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1

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory...

2013-07-01

2

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 300 area facility liquid effluent monitoring: 1994 and 1995 field tests  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Effluent Management Services manages liquid waste streams from some of the 300 Area buildings on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to ensure liquid discharges to the Columbia River are in compliance with permit requirements. The buildings are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 and FY 1995, three field tests were conducted to gather information that could be used to (1) increase the understanding of 300 Area building liquid waste streams based on the characterization and monitoring data collected during calendar year (CY) 1994 and CY 1995 and (2) establish improved methods for evaluating facility releases. The three field tests were (1) an evaluation of a continuous monitoring/event-triggered sampling system, (2) a volatile organic compound hold-time study, and (3) an investigation of the dilution and retention properties of the 300 Area process sewer. The results from the first field test showed that future characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams could benefit significantly from augmenting continuous monitoring with event-triggered sampling. Current continuous-monitoring practices (i.e., monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow) cannot detect discharges of organic pollutants. Effluent control effectiveness would be enhanced by incorporating a continuous total organic carbon analyzer in the system to detect events involving releases of organic compounds. In the second field test, sample hold times were shown to have a significant effect on volatile organic compound data. Samples analyzed in the field within 1 hour of collection generally had 1.5 to 3 times higher volatile organic compound concentrations than those analyzed 1.5 to 4 weeks later at on-site and off-site laboratories, respectively. The number of volatile organic compounds detected also decreased with increasing hold times.

Riley, R.G.; Thompson, C.J.; Damberg, E.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1997-07-01

3

Testing shields in the Argonne National Laboratory fuel conditioning facility support areas.  

PubMed

Testing has been completed for two lightly shielded areas that support operations in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Operational requirements dictated the use of a radiography source containing 0.44 TBq (12 Ci) of 192Ir to challenge reinforced concrete and steel shields that surround a decontamination, maintenance, and repair area for contaminated equipment used in hot cell operations. A more intense source containing 0.89 TBq (24 Ci) of 192Ir was used to test lead shot and steel shields around tanks in a radioactive liquid waste system and the boundaries of the room that contained it. Measurement procedures were developed to find design flaws and construction deficiencies while minimizing radiation exposure to test participants. While the shields are adequate to limit gamma ray deep dose equivalents to 10 mSv y(-1) (1 rem y(-1)) or less to facility personnel, several modifications were necessary to assure that the attenuation is adequate to keep dose rates less than 5 microSv h(-1) (0.5 mrem h(-1)) in normally occupied areas. PMID:8972837

Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

1997-01-01

4

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

NONE

1994-12-31

5

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the developmen...

1994-01-01

6

Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (IN...

M. A. Lanphere D. E. Champion M. A. Kuntz

1994-01-01

7

Safety Analyses at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Test Reactor Area - Past to Present  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test reactors are unique in that the core configuration may change with each operating interval. The process of safety analyses for test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Test Reactor Area has evolved as the computing capabilities, software, and regulatory requirements have changed. The evaluations for experiments and the reactor have moved from measurements in a set configuration

Richard Garry Ambrosek; Frederick William Ingram

1999-01-01

8

Interpreting Laboratory Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Interpreting Laboratory Test Results A laboratory test is a medical procedure in which a sample of blood , urine , or other tissues or substances in the ...

9

Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

Brenda R. Pace

2003-07-01

10

Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer.

Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Isotope Geology; Kuntz, M.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Branch of Central Regional Geology

1994-12-31

11

Computer Integrated Laboratory Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective is the integration of computers into the Engineering Materials Science Laboratory course, where existing test equipment is not computerized. The first lab procedure is to demonstrate and produce a material phase change curve. The second proc...

C. C. Dahl

1992-01-01

12

4. TEST AREA 1120 OVERVIEW, TEST AREA 1115 IN MIDDLE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. TEST AREA 1-120 OVERVIEW, TEST AREA 1-115 IN MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND TEST AREA 1-110 IN FAR DISTANCE AT EXTREME LEFT. ROGERS DRY LAKE AND THE HANGARS AT MAIN BASE ARE VISIBLE IN THE FAR RIGHT DISTANCE. TEST STANDS 2-A AND 1-A ARE NEAREST THE CAMERA. Looking west southwest. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

13

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F  

SciTech Connect

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

14

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume One - Main Text and Appendices A and B  

Microsoft Academic Search

The laboratory investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing in situ chemical oxidation for remediating the secondary source of groundwater contaminants at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) Site. The study involved trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated media (groundwater, soil, and sludge) from TAN. The effectiveness of the selected oxidant, potassium permanganate (KMn0(sub4)), was

S. R. Cline; D. L. Denton; J. M. Giaquinto; M. K. McCracken; R. C. Starr

1999-01-01

15

HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

2005-02-01

16

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Drill Holes Completed During 1986 in LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Use Areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: Volume 8.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a compilation of data from drill holes completed during the calendar year 1986 in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Data presented in this report include hole locations, drilling statistics, a sup...

A. P. Cavazos S. L. Drellack W. T. Hughes P. H. Thompson

1987-01-01

17

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Four - Appendix G  

Microsoft Academic Search

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL\\/TM-13711\\/V1. This volume contains Appendix G. Appendix G is a presentation of VOC chromatography data collected during the study. Information on the calibration

S. R. Cline; D. L. Denton; J. M. Giaquinto; M. K. McCracken; R. C. Starr

1999-01-01

18

Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

Bayliss, S.C. [DanShar, Inc., Bosque Farms, NM (United States); Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project

1996-04-01

19

Comparing laboratory column test treatments with field profiles of fecal indicator bacteria and virus from concentrated source areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fecal contamination of potable water supplies is prevalent throughout the developing world. In rural Bangladesh, groundwater contamination of shallow unconfined aquifers is attributed to the infiltration of fecal organisms from sewage ponds, sewage ditches and latrines. However, few studies conclusively link sources to wells at the scale required for microbial transport to occur. We present a combined field and laboratory investigation into the transport of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enteric viral indicator F+ RNA coliphage (MS-2) using drive point piezometers and extracted sediment cores. Fieldwork and coring took place in the Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Field measurements at the 100-cm scale were made using an array of three drive-point piezometers under highly contaminated ponds and canals over a 10-day period during the peak of the monsoon season. The profiles of E. coli detected under ponds and canals by a culture-based most probable number method were consistent with a first order filtration rate over the distances studied and filtration rates ranged from 1 - 8 m-1. In order to determine possible attachment mechanisms and the influence of sediment treatments applied in laboratory testing, duplicate column transport studies at the 10-cm scale were performed on intact cores processed immediately on-site, intact cores preserved by freezing, dried repacked sediment, acid-washed repacked sediment, and a uniform silica sand. Two ionic strengths (3.5 and 20 mM) were used to encompass the range of electrical conductivity typically found in the shallow portion of the aquifer. Columns were dissected and the attached E. coli quantified by section. Even at the solution chemistry less favorable for particle attachment (low ionic strength), filtration rates for the core tested on-site predict a transport distance of 0.5m for a 4-log unit reduction in E. coli concentration. Although the filtration rates found in the field study are lower than those found from column studies, calculations using the highest initial concentration and the lowest filtration rate observed predict travel distances (4-log reduction) up to 7m within the aquifer. This finding has important implications for the microbial safety of populations relying on shallow untreated well water because it indicates that factors such as preferential flow pathways or poor well construction may be more important than transport along a hydraulic gradient, even in a relatively uniform sandy aquifer with concentrated sewage sources.

Feighery, J.; Culligan, P.; Ferguson, A. S.; Mailloux, B. J.; McKay, L. D.; Ahmed, K.; Alam, M.; Huq, M.; Emch, M.; Serre, M. L.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

2010-12-01

20

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Four - Appendix G  

SciTech Connect

This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix G. Appendix G is a presentation of VOC chromatography data collected during the study. Information on the calibration curves and calibration checks used as well as the sample GC reports themselves are included here. The concentration values presented on the GC reports are calculation using the data from the applicable calibration curve and any necessary dilutions which were made.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

21

IMPROVED LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a program to evaluate an Improved Laboratory Dispersant Effectiveness Test (ILDET) which was developed to replace EPA's Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test (RSDET). The report summarizes the development of the IL...

22

Fiber optic testing laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TIA and the EIA have developed a set of standardized test procedures for optical loss of fiber, cables, connectors and splices under many varying environmental conditions called FOTPs. We have implemented the experimental setup corresponding to four of these FOTPs. The firs test allows to measure the change in optical transmittance for devices used in optical fiber systems, between an initial condition and a new condition induced by exposure of the device to physical or environmental changes. The second test determines the quality of the ends for both, bare and connectorized fiber using an interferometric microscope. The third one measures the cutoff wavelength for single-mode fibers. Finally, the capacity of a fiber cable to resist simultaneously torsion and traction are determined measuring the changes in optical transmittance when the cable is properly installed in a special tower. This work is considered as the first step towards the settlement of a regional center for fiber optic testing.

Gualdron Gonzalez, Oscar; Lasprilla Alvarez, Maria del Carmen; Torres, Yezid

2001-08-01

23

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

2002-06-01

24

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E  

SciTech Connect

These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

25

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume One - Main Text and Appendices A and B  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing in situ chemical oxidation for remediating the secondary source of groundwater contaminants at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) Site. The study involved trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated media (groundwater, soil, and sludge) from TAN. The effectiveness of the selected oxidant, potassium permanganate (KMn0(sub4)), was evaluated at multiple oxidant and contaminant concentrations. Experiments were performed to determine the oxidant demand of each medium and the rate of TCE oxidation. The experiments were performed under highly controlled conditions (gas-tight reactors, constant 12C temperature). Multiple parameter were monitored over time including MN0(sub 4) and TCE concentrations and pH.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

26

Electromedical devices test laboratories accreditation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years, the technology and equipment at hospitals have been increase in a great way as the risks of their implementation. Safety in medical equipment must be considered an important issue to protect patients and their users. For this reason, test and calibrations laboratories must verify the correct performance of this kind of devices under national and international standards. Is an essential mission for laboratories to develop their measurement activities taking into account a quality management system. In this article, we intend to transmit our experience working to achieve an accredited Test Laboratories for medical devices in National technological University.

Murad, C.; Rubio, D.; Ponce, S.; Álvarez Abri, A.; Terrón, A.; Vicencio, D.; Fascioli, E.

2007-11-01

27

A/M Area Metallurgical Laboratory: Summary of Phase I Characterization Well Installation, Cone Penetrometer Testing and Soil Coring for Soil Headspace Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Phase I characterization of chlorinated solvent contamination in the regulatory-defined uppermost aquifer (includes the M Area, Lost Lake and middle sand aquifer zones) within the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) of the A/M Area.

Van Pelt, R.S.

1999-11-05

28

Laboratory testing for platelet antibodies.  

PubMed

Laboratory testing for immune-mediated thrombocytopenias involves identification and classification of antibodies present in patient sera or attached to patient platelets. This article summarizes the available types of platelet antibody testing and applications in disorders such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, multiple platelet transfusion refractoriness, immune thrombocytopenia, and drug-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:23757218

Heikal, Nahla M; Smock, Kristi J

2013-07-23

29

Novel anticoagulants and laboratory testing.  

PubMed

The introduction of several oral direct anticoagulants within the past 2-3 years has dramatically changed clinical practice and has also impacted on utilization and interpretation of coagulation laboratory testing. This article reviews the effects of the oral thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the oral factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, on screening and diagnostic coagulation tests, and describes methods for measuring the their anticoagulant activity in plasma. Currently, there are evidence gaps regarding the role of laboratory testing for surveillance and management of adverse events associated with these new anticoagulants which do not require routine therapeutic drug monitoring. This is a rapidly changing field, and coagulation laboratory experts have a major role in ensuring patients receive appropriate testing and accurate interpretations of results. PMID:23590653

Eby, C

2013-06-01

30

Laboratory test system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to develop a laboratory test capability for evaluating new and existing digital product designs. In recent years, Bendix Kansas City has become more active in syppling early development hardware to the design laboratories for evaluation. Because of the more complex electronic designs being used in new components, more highly automated test systems are needed to evaluate development hardware. To meet this requirement, a universal test system was developed to provide both basic test capabilities and flexibility to adapt easily to specific product applications. This laboratory evaluation system will reduce the need to develop complex dedicated test systems for each new product design, while still providing the benefits of an automated system. A special purpose interface chassis was designed and fabricated to permit a standardized interface between the test system and the product application. Connector assignments by system functions provide convenience and function isolation. Standard cables were used to reduce the need for special purpose hardware. Electrical testing of a developmental electronics assembly demonstrated the adaptability of this system for a typical product application. Both the interface hardware and the software were developed for this application.

Asher, G.L.

1980-03-01

31

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01

32

Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer at test area north, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to depths of at least 500 feet penetrate 10 basalt-flow groups and 5 to 10 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 940,000 to 1.4 million years. Each basalt-flow group consists of one or more basalt flows from a brief, single or compound eruption. All basalt flows of each group erupted from the same vent, and have similar ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium contents, and natural-gamma emissions. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated for hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years during periods of volcanic quiescence. Basalt and sediment are elevated by hundreds of feet with respect to rocks of equivalent age south and cast of the area, a relation that is attributed to past uplift at TAN. Basalt and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 200 feet below land surface. Rocks below this depth are saturated and make up the Snake River Plain aquifer. The effective base of the aquifer is at a depth of 885 feet below land surface. Detailed stratigraphic relations for the lowermost part of the aquifer in the depth interval from 500 to 885 feet were not determined because of insufficient data. The stratigraphy of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in the upper 500 feet of the unsaturated zone and aquifer was determined from natural-gamma logs, lithologic logs, and well cores. Basalt cores were evaluated for potassium-argon ages, paleomagnetic properties, petrographic characteristics, and chemical composition. Stratigraphic control was provided by differences in ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium content, and natural-gamma emissions of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds.

Anderson, S.R.; Bowers, B.

1995-06-01

33

222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

RUELAS, B.H.

2007-03-26

34

42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory...

2010-10-01

35

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected at...

W. H. DeLuca K. R. Gillie J. E. Kulaga J. A. Smaga A. F. Tummillo

1993-01-01

36

42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director...Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1403 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory...

2010-10-01

37

Analysis of instantaneous profile test data from soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill, including the relations between hydraulic conductivity, moisture content, and soil water tension. A 4.7 meter by 4.7 meter plot was saturated with water to a depth of 2 meters, and the wetting and drying responses of the vertical profile were observed. These data were analyzed to obtain in situ measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic properties.

Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01

38

Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.  

PubMed

The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006). PMID:19045633

Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

2008-09-01

39

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

2009-06-18

40

Managing demand for laboratory tests: a laboratory toolkit.  

PubMed

Healthcare budgets worldwide are facing increasing pressure to reduce costs and improve efficiency, while maintaining quality. Laboratory testing has not escaped this pressure, particularly since pathology investigations cost the National Health Service £2.5 billion per year. Indeed, the Carter Review, a UK Department of Health-commissioned review of pathology services in England, estimated that 20% of this could be saved by improving pathology services, despite an average annual increase of 8%-10% in workload. One area of increasing importance is managing the demands for pathology tests and reducing inappropriate requesting. The Carter Review estimated that 25% of pathology tests were unnecessary, representing a huge potential waste. Certainly, the large variability in levels of requesting between general practitioners suggests that inappropriate requesting is widespread. Unlocking the key to this variation and implementing measures to reduce inappropriate requesting would have major implications for patients and healthcare resources alike. This article reviews the approaches to demand management. Specifically, it aims to (a) define demand management and inappropriate requesting, (b) assess the drivers for demand management, (c) examine the various approaches used, illustrating the potential of electronic requesting and (d) provide a wider context. It will cover issues, such as educational approaches, information technology opportunities and challenges, vetting, duplicate request identification and management, the role of key performance indicators, profile composition and assessment of downstream impact of inappropriate requesting. Currently, many laboratories are exploring demand management using a plethora of disparate approaches. Hence, this review seeks to provide a 'toolkit' with the view to allowing laboratories to develop a standardised demand management strategy. PMID:23015659

Fryer, Anthony A; Smellie, W Stuart A

2012-09-26

41

Testing containment of laboratory hoods  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory fume hoods often do not adequately provide protection to a chemist or technician at the hood. The reason for failure of the hoods to perform adequately are varied and, in many instances, difficult to determine. In some cases, the laboratory hood manufacturer has provided equipment that does not reflect the state of art in controlling laboratory exposures. In other cases, the architect or engineer has disregarded the function of the hood thus the design of the installation is faulty and the hood will not work. The contractor may have installed the system so poorly that it will not adequately function. Finally, the chemist or technician may misuse the hood, causing poor performance. This paper considers a method of evaluating the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Using the method, the paper examines several instances where the laboratory fume hood performed inadequately, quantifies the performance and identifies the cause of poor performance.

Knutson, G.W.

1987-06-01

42

Systems integration test laboratory application & experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early

Melvyn Rimer; Michael Falco; Michael J. Solan

1991-01-01

43

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. ...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing...

2009-10-01

44

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. ...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing...

2010-10-01

45

Preconstruction evaluation modeling of open area test sites (OATS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction of open area test sites (OATS) for commercial EMI testing for FCC and CE radiated emission requirements is at an all-time high. The demand for test facilities to meet the amount of testing required for computer, consumer, medical and other products has forced many test laboratories to turn away business due to a lack of test capacity. Semi-anechoic

B. Archambeault

1997-01-01

46

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2013-04-01

47

Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice  

MedlinePLUS

... this website will be limited. Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this page helpful? Introduction | Why develop new tests | Regulation | Gaining acceptance | Conclusion | Article Sources Overview ...

48

Genomic testing: the clinical laboratory perspective.  

PubMed

The expansion of genetic testing in the clinical laboratory is well under way, with many clinically validated genetic tests already in use. As sequencing technology becomes more efficient and less costly, clinical laboratories will make the transition from single-gene testing to multigene panels. Early, more targeted applications will gradually be replaced by more comprehensive genomic offerings, including exome and whole-genome analysis. Despite significant technological advancements, many obstacles remain for full incorporation of whole-genome testing. PMID:23872833

Faruki, H

2013-08-01

49

Algorithmic testing in laboratory medicine  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A method of pipelining a disease specific diagnostic algorithm on an n-bit data word stored in a memory whereby the n-bit data word is divided into clinical tests describing ranges of normal values. Then, each of the clinical tests of the n-bit data word is read out from memory. Upon receiving a first of the results of the clinical tests, the result is compared with the normal value and the detection algorithm is computed based on the first result. This results in continuation with the next test if positive or terminate if negative. The above-steps are repeated recursively until all of the required test in the diagnostic algorithm are computed to provide the complete diagnosis of a disease.

2007-04-24

50

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel...Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing...

2009-10-01

51

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel...Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing...

2010-10-01

52

Data Link Subsystem Laboratory Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Various very high frequency (VHF) transmitter-receiver combinations were used with minimum shift key (MSK) modems for bit error rate tests at 2400 and 4800 bit/second (b/s) rates and at various radiofrequency (RF) noise density levels over a simulated RF ...

A. J. Swezeny

1976-01-01

53

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB. 8 AUG 57." In upper left corner, photo no. "8462 57" cropped out: "A-AFFTC 8 AUG 57, RETL TEST AREA" This photo is a high oblique view, showing the wing of the photo plane and Test Area 1-115. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

54

Proficiency testing in the food microbiology laboratory.  

PubMed

Laboratories offering a quality service for the microbiological examination of food must implement a quality assurance system. An effective system should, in addition to daily quality control of procedures, consumables, and equipment, include external laboratory accreditation to a recognised standard, the use of validated test methods, and participation in an external quality assessment (proficiency testing) scheme. External quality assessment (EQA) is a system in which samples of known but undisclosed content are introduced into a laboratory's routine testing procedure, in other words, a challenge to those procedures. There are a number of EQA schemes available to food microbiology laboratories, either offering freeze dried mixtures of organisms as simulated foods or preweighed portions of spiked dried foods. There are a number of important requirements for an effective EQA scheme and a range of benefits from participation to a laboratory. These are discussed in the light of experience with the development of a specific scheme. PMID:10457655

Roberts, D

1999-03-01

55

Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

56

Systems integration test laboratory application experiences  

SciTech Connect

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early in the development phase of a system---prior to committing to actual hardware/software (HW/SW)---permits early detection of system anomalies, thereby minimizing program development costs while enhancing safety. Later the laboratory can be used to train system operators (for example, pilots, ground crew) in preparation for flight/ground test. In the case of the statically unstable X-29 forward swept wing aircraft, a comprehensive real-time, hardware-in-the-loop test facility was critical in the development of the aircraft's digital fly-by-wire (FBW) flight control system. The X-29 laboratory initially was used to introduce control laws to a simulated real-time environment to verify control system characteristics. Later, actual flight hardware was introduced to the laboratory, at which point the formal system verification/validation test program began. The test program utilized detailed test plans and procedures derived from system requirements and specifications to map out all tests required.

Rimer, M.; Falco, M.; Solan, M.J. (Grumman Space Systems Division, Bethpage, NY (USA))

1991-01-10

57

Further Laboratory Testing of In-Vehicle Alcohol Test Devices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The technical report presents the results of laboratory testing of three models of commercially available in-vehicle alcohol test (IVAT) devices. These devices are designed to prevent persons with alcohol on their breath above a preset threshold from star...

J. F. Frank

1988-01-01

58

Laboratory Hydraulic Testing in Unsaturated Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper synthesizes the state-of-the art of the various laboratory testing techniques presently available for measuring\\u000a the water hydraulic constitutive functions of unsaturated soils. Emphasis is on the laboratory testing techniques for measuring\\u000a the soil–water retention curves and the water hydraulic conductivity functions of unsaturated soils. The significant recent\\u000a advances in the investigation of the hydraulic behaviour of unsaturated swelling

Farimah Masrouri; Kátia V. Bicalho; Katsuyuki Kawai

2008-01-01

59

Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

NONE

1995-04-01

60

Crush Testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic crush test is required in the certification testing of some small Type B transportation packages. International Atomic Energy Agency regulations state that the test article must be subjected to a dynamic crush test by positioning the specimen on the target so as to suffer maximum damage. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Transportation Technologies Group performs testing of Type B transportation packages, including the crush test, at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee (United States). This paper documents ORNL s experiences performing crush tests on several different Type B packages.

Feldman, Matthew R [ORNL

2011-01-01

61

Systems integration test laboratory application & experiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early in the development phase of a system-prior to committing to actual hardware/software (HW/SW)-permits early detection of system anomalies, thereby minimizing program development costs while enhancing safety. Later the laboratory can be used to train system operators (for example, pilots, ground crew) in preparation for flight/ground test. In the case of the statically unstable X-29 forward swept wing aircraft, a comprehensive real-time, hardware-in-the-loop test facility was critical in the development of the aircraft's digital fly-by-wire (FBW) flight control system. The X-29 laboratory initially was used to introduce control laws to a simulated real-time environment to verify control system characteristics. Later, actual flight hardware was introduced to the laboratory, at which point the formal system verification/validation test program began. The test program utilized detailed test plans and procedures derived from system requirements and specifications to map out all tests required. This assured that the maximum number of components of the system were exercised in the laboratory, and all components tested had traceability throughout the test program. The end-to-end hardware-in-the loop simulation provided the environment to perform critical failure modes testing, parameter sensitivity evaluation and ultimately pilot/ground crew training during normal and degraded flight control system operation. The X-29 test experience, applicable to the laboratory testing of all critical control systems, has ingrained the philosophy that successful development of complex systems requires an orderly build-up of complexity within the laboratory. By this we mean that components of the simulation are introduced to the laboratory only when previous additions are well understood and formally verified by prescribed testing procedures. First, non-real-time computer models of the system are developed (for example, stability derivatives from scale model wind tunnel data). Upon reaching a level of maturity, these non-real-time codes are implemented and verified in a real-time environment. The real-time implementation is important because it lends itself to interfacing with actual flight hardware and software for final verification/validation (V/V) and training. This philosophy of laboratory management for critical control systems test is not limited to aircraft applications. Any dynamic control system could be developed and tested in a fashion similar to the X-29 control system. The gradual buildup of complexity in the laboratory commencing with non-real-time math modeling, leading to real-time, hard-ware-in-the-loop validation and ultimately operator training is a necessary procedure for obtaining safe, reliable systems. This paper discusses the experience gained from the development of the X-29 digital flight control system, use of the laboratory for development, verification and validation, and how this test philosophy is applied to any system.

