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1

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2010-07-01

2

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2014-07-01

3

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2013-07-01

4

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2011-07-01

5

33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334...experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted...southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

2012-07-01

6

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 300 area facility liquid effluent monitoring: 1994 and 1995 field tests  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Effluent Management Services manages liquid waste streams from some of the 300 Area buildings on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to ensure liquid discharges to the Columbia River are in compliance with permit requirements. The buildings are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 and FY 1995, three field tests were conducted to gather information that could be used to (1) increase the understanding of 300 Area building liquid waste streams based on the characterization and monitoring data collected during calendar year (CY) 1994 and CY 1995 and (2) establish improved methods for evaluating facility releases. The three field tests were (1) an evaluation of a continuous monitoring/event-triggered sampling system, (2) a volatile organic compound hold-time study, and (3) an investigation of the dilution and retention properties of the 300 Area process sewer. The results from the first field test showed that future characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams could benefit significantly from augmenting continuous monitoring with event-triggered sampling. Current continuous-monitoring practices (i.e., monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow) cannot detect discharges of organic pollutants. Effluent control effectiveness would be enhanced by incorporating a continuous total organic carbon analyzer in the system to detect events involving releases of organic compounds. In the second field test, sample hold times were shown to have a significant effect on volatile organic compound data. Samples analyzed in the field within 1 hour of collection generally had 1.5 to 3 times higher volatile organic compound concentrations than those analyzed 1.5 to 4 weeks later at on-site and off-site laboratories, respectively. The number of volatile organic compounds detected also decreased with increasing hold times.

Riley, R.G.; Thompson, C.J.; Damberg, E.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1997-07-01

7

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

NONE

1994-12-31

8

Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer.

Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Isotope Geology; Kuntz, M.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Branch of Central Regional Geology

1994-12-31

9

HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID33-E  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area

Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

2005-01-01

10

Toxicity test of the F-Area seep soils by laboratory lettuce seed germination and seedling growth  

SciTech Connect

This study is a follow-up of a similar study done by Loehle (1990). The objectives of the original study were to: (1) measure the toxicity of groundwater contaminated by the F-Area seepage basins where this water surfaces in a seepline along Fourmile Branch and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of rainwater for washing contaminants from the soil. Results of seed germination tests show no significant difference between water extracted from one extraction of F-Area seepline soil, soil from a control area, the sixth consecutive extraction from F-Area soil, and a deionized water control. A root-growth assay on the same seeds shows a significant effect with the order of growth, first extraction of F-Area soilArea extraction. When compared to the results of the 1990 study, this suggests that there may be some improvement in the soil at the F-Area seepline, but there is still some evidence of phytotoxicity in this soil. As shown previously, the cause of the toxicity is removed by soil washing, suggesting that continued improvement should be expected.

Eaton, D.; Murphy, C.E.

1993-09-01

11

Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

2013-06-01

12

Computer integrated laboratory testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective is the integration of computers into the Engineering Materials Science Laboratory course, where existing test equipment is not computerized. The first lab procedure is to demonstrate and produce a material phase change curve. The second procedure is a demonstration of the modulus of elasticity and related stress-strain curve, plastic performance, maximum and failure strength. The process of recording data by sensors that are connected to a data logger which adds a time base, and the data logger in turn connected to a computer, places the materials labs into a computer integrated mode with minimum expense and maximum flexibility. The sensor signals are input into a spread sheet for tabular records, curve generation, and graph printing.

Dahl, Charles C.

1992-01-01

13

Comparing laboratory column test treatments with field profiles of fecal indicator bacteria and virus from concentrated source areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fecal contamination of potable water supplies is prevalent throughout the developing world. In rural Bangladesh, groundwater contamination of shallow unconfined aquifers is attributed to the infiltration of fecal organisms from sewage ponds, sewage ditches and latrines. However, few studies conclusively link sources to wells at the scale required for microbial transport to occur. We present a combined field and laboratory investigation into the transport of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enteric viral indicator F+ RNA coliphage (MS-2) using drive point piezometers and extracted sediment cores. Fieldwork and coring took place in the Matlab Upazila, Bangladesh. Field measurements at the 100-cm scale were made using an array of three drive-point piezometers under highly contaminated ponds and canals over a 10-day period during the peak of the monsoon season. The profiles of E. coli detected under ponds and canals by a culture-based most probable number method were consistent with a first order filtration rate over the distances studied and filtration rates ranged from 1 - 8 m-1. In order to determine possible attachment mechanisms and the influence of sediment treatments applied in laboratory testing, duplicate column transport studies at the 10-cm scale were performed on intact cores processed immediately on-site, intact cores preserved by freezing, dried repacked sediment, acid-washed repacked sediment, and a uniform silica sand. Two ionic strengths (3.5 and 20 mM) were used to encompass the range of electrical conductivity typically found in the shallow portion of the aquifer. Columns were dissected and the attached E. coli quantified by section. Even at the solution chemistry less favorable for particle attachment (low ionic strength), filtration rates for the core tested on-site predict a transport distance of 0.5m for a 4-log unit reduction in E. coli concentration. Although the filtration rates found in the field study are lower than those found from column studies, calculations using the highest initial concentration and the lowest filtration rate observed predict travel distances (4-log reduction) up to 7m within the aquifer. This finding has important implications for the microbial safety of populations relying on shallow untreated well water because it indicates that factors such as preferential flow pathways or poor well construction may be more important than transport along a hydraulic gradient, even in a relatively uniform sandy aquifer with concentrated sewage sources.

