrangements, pulse jet sizes, nozzle diameters, nozzle configurations, nozzle velocities, pulse jet firing orders, and waste simulant rheologies. This paper describes the EDL Pulse Jet Mixing Test Stand capabilities, experimental methods and data acquisition.

GUERRERO, HECTOR

2004-10-21

217

Device detecting neutral solar wind and laboratory tests.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GAS-2 was designed to detect neutral atoms of the solar wind with typical energies of about 1 keV. The coincidence technique separates fast atoms from the intense flux of photons from the Sun. The energy of detected hydrogen atoms is estimated using the time-of-flight method. The device was built for the RELIKT-2 spacecraft and was laboratory tested.

Kalinin, A. P.; Verigin, M. I.; Gdalevich, G. L.; Safronov, A. Yu.; Hlond, M.

1995-12-01

218

Understanding laboratory testing in diagnostic uncertainty: a qualitative study in general practice.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Better knowledge of the professional's motives for ordering laboratory tests in the case of diagnostic uncertainty may lead to interventions directed at reducing unnecessary testing. AIM: To gain insight into the general practitioner's (GP's) motives for ordering laboratory tests for patients presenting with unexplained complaints. DESIGN OF STUDY: Semi-structured interviews based on surgery observations. SETTING: Twenty-one general practices in rural and urban areas of The Netherlands. METHOD: Investigation of the GP's perception of determinants of test-ordering behaviour in the situation of diagnostic uncertainty. The interviews were structured by evaluating the consultations and test-ordering performance of that day. RESULTS: Dutch GPs vary considerably in their motives for ordering tests. Numerous motives emerged from the data. Some examples of important themes include: personal routines; tolerance of diagnostic uncertainty; time pressure; and tactical motives for test ordering. Complying with the perceived needs of the patient for reassurance through testing is seen as an easy, cost- and time-effective strategy. A clear hierarchy in the determinants was not found. CONCLUSION: The decision to request laboratory testing is the result of a complex interaction of considerations that are often conflicting. Designers of interventions meant to improve the ordering of tests should be aware of the numerous determinants, and take contextual variables into account.

van der Weijden, Trudy; van Bokhoven, Marloes A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van Hasselt, Cathelijne M; Grol, Richard P T M

2002-01-01

219

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

220

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

Batchelor, K.

1990-01-01

221

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-09-01

222

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-05-01

223

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01

224

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

SciTech Connect

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R and D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH2) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN2 and LH2. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R and D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liujin [Fermilab, Cryogenics department, MS347 Batavia, Illinois, 60510 (United States)

2006-03-20

225

Spatial analysis of positive and negative Q fever laboratory results for identifying high- and low-risk areas of infection in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background The Netherlands faced a large Q fever epidemic from 2007 to 2010, in which thousands of people were tested for the presence of antibodies against Coxiella burnetii as part of individual patient diagnosis. So far, only data of notified cases were used for the identification of high-risk areas, which can lead to misclassification of risk. Therefore, we identified high- and low-risk areas based on laboratory test results to make control measures more efficient. Methods Data on diagnostic Q fever laboratory tests were obtained from two regional laboratories of medical microbiology in the high-incidence area in the south of the Netherlands. The proportion of patients testing positive was mapped per postal code area. Patients testing positive were compared to patients testing negative based on the distance between residential address and the nearest infected goat farm with adjustment for age and sex. Results and conclusion Of 11,035 patients tested, 4,011 (36.4%) had a positive laboratory test result for Q fever. Maps showing the spatial pattern of tests performed and proportion of positive tests allowed for the identification of high- and low-risk Q fever areas. The proportion of patients testing positive was higher in areas close to infected goat farms compared to areas further away. Patients living <1 km from an infected goat farm had a substantially higher risk of testing positive for antibodies to C. burnetii than those living >10 km away (OR 21.70, 95% CI 16.28–28.92). Laboratory test results have the potential to make control measures more efficient by identifying high-risk areas as well as low-risk areas.

van den Berg, Elsa J.; Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Schneeberger, Peter M.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C.; van der Hoek, Wim

2013-01-01

226

Tested method to minimize plutonium assay discrepancies between laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium assay differences are frequently observed between laboratories exchanging plutonium dioxide powders. These differences are commonly the result of chemical changes and/or nonhomogeneities in sampled materials. The irregularities are often caused by moisture absorption during sampling, packaging, shipment, and storage of the materials. A method is proposed which eliminates the effects of chemical change in samples, particularly moisture absorption, and minimizes sampling error. A nondestructive thermal watts/gram test on every preweighed sampled and total dissolution of these samples for chemical assay are the primary features which make this method effective. Because this method minimizes the error related to exchange material, it is possible to design an interlaboratory exchange program which demonstrates the assay capabiliies of the participants. In an experiment performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, three PuO/sub 2/ batches of varying isotopic composition were synthesized at Mound to be used in the exchange tess. Powder sample aliquots from each batch were weighed directly into their vials under controlled atmospheric conditions. Calorimetric heat measurements were made on each vial to test homogeneity and verify sample weight. Six vials of each batch were chemically assayed at Mound and six at NBL (New Brunswick Laboratory). Both laboratories chose controlled-potential coulometry as the chemical assay technique because of its demonstrated precision and accuracy. Total dissolution of preweighed exchange samples eliminated the need for laborious and usually futile heating to return the material to its original condition. The mean chemical assay values obtained by Mound and NBL agree to within 0.01% for each of the compositions tested. Testing of both chemical assay and calorimetric data revealed no sampling error throughout the experiment.

Seiler, R.J.; Goss, R.L.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Rogers, D.R.

1982-01-29

227

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of this program was to mini...

G. A. Stoetzel S. R. Bivens

2002-01-01

228

Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subse...

1993-01-01

229

DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

2009-06-01

230

Characterization, Testing of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. This laboratory course is a supplement to the ESC 216 Course which "examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and for controlling material fabrication and final device performance." Here, users will find a Lab Overview which provides a brief outline of the Labs, Topics and Methods, and Activities provided. Lab titles include: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Introduction to FESEM, and Magnetic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. To access this and other resources on Nano4me.org a free, quick, and simple registration process is required.

2010-03-09

231

Issues in mapping LOINC laboratory tests to SNOMED CT.  

PubMed

Comprehensive clinical terminologies such as SNOMED CT tend to overlap with specialized terminologies such as LOINC (e.g., for the domain of laboratory procedures). Terminological systems such as the UMLS are often used to bridge between terminologies. However, the integration of LOINC in the UMLS and with other terminologies remains suboptimal. We mapped concepts for laboratory tests from LOINC to pre-coordinated SNOMED CT concepts, based on shared relations to other concepts. As LOINC is finer-grained than SNOMED CT, several LOINC codes tend to map to the same SNOMED CT concept. However, a large proportion of LOINC codes could not be mapped to SNOMED CT through this approach, because of underspecified definitions in SNOMED CT and a lack of fine-grained, pre-coordinated concepts in SNOMED CT. PMID:18999311

Bodenreider, Olivier

2008-01-01

232

Evaluation of Laboratory Directed Research and Development investment areas at Sandia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a variety of research projects each year under its Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Recently, information visualization techniques have been used with corporate data to map several LDRD investment areas for the purpose of understanding strategic overlaps and identifying potential opportunities for future development outside of our current technologies. Tools, techniques, and specific analyses are

Kevin W. Boyack; Nabeel Rahal

2005-01-01

233

A Seminar Report on Implementing Distributive Education Project Laboratories in High Schools and Area Vocational Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help high school and area vocational center distributive education teacher-coordinators carry out methods of project-oriented and project laboratory instruction, Western Michigan University conducted three one-day seminars for 40 distributive educators. Presentations were: (1) "Implementation of Project Laboratories" by J.A. Daenzer, (2)…

Trimpe, Adrian, Ed.; Dannenberg, Raymond A., Ed.

234

High efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer: Construction and laboratory testing  

SciTech Connect

The new high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system (HEXOS) has been developed to study impurity concentrations and impurity transport properties in the plasma of the stellarator W7-X. The HEXOS system consists of four different grating based spectrometers, which provide large etendue and good spectral resolution over a broad wavelength range (2.5-160 nm, divided into four subsections with some overlapping). The mechanical arrangement as two double spectrometers allows for a compact installation geometry on W7-X. Laboratory testing and wavelength and intensity calibrations have been performed using a dc hollow cathode discharge (24-150 nm) and a pinch discharge (2.5-30 nm)

Biel, W.; Greiche, A.; Burhenn, R.; Jourdain, E.; Lepere, D. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Jobin-Yvon SAS, F-91165 Longjumeau (France)

2006-10-15

235

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01

236

Feasibility study of an orbiting laboratory for testing CSI technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept for an orbiting laboratory for testing Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology is described. The CSI-Star concept reflects a lower cost, higher risk approach. The concept supports demonstration and validation testing for critical CSI technologies at a cost of $20M to $26M with a 1-year reliability of approximately 0.9. The Ball Aerospace QuickStar bus is the carrier for the CSI test article. QuickStar is launched as a secondary payload on the McDonnell Douglas Delta 2. The QuickStar/Delta 2 approach is flight proven. The CSI test article is a 20 foot, 1 Hz, truss beam which is deployed from the QuickStar bus. The test article is well instrumented for quality system identification. The laboratory provides three layers of active control consisting of global vibration suppression along the truss beam, vibration isolation between the beam and instrument platforms, and vibration compensation through the use of gimbaled platforms which point lasers relative to optical sensor targets. The configuration simulates the dynamics of multi-instrument science platforms such as those of the Earth Observation System (EOS) while maintaining strong ties to astrophysics missions such as the Optical Interferometer. Uplink/downlink services and a reprogrammable computer provide flexibility for long-term investigations by members of the CSI community (NASA, DoD, academia, and industry). CSI-Star fills the gap between short-term experiments, which have been conducted primarily on the Shuttle, and future science missions which require the technology. The on-orbit maturity of CSI technology must be established to obtain acceptance by project managers and to promote injection of the technology into future science missions.

Bicos, Andrew S.; Loboda, Gregory G.

1993-01-01

237

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends in environmental radiation, and to provide such information to the public. It summarizes these activities for calendar

R. G. Patzer; S. C. Black; R. F. Grossman; D. D. Smith

1984-01-01

238

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area FY 1999 progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results from fiscal year (FY) 1999 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) work-for-others project. This report is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL to document the migration of radionuclides and controls of radionuclide

D K Smith; G F Eaton; T P Rose; J E Moran; A Brachmann; J E McAninch; A B Kersting; V V Romanovski; R E Martinelli; J K Jr Werner

2000-01-01

239

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA\\/NSO) through the Defense

H W Culham; G F Eaton; V Genetti; Q Hu; A B Kersting; R E Lindvall; J E Moran; G A Blasiyh Nuno; B A Powell; T P Rose; M J Singleton; R W Williams; M Zavarin; P Zhao

2008-01-01

240

Tabulation of physical and mechanical property data supporting post-test characterization of the Full Scale Heat Test No. 2 area at the NSTF (Near-Surface Test Facility)  

SciTech Connect

The attached tabulation of laboratory data contains the results of physical and mechanical property testing performed on core from the vicinity of the Jointed Block Test Facility. This testing was performed in support of the Block Test characterization and discrete Jointed Block Modeling studies which will eventually be reported in the Phase 1 completion report. Testing was conducted in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory in the 2101M Building, 200 East Area, under the auspices of the Materials Testing Group, Engineered Barriers Department.

Hulstrom, L.C.

1985-04-01

241

Laboratory testing of a continuous emissions monitor for hydrochloric acid.  

PubMed

Continuous monitoring of exhaust flue gas has become a common practice in power plants in response to Federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) standards. Under the current rules, hydrochloric acid (HCl) is not continuously measured at most plants; however, MATS standards have been proposed for HCl, and tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption spectroscopy is one method that can be used to measure HCl continuously. The focus of this work is on the evaluation and verification of the operation performance of an HCL TDL over a range of real-world operating environments. The testing was conducted at the University of California at Riverside (UCR) spectroscopy evaluation laboratory. Laboratory tests were conducted at three separate temperatures, 25 degrees C, 100 degrees C, and 200 degrees C, and two distinct moisture levels for the enhanced temperatures, 0%, (2 tests) and 4%, over a concentration range from 0 ppmv to 25 ppmv-m at each of the elevated temperatures. The results showed good instrument accuracy as afunction of changing temperature and moisture. Data analysis showed that the average percentage difference between the ammonia concentration and the calibration source was 3.33% for varying moisture from 0% to 4% and 2.69%for varying temperature from 25 to 100/200 degrees C. An HCl absorption line of 1.742 microm was selected for by the manufacturer for this instrument. The Hi Tran database indicated that CO2 is probably the only major interferent, although the CO2 absorption is very weak at that wavelength. Interference tests for NO, CO, SO2, NH3, and CO2 for a range of concentrations typical of flue gasses in coal-fired power plants did not show any interference with TDL HCl measurements at 1.742 microm. For these interference tests, CO2 was tested at a concentration of 11.9% concentration in N2 for these tests. Average precision over the entire range for all 10 tests is 3.12%. Implications: The focus of this study was.an evaluation of the operation performance of a tunable diode laser (TDL) for the measurement of hydrochloric acid (HCl) over a range of real-world operating environments. The results showed good instrument accuracy as a function of changing temperature from 25 degrees C to 200 degrees C and moisture from 0% to 4%. Such as an instrument could be used for continuous monitoring of exhaust flue gas in power plants once the Federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) standards have been fully implemented. PMID:25039201

Dene, Chuck; Pisano, John T; Durbin, Thomas D; Bumiller, Kurt; Crabbe, Keith; Muzio, Lawrence J

2014-06-01

242

Antifungal Susceptibility Testing: Current Role from the Clinical Laboratory Perspective  

PubMed Central

Despite availability of many antifungal agents, antifungal clinical resistance occurs, perhaps as a consequence of an infecting organism found to be resistant in vitro to one or more antifungals tested. From what derives the important current role of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST), that is to determine which agents are like to be scarcely effective for a given infection. Thus, AFST results, if timely generated by the clinical microbiology laboratory and communicated to clinicians, can aid them in the therapeutic decision making, especially for difficult-to-treat invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Although recently refined AFST methods are commercially available for allowing a close antifungal resistance surveillance in many clinical setting, novel assays such as flow cytometry or MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry are upcoming tools for AFST. Based on short-time antifungal drug exposure of fungal isolates, these assays could provide a reliable means for quicker and sensitive assessment of AFST.

Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; De Carolis, Elena; Posteraro, Patrizia; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

2014-01-01

243

Antifungal susceptibility testing: current role from the clinical laboratory perspective.  

PubMed

Despite availability of many antifungal agents, antifungal clinical resistance occurs, perhaps as a consequence of an infecting organism found to be resistant in vitro to one or more antifungals tested. From what derives the important current role of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST), that is to determine which agents are like to be scarcely effective for a given infection. Thus, AFST results, if timely generated by the clinical microbiology laboratory and communicated to clinicians, can aid them in the therapeutic decision making, especially for difficult-to-treat invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Although recently refined AFST methods are commercially available for allowing a close antifungal resistance surveillance in many clinical setting, novel assays such as flow cytometry or MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry are upcoming tools for AFST. Based on short-time antifungal drug exposure of fungal isolates, these assays could provide a reliable means for quicker and sensitive assessment of AFST. PMID:24804003

Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; De Carolis, Elena; Posteraro, Patrizia; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

2014-01-01

244

A ultra low level laboratory for nuclear test ban measurements.  

PubMed

The radionuclide laboratory at the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ATL03) was installed to support the international monitoring system for verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT and Text of the establishment of a Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test-Ban-Treaty Organization, 1996). Therefore, the background of a high-purity germanium detection system has been reduced by developing a high sophisticated active and passive detector shielding. The entire system is encapsulated in an iron-castle and placed into a fall-out shelter. The final count rate, achieved over the energy interval from 40 to 2700 keV, amounts to 0.18 counts s(-1) kg(-1) (Ge). PMID:11839044

Schwaiger, M; Steger, F; Schroettner, T; Schmitzer, C

2002-01-01

245

System for laboratory proficiency testing in bacteriology: organisation and impact on microbiology laboratories in health care facilities funded by the Ontario Government.  

PubMed Central

The Ministry of Health requires that all medical laboratories in the Province of Ontario participate in a laboratory proficiency testing program (LPTP). In bacteriology compliance has been excellent. Eighty-six laboratories, for various reasons over the period under review, have surrendered their licence or, because of poor performance on LPTP test surveys, have had their licence withdrawn by the Ministry. The highest percentage of withdrawals occurred in small hospitals in isolated areas. In April 1979 there were 249 participating laboratories. Participants' results are first analysed by computer, and, subsequently, approximately 20% of participants' reports are reviewed by the Committee. Various Committee actions ensue: correspondence with the laboratory director regarding errors; an offer of a visit; and possibly a report via a senior LPTP committee to the Ministry that a laboratory is non-proficient and, in LPTP's terms of reference, non-remediable. Subsequent Ministry action might be the withdrawal of a laboratory's licence. However, this last recourse only occurs when educational efforts have proved ineffectual. Overall, performance in LPTP bacteriology surveys has improved over the period 1975-8, with 68% of 263 laboratories achieving a score of 70% or higher and 26% of 263 laboratories scoring less than 60%.

Whitby, J L; Black, W A; Richardson, H; Wood, D E

1982-01-01

246

Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This report contains Appendix B which provides all of the laboratory summary data sheets for the Area 6 SCEPs closure activities.

NONE

1997-11-01

247

Efficiency of ear protectors in laboratory and real life tests.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of ten different ear-protectors (6 types of earmuffs and 4 types of earplugs) has been tested under laboratory conditions and in the real occupational environment. Three methods were used: (1) physical, utilizing a dummy head; (2) subjective, real-ear, executed on trained human subjects; (3) subjective, measuring TTS2 resulting from occupational, one-workday exposure. It could be shown that the ear protection efficiency ascertained on the basis of TTS2 measurements on workers exposed to noise in their occupational environment is, in nearly all cases, smaller than the efficiency expected, taking into account the sound damping of the same protectors, tested under laboratory conditions, using the physical or real-ear method. Measurements of TTS2 were found to give the best data needed to define the protectors' efficiency, since they include, simultaneously, the impact of various environmental factors, the subjective reactiveness, the nature of the professional task and the acoustical features of the protector used. Therefore this method enables the estimation of the real protection given to workers with a risk of noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:2379964

Pawlas, K; Grzesik, J

1990-01-01

248

Design and laboratory testing of a prototype linear temperature sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report discusses the basic theory, design, and laboratory testing of a prototype linear temperature sensor (or "line sensor'), which is an instrument for measuring internal waves in the ocean. The operating principle of the line sensor consists of measuring the average resistance change of a vertically suspended wire (or coil of wire) induced by the passage of an internal wave in a thermocline. The advantage of the line sensor over conventional internal wave measurement techniques is that it is insensitive to thermal finestructure which contaminates point sensor measurements, and its output is approximately linearly proportional to the internal wave displacement. An approximately one-half scale prototype line sensor module was teste in the laboratory. The line sensor signal was linearly related to the actual fluid displacement to within 10%. Furthermore, the absolute output was well predicted (within 25%) from the theoretical model and the sensor material properties alone. Comparisons of the line sensor and a point sensor in a wavefield with superimposed turbulence (finestructure) revealed negligible distortion in the line sensor signal, while the point sensor signal was swamped by "turbulent noise'. The effects of internal wave strain were also found to be negligible.

Dube, C. M.; Nielsen, C. M.

1982-07-01

249

En route noise annoyance laboratory test: Preliminary results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until recently concerns about the impact of aircraft noise on people have centered around the takeoff and landing operations of aircraft in the vicinity of airport terminals. The development of the advanced turboprop (propfan) engine, modifications to air corridors, and the desire to maintain a natural environment in national parks and recreation areas have now focused attention on the impact at ground level of the en route noise produced by aircraft at cruise conditions and altitudes. Compared to terminal area noise, en route noise is characterized by relatively low noise levels, lack of high frequency spectral content, and long durations. Much research has been directed towards understanding and quantifying the annoyance caused by terminal area aircraft noise, but relatively little research has been conducted for en route noise. To address this need, a laboratory experiment was conducted to quantify the annoyance of people on the ground to en route noise generated by aircraft at cruise conditions. The objectives of the experiment are to determine the annoyance prediction ability of noise measurement procedures and corrections when applied to en route noise; to determine differences in annoyance response to en route noise and takeoff/landing noise; and to determine differences in annoyance response to advanced turboprop en route noise and conventional jet en route noise.

Mccurdy, David A.

1990-01-01

250

Buried waste remote survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Burial site characterization is an important first step in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. Testing and demonstration of technology for remote buried waste site characterization were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by a team from five US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. The US Army`s Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) vehicle, on loan to the Oak

B. S. Richardson; M. W. Noakes; B. E. Griebenow; N. E. Josten

1991-01-01

251

Buried waste remote survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Burial site characterization is an important first step in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. Testing and demonstration of technology for remote buried waste site characterization were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by a team from five US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. The US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) vehicle, on loan to the Oak

B. S. Richardson; M. W. Noakes; B. E. Griebenow; N. E. Josten

1991-01-01

252

Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications (journal articles, presentations, outreach support, and other reports), but will not be attributed to a specific vendor.

Not Available

2011-12-01

253

K Basin Sludge Conditioning Testing Nitric Acid Dissolution Testing of K East Area Sludge Composite, Small and Large-Scale Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to support the development of the K Basin Sludge Treatment System. For this work, testing was performed to examine the dissolution behavior of a K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite, referred to as K East area sludge composite, in nitric acid

C. D. Carlson; C. H. Delegard; I. E. Burgeson; A. J. Schmidt; K. L. Silvers

1999-01-01

254

Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory. Technical progress report, March-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Test and Application Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1 to 100 kW of peak power, throughout the United States. The sites contain modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Project during the four-month period 1 March 1980 through 30 June 1980 are summarized. During this period, site evaluations at test facilities in Chicago, Illinois; Bryan, Ohio; Mead, Nebraska; and Natural Bridges National Monument (NBNM), Utah, were conducted. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were generated for all branch circuits at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) and at NBNM. Module failures at the UTA and NBNM were analyzed. Two versions of a new type of photovoltaic/thermal air collector were visually analyzed. Two liquid PV/T collectors from the same manufacturer were subjected to degradation analyses. The Lincoln Laboratory Large-Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) was relocated and recalibrated.

Forman, S. E.; Themelis, M. P.

1980-10-30

255

EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

2012-01-01

256

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

257

20. Interior view of rehabilitation area in rehabilitation and testing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Interior view of rehabilitation area in rehabilitation and testing facilities; near center of occupied portion; view to northeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

258

Portable nondestructive testing and dynamic test diagnostics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the most complete NDT facilities worldwide. In addition to many fixed pieces of equipment, the Laboratory has a very wide range of NDT and dynamic test diagnostic equipment that can be taken to the job site. Most of the equipment described here was procured for a specific purpose to support a program consistent with the nuclear weapons mission of Los Alamos. However, through the years, the equipment has found use in many other applications both within and external to weapons research, development, and testing. Various combinations of these equipments form unique capabilities, as demonstrated by the applications. The portable equipment is mainly applied to problems where the process or object under study cannot be brought into an NDT laboratory.

Fry, D.A.; Brooks, G.H.; Bryant, L.E.; Guerrero, A.; Valdez, J.E.

1994-11-01

259

Quality assurance testing of an explosives trace analysis laboratory--further improvements.  

PubMed

The Forensic Explosives Laboratory (FEL) operates within the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) which is part of the UK Government Ministry of Defence (MOD). The FEL provides support and advice to the Home Office and UK police forces on matters relating to the criminal misuse of explosives. During 1989 the FEL established a weekly quality assurance testing regime in its explosives trace analysis laboratory. The purpose of the regime is to prevent the accumulation of explosives traces within the laboratory at levels that could, if other precautions failed, result in the contamination of samples and controls. Designated areas within the laboratory are swabbed using cotton wool swabs moistened with ethanol water mixture, in equal amounts. The swabs are then extracted, cleaned up and analyzed using Gas Chromatographs with Thermal Energy Analyzer detectors. This paper follows on from a previous published paper describing the regime and summarizing subsequent results from approximately 6 years of tests. Lessons learned and improvements made over the period are also discussed. Monitoring samples taken from surfaces within the trace laboratories and trace vehicle examination bay have, with few exceptions, revealed only low levels of contamination, predominantly of RDX. Analysis of the control swabs, processed alongside the monitoring swabs, has demonstrated that in this environment the risk of forensic sample contamination, assuming all the relevant anti-contamination procedures have been followed, is so small that it is considered to be negligible. The monitoring regime has also been valuable in assessing the process of continuous improvement, allowing sources of contamination transfer into the trace areas to be identified and eliminated. PMID:17524053

Crowson, Andrew; Doyle, Sean P; Todd, Clifford C; Watson, Stuart; Zolnhofer, Nicola

2007-07-01

260

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

261

Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

2009-01-01

262

Laboratory tests of IEC DER object models for grid applications.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (SRP) and Sandia National Laboratories to jointly develop advanced methods of controlling distributed energy resources (DERs) that may be located within SRP distribution systems. The controls must provide a standardized interface to allow plug-and-play capability and should allow utilities to take advantage of advanced capabilities of DERs to provide a value beyond offsetting load power. To do this, Sandia and SRP field-tested the IEC 61850-7-420 DER object model (OM) in a grid environment, with the goal of validating whether the model is robust enough to be used in common utility applications. The diesel generator OM tested was successfully used to accomplish basic genset control and monitoring. However, as presently constituted it does not enable plug-and-play functionality. Suggestions are made of aspects of the standard that need further development and testing. These problems are far from insurmountable and do not imply anything fundamentally unsound or unworkable in the standard.

Blevins, John D. (PE Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ); Menicucci, David F.; Byrd, Thomas, Jr. (,; .); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ginn, Jerry W.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan (Primecore, Inc.)

2007-02-01

263

Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 49 x 10(exp 6)/ft (1.3 x 10(exp 7)/m to 19 x 10(exp 6/ft) and 1.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 19 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.39 x 10(exp 7)/m to 62 x 10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.36 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.2 x 10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for the wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 12% or better of the experimental data.

Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

2008-01-01

264

RadBall™ Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall™, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall™ technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

Farfan, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Harpring, Larry J.; Gordon, John R.; Blessing, Ronald; Coleman, J. Rusty; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

2010-01-01

265

RadBall Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory.  

PubMed

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall(™), consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall(™) technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL). PMID:21617738

Farfán, Eduardo B; Foley, Trevor Q; Jannik, G Timothy; Harpring, Larry J; Gordon, John R; Blessing, Ronald; Coleman, J Rusty; Holmes, Christopher J; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J

2010-01-01

266

42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...complexity testing; technical supervisor. 493.1447 Section 493.1447 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high...

2010-10-01

267

76 FR 49491 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration; Extension of the Deadline for Submission...Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration. The deadline for submitting supporting...request a temporary code under the Demonstration, which ended on August 1,...

2011-08-10

268

Comparison and Evaluation of Field and Laboratory Toxicity Tests with Fenvalerate on an Estuarine Crustacean.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field and laboratory toxicity tests were conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural runoff. The study examined an integ...

D. S. Baughman D. W. Moore G. I. Scott

1989-01-01

269

Magnetoacoustic Testing of Railroad Wheels: Assessing the Laboratory to Component Test Transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetoacoustic test method has been shown through numerous laboratory investigations to have good potential for monitoring residual stresses in industrial components. This paper specifically addresses the difficulties that have hindered the evolution of this technique into a field tool capable of measuring residual stresses in the rims of railroad wheels. These hindrances include a need to decipher complex stress

D. Utrata

1992-01-01

270

Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

1989-01-01

271

[How to improve the accreditation validity of medical devices testing laboratory].  