Rimer, Melvyn; Falco, Michael; Solan, Michael J.

1991-01-01

62

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

63

42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441...

2012-10-01

64

42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1403...

2012-10-01

65

42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441...

2011-10-01

66

42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1403...

2011-10-01

67

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area Program and Hydrologic Resources Management Project October 1, 1999-September 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2000 for the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office under their Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Bilby where radionuclides do not appear to have moved a short distance from the cavity. We have begun field use of a tool that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

David L. Finnegan; Joseph L. Thompson

2001-01-01

68

Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory grounding system evaluation test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, a test bed that simulates Shuttle orbiter systems, was designed with an isolated single-point earth grounding system. A new single power transformer dedicated to the lab area was installed to replace the three existing transformers. This new hardware installation conflicts with the lab's ground isolation requirements but conforms to the National Electrical Code, 1990 edition.

V. B. McDaniel; T. S. Oepomo

2000-01-01

69

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25

70

Problems and solutions in laboratory testing for hemophilia.  

PubMed

A diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B begins with clinical assessment of the patient and is facilitated by laboratory testing. The influence of the latter on a diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B is clear-a diagnosis cannot be made without laboratory confirmation of a deficiency of factor FVIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. Moreover, the degree of hemophilia severity is specifically characterized by laboratory test results. In turn, patient management, including choice and application of therapies, is influenced by the diagnosis, as well as by identification of respective disease severity. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to inappropriate management and unnecessary therapy, and thus to adverse outcomes. Moreover, identification of factor inhibitors in hemophilia will lead to additional and differential treatments, and incorrect identification of inhibitors or inhibitor levels may also lead to inappropriate management. Problems in hemophilia diagnosis or inhibitor detection can occur at any stage in the clinical diagnosis/laboratory interface, from the "pre-preanalytical" to "preanalytical" to "analytical" to "postanalytical" to "post-postanalytical." This report outlines the various problems in laboratory testing for hemophilia and provides various strategies or solutions to overcome these challenges. Although some outlined solutions are specific to the potential errors related to hemophilia, others are general in nature and can be applied to other areas of laboratory hemostasis. Key to improvement in this area is adoption of best practice by all involved, including clinicians, phlebotomists, and laboratories. Also key is the recognition that such errors may occur, and thus that clinicians should assess laboratory test results in the context of their patient's clinical history and follow-up any potential errors, thus avoid misdiagnoses, by requesting repeat testing on a fresh sample. PMID:24026910

Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Meijer, Piet; Jennings, Ian; Sioufi, John; Bonar, Roslyn A; Kitchen, Dianne P; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Lippi, Giuseppe

2013-09-11

71

Extracting laboratory test information from biomedical text  

PubMed Central

Background: No previous study reported the efficacy of current natural language processing (NLP) methods for extracting laboratory test information from narrative documents. This study investigates the pathology informatics question of how accurately such information can be extracted from text with the current tools and techniques, especially machine learning and symbolic NLP methods. The study data came from a text corpus maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, containing a rich set of information on laboratory tests and test devices. Methods: The authors developed a symbolic information extraction (SIE) system to extract device and test specific information about four types of laboratory test entities: Specimens, analytes, units of measures and detection limits. They compared the performance of SIE and three prominent machine learning based NLP systems, LingPipe, GATE and BANNER, each implementing a distinct supervised machine learning method, hidden Markov models, support vector machines and conditional random fields, respectively. Results: Machine learning systems recognized laboratory test entities with moderately high recall, but low precision rates. Their recall rates were relatively higher when the number of distinct entity values (e.g., the spectrum of specimens) was very limited or when lexical morphology of the entity was distinctive (as in units of measures), yet SIE outperformed them with statistically significant margins on extracting specimen, analyte and detection limit information in both precision and F-measure. Its high recall performance was statistically significant on analyte information extraction. Conclusions: Despite its shortcomings against machine learning methods, a well-tailored symbolic system may better discern relevancy among a pile of information of the same type and may outperform a machine learning system by tapping into lexically non-local contextual information such as the document structure.

Kang, Yanna Shen; Kayaalp, Mehmet

2013-01-01

72

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25

73

Test Pool Questions, Area III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This manual contains multiple choice questions to be used in testing students on nurse training objectives. Each test includes several questions covering each concept. The concepts in section A, medical surgical nursing, are diseases of the following systems: musculoskeletal; central nervous; cardiovascular; gastrointestinal; urinary and male…

Sloan, Jamee Reid

74

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR AREAS SOUTH OF PERCH AVENUE. "COLD" SERVICES NORTH OF PERCH. ADVANCED TEST REACTOR IN NEW SECTION WEST OF COLD SERVICES SECTION. NEW PERIMETER FENCE ENCLOSES BETA RAY SPECTROMETER, TRA-669, AN ATR SUPPORT FACILITY, AND ATR STACK. UTM LOCATORS HAVE BEEN DELETED. IDAHO NUCLEAR CORPORATION, FROM A BLAW-KNOX DRAWING, 3/1968. INL INDEX NO. 530-0100-00-400-011646, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

75

Glass batch preheater: Phase 2. Laboratory testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility of using fluidized bed technology for glass batch preheating was evaluated. This technology provides over a 20% energy reduction, a reduction in air pollution emissions, a reduction in furnace operating temperature (and consequently increased furnace life), as well as less than a two year payback period. Construction and testing of a laboratory scale heat exchanger to investigate the compatibility of the fluidization process with the glass manufacturing process is described. Tests performed have verified: the heat transfer performance; the fluidization characteristics of glass batch; the solids mixing and subsequent reduction of batch segregation; the elutriation characteristics (loss of fine particles); and that no deleterious effects, as indicated by laboratory crucible melts, are introduced by the fluidized bed.

Cole, W. E.; Veltfort, N.

1982-01-01

76

Quality assurance in home laboratory testing.  

PubMed

In review, one is compelled to the notion that a variety of the aforementioned thoughts become pre-eminent in assuring quality. The selection of the tests available for home testing is crucial. They should be divided into categories of single encounter tests and multiple use tests. The single encounter implies a test that has an extremely high degree of reliability and is likely to achieve an answer to the question asked. This should relate to a disease or process for which potential favorable treatment can be achieved or which may have a major favorable impact on public health. In this category one thinks in terms of the worldwide prevalence of hepatitis B and other infectious diseases that are particularly common in third world countries. Yet, these are not "markets" likely to be able to afford this testing. Similarly, these societies are not currently sophisticated in terms of application of preventive measures. On the other hand, major benefits could be projected from the other category of testing, namely, therapeutic monitoring in the hands of individuals who will repetitively test for the same substance in the same manner. This includes not only diabetes but other conditions that are monitored for drug therapy, including seizure disorders and bronchospasm. Inherent in this aspect is the requirement for meaningful and ongoing instruction in proper testing methodology and recording of results. The incorporation of some type of memory device to enforce this aspect of testing appears extremely desirable, if not mandatory. Finally, we must consider the potential for misuse of the single test type of device. One suspects that it would be highly desirable that any test made available for self-testing should also be mandated as accessible through certified laboratories at the request of an individual, which would at least provide reliable performance of the test with a quality result. The development of the concept of quality assurance in home testing is in its infancy and will require continuing evolution. PMID:3791913

Keffer, J H

1986-12-01

77

Laboratory testing of the electrosource traction battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report is to describe the testing performed on the electrosource lead acid modules. They use composite lead wire, paste processing which bypasses the hydroset process, and a side-by-side bipolar plate design. These concepts improved the energy density and cost as compared to the present product. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's interest lies in evaluating these new ideas and comparing the modules made with this technology to other commercially available lead-acid products.

Hardin, J. E.

1992-03-01

78

Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized

Kendrah D. Murphy; Herman L. Marshall; Norbert S. Schulz; Kevin Jenks; Sophie J. B. Sommer; Eric A. Marshall

2010-01-01

79

Testing activities at the National Battery Test Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The National Battery Test Laboratory (NBTL) is an Argonne National Laboratory facility for testing, evaluating, and studying advanced electric storage batteries. The facility tests batteries developed under Department of Energy programs and from private industry. These include batteries intended for future electric vehicle (EV) propulsion, electric utility load leveling (LL), and solar energy storage. Since becoming operational, the NBTL has evaluated well over 1400 cells (generally in the form of three- to six-cell modules, but up to 140-cell batteries) of various technologies. Performance characterization assessments are conducted under a series of charge/discharge cycles with constant current, constant power, peak power, and computer simulated dynamic load profile conditions. Flexible charging algorithms are provided to accommodate the specific needs of each battery under test. Special studies are conducted to explore and optimize charge procedures, to investigate the impact of unique load demands on battery performance, and to analyze the thermal management requirements of battery systems.

Hornstra, F.; DeLuca, W.H.; Mulcahey, T.P.

1985-01-01

80

Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

81

Laboratory for testing electro-optical surveillance systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modern laboratory capable to carry out expanded tests of all types of electro-optical surveillance systems (thermal imagers, TV/LLLTV cameras, night vision devices, laser range finders/designators/illuminators, multi-sensor surveillance systems) and basic modules of such surveillance systems (IR FPA/CCD/CMOS/EBAPS sensors, image intensifier tubes, optical objectives) was developed and is presented in this paper. The laboratory can be treated as a both scientific and technical achievement due to its several features. First, all important parameters of modern electro-optical surveillance systems or parameters of basic modules of such systems can be measured. Second, the laboratory is built using a set of semi-independent modular test stations. This modular concept enables easy creations of many versions optimized for different applications. Third, interpretation of the measurement data is supported by a set of specialized computer simulation programs. Fourth, all tests stations in the laboratory were developed by the same design team and are based on similar test concepts.. Because of these features the laboratory of electro-optical surveillance technology presented in this paper can be an optimal solutions for scientific centers or industrial companies who plan to enter and make quick progress in all main areas of surveillance technology.

Chrzanowski, K.

2011-05-01

82

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

83

Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

McAtee, R.E.

1991-09-01

84

Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

1987-02-01

85

Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

2010-07-01

86

Open-Area Test Site (OATS) Calibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Open-area test site (OATS) calibration is discussed in this tutorial. The calibration is performed according to the CISPR and ANSI\\/IEEE standards. First, theoretical calculations of the normalized-site-attenuation (NSA) procedure are presented. Then, normalized-site-attenuation measurements of a newly established open-area test site are given. Finally, calibration is done through comparisons.

S. Eser; L. Sevgi

2010-01-01

87

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program...National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program...February 2007, and Lab Bulletin LB-42-2009...National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program...criteria, and policies. Information regarding...

2013-01-01

88

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2013-04-01

89

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the

Michael J. Truex; Vincent R. Vermeul; Brad G. Fritz; Rob D. Mackley; Donaldo P. Mendoza; Rebecca P. Elmore; Alexandre V. Mitroshkov; Deborah S. Sklarew; Christian D. Johnson; Martinus Oostrom; Darrell R. Newcomer; Fred J. Brockman; Christina L. Bilskis; Susan S. Hubbard; John E. Peterson; Kenneth H. Williams; E. Gasperikova; J. Ajo-Franklin

2009-01-01

90

Tests of Rock Cores, Pembine Study Area, Michigan and Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were conducted on rock core samples received from six core holes in the Pembine Area of Dickinson County, Michigan, and Marinette and Oconto Counties, Wisconsin. Results were used to evaluate the quality and uniformity of the rock to dept...

R. W. Crisp

1970-01-01

91

Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in

T. L. Patton; R. H. Pearl; S. Y. Tsai

1990-01-01

92

Comparison of the Babesia duncani (WA1) IgG detection rates among clinical sera submitted to a reference laboratory for WA1 IgG testing and blood donor specimens from diverse geographic areas of the United States.  

PubMed

All reported cases of WA1 babesiosis have occurred in the Pacific coast region of the United States, suggesting that WA1 is limited to this geographic area. However, we detected WA1 IgG in 27% of clinical sera sent to our laboratory for WA1 IgG testing from across the United States over a 2-year period, suggesting that exposure to WA1 or a closely related organism occurs outside Pacific coast states. We sought to determine if this high WA1 IgG detection rate among clinical specimens merely reflects WA1 seroprevalence outside the Pacific region. WA1 IgG, as well as Babesia microti IgG, was measured in 900 blood donor specimens from 9 states. Overall seroprevalence was 2.0% for WA1 and 0.4% for B. microti; regional seroprevalences ranged from 0 to 4% and 0 to 2%, respectively. Additional studies were performed to determine if WA1 IgG reactivity was attributable to polyclonal B-cell activation associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; 40 WA1 IgG-positive clinical sera and the 18 WA1 IgG-positive blood donor specimens were all negative for EBV capsid antigen (EBVCA) IgM (a marker of acute EBV infection), and 40 EBVCA IgM-positive sera were all negative for WA1 IgG. These findings indicate that the high WA1 IgG detection rate among clinical specimens does not simply reflect the national WA1 seroprevalence among blood donors or nonspecific reactivity due to acute EBV infection. Rather, the findings suggest that infection with WA1 or a related organism is more common than indicated by the literature and is not limited to Pacific coast states. PMID:20861326

Prince, Harry E; Lapé-Nixon, Mary; Patel, Hemlata; Yeh, Cindy

2010-09-22

93

Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

1994-06-01

94

Circannual Rhythm of Laboratory Test Parameters among Chronic Haemodialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Seasonal variations in laboratory test results have been pointed out in dialysis patients. Although the mechanism for this phenomenon is not clear, this could result in changes in dialysis and medication prescriptions. We investigated the effect of the circannual rhythm on laboratory test parameters in chronic haemodialysis patients. Methods: Data of 38 laboratory test parameters were collected every month

Mitsuru Yanai; Atsushi Satomura; Yuki Uehara; Masaya Murakawa; Makoto Takeuchi; Kazunari Kumasaka

2008-01-01

95

Contactless area measurement of area edema in laboratory rodent paw: (Contactless Planimetry)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the designed hardware and software systems (planimeters) for contactless measurement of areas (measuring the variation of oedema area's) of planar projections of laboratory rodent leap. These systems operate on the principle of processing the video signal scanned by a digital camera.

Said Ech-Chadi

2011-01-01

96

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests...Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

2009-10-01

97

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests...Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

2010-10-01

98

49 CFR 199.107 - Drug testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug testing laboratory. 199.107 Section 199...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.107 Drug testing...

2012-10-01

99

49 CFR 199.107 - Drug testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug testing laboratory. 199.107 Section 199...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.107 Drug testing...

2011-10-01

100

Laboratory tests of short intense envelope solitons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stability of short intense nonlinear wave groups propagating over deep water is tested in laboratory runs which are performed in the facility of the Technical University of Berlin. The strongly nonlinear simulation of quasi-steady nonlinear wave groups within the framework of the Euler equations is used to generate the surface elevation time series at a border of the water tank. Besides, the exact analytic solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation is used for this purpose. The time series is then transformed to a wave maker signal with use of a designed transfer algorithm. Wave group propagation along the tank was recorded by 4 distant gauges and by an array of 6 densely situated gauges. This setup allows to consider the wave evolution from 10 to 85 m from the wave maker, and to obtain the wave envelope shape directly from the instrumental data. In the experiments wave groups were characterized by the steepness values up to kAcr < 0.32 and kAtr < 0.24, where k is the mean wavenumber, Acr is the crest amplitude, and Atr is the trough amplitude; and the maximum local wave slope was up to 0.34. Wave breaking phenomenon was not observed in the experiments. Different mean wave numbers and wave groups of different intensities were considered. In some cases the wave groups exhibit noticeable radiation in the course of propagation, though the groups are not dispersed fully. The effect of finite water depth is found to be significant on the wave group stability. Intense wave groups have shorter time of adjustment, what in some sense may help them to manifest their individuality clearer. The experimental tests confirm recent numerical simulations of fully nonlinear equations, where very steep stable single and interacting nonlinear wave groups were reported [1-3]. The quasi-stationary wave groups observed in numerical and laboratory experiments are strongly nonlinear analogues of the nonlinear Schrodinger envelope solitons. The results emphasize the importance of long-living nonlinear wave groups in dynamics of intense sea waves. [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, A.O. Prokofiev, Eur. J. Mech. B / Fluids 25, 677 (2006). [2] A.I. Dyachenko, V.E. Zakharov, JETP Lett. 88, 307 (2008). [3] A.V. Slunyaev, JETP 109, 676 (2009).

Slunyaev, A.; Clauss, G. F.; Klein, M.; Onorato, M.

2012-04-01

101

Teacher Testing and the Pacific Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this paper was to ascertain in some measure the direction teacher testing may take in the Pacific Area states other than Guam and Hawaii. Guam and Hawaii have installed teacher testing programs and have clearly established certification requirements that make it mandatory for teacher applicants to have baccalaureates. The other…

Adachi, Mitsuo

102

CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

Farfan, E.

2009-11-23

103

Test plan for residential testing at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Systems and Component Test Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This test plan covers the philosophy and objectives of a residential test program planned for the Lincoln Laboratory PV Systems Test Facility. The planned testing for the first four years of facility operation is defined in terms of system types and schedule. A more detailed description is given of the first power system design to be tested, including definition of components and instruments.

Sacco, S.B.

1978-10-30

104

SNRB catalytic baghouse laboratory pilot testing  

SciTech Connect

The SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB) is an advanced air pollution process patented by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) that provides for significantly reduced sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and particulate emissions from coal-fired boilers. The process uses a high-temperature catalytic baghouse for integrating SO{sub x} reduction through injecting an alkali sorbent (such as hydrated lime or sodium bicarbonate), NO{sub x} removal through ammonia injection and selective catalytic reduction (SCR), and particulate collection. The advantages of the process include: compact integration of the emission control technologies into a single component; dry sorbent and by-product handling; and improved SCR catalyst life due to lowered SO{sub x} and particulate levels. The SNRB concept has been successfully demonstrated in a 1,500-ACFM pilot baghouse at B and W's Alliance (Ohio) Research Center. This paper describes the SNRB technology presents the SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and particulate removal performance results over a range of operating conditions for the laboratory pilot test program.

Kudlac, G.A.; Farthing, G.A. (Babcock and Wilcox, Alliance, Ohio (United States)) Szymanski, T. (Norton Co., Akron, OH (United States)); Corbett, R. (Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1992-02-01

105

The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

Sheldon Freid

2007-02-13

106

42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical...

2010-10-01

107

42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general...

2009-10-01

108

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. 493...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist....

2010-10-01

109

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. 493...Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist....

2009-10-01

110

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...523 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Quality control tests shall...necessary to determine the shelf-life and stability of...satisfactory composition, shelf-life and stability. ...ingredient. For keeping quality tests...

2009-01-01

111

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...523 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Quality control tests shall...necessary to determine the shelf-life and stability of...satisfactory composition, shelf-life and stability. ...ingredient. For keeping quality tests...

2010-01-01

112

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...523 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Quality control tests shall...determine the shelf-life and stability of the...composition, shelf-life and stability. ...ingredient. For keeping quality tests...

2013-01-01

113

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

2012-10-01

114

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

2012-10-01

115

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

2011-10-01

116

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

2011-10-01

117

New technologies to improve laboratory testing  

SciTech Connect

Several core technologies that are having, or will have, an impact on the clinical laboratory are discussed. These include instrument-related technologies such as computer technology, chemometrics, robotics, sensors, and biological technologies such as cell fusion and recombinant DNA. 79 references, 14 figures. (ACR)

Burtis, C.A.

1985-01-01

118

Estimating Abrasivity of Rock by Laboratory and In Situ Tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The degree to which a rock abrades another rock is called its "abrasivity". Laboratory tests of abrasivity can be broadly divided into four kinds: drilling, rubbing, turning-operation and tumbling tests. The present study was initiated 30 years ago with the objective of investigating and developing methods for measuring rock abrasivity, and making some contribution towards understanding the relationships between the above test methods. Within the range of tests conducted, the turning-operation test turned out to be superior to the drilling test, albeit slightly, in terms of practicality. We have also conducted in situ tests using rock drills for the last 20 years. The results of those tests have been investigated and compared with the results of laboratory tests. There is a large degree of scatter in the data on gauge loss in button bits, which has obscured any correlations with laboratory data. Some correlations were found between height loss in button bits and laboratory findings.

Okubo, S.; Fukui, K.; Nishimatsu, Y.

2011-03-01

119

Good laboratory practices for biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders.  

PubMed

Biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening are essential laboratory services for the screening, detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism or inherited metabolic disorders. Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized on the basis of the level of testing complexity as either waived (i.e., from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived testing (which includes tests of moderate and high complexity). Laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing are required by CLIA regulations to meet the general quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the personnel requirements for high-complexity testing. Laboratories that perform public health newborn screening are subject to the same CLIA regulations and applicable state requirements. As the number of inherited metabolic diseases that are included in state-based newborn screening programs continues to increase, ensuring the quality of performance and delivery of testing services remains a continuous challenge not only for public health laboratories and other newborn screening facilities but also for biochemical genetic testing laboratories. To help ensure the quality of laboratory testing, CDC collaborated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Institutes of Health to develop guidelines for laboratories to meet CLIA requirements and apply additional quality assurance measures for these areas of genetic testing. This report provides recommendations for good laboratory practices that were developed based on recommendations from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, with additional input from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society; the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; and representatives of newborn screening laboratories. The recommended practices address the benefits of using a quality management system approach, factors to consider before introducing new tests, establishment and verification of test performance specifications, the total laboratory testing process (which consists of the preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic phases), confidentiality of patient information and test results, and personnel qualifications and responsibilities for laboratory testing for inherited metabolic diseases. These recommendations are intended for laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing to improve the quality of laboratory services and for newborn screening laboratories to ensure the quality of laboratory practices for inherited metabolic disorders. These recommendations also are intended as a resource for medical and public health professionals who evaluate laboratory practices, for users of laboratory services to facilitate their collaboration with newborn screening systems and use of biochemical genetic tests, and for standard-setting organizations and professional societies in developing future laboratory quality standards and practice recommendations. This report complements Good Laboratory Practices for Molecular Genetic Testing for Heritable Diseases and Conditions (CDC. Good laboratory practices for molecular genetic testing for heritable diseases and conditions. MMWR 2009;58 [No. RR-6]) to provide guidance for ensuring and improving the quality of genetic laboratory services and public health outcomes. Future recommendations for additional areas of genetic testing will be considered on the basis of continued monitoring and evaluation of laboratory practices, technology advancements, and the development of laboratory standards and guidelines. PMID:22475884

2012-04-01

120

Laboratory Tests - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Arabic (???????) Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Khmer (Khmer) ... Chinese Community Health Resource Center Return to top French (français) 24-Hour Urine Test Test d'urine ...

121

Whole-vehicle Susceptibility Correlation With Laboratory Test Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison was made between Whole-Vehicle Susceptibility (WVS) test results and results from laboratory tests utilizing Bulk Current Injection (BCI) and Transverse Electromagnetic (EM) cell testing techniques. All tests were performed on three electronic systems used in a 11.5 meter (36 ft), 67 passenger touring bus. The measured induced currents for each of the three systems during the WVS test

Daniel L. Williams; M. Idoguchi; W. H. McGinnis

1992-01-01

122

19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance...

2013-04-01

123

Instrumentation of National Physical Laboratory Fatigue Testing Machine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A National Physical Laboratory fatigue testing machine used for the fatigue pre-cracking of Charpy-sized test specimens has been instrumented. It is now possible to monitor crack growth electronically thereby reducing the operator's time in attendance at ...

N. J. Baldwin D. S. Saunders N. M. Burman

1980-01-01

124

Laboratory Tests of a Prototype Articulated Covered Hopper Car.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were recently conducted to quantify the improvement in the safety related performance of a prototype covered hopper car. The testing was part of the High Performance High Cube Covered Hopper Car Program, which was implemented to encourage...