Feighery, J.; Culligan, P.; Ferguson, A. S.; Mailloux, B. J.; McKay, L. D.; Ahmed, K.; Alam, M.; Huq, M.; Emch, M.; Serre, M. L.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

2010-12-01

14

Genetic Testing Laboratory Directory  

MedlinePLUS

... names, disease names, phenotypes, gene symbols and names, protein names, laboratory names, directors and locations. Search term ... phenotypes by searching for disease names, traits, drugs, proteins and analytes. Find genes by searching gene symbols ...

15

IMPROVED LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a program to evaluate an Improved Laboratory Dispersant Effectiveness Test (ILDET) which was developed to replace EPA's Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test (RSDET). The report summarizes the development of the IL...

16

Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014  

SciTech Connect

The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

Alan Giesbrecht

2014-05-01

17

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

2002-06-01

18

Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E  

SciTech Connect

These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

1999-04-01

19

300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-09-30

20

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01

21

Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)  

SciTech Connect

A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct responsibility of the specific facility manager. The specific DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, guidance documents and good industry practices that serve as the basis for each element/subelement are identified and aligned with each subelement.

Kammenzind, D.E.

1997-05-28

22

Laboratory Safety Survey Sec. Area of Interest  

E-print Network

Laboratory Safety Survey Room: PI: Date: Sec. Area of Interest A General Lab Safety Y N N/A COS 1? MSDS Available? 4 Do lab personnel know location of safety plan? 5 Is there disinfectant Biohazard signs properly posted? 2 Radiation signs properly posted? 3 Do lab personnel know MSDS location

Gelfond, Michael

23

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Confirming Anthrax Through the Laboratory Response Network Laboratory Testing - FAQs Collecting Specimens Recommended Specimens Information for Specific Groups Laboratory Professionals People Who Work with Animal Products Exposure to Hides/Drums Treatment of Products ...

24

Laboratory procedures for waste form testing  

SciTech Connect

The 100 and 300 areas of the Hanford Site are included on the US Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) National Priorities List under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Soil washing is a treatment process that is being considered for the remediation of the soil in these areas. Contaminated soil washing fines can be mixed or blended with cementations materials to produce stable waste forms that can be used for beneficial purposes in mixed or low-level waste landfills, burial trenches, environmental restoration sites, and other applications. This process has been termed co-disposal. The Co-Disposal Treatability Study Test Plan is designed to identify a range of cement-based formulations that could be used in disposal efforts in Hanford in co-disposal applications. The purpose of this document is to provide explicit procedural information for the testing of co-disposal formulations. This plan also provides a discussion of laboratory safety and quality assurance necessary to ensure safe, reproducible testing in the laboratory.

Mast, E.S.

1994-09-19

25

World of Forensic Laboratory Testing  

MedlinePLUS

... Was this page helpful? Overview | Forensic Pathology | Forensic Toxicology | Genetic Tests and DNA Typing | Testing in Cases ... Michael Jackson died in 2009, results of Forensic Toxicology tests on his brain tissue took almost a ...

26

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB. 8 AUG 57." In upper left corner, photo no. "8462 57" cropped out: "A-AFFTC 8 AUG 57, RETL TEST AREA" This photo is a high oblique view, showing the wing of the photo plane and Test Area 1-115. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

27

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2011-04-01

28

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2012-04-01

29

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2013-04-01

30

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2014-04-01

31

21 CFR 640.67 - Laboratory tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.67 Laboratory tests. Each unit of Source Plasma shall be tested for evidence of infection due to communicable disease agents as...

2010-04-01

32

Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice  

MedlinePLUS

... this website will be limited. Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this page helpful? Introduction | Why develop new tests | Regulation | Gaining acceptance | Conclusion | Article Sources Overview ...