PubMed

The safety and effectiveness of medical devices are directly related to human health. Therefore, how to improve the accreditation validity of medical devices testing laboratory has been the focus of attention from every corner of society. With respect to the characteristics of medical devices testing laboratory, this paper represented the existing issues during the accreditation and evaluation of testing laboratory, put forward some improvement suggestions on how to improve the validity of testing laboratory evaluation based on the practical experience. PMID:24195401

Qi, Weiming

2013-07-01

272

Evaluation of groundwater monitoring at offsite nuclear test areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater quality has been monitored at nuclear test sites distant from the Nevada Test Site as part of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) since 1972. Separate reports describing the monitoring programs recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrologic Program Advisory Group were issued by the DOE for most of the offsite areas during the early 1980s, and

J. B. Chapman; S. L. Hokett

1991-01-01

273

Laboratory test plan in-well vapor stripping system  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the activities that will be conducted as a part of the laboratory testing of a full-scale mockup of the Stanford in-well vapor stripping system. These tests will be conducted to delineate design parameters for the in-well vapor stripping unit and to identify and quantify variables that are sensitive to the dynamic hydraulic effects induced by operation of the system. No radioactive materials are involved in this test. In-well vapor stripping has been used successfully as an alternative to conventional pump-and-treat technology for remediation of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated groundwater in Europe and more recently in the United States. In-well vapor stripping permits in situ remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater by combining an in-well vapor stripping system with a treatment well is used to extract and discharge groundwater simultaneously, resulting in the establishment of a vertical circulation groundwater flow cell in the aquifer. Groundwater extracted from the aquifer via the lower screened interval is treated for VOCs by in-well vapor stripping within the treatment well. This stripping causes aqueous phase VOCs to partition preferentially into a vapor phase. Treated groundwater is discharged back to the aquifer via the upper screened interval of the treatment well, while the vapor phase VOCs are simultaneously removed from the well bore and contained at the surface with a vacuum extraction system. Groundwater entrained into the vertical circulation flow cell becomes sequentially cleaned of VOC contamination in an efficient manner without the need for surface treatment and handling of contaminated groundwater. An added benefit of in-well vapor stripping is the ability to perform vadose zone vapor extraction concurrently with groundwater remediation. This uses the vacuum extraction capabilities of the in-well vapor stripping configured with the upper screened interval placed into the vadose zone above the water table.

Koegler, K.J

1994-07-01

274

An administrative intervention to improve the utilization of laboratory tests within a university hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Improving the appropriateness of testing behavior and reducing the number of laboratory tests have been recog- nized as essential parts of quality improvement. Objective. To assess the effectiveness of an administrative and a short-term educational intervention aimed at reducing clinical biochemistry laboratory utilization. Design. An analysis comparing utilization of laboratory tests performed on in-patients before and after the intervention.

RONIT CALDERON-MARGALIT; SHLOMO MOR-YOSEF; MICHAEL MAYER; BELLA ADLER; SHMUEL C. SHAPIRA

2005-01-01

275

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-05-22

276

Interference of medical contrast media on laboratory testing.  

PubMed

The use of contrast media such as organic iodine molecules and gadolinium contrast agents is commonplace in diagnostic imaging. Although there is widespread perception that side effects and drug interactions may be the leading problems caused by these compounds, various degrees of interference with some laboratory tests have been clearly demonstrated. Overall, the described interference for iodinate contrast media include inappropriate gel barrier formation in blood tubes, the appearance of abnormal peaks in capillary zone electrophoresis of serum proteins, and a positive bias in assessment of cardiac troponin I with one immunoassay. The interference for gadolinium contrast agents include negative bias in calcium assessment with ortho-cresolphthalein colorimetric assays and occasional positive bias using some Arsenazo reagents, negative bias in measurement of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and zinc (colorimetric assay), as well as positive bias in creatinine (Jaffe reaction), total iron binding capacity (TIBC, ferrozine method), magnesium (calmagite reagent) and selenium (mass spectrometry) measurement. Interference has also been reported in assessment of serum indices, pulse oximetry and methaemoglobin in samples of patients receiving Patent Blue V. Under several circumstances the interference was absent from manufacturer-supplied information and limited to certain type of reagents and/or analytes, so that local verification may be advisable to establish whether or not the test in use may be biased. Since the elimination half-life of these compounds is typically lower than 2 h, blood collection after this period may be a safer alternative in patients who have received contrast media for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24627717

Lippi, Giuseppe; Daves, Massimo; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

2014-01-01

277

Exercise-induced changes in common laboratory tests.  

PubMed

Examination of 19 serum biochemical and hematologic parameters in a group of white male runners, ranging in age from 23 to 47 years, just prior to and immediately after a 13-mile "mini-marathon," demonstrated a significant increase, by paired Student t-test, in mean values of: K+, BUN, creatinine, CK, LDH, AST (SGOT), alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, uric acid and leukocyte counts. Prevailing environmental conditions were such as to produce no significant hemoconcentration. Using this group's statistics and this hospital laboratory's upper limits of normal, the percentage of values above two SDs are, for the resting state: K+ 7%, BUN 7%, creatinine 0%, CK 21%, LDH 21%, AST 0%, alkaline phosphatase 0%, bilirubin 7%, uric acid 7%, and leukocyte count 0%. Post-exertional values above normal limits are: K+ 7%, BUN 21%, creatinine 21%, CK 93%, LDH 86%, AST 0%, alkaline phosphatase 0%, bilirubin 14%, uric acid 36%, and leukocyte 71%. Consequently, abnormally high values for K+, BUN, creatinine, CK, LDH, bilirubin, uric acid, and leukocyte counts can often be expected in some patients who exercise heavily. The degree of the abnormality will depend on the level and length of exercise as well as the elapsed time between exercise and testing. PMID:7072633

Priest, J B; Oei, T O; Moorehead, W R

1982-03-01

278

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01

279

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory`s 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory`s Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram.

O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

1993-09-01

280

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

Peters, W.R.

1993-08-01

281

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2011-01-01

282

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2012-01-01

283

Development of a novel SCADA system for laboratory testing.  

PubMed

This document summarizes the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system that allows communication with, and controlling the output of, various I/O devices in the renewable energy systems and components test facility RESLab. This SCADA system differs from traditional SCADA systems in that it supports a continuously changing operating environment depending on the test to be performed. The SCADA System is based on the concept of having one Master I/O Server and multiple client computer systems. This paper describes the main features and advantages of this dynamic SCADA system, the connections of various field devices to the master I/O server, the device servers, and numerous software features used in the system. The system is based on the graphical programming language "LabVIEW" and its "Datalogging and Supervisory Control" (DSC) module. The DSC module supports a real-time database called the "tag engine," which performs the I/O operations with all field devices attached to the master I/O server and communications with the other tag engines running on the client computers connected via a local area network. Generic and detailed communication block diagrams illustrating the hierarchical structure of this SCADA system are presented. The flow diagram outlining a complete test performed using this system in one of its standard configurations is described. PMID:15272800

Patel, M; Cole, G R; Pryor, T L; Wilmot, N A

2004-07-01

284

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

285

Continuous Improvement in Battery Testing at the NASA/JSC Energy System Test Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas conducts development and qualification tests to fulfill Energy System Division responsibilities relevant to ASA programs and projects. EST A has historically calle...

J. Cook W. Boyd

2003-01-01

286

Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the a...

W. R. Hackett R. P. Smith

1994-01-01

287

Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

Morrey, E.V.

1996-03-01

288

Laboratory tests for the antiphospholipid syndrome: current concepts.  

PubMed

There is increased scientific interest in the diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), as therapeutic interventions can lead to substantial improvement in clinical outcome. As the clinical features of APS are far from specific, a sound laboratory method is needed to support or exclude the diagnosis. Two methods are currently used for the diagnosis of APS: (1). ELISA-based immunoassays for the detection of anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies; and (2). clotting assays for determination of the lupus anticoagulant (LA). However, the first method is limited by a low specificity, and the second by low sensitivity. Furthermore, for both methods standardisation is unsatisfactory. Therefore, a number of new assays have been proposed as alternative or supplementary to aCL and LA tests. These include the anti-beta-2-glycoprotein I or antiprothrombin ELISAs, an ELISA utilising a phospholipid mixture, clotting assays with varying activators and assays utilising chromogenic substrates. This review presents a brief outline of APS, the autoantibodies associated with this syndrome, the basic principles of the standard assays used and a description of newer methods currently being validated. PMID:15203748

Passam, Freda; Krilis, Steven

2004-04-01

289

Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff  

SciTech Connect

Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs.

Sharpe, C.J.; Daemen, J.J.

1991-03-01

290

SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

2011-06-09

291

Index Testing to Support the Stormwater Management Erosion and Sediment Control Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main aim of the project was to support the Stormwater Management Academy Research and Testing Laboratory (SMARTL) with material index testing. In addition to testing erosion and sediment control products on the test beds in the field-scale laboratory ...

I. Gogo-Abite M. Chopra M. Hardin M. Wanielista

2010-01-01

292

The effects of calculator-based laboratories on standardized test scores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nationwide, the goal of providing a productive science and math education to our youth in today's educational institutions is centering itself around the technology being utilized in these classrooms. In this age of digital technology, educational software and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) have become significant devices in the teaching of science and math for many states across the United States. Among the technology, the Texas Instruments graphing calculator and Vernier Labpro interface, are among some of the calculator-based laboratories becoming increasingly popular among middle and high school science and math teachers in many school districts across this country. In Tennessee, however, it is reported that this type of technology is not regularly utilized at the student level in most high school science classrooms, especially in the area of Physical Science (Vernier, 2006). This research explored the effect of calculator based laboratory instruction on standardized test scores. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of traditional teaching methods versus graphing calculator teaching methods on the state mandated End-of-Course (EOC) Physical Science exam based on ability, gender, and ethnicity. The sample included 187 total tenth and eleventh grade physical science students, 101 of which belonged to a control group and 87 of which belonged to the experimental group. Physical Science End-of-Course scores obtained from the Tennessee Department of Education during the spring of 2005 and the spring of 2006 were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings of this research study suggested the type of teaching method, traditional or calculator based, did not have an effect on standardized test scores. However, the students' ability level, as demonstrated on the End-of-Course test, had a significant effect on End-of-Course test scores. This study focused on a limited population of high school physical science students in the middle Tennessee Putnam County area. The study should be reproduced in various school districts in the state of Tennessee to compare the findings.

Stevens, Charlotte Bethany Rains

293

Assessment of the Effects of Reimbursement Policy on the Utilization of Clinical Laboratory Testing and the Contribution of Testing to Patient Care (Outcomes and Risk Factors in Physician Office Clinical Laboratory Testing for Prothrombin Time (Protime) and Digoxin).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the report is to determine the feasibility of using claims data to identify errors in laboratory testing. Both physician office labs and independent clinical laboratories were examined. The project assessed the results of two tests: the prothr...

S. T. Mennemeyer J. W. Winkelman

1992-01-01

294

Mapping laboratory test codes to LOINC for a regional health information exchange.  

PubMed

Fully mapping laboratory tests to LOINC greatly increases functionality within a regional data exchange, but it is a costly process. As an inexpensive approach, we defined 53 "clinically significant" labs to map within the Memphis, Tennessee RHIO. These tests comprised a small percentage of unique test codes but a large percentage of laboratory message volume. We propose mapping a few clinically significant laboratory tests can deliver a low cost increase in functionality for a RHIO. PMID:18694179

Porter, Jameson P; Starmer, Jack; King, Janet; Frisse, Mark E

2007-01-01

295

First imported coccidioidomycosis in Turkey: A potential health risk for laboratory workers outside endemic areas?  

PubMed Central

Coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii is endemic in arid climate zones in America, travel-related cases have been reported. We report the first documented case of coccidioidomycosis in Turkey, overviewing reported cases in Europe and underlying difficulties of differential diagnosis outside endemic regions. The patient was an otherwise healthy 41-year-old man who travelled endemic areas. Laboratory diagnosis was based on direct microscopy of two subsequent subcutaneous biopsy specimens and culture and confirmed molecularly. Laboratory personnel should become aware that BioSafety Level-3 organisms may become more frequent and widespread.

Kantarcioglu, A. Serda; Sandoval-Denis, M.; Aygun, Gokhan; Kiraz, Nuri; Akman, Canan; Apaydin, Hulya; Karaman, Emin; Guarro, Josep; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Gurel, M.S.

2014-01-01

296

Buried waste remote survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area  

SciTech Connect

Burial site characterization is an important first step in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. Testing and demonstration of technology for remote buried waste site characterization were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by a team from five US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. The US Army`s Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) vehicle, on loan to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was used as a remotely operated sensor platform. The SRIP was equipped with an array of sensors including terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), organic vapor detector, gamma-based radar detector, and spectrum analyzer. The testing and demonstration were successfully completed and provided direction for future work in buried waste site characterization.

Richardson, B.S.; Noakes, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griebenow, B.E.; Josten, N.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-12-31

297

Buried waste remote survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area  

SciTech Connect

Burial site characterization is an important first step in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. Testing and demonstration of technology for remote buried waste site characterization were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by a team from five US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. The US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) vehicle, on loan to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was used as a remotely operated sensor platform. The SRIP was equipped with an array of sensors including terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), organic vapor detector, gamma-based radar detector, and spectrum analyzer. The testing and demonstration were successfully completed and provided direction for future work in buried waste site characterization.

Richardson, B.S.; Noakes, M.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Griebenow, B.E.; Josten, N.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-01-01

298

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS

D. Markley

1991-01-01

299

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01

300

In situ moisture monitoring system for a solid low-level radioactive disposal pit at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At the end of the 1950's, Los Alamos National Laboratory began to develop a Laboratory-wide, shallow-land, solid low-level radioactive waste disposal area on top of Mesita del Buey at TA-54, Area G. An in situ hydrologic monitoring system in the zone of a...

W. F. Purtymun

1990-01-01

301

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

10 Energy 1 2009-01-01 ...false Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens...153 Section 26.153 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories Certified by the...

2009-01-01

302

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 ...false Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens...153 Section 26.153 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories Certified by the...