D. L. Cackovic F. Irani

1988-01-01

125

Laboratory Testing of Volcanic Gas Sampling Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of laboratory experiments were performed designed to calibrate several commonly used methods for field measurement of volcanic gas composition. H2, CO2, SO2 and CHCl2F gases were mixed through carefully calibrated rotameters to form mixtures representative of the types of volcanic compositions encountered at Kilauea and Showa-Shinzan. Gas mixtures were passed through a horizontal furnace at 700oC to break

V. C. Kress; R. Green; M. Ortiz; P. Delmelle; T. Fischer

2003-01-01

126

System improvements and new experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Test Reactor Area (TRA) located at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was a cornerstone in the development of nuclear technologies during the last half of the 20th century. The INEEL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the third generation of test reactors at the TRA, has base programs planned for the first half of

Raymond V Furstenau; Delwin C Mecham

2001-01-01

127

Laboratory testing of anticoagulants: the present and the future.  

PubMed

This review provides an update on laboratory testing and monitoring for existing and emerging anticoagulants, starting with an overview of haemostasis and the routine coagulation tests currently employed within most haemostasis laboratories, including the prothrombin time (PT)/international normalised ratio (INR) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Current anticoagulant therapy and laboratory monitoring is then discussed in terms of benefits and limitations, followed by a similar brief discussion of the new and emerging anticoagulants. The main focus, however, is laboratory testing related to vitamin K antagonists, heparin, lepirudin and the new agents dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban. Although the newer agents do not require laboratory monitoring, laboratory testing will occasionally be required, and pathology laboratories should become proactive in developing appropriate strategies. The tests most likely to fulfill this role are the ecarin clotting time (or chromogenic alternatives), and the chromogenic anti-Xa assay. Nevertheless, the dilute Russell viper venom time (dRVVT) assay may provide another alternative, and existing routine tests are also likely to be utilised for the foreseeable future, potentially also for laboratory testing of the new anticoagulants, albeit perhaps in modified form. PMID:22081129

Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Lippi, Giuseppe; Koutts, Jerry

2011-12-01

128

Pulmonary Function Testing in Small Laboratory Mammals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The lung is the primary organ likely to be exposed by inhalation studies and, therefore, measurement of changes in lung function are of particular interest to the pulmonary physiologist and toxicologist. Tests of pulmonary function have been developed whi...

J. J. O'Neil J. A. Raub

1984-01-01

129

Evaluation of three oil spill laboratory dispersant effectiveness tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

EPA evaluated three laboratory methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and currently required by regulation) in the United States, the Swirling Flask Test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-Dilution Test (used in France and other European countries). Six test oils and three dispersants were evaluated; dispersants were applied to the oil at an average 1:10 ratio

D. Sullivan; J. Farlow; K. A. Sahatjian

1993-01-01

130

Characterization of mudrocks: a practical application of advanced laboratory testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated approach to geomaterial characterization is advocated that combines geology, in-situ testing, fabric studies,\\u000a routine index experiments and advanced laboratory testing. It is shown that advanced laboratory testing can explore features\\u000a such as kinematic yielding and anisotropy in stiffness or shear strength that would otherwise be impossible to quantify. A\\u000a detailed study performed in London clay at the new

Richard J. Jardine

2011-01-01

131

Laboratory Load Tests on Buried Flexible Pipe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an effort to lower construction costs of closed conduit systems, the Bureau of Reclamation has been investigating the soil-structure interaction of buried flexible pipe. The test pipes are buried in a large container by placing a lean clay soil at opti...

A. K. Howard

1970-01-01

132

Laboratory Load Tests on Buried Flexible Pipe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of a study on soil factors affecting the behavior of buried pipe, research is being conducted on the soil-structure interaction of buried flexible pipe; earlier tests dealt with rigid pipe. The main items of investigation on flexible pipe are soil...

A. K. Howard

1968-01-01

133

PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING IN SMALL LABORATORY MAMMALS  

EPA Science Inventory

The lung is the primary organ likely to be exposed by inhalation studies and, therefore, measurement of changes in lung function are of particular interest to the pulmonary physiologist and toxicologist. Tests of pulmonary function have been developed which can be used with small...

134

Laboratory Test of CCD #1 in BOAO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An introduction to the first CCD camera system in Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (CCD#1) is presented. The CCD camera adopts modular dewar design of IfA(Institute for Astronomy at Hawaii University) and SDSU(San Diego State University) general purpose CCD controller. The user interface is based on IfA design of easy-to-use GUI program running on the NeXT workstation. The characteristics of the CCD#1 including Gain, Charge Transfer Efficiency, rms Read-Out Noise, Linearity and Dynamic range is tested and discussed. The CCD#1 shows 6.4 electrons RON and gain of 3.49 electrons per ADU, and the optimization resulted in about 27 seconds readout time guaranteeing charge transfer efficiency of 0.99999 for both directions. Linearity test shows that non-linear coefficient is 6e-7 in the range of 0 to 30,000 ADU.

Park, Byeong-Gon; Chun, Moo Young; Kim, Seung-Lee

1995-12-01

135

Centrifugal contractors for laboratory-scale solvent extraction tests  

SciTech Connect

A 2-cm contactor (minicontactor) was developed and used at Argonne National Laboratory for laboratory-scale testing of solvent extraction flowsheets. This new contactor requires only 1 L of simulated waste feed, which is significantly less than the 10 L required for the 4-cm unit that had previously been used. In addition, the volume requirements for the other aqueous and organic feeds are reduced correspondingly. This paper (1) discusses the design of the minicontactor, (2) describes results from having applied the minicontactor to testing various solvent extraction flowsheets, and (3) compares the minicontactor with the 4-cm contactor as a device for testing solvent extraction flowsheets on a laboratory scale.

Leonard, R.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

1995-12-31

136

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is spon...

D. Smith

1998-01-01

137

Laboratory Vision Tests of Military Aircrewmen. Part 1. 1966 Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A battery of vision tests was administered to 232 military aircrewmen who were participating in flight tests being conducted by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Measures of foveal and peripheral visual acuity, eye dominance, auditory- and visual-response time, ...

R. A. Erickson C. G. Burge

1968-01-01

138

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the

C. V. McIsaac; C. W. Sill; R. J. Gehrke; E. W. Killian; K. D. Watts

1993-01-01

139

Laboratory Tests in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) requires objective testing. However, all imaging techniques have their own limitations and costs and cannot be performed in every patient with suspected PE. After decades of unfruitful research, several laboratory tests have been evaluated for suspected PE, the most promising being the D-dimer test. As a general rule, the specificity of D-dimers is too

Guy Meyer; Pierre Marie Roy; Hervé Sors; Olivier Sanchez

2003-01-01

140

Donor Suitability Related to Laboratory Testing for Viral ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... Subject: Donor Suitability Related to Laboratory Testing for Viral Hepatitis and a History of Viral Hepatitis To: All Registered Blood Establishments ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/biologicsbloodvaccines/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation

141

Laboratory Investigation Of Containment In Underground Nuclear Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In support of the DNA program for stemming and containment of underground nuclear tests, existing laboratory techniques were further developed and applied to investigate the mechanics of containing gases in cavities formed by underground nuclear explosion...

J. C. Cizek A. L. Florence

1982-01-01

142

76 FR 10500 - Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...the approach it uses for calculating the fees the Agency charges Nationally Recognized...and also is requiring prepayment of these fees. This adjustment increases the...

2011-02-25

143

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory (left), Aerial Tramway Loading Terminal (center), and Huber Breaker (right) Photograph taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

144

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These completed operational testing activities demonstrated the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-03-01

145

Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 3, In vivo test phantoms  

SciTech Connect

Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard describes the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay performance-testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of test phantoms used for calibration of measurement systems for direct bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented.

MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.

1988-11-01

146

Laboratory performance in a food microbiology proficiency testing scheme.  

PubMed

Results from two shipments in a proficiency testing scheme in which almost 200 food microbiology laboratories participated are summarized. Freeze-dried mixtures of bacteria were used as simulated food samples. Four and six samples, respectively, were examined. The statistical procedures used to evaluate the performance of participating laboratories are described. It is shown that laboratories which had been in the scheme for a long time perform, on average, better than those that had been in the scheme for a short time. The former laboratories produced fewer false and outlying results, and were more accurate and precise in their determinations. PMID:1399915

Peterz, M

1992-09-01

147

Laboratory testing of closure cap repair techniques  

SciTech Connect

Landfill design requires a low permeability closure cap as well as a low permeability liner. The Savannah River Site, in South Carolina, has approximately 85 acres of mixed waste landfills covered with compacted kaolin clay. Maintaining low permeability of the clay cap requires both that the permeability of the compacted clay itself remain low and that the integrity of the barrier be maintained. Barrier breaches typically result from penetration by roots or animals, and especially cracks caused by uneven settling or desiccation. In this study, clay layers, 0.81 m in diameter and 7.6 cm thick, were compacted in 7 lysimeters to simulate closure caps. The hydraulic conductivity of each layer was measured, and the compacted clay layers (CCL`s) were cracked by drying. Then various repair techniques were applied and the effectiveness of each repair was assessed by remeasuring the hydraulic conductivity. Finally the repaired CCL was again dried and measured to determine how the repair responded to the conditions that caused the original failure. For a full report of this investigation see Persoff et al. Six repair techniques have been tested, four of which involve the use of injectable barrier liquids colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX) described below: (I) covering the crack with a bentonite geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), (ii) recompaction of new kaolinite at STD+3 moisture content joined to existing kaolinite that had dried and shrunk, (iii) direct injection of colloidal silica to a crack, (iv) injection of colloidal silica (CS) to wells in an overlying sand layer, (v) direct injection of polysiloxane to a crack, and (vi), injection of polysiloxane (PSX) to wells in an overlying soil layer.

Persoff, P.; Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Tuck, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)] [and others

1996-10-01

148

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under

Sean B. French; Rob Shuman

2012-01-01

149

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01

150

Descriptive profile of tuberculin skin testing programs and laboratory-acquired tuberculosis infections in public health laboratories.  

PubMed

The increase in numbers of cases of tuberculosis in the United States has placed greater demands on mycobacteriology laboratory workers to produce rapid and accurate results. The greater number of specimens generated by the increased emphasis on detecting the disease has placed these workers at greater risk of laboratory-acquired infection. We surveyed 56 state and territorial public health laboratories to determine the status of existing tuberculin skin testing (TST) programs and to evaluate the frequency of probable laboratory-acquired tuberculosis for each responding mycobacteriology laboratory. Probable laboratory-acquired infections were determined by each laboratory's evaluation of occupational positions, duties, and employee histories and review of medical records. Two-step TST for new employees was routinely practiced in only 33% of responding laboratories, and mycobacteriology laboratorians were found to be most frequently screened when they were compared to employees of other departments. Of 49 (88%) responding laboratories, 13 reported that 21 employees were TST converters from 1990 to 1994. Seven of these 21 employees were documented to have laboratory-acquired infections based on evaluations by their respective laboratories. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, converters are categorized on the basis of both a change in the size of the zone of induration and the age of the person being tested. By the definitions in the guidelines, 14 mycobacteriologists were identified as recent converters, 7 of whom were > or = 35 years of age and 4 of whom were exposed in the laboratory within a 2-year period. Inadequate isolation procedures, the high volume of specimen handling, and faulty ventilation accounted for these laboratory-associated infections. These results suggest that more frequent periodic evaluations based on documented TST conversions for workers in mycobacterial laboratories should be performed, since this population is at increased risk of becoming infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although general assessments are necessary to accurately and effectively evaluate the risk of tuberculosis transmission, they are especially important for those working in high-risk areas within a public health laboratory. PMID:9196206

Kao, A S; Ashford, D A; McNeil, M M; Warren, N G; Good, R C

1997-07-01

151

Descriptive profile of tuberculin skin testing programs and laboratory-acquired tuberculosis infections in public health laboratories.  

PubMed Central

The increase in numbers of cases of tuberculosis in the United States has placed greater demands on mycobacteriology laboratory workers to produce rapid and accurate results. The greater number of specimens generated by the increased emphasis on detecting the disease has placed these workers at greater risk of laboratory-acquired infection. We surveyed 56 state and territorial public health laboratories to determine the status of existing tuberculin skin testing (TST) programs and to evaluate the frequency of probable laboratory-acquired tuberculosis for each responding mycobacteriology laboratory. Probable laboratory-acquired infections were determined by each laboratory's evaluation of occupational positions, duties, and employee histories and review of medical records. Two-step TST for new employees was routinely practiced in only 33% of responding laboratories, and mycobacteriology laboratorians were found to be most frequently screened when they were compared to employees of other departments. Of 49 (88%) responding laboratories, 13 reported that 21 employees were TST converters from 1990 to 1994. Seven of these 21 employees were documented to have laboratory-acquired infections based on evaluations by their respective laboratories. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, converters are categorized on the basis of both a change in the size of the zone of induration and the age of the person being tested. By the definitions in the guidelines, 14 mycobacteriologists were identified as recent converters, 7 of whom were > or = 35 years of age and 4 of whom were exposed in the laboratory within a 2-year period. Inadequate isolation procedures, the high volume of specimen handling, and faulty ventilation accounted for these laboratory-associated infections. These results suggest that more frequent periodic evaluations based on documented TST conversions for workers in mycobacterial laboratories should be performed, since this population is at increased risk of becoming infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although general assessments are necessary to accurately and effectively evaluate the risk of tuberculosis transmission, they are especially important for those working in high-risk areas within a public health laboratory.

Kao, A S; Ashford, D A; McNeil, M M; Warren, N G; Good, R C

1997-01-01

152

Heart Rate Characteristics and Laboratory Tests in Neonatal Sepsis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. Objective. The evaluation of an infant for suspected sepsis often includes obtaining blood for laboratory tests. The shortcomings of the current practice are that the infant has to appear clinically ill for the diagnosis to be entertained, and the conventional labo- ratory tests are invasive. We have found that the clinical diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is preceded by abnormal

M. Pamela Griffin; Douglas E. Lake; J. Randall Moorman

2010-01-01

153

Laboratory Wear Testing Capabilities of the Bureau of Mines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The laboratory wear testing capabilities of the Bureau of Mines are described. Wear tests are used to support the Bureau's research efforts towards reducing the wear of equipment used for mining and minerals processing and any wear involving a loss of str...

R. Blickensderfer J. H. Tylczak B. W. Madsen

1985-01-01

154

Swine influenza test results from animal health laboratories in Canada.  

PubMed

Due to its infrastructure and partnerships the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network was able to rapidly collect test results from 9 Canadian laboratories that were conducting primary testing for influenza on swine-origin samples, in response to the threat posed by the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in 2009. PMID:24155436

Kloeze, Harold; Mukhi, Shamir N; Alexandersen, Soren

2013-05-01

155

Testing activities at the National Battery Test Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to acquire and to provide information on battery performance and lifetime under uniform test conditions and conditions that simulate load profiles in the intended application; to determine the effects of temperature and depths of discharge on performance and lifetime; to provide data for battery analyses and modeling; and to provide other information as required by the ongoing battery development program.

Hornstra, F.; DeLuca, W.H.; Gay, E.C.; Yao, N.P.

1984-01-01

156

Laboratory abrasive wear tests: investigation of test methods and alloy correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

When screening materials, laboratory abrasive wear testing is a quick and inexpensive way of obtaining large quantities on information on wear rates and wear mechanisms. Typical laboratory abrasive wear tests approximate two- and three-body abrasion. The Albany Research Center, however, uses a suite of four laboratory abrasion, gouging–abrasion, and impact–gouging abrasion wear tests to rank materials for wear applications in

J. A. Hawk; R. D. Wilson; J. H. Tylczak; Ö. N. Do?an

1999-01-01

157

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01

158

Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain

M. G. Davis; R. D. Flotard; C. A. Fontana; P. A. Huff; H. K. Maunu; T. L. Mouck; A. A. Mullen; M. D. Sells

1997-01-01

159

The geology of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding area: A field trip for the 28th International Geological Congress  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established to provide an area for continental testing of nuclear devices. Geologists from the US Geological Survey (USGS) mapped much of the NTS region. These maps formed the basis for subsequent studies by geologic support groups from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the USGS. A good

H. L. McKague; P. P. Orkild; S. R. Mattson

1989-01-01

160

Photovoltaic Leaf Area Meter Development and Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photovoltaic (PV) panel was used to develop a simple and practical leaf area meter. Components of the developed PV leaf area meter include a PV panel as sensor, a wooden cabinet as enclosure, a flashlight as light source, and a commercial digital multimeter for voltage measurement. The principle of projected area measurement is the voltage generated by the PV panel

C. Igathinathane; B. Chennakesavulu; K. Manohar; A. R. Womac; L. O. Pordesimo

2008-01-01

161

Half cell operations test of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preparations and tests are underway at the N-15 site in Waxahachie, Texas, to obtain operational parameters and characteristics for the 100-m-long 50-mm-aperture half cell of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) collider. The first power phase of this test refers to the accelerator system string test. The experimental procedure is described. These measurements are being added to the previous information

A. D. McInturff; S. Augustynowicz; W. Burgett; R. Coombes; C. Dickey; T. Dombeck; W. Feitz; R. Flora; J. Gannon; D. Haenni; P. Kraushaar; M. Levin; M. McAshan; G. Mulholland; D. Murray; W. Robinson; T. Savord; F. Spinos; G. Tool; D. Wallis; D. Voy; J. Zbasnik

1993-01-01

162

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30

163

Financial incentives and the supply of laboratory tests.  

PubMed

This study examined how the number of laboratory tests taken by a sample of Norwegian contract physicians is influenced by their private economy outside of the practice and by changes in remuneration. The data are drawn from 40,000 consultations carried out by 44 contract physicians in 1991-1994. Two factors which led to changes in the level of physicians' income are considered: changes in remuneration for consultations and laboratory tests and changes in interest rates on loans and bank deposits. The effect which changes in interest rates have on physicians' disposable income was calculated using information about their financial assets and debts obtained from tax assessments. The main finding was that changes in private economy and changes in remuneration have no or only a small effect on the number of laboratory tests taken. Our results suggest that fee regulation can be an effective means of controlling physicians' income and therefore government expenditure on primary physician services. PMID:15609196

Carlsen, Fredrik; Grytten, Jostein; Skau, Irene

2003-11-01

164

Laboratory characterization tests for antimisting fuel. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have shown that FM-9 antimisting fuel had the potential for precluding the fine mist and associated fireball generation in aircraft post-crash situations while allowing for the restoration of the filtration and antomizing characteristics required for aircraft operation. The Federal Aviation Administration, the Aircraft Establishment, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, and Pratt and Whitney Aircraft developed many specialized laboratory characterization tests throughout the antimisting fuel program to evaluate the antimisting properties, the degradability, the composition, and rheological properties of FM-9 antimisting fuel and the physical properties of FM-9 slurry used in the inline blending process for anitmisting fuel. This report documents all the laboratory characterization tests that were successfully developed and used as a standardized test method during the program.

Wilson, J.J.

1987-03-01

165

A New Test for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Spherocytosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new test for the laboratory diagnosis of spherocytosis, conventionally called ‘Pink test’, is presented. This test, semi-quantitatively or quantitatively, determines the hemolysis of small blood samples in a solution containing glycerol (135 mmol\\/l), NaCl (25 mmol\\/l), NaN3 (1.5 mmol\\/l), buffered to pH 6.66 with Bis-Tris (70 mmol\\/l) and HC1. ‘Pink test’, as well as ‘acidified’ glycerol lysis test, were

Luciano Vettore; Alberto Zanella; Ludovico Molaro; Concetta De Matteis; Maurizio Pavesi; Mariagabriella Mariani

1984-01-01

166

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31

167

Amxmr-p 715-902, Quality Assurance Pamphlet. Mechanical Testing Laboratory Test Specimens.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the pamphlet is to present as ready reference, detailed specification drawings of the Laboratory Test Specimens generally used for mechanical testing by the U. S. Army Materials Research Agency.

J. E. Black

1965-01-01

168

Site Characterization and Monitoring of Technical Area 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In 1959-1961, subcritical hydronuclear safety experiments were conducted at Technical Area (TA) 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These underground experiments were designed and conducted to investigate safety issues. Seventy hydronuclear safety, tracer, and containment test experiments were conducted in 1-m or 2-m diameter shafts at depths ranging between 9 m and 33 m. The subsurface radiological and metals inventory consists of about 40 kg of plutonium, 93 kg of uranium-235, 170 kg of uranium-238, 11 kg of beryllium, and possibly more than 90,000 kg of lead. Explosives used in the experiments consisted largely of TNT, RDX, HMX, and barium nitrate. It is highly likely that the explosives, except for the barium component, were completely consumed by the detonations. Hydronuclear safety test shafts were drilled, test materials were placed at the bottom of the shafts, shafts were backfilled with sand or local crushed tuff, tests were detonated, subsidence in the shafts were backfilled, and cement caps were poured over the test shafts. The diameter of the affected detonation zones is believed to be less than 6 m. Most test shafts were drilled on an 8-m grid spacing in four main areas within TA-49.

Levitt, D. G.; Kisiel, K. C.; Newell, D. L; Hopkins, J. K.; Criswell, C. W.; Woodworth, L. A.

2003-02-25

169

Phase two laboratory testing of Direct Freeze ice slurry district cooling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the laboratory development progress of a proprietary ice production technology (Direct Freeze) for ice-water slurry district cooling systems. The current work builds on a previous Phase 1 effort performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the current Phase 2 effort was divided into two separate areas. The first, Ice Slurry Hydraulic Characterization Tests,

Winters

1991-01-01

170

Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by {approx}50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with {sup 241}Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy.

D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

1999-10-01

171

78 FR 22536 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...publication of Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...public comment period on EAC Web site...for becoming an EAC accredited test laboratory and guidelines...

2013-04-16

172

French laboratory proficiency testing program for food microbiology.  

PubMed

The proficiency testing program in food microbiology (Réseau d'Analyses et d'Echanges en Microbiologie des Aliments; RAEMA), created in 1988, currently includes 440 participating laboratories. The program establishes proficiency in detection of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, as well as quantitation of aerobic microorganisms, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus, and Listeria monocytogenes. Twice a year, 5 test samples are sent to participants to assess their precision and trueness for enumeration and detection of microorganisms. Results show an increasing involvement of food microbiology laboratories in quality assurance programs and use of standard and validated analytical methods. However, the percentage of laboratories obtaining questionable and unsatisfactory microbiological results remains relatively constant. PMID:12180693

Augustin, Jean-Christophe; Carlier, Vincent

173

Prediction of sprint triathlon performance from laboratory tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated whether sprint triathlon performance can be adequately predicted from laboratory tests. Ten triathletes [mean (SEM), age 21.8 (0.3) years, height 179 (2) cm, body mass 67.5 (2.5) kg] performed two graded maximal exercise test in random order, either on their own bicycle which was mounted on an ergometer or on a treadmill, to determine their peak oxygen consumption ( V?O

R. Van Schuylenbergh; B. Vanden Eynde; P. Hespel

2004-01-01

174

Useful laboratory tests for studying thrombogenesis in acute cardiac syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review laboratory tests that evaluate thrombogen- esis during acute coronary syndromes. These tests have been found to be valuable research tools in more clearly understanding the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndromes. In particular, we describe tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, fibrinopeptide A, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen acti- vator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), t-PA-PAI complex,

Jawed Fareed; Debra A. Hoppensteadt; Fred Leya; Omer Iqbal; Helmut Wolf; Roger Bick

175

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01

176

DESCRIPTION OF RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

An onsite team of multidisciplined engineers and scientists conduct research and provide technical services in the areas of testing, design, and field implementation for both solid and hazardous waste management. Engineering services focus on the design and implementation of...

177

Molecular testing for infectious diseases should be done in the clinical microbiology laboratory.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, there has been an explosion in the use of molecular tests to diagnose and manage infectious diseases. HIV is a prime example of an infectious agent whose diagnosis at least in the acute stage, susceptibility testing, and management are all dependent on molecular diagnostics. The ability to accurately diagnose a plethora of respiratory pathogens quickly, simply, and relatively inexpensively compared to traditional methods is becoming a reality. Direct sequencing and microarray analysis holds great promise for directly detecting a wide variety of organisms from clinical specimens. The question is where this testing should be done in the clinical laboratory. There are at least four models that have emerged: Molecular infectious disease testing as an arm of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Molecular infectious disease testing done in a central molecular pathology laboratory under the leadership of a clinical microbiologist. Molecular infectious disease testing done in a central molecular pathology laboratory under the leadership of an individual whose primary interest is in another area of molecular pathology. Molecular infectious disease testing sent to a reference laboratory and not done on site or within the institution's health care system. We have asked three individuals who have thought about this very complex issue to share their rationale for supporting one of these models. Frederick Nolte is the Director of Clinical Laboratories and Director of Molecular Pathology at the Medical University of South Carolina, is active in and held several positions of responsibility in AMP (Association of Molecular Pathology) and is Chair of the CLSI's Area Committee for Molecular Methods, Alex McAdam is the Director of the Infectious Diseases Diagnostic Division at Children's Hospital Boston and an editor of this journal, and his colleague, Nima Mosammaparast, is the Assistant Director of the Infectious Diseases Diagnostic Laboratory at Children's Hospital Boston. PMID:22422845

Mosammaparast, Nima; McAdam, Alexander J; Nolte, Frederick S

2012-03-14

178

Similar Cases Retrieval from the Database of Laboratory Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

We proposed a suitable method to search similar cases from the laboratory test results database, whose data are basically numerical and ordinal data. We transformed raw data into ordinal ranks and into new scores lying between 0 and 1, then calculated the Mahalanobis distances as a similarity measure. We used 3000 cases of blood count data. In 100 sample cases,

Zhenjun Yang; Yasushi Matsumura; Shigeki Kuwata; Hideo Kusuoka; Hiroshi Takeda

2003-01-01

179

Similar Cases Retrieval From the Database of Laboratory Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

We proposed a suitable method to search similar cases from the laboratory test results database, whose data are basically numerical and ordinal data. We transformed raw data into ordinal ranks and into new scores lying between 0 and 1, then calculated the Mahalanobis distances as a similarity measure. We used 3000 cases of blood count data. In 100 sample cases,

Zhenjun Yang; Yasushi Matsumura; Shigeki Kuwata; Hideo Kusuoka; Hiroshi Takeda

2003-01-01

180

Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

2010-01-01

181

Reconciling motor performance indicators from theoretical calculations and laboratory tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quite often because of the complexity in the design of large industrial motors, the theoretical motor parameter calculations do not match actual results from laboratory tests. Thus, it becomes important to predict the amount of discrepancy between the two methods to develop confidence in the motor parameter calculations. This paper discusses the development of multiple artificial neural networks (ANNs) designed

Himanshu Hirlekar; Badrul H. Chowdhury; S. Ruffing

2010-01-01

182

A generative approach to a virtual material testing laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This thesis presents a virtual material testing laboratory that is highly generic and flexi- ble in terms of both the material behaviour and experiments that it supports. Generic and flexible material behaviour was accomplished via symbolic computation, generative pro- gramming,techniques and an abstraction layer that effectively hides the material model specific portions of the numerical algorithms. To specify a

John Mccutchan

183

Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

2010-01-01

184

GATE AND VACUUM FLUSHING OF SEWER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this study was to test the performance of a traditional gate-flushing device and a newly-designed vacuum-flushing device in removing sediment from combined sewers and CSO storage tanks. A laboratory hydraulic flume was used to simulate a reach of sewer or storag...

185

Molecular testing: improving patient care through partnering with laboratory genetic counselors.  

PubMed

The utility of molecular diagnostics in clinical practice has been steadily increasing and is expected to continue to do so as the applications of genomic medicine increase. The goal of this article was to describe the roles and responsibilities of genetic counselors who work in the customer service area of molecular diagnostics laboratories. In this role, genetic counselors provide recommendations to clinicians on issues that are specific to DNA-based testing. This article will address some issues that are specifically relevant to disease genetic tests. Many molecular diagnostic laboratories employ genetic counselors, who have extensive training in how to communicate genetic information, to provide information in the preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic stages of testing. To maximize the quality of the service, it is important to establish an understanding of what can be expected of both the practitioner and the laboratory genetic counselor. Although some complications in the laboratory cannot be anticipated, discussing the case with the laboratory genetic counselors beforehand may avert certain problems. This article discusses real cases from laboratory genetic counselors to illustrate issues that arise due to technical difficulties and the inherent limitations of molecular testing. The summary describes practical ways in which clinicians and laboratory personnel can work together to either avoid or, when unavoidable, better manage problems and delays. The responsibilities of genetic counselors working in molecular diagnostics are discussed. PMID:18496032

Scacheri, Cheryl; Redman, Joy B; Pike-Buchanan, Lisa; Steenblock, Kelle

2008-05-01

186

Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: In vivo measurements, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A study of two rounds of in vivo laboratory performance testing was undertaken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the appropriateness of the in vivo performance criteria of draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard ANSI N13.3, Performance Criteria for Bioassay.'' The draft standard provides guidance to in vivo counting facilities regarding the sensitivity, precision, and accuracy of measurements for certain categories of commonly assayed radionuclides and critical regions of the body. This report concludes the testing program by presenting the results of the Round Two testing. Testing involved two types of measurements: chest counting for radionuclide detection in the lung, and whole body counting for detection of uniformly distributed material. Each type of measurement was further divided into radionuclide categories as defined in the draft standard. The appropriateness of the draft standard criteria by measuring a laboratory's ability to attain them were judged by the results of both round One and Round Two testing. The testing determined that performance criteria are set at attainable levels, and the majority of in vivo monitoring facilities passed the criteria when complete results were submitted. 18 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.; Olsen, P.C.

1990-04-01

187

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01

188

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01

189

Field investigation at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of groundwater monitoring at non-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear test sites raised questions about the potential for radionuclide migration from the Faultless event and how to best monitor for such migration. With its long standing interest in the Faultless area and background in Nevada hydrogeology, the Desert Research Institute conducted a field investigation in FY92 to address the following issues: The status of chimney infilling (which determines the potential for migration); the best level(s) from which to collect samples from the nearby monitoring wells, HTH-1 and HTH-2; the status of hydraulic heads in the monitoring well area following records of sustained elevated post-shot heads. The field investigation was conducted from July 27 to 31 and August 4 to 7, 1992. Temperature and electrical conductivity logging were performed in HTH-1, HTH-2, and UC-1-P-2SR. Water samples were collected from HTH-1 and HTH-2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) also collected samples during the July trip, including samples from UC-1-P-2SR. This report presents the data gathered during these field excursions and some preliminary conclusions. Full interpretation of the data in light of the issues listed above is planned for FY93.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.

1992-11-01

190

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Tested Disposal Methods for Chemical Wastes from Academic Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes procedures for disposing of dichromate cleaning solution, picric acid, organic azides, oxalic acid, chemical spills, and hydroperoxides in ethers and alkenes. These methods have been tested under laboratory conditions and are specific for individual chemicals rather than for groups of chemicals. (JN)

Armour, M. A.; And Others

1985-01-01

191

An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered

Riedhauser

1994-01-01

192

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

Not Available

1991-05-01

193

Comparison of Recuperator Alloy Degradation in Laboratory and Engine Testing  

SciTech Connect

In order to increase the efficiency of advanced microturbines, durable alloy foils are needed for their recuperators to operate at 650-700 C. Prior work has demonstrated that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr from austenitic alloys, leading to a reduction in lifetime for the thin-walled components in this application. New commercial alloy foils are being tested in both laboratory tests in humid air and in the exhaust gas of a modified 60 kW microturbine. Initial results are presented for a commercial batch of 80 {micro}m alloy 120 foil. The Cr consumption rates in laboratory testing were similar to those observed in previous testing. The initial results from the microturbine indicate a faster Cr consumption rate compared to the laboratory test, but longer term results are needed to quantify the difference. These results will help to verify a Cr consumption model for predicting lifetimes in this environment based on classical gas transport theory.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2006-01-01

194

Use of laboratory tests in out-of-hours services in Norway  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the use of laboratory tests and which factors influence the use in Norwegian out-of-hours (OOH) services. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting Out-of-hours services in Norway. Subjects All electronic reimbursement claims from doctors at OOH services in Norway in 2007. Main outcome measures Number of contacts and laboratory tests in relation to patients’ and doctors’ characteristics. Results 1 323 281 consultations and home visits were reported. Laboratory tests were used in 31% of the contacts. C-reactive protein (CRP) was the most common test (27% of all contacts), especially in respiratory illness (55%) and infants (44%). Electrocardiogram and rapid strep A test were used in 4% of the contacts. Young doctors, female doctors, and doctors in central areas used laboratory tests more often. Conclusion CRP is extensively used in OOH services, especially by young and inexperienced doctors, and in central areas. Further investigations are required to see if this extensive use of CRP is of importance for correct diagnosis and treatment.

Rebnord, Ingrid Keilegavlen; Sandvik, Hogne; Hunskaar, Steinar

2012-01-01

195

The World Health Organization's External Quality Assurance System Proficiency Testing Program Has Improved the Accuracy of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and Reporting among Participating Laboratories Using NCCLS Methods  

PubMed Central

A total of 150 laboratories in 33 countries that followed the NCCLS testing procedures participated in the World Health Organization's External Quality Assurance System for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EQAS-AST) from January 1998 through March 2001. Laboratories tested seven bacterial isolates for antimicrobial resistance and reported the results to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga. The results were compared to the results generated at the CDC with the NCCLS broth microdilution and disk diffusion reference methods. Although there were few testing errors with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, drugs that are not appropriate for therapy of Salmonella infections were tested and reported by 136 (91%) of 150 laboratories. In addition, 29 (20%) of 150 laboratories used the Staphylococcus aureus breakpoints to report oxacillin results for Staphylococcus saprophyticus. For a vanB-containing Enterococcus faecalis strain, 124 (83%) of 150 laboratories correctly reported vancomycin results that were ±1 doubling dilution from the reference MIC or ±3 mm from the reference disk diffusion result. Of the laboratories that tested Streptococcus agalactiae by disk diffusion, 17% reported nonsusceptible results for penicillin in error. While 110 laboratories (73%) tested the S. pneumoniae challenge isolate against a fluoroquinolone, 83% tested it against ciprofloxacin, for which there are no NCCLS interpretive criteria. Ten of 12 laboratories testing levofloxacin and 4 of 4 laboratories testing ofloxacin by an MIC method correctly reported resistant results for the isolate. Feedback letters sent to participating laboratories highlighted areas of susceptibility testing in individual laboratories that needed improvement. The positive impact of the feedback letters and the overall effectiveness of the EQAS program were documented in repeat testing challenges with pneumococci and staphylococci. The 31 and 19% increases in the numbers of laboratories using appropriate testing methods for pneumococci and staphylococci, respectively, in 2000 versus 1998 indicate that laboratory performance is improving.

Chaitram, Jasmine M.; Jevitt, Laura A.; Lary, Sara; Tenover, Fred C.

2003-01-01

196

Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s waste area group 2  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report.

Burns, D.E.

1995-11-01

197

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26

198

Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.  

PubMed

This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked. PMID:21735375

Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

2011-07-01

199

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams.  

PubMed

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae.A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages.In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. PMID:5296399

Jamnback, H; Frempong-Boadu, J

1966-01-01

200

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams*  

PubMed Central

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae. A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages. In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3

Jamnback, H.; Frempong-Boadu, J.

1966-01-01

201

State of malaria diagnostic testing at clinical laboratories in the United States, 2010: a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

Background The diagnosis of malaria can be difficult in non-endemic areas, such as the United States, and delays in diagnosis and errors in treatment occur too often. Methods A nationwide survey of laboratories in the United States and its nine dependent territories was conducted in 2010 to determine factors that may contribute to shortcomings in the diagnosis of malaria. This survey explored the availability of malaria diagnostic tests, techniques used, and reporting practices. Results The survey was completed by 201 participants. Ninety percent reported that their laboratories had at least one type of malaria diagnostic test available on-site. Nearly all of the respondents' laboratories performed thick and thin smears on-site; approximately 50% had access to molecular testing; and only 17% had access to rapid diagnostic tests on-site. Seventy-three percent reported fewer than five confirmed cases of malaria in their laboratory during the 12-month period preceding the survey. Twenty-eight percent stated that results of species identification took more than 24 hours to report. Only five of 149 respondents that performed testing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week complied with all of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines for analysis and reporting of results. Conclusion Although malaria diagnostic testing services were available to a majority of U.S. laboratories surveyed, very few were in complete compliance with all of the CLSI guidelines for analysis and reporting of results, and most respondents reported very few cases of malaria annually. Laboratories' difficulty in adhering to the rigorous CLSI guidelines and their personnel's lack of practice and proficiency may account for delays and errors in diagnosis. It is recommended that laboratories that infrequently process samples for malaria seek opportunities for practice and proficiency training annually and take advantage of available resources to assist in species identification.

2011-01-01

202

Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

1995-12-31

203

Implementing a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in an Army Corps of Engineers' Water Quality Testing Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's environmental laboratory faces numerous challenge such as enhanced regulatory oversight, decreasing costs per tests, and numerous laboratory accreditations that are offered and\\/or required. Selecting the LIMS that will “fit” your laboratory is important, but so is finding a system that has the flexibility to conform to the changes that will be required by the laboratory over the years. These

Elizabeth Turner; Christine Paszko; Don Kolva

2001-01-01

204

Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested -- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1--2 Wh/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20--30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles (PSFUDS) which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4--5{degrees}C for tests that lasted 5--7 hours. 7 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Burke, A.F.

1991-10-01

205

Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

2007-02-01

206

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A SATURN I STATIC TEST. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN 1960 JUST PRIOR TO THE CHANGE OVER OF LAND, FACILITIES AND MISSION FROM ARMY/MICOM (MISSILE COMMAND) TO NASA/MSFC (MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER). MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

207

Special Hydraulic Tests of Emergency Cooling System, L-Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The delay in the L-Area startup provides an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the emergency cooling system (ECS). A series of special hydraulic tests of the ECS are proposed for L-Area. These tests are in addition to the test proposed by SRL. The tes...

G. F. Merz

1985-01-01

208

TEST PLAN FOR MONITORING COOLING COILS IN A LABORATORY SETTING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to understand and quantify the moisture removal performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. The project will include a comprehensive literature review, detailed measurement of cooling coil performance in a laboratory facility, monitoring cooling systems at several field test sites, and development/validation of engineering models that can be used in energy calculations and building simulations. This document contains the detailed test plan for monitoring cooling coil performance in a laboratory setting. Detailed measurements will be taken on up to 10 direct expansion (DX) and chilled water cooling coils in various configurations to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation.

Don B. Shirey, III

2002-04-01

209

SRNL Engineering Development Laboratory Pulse Jet Testing Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Engineering Development Laboratory recently performed pulse jet mixer development studies related to Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Concentrate Receipt Vessel. These were performed on a wide variety of pulse jet arrangements, pulse jet sizes, nozzle diameters, nozzle configurations, nozzle velocities, pulse jet firing orders, and waste simulant rheologies. This paper describes the EDL Pulse Jet Mixing Test Stand capabilities, experimental methods and data acquisition.

GUERRERO, HECTOR

2004-10-21

210

Efficiency of ear protectors in laboratory and real life tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of ten different ear-protectors (6 types of earmuffs and 4 types of earplugs) has been tested under laboratory conditions and in the real occupational environment. Three methods were used: (1) physical, utilizing a dummy head; (2) subjective, real-ear, executed on trained human subjects; (3) subjective, measuring TTS2 resulting from occupational, one-workday exposure. It could be shown that the

K. Pawlas; J. Grzesik

1990-01-01

211

System Integration Laboratory test plan (RADL Item 6-4)  

SciTech Connect

A general demonstration test plan is provided for the activities to be accomplished at the SFDI Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) at Huntington Beach. The Master Control System (MCS), the Subsystem Distributed Process Control (SDPC), the Signal Conditioning Units (SCU), and Redline Units (RLU) from the Receiver Subsystem (RS) and the Thermal Storage Subsystem (TSS) and other external interface operational functions shall be integrated and functionally demonstrated. The overall plan for the SIL activities is presented.

Not Available

1980-05-01

212

A laboratory method for testing laundry products for detergency  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory screening test for fabric detergency has been developed, which closely parallels practical laundry operations.\\u000a Natural airborne particulate is used so that the argument for and against carbon soil is eliminated. The oily soil consists\\u000a of synthetic sebum, thereby simulating the surface film that covers the human integument. The particulate and fatty matter\\u000a are combined into an aqueous suspension

W. G. Spangler; H. D. Cross; B. R. Schaafsma

1965-01-01

213

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...handling and laboratory analysis for...and testing laboratories shall use appropriate...cutoff levels in screening specimens to...only testing laboratories certified by...the âUrine Sample Custody...

2013-01-01

214

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

215

Interpretation of laboratory tests for canine Cushing's syndrome.  

PubMed

Hypercortisolism (HC) is a common disease in dogs. This article will review the laboratory tests that are available for diagnosis of HC and laboratory tests for differentiating between causes of HC. An emphasis will be made on the clinical process that leads to the decision to perform those tests and common misconceptions and issues that arise when performing them. To choose between the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulation test and the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST), the advantages and disadvantages of both tests should be considered, as well as the clinical presentation. If the index of suspicion of HC is high and other diseases have been appropriately ruled out, the specificity of the ACTH stimulation test is reasonably high with an expected high positive predictive value. Because of the low sensitivity, a negative result in the ACTH stimulation test should not be used to rule out the diagnosis of HC. The LDDST is more sensitive but also less specific and affected more by stress. A positive result on the urine cortisol:creatinine ratio does not help to differentiate HC from other diseases. A negative result on the urine cortisol:creatinine ratio indicates that the diagnosis of HC is very unlikely. The LDDST is useful in differentiating pituitary-dependent HC from an adrenal tumor in about two thirds of all dogs with HC. Differentiation of HC from diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, and hypothyroidism cannot be based solely on endocrine tests. Clinical signs, imaging studies, histopathology, and response to treatment should all be considered. PMID:21596349

Gilor, Chen; Graves, Thomas K

2011-05-01

216

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

217

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-09-01

218

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G B; Currie, J W

1992-03-01

219

Proposals for ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) support to Tiber LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). [Engineering Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the interests and capabilities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in their proposals to support the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) project. Five individual proposals are cataloged separately. (FI)

Berry, L.A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.; Sheffield, J.

1987-01-27

220

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

SciTech Connect

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01

221

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01

222

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25

223

Issues in mapping LOINC laboratory tests to SNOMED CT.  

PubMed

Comprehensive clinical terminologies such as SNOMED CT tend to overlap with specialized terminologies such as LOINC (e.g., for the domain of laboratory procedures). Terminological systems such as the UMLS are often used to bridge between terminologies. However, the integration of LOINC in the UMLS and with other terminologies remains suboptimal. We mapped concepts for laboratory tests from LOINC to pre-coordinated SNOMED CT concepts, based on shared relations to other concepts. As LOINC is finer-grained than SNOMED CT, several LOINC codes tend to map to the same SNOMED CT concept. However, a large proportion of LOINC codes could not be mapped to SNOMED CT through this approach, because of underspecified definitions in SNOMED CT and a lack of fine-grained, pre-coordinated concepts in SNOMED CT. PMID:18999311

Bodenreider, Olivier

2008-11-06

224

Laboratory testing for cobalamin deficiency in megaloblastic anemia.  

PubMed

Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia in Western populations. Laboratory evaluation of megaloblastic anemia frequently includes the assessment of patient cobalamin and folate status. Current total serum cobalamin measurements are performed in the clinical laboratory with competitive binding luminescence assays, whose results may not always accurately reflect actual cobalamin stores. Surrogate markers of cobalamin deficiency such as methylmalonic acid and homocysteine have been utilized to improve diagnostic accuracy; however, the specificity of these tests by themselves is rather low. Measurement of the biologically active fraction of cobalamin, holotranscobalamin, has been proposed as a replacement for current total cobalamin assays. Although holotranscobalamin measurements appear to have slighter better sensitivity, the specificity of this assay remains to be determined. The relative merits and demerits of commonly available methods to assess cobalamin deficiency in patients with suspected megaloblastic anemia are discussed. PMID:23423840

Oberley, Matthew J; Yang, David T

2013-03-15

225

Technical baseline description for in situ vitrification laboratory test equipment  

SciTech Connect

IN situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as possible waste treatment technology. ISV was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington, as a thermal treatment process to treat contaminated soils in place. The process, which electrically melts and dissolves soils and associated inorganic materials, simultaneously destroys and/or removes organic contaminants while incorporating inorganic contaminants into a stable, glass-like residual product. This Technical Baseline Description has been prepared to provide high level descriptions of the design of the Laboratory Test model, including all design modifications and safety improvements made to data. Furthermore, the Technical Baseline Description provides a basic overview of the interface documents for configuration management, program management interfaces, safety, quality, and security requirements. 8 figs.

Beard, K.V.; Bonnenberg, R.W.; Watson, L.R.

1991-09-01

226

Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

2006-11-01

227

Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document. 14 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Grossman, J.W.; Houser, R.M.; Erdman, W.W.

1991-01-01

228

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

229

42 CFR 493.807 - Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...laboratories performing nonwaived testing. 493.807 Section 493...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing § 493.807...

2012-10-01

230

49 CFR 40.81 - What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing? 40.81 Section 40.81 Transportation...Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.81 What...

2011-10-01

231

49 CFR 40.81 - What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing? 40.81 Section 40.81 Transportation...Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.81 What...

2012-10-01

232

Laboratory testing for bleeding disorders: strategic uses of high and low-yield tests.  

PubMed

Laboratory testing is essential for diagnosing bleeding disorders. The tests and panels that laboratories currently use for bleeding disorder evaluation are not standardized, although most offer coagulation screening tests in bleeding disorder panels. Some tests for bleeding disorders, including von Willebrand factor multimer assays and tests for rarer disorders, are not widely available. Accordingly, clinicians and laboratories need tailored strategies for evaluating common and rare bleeding disorders. Coagulation screening tests have high specificity, however, false positives and false negatives do occur among subjects evaluated for bleeding disorders and more specific tests (e.g., factor assays) are required to further assess abnormalities. Tests for defects in primary hemostasis have similar high specificity but much greater sensitivity for common bleeding disorders than coagulation screening tests. Nonetheless, extensive testing fails to establish a diagnosis in a significant number of individuals considered to have significant bleeding problems. Rare bleeding disorder investigations are important to diagnose some conditions, particularly those with delayed-onset bleeding, such as factor XIII deficiency, ?2 antiplasmin deficiency, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency, and Quebec platelet disorder. These issues need careful consideration when assessing patients for congenital and acquired bleeding problems. PMID:23480172

Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A

2013-03-11

233

42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; general supervisor. ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459...

2012-10-01

234

42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447...

2011-10-01

235

42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453...

2011-10-01

236

42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447...

2012-10-01

237

42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453...

2012-10-01

238

42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1409...

2011-10-01

239

42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1415...

2012-10-01

240

42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing high complexity testing; general supervisor. ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459...

2011-10-01

241

42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1409...

2012-10-01

242

42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ...Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1415...

2011-10-01

243

Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk moduli of the samples measured using this technique were consistent with those measured using more conventional methods. The second technique involved performing triaxial tests under lateral strain control. By limiting the lateral strain to zero by controlling the applied confining pressure while loading the specimen axially in compression, one can maintain a right-circular cylindrical geometry even under large deformations. This technique is preferred over standard triaxial testing methods which result in inhomogeneous deformation or "barreling". Manifestations of the inhomogeneous deformation included non-uniform stress states, as well as unrealistic Poisson's ratios (> 0.5) or those that vary significantly along the length of the specimen. Zero lateral strain controlled tests yield a more uniform stress state, and admissible and uniform values of Poisson's ratio. Hansen, F.D., Knowles, M.K., et al. 1997. Description and Evaluation of a Mechanistically Based Conceptual Model for Spall. SAND97-1369. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

2011-12-01

244

Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments  

SciTech Connect

This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

1991-01-01

245

Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This report contains Appendix B which provides all of the laboratory summary data sheets for the Area 6 SCEPs closure activities.

NONE

1997-11-01

246

Optimum alternative to EMC open area test site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The open area test site (OATS) for EMC is an open test space, the ground of which is the conductive plane without any surrounding shelter around. It is an essential test used as a standard. However, with the space electromagnetic (EM) frequency spectrum being widely used, the use of OATS is becoming more and more restricted so that it has

Yu Huachang

1998-01-01

247

Hydrological conditions at the 317\\/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317\\/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for

T. L. Patton; R. H. Pearl; S. Y. Tsai

1990-01-01

248

Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for

Sean B. French; Rob Shuman

2012-01-01

249

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...concrete, water quality and hydraulic laboratories, and to the...which derives its principal support from Federal funds in the...DAEN-CWE-DC. (2) Hydraulic laboratories. Division...District Engineers operating hydraulic laboratories or...