2010-01-01

303

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories  

Cancer.gov

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories Amie M. Deffenbaugh, BS, Lynn Anne Burbidge, BS, Julia Reid, MStat, Walter W. Noll, MD Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT

304

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2013-10-01

305

Laboratory testing in-tank sludge washing, summary letter report  

SciTech Connect

In-tank washing is being considered as a means of pretreating high-level radioactive waste sludges, such as neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) sludge. For this process, the contents of the tank will be allowed to settle, and the supernatant solution will be decanted and removed. A dilute sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrite wash solution will be added to the settled sludge and the tank contents will be mixed with a mixer pump system to facilitate washing of the sludge. After thorough mixing, the mixer pumps will be shut off and the solids will be allowed to re-settle. After settling, the supernatant solution will be withdrawn from the tank, and the wash cycle will be repeated several times with fresh wash solution. Core sample data of double shell tank 241-AZ-101 indicate that settling of NCAW solids may be very slow. A complicating factor is that strong thermal currents are expected to be generated from heat produced by radionuclides in the sludge layer at the bottom of the tank. Additionally, there are concerns that during the settling period (i.e., while mixing pumps and air-lift re-circulators are shut off), the radionuclides may heat the residual interstitial water in the sludge to the extent that violent steam discharges (steam bumping) could occur. Finally, there are concerns that during the washing steps sludge settling may be hindered as a result of the reduced ionic strength of the wash solution. To overcome the postulated reduced settling rates during the second and third washing steps, the use of flocculants is being considered. To address the above concerns and uncertainties associated with in-tank washing, PNL has conducted laboratory testing with simulant tank waste to investigate settling rates, steam bump potential, and the need for and use of flocculating agents.

Norton, M.V.; Torres-Ayala, F.

1994-09-01

306

Laboratory testing during critical care transport: point-of-care testing in air ambulances.  

PubMed

Air and ground transport are used for prehospital transport of patients in acute life-threatening situations, and increasingly, critically ill patients undergo interhospital transportation. Results from clinical studies suggest that critical tests performed during the transport of critically ill patients presents a potential opportunity to improve patient care. Our project was to identify, according to the recommendations published at this time, a model of point-of-care testing (POCT) (arterial blood gases analysis and glucose, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, hematocrit/hemoglobin measurements) in air ambulances. In order to identify the key internal and external factors that are important to achieving our objective, an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis) was incorporated into our planning model prior to starting the project. To allow the entire POCT process (pre-, intra-, and post-analytic steps) to be under the control of the reference laboratory, an experimental model of information technology was applied. Real-time results during transport of critically ill patients must be considered to be an integral part of the patient care process and excellent channels of communication are needed between the intensive care units, emergency medical services and laboratories. With technological and computer advances, POCT during critical care transport will certainly increase in the future: this will be a challenge from a laboratory and clinical context. PMID:20406127

Di Serio, Francesca; Petronelli, Maria Antonia; Sammartino, Eugenio

2010-07-01

307

Biodegradation of wastewater nitrogen compounds in fractures: laboratory tests and field observations.  

PubMed

Throughout several coastal regions in the Mediterranean where rainfalls rarely exceed 650 mm per year municipal treated wastewater can be conveniently reused for soil irrigation. Where the coastal aquifer supplies large populations with freshwater in such area, an assessment of ground water quality around spreading sites is needed. In this study, the efficacy of natural filtration on nitrogen degradation in wastewater spreads on the soil covering the Salento (Southern Italy) fractured limestone was quantified by using laboratory tests and field measurements. In the laboratory, effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants was filtered through a package of fractures made by several slabs of limestone. An analysis of wastewater constituent concentrations over time allowed the decay rates and constants for nitrogen transformation during natural filtration to be estimated in both aerated and non-aerated (i.e., saturated) soil fractures. A simulation code, based on biodegradation decay constants defined in the laboratory experiments, was then used to quantify the total inorganic nitrogen removal from wastewater injected in an aquifer in the Salento region (Nardò). Here the water sampled in two monitoring wells at 320 m and 500 m from the wastewater injection site and downgradient with respect to groundwater flow was used to verify the laboratory nitrification and denitrification rates. PMID:17307273

Masciopinto, Constantino

2007-07-17

308

Biodegradation of wastewater nitrogen compounds in fractures: Laboratory tests and field observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Throughout several coastal regions in the Mediterranean where rainfalls rarely exceed 650 mm per year municipal treated wastewater can be conveniently reused for soil irrigation. Where the coastal aquifer supplies large populations with freshwater in such area, an assessment of ground water quality around spreading sites is needed. In this study, the efficacy of natural filtration on nitrogen degradation in wastewater spreads on the soil covering the Salento (Southern Italy) fractured limestone was quantified by using laboratory tests and field measurements. In the laboratory, effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants was filtered through a package of fractures made by several slabs of limestone. An analysis of wastewater constituent concentrations over time allowed the decay rates and constants for nitrogen transformation during natural filtration to be estimated in both aerated and non-aerated (i.e., saturated) soil fractures. A simulation code, based on biodegradation decay constants defined in the laboratory experiments, was then used to quantify the total inorganic nitrogen removal from wastewater injected in an aquifer in the Salento region (Nardò). Here the water sampled in two monitoring wells at 320 m and 500 m from the wastewater injection site and downgradient with respect to groundwater flow was used to verify the laboratory nitrification and denitrification rates.

Masciopinto, Constantino

2007-07-01

309

Environmental Tests of Cesium Beam Frequency Standards at the Frequency Standards Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tests of the effect of various environmental parameters on HP 5061B, option 004, cesium beam frequency standards have been made at the test facilities of the Frequency Standards Laboratory at JPL. These standards were on loan from the United States Naval ...

C. A. Greenhall L. Maleki R. L. Sydnor T. K. Tucker W. A. Diener

1989-01-01

310

Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1994-04-01

311

Underground test area subproject waste management plan. Revision No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was the site of 928 underground nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. The tests were performed as part of the Atomic Energy Commission and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons testing program. The NTS is managed by the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Of the 928 tests conducted below ground surface at the NTS, approximately 200 were detonated below the water table. As an unavoidable consequence of these testing activities, radionuclides have been introduced into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. In the few instances of groundwater sampling, radionuclides have been detected in the groundwater; however, only a very limited investigation of the underground test sites and associated shot cavities has been conducted to date. The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject was established to fill this void and to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the NTS. One of its primary objectives is to gather data to characterize the deep aquifer underlying the NTS.

NONE

1996-08-01

312

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01

313

Planning, Execution and Evaluation of Laboratory Pulping Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report gives guidelines to help Project Managers supervise laboratory research work and guide their counterpart staff in: (1) adequate measures for recording research data and research administration in general; (2) planning, executing, and evaluatin...

A. J. Watson

1978-01-01

314

Stone Preservatives: Methods of Laboratory Testing and Preliminary Performance Criteria.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although numerous materials have been proposed as preservatives for stone in historic buildings and monuments, their efficacy is difficult to establish. A laboratory research program of accelerated simulated stone decay was used to obtain data on stone pr...

G. A. Sleater

1977-01-01

315

Laboratory Tests of IEC DER Object Models for Grid Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (SRP) and Sandia National Laboratories to jointly develop advanced methods of controlling distributed ene...

J. W. Ginn J. O. Moyet D. F. Menicucci T. Byrd S. Gonzalez J. D. Blevins

2007-01-01

316

SRNL Engineering Development Laboratory Pulse Jet Testing Capabilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Engineering Development Laboratory recently performed pulse jet mixer development studies related to Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Concentrate Receipt Vessel. These were performed on a wide variety of pulse jet arrangements, pulse jet sizes, n...

2005-01-01

317

Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

2013-10-01

318

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2001  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2001 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2002-07-08

319

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2001-07-05

320

Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

NONE

1996-07-01

321

Patient preferences for notification of normal laboratory test results: A report from the ASIPS Collaborative  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Many medical errors occur during the laboratory testing process, including lost test results. Patient inquiry concerning results often represents the final safety net for locating lost results. This qualitative study sought to identify, from a patient perspective, specific preferences and factors that influence the process of communicating normal (negative) laboratory test results to patients. METHODS: We conducted 30-minute guided

Donna M Baldwin; Javán Quintela; Christine Duclos; Elizabeth W Staton; Wilson D Pace

2005-01-01

322

40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix...II Appendix II to Part 1054âDuty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...with the following steady-state duty cycle: G3 mode No. Engine speed a...

2013-07-01

323

The national market for medicare clinical laboratory testing: implications for payment reform.  

PubMed

Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of the laboratory market. To inform payment policy, we analyzed the structure of the national market for Medicare Part B clinical laboratory testing, using a 5-percent sample of 2006 Medicare claims data. The independent laboratory market is dominated by two firms-Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America. The hospital outreach market is not as concentrated as the independent laboratory market. Two subgroups of Medicare beneficiaries, those with end-stage renal disease and those residing in nursing homes, are each served in separate laboratory markets. Despite the concentrated independent laboratory market structure, national competitive bidding for non-patient laboratory tests could result in cost savings for Medicare. PMID:24800143

Gass Kandilov, Amy M; Pope, Gregory C; Kautter, John; Healy, Deborah

2012-01-01

324

The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing: Implications for Payment Reform  

PubMed Central

Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of the laboratory market. To inform payment policy, we analyzed the structure of the national market for Medicare Part B clinical laboratory testing, using a 5-percent sample of 2006 Medicare claims data. The independent laboratory market is dominated by two firms—Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America. The hospital outreach market is not as concentrated as the independent laboratory market. Two subgroups of Medicare beneficiaries, those with end-stage renal disease and those residing in nursing homes, are each served in separate laboratory markets. Despite the concentrated independent laboratory market structure, national competitive bidding for non-patient laboratory tests could result in cost savings for Medicare.

Gass Kandilov, Amy M.; Pope, Gregory C.; Kautter, John; Healy, Deborah

2012-01-01

325

Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

1995-02-01

326

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01

327

The rf experimental program in the Fermilab mucool test area  

SciTech Connect

The rf R&D program for high gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown, and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

J. Norem; R. Sandstrom; A. Bross; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; Y. Torun; R. Rimmer; D. Li; M. Zisman; R. Johnson

2005-05-16

328

The rf experimental program in the fermilab mucool test area  

SciTech Connect

The rf R&D program for high-gradient, low frequency cavities to be used in muon cooling systems is underway in the Fermilab MUCOOL Test Area. Cavities at 805 and 201 MHz are used for tests of conditioning techniques, surface modification and breakdown studies. This work has the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as its immediate goal and efficient muon cooling systems for neutrino sources and muon colliders as the long term goal. We study breakdown and dark current production under a variety of conditions.

Norem, J.; Sandstrom, R.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.S.; Johnson, R.

2005-05-20

329

Sandia National Laboratories Electrochemical Storage System Abuse Test Procedure Manual  

SciTech Connect

The series of tests described in this report are intended to simulate actual use and abuse conditions and internally initiated failures that may be experienced in electrochemical storage systems (ECSS). These tests were derived from Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, user input, and historical abuse testing. The tests are to provide a common framework for various ECSS technologies. The primary purpose of testing is to gather response information to external/internal inputs. Some tests and/or measurements may not be required for some ECSS technologies and designs if it is demonstrated that a test is not applicable, and the measurements yield no useful information.

Unkelhaeuser, Terry; Smallwood David

1999-07-01

330

Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Romero, Andy

2012-01-01

331

Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

332

Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

Yvonne Townsend

2000-05-01

333

L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application  

SciTech Connect

The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

Wood, D.C.

2001-06-26

334

Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

1991-01-01

335

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1998  

SciTech Connect

In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1997 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 97 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1998. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas.

SR Bivins; GA Stoetzel

1999-06-17

336

The Rapid Plasma Reagin Test Cannot Replace the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Neurosyphilis Diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Background The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test is a mainstay for neurosyphilis diagnosis, but it lacks diagnostic sensitivity and is logistically complicated. The Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) test is easier to perform, but its appropriateness for use on CSF is controversial. Methods RPR reactivity was determined for CSF from 149 individuals with syphilis using two methods. The CSF-RPR was performed according to the method for serum. The CSF RPR-V was performed using the method recommended for the CSF-VDRL. Laboratory defined neurosyphilis included reactive CSF-Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption test and CSF white blood cells > 20/ul. Symptomatic neurosyphilis was defined as vision loss or hearing loss. Results CSF-VDRL was reactive in 45 (30.2%) patients. Of these, 29 (64.4%) were CSF-RPR reactive and 37 (82.2%) were CSF-RPR-V reactive. There were no instances where the CSF VDRL was nonreactive but the CSF-RPR or CSF-RPR-V was reactive. Among the 28 samples that were reactive in all three tests, CSF-VDRL titers (median [IQR], 1:4 [1:4-1:16]) were significantly higher than CSF-RPR (1:2 [1:1-1:4], p=0.0002) and CSF-RPR-V titers (1:4 [1:2-60 1:8], p=0.01). The CSF RPR and the CSF-RPR-V tests had lower sensitivities than the CSF VDRL: 56.4% and 59.0% vs. 71.8% for laboratory-diagnosed neurosyphilis and 51.5% and 57.6% vs. 66.7% for symptomatic neurosyphilis. Conclusions Compared to the CSF-VDRL, the CSF-RPR has a high false-negative rate, thus not improving upon this known limitation of the CSF-VDRL for neurosyphilis diagnosis. Adapting the RPR procedure to mimic the CSF-VDRL decreased, but did not eliminate, the number of false negatives, and did not avoid all the logistical complications of the CSF VDRL.

Marra, Christina M.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Maxwell, Clare L.; Ho, Emily L.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Jones, Trudy

2012-01-01

337

Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

NONE

1997-08-18

338

Evaluation of groundwater monitoring at offsite nuclear test areas  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater quality has been monitored at nuclear test sites distant from the Nevada Test Site as part of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) since 1972. Separate reports describing the monitoring programs recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrologic Program Advisory Group were issued by the DOE for most of the offsite areas during the early 1980s, and the analytical results from the LTHMP have been regularly reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), but there has been little else published about the program. The LTHMP has continued to demonstrate the safety of drinking water supplies near the offsite areas and there have been very few modifications to the program initially mandated by the DOE in 1972. During this time, however, there have been many changes in the fields of hydrogeology and environmental monitoring. In 1988, the DOE requested the Desert Research Institute to perform a critical review of the LTHMP in light of the many technical and regulatory advances in groundwater monitoring in recent years. This report presents an evaluation of the offsite groundwater monitoring program and evaluations specific to the monitoring networks at each of the eight offsite test areas. Discussion of the overall program is presented first, followed by site-specific recommendations. References follow each section for the convenience of readers interested in particular sites. 63 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Chapman, J.B.; Hokett, S.L.