2013-07-01

250

An aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological gamma survey was conducted over the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1 through 6 June 1989. Flight lines at 150-foot altitude and 250-foot line spacings assured nearly 100% coverage. The terrestrial exposure at about 6 {mu}R/h was nearly the same as that measured by the previous survey of this area (May 1977). Ten anomalous areas, mostly Na-22 and Mn-54, were detected within buildings and laboratories in the area. Although these locations have changed somewhat from the 1977 survey, the aerial data shows good agreement with the ground-based ion chamber and soil sample data. 7 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-11-01

251

Coal-water-slurry evaluation. Volume 2. Laboratory and combustion test results. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the second of three volumes describing a multi-phase coal-water slurry (CWS) test program. This volume presents the results of laboratory, atomization, and combustion tests which were performed on six slurries and their parent coals. The objectives of these tests was to establish laboratory test procedures for evaluating CWS fuels, to investigate relationships between laboratory properties and CWS combustion

R. D. Daley; G. A. Farthing; S. J. Vecci

1984-01-01

252

Environmental assessment for the depleted uranium testing program at the Nevada Test Site by the United States Army Ballistics Research Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This proposed action provides the Department of Energy (DOE) authorization to the US Army to conduct a testing program using Depleted Uranium (DU) in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL) would be the manag...

1992-01-01

253

14 CFR 91.305 - Flight test areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL...person may flight test an aircraft except over open water, or sparsely populated areas, having light air...

2013-01-01

254

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

255

Portable nondestructive testing and dynamic test diagnostics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the most complete NDT facilities worldwide. In addition to many fixed pieces of equipment, the Laboratory has a very wide range of NDT and dynamic test diagnostic equipment that can be taken to the job site. Most of the equipment described here was procured for a specific purpose to support a program consistent with the nuclear weapons mission of Los Alamos. However, through the years, the equipment has found use in many other applications both within and external to weapons research, development, and testing. Various combinations of these equipments form unique capabilities, as demonstrated by the applications. The portable equipment is mainly applied to problems where the process or object under study cannot be brought into an NDT laboratory.

Fry, D.A.; Brooks, G.H.; Bryant, L.E.; Guerrero, A.; Valdez, J.E.

1994-11-01

256

Experiences in building an open area test site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses experience gained from the construction of an open-area test site (OATS) in an urban area with high ambient radiofrequency wave levels. It is shown that a high-quality site (as determined by site attenuation measurements) can be achieved by adhering to basic design practices and using conservative design practices when uncertain. The design approach taken to minimize site

F. Tarico

1989-01-01

257

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

258

Changing trends in laboratory testing in the United States: a personal, historical perspective.  

PubMed

This article reflects on my nearly 40 years providing clinical and laboratory genetic services. It reviews the evolution of laboratory and genetic testing from their grant-supported academic research to current complexities. Changes in the economic and academic landscape parallel technological innovations in laboratory testing. My career trajectory parallels the newer trend of genetic testing. I began in academics, working as a student and postdoctoral fellow in academic laboratories that also provided clinical testing services. Next came time in a small molecular laboratory performing diagnosis and testing services. My current position is with a national commercial laboratory company. PMID:23078665

Strom, Charles M

2012-12-01

259

Laboratory tests of IEC DER object models for grid applications.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (SRP) and Sandia National Laboratories to jointly develop advanced methods of controlling distributed energy resources (DERs) that may be located within SRP distribution systems. The controls must provide a standardized interface to allow plug-and-play capability and should allow utilities to take advantage of advanced capabilities of DERs to provide a value beyond offsetting load power. To do this, Sandia and SRP field-tested the IEC 61850-7-420 DER object model (OM) in a grid environment, with the goal of validating whether the model is robust enough to be used in common utility applications. The diesel generator OM tested was successfully used to accomplish basic genset control and monitoring. However, as presently constituted it does not enable plug-and-play functionality. Suggestions are made of aspects of the standard that need further development and testing. These problems are far from insurmountable and do not imply anything fundamentally unsound or unworkable in the standard.

Blevins, John D. (PE Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ); Menicucci, David F.; Byrd, Thomas, Jr. (,; .); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ginn, Jerry W.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan (Primecore, Inc.)

2007-02-01

260

Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 microPa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft x 24.6 ft x 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. The design goals and constraints of the facility are discussed. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers.

Rogers, Jonathan D.; Hendrick, David M.

261

The Boulby Geoscience Project Underground Research Laboratory: Initial Results of a Rock Mechanics Laboratory Testing Programme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Boulby Mine, which is situated on the northeast coast of England, is a major source of potash, primarily for use as a fertiliser, with a secondary product of rock salt (halite), used in highway deicing. The deposits are part of the Zechstein formation and are found at depths of between c.1100 and 1135 m below sea level. The evaporite sequence also contains a range of further lithologies, including anhydrite, dolomite and a mixed evaporate deposit. From a scientific perspective the dry, uncontaminated nature of the deposits, the range of lithologies present and the high stress conditions at the mine provide a unique opportunity to observe rock deformation in situ in varying geological and stress environments. To this end the Boulby Geoscience Project was established to examine the feasibility of developing an underground research laboratory at the mine. Information regarding the mechanical properties of the strata at the Boulby Mine is required to develop our understanding of the strength and deformation behaviour of the rock over differing timescales in response to variations in the magnitude and duration of applied stresses. As such data are currently limited, we have developed a laboratory testing programme that examines the behaviour of the deposits during the application of differential compressive stresses. We present the initial results of this testing programme here. Experiments have been carried out using a high pressure Virtual Infinite Strain (VIS) triaxial apparatus (250 kN maximum axial load; 64 MPa maximum cell pressure) manufactured by GDS Instruments. Conventional compression tests under uniaxial and triaxial conditions have been undertaken to determine the effects of axial stress application rate, axial strain rate and confining pressure on behaviour and failure mechanisms. The experimental programme also includes advanced testing into time-dependent creep behaviour under constant deviatoric stress; the effects of variations in temperature and stress path loading on peak shear strength and deformation behaviour; and the effects of low frequency cyclic loading on evolution of material properties. We compare the results of the testing programme with similar published data on evaporite rocks and existing models of material deformation and briefly discuss the implications for the design of sub-surface excavations.

Brain, M. J.; Petley, D. N.; Rosser, N.; Lim, M.; Sapsford, M.; Barlow, J.; Norman, E.; Williams, A.; Pybus, D.

2009-12-01

262

Passive test cell data for the solar laboratory, Winter 1980-81  

SciTech Connect

Testing was done during the 1980-81 winter in 400 ft/sup 3/ test cells at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Solar Lab. This testing was done primarily to determine the relative efficiency of various passive solar heating concepts and to obtain data that could be used to validate computer simulation programs. The passive solar systems tested were Trombe wall with and without selective absorber, water wall, phase-change wall, direct gain, a heat-pipe collector, and two sunspace geometries. The heating load coefficient of these cells was roughly 26 Btu/h /sup 0/F and the collector area was 23.4 ft/sup 2/, giving a load collector ratio of approximately 27 Btu//sup 0/F day ft/sup 2/. The test cell configurations and instrumentation are detailed herein, and the resulting data and cell efficiencies are discussed.

McFarland, R.D.

1982-05-01

263

78 FR 60898 - Regulation on Definition and Requirements for a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Requirements of a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory. In addition to extending...Agency proposes to include optional standardized forms to facilitate and simplify...Requirements of a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (29 CFR...

2013-10-02

264

Asphalt durability: From laboratory test to field implementation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how data from field trials, which were originally laid to validate the Australian Road Research Board asphalt durability test, were used to develop a field hardening model for the asphalt binder in sprayed seals. The work has been previously reported, and only sufficient information is given here to permit developments in the use of the model to be followed. A second model, which allows prediction of the asphalt viscosity level associated with seal distress in different climatic regions, is put forward in this paper. By using the two models it is possible to make predictions concerning seal life in different areas of a country.

Oliver, J.W.H. (Australian Road Research Board, Nunawading (Australia))

1990-07-01

265

Underground Test Area Subproject Project Management Plan, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the manner in which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) will manage the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It provides the basic guidance for implementation and the organizational structure for meeting the UGTA objectives.

NONE

1998-06-03

266

Well and aquifer evaluation test in 200-E Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

A well to provide an emergency source of condenser cooling water was ; drilled in the 200 East Area north of the 241-A tank farm at plant coordinates N-; 42370, W-47350. A flow of 100 gpm was specified. The criteria for site ; selection, the pumping tests, and the pumping test results are discussed. (CH)

J. R. Raymond; V. L. McGhan

1960-01-01

267

A report on methods to reduce, refine and replace animal testing in industrial toxicology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Committee to Promote Principles of Reduction, Refinement and Replacement of Animal Testing in Industrial Toxicology Laboratories was established in 1987 to work toward industrywide improvements in laboratory animal testing methods. The committee's goals are to gather information about effective nonanimal testing techniques and other methods of conserving and improving the care of laboratory animals, to work toward the systematic

Myron A. Mehlman; Emil A. Pfitzer; Robert A. Scala

1989-01-01

268

75 FR 34463 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Request for Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Request for...Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' The purpose of the public...oversight of laboratory developed tests (LDTs). FDA is seeking input...301-840-0200 or refer to the meeting web page at...

2010-06-17

269

Laboratory-scale testing of non-consumable anode materials: Inert Electrodes Program  

SciTech Connect

Development of inert anode materials for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum is one of the major goals of the Inert Electrodes Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objectives of the Materials Development and Testing Task include the selection, fabrication, and evaluation of candidate non-consumable anode materials. Research performed in FY 1987 focused primarily on the development and evaluation of cermets that are based on the two-phase oxide system NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and contain a third, electrically conductive metal phase composed primarily of copper and nickel. The efforts of this task were focused on three areas: materials fabrication, small-scale materials testing, and laboratory-scale testing. This report summarizes the development and testing results of the laboratory-scale testing effort during FY 1987. The laboratory-scale electrolysis testing effort was instrumental in partially determining electrolysis cell operating parameters. Although not optimized, NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4//endash/Cu-based cermets were successfully operated for 20 h in cryolite-based electrolytes ranging in bath ratios from 1.1 to 1.35, in electrolytes that contained 1.5 wt % LiF, and at conditions slightly less than Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ saturation. The operating conditions that lead to anode degradation have been partly identified, and rudimentary control methods have been developed to ensure proper operation of small electrolysis cells using nonconsumable anodes. 11 figs., 1 tab.

Marschman, S.C.

1989-03-01

270

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31

271

New facility design and work method for the quantitative fit testing laboratory. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) tests the quantitative fit of masks which are worn by military personnel during nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare. Subjects are placed in a Dynatech-Frontier Fit Testing Chamber, salt air is fed into the chamber, and samples of air are drawn from the mask and the chamber. The ratio of salt air outside the mask to salt air inside the mask is called the quantitative fit factor. A motion-time study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the layout and work method presently used in the laboratory. A link analysis was done to determine equipment priorities, and the link data and design guidelines were used to develop three proposed laboratory designs. The proposals were evaluated by projecting the time and motion efficiency, and the energy expended working in each design. Also evaluated were the lengths of the equipment links for each proposal, and each proposal's adherence to design guidelines. A mock-up was built of the best design proposal, and a second motion-time study was run. Results showed that with the new laboratory and work procedures, the USAFSAM analyst could test 116 more subjects per year than are currently tested. Finally, the results of a questionnaire given to the analyst indicated that user acceptance of the work area improved with the new design.

Ward, G.F.

1989-05-01

272

Development of a particulate control cyclocentrifuge. Phase II: laboratory tests. Test plan  

SciTech Connect

A study recently completed as Phase I effort predicts that a device combining the principles of a centrifuge with a cyclone, termed the CYCLOCENTRIFUGE, can provide a sufficient degree of gas-cleanup at high temperature and pressure to meet the most stringent particle-removal specifications for a very difficult application - the cleanup of gas turbine fuels. The objective of the present phase of this contract, Phase II, was to construct and test a Cyclocentrifuge laboratory model for the purpose of verifying the analytical predictions made in Phase I. Because of budget and schedule limitations, only one laboratory Cyclocentrifuge unit was manufactured. Based on design study reviews, the requirement for unquestionable mechanical integrity was given priority over the desire to achieve a design which would incorporate means for adjusting the orientation and location of key aerodynamic components. This resulted in a manufacturing process whereby the swirl augmentation rotor was machined from a forging and welded to rigid support hubs. For the laboratory model, this manufacturing approach was found also to be the lowest cost procedure. Although the selected manufacturing approach eliminates uncertainties with respect to component alignment, potential loose parts, and joint stresses, use of this design in a test program will not determine the optimum Cyclocentrifuge design parameters. However, the prime Phase II test objective - which is to prove the Cyclocentrifuge separation principle - will be achieved by the test plan outlined below.

Albrecht, P.R.

1978-07-07

273

Development of a novel SCADA system for laboratory testing.  

PubMed

This document summarizes the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system that allows communication with, and controlling the output of, various I/O devices in the renewable energy systems and components test facility RESLab. This SCADA system differs from traditional SCADA systems in that it supports a continuously changing operating environment depending on the test to be performed. The SCADA System is based on the concept of having one Master I/O Server and multiple client computer systems. This paper describes the main features and advantages of this dynamic SCADA system, the connections of various field devices to the master I/O server, the device servers, and numerous software features used in the system. The system is based on the graphical programming language "LabVIEW" and its "Datalogging and Supervisory Control" (DSC) module. The DSC module supports a real-time database called the "tag engine," which performs the I/O operations with all field devices attached to the master I/O server and communications with the other tag engines running on the client computers connected via a local area network. Generic and detailed communication block diagrams illustrating the hierarchical structure of this SCADA system are presented. The flow diagram outlining a complete test performed using this system in one of its standard configurations is described. PMID:15272800

Patel, M; Cole, G R; Pryor, T L; Wilmot, N A

2004-07-01

274

Mycobacteria: laboratory methods for testing drug sensitivity and resistance  

PubMed Central

In its seventh report, published in 1960, the WHO Expert Committee on Tuberculosis “noted the need for international standards for the definition and determination of drug resistance which will permit comparisons to be made from one area to another, and recommended that the World Health Organization take appropriate steps to establish such standards”.10 Acting on this recommendation, WHO took the first step towards standardization by convening in Geneva, in December 1961, an informal international meeting of specialists in the bacteriology of tuberculosis. At this meeting an attempt was made to formulate prerequisites for reliable sensitivity tests and to specify the technical procedures for them. The first part of the present paper is a joint contribution by the participants in the meeting, summarizing the general conclusions reached and recommendations made with regard to tests of sensitivity to the three main antituberculosis drugs—isoniazid, streptomycin and p-aminosalicylic acid. The other three parts describe, in turn, three different tests for determining drug sensitivity—the absolute-concentration method, the resistance-ratio method and the proportion method—that are generally considered to give reasonably accurate results.

Canetti, G.; Froman, S.; Grosset, J.; Hauduroy, P.; Langerova, Miloslava; Mahler, H. T.; Meissner, Gertrud; Mitchison, D. A.; Sula, L.

1963-01-01

275

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of a New Rapid Test for Detecting Wuchereria bancrofti Antigen in Human Blood  

PubMed Central

Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) guidelines call for using filarial antigen testing to identify endemic areas that require mass drug administration (MDA) and for post-MDA surveillance. We compared a new filarial antigen test (the Alere Filariasis Test Strip) with the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test that has been used by the GPELF for more than 10 years. Laboratory testing of 227 archived serum or plasma samples showed that the two tests had similar high rates of sensitivity and specificity and > 99% agreement. However, the test strip detected 26.5% more people with filarial antigenemia (124/503 versus 98/503) and had better test result stability than the card test in a field study conducted in a filariasis-endemic area in Liberia. Based on its increased sensitivity and other practical advantages, we believe that the test strip represents a major step forward that will be welcomed by the GPELF and the filariasis research community.

Weil, Gary J.; Curtis, Kurt C.; Fakoli, Lawrence; Fischer, Kerstin; Gankpala, Lincoln; Lammie, Patrick J.; Majewski, Andrew C.; Pelletreau, Sonia; Won, Kimberly Y.; Bolay, Fatorma K.; Fischer, Peter U.

2013-01-01

276

Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The

W. R. Hackett; R. P. Smith

1994-01-01

277

Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

Morrey, E.V.

1996-03-01

278

SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

2011-06-09

279

Automated radiofrequency electromagnetic interference testing of apnea monitors using an open area test site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical devices that electronically sense physiological functions may be affected by external radiofrequency (RF) radiation from sources such as television and radio stations. When RF disrupts normal device function, it is referred to as electromagnetic interference (EMI). The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) has been testing infant apnea monitors for susceptibility to EMI. Laboratory testing and user site

Paul S. Ruggera; Eugene R. O'Bryan; Jon P. Casamento

1992-01-01

280

Accuracy and Reproducibility of Blood Lead Testing in Commercial Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Design: We submitted masked duplicate blood lead specimens to 8 masked laboratories. Each laboratory re- ceived blood aliquots immediately following drawing (time 1) and 2 weeks later (time 2) from 7 human sub- jects and 3 bovine blood samples with known lead lev- els of 0.26, 0.57, and 0.79 µmol\\/L (5.4, 11.8, and 16.4 µg\\/dL). Of the 8 laboratories, 5

Nishith K. Jobanputra; Robert Jones; Gail Buckler; Ronald P. Cody; Michael Gochfeld; Thomas M. Matte; David Q. Rich; George G. Rhoads

1998-01-01

281

Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to

R. R. Lee; A. H. Curtis; L. M. Houlberg; S. T. Purucker; M. L. Singer; M. F. Tardiff; D. A. Wolf

1994-01-01

282

Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 2, In vitro samples  

SciTech Connect

Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of in vitro test samples (artificial urine and fecal matter) for indirect bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

1988-11-01

283

REMOTE LABORATORY FOR FPGA BASED RECONFIGURABLE SYSTEMS TESTING  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a remote laboratory system that allows performing experiments controlled across the Internet via web interface as well as locally in the classroom. The system has been developed for courses of advanced digital design and signal processing using complex Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platforms. It allows students full access to laboratory equipments, advanced software licenses, and FPGA

Ján Šaliga; Linus Michaeli; Ingrid Hroncová

2009-01-01

284

Acoustic testing and modeling: an advanced undergraduate laboratory.  

PubMed

This paper describes an advanced laboratory course in acoustics, specifically targeted for students with an interest in engineering applications at a school with a strongly integrated industrial co-op program. The laboratory course is developed around a three-pronged approach to problem solving that combines and integrates theoretical models, computational models, and experimental data. The course is structured around modules that begin with fundamental concepts and build laboratory skills and expand the knowledge base toward a final project. Students keep a detailed laboratory notebook, write research papers in teams, and must pass laboratory certification exams. This paper describes the course layout and philosophy and shares personal experience from both faculty and student perspectives. PMID:22423802

Russell, Daniel A; Ludwigsen, Daniel O

2012-03-01

285

Multiscale Atmospheric Simulations Over Urban Areas: Testing WRF Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of our study is to simulate realistic flows over specific sites in the NYC metropolitan area. This requires accurate atmospheric simulations at scales ranging from the mesoscales to the small turbulent scales. The meteorological Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model has been extensively tested as a mesoscale simulation tool; however, only limited results have been reported on its performance

C. Talbot; E. Bou-Zeid

2008-01-01

286

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS

D. Markley

1991-01-01

287

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01

288

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tests - 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and supports the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 3 LLNL test locations in areas 2 and 12: Kennebec in U2af, Cumberland in U2e, and Yuba in U12b.10.

Pawloski, G A

2011-02-28

289

Independent detector testing laboratory and the NGST detector characterization project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) has been established by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and it will assist the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors. The NGST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. NGST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z ~10-20). To achieve this goal, the NGST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype NGST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the NGST program within the 0.6-5 ?m bandpass and in an ultra-low background (<0.01 e-/s/pixel) environment. We describe the NGST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the IDTL. In this project, we will measure first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

Figer, Donald F.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Regan, Michael W.; Balleza, Jesus C.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bergeron, Louis E.; Greene, Gretchen R.; Kim, Sungsoo; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Morse, Ernie; Pelton, Russell; Reeves, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Stemniski, P.; Stockman, Hervey S.; Telewicz, M.

2003-03-01

290

The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory and the JWST Detector Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z ~10-20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6-5 ? m bandpass and in an ultra-low background (<0.01 e-/s/pixel) environment. We describe the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the IDTL. In this project, we will measure first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

Figer, D. F.; Rauscher, B. J.; Regan, M. W.; Balleza, J.; Barkhouser, R.; Bergeron, L.; Greene, G. R.; McCandliss, S. R.; Morse, E.; Reeves, T.; Stockman, H. S.

2002-12-01

291

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories  

Cancer.gov

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories Amie M. Deffenbaugh, BS, Lynn Anne Burbidge, BS, Julia Reid, MStat, Walter W. Noll, MD Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT

292

Laboratory testing during critical care transport: point-of-care testing in air ambulances.  

PubMed

Air and ground transport are used for prehospital transport of patients in acute life-threatening situations, and increasingly, critically ill patients undergo interhospital transportation. Results from clinical studies suggest that critical tests performed during the transport of critically ill patients presents a potential opportunity to improve patient care. Our project was to identify, according to the recommendations published at this time, a model of point-of-care testing (POCT) (arterial blood gases analysis and glucose, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, hematocrit/hemoglobin measurements) in air ambulances. In order to identify the key internal and external factors that are important to achieving our objective, an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis) was incorporated into our planning model prior to starting the project. To allow the entire POCT process (pre-, intra-, and post-analytic steps) to be under the control of the reference laboratory, an experimental model of information technology was applied. Real-time results during transport of critically ill patients must be considered to be an integral part of the patient care process and excellent channels of communication are needed between the intensive care units, emergency medical services and laboratories. With technological and computer advances, POCT during critical care transport will certainly increase in the future: this will be a challenge from a laboratory and clinical context. PMID:20406127

Di Serio, Francesca; Petronelli, Maria Antonia; Sammartino, Eugenio

2010-07-01

293

23 CFR 637.209 - Laboratory and sampling and testing personnel qualifications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION AND APPROVAL Quality Assurance Procedures for Construction § 637.209 Laboratory and sampling...same project: Verification testing, quality control testing, IA testing,...

2013-04-01

294

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...designated by testing facility management...Registration Rule or a testing facility, if it...under laboratory conditions to determine or...in humans, other living organisms, or media...system means any animal, microorganism...reference substance. Testing facility...

2010-07-01

295

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...designated by testing facility management...Registration Rule or a testing facility, if it...under laboratory conditions to determine or...in humans, other living organisms, or media...system means any animal, microorganism...reference substance. Testing facility...

2009-07-01

296

49 CFR 40.89 - What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...40.89 What is validity testing, and are laboratories required... (a) Specimen validity testing is the evaluation of the specimen...it is consistent with normal human urine. The purpose of validity testing is to determine whether...

2012-10-01

297

42 CFR 493.1361 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...performing PPM procedures; testing personnel. 493.1361 ...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...performing PPM procedures; testing personnel. The...

2012-10-01

298

42 CFR 493.1361 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...performing PPM procedures; testing personnel. 493.1361 ...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS...REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...performing PPM procedures; testing personnel. The...

2011-10-01

299

Testing of the Semikron Validation AIPM Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- October 2004  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the electrical tests performed on the Semikron high-voltage automotive integrated power module (AIPM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Testing was performed in the 100-hp dynamometer test cell at the National Transportation Research Center.

Nelson, S.C.

2004-11-12

300

The Laboratory Diagnosis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Emerging Laboratory Tests for an Emerging Pathogen  

PubMed Central

The 2003 pandemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) profiled the ability of modern diagnostic microbiology and molecular biology to identify, isolate and characterize, within weeks, a previously unknown viral infectious pathogen. The culprit, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was detected in patient specimens by traditional cell culture using an unusual cell line for respiratory viruses, Vero E6, and by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the polymerase 1 B region of the genome. In addition, serologic assays were rapidly developed, and the genome of this large virus was sequenced within one month of its spread to North America. At the present time, diagnostics have progressed to the point that RT-PCR has a sensitivity approaching 80% within the first few days of onset of illness, while serology has a sensitivity close to 100% on convalescent sera taken >21 days after illness onset. Viral culture remains a method confined to biosafety level III laboratories. The specificity of RT-PCR and serology remains to be conclusively defined, but in most studies to date seems to be >90%. Serologic cross-reactivity with human coronaviruses causing the common cold may be a problem with some serologic assays. The early development of SARS-CoV diagnostics is now being replaced by refinement and optimization of these assays. Although at the present time we do not have a test that will definitively rule in or rule out SARS at the time of initial presentation of a patient with a respiratory infection, modifications of existing assays will hopefully result in our ability to make this diagnosis with a high degree of accuracy in the future.

Richardson, Susan E.; Tellier, Raymond; Mahony, James

2004-01-01

301

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01

302

Public Health Laboratory Testing to Detect and Report Biological Threats.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To assess the extent to which State public health laboratories have made progress toward the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) requirements intended to decrease the time needed to detect and report biological public health threats. Since 2...

2008-01-01

303

Stone Preservatives: Methods of Laboratory Testing and Preliminary Performance Criteria.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although numerous materials have been proposed as preservatives for stone in historic buildings and monuments, their efficacy is difficult to establish. A laboratory research program of accelerated simulated stone decay was used to obtain data on stone pr...

G. A. Sleater

1977-01-01

304

Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1994-04-01

305

Performance of European laboratories testing serum samples for Toxoplasma gondii  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred twenty-nine European laboratories participated in a collaborative, multicentre study designed to evaluate the overall reliability of different serological techniques for diagnosis ofToxoplasma gondii infection. Five freeze-dried reference sera were distributed to each laboratory, each of which analysed the sera with its routine methods. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was the technique used most frequently, followed by the immunofluorescent antibody

J. C. Petithory; I. Reiter-Owona; F. Berthelot; M. Milgram; J. De Loye; E. Petersen

1996-01-01

306

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2001  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2001 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2002-07-08

307

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2006  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2007-07-19

308

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2005  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the PNNL Radiological Control Program Description, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2005 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2006-06-21

309

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 2000  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM) in January 1993. This program is to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-2000 confirm that personnel dosimetry is not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

2001-07-05

310

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, Bruce Harley

2002-08-01

311

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, B.H.

2002-05-13

312

An aerial radiological survey of the Argonne National Laboratory and surrounding area, Argonne, Illinois  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period May 17 through May 26, 1989, over a 32-square-mile (83-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) facilities located near Argonne, Illinois. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with line spacings of 200 feet (61 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure

Hoover

1994-01-01

313

Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.  

SciTech Connect

The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-12

314

9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...is not limited to, review and copying of records, examination of slides, observation of the test being conducted, and interviewing of personnel. (b) A laboratory may request approval to conduct one or more types of scrapie test or genotype...

2013-01-01

315

Development of a Laboratory Test for Multiport Fuel Injector Deposits - Evaluation of the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test Apparatus (JFTOT).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the laboratory effort to develop a bench test suitable for screening gasolines to determine their potential for forming deposits in automotive port fuel injectors. The test selected for this work was the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Te...

H. O. Strange

1987-01-01

316

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section... § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame resistance of conveyor belts are...

2013-07-01

317

King County Metro Transit: Allison Hybrid Electric Transit Bus Laboratory Testing  

SciTech Connect

Paper summarizes chassis dynamometer testing of two 60-foot articulated transit buses, one conventional and one hybrid, at NREL's ReFUEL Laboratory. It includes experimental setup, test procedures, and results from vehicle testing performed at the NREL ReFUEL laboratory.

Hayes, R. R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-09-01

318

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01

319

Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

Yvonne Townsend

2000-05-01

320

Sandia National Laboratories Electrochemical Storage System Abuse Test Procedure Manual  

SciTech Connect

The series of tests described in this report are intended to simulate actual use and abuse conditions and internally initiated failures that may be experienced in electrochemical storage systems (ECSS). These tests were derived from Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, user input, and historical abuse testing. The tests are to provide a common framework for various ECSS technologies. The primary purpose of testing is to gather response information to external/internal inputs. Some tests and/or measurements may not be required for some ECSS technologies and designs if it is demonstrated that a test is not applicable, and the measurements yield no useful information.

Unkelhaeuser, Terry; Smallwood David

1999-07-01

321

L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application  

SciTech Connect

The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

Wood, D.C.

2001-06-26

322

Numerical Modeling of Surfactant-Induced Flow During Laboratory Measurement of Air-Water Interfacial Area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An understanding of the relationship between air-water interfacial area (AI) and moisture saturation (SW) is necessary for the accurate prediction of the subsurface transport of solutes that partition to the interface or are readily transferred across the interface. Interfacial areas are commonly measured in a laboratory soil column using the aqueous interfacial-partitioning tracer methodology (IPT), in which AI is calculated based on the ratio of travel times of interfacial and non-reactive tracers. IPTs are conducted in uniformly-wetted soil columns and therefore, allow the determination of AI at a particular value of SW. The interfacial tracers used are typically surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), which are reversibly retained the air-water interface. At the SDBS concentrations often used, the aqueous surface tension of the interfacial tracer solution is approximately 30% lower than that of the non-reactive tracer solution. Because capillary pressure gradients caused by surfactant-induced surface tension gradients can induce unsaturated flow, we used numerical modeling to examine the potential for perturbations in unsaturated flow, and thus non-uniform distributions in SW, to occur during IPT tests. We used HYDRUS 1D, modified to include concentration-dependent surfactant effects on capillary pressure, in order to simulate a typical IPT experimental configuration in which SDBS was the interfacial tracer. Linear partitioning of the tracer to the air-water interface and sorption to the solid were included as SDBS retention mechanisms. The simulation results indicated that the surface tension changes caused by SDBS were sufficient to induce significant transient unsaturated flow, which was manifested as localized drainage and wetting as the SDBS passed through the column. Average SW in the column subsequently rebounded and reached a new steady-state flow condition once SDBS had displaced resident tracer-free water. The average SW at the final steady state was lower than the original SW and was a function of the hydraulic characteristics of the porous medium, hysteretic effects, and the experimental boundary conditions. Because AI values vary with SW, these simulations suggest that surfactant-induced surface tension gradients and transient flow may introduce considerable uncertainty in AI-SW relationships measured by IPT.

Henry, E. J.; Costanza-Robinson, M. S.

2010-12-01

323

Syphilis serology testing: a comparative study of Abbot Determine, Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) card test and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) methods.  

PubMed

Blood from 2100 women attending the antenatal clinic of the Port Moresby General Hospital (PMGH) and the 9 Mile urban clinic of Port Moresby was tested for syphili using the laboratory-based Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) syphilis serology test and two clinic-based syphilis tests, Abbot Determine and Abbot Syfacard-RR (Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) card test). The Abbot Determine and the Syfacard-R tests were compared with the VDRL test, the gold standard in this study. The validation test results of Determine versus VDRL were as follows: sensitivity 92.0%; specificity 94.6%; the predictive value of a positive test 42.6%; and the predictive value of a negative test 99.6%. The validation tests for RPR versus VDRL were as follows: sensitivity 56.3% specificity 96.5%; predictive value of a positive test 41.2%; and the predictive value of a negative test 98.1%. The RPR test costs 3.5 kina (about one US dollar) a test, the VDRL less than 1 kina a test whilst the Determine test kit costs about 5 kina a test. When laboratory time, salaries and other supplies are costed the Determine test is expected to cost relatively much less. Our recommendation is that the Determine test be made available in areas of the country where VDRL is unavailable or where logistics do not allow for test results to be available early enough to make a difference to the care of th pregnant woman and her fetus. PMID:17212063

Angue, Yakep; Yauieb, Appolonia; Mola, Glen; Duke, Trevor; Amoa, A B

324

Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

325

Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1997  

SciTech Connect

In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a) (1)--(3) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually, and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years (CY) 1993--1996 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 93 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during CY 1997. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusions that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas.

Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1998-07-01

326

Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1998  

SciTech Connect

In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1997 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 97 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1998. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas.

SR Bivins; GA Stoetzel

1999-06-17

327

NNWSI waste from testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Semiannual report, July-December 1985  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste forms under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include (1) the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and (2) the performance of tests designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1984. This report summarizes progress in 1985. Reports will be issued semi-annually hereafter.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.

1986-03-01

328

The Rapid Plasma Reagin Test Cannot Replace the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Neurosyphilis Diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Background The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test is a mainstay for neurosyphilis diagnosis, but it lacks diagnostic sensitivity and is logistically complicated. The Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) test is easier to perform, but its appropriateness for use on CSF is controversial. Methods RPR reactivity was determined for CSF from 149 individuals with syphilis using two methods. The CSF-RPR was performed according to the method for serum. The CSF RPR-V was performed using the method recommended for the CSF-VDRL. Laboratory defined neurosyphilis included reactive CSF-Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption test and CSF white blood cells > 20/ul. Symptomatic neurosyphilis was defined as vision loss or hearing loss. Results CSF-VDRL was reactive in 45 (30.2%) patients. Of these, 29 (64.4%) were CSF-RPR reactive and 37 (82.2%) were CSF-RPR-V reactive. There were no instances where the CSF VDRL was nonreactive but the CSF-RPR or CSF-RPR-V was reactive. Among the 28 samples that were reactive in all three tests, CSF-VDRL titers (median [IQR], 1:4 [1:4-1:16]) were significantly higher than CSF-RPR (1:2 [1:1-1:4], p=0.0002) and CSF-RPR-V titers (1:4 [1:2-60 1:8], p=0.01). The CSF RPR and the CSF-RPR-V tests had lower sensitivities than the CSF VDRL: 56.4% and 59.0% vs. 71.8% for laboratory-diagnosed neurosyphilis and 51.5% and 57.6% vs. 66.7% for symptomatic neurosyphilis. Conclusions Compared to the CSF-VDRL, the CSF-RPR has a high false-negative rate, thus not improving upon this known limitation of the CSF-VDRL for neurosyphilis diagnosis. Adapting the RPR procedure to mimic the CSF-VDRL decreased, but did not eliminate, the number of false negatives, and did not avoid all the logistical complications of the CSF VDRL.

Marra, Christina M.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Maxwell, Clare L.; Ho, Emily L.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Jones, Trudy

2012-01-01

329

A Comparison of Laboratory Tests in the Malabsorption Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Absorption of radioiodinated triolein was tested in 93 individuals (15 controls, 28 cases of functional diarrhea, and 50 patients with suspected or manifest malabsorption syndrome). The results so obtained were compared in 59 cases with estimations of fecal radioactivity and chemically determined fecalfat excretion. A highly significant correlation was found. The urinary xylose excretion test was performed in 96 individuals. The diagnostic value of the radioactive fat absorption test was compared with that of the xylose excretion test in 78 cases. Both tests were diagnostic in cases of non-tropical sprue, but the xylose excretion test reflected the clinical improvement more accurately in treated cases. The radioactive fat absorption test was more reliable in the diagnosis of malabsorption secondary to bowel resection than was the xylose excretion test, but the converse was true in the diagnosis of malabsorption secondary to gastrectomy. The simultaneous use of these two tests was found to be a simple and reliable screening procedure.

Hetenyi, Caroline; O'Sullivan, Paul M.

1964-01-01

330

Laboratory thermal transient tests on irradiated mixed oxide fuel. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of laboratory thermal transient experiments have been performed on mixed oxide fuel pin sections preirradiated at medium power to mid-range burnup, to determine the mechanisms of fission gas release. Heating rate and maximum temperature were varied and the resultant effect on the gas release, microstructure and gas bubble distribution were determined.

O. D. Slagle; C. A. Hinman; E. T. Weber

1976-01-01

331

Laboratory characterization tests for antimisting fuel. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments have shown that FM-9 antimisting fuel had the potential for precluding the fine mist and associated fireball generation in aircraft post-crash situations while allowing for the restoration of the filtration and antomizing characteristics required for aircraft operation. The Federal Aviation Administration, the Aircraft Establishment, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, and Pratt

1987-01-01

332

Laboratory testing of displacement and load induced fretting  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptually new simulation system for the laboratory investigation of fretting wear is described. Fretting vibrations are generated either directly by oscillating a linear relative displacement device of constant stroke between the contacting bodies or indirectly by oscillating the applied contact load resulting in a cyclic radial expansion of the contact zone. The principles of both actuation mechanisms are outlined

H. Mohrbacher; J.-P. Celis; J. R. Roos

1995-01-01

333

Area monitoring dosimeter program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1995  

SciTech Connect

In January 1993, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established an are monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The purpose of the program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with the RCM, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to (1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and (2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program.

Bivins, S.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1996-05-01

334

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

SciTech Connect

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01

335

Field tests of the surface area modulation downhole telemetry system  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests of the surface area modulation (SAM) downhole wireless telemetry system were performed at the DOE Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming in November, 1995 and September, 1996. SAM telemetry involves the introduction of a gap of electrically insulating material in the tubular conductors in the well. The electrical resistance of a switch in this gap can then be modulated to alter the electrical characteristics of a circuit involving the well tubulars. These changes affect the current in the circuit, which is monitored with a surface ammeter. Downhole data are encoded and transmitted to the surface as a pattern of current oscillations. The tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the system to transmit information from depths exceeding 2,000 feet to the surface at up to 2,400 baud.

Keefe, R.G.; Ballard, S.

1997-09-01

336

An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-09-07

337

FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

HERTING DL

2007-11-29

338

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered

T. L. Ashwood; G. W. II Suter; A. J. Stewart

1992-01-01

339

Hanford 100N Area Apatite Emplacement: Laboratory Results of Ca-Citrate-PO4 Solution Injection and Sr-90 Immobilization in 100N Sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes laboratory-scale studies investigating the remediation of Sr-90 by Ca-citrate-PO4 solution injection/infiltration to support field injection activities in the Hanford 100-N Area. This study is focused on experimentally testing wheth...

C. A. Burns D. C. Girvin J. F. Szecsody J. P. McKinley R. C. Moore

2007-01-01

340

Laboratory test tube centrifuge with longer working cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

of the All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry [2], eliminates these deficiencies and makes it possible to carry out continuous filtration in test tubes, by continuous supply of the original suspension into the filtering test tubes and continuous withdrawal of the filtrate. Continuous precipitation into test tubes with unbroken bottoms canalso be carried out with this centrifuge. Figure 1

Z. B. Kristall; I. V. Danilenko

1968-01-01

341

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...test area. (a) The area. The test area or âFoul Areaâ encompasses...The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the designated...least three miles. (2) Sonobuoy drop tests will normally be conducted at...

2013-07-01

342

100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.

Not Available

1993-08-01

343

9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests...17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests...sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed...00 161.00 165.00 Parasitology Test 29.00...

2010-01-01

344

9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests...17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests...sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed...00 161.00 165.00 Parasitology Test 29.00...

2009-01-01

345

9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL...other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL...performed at the Pathobiology Laboratory at NVSL (excluding FADDL...Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under...

2013-01-01

346

Role of Independent Laboratory in Italy: Present Situation and Future Trends in Electrical Equipment Test Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper examines the planning of independent laboratories for the testing of electrical equipment. In particular, electronic systems for electric power transmission are treated. Different types of tests are also discussed. With regard to the field of p...

L. Thione

1986-01-01

347

Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing  

EPA Science Inventory

While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

348

Spot Test Kits for Detecting Lead in Household Paint: A Laboratory Evaluation (Revised May 2000).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A laboratory study was conducted to determine the reliability of spot test kits for detecting the presence of lead in household paint when tests were conducted by certified lead inspectors of risk assessors. Reagent solutions were applied to paint specime...

W. J. Rossiter M. G. Vangel M. E. McKnight G. Dewalt

2000-01-01

349

Description of the MIT/Lincoln Laboratory Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document describes the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Lincoln Laboratory Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility and the mechanical and electrical interfaces for items to be tested. These interfaces include those for the solar array, batteries, inv...

S. B. Sacco

1979-01-01

350

20 CFR 416.919k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and other services. We may purchase medical examinations, including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function studies, electrocardiograms, and...

2013-04-01

351

20 CFR 404.1519k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and other services. We may purchase medical examinations, including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function studies, electrocardiograms, and...

2013-04-01

352

Laboratory Prototype of In situ Cyclic and Dynamic Geotechnical Testing System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents selected elements of a laboratory prototype of a new in situ geotechnical testing system. The testing system, currently under construction, is intended to provide improved measures of the in situ nonlinear shear stress-strain character...

R. Henke W. Henke

1987-01-01

353

Maintaining data quality in an environmental testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In today's competitive and highly litigious world, it is critical that any laboratory generating data for the environmental and allied industries have a world-class Quality Assurance Program. This Plan must conform to the requirements of every agency and client with whom the lab does business. The goal of such a program is data defensibility; i.e., data validity. Data (usually qualitative analyte [compound or element] identifications and quantitative numerical results) are the end results of nearly all analytical laboratory processes, and the source of revenue. Clients pay for results. The clients expect the results to be accurate, precise, and repeatable. If their data has to go to court, the laboratory will be called upon to defend the accuracy and precision of their work. Without a strong QA program, this will be impossible. The potential implications and repercussions of non-defensible lab data are far-reaching and very costly in terms of loss of future revenues and in legal judgments.

Cohen, Roy J.

2001-03-05

354

An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered by a previous survey in 1981. The results of the aerial survey show a background exposure rate which varies between 5 and 18 {mu}R/h plus an approximate 6 {mu}R/h contribution from cosmic rays. The major radioactive isotopes found in this survey were: potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228, which are all naturally-occurring isotopes, and cobalt-60, cesium-137, and excess amounts of thallium-208 and actinium-228, which are due to human actions in the survey area. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from this survey`s gamma ray measurements agree almost exactly with the exposure rates inferred from the 1981 survey. In addition to the aerial measurements, another survey team conducted in situ and soil sample radiation measurements at three sites within the survey perimeter. These ground-based measurements agree with the aerial measurements within {+-} 5%.

Riedhauser, S.R.

1994-06-01

355

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne meteorological measurements, ground and airborne radiation monitoring teams, and special briefings to the Test Controller's Advisory Panel. Test-related radioactivity

D. D. Smith; R. F. Grossman; W. D. Corkern; D. J. Thome; R. G. Patzer; J. L. Hopper

1981-01-01

356

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

357

Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Testing in R-Area  

SciTech Connect

Six constant-rate, multiple-well aquifer tests were recently conducted in R-area to provide site-specific in situ hydraulic parameters for assessing groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB) plume migration and RRSB remedial alternatives. The pumping tests were performed in the Upper Three Runs and Gordon aquifers between December 1999 and February 2000. The tests provide reliable estimates of horizontal conductivity averaged over aquifer thickness, and a relatively large horizontal zone of influence. To complement these results, Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter (EBF) testing was subsequently performed to determine the vertical variation of horizontal conductivity for RPC-2PR, RPC-3PW, RPT-2PW, RPT-3PW, RPT-4PW and RPT-30PZ. The EBF data generally indicate significant aquifer heterogeneity over the tested screen intervals (Figures 14, 16-18, 20, 22, 24, 26 and 27-31). The vertical variation of groundwater flow in or out of the well screen under ambient conditions was also measured (Figures 13, 15, 19, 21, 23 and 25). These data have implications for contaminant monitoring.

Flach, G.P.

2000-10-12

358

Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs.

Ellison, A.J.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-06-01

359

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section 14...PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal...

2009-07-01

360

30 CFR 14.21 - Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. 14.21 Section 14...PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.21 Laboratory-scale flame test apparatus. The principal...

2010-07-01

361

An ISO guide 25 certified testing laboratory for clinical engineering education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The establishment of a certified ISO Guide 25 testing laboratory for medical devices is an important corner stone for a better national medical device management system and practices of the assorted standards or guidelines. It can also contribute significantly to the educational program for clinical engineer. As a starting point, a medical electrical safety-testing laboratory according to the AAMIES-1 (1993)

Chii-Wann Lin; Po-Quang Chen; Chin-Te Chen; Chung-Ming Lu; Jia-Hung Chien; Chiu-Hung Yang; Chun-Kai Huang; Chang-Yi Wang; Yung-Zu Tseng; Hwa-Chang Liu

2000-01-01

362

Modeling temperature distribution and thermal property of asphalt concrete for laboratory testing applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Material characterization from laboratory tests on asphalt concrete or predictions of pavement performance are meaningful only if temperature of the material is well taken into account. This paper discusses an analytical model to predict the transient temperature distribution within asphalt concrete and to determine its thermal properties. The paper also presents the laboratory test program designed to validate the model.

Qinwu Xu; Mansour Solaimanian

2010-01-01

363

COMPARISON OF P-NITROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION IN FIELD AND LABORATORY TEST SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Acclimation of microbial communities exposed to p-nitrophenol (PNP) was measured in laboratory test systems and in a freshwater pond. Laboratory tests were conducted in shake flasks with water, shake flasks with water and sediment, eco-cores, and two sizes of microcosm. The sedim...

364

Quality Assurance: Are Laboratories Assuring, Assessing, or Assuming the Quality of Clinical Testing Today?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quality assurance implies making certain, guaranteeing the attainment of quality. Do laboratories actually guarantee the quality of testing services today? If not, what is the purpose of quality assurance plans, programs, and practices? Have laboratories even defined the quality to be achieved for each test? If not, how can quality be guaranteed? Do current efforts in assessing quality provide for

James O. Westgard

365

Quality assurance practices in Europe: a survey of molecular genetic testing laboratories.  

PubMed

In the 2000s, a number of initiatives were taken internationally to improve quality in genetic testing services. To contribute to and update the limited literature available related to this topic, we surveyed 910 human molecular genetic testing laboratories, of which 291 (32%) from 29 European countries responded. The majority of laboratories were in the public sector (81%), affiliated with a university hospital (60%). Only a minority of laboratories was accredited (23%), and 26% was certified. A total of 22% of laboratories did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) and 28% did not use reference materials (RMs). The main motivations given for accreditation were to improve laboratory profile (85%) and national recognition (84%). Nearly all respondents (95%) would prefer working in an accredited laboratory. In accredited laboratories, participation in EQA (P<0.0001), use of RMs (P=0.0014) and availability of continuous education (CE) on medical/scientific subjects (P=0.023), specific tasks (P=0.0018), and quality assurance (P<0.0001) were significantly higher than in non-accredited laboratories. Non-accredited laboratories expect higher restriction of development of new techniques (P=0.023) and improvement of work satisfaction (P=0.0002) than accredited laboratories. By using a quality implementation score (QIS), we showed that accredited laboratories (average score 92) comply better than certified laboratories (average score 69, P<0.001), and certified laboratories better than other laboratories (average score 44, P<0.001), with regard to the implementation of quality indicators. We conclude that quality practices vary widely in European genetic testing laboratories. This leads to a potentially dangerous situation in which the quality of genetic testing is not consistently assured. PMID:22739339

Berwouts, Sarah; Fanning, Katrina; Morris, Michael A; Barton, David E; Dequeker, Elisabeth

2012-06-27

366

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-01-01

367

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-09-01

368

Failure in laboratory fault models in triaxial tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of a fault in the Earth is a sand-filled saw cut in a granite cylinder subjected to a triaxial test. The saw cut is inclined at an angle a to the cylinder axis, and the sand filling is intended to represent gouge. The triaxial test subjects the granite cylinder to a constant confining pressure and increasing axial stress

J. C. Savage; D. A. Lockner; J. D. Byerlee

1996-01-01

369

Failure in laboratory fault models in triaxial tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of a fault in the Earth is a sand-filled saw cut in a granite cylinder subjected to a triaxial test. The saw cut is inclined at an angle alpha to the cylinder axis, and the sand filling is intended to represent gouge. The triaxial test subjects the granite cylinder to a constant confining pressure and increasing axial stress

J. C. Savage; D. A. Lockner; J. D. Byerlee

1996-01-01

370

Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

1984-01-01

371

Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

1984-01-01

372

Laboratory Tests of Gravitational Physics Using a Cryogenic Torsion Pendulum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress and plans are reported for a program of gravitational physics experiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large amplitude torsional oscillation. The program includes a UC Irvine project to measure the gravitational constant G and joint UC Irvine-U. Washington projects to test the gravitational inverse square law at a range of about 10 cm and to test the weak equivalence

E. C. Berg; M. K. Bantel; W. D. Cross; T. Inoue; R. D. Newman; J. H. Steffen; M. W. Moore; P. E. Boynton

2005-01-01

373

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-OC-1-57-75, Drawing No. AF-6009-15, sheet 53 of 96, D.O. Series No. AF 1394/73, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296 Rev. C, Date: 19 NOV 59. Drawing includes plan, section, and details of track. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

374

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01

375

The SALT HRS spectrograph: instrument integration and laboratory test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SALT HRS is a fibre-fed, high dispersion échelle spectrograph currently being constructed for the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). In this paper we highlight the performance of key optical components, describe the integration tasks that have taken place and present some first light results from the laboratory. The instrument construction is well advanced and we report on the attainment of the required mechanical and thermal stability and provide a measurement of the input optics performance (including the fibre feed). The initial optical alignment of both the fibre input optics, including image slicers, and the spectrograph optics has taken place and is described.