1991-03-01

339

Percolation Tests for Septic Systems: A Laboratory Exercise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how the procedures by which a certificate soil tester evaluates a parcel of land for its suitability as a site for a private sewage system or septic tank can be used by college students as a laboratory exercise in environmental geology. (HM)

Tinker, John R., Jr.

1978-01-01

340

PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to

Renee L. Russell; Reid A. Peterson; Donald E. Rinehart; William C. Buchmiller

2009-01-01

341

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01

342

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

SciTech Connect

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01

343

Laboratory and on-road evaluations of cabin air filters using number and surface area concentration monitors.  

PubMed

An automotive cabin air filter's effectiveness for removing airborne particles was determined both in a laboratory wind tunnel and in vehicle on-road tests. The most penetrating particle size for the test filter was approximately 350 nm, where the filtration efficiency was 22.9 and 17.4% at medium and high fan speeds, respectively. The filtration efficiency increased for smaller particles and was 43.9% for 100 nm and 72.0% for 20 nm particles at a medium fan speed. We determined the reduction in passenger exposure to particles while driving in freeway traffic caused by a vehicle ventilation system with a cabin air filter installed. Both particle number and surface area concentration measurements were made inside the cabin and in the surrounding air. At medium fan speed, the number and surface area concentration-based exposure reductions were 65.6 +/- 6.0% and 60.6 +/- 9.4%, respectively. To distinguish the exposure reduction contribution from the filter alone and the remainder of the ventilation system, we also performed tests with and without the filter in place using the surface area monitors. The ventilation system operating in the recirculation mode with the cabin air filter installed provided the maximum protection, reducing the cabin particle concentration exponentially over time and usually taking only 3 min to reach 10 microm2/cm3 (a typical office air condition) under medium fan speed. PMID:18589976

Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Pui, David Y H; Kuehn, Thomas H

2008-06-01

344

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Environmental Verification Processes and Test Effectiveness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on the JPL processes for enviornmental verification and testing of aerospace systems is presented. The topics include: 1) Processes: a) JPL Design Principles b) JPL Flight Project Practices; 2) Environmental Verification; and 3) Test Effectiveness Assessment: Inflight Anomaly Trends.

Hoffman, Alan R.; Green, Nelson W.

2006-01-01

345

FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

HERTING DL

2007-11-29

346

An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-09-07

347

Wind/Diesel Test Facility at Risoe National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the wind/diesel programme at Risoe the Test Station for Windmills has established a self-contained facility for the testing of wind/diesel systems. The test facility has its own universal windmill foundation, diesel container, measurement compu...

P. Lundsager H. Aagaard Madsen

1985-01-01

348

Economic Analysis of Requests for Laboratory Tests in Primary Health Care Centers  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Operation of the Primary health care center and Medical-biochemical laboratories depends on the number of performed laboratory tests. The number of unnecessary tests significantly affect the operation of health institutions. Material and methods: We analyzed the 1000 requests for laboratory tests at the Primary Health Care Centre in Gracanica from primary care units. Based on the requests for laboratory diagnostics advisable diagnoses from primary health care unit in the Primary Health Care Center (PHC) we made an economic analysis of the total required laboratory tests in the requests for laboratory diagnosis. Incorporating the economic analysis of laboratory tests in requests for laboratory diagnosis by doctors in primary health care (PHC) and the economic analysis of laboratory tests by the disease in primary health care. Results: The economic value of 5333 laboratory tests was 84 312 points (1 point is 0.80 KM). Of the total value of the index score requirements of GPs are 44, 1%, the requirement of family doctors account for 40% and requirements of other specialists make up 15, 9%.. Discussion: In the requests of the PHC units for laboratory tests are required all levels of services: urine, CBC, SE, glucose, bilirubine, ALT, AST, AF, CK, cholesterol, HDL chol., triglicerdes, creatinine, urea, uric acid, CRP, fibrinogen, calcium and phosphorus. The following requests are the most common laboratory tests: urine, CBC, blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, aminotransferases, creatinine, urea. The doctors in family practice most often requested: blood glucose, urine, CBC, SE, TGL. , Chol., ALT, AST, creatinine and urea. General practitioners were demanding more cholesterol and triglycerides, and family medicine doctors were demanding less cholesterol and triglycerides and more often CRP, fibrinogen, ALT, AST, what from the level of economic cost analysis rises the issue whether this was justified?

Zunic, Lejla

2012-01-01

349

A laboratory test for fuel injector deposit studies  

SciTech Connect

A Port Fuel Injector Deposit (PFID) test has been developed which provides repeatable results. The test can discriminate gasolines with differing fuel injector fouling tendencies in vehicles. Results confirm previous work that added mono- and diolefins increase deposit growth. The test is also able to evaluate the performance of additives. Other factors found to affect injector deposit formation include: injector soak temperature, injector soak pressure, weeping vs. non-weeping injectors, and the presence of oxygen around the injector pintle. The PFID test can be run in about one quarter the time needed to evaluate fuels in vehicle and dynamometer tests. 10 refs., 22 figs.

Not Available

1989-01-01

350

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23

351

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory-based testing.  

PubMed

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory-housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch-screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching-to-sample memory test. Despite the differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

2013-05-01

352

Laboratory Tests to Evaluate the Performance of Corrosion Inhibitors for Road De-Icing Salt.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes laboratory experiments to evaluate three proprietary corrosion inhibitors as additives to road de-icing salt. Test panels of both bare and painted mild steel were used; tests were carried out employing first an intermittent salt spray...

D. E. Steed

1969-01-01

353

Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Schaschl, Leslie

2011-01-01

354

Maintaining data quality in an environmental testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In today's competitive and highly litigious world, it is critical that any laboratory generating data for the environmental and allied industries have a world-class Quality Assurance Program. This Plan must conform to the requirements of every agency and client with whom the lab does business. The goal of such a program is data defensibility; i.e., data validity. Data (usually qualitative analyte [compound or element] identifications and quantitative numerical results) are the end results of nearly all analytical laboratory processes, and the source of revenue. Clients pay for results. The clients expect the results to be accurate, precise, and repeatable. If their data has to go to court, the laboratory will be called upon to defend the accuracy and precision of their work. Without a strong QA program, this will be impossible. The potential implications and repercussions of non-defensible lab data are far-reaching and very costly in terms of loss of future revenues and in legal judgments.

Cohen, Roy J.

2001-03-05

355

Comparison of pNitrophenol biodegradation in field and laboratory test systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acclimation of microbial communities exposed to p-nitrophenol (PNP) was measured in laboratory test systems and in a freshwater pond. Laboratory tests were conducted in shake flasks with water, shake flasks with water and sediment, eco-cores, and two sizes of microcosm. The sediment and water samples used in the laboratory experiments were obtained from the pond. After a 6-day acclimation period,

J. C. Spain; P. A. Van Veld; C. A. Monti; P. H. Pritchard; C. R. Cripe

1984-01-01

356

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

357

Continual planning and scheduling for managing patient tests in hospital laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital laboratories perform examination tests upon patients, in order to assist medical diagnosis or therapy progress. Planning and scheduling patient requests for examination tests is a complicated problem because it concerns both minimization of patient stay in hospital and maximization of laboratory resources utilization. In the present paper, we propose an integrated patient-wise planning and scheduling system which supports the

Catherine C Marinagi; Constantine D. Spyropoulos; Christos Papatheodorou; Stavros Kokkotos

2000-01-01

358

LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS FOR EVALUATING POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The scope of the Laboratory Testing Work Group was to evaluate methods for testing aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates in the laboratory. Specifically, discussions focused on the following objectives: 1) assess the extent to which consensus-based standard methods and other pub...

359

40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? 1048...Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? ...the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described in Appendix II to...

2013-07-01

360

Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters  

SciTech Connect

A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on the measured glass reaction rate. The effects of these parameters must be accounted for in mechanistic models used to project glass durability over long times. Test parameters can also be utilized to highlight particular processes in laboratory tests. Waste glass corrosion results as water diffusion, ion-exchange, and hydrolysis reactions occur simultaneously to devitrify the glass and release soluble glass components into solution. The rates of these processes are interrelated by the affects of the solution chemistry and glass alteration phases on each process, and the dominant (fastest) process may change as the reaction progresses. Transport of components from the release sites into solution may also affect the observed corrosion rate. The reaction temperature will affect the rate of each process, while other parameters will affect the solution chemistry and which processes are observed during the test. The early stages of corrosion will be observed under test conditions which maintain dilute leachates and the later stages will be observed under conditions that generate more concentrated leachate solutions. Typically, water diffusion and ion-exchange reactions dominate the observed glass corrosion in dilute solutions while hydrolysis reactions dominant in more concentrated solutions. Which process(es) controls the long-term glass corrosion is not fully understood, and the long-term corrosion rate may be either transport- or reaction-limited.

Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

1993-12-31

361

Testing general relativity in space-borne and astronomical laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of space-based experiments and astronomical observations designed to test the theory of general relativity is surveyed. Consideration is given to tests of post-Newtonian gravity, searches for feeble short-range forces and gravitomagnetism, improved measurements of parameterized post-Newtonian parameter values, explorations of post-Newtonian physics, tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, observational tests of post-Newtonian orbital effects, and efforts to detect quadrupole and dipole radiation damping. Recent numerical results are presented in tables.

Will, Clifford M.

1989-01-01

362

Asbestos-cement panels test report, 100K Area, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The 105KE/105KW reactor facilities were constructed in the mid-1950s. The 105KE/105KW fuel-basin roof panels are in a radiation controlled area where there is smearable contamination. The roof panels in all of the inspected areas were constructed from corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C) panels. The corrugated A/C roof panels exhibit common signs of aging including cracking, chipping, spalling, or a combination of these processes. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has engaged Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. (WJE) to perform laboratory and field tests on A/C roof panels of the 105KW building and also to make recommendations for panel replacement, maintenance, or upgrade that will maintain the structural integrity of the roof panels for an additional 20 years of service. This report contains the results of laboratory and in-situ testing performed by WJE. A Roof Proof Load Test Plan was prepared for WJE and approved by WHC. Conclusions and recommendations based on test results are presented for the 190-KE wall panels and 105KW roof panels.

Moustafa, S.E. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner and Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Wiss, Janney, Elstner and Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-12-01

363

Quality assurance practices in Europe: a survey of molecular genetic testing laboratories  

PubMed Central

In the 2000s, a number of initiatives were taken internationally to improve quality in genetic testing services. To contribute to and update the limited literature available related to this topic, we surveyed 910 human molecular genetic testing laboratories, of which 291 (32%) from 29 European countries responded. The majority of laboratories were in the public sector (81%), affiliated with a university hospital (60%). Only a minority of laboratories was accredited (23%), and 26% was certified. A total of 22% of laboratories did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) and 28% did not use reference materials (RMs). The main motivations given for accreditation were to improve laboratory profile (85%) and national recognition (84%). Nearly all respondents (95%) would prefer working in an accredited laboratory. In accredited laboratories, participation in EQA (P<0.0001), use of RMs (P=0.0014) and availability of continuous education (CE) on medical/scientific subjects (P=0.023), specific tasks (P=0.0018), and quality assurance (P<0.0001) were significantly higher than in non-accredited laboratories. Non-accredited laboratories expect higher restriction of development of new techniques (P=0.023) and improvement of work satisfaction (P=0.0002) than accredited laboratories. By using a quality implementation score (QIS), we showed that accredited laboratories (average score 92) comply better than certified laboratories (average score 69, P<0.001), and certified laboratories better than other laboratories (average score 44, P<0.001), with regard to the implementation of quality indicators. We conclude that quality practices vary widely in European genetic testing laboratories. This leads to a potentially dangerous situation in which the quality of genetic testing is not consistently assured.

Berwouts, Sarah; Fanning, Katrina; Morris, Michael A; Barton, David E; Dequeker, Elisabeth

2012-01-01

364

Microelectronic circuit test engineering laboratories with programmable logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

A use for programmable logic is presented targeting microelectronic circuit test engineering education. These devices offer strengths in cost, time and flexibility in an educational environment. The rationale for this work is to support electronic hardware design, fabrication and test for mixed-signal integrated circuits typically used in mixed-technology systems. Today, the use of the programmable logic device (PLD) is pervasive

Ian Grout; Joseph Walsh

365

Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

1984-01-01

366

An in situ moisture monitoring system for a solid low-level radioactive disposal pit at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the end of the 1950's, Los Alamos National Laboratory began to develop a Laboratory-wide, shallow-land, solid low-level radioactive waste disposal area on top of Mesita del Buey at TA-54, Area G. An in situ hydrologic monitoring system in the zone of aeration was developed in early 1990 to detect the presence of the infiltration of meteoric water into Pit

Purtymun

1990-01-01

367

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01

368

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Battery Test Operations User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Battery Test Operations. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Salinas, Michael

2012-01-01

369

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-OC-1-57-75, Drawing No. AF-6009-15, sheet 53 of 96, D.O. Series No. AF 1394/73, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296 Rev. C, Date: 19 NOV 59. Drawing includes plan, section, and details of track. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

370

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in

Michael J. Truex; Vincent R. Vermeul; Rob D. Mackley; Brad G. Fritz; Donaldo P. Mendoza; Christian D. Johnson; Rebecca P. Elmore; Fred J. Brockman; Christina L. Bilskis

2008-01-01

371

Laboratory testing issues for protein C, protein S, and antithrombin.  

PubMed

Thrombophilia is a complex disease process, which clinically expresses as venous thrombosis. The presence of a genetic defect in one of the major contributing components (protein C [PC], protein S [PS], and antithrombin [AT]) to thrombophilia can be determined by clinical laboratory assays. However, understanding the limitations and problems associated with assays is paramount to an accurate analysis of the genetic status. This review will discuss the major analytical issues and provide recommendations for assaying PC, PS, and AT in plasma. Recommendations are also made about pre-analytical and postanalytical issues clinically affecting these assays. PMID:24750675

Marlar, R A; Gausman, J N

2014-06-01

372

IRAN: laboratory test bench for hypertelescope pupil-plane recombination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2004, our group proposed IRAN, an alternative beam-combination technique to the so-called hypertelescope imaging method introduced by Labeyrie in the 1990s. We have recently set up a laboratory experiment aiming at validating our image densification approach instead of the pupil densification scheme of Labeyrie. In our experiment, seven sub-apertures illuminated by laser sources are recombined using the IRAN scheme. The validation of the IRAN recombination consists basically in retrieving the point-spread intensity distribution (PSID), demonstrating the conservation of the object-image convolution relation. We will introduce IRAN, compare it to the hyper-telescope, and present the experimental results that we obtained.