Bramall, D. G.; Schmoll, J.; Tyas, L. M. G.; Clark, P.; Younger, E.; Sharples, R. M.; Dipper, N. A.; Ryan, S. G.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Brink, J.

2012-09-01

376

The passive autocatalytic recombiner test program at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) are being considered by the nuclear power industry as a combustible gas control system in operating plants and advanced light water reactor (ALWR) containments for design basis events. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed systems and methodologies to measure the amount of hydrogen that can be depleted in a containment by a PAR. Experiments were performed that determined the hydrogen depletion rate of a PAR in the presence of steam and also evaluated the effect of scale (number of cartridges) on the PAR performance at both low and high hydrogen concentrations.

Blanchat, T.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Reactor Safety Experiments; Malliakos, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-10-01

377

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in

Michael J. Truex; Vincent R. Vermeul; Rob D. Mackley; Brad G. Fritz; Donaldo P. Mendoza; Christian D. Johnson; Rebecca P. Elmore; Fred J. Brockman; Christina L. Bilskis

2008-01-01

378

Inter-laboratory variability in in vitro spinal segment flexibility testing.  

PubMed

In vitro spine flexibility testing has been performed using a variety of laboratory-specific loading apparatuses and conditions, making test results across laboratories difficult to compare. The application of pure moments has been well established for spine flexibility testing, but to our knowledge there have been no attempts to quantify differences in range of motion (ROM) resulting from laboratory-specific loading apparatuses. Seven fresh-frozen lumbar cadaveric motion segments were tested intact at four independent laboratories. Unconstrained pure moments of 7.5 Nm were applied in each anatomic plane without an axial preload. At laboratories A and B, pure moments were applied using hydraulically actuated spinal loading fixtures with either a passive (A) or controlled (B) XY table. At laboratories C and D, pure moments were applied using a sliding (C) or fixed ring (D) cable-pulley system with a servohydraulic test frame. Three sinusoidal load-unload cycles were applied at laboratories A and B while a single quasistatic cycle was applied in 1.5 Nm increments at laboratories C and D. Non-contact motion measurement systems were used to quantify ROM. In all test directions, the ROM variability among donors was greater than single-donor ROM variability among laboratories. The maximum difference in average ROM between any two laboratories was 1.5° in flexion-extension, 1.3° in lateral bending and 1.1° in axial torsion. This was the first study to quantify ROM in a single group of spinal motion segments at four independent laboratories with varying pure moment systems. These data support our hypothesis that given a well-described test method, independent laboratories can produce similar biomechanical outcomes. PMID:21764061

Wheeler, Daniel J; Freeman, Andrew L; Ellingson, Arin M; Nuckley, David J; Buckley, Jenni M; Scheer, Justin K; Crawford, Neil R; Bechtold, Joan E

2011-07-20

379

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01

380

Application of laboratory fungal resistance tests to solid wood and ...  

Treesearch

However, irreversible damage due to water sorption made separating the effects of ... Keywords: Plastic-impregnated wood, absorption, adsorption, wood, ... biodegradation, polyethylene, moisture, wood flour, soil-block testing, weight of wood ...

381

A small scale laboratory flammability test for electronic components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new flammability test apparatus has been designed to fill the need for a small scale test for electronic components, to evaluate smoke evolved and time to flaming ignition. A concept similar in many respects to the approach to flammability studies made by the Ohio State University Release Rate Apparatus has been taken in providing a variable, controlled, radiant heat flux furnace in an enclosed space. The system incorporates an optional spark-induced method of ignition of combustible gases, and measurements are carried out at controlled ambient temperatures. The test apparatus uses many standard and readily available components and has been found to be useful for testing specimen up to 100 mm square, including individual electronic components and small circuit boards complete with components.

Woollerton, G. R.; Culver, D.

1980-04-01

382

Test New Electric Incinerator Design for Sterilizing Laboratory Air.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two sizes of an electric air sterilizer designed for long operational life and ease of maintenance were tested for effectiveness in sterilizing air containing heavy concentrations of bacterial spores. The results are given. (Author)

G. J. Harris G. G. Gremillion P. H. Towson

1964-01-01

383

Laboratory MCAO Test-Bed for Developing Wavefront Sensing Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental optical bench test-bed for developing new wavefront sensing concepts for Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) systems is described. The main objective is to resolve imaging problems associated with wavefront sensing of the atmospheric turbulence for future MCAO systems on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). The test-bed incorporates five reference sources, two deformable mirrors (DMs) and atmospheric phase screens to simulate

A. V. Goncharov; J. C. Dainty; S. Esposito; A. Puglisi

2005-01-01

384

Laboratory Tests of Gravitational Physics Using a Cryogenic Torsion Pendulum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress and plans are reported for a program of gravitational physics\\u000aexperiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large amplitude\\u000atorsional oscillation. The program includes a UC Irvine project to measure the\\u000agravitational constant G and joint UC Irvine - U. Washington projects to test\\u000athe gravitational inverse square law at a range of about 10 cm and to test the

E. C. Berg; M. K. BANTEL; W. D. CROSS; T. INOUE; R. D. NEWMAN; J. H. STEFFEN; M. W. Moore; P. E. BOYNTON

2004-01-01

385

Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

Nigbor, R. L.; Evans, J. R.; Hutt, C. R.

2009-01-01

386

Hydraulic tests of emergency cooling system: L-Area  

SciTech Connect

The delay in L-Area startup provided an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) which will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level. ECS flow is a major input to the FLOOD code which calculates reactor ECS power limits. The FLOOD code assesses the effectiveness of the ECS cooling capacity by modeling the core and plenum hydraulics under accident conditions. Presently, reactor power is not limited by the ECS cooling capacity (power limit). However, the manual calculations of ECS flows had been recently updated to include piping changes (debris strainer, valve changes, pressure release systems) and update fitting losses. Both updates resulted in reduced calculated ECS flows. Upon completion of the current program to update, validate, and document, reactor power may be limited under certain situations by ECS cooling capacity for some present reactor charge designs. A series of special hydraulic tests (Reference 1, 3) were conducted in L-Area using all sources of emergency coolant including the ECS pumps (Reference 2). The tests provided empirical hydraulic data on the ECS piping. These data will be used in computer models of the system as well as manual calculations of ECS flows. The improved modeling and accuracy of the flow calculations will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level with respect to an ECS power limit.

Hinton, J H

1988-01-01

387

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...THE SPECIAL EQUIPMENT TO BE USED FOR SUCH CARRIAGE (ATP); INSPECTION, TESTING, AND CERTIFICATION OF SPECIAL...fees for certificates. A current list of U.S. ATP testing stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for issuance of...

2013-01-01

388

Laboratory testing of a flexible boom for ice management  

SciTech Connect

Combating oil spills in the Arctic is a major challenge. Drilling or producing oil or gas in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) may allow booms to be deployed upstream of an offshore structure to clear the water of ice, thereby enabling conventional oil spill countermeasures to be used. Such a boom would be kept in place by two ice-going service vessels or by moored buoys. SINTEF NHL and NRC have performed a number of small-scale tests with a flexible boom in the NRC ice basin in Ottawa. The purpose of the tests was to measure the effectiveness of using a flexible boom for collecting ice, and to determine the loads associated with collecting the ice. In the tests, various boom configurations were towed against a broken ice field consisting of ice pieces typically 50--100 mm across and 30 mm thick. The ice concentration was usually 10/10, but it was reduced to 8/10 and 5/10 for two tests. The boom was towed at speeds of 20 and 50 mm-s[sup [minus]1]. Both the width of the boom and the slackness of the boom were varied over reasonable ranges. Two six-component dynamometers were used to support the boom. Thus, the force components on each end of the boom were measured. Further, two video cameras were used to record the effectiveness of each boom configuration. In this paper, the full results of this test program are presented and the application of the test results to the full-scale situation are discussed. The tests show that, under certain conditions, the use of boom is feasible for ice management in oil-contaminated water.

Loeset, S. (SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway). Norwegian Hydrotechnical Lab.); Timco, G.W. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1993-08-01

389

The GeneInsight Suite: A Platform to Support Laboratory and Provider Use of DNA based Genetic Testing  

PubMed Central

The future of personalized medicine will hinge on effective management of patient genetic profiles. Molecular diagnostic testing laboratories need to track knowledge surrounding an increasingly large number of genetic variants, incorporate this knowledge into interpretative reports and keep ordering clinicians up to date as this knowledge evolves. Treating clinicians need to track which variants have been identified in each of their patients along with the significance of these variants. The GeneInsightSM Suite assists in these areas. The suite also provides a basis for interconnecting laboratories and clinicians in a manner that increases the scalability of personalized medicine processes.

Aronson, Samuel J.; Clark, Eugene H.; Babb, Lawrence J; Baxter, Samantha; Farwell, Lisa M.; Funke, Birgit H.; Hernandez, Amy Lovelette; Joshi, Victoria A.; Lyon, Elaine; Parthum, Andrew R.; Russell, Franklin J.; Varugheese, Matthew; Venman, Thomas C.; Rehm, Heidi L.

2011-01-01

390

Whole-Blood Hemagglutination Inhibition Test for Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) Antibodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nontreponemal antibody tests such as the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test are carried out on serum and widely used as screening tests for syphilis. The aim of the present study was to develop a screening test for syphilis making use of whole blood and VDRL liposomes. Antibody to human red blood cells was conjugated to VDRL liposomes and reacted

M. P. MEYER; R. E. BAUGHN

2000-01-01

391

Laboratory Tests on Shotcrete-Rock Joints in Direct Shear, Tension and Compression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. A series of laboratory tests was performed on cemented shotcrete-rock joints to investigate the strength and stiffness of the interfaces, while simulating field conditions as close as possible. The direct shear test formed the core of the experimental work, while the tension and compression tests were complementary. To simulate loading conditions experienced in practical cases the direct shear tests

D. Saiang; L. Malmgren; E. Nordlund

2005-01-01

392

Test results for laboratory scale inductive highT(sub c) superconducting fault current limiters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several laboratory scale screened iron core superconducting fault current limiters (less than 1 kVA nominal rating) have been built and tested in order to study their fault current limitation characteristics. In this article we present the experimental results for a static impedance test and for a dynamic short circuit test. The static test is used to define the device operating

J. R. Cave; D. W. A. Willen; Y. Brissette; C. Richer; V. A. Aresteanu

1994-01-01

393

Test results for laboratory scale inductive high-Tc superconducting fault current limiters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several laboratory scale screened iron core superconducting fault current limiters (<1 kVA nominal rating) have been built and tested in order to study their fault current limitation characteristics. In this article we present the experimental results for a static impedance test and for a dynamic short circuit test. The static test is used to define the device operating conditions and

J. R. Cave; D. W. A. Willen; Y. Brissette; C. Richer; V. A. Aresteanu

1994-01-01

394

Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

NONE

1996-02-09

395

Preliminary report on the ecological assessment of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In support of the remedial investigation for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5, staff of the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted preliminary ecological assessment activities. A screening level ecological risk assessment has been completed, ambient toxicity tests have been conducted on streams and seeps within WAG 5, WAG 5 has been surveyed for rare and endangered species and wetlands, and wild turkeys that may feed on contaminated vegetation and insects in WAG 5 have been screened for beta-emitting isotopes and [sup 137]Cs. The screening-level ecological risk assessment identified some data gaps that were addressed in the ecological assessment plan. These include gaps in data on the toxicity of surface water and soil within WAG 5 and on the status of rare and endangered species. In addition, the screening-level risk assessment identified the need for data on the level of contaminants in wild turkeys that may be consumed by predatory wildlife and humans. Three rounds of ambient toxicity tests on six streams and seeps, using the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia, have identified potential toxicity in three of the sample sites. Further tests are required to identify the toxicant. No rare or endangered animal species have been identified in the WAG 5 area.

Ashwood, T.L.; Suter, G.W. II; Stewart, A.J.

1992-09-01

396

Quality Assurance Guidelines for Testing Using Rapid HIV Antibody Tests Waived Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document provides guidance on quality assurance (QA) practices for sites using or planning to use rapid test kits to detect antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) waived under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA...

2007-01-01

397

Development and Testing of Extruded Cables Having Improved Fire Performance. Part 2: Fire Simulation in Laboratory-Test Methods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Within the research work pursued by ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board) with the collaboration of the principal Italian manufacturers of cables for power plants, several fire propagation tests were carried out at the CESI (Italy) laboratories. The a...

C. Masetti P. Ostano

1986-01-01

398

Laboratory evaluation of wipe testing based on lead oxide surface contamination  

SciTech Connect

Although wipe testing has been used extensively as a measure of surface contamination in industrial hygiene, few scientific studies have been reported to validate the procedure with respect to quantitative recovery, repeatability or methodology. Consequently, a laboratory evaluation of wipe testing with particular attention to the OSHA procedure was undertaken using lead oxide dust as the test contaminant. A dust dispersion system was devised using a Wright dust feeder to produce relatively uniform surface concentrations in an aerosol chamber. Wipe materials included moistened filter paper, commercial paper towels, adhesive paper labels and adhesive tape. The quantitative recovery and repeatability of the wipe procedures were related to surface concentrations and the operational and material variables. Significant improvements in recoveries of up to 90% can be obtained with good repeatability for removable lead oxide dust on non-porous surfaces using moist paper on a fixed test surface area. For porous surfaces, which show significantly lower recovery by all methods, adhesive sampling materials applied at maximum pressure provided an optimum recovery of 77%. The importance of reliable surface contamination measurements in assessing potential health hazards underscores the desirability of improving the demonstrated deficiencies of the OSHA and other wipe sampling procedures.

Chavalitnitikul, C.; Levin, L.

1984-05-01

399

Final laboratory integration and test of the Keck Interferometer nuller  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mid-infrared (8-13?m) nulling is a key observing mode planned for the NASA-funded Keck Interferometer at the Keck Observatory on the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. By destructively interfering and thereby canceling the on-axis light from nearby stars, this observing mode will enable the characterization of the faint emission from exo-zodiacal dust surrounding these stellar systems. We report here the null leakage error budget and pre-ship results obtained in the laboratory after integration of the nulling beam combiner with its mid-infrared camera and key components of the Keck Interferometer. The mid-infrared nuller utilizes a dual-polarization, modified Mach-Zehnder (MMZ) beam combiner in conjunction with an atmospheric dispersion corrector to achieve broadband achromatic nulling.

Crawford, S. L.; Colavita, M. M.; Garcia, J. I.; Ligon, E. R.; Mennesson, B.; Paine, C. G.; Serabyn, E.; Smythe, R. F.; Swain, M. R.; Vasisht, G.

2005-08-01

400

An aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and surrounding area, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over four areas in the California cities of Dublin, Livermore, and Tracy from 8 through 29 April 1986. Although a similar aerial survey had been previously conducted over Livermore and Tracy in 1975, this was the first such survey performed over the city of Dublin. The surveyed areas included the Camp Parks training facility in Dublin; the Las Positas Golf Course and the Livermore sewage treatment plant in west Livermore; the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities in east Livermore; and the LLNL facilities at Site 300 located three miles southwest of the city of Tracy, California. Only naturally-occurring radiation was detected over the Camp Parks area in Dublin and over the golf course and sewage treatment plant in west Livermore. Man-made radionuclides were detected over the LLNL facilities in east Livermore and over Site 300. These man-made sources were typical of source storage and radiological activities conducted at the facilities. In areas where only naturally-occurring gamma emitters were detected, the observed range of activity was essentially the same in both the 1975 and 1986 surveys. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

401

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Selected Drill Holes in LANL Use Areas of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Volume 5.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a compilation of data from drill holes completed, except where noted, during the calendar year 1983 in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. Data presented in this report includes hole locations, dril...

S. L. Drellack J. L. Gonzales W. J. Davies

1984-01-01

402

Laboratory effectiveness testing of water-in-oil emulsion breakers  

SciTech Connect

The physics and chemistry of water-in-oil emulsions dominate the development of effectiveness tests. Emulsions are variable in stability--this variability is largely dependent on oil type and degree of weathering. These factors complicate the development of a test. Emulsions which have low stability will apparently break easily with chemical emulsion breakers. Broken emulsions will form a foam-like material, called rag, which retains water which is not part of the stable emulsions. Analytical methods used to determine the final stability of the broken or unbroken emulsion were evaluated. Measurements of water content and viscosity measurements show correlation to emulsion stability. Viscosity provides a more reliable measure of emulsion stability but water content measurements are more convenient and are largely used in this study. Twelve tests were developed in the past. Two testing methods have been developed to a usable stage. These tests are described and data using them provided. The effects of mixing time, agent amount, settling time and mixing energy on effectiveness results are presented.

Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Bier, I.; Conrod, D. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Tennyson, E. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States)

1995-06-01

403

Biochemical laboratory tests in viral hepatitis and other hepatic diseases  

PubMed Central

The differential diagnosis between viral hepatitis and other liver diseases (particularly obstructive jaundice) is often difficult on purely clinical grounds. Damage to the liver causes changes in the pattern of the serum enzymes and this has led to the development in recent years of a number of enzyme tests. The authors have amassed evidence to show that the most useful of these is determination of the levels of serum glutamic oxalacetic and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGOT and SGPT), coupled with calculation of the SGOT/SGPT ratio. It is characteristic of viral hepatitis that both levels are greatly increased, but the SGOT/SGPT ratio, normally greater than one, falls considerably below his figure. In a few cases of obstructive jaundice, the serum transaminase picture may initially resemble that in viral hepatitis, but the differential diagnosis can be established by repeating the determinations at intervals. Other enzyme tests, such as determination of alkaline phosphatase and leucylaminopeptidase, may be used to confirm the biliary obstruction. Flocculation tests and electrophoretic determination of the plasma protein picture, while of limited value in the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis, are useful in conjunction with the serum transaminase test for assessing the activity of the disease and any tendency to progress towards “active” chronic hepatitis or post-hepatic cirrhosis.

De Ritis, Fernando; Giusti, Giuseppe; Piccinino, Felice; Cacciatore, Luigi

1965-01-01

404

Preparation and laboratory tests of oil-adjuvant cholera vaccine.  

PubMed

In a search for cholera vaccines of improved efficacy, agar-grown strains of classical Vibrio cholerae were killed with formol and emulsified with Arlacel A in mineral oil; the final vibrio concentration was adjusted to 2 x 10(9) vibrios per adult dose (equal proportions of Inaba and Ogawa types).There was an unexplained discrepancy between determinations of the vibrio content, by cell counting and opacity measurements, and of the antigen content, by nitrogen measurements and the complement-fixation test.The potency of the vaccine, estimated by the mouse-protection test, was about 5 times that of the International Reference Preparations of Cholera Vaccine. A new potency test, the "maternal-immunity" test in infant rabbits, did not give quantitative results but suggested a somewhat higher potency for the vaccine.The protective effect 6 months after vaccination, as determined by agglutinin titres in the sera of volunteers, was still high, confirming the results of a field trial of the vaccine. However, local reactions (indurations) were observed in a considerable proportion of vaccinees in the field trial. Histopathological examination of tissue from the site of the reactions revealed them to be due to a combination of foreign-body reactions and local hypersensitivity. PMID:5300875

Ogonuki, H; Hashizume, S; Takashashi, B

1967-01-01

405

Photovoltaic DC Arc Fault Detector testing at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2011 National Electrical Code® (NEC®) added Article 690.11 that requires photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed DC arc fault protection device. To fill this new market, manufacturers are developing new Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs). Comprehensive and challenging testing has been conducted using a wide range of PV technologies, system topologies, loads and

Jay Johnson; Birger Pahl; Charles Luebke; Tom Pier; Theodore Miller; Jason Strauch; Scott Kuszmaul; Ward Bower

2011-01-01

406

Lupus anticoagulant testing: performance and practices by north american clinical laboratories.  

PubMed

Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) testing is important for evaluating patients with antiphospholipid syndromes and hypercoagulable states. We reviewed results of proficiency testing challenges (n = 5) distributed by the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association to examine LAC testing performed by participating laboratories. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and dilute Russell viper venom time (dRVVT) constituted major testing methods. In screening studies, LAC-sensitive APTT methods were more sensitive to weak LAC than dRVVT-based methods but less specific. In confirmatory testing, dRVVT methods performed better, but performance was LAC-dependent. The highest false-negative confirmatory test results were obtained for the platelet neutralization procedure. Noncompliance with recommendations for LAC testing by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis was high (8%-38%), with the majority of noncompliant laboratories failing to report results of mixing studies. These data provide new insights into LAC testing in North America and identify opportunities for standardization. PMID:20959659

Dembitzer, Francine R; Ledford Kraemer, Marlies R; Meijer, Piet; Peerschke, Ellinor I B

2010-11-01

407

Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the...

S. B. French

2012-01-01

408

Cognitive Laboratory Experiences : On Pre-testing Computerised Questionnaires  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the literature on questionnaire design and survey methodology, pre-testing is mentioned as a way to evaluate questionnaires (i.e. investigate whether they work as intended) and control for measurement errors (i.e. assess data quality). As the American Statistical Association puts it (ASA, 1999, p. 11): “The questionnaire designer must understand the need to pretest, pretest, and then pretest some more.”

G. J. M. E. Snijkers

2002-01-01

409

Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

1992-10-01

410

Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program.

Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

1992-01-01

411

[Notes on laboratory coagulation testing for acquired hemophilia A].  

PubMed

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a bleeding disorder characterized by autoantibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Patients with the disorder show a mortality rate of 7.9-25%; therefore, rapid and accurate diagnosis is critical. Isolated prolonged APTT in patients showing spontaneous bleeding with no previous history of a bleeding disorder suggests a diagnosis of AHA. AHA is confirmed by a markedly reduced FVIII activity without a reduction of von Willebrand factor and measurement of the inhibitor titer to FVIII. APTT cross-mixing tests are useful for the rapid distinction between factor deficiency and the presence of an inhibitor. FVIII inhibitor is time and temperature-dependent; therefore, mixing tests performed immediately and after 2 hours of incubation should be compared. In some cases, all intrinsic factors are decreased, which may represent an in vitro artifact due to the depletion of FVIII in the substrate plasma by the inhibitor. A lupus anticoagulant (LA) can also cause the artifactual lowering of factor levels due to the inhibition of phospholipids in the assay. Factor assays should be repeated at higher serial dilutions of the test plasma, which will attenuate the effect of the inhibitor or LA on the factor measurement and may also distinguish between AHA and LA. Acquired inhibitors to FVIII often display non-linear type 2 kinetics; therefore, the inhibitor titer measured by the Bethesda assay corresponding to the dilution that is closest to 50% inhibition should be reported. Moreover, plasma samples with some FVIII activity should be preincubated for 30 minutes at 56 degrees C in order to inactivate residual FVIII in the test samples. PMID:19928498

Amano, Kagehiro

2009-10-01

412

Lysosomal storage disorders: Molecular basis and laboratory testing  

PubMed Central

Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a large group of more than 50 different inherited metabolic diseases which, in the great majority of cases, result from the defective function of specific lysosomal enzymes and, in cases, of non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins or non-lysosomal proteins involved in lysosomal biogenesis. The progressive lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites results in generalised cell and tissue dysfunction, and, therefore, multi-systemic pathology. Storage may begin during early embryonic development, and the clinical presentation for LSDs can vary from an early and severe phenotype to late-onset mild disease. The diagnosis of most LSDs--after accurate clinical/paraclinical evaluation, including the analysis of some urinary metabolites--is based mainly on the detection of a specific enzymatic deficiency. In these cases, molecular genetic testing (MGT) can refine the enzymatic diagnosis. Once the genotype of an individual LSD patient has been ascertained, genetic counselling should include prediction of the possible phenotype and the identification of carriers in the family at risk. MGT is essential for the identification of genetic disorders resulting from non-enzymatic lysosomal protein defects and is complementary to biochemical genetic testing (BGT) in complex situations, such as in cases of enzymatic pseudodeficiencies. Prenatal diagnosis is performed on the most appropriate samples, which include fresh or cultured chorionic villus sampling or cultured amniotic fluid. The choice of the test--enzymatic and/or molecular--is based on the characteristics of the defect to be investigated. For prenatal MGT, the genotype of the family index case must be known. The availability of both tests, enzymatic and molecular, enormously increases the reliability of the entire prenatal diagnostic procedure. To conclude, BGT and MGT are mostly complementary for post- and prenatal diagnosis of LSDs. Whenever genotype/phenotype correlations are available, they can be helpful in predicting prognosis and in making decisions about therapy.

2011-01-01

413

Field and laboratory testing in young elite soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: The Bangsbo test correlated with the lowest velocity associated with VO2MAX (vVO2MAX; R 2 = 0.55, p,0.001), but not with VO2MAX. Sprint times at 30 m and 20 m were related to peak extension velocity and peak extension force measured during vertical jumping, but not to vertical jump height per se. The jumping force and velocity could explain 46%

K Chamari; Y Hachana; Y B Ahmed; O Galy; F Sghaier; O Hue

2004-01-01

414

Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01

415

Laboratory tests of iron status: correlation or common sense?  

PubMed

We demonstrate that simple correlation between the various tests of iron status is not sufficient for examining their value in diagnosing iron deficiency (ID). Three degrees of ID are recognized: Iron depletion (ID grade I) is defined by decreased total body iron and normal iron support to erythropoiesis, as diagnosed by decreased storage iron, decreased ferritin, normal sideroblast count, normal zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), and transferrin saturation >15%. When the iron supply to erythropoiesis becomes insufficient, as diagnosed by transferrin saturation < or = 15%, increased ZPP, and decreased sideroblast count, iron-deficient erythropoiesis (ID grade II) occurs. When finally hemoglobin is below its normal range, iron-deficiency anemia (ID grade III) results. The various tests for ID cannot be compared without taking into account the severity of the deficiency. Depending on the grade of ID examined, the correlation of markers seen in our patients' data varied considerably. We conclude that a "best" marker of ID does not exist. However, the different tests efficiently complement each other by detecting different stages and individually show the clinical extent of ID. Ferritin reflects the iron stores. ZPP indicates whether the ID in a given patient is clinically relevant or not. Finally, the extent of a clinically relevant ID can be assessed by the measured ZPP, hemoglobin concentration, and red cell indices. PMID:8653897

Hastka, J; Lasserre, J J; Schwarzbeck, A; Reiter, A; Hehlmann, R

1996-05-01

416

Nevada Test Site. 2007 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence,...

2008-01-01

417

Data analysis of a high-density polyethylene geomembrane located in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is monitoring the material properties of the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) cap at Waste Area Grouping 6 for degradation due to exposure to the environment. The material properties o...

M. R. Martino

1994-01-01

418

Summary of environmental characterization activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Solid Waste Storage Area Six, FY 1986 through 1987.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP), has supported characterization activities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA 6) to acquire information necessary for identification and planning of remedial actions that may be warrant...

E. C. Davis D. K. Solomon R. B. Dreier S. Y. Lee A. D. Kelmers

1987-01-01

419

RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring. (CBS)

Not Available

1991-09-01

420

Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Virtual Private Networking is a new communication technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National laboratories has embrace the technology for interconnecting rem...

Miller Yonek

2001-01-01

421

Aerial Radiological Survey of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Surrounding Areas. Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A team from the U.S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories/ New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during the months of...

T. J. Hendricks D. L. Prout

2001-01-01

422

Assessment and cleanup of the Taxi Strip waste storage area at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)  

SciTech Connect

In September 1982 the Hazards Control Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a final radiological survey of a former low-level radioactive waste storage area called the Taxi Strip so that the area could be released for construction of an office building. Collection of soil samples at the location of a proposed sewer line led to the discovery of an old disposal pit containing soil contaminated with low-level radioactive waste and organic solvents. The Taxi Strip area was excavated leading to the discovery of three additional small pits. The clean-up of Pit No. 1 is considered to be complete for radioactive contamination. The results from the chlorinated solvent analysis of the borehole samples and the limited number of samples analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicate that solvent clean-up at this pit is complete. This is being verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of a few additional soil samples from the bottom sides and ends of the pit. As a precaution, samples are also being analyzed for metals to determine if further excavation is necessary. Clean-up of Pits No. 2 and No. 3 is considered to be complete for radioactive and solvent contamination. Results of analysis for metals will determine if excavation is complete. Excavation of Pit No. 4 which resulted from surface leakage of radioactive contamination from an evaporation tray is complete.

Buerer, A.

1983-01-26

423

Functional requirements of the borrow area and haul route for the Waste Area Grouping projects at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the mission and functional requirements for the development of a borrow area and the associated haul route to support closure and/or remediation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other WAGs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document specifies the basic functional requirements that must be met by the borrow area and haul route developed to produce low-permeability soil for the covers or caps at WAG 6.

Miller, D.G.

1992-09-01

424

Argonne National Laboratory`s photo-oxidation organic mixed waste treatment system - installation and startup testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) Photo-Oxidation Organic Mixed Waste Treatment System. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in

T. L. Shearer; R. A. Nelson; T. Torres; C. Conner; D. Wygmans

1997-01-01

425

Argonne National Laboratory`s photo-oxidation organic mixed waste treatment system - installation and startup testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) Photo-Oxidation Organic Mixed Waste Treatment System. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the Waste Management Facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois. 1 fig.

Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.; Torres, T.; Conner, C.; Wygmans, D.

1997-09-01

426

The long and winding regulatory road for laboratory-developed tests.  

PubMed

"High complexity" clinical laboratories are approved under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments to develop, validate, and offer a laboratory-developed test (LDT) for clinical use. The Food and Drug Administration considers LDTs to be medical devices under their regulatory jurisdiction, and that at least certain LDTs should be subject to greater regulatory scrutiny. This review describes the current regulatory framework for LDTs and suggests ways in which to appropriately enhance this framework. PMID:22706853

Weiss, Ronald L

2012-07-01

427

[Approval of ISO/IEC 17025 and quality control of laboratory testing].  

PubMed

First section of Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) was approved by ISO/IEC 17025 as a laboratory having an appropriate laboratory testing technique. NIHS is the first national laboratory approved by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS has also been accepted the appropriate technique and facility for the BSL3 level pathogens by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS is necessary to take an external audit almost every year. This approval is renewed every 4 years. PMID:21381399

Yamamoto, Shigeki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Machii, Kenji; Igimi, Shizunobu

2010-01-01

428

Quality Indicators to Detect Pre-Analytical Errors in Laboratory Testing  

PubMed Central

Pre-analytical steps, the major source of mistakes in laboratory diagnostics, arise during patient preparation, sample collection, sample transportation, sample preparation, and sample storage. However, while it has been reported that the pre-analytical phase is error-prone, only recently has it been demonstrated that most errors occur in the ‘pre-pre-analytical phase’. This comprises the initial procedures of the testing process performed by healthcare personnel outside the laboratory walls and outside the direct control of the clinical laboratory. Quality indicators (QIs) should therefore cover all steps in the pre-analytical phase, from test requesting to sample storage. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of QIs in laboratory testing is described. The focus is on the experience of a working group of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) in developing a model of QIs, 16 of which concern the pre-analytical phase.

Plebani, Mario

2012-01-01

429

Laboratory Test Report for Six ENERGY STAR Dehumidifiers  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the measured performance of six residential ENERGY STAR vapor compression dehumidifiers. The performance of each was measured over a wide range of inlet air conditions and fit to a numerical model for capacity and efficiency. Performance curves were developed for use in EnergyPlus. Test data from all six dehumidifiers were also fit to generic performance curves. This work can be used by energy modelers and equipment manufacturers to understand how current products will operate in a wide range of environments, and to develop advanced space conditioning systems for efficient, safe, durable and healthy homes.

Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2011-12-01

430

Underground test area quality assurance project plan, Nevada test site, Nevada. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is one of the planning documents used for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which falls under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP). The Nevada ERP consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The UGTA Subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. The purposes of the UGTA Subproject are to define boundaries around each Corrective Action Unit (CAU), as defined by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), that establish areas containing water that may be unsafe for domestic or municipal use and to establish monitoring programs for each CAU that will verify modeling upon which the boundaries are based.

NONE

1997-04-01

431

Laboratory tests for rapid screening of drugs of abuse in the workplace: a review.  

PubMed

The use of rapid, on-site drug detection devices is reviewed. These tests permit the detection of various psychoactive substances in urine, and are easily used by nonskilled personnel. Saliva tests are available for detection of alcohol. These rapid tests have varying degrees of accuracy, and it is recommended that positive outcomes for all rapid tests be verified by standard laboratory procedures. The tests have potential use in the emergency room, doctor's office, drug treatment program, and the work place. When access to formal laboratory testing is limited by either time or location, an easily portable test can give critical information. A number of commercially available tests are reviewed for method, accuracy, advantages and disadvantages. Consequently, the interested practitioner should be able to find a suitable screening test from among the tests reviewed. PMID:8476942

Schwartz, R H; Clark, H W; Meek, P S

1993-01-01

432

Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Bartholomay, R.C.

1990-08-01

433

49 CFR 40.89 - What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and are laboratories required to conduct it? 40.89 Section 40.89 Transportation...and are laboratories required to conduct it? (a) Specimen validity testing is the evaluation of the specimen to determine if it is consistent with normal human...

2011-10-01

434

A Spirometry-Based Algorithm To Direct Lung Function Testing in the Pulmonary Function Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To design a spirometry-based algorithm to predict pulmonary restrictive impairment and reduce the number of patients undergoing unnecessary lung volume testing. Design: Two prospective studies of 259 consecutive patients and 265 consecutive patients used to derive and validate the algorithm, respectively. Setting: A pulmonary function laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. Patients: Consecutive adults referred to the laboratory for

Christine A. Glady; Shawn D. Aaron; Mary Lunau; Jennifer Clinch; Robert E. Dales

2003-01-01

435

Evaluation of nitrate analysis using test strips: Comparison with two analytical laboratory methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nitrate remains a contaminant of concern for users of well water. Well?water evaluation, either to assess nitrate contamination or to evaluate sites prior to including them in a larger water quality study, often involves costly laboratory analysis. A cost effective alternative to laboratory analysis are dip?style test strips. However, the accuracy of these types of products must be reliable, as

M. Bischoff; A. M. Hiar; R. F. Turco

1996-01-01

436

A program to accredit laboratories for reliable testing of pork and horsemeat for Trichinella  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has developed a program to accredit external laboratories to conduct Trichinella digestion assays for export purposes. Accredited laboratories are responsible for staffing, equipment and operating test facilities under the auspices and guidance of the CFIA. The CFIA's Centre for Animal Parasitology provides training, proficiency samples, audits and other support for the accreditation process. The

Lorry B. Forbes; W. Brad Scandrett; Alvin A. Gajadhar

2005-01-01

437

A program to accredit laboratories for reliable testing of pork and horsemeat for Trichinella  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has developed a program to accredit external laboratories to conduct Trichinella digestion assays for export purposes. Accredited laboratories are responsible for staffing, equipment and operating test facilities under the auspices and guidance of the CFIA. The CFIA's Centre for Animal Parasitology provides training, proficiency samples, audits and other support for the accreditation process. The

Lorry B. Forbes; W. Brad Scandrett; Alvin A. Gajadhar

438

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-I and PERL-II). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final verdict for the use of these technologies is still out but the first part of the work has been completed with promising results. The goal of this part of the work was to close a servo position loop around a slide incorporating these technologies and to measure the performance. This paper discusses the tests that were setup for system evaluation and the results of the measurements made. Some very promising results include; slide positioning to nanometer level and slow speed slide direction reversal at less than 100nm/min with no observed discontinuities. This is very important for machine contouring in diamond turning. As a point of reference, at 100 nm/min it would take the slide almost 7 years to complete the full designed travel of 350 mm. This speed has been demonstrated without the use of a velocity sensor. The velocity is derived from the position sensor. With what has been learned on the test bed, the paper finishes with a brief comparison of the old and new technologies. The emphasis of this comparison will be on the servo performance as illustrated with bode plot diagrams.

Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

2001-04-10

439

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ULTRA-350 Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has many in-house designed high precision machine tools. Some of these tools include the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) [1], Diamond Turning Machine No.3 (DTM-3) and two Precision Engineering Research Lathes (PERL-1 and PERL-11). These machines have accuracy in the sub-micron range and in most cases position resolution in the couple of nanometers range. All of these machines are built with similar underlying technologies. The machines use capstan drive technology, laser interferometer position feedback, tachometer velocity feedback, permanent magnet (PM) brush motors and analog velocity and position loop servo compensation [2]. The machine controller does not perform any servo compensation it simply computes the differences between the commanded position and the actual position (the following error) and sends this to a D/A for the analog servo position loop. LLNL is designing a new high precision diamond turning machine. The machine is called the ULTRA 350 [3]. In contrast to many of the proven technologies discussed above, the plan for the new machine is to use brushless linear motors, high precision linear scales, machine controller motor commutation and digital servo compensation for the velocity and position loops. Although none of these technologies are new and have been in use in industry, applications of these technologies to high precision diamond turning is limited. To minimize the risks of these technologies in the new machine design, LLNL has established a test bed to evaluate these technologies for application in high precision diamond turning. The test bed is primarily composed of commercially available components. This includes the slide with opposed hydrostatic bearings, the oil system, the brushless PM linear motor, the two-phase input three-phase output linear motor amplifier and the system controller. The linear scales are not yet commercially available but use a common electronic output format. As of this writing, the final verdict for the use of these technologies is still out but the first part of the work has been completed with promising results. The goal of this part of the work was to close a servo position loop around a slide incorporating these technologies and to measure the performance. This paper discusses the tests that were setup for system evaluation and the results of the measurements made. Some very promising results include; slide positioning to nanometer level and slow speed slide direction reversal at less than 100nm/min with no observed discontinuities. This is very important for machine contouring in diamond turning. As a point of reference, at 100 nm/min it would take the slide almost 7 years to complete the full designed travel of 350 mm. This speed has been demonstrated without the use of a velocity sensor. The velocity is derived from the position sensor. With what has been learned on the test bed, the paper finishes with a brief comparison of the old and new technologies. The emphasis of this comparison will be on the servo performance as illustrated with bode plot diagrams.

Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A; Carlisle, K

2001-04-10

440

Decision Analysis: Point-of-care Chlamydia Testing vs. Laboratory-based Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To evaluate and compare the performance of several different methods available for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infection, and to explore possible testing and treatment strategies incorporating point-of-care testing versus laboratory-based tests. DESIGN Prospective trial and decision analysis.

Geoffrey R. Swain; A. McDonald; R. Pfister

2004-01-01

441

Laboratory test to evaluate the resistance of refractories to molten slags  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to develop a reproducible laboratory test for evaluating the resistance of refractories to molten slags. Tests were conducted with a slag representative of slag used to produce mineral wool. A rotating cylindrical furnace was lined with the brick being tested, and it was operated at temperatures up to 1660°C for periods ranging from 8 to 32 hours.

J. R. Cobble; L. Y. Sadler

1980-01-01

442

Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA)); Cooper, G.A. (Univ. of California, Berkley, CA (USA)); Curry, D.A. (International Drilling and Downhole Technology Centre in Aberdeen (Great Britian)); McCann, D. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA))

1989-12-01

443

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

444

Prediction of Wear Resistance of Rubber Track-Pads by Standard Laboratory Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Various laboratory tests were investigated to determine if such tests could be used in predicting the wear resistance of rubber track pads. The main causes of track pad failure in service tests performed over the past 17 years were found to be chunking, c...

E. W. Bergstrom

1971-01-01

445

A Laboratory Evaluation of Wipe Testing Based on Lead Oxide Surface Contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although wipe testing has been used extensively as a measure of surface contamination in industrial hygiene, few scientific studies have been reported to validate the procedure with respect to quantitative recovery, repeatability or methodology. Consequently, a laboratory evaluation of wipe testing with particular attention to the OSHA procedure was undertaken using lead oxide dust as the test contaminant. A dust

CHAIYUTH CHAVALITNITIKUL; LESTER LEVIN

1984-01-01

446

Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory for K-Area Interim Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The DOE 3013 storage standard requires nested, welded 300 series stainless steel containers to store plutonium-bearing materials for up to 50 years. Packaged contents include stabilized plutonium-bearing residues that contain chloride salts and a low (< 0.5 weight %) water content. The DOE 3013 STD requires surveillance of the packages over the 50 year lifetime. These surveillance requirements have been further defined by the Integrated Surveillance Program to include both non-destructive examination (NDE) and destructive examination (DE) of the 3013 container. The DE portion of surveillance involves examining the 3013 nested containers, analyzing the head space gas, and evaluating the plutonium oxide chemistry. At SRS, the stored 3013 containers will undergo preparation for the DE surveillance activities in facilities located in K-Area. The actual DE surveillance will be performed in SRNL. This report provides preliminary functional requirements for the destructive examination (DE) of plutonium-bearing oxide materials and containers in support of K-Area Interim Surveillance (KIS). The KIS project will install interim facilities to prepare the samples for analysis in SRNL. This document covers the requirements for the interim period beginning in 2007, and lasting until the Container Storage and Surveillance Capability (CSSC) project provides the permanent facilities in K-Area to perform sampling and repackaging operations associated with the 3013 container storage and surveillance program. Initial requirements for the CSSC project have been previously defined in WSRC-TR-2004-00584 ''Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory''. As part of the Plutonium Surveillance Program of 3013 Containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will receive the emptied 3013 container components, plutonium oxide samples and headspace gas samples from K-Area. The DE program scope includes chemical and metallurgical analyses for a maximum of 25 DE sets a year to provide essential data in support of the SRS Plutonium Surveillance Program. The normal operation is expected to be approximately 15 DE sets a year.

Stefek, T. M.

2005-09-29

447

Fundamental Theories and Concepts for Developing a Versatile Laboratory Permeability Test System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluation of the hydraulic properties of geological and/or synthetic materials has practical implications in earth science, geotechnical and geo-environmental fields. Typical examples include determination of hydraulic properties of natural and engineered barrier materials for the design and assessment of underground facilities associated with geological disposal of radioactive nuclear wastes. Traditional techniques such as the constant head and falling head permeability test methods have been using in most geotechnical laboratories. A few laboratories also use the constant flow rate permeability test method, generally known as the flow pump permeability test method, for testing specimens having relatively low permeability. In most cases, a laboratory system is designed and developed for performing one or two specific test methods and simplified equations are used to calculate only the value of permeability. In fact, different methods have different characteristics and are applicable to different permeability ranges. And simultaneous evaluation of the specific storage of test specimen, another parameter related to unsteady flow in geological materials, is of fundamental importance in many engineering practices. In this study, the concepts for most of possible laboratory permeability tests are systematically reviewed and summarized. Constant head, falling head and constant flow rate are considered to be possible boundary conditions for the upstream end of a test specimen, and constant head and rising tailing water are considered to be possible boundary conditions for the downstream end of a test specimen, respectively. By combining proper boundary conditions for the upstream and downstream ends of a test specimen, different types of permeability test can be organized and implemented. Based on the conceptual discussions, a schematic drawing of a versatile permeability test system is designed and illustrated. Corresponding to the individual permeability tests, rigorous analytical solutions for different test methods are summarized and used to discuss the characteristics of each test method. The fundamental concepts and theories presented in this paper offer a practical reference for developing a versatile laboratory permeability test system and provide an analytical basis for interpreting experimental results.

Zhang, M.; Takeda, M.; Nakajima, H.

2006-12-01

448

Laboratory Testing of Internal Bracing Systems for a Lightweight Relocatable Structure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents laboratory testing and evaluation of internal lateral bracing schemes for use in commerically available, off-the-shelf lightweight relocatable structures (LRS) selected for possible military application in a Theater of Operations (TO...

A. M. Kao S. C. Sweeney

1986-01-01

449

Process Monitoring Concepts for Safeguards and Demonstrations at an Oak Ridge National Laboratory Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility has been constructed to demonstrate advanced equipment, processes, and controls for use in future reproc...

M. H. Ehinger

1986-01-01

450

Some Laboratory Tests of the Accuracy of the Belfort Universal Recording Raingage.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were conducted with the Belfort Universal Recording Raingage to provide information on the instruments' response and accuracy with simulated light precipitation rates. Such rates are characteristic of many snowfalls in the Rocky Mountains...

L. Holman J. McPartland A. Super

1985-01-01

451

A Laboratory Test to Evaluate the Resistance of Refractories to Molten Slags.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the Federal Bureau of Mines project to develop new or improved materials for metallurgical furnace applications, research was conducted to develop a reproducible laboratory test for evaluating the resistance of refractories to molten slags. Tes...

J. R. Cobble L. Y. Sadler

1980-01-01

452

Building 832 and Small Neighborhood Applications for Sandia Laboratories Solar Energy System Test Bed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Applications of Sandia Laboratories solar energy system test bed to Building 832 and to a small neighborhood of single family homes have been simulated by using the energy system simulation computer program SOLSYS. Component requirements and system perfor...

M. W. Edenburn

1975-01-01

453

FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH SHRIMP, MYSIDS, AND SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO FENTHION  

EPA Science Inventory

The authors conducted a series of laboratory pulse-exposure experiments to model short-term field exposures of two representative estuarine crustaceans, Penaeus duorarum and Mysidopsis bahia, to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion. These tests established acutely lethal and ...

454

Estimating Pesticide Effects on Fecundity Rates of Wild Birds Using Current Laboratory Reproduction Tests  

EPA Science Inventory

The manuscript reviews the issues concerning the use of results on pesticide effects from laboratory avian reproduction tests for estimating potential impacts of pesticides on fecundity rates in avian population models....

455

Intercomparison of Load Cell Verification Tests Performed by National Laboratories of Five Countries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A round-robin intercomparison of OILM IR 60 load cell verification tests, as performed by national laboratories of five countries, is reported. The five participating countries were Australia, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Netherlands, the United K...

R. A. Mitchell S. L. Yaniv K. Yee O. K. Warnlof

1989-01-01

456

Accelerated Laboratory Corrosion Test for Materials and Finishes Used in Naval Aircraft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An accelerated laboratory corrosion test has been developed to screen materials and finishes for use on naval aircraft. Sulfur dioxide is introduced at periodic intervals into a conventional salt fog chamber to simulate conditions produced by the carrier ...

S. J. Ketcham

1977-01-01

457

A study in test reproducibility between laboratories: Report of a Pseudomonas Working Party  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results are reported of a collaborative study in laboratories of 17 tests commonly used for pseudomonads, together with statistical analysis of the results in the form of analyses of variance. The studies involved 59 strains.

P. H. A. Sneath; Vera G. Collins

1974-01-01

458

Acoustic emissions verification testing of International Space Station experiment racks at the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH, provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL's primary customer has been the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), a multirack microgravity

James C. Akers; Paul J. Passe; Beth A. Cooper

2005-01-01

459

Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

NONE

1994-12-01

460

Comparison of laboratory performance with blind and mail-distributed proficiency testing samples.  

PubMed Central

Simulated addict urine samples containing drugs were sent to collaborating hospital administrators and officials of methadone centers, who then forwarded the samples to their supporting laboratories as though they were ordinary specimens from patients. The laboratories, which were already participating in the proficiency testing program of the Center for Disease Control, received the identical test samples in the mail as part of a regular Center for Disease Control proficiency testing program. Most of the laboratories performed acceptably with the mail-distributed samples, but many performed poorly when the identical samples were sent to them as if they were specimens from patients. Because of the limitations of proficiency testing involving mail-distribution samples and the impracticality of extensive testing with blind samples on a national level, the Center for Disease Control proposes to compliment its regular proficiency testing program with a monitored, onsite program of performance evaluation.

LaMotte, L C; Guerrant, G O; Lewis, D S; Hall, C T

1977-01-01

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