Allouche, F.; Vakili, F.; Glindemann, A.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Fossat, E.; Douet, R.

2008-07-01

373

The SALT HRS spectrograph: instrument integration and laboratory test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SALT HRS is a fibre-fed, high dispersion échelle spectrograph currently being constructed for the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). In this paper we highlight the performance of key optical components, describe the integration tasks that have taken place and present some first light results from the laboratory. The instrument construction is well advanced and we report on the attainment of the required mechanical and thermal stability and provide a measurement of the input optics performance (including the fibre feed). The initial optical alignment of both the fibre input optics, including image slicers, and the spectrograph optics has taken place and is described.

Bramall, D. G.; Schmoll, J.; Tyas, L. M. G.; Clark, P.; Younger, E.; Sharples, R. M.; Dipper, N. A.; Ryan, S. G.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Brink, J.

2012-09-01

374

[Ayurvedics drugs in France. Laboratories polytherapic, a test].  

PubMed

In the beginning of the thirties, Dr Jean Saidman, who has already created a rotative solarium at Aix-les-Bains, built another one in Jamnagar (India). When he was there, he discovered ayurvedic therapy. After the Second World War, with his friends Dr Rémus Krainik and the chemist René-Henri Monceaux, he set up a "néo-ayurvedic action committee", and then a pharmaceutical laboratory, "Polythérapic", to export to french colonies patents medicines inspired by indian medicine. The authors tale this experience suddenly stopped by the unexpected death of Jean Saidman, in 1949. PMID:21661222

Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

2011-02-01

375

Continuous Improvement in Battery Testing at the NASA/JSC Energy System Test Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas conducts development and qualification tests to fulfill Energy System Division responsibilities relevant to ASA programs and projects. EST A has historically called upon a variety of fluid, mechanical, electrical, environmental, and data system capabilities spread amongst five full-service facilities to test human and human supported spacecraft in the areas of propulsion systems, fluid systems, pyrotechnics, power generation, and power distribution and control systems. Improvements at ESTA are being made in full earnest of offering NASA project offices an option to choose a thorough test regime that is balanced with cost and schedule constraints. In order to continue testing of enabling power-related technologies utilized by the Energy System Division, an especially proactive effort has been made to increase the cost effectiveness and schedule responsiveness for battery testing. This paper describes the continuous improvement in battery testing at the Energy Systems Test Area being made through consolidation, streamlining, and standardization.

Boyd, William; Cook, Joseph

2003-01-01

376

A rapid amphipod reproduction test for sediment quality assessment: In situ bioassays do not replicate laboratory bioassays.  

PubMed

An underlying assumption of laboratory-based toxicity tests is that the sensitivity and exposure of organisms in the laboratory is comparable to that in the field. We sought to make a comparison between field-based and laboratory-based sediment toxicity tests using a recently developed rapid amphipod reproduction test that encompasses gametogenesis, fertilization, and embryo development before hatching. The test species, Melita plumulosa, is an epibenthic, detritivorous amphipod native to Eastern Australia. Test sediments were sourced from Lake Macquarie, a large saltwater lagoon located 100 km north of Sydney (New South Wales, Australia) that has received heavy-metal pollution over many decades, primarily from a Pb/Zn smelter but also from collieries, coal-fired power stations, and urban areas. This has led to a north-south trace-metal concentration gradient, including Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu, in the sediments of Lake Macquarie. Sediments from these northern bays were demonstrated to reduce amphipod fecundity in laboratory-based tests. For the current study, the amphipod reproduction test has been modified for use in situ. In situ test chambers were deployed at the mouth of Cockle Creek, Lake Macquarie. Sediments that were demonstrated to reduce fecundity of M. plumulosa in the laboratory reproduction test were not similarly toxic when amphipods were exposed to the same sediments in situ. Factors related to the regular tidal renewal of overlying water likely altered exposure profiles in situ, including the provision of additional or alternative nutrition that obviated the need for amphipods to interact with the contaminated sediments, and a washout effect that prevented the accretion of dissolved zinc in the overlying water. PMID:20862754

Mann, Reinier M; Hyne, Ross V; Simandjuntak, Desiree L; Simpson, Stuart L

2010-11-01

377

A small scale laboratory flammability test for electronic components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new flammability test apparatus has been designed to fill the need for a small scale test for electronic components, to evaluate smoke evolved and time to flaming ignition. A concept similar in many respects to the approach to flammability studies made by the Ohio State University Release Rate Apparatus has been taken in providing a variable, controlled, radiant heat flux furnace in an enclosed space. The system incorporates an optional spark-induced method of ignition of combustible gases, and measurements are carried out at controlled ambient temperatures. The test apparatus uses many standard and readily available components and has been found to be useful for testing specimen up to 100 mm square, including individual electronic components and small circuit boards complete with components.

Woollerton, G. R.; Culver, D.

1980-04-01

378

76 FR 10500 - Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 [Docket No. OSHA-2007-0031] Nationally Recognized Testing...Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Final rule...Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is adjusting the approach it uses...

2011-02-25

379

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...vii) pH; (viii) Protein; (ix) Specific gravity; and (x) Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation testsâvisual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy testsâvisual color...

2010-10-01

380

Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE\\/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed (“home-brewed”) tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and

Holger F. Rabenau; Harald H. Kessler; Marhild Kortenbusch; Andreas Steinhorst; Reinhard B. Raggam; Annemarie Berger

2007-01-01

381

23 CFR 637.209 - Laboratory and sampling and testing personnel qualifications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...non-STD designated laboratory which performs IA sampling and testing shall be accredited...be used in the acceptance decision or the IA program shall be executed by qualified sampling...Verification testing, quality control testing, IA testing, or dispute resolution...

2013-04-01

382

Hydraulic tests of emergency cooling system: L-Area  

SciTech Connect

The delay in L-Area startup provided an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) which will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level. ECS flow is a major input to the FLOOD code which calculates reactor ECS power limits. The FLOOD code assesses the effectiveness of the ECS cooling capacity by modeling the core and plenum hydraulics under accident conditions. Presently, reactor power is not limited by the ECS cooling capacity (power limit). However, the manual calculations of ECS flows had been recently updated to include piping changes (debris strainer, valve changes, pressure release systems) and update fitting losses. Both updates resulted in reduced calculated ECS flows. Upon completion of the current program to update, validate, and document, reactor power may be limited under certain situations by ECS cooling capacity for some present reactor charge designs. A series of special hydraulic tests (Reference 1, 3) were conducted in L-Area using all sources of emergency coolant including the ECS pumps (Reference 2). The tests provided empirical hydraulic data on the ECS piping. These data will be used in computer models of the system as well as manual calculations of ECS flows. The improved modeling and accuracy of the flow calculations will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level with respect to an ECS power limit.

Hinton, J H

1988-01-01

383

Laboratory test costs: attitudes and awareness among staff in a regional hospital.  

PubMed

There continues to be an unrelenting rise in the volumes of laboratory tests ordered in medicine, which is both expensive and has the potential for over-investigation. We performed a quantitative, observational, cross-sectional study of staff with the authority to initiate a laboratory test, using a voluntary, anonymous questionnaire. Our aim was to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory test costs. 226 surveys were completed over 2 weeks in June, 2012. Most numerous respondents were Staff nurses 125 (55.3%) followed by senior house officers (SHOs) 26 (11.5%) and clinical nurse managers/specialists (CNMs and CNSs) 23 (10.2%). The majority of staff, 191(85.6%), felt unaware of the cost of laboratory tests, which they ordered. For non urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 136 (61.8%) felt cost was either quite of very important. For urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 188 (84.6%) felt cost was of minor or of no importance. Doctors felt more aware of costs than nurses (26.9% vs. 9.3%) and doctors test cost estimates were correct more often than nurses (33% vs. 21%). The results indicate poor awareness of laboratory test cost amongst doctors and nurses. Given the expenditure incurred by a rise in the volume of tests and the potential for over-investigation for patients, strategies for improving the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory tests need to be developed. PMID:24592638

Clancy, C; Murphy, M

2014-01-01

384

Mars Science Laboratory Sample Acquisition, Sample Processing and Handling: Subsystem Design and Test Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling subsystem for the Mars Science Laboratory is a highly-mechanized, Rover-based sampling system that acquires powdered rock and regolith samples from the Martian surface, sorts the samples into fine particles through sieving, and delivers small portions of the powder into two science instruments inside the Rover. SA/SPaH utilizes 17 actuated degrees-of-freedom to perform the functions needed to produce 5 sample pathways in support of the scientific investigation on Mars. Both hardware redundancy and functional redundancy are employed in configuring this sampling system so some functionality is retained even with the loss of a degree-of-freedom. Intentional dynamic environments are created to move sample while vibration isolators attenuate this environment at the sensitive instruments located near the dynamic sources. In addition to the typical flight hardware qualification test program, two additional types of testing are essential for this kind of sampling system: characterization of the intentionally-created dynamic environment and testing of the sample acquisition and processing hardware functions using Mars analog materials in a low pressure environment. The overall subsystem design and configuration are discussed along with some of the challenges, tradeoffs, and lessons learned in the areas of fault tolerance, intentional dynamic environments, and special testing

Jandura, Louise

2010-01-01

385

Laboratory testing of a flexible boom for ice management  

SciTech Connect

Combating oil spills in the Arctic is a major challenge. Drilling or producing oil or gas in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) may allow booms to be deployed upstream of an offshore structure to clear the water of ice, thereby enabling conventional oil spill countermeasures to be used. Such a boom would be kept in place by two ice-going service vessels or by moored buoys. SINTEF NHL and NRC have performed a number of small-scale tests with a flexible boom in the NRC ice basin in Ottawa. The purpose of the tests was to measure the effectiveness of using a flexible boom for collecting ice, and to determine the loads associated with collecting the ice. In the tests, various boom configurations were towed against a broken ice field consisting of ice pieces typically 50--100 mm across and 30 mm thick. The ice concentration was usually 10/10, but it was reduced to 8/10 and 5/10 for two tests. The boom was towed at speeds of 20 and 50 mm-s[sup [minus]1]. Both the width of the boom and the slackness of the boom were varied over reasonable ranges. Two six-component dynamometers were used to support the boom. Thus, the force components on each end of the boom were measured. Further, two video cameras were used to record the effectiveness of each boom configuration. In this paper, the full results of this test program are presented and the application of the test results to the full-scale situation are discussed. The tests show that, under certain conditions, the use of boom is feasible for ice management in oil-contaminated water.

Loeset, S. (SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway). Norwegian Hydrotechnical Lab.); Timco, G.W. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1993-08-01

386

Off-site environmental monitoring report: radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends in environmental radiation, and to provide such information to the public. It summarizes these activities for calendar

G. D. Potter; S. C. Black; R. F. Grossman; R. G. Patzer; D. D. Smith

1985-01-01

387

Selected stratigraphic contacts for drill holes in LANL use areas of Yucca Flat, NTS (Nevada Test Site)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a compilation of selected stratigraphic contacts in drill holes of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site (NTS), used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This is the product of an ongoing effort to establish and maintain the most up-to-date database of formation tops in LANL use areas of Yucca Flat. Several changes have been made to the

S. L. Jr. Drellack; A. P. Cavazos

1987-01-01

388

Lithology and stratigraphy of selected drill holes in LANL use areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Volume V  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a compilation of data from drill holes completed, except where noted, during the calendar year 1983 in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Data presented in this report includes hole locations, drilling statistics, a supplemental data sheet, stratigraphy and lithology penetrated, and selected geophysical logs including a log of drilling

S. L. Jr. Drellack; J. L. Gonzales; W. J. Davies

1984-01-01

389

Microbiological examination and proficiency testing in dairy laboratories.  

PubMed

This paper considers the main factors in the assessment of microbiological examination of food and discusses a few points related to validation of quantitative and qualitative microbiological methods. Within the scope of accredited methods, the author defines the terms such as conform reference, equivalence of reference method, and in-house method. The paper describes evaluation of a routine method with respect to the official method based on results obtained by automatic epifluorescent microscopy using the BactoScan 8000 instrument for determination of bacteriological quality of milk and provides general guidance for the establishment of a conversion relationship between the two methods. The paper gives an overview of the quality assurance aspects involved in the application of the routine method and concludes with an example of interlaboratory proficiency study for the epifluorescent microscopic method which is regularly applied in dairy laboratories. PMID:11370300

Teger, S G

2001-03-01

390

Seed dressing pesticides on springtails in two ecotoxicological laboratory tests.  

PubMed

Terrestrial ecotoxicological tests are powerful tools for assessing the ecological risks that pesticides pose to soil invertebrates, but they are rarely used to evaluate seed dressing pesticides. This study investigated the effects of seed dressing pesticides on survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola), using standardized ecotoxicological tests (after ISO guidelines with few adaptations for tropical conditions). Commercial formulations of five seed dressing pesticides were tested individually in Tropical Artificial Soil (TAS): the insecticides imidacloprid, fipronil, thiametoxam, and the fungicides captan and carboxin+thiram. Thiametoxam, captan, and carboxin+thiram were only lethal to F. candida at the highest concentration tested (1000mg of active ingredient kg(-1) of dry soil). Imidacloprid and fipronil were lethal at lower concentrations (100 and 10mg a.i. kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively), however, these concentrations were much higher than those predicted (PEC) for soil. Imidacloprid and fipronil were the most toxic pesticides in both tests, reducing significantly collembolan reproduction (EC20=0.02 and 0.12mga.i.kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively). Further studies under more realistic conditions are needed, since imidacloprid and fipronil reduced collembolan reproduction at concentrations below or close to their respective PECs. PMID:24785712

Alves, Paulo Roger L; Cardoso, Elke J B N; Martines, Alexandre M; Sousa, José Paulo; Pasini, Amarildo

2014-07-01

391

Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

2012-01-01

392

Guidelines for EMC laboratory accreditation  

Microsoft Academic Search

NABL (National Accreditation Board for Test and Calibration Laboratories) has already issued NABL-101 Acceptance criteria for accrediting test laboratories. This is based on International Standard ISO\\/IEC Guide 25. Further there are separate guidelines issued for specialised areas like biological and radiological laboratories. However, the EMC laboratory is being assessed along with any other test parameter which is being accredited. The

A. Sathyanaryanan; U. K. Nandwani

1999-01-01

393

Photovoltaic DC Arc Fault Detector testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2011 National Electrical Code® (NEC®) added Article 690.11 that requires photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed DC arc fault protection device. To fill this new market, manufacturers are developing new Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs). Comprehensive and challenging testing has been conducted using a wide range of PV technologies, system topologies, loads and

Jay Johnson; Birger Pahl; Charles Luebke; Tom Pier; Theodore Miller; Jason Strauch; Scott Kuszmaul; Ward Bower

2011-01-01

394

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify ...

J. S. Ahrens

1997-01-01

395

Crime laboratory proficiency testing results, 1978-1991, II: Resolving questions of common origin.  

PubMed

A preceding article has examined the origins of crime laboratory proficiency testing and the performance of laboratories in the identification and classification of common types of physical evidence. Part II reviews laboratory proficiency in determining if two or more evidence samples shared a common source. Parts I and II together review the results of 175 separate tests issued to crime laboratories over the period 1978 to 1991. Laboratories perform best in determining the origin of finger and palm prints, metals, firearms (bullets and catridge cases), and footwear. Laboratories have moderate success in determining the source of bloodstains, questioned documents, toolmarks, and hair. A final category is of greater concern and includes those evidence categories where 10% or more of results disagree with manufacturers regarding the source of samples. This latter group includes paint, glass, fibers, and body fluid mixtures. The article concludes with a comparison of current findings with earlier LEAA study results, and a discussion of judicial and policy implications. PMID:8522912

Peterson, J L; Markham, P N

1995-11-01

396

Assessment of fracture-sampling techniques for laboratory tests on core  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the site characterization work to be done at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, a candidate site for the first mined-geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste, laboratory tests are proposed to evaluate fluid flow in single fractures. Laboratory and onsite tests were conducted to develop methods for collecting rock-core samples containing single fractures for the subsequent laboratory tests. Techniques for collecting rock cores with axial (parallel to the core axis) and radial (perpendicular to the core axis) fractures are discussed.

Severson, G. R.; Boernge, J. M.

1991-01-01

397

Field and laboratory testing in young elite soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: The Bangsbo test correlated with the lowest velocity associated with VO2MAX (vVO2MAX; R 2 = 0.55, p,0.001), but not with VO2MAX. Sprint times at 30 m and 20 m were related to peak extension velocity and peak extension force measured during vertical jumping, but not to vertical jump height per se. The jumping force and velocity could explain 46%

K Chamari; Y Hachana; Y B Ahmed; O Galy; F Sghaier; O Hue

2004-01-01

398

Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3\\/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished

R. R. Hendrickson; A. H. Jones; R. W. Winzenried; A. B. Maish

1980-01-01

399

Lysosomal storage disorders: Molecular basis and laboratory testing  

PubMed Central

Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a large group of more than 50 different inherited metabolic diseases which, in the great majority of cases, result from the defective function of specific lysosomal enzymes and, in cases, of non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins or non-lysosomal proteins involved in lysosomal biogenesis. The progressive lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites results in generalised cell and tissue dysfunction, and, therefore, multi-systemic pathology. Storage may begin during early embryonic development, and the clinical presentation for LSDs can vary from an early and severe phenotype to late-onset mild disease. The diagnosis of most LSDs--after accurate clinical/paraclinical evaluation, including the analysis of some urinary metabolites--is based mainly on the detection of a specific enzymatic deficiency. In these cases, molecular genetic testing (MGT) can refine the enzymatic diagnosis. Once the genotype of an individual LSD patient has been ascertained, genetic counselling should include prediction of the possible phenotype and the identification of carriers in the family at risk. MGT is essential for the identification of genetic disorders resulting from non-enzymatic lysosomal protein defects and is complementary to biochemical genetic testing (BGT) in complex situations, such as in cases of enzymatic pseudodeficiencies. Prenatal diagnosis is performed on the most appropriate samples, which include fresh or cultured chorionic villus sampling or cultured amniotic fluid. The choice of the test--enzymatic and/or molecular--is based on the characteristics of the defect to be investigated. For prenatal MGT, the genotype of the family index case must be known. The availability of both tests, enzymatic and molecular, enormously increases the reliability of the entire prenatal diagnostic procedure. To conclude, BGT and MGT are mostly complementary for post- and prenatal diagnosis of LSDs. Whenever genotype/phenotype correlations are available, they can be helpful in predicting prognosis and in making decisions about therapy.

2011-01-01

400

Laboratory and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus testing  

PubMed Central

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with a wide spectrum of disease that ranges from self-limited skin warts to life-threatening cancers. Since HPV plays a necessary etiological role in cervical cancer, it is logical to use HPV as a marker for early detection of cervical cancer and precancer. Recent advances in technology enable the development of high-throughput HPV assays of different formats, including DNA-based, mRNA-based, high-risk group-specific and type-specific methods. The ultimate goal of these assays is to improve the accuracy and cost-effiectiveness of cervical screening programs. HPV testing has several potential advantages compared to cytology-based screening. However, since the cancer to transient infection ratio is always low in the general population, HPV test results are bound to have a low positive predictive value that may subject women to unnecessary follow-up investigations. The wide-spread administration of prophylactic HPV vaccine will substantially decrease the incidence of cancer and precancer. This poses a number of challenges to cytology-based screening, and the role of HPV testing is expected to increase. Finally, apart from technical and cost-effiectiveness considerations, one should also keep in mind the psycho-social impact of using sexually-transmitted agents as a marker for cancer screening.

Chan, Paul K.S.; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Cheung, Tak Hong; Giovannelli, Lucia; Park, Jong Sup

2012-01-01

401

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Virtual Private Networking is a new communication technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National laboratories has embrace the technology for interconnecting rem...

Miller Yonek

2001-01-01

402

Data analysis of a high-density polyethylene geomembrane located in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is monitoring the material properties of the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) cap at Waste Area Grouping 6 for degradation due to exposure to the environment. The material properties o...

M. R. Martino

1994-01-01

403

Review of Matters Relating to U.S. Army Laboratories and Research Activities in the San Francisco Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This review was conducted in response to a congressional inquiry concerning activities at (1) the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR), located adjacent to the Letterman Army Medical Center (LAMC) in San Francisco, and (2) the LAMC Area Laboratory,...

1981-01-01

404

Nevada Test Site 2005 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence,...

2006-01-01

405

Hydraulic Isolation of Waste Disposal Areas at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the location of several large waste disposal areas that received waste from more than 50 years of operation, production, and research activities at ORNL and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Southern Regional Burial Ground for wastes from more than 50 other facilities. The major burial grounds in the valley are Solid Waste Storage Areas (SWSAs) 4, 5, and 6, where wastes were buried in more than 850 unlined trenches and more than 1500 unlined auger holes. The area includes 3 seepage pits and 3 gravel-filled trenches used by ORNL for the disposal of liquid low level wastes. The burial grounds contained several hundred thousand cubic yards of waste, and the combined inventory of the burial grounds and liquid disposal sites was well over 1 million curies. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions for the Melton Valley Watershed at ORNL selected hydraulic isolation of major waste sources as the primary mechanism for remediation of the watershed. Isolation was to be accomplished mainly through the construction of multi-layer caps over the burial grounds, seepage pits, and trenches. Groundwater diversion and collection systems were installed along the up-gradient and down-gradient edges, respectively, of selected caps to enhance the performance of the isolation system. The waste areas were covered with both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type and isolation multi-layer caps. A total of 13 multi-layer caps covering 58.7 hectares (ha) (plan view) were constructed in Melton Valley between 2003 and 2006. The project encountered considerable challenges, not the least of which was its scale, involving simultaneous construction activities at widely scattered sites across the 430-ha watershed. Detailed planning and coordination enabled year-round fieldwork, an essential requirement necessary to retain a skilled, experienced workforce and meet the contract milestone for completion. Other factors key to the success of the project involved the use of an on-site borrow area and construction of a dedicated haul road for transfer of materials from the borrow area to the capping sites. In summary: Remedy effectiveness data obtained during 2007 for the Melton Valley ROD actions collectively indicate that the remedy is generally operating and functioning as planned. Contaminant releases of the principal contaminants of concern in Melton Valley have decreased significantly during and since remediation of the contaminant source areas. Hydrologic isolation systems at the burial grounds functioned as intended as demonstrated by attainment of groundwater level goals in most areas. (authors)

Cater, F.; Cange, J.B.; Lambert, R.K. [Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spurling, R. [B and W Technical Services Y-12 LLC, National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Julius, J.F.K.; Skinner, R. [United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01

406

Telemedicine in the blood transfusion laboratory: remote interpretation of pre-transfusion tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a telemedicine system for blood transfusion work, to supply the local hospital laboratory with an expert opinion from the central reference laboratory. The telemedicine system allows remote inspection and interpretation of pre-transfusion tests, which are performed by ID-cards (micro-tube gel technology). The system was installed at three blood transfusion laboratories in Slovenia, approximately 70 km apart. Validation

Marko Meza; Marko Breskvar; Andrej Kosir; Irena Bricl; Jurij Tasic; Primoz Rozman

2007-01-01

407

Interlaboratory Proficiency Testing as a Tool for Improving Performance in Laboratories Diagnosing Bovine Mastitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

TheNationalVeterinaryandFoodResearchInstitute (Finland) and the Veterinary Laboratories Agency of the Quality Assurance Unit, Department for Environ- ment, Food and Rural Affairs, United Kingdom (pre- viously theMinistry ofAgriculture, Fisheriesand Food) organized a proficiencytesting program for laboratories analyzing veterinary mastitis samples. Three test sam- pleswithlyophilizedstrainsofcommonaerobicbacteria were sent to the participating laboratories 7 times be- tween 2000 and 2003. The participants returned 98% of

A. Pitkälä; V. Gindonis; H. Wallin; T. Honkanen-Buzalski

2005-01-01

408

[Approval of ISO/IEC 17025 and quality control of laboratory testing].  

PubMed

First section of Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) was approved by ISO/IEC 17025 as a laboratory having an appropriate laboratory testing technique. NIHS is the first national laboratory approved by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS has also been accepted the appropriate technique and facility for the BSL3 level pathogens by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS is necessary to take an external audit almost every year. This approval is renewed every 4 years. PMID:21381399

Yamamoto, Shigeki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Machii, Kenji; Igimi, Shizunobu

2010-01-01

409

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast from hill north of structure. The building wing in the right foreground houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. Test Cell 10 is located in the center background, Test Cell 9 is at the far left, and the equipment room is in the immediate left foreground. The control room is in the center of the structure and abuts the aforementioned test cell and equipment room wings. This structure served as a facility for testing, handling, and storage of Titan II's hydrazine- and nitrogen teteroxide-based propellant system components for compatability determinations. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

410

Are patients well informed about the fasting requirements for laboratory blood testing?  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Proper preparation of the individual is a key prerequisite for ensuring the quality of laboratory testing. Our hypothesis was that many outpatients are not sufficiently familiar with the correct way of preparing for the laboratory tests, for which the individual needs to be at fasting. This study aimed to investigate: i) whether patients are aware of how they need to prepare properly for laboratory tests; ii) the way in which users are informed about how to prepare for laboratory testing; and iii) whether users arrive to the laboratory for phlebotomy properly prepared. Materials and methods: An anonymous questionnaire was conducted on 150 outpatients older than 18 years, during February 2013. The response rate was 11%. All patients were interviewed by the laboratory staff. Patients were informed about detail of the questionnaire and agreed to participate in the survey. Results: Out of the total number subjects, 39% were fully aware of the proper definition of the fasting, whereas even 46% subjects replied that the last meal has to be taken the day before and the exact time that must pass after the last meal to blood sampling is not important. Furthermore, 52% subjects did not receive any information about how they need to prepare themselves properly for blood testing. Only 60% of them came properly prepared for the laboratory blood testing. Conclusions: Substantial proportion of patients do not come properly prepared for laboratory testing. We conclude that patients are not well informed about the fasting requirements for laboratory blood testing. Moreover, requesting physician is the preferred source of information from which patients learn how to prepare themselves for phlebotomy.

Kackov, Sanja; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Gatti-Drnic, Ani

2013-01-01

411

Quality assurance plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) is concerned with design and construction (Sect. 2) and characterization and monitoring (Sect. 3). The basis for Sect. 2 is the Quality Assurance Plan for the Design and Construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the basis for Sect. 3 is the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Combining the two areas into one plan gives a single, overall document that explains the requirements and from which the individual QAPs and quality assurance project plans can be written. The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 QAP establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 project. Quality Assurance (QA) activities are subject to requirements detailed in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), QA Program and the Environmental Restoration (ER) QA Program, as well as to other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, subcontractors to Energy Systems, and architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 QAP will be supplemented by subproject QAPs that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject.

Not Available

1994-01-01

412

Assessment and cleanup of the Taxi Strip waste storage area at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)  

SciTech Connect

In September 1982 the Hazards Control Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a final radiological survey of a former low-level radioactive waste storage area called the Taxi Strip so that the area could be released for construction of an office building. Collection of soil samples at the location of a proposed sewer line led to the discovery of an old disposal pit containing soil contaminated with low-level radioactive waste and organic solvents. The Taxi Strip area was excavated leading to the discovery of three additional small pits. The clean-up of Pit No. 1 is considered to be complete for radioactive contamination. The results from the chlorinated solvent analysis of the borehole samples and the limited number of samples analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicate that solvent clean-up at this pit is complete. This is being verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of a few additional soil samples from the bottom sides and ends of the pit. As a precaution, samples are also being analyzed for metals to determine if further excavation is necessary. Clean-up of Pits No. 2 and No. 3 is considered to be complete for radioactive and solvent contamination. Results of analysis for metals will determine if excavation is complete. Excavation of Pit No. 4 which resulted from surface leakage of radioactive contamination from an evaporation tray is complete.

Buerer, A.

1983-01-26

413

Functional requirements of the borrow area and haul route for the Waste Area Grouping projects at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the mission and functional requirements for the development of a borrow area and the associated haul route to support closure and/or remediation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other WAGs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document specifies the basic functional requirements that must be met by the borrow area and haul route developed to produce low-permeability soil for the covers or caps at WAG 6.

Miller, D.G.

1992-09-01

414

Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory. Technical progress report, July-October 1980  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Residential Photovoltaic Field Test and Applications Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1 to 100 kW of peak power, throughout the United States. These sites contain modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Application Project during the period of July through October 1980, are summarized.

Forman, S. E.; Themelis, M. P.

1981-01-30

415

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

Not Available

1993-08-01

416

Laboratory Test Report for Six ENERGY STAR Dehumidifiers  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the measured performance of six residential ENERGY STAR vapor compression dehumidifiers. The performance of each was measured over a wide range of inlet air conditions and fit to a numerical model for capacity and efficiency. Performance curves were developed for use in EnergyPlus. Test data from all six dehumidifiers were also fit to generic performance curves. This work can be used by energy modelers and equipment manufacturers to understand how current products will operate in a wide range of environments, and to develop advanced space conditioning systems for efficient, safe, durable and healthy homes.

Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2011-12-01

417

Comparison of Area 17 Cellular Composition in Laboratory and Wild-Caught Rats Including Diurnal and Nocturnal Species  

PubMed Central

In this study we examine the size of primary sensory areas in the neocortex and the cellular composition of area 17/V1 in three rodent groups: laboratory nocturnal Norway rats (Long-Evans; Rattus norvegicus), wild-caught nocturnal Norway rats (R. norvegicus), and laboratory diurnal Nile grass rats (Arvicanthis niloticus). Specifically, we used areal measures of myeloarchitecture of the primary sensory areas to compare area size and the isotropic fractionator method to estimate the number of neurons and nonneurons in area 17 in each species. Our results demonstrate that the percentage of cortex devoted to area 17 is significantly greater and the percentage of cortex devoted to S1 is significantly smaller in the diurnal Nile grass rat compared with the nocturnal Norway rat groups. Further, the laboratory rodent groups have a greater percentage of cortex devoted to auditory cortex compared with the wild-caught group. We also demonstrate that wild-caught rats have a greater density of neurons in area 17 compared to laboratory-reared animals. However, there were no other clear cellular composition differences in area 17 or differences in the percentage of brain weight devoted to area 17 between nocturnal and diurnal rats. Thus, there are differences in primary sensory area size between diurnal versus nocturnal and laboratory versus wild-caught rat groups and cellular density between wild-caught and laboratory rat groups. Our results demonstrate that the differences in the size and cellular composition of cortical areas do not fit with what would be expected based on brain scaling differences alone, and have a consistent relationship with lifestyle and sensory morphology.

Campi, Katharine L.; Collins, Christine E.; Todd, William D.; Kaas, Jon; Krubitzer, Leah

2011-01-01

418

Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Bartholomay, R.C.

1990-08-01

419

10 CFR 31.11 - General license for use of byproduct material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing. ...in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratory or hospital to...in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratories or hospitals...

2009-01-01

420

10 CFR 31.11 - General license for use of byproduct material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing. ...in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratory or hospital to...in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratories or hospitals...

2010-01-01

421

Underground test area quality assurance project plan, Nevada test site, Nevada. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is one of the planning documents used for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which falls under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP). The Nevada ERP consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The UGTA Subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. The purposes of the UGTA Subproject are to define boundaries around each Corrective Action Unit (CAU), as defined by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), that establish areas containing water that may be unsafe for domestic or municipal use and to establish monitoring programs for each CAU that will verify modeling upon which the boundaries are based.

NONE

1997-04-01

422

FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

2009-01-01

423

Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

1996-09-01

424

Geophysical investigations at the engine test area of Camp Crowder, Missouri.  

SciTech Connect

Camp Crowder, which is located south of Neosho, Missouri, is currently a Missouri Army National Guard training facility (Figure 1). The site was established as Camp Crowder during World War II and served as a U.S. Army Signal Corps Replacement Training Center. During the height of the war, Camp Crowder occupied an area of about 43,000 acres, which is much larger than its current dimensions. From 1957 to 1972, a portion of Camp Crowder was operated for the federal government as a rocket and jet engine manufacturing plant and testing area. One testing area was known as the ETA (ETA) and remains a part of Camp Crowder (Figure 2). The other test area was termed the Components Test Area (CTA) and is now privately owned. Recent site investigations have indicated that contamination is present in both the soil and groundwater at the ETA and the CTA (Rust 1993). Dye tracer studies conducted on and near Camp Crowder show that the site provides groundwater recharge to several nearby springs (Vandike and Brookshire 1996). Photogeologic analysis by Frano (1999) indicates the presence of several lineament sets, which are likely to represent fracture systems in the underlying bedrock. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been tasked to identify and apply appropriate geophysical techniques that will assist in the development of a more thorough understanding of the complex interrelationships between groundwater flow and geologic structure at the Camp Crowder site. The specific goal of this effort is to locate zones for preferential groundwater and/or contaminant migration.

Miller, S. F.; Thompson, M. D.; Cooper, J. M.; Mandell, W.

2000-08-11

425

Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

Ludowise, J.D.

1994-05-01

426

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-1 and PERL-11). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final verdict for the use of these technologies is still out but the first part of the work has been completed with promising results. The goal of this part of the work was to close a servo position loop around a slide incorporating these technologies and to measure the performance. This paper discusses the tests that were setup for system evaluation and the results of the measurements made. Some very promising results include; slide positioning to nanometer level and slow speed slide direction reversal at less than 100nm/min with no observed discontinuities. This is very important for machine contouring in diamond turning. As a point of reference, at 100 nm/min it would take the slide almost 7 years to complete the full designed travel of 350 mm. This speed has been demonstrated without the use of a velocity sensor. The velocity is derived from the position sensor. With what has been learned on the test bed, the paper finishes with a brief comparison of the old and new technologies. The emphasis of this comparison will be on the servo performance as illustrated with bode plot diagrams.

Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

2001-04-10

427

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-I and PERL-II). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final verdict for the use of these technologies is still out but the first part of the work has been completed with promising results. The goal of this part of the work was to close a servo position loop around a slide incorporating these technologies and to measure the performance. This paper discusses the tests that were setup for system evaluation and the results of the measurements made. Some very promising results include; slide positioning to nanometer level and slow speed slide direction reversal at less than 100nm/min with no observed discontinuities. This is very important for machine contouring in diamond turning. As a point of reference, at 100 nm/min it would take the slide almost 7 years to complete the full designed travel of 350 mm. This speed has been demonstrated without the use of a velocity sensor. The velocity is derived from the position sensor. With what has been learned on the test bed, the paper finishes with a brief comparison of the old and new technologies. The emphasis of this comparison will be on the servo performance as illustrated with bode plot diagrams.

Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

2001-04-10

428

A laboratory facility for electric vehicle propulsion system testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The road load simulator facility located at the NASA Lewis Research Center enables a propulsion system or any of its components to be evaluated under a realistic vehicle inertia and road loads. The load is applied to the system under test according to the road load equation: F(net)=K1F1+K2F2V+K3 sq V+K4(dv/dt)+K5 sin theta. The coefficient of each term in the equation can be varied over a wide range with vehicle inertial representative of vehicles up to 7500 pounds simulated by means of flywheels. The required torque is applied by the flywheels, a hydroviscous absorber and clutch, and a drive motor integrated by a closed loop control system to produce a smooth, continuous load up to 150 horsepower.

Sargent, N. B.

1980-01-01

429

Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory for K-Area Interim Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The DOE 3013 storage standard requires nested, welded 300 series stainless steel containers to store plutonium-bearing materials for up to 50 years. Packaged contents include stabilized plutonium-bearing residues that contain chloride salts and a low (< 0.5 weight %) water content. The DOE 3013 STD requires surveillance of the packages over the 50 year lifetime. These surveillance requirements have been further defined by the Integrated Surveillance Program to include both non-destructive examination (NDE) and destructive examination (DE) of the 3013 container. The DE portion of surveillance involves examining the 3013 nested containers, analyzing the head space gas, and evaluating the plutonium oxide chemistry. At SRS, the stored 3013 containers will undergo preparation for the DE surveillance activities in facilities located in K-Area. The actual DE surveillance will be performed in SRNL. This report provides preliminary functional requirements for the destructive examination (DE) of plutonium-bearing oxide materials and containers in support of K-Area Interim Surveillance (KIS). The KIS project will install interim facilities to prepare the samples for analysis in SRNL. This document covers the requirements for the interim period beginning in 2007, and lasting until the Container Storage and Surveillance Capability (CSSC) project provides the permanent facilities in K-Area to perform sampling and repackaging operations associated with the 3013 container storage and surveillance program. Initial requirements for the CSSC project have been previously defined in WSRC-TR-2004-00584 ''Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory''. As part of the Plutonium Surveillance Program of 3013 Containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will receive the emptied 3013 container components, plutonium oxide samples and headspace gas samples from K-Area. The DE program scope includes chemical and metallurgical analyses for a maximum of 25 DE sets a year to provide essential data in support of the SRS Plutonium Surveillance Program. The normal operation is expected to be approximately 15 DE sets a year.

Stefek, T. M.

2005-09-29

430

Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, TA-54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

SciTech Connect

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Site 1-recently disturbed and Site 2-partially disturbed) at Area G, Technical Area 54 and a control site on Frijoles Mesa (Site 4) in 1995. Our objectives were (1) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify if the primary mode of contamination to small mammals is by surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least rive animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr , {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 3}H. Significantly higher (parametric West at p=0.05) levels of total U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu were detected in pelts than in carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Our results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses, which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0125) mean tritium concentration in carcasses than Site 2 or Site 4. In addition Site 1 also had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, p=0.0024) mean tritium concentration in pelts than Site 2 or Site 4. Site 2 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0499) mean {sup 239}Pu concentration in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 4.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

1997-01-01

431

Laboratory Tests on Ice Sheet Adhesion Strength on Piles of Different Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pile uplift laboratory tests were carried out with piles of six different materials: polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, steel, wood, concrete and steel coated with Inerta 160 marine coating. Two different types of failure were observed, separation between i...

R. Frederking J. Karri

1981-01-01

432

Screening for Saponins Using the Blood Hemolysis Test. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment for undergraduate chemistry laboratories involving a chemical found in plants and some sea animals. Discusses collection and identification of material, a hemolysis test, preparation of blood-coated agar plates, and application of samples. (CW)

Sotheeswaran, Subramaniam

1988-01-01

433

FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH SHRIMP, MYSIDS, AND SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO FENTHION  

EPA Science Inventory

The authors conducted a series of laboratory pulse-exposure experiments to model short-term field exposures of two representative estuarine crustaceans, Penaeus duorarum and Mysidopsis bahia, to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion. These tests established acutely lethal and ...

434

Mock-Up and Testing of a Variable Volume Laboratory Fume Hood Exhaust System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A test of an ANL-designed variable volume system prototype used to displace an existing constant volume fume hood ventilation system in a laboratory of the Materials Science Division is described. Performance characteristics such as response, stability, r...

J. Vresk P. R. Hirsch S. A. Davis G. E. Myers J. L. Woodring

1980-01-01

435

Multi-Laboratory Testing of Calibration Methods for Environmental Dose Rate Meters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Calibration experiments were carried out at Risoe National Laboratory 28-30 August 1985 with the aim of testing calibration methods for instruments used for background gamma radiation monitoring. Two calibration methods using certified gamma sources were ...

L. Boetter-Jensen S. P. Nielsen

1985-01-01

436

The Comparative Method, Hypothesis Testing and Phylogenetic Analysis--An Introductory Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory sequence that allows students to use traditional comparative methods, scientific methodology, and modern molecular data bases to test hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. (Contains 13 references.) (ASK)

Singer, Fred; Hagen, Joel B.; Sheehy, Robert R.

2001-01-01

437

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) Laboratory Components Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8 D Revision 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the R...

K. Winterholler

2008-01-01

438

A proposed test to support the clinical movement analysis laboratory accreditation process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a testing methodology and resultant set of four variables that can be used to quickly and easily document the correct installation, configuration, and combined working status of force platform (FP) and three-dimensional (3D) motion capture components of a clinical movement analysis (CMA) laboratory. Using a rigid, rod-shaped testing device, CMA laboratory data are collected simultaneously from the

John P. Holden; W. Scott Selbie; Steven J. Stanhope

2003-01-01

439

Development of a Testing Platform for Scaled-Laboratory Studies of Marine Hydrokinetic Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

A small-scale platform for testing model hydrokinetic devices in riverine environments has been developed for the hydraulic flume facility (32 ft long, 4 ft wide, 1.5 ft deep) in the Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Laboratory (EFM&H) at Bucknell University. This platform is being used to advance development of marine hydrokinetic technologies by providing scaled-laboratory testing in a controlled environment.

M. L. Beninati; M. A. Volpe; D. R. Riley; M. H. Krane

2010-01-01

440

Results of ground-water tracer tests using tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water tracer test were conducted at two sites in the radioactive-waste disposal area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1977 to 1982. The purpose of the tests was to determine if the regolith beds had weathered sufficiently to permit the substantial flow of water across them. About 50 curies of tritium dissolved in water were used as the tracer in one site, and about 100 curies at the other. Results demonstrated that ground water is able to flow through joints in the weathered bedding and that the direction of the water-table gradient is the primary factor governint flow direction. Nevertheless, the substantial lateral spread of the plume as it developed showed that bedding-plane openings can still exert a significant secondary influence on flow direction in weathered rock. About 3,500 water samples from the injection and observation wells were analyzed for tritium during the test period. Concentrations detected spanned 11 orders of magnitude. Measurable concentrations were still present in the two injection wells and most observation wells 5 years after the tracer was introduced. Matrix diffusion may have played a significant role in these tests. The process would account for the sustained concentrations of tritium at many of the observation wells, the long-term residual concentrations at the injection and observation wells, and the apparent slow movement of the centers of mass across the two well fields. The process also would have implications regarding aquifer remediation. Other tracer tests have been conducted in the regolith of the Conasauga Group. Results differ from the results described in this report.

Webster, D. A.

1996-01-01