33

Evaluation of Mycology Laboratory Proficiency Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes over the last decade in overt proficiency testing (OPT) regulations have been ostensibly directed at improving laboratory performance on patient samples. However, the overt (unblinded) format of the tests and regulatory penalties associated with incorrect values allow and encourage laboratorians to take extra precau- tions with OPT analytes. As a result OPT may measure optimal laboratory performance instead of

ANDREW A. REILLY; IRA F. SALKIN; MICHAEL R. MCGINNIS; SALLY GROMADZKI; LESTER PASARELL; MAGGI KEMNA; NANCY HIGGINS; MAX SALFINGER

1999-01-01

34

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

Winkler, J.

2012-03-01

35

42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

2010-10-01

36

Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

37

Laboratory tests and compliance of dermatologic outpatients.  

PubMed

Laboratory tests, including blood tests and urine analysis, are frequently performed in the dermatology outpatient clinic, but doctors often do not consider the cognitive or psychological effect of the examinations. Based on terror management theory, we hypothesized that performing laboratory tests increases the patient's fear of mortality, and therefore has a positive effect on the patient's attitude toward the doctor's recommendations and willingness to accept them. The study employed a single factor between-subjects design, using a questionnaire completed by the patients. One group consisted of patients who had undergone laboratory tests 1 week before the survey, and the other group consisted of patients who had not undergone a laboratory test. Although the differences between two groups were not statistically significant, the patients who had laboratory tests had tendency to show even lower positive attitude toward the doctor's recommendations and less intention to follow the recommendations. In contrast to our hypothesis, performing laboratory tests does not subliminally increase patients' fears or anxieties about their disease or their compliance with doctors' recommendations. PMID:24555101

Shin, Won Ung; Baek, Yoo Sang; Kim, Tom Joonhwan; Oh, Chil Hwan; Kim, Jaehwan

2013-01-01

38

The Mars Science Laboratory Touchdown Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Touchdown Test Program for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, a facility was developed to use a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the Skycrane landing event.

White, Christopher; Frankovich, John; Yates, Phillip; Wells Jr, George H.; Losey, Robert

2009-01-01

39

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

40

Variation in properties of nuclear test areas and media at the Nevada Test Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data have gradually been accumulating on the physical properties of nuclear test sites at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) since underground testing began there in 1957. These data have been stored in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program`s Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank. This report briefly describes the principal test areas (Yucca

N. W. Howard

1985-01-01

41

7 CFR 58.442 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Laboratory and quality control tests. ...442 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a) Chemical analyses —(1...assure compliance with composition requirements. (2) Test method. Chemical analysis...

2010-01-01

42

Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions.

These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011.

This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2008-01-01

43

42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

2010-10-01

44

Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

NONE

1995-04-01

45

Systems integration test laboratory application & experiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to safely control highly dynamic systems is of prime importance to designers. Whether the system is an aircraft, spacecraft, or propulsion system, control system designers must turn to test laboratories not only to verify and validate the control systems, but also to actually use the laboratory as a design and development tool. The use of the laboratory early in the development phase of a system—prior to committing to actual hardware/software (HW/SW)—permits early detection of system anomalies, thereby minimizing program development costs while enhancing safety. Later the laboratory can be used to train system operators (for example, pilots, ground crew) in preparation for flight/ground test. In the case of the statically unstable X-29 forward swept wing aircraft, a comprehensive real-time, hardware-in-the-loop test facility was critical in the development of the aircraft's digital fly-by-wire (FBW) flight control system. The X-29 laboratory initially was used to introduce control laws to a simulated real-time environment to verify control system characteristics. Later, actual flight hardware was introduced to the laboratory, at which point the formal system verification/validation test program began. The test program utilized detailed test plans and procedures derived from system requirements and specifications to map out all tests required. This assured that the maximum number of components of the system were exercised in the laboratory, and all components tested had traceability throughout the test program. The end-to-end hardware-in-the loop simulation provided the environment to perform critical failure modes testing, parameter sensitivity evaluation and ultimately pilot/ground crew training during normal and degraded flight control system operation. The X-29 test experience, applicable to the laboratory testing of all critical control systems, has ingrained the philosophy that successful development of complex systems requires an orderly build-up of complexity within the laboratory. By this we mean that components of the simulation are introduced to the laboratory only when previous additions are well understood and formally verified by prescribed testing procedures. First, non-real-time computer models of the system are developed (for example, stability derivatives from scale model wind tunnel data). Upon reaching a level of maturity, these non-real-time codes are implemented and verified in a real-time environment. The real-time implementation is important because it lends itself to interfacing with actual flight hardware and software for final verification/validation (V/V) and training. This philosophy of laboratory management for critical control systems test is not limited to aircraft applications. Any dynamic control system could be developed and tested in a fashion similar to the X-29 control system. The gradual buildup of complexity in the laboratory commencing with non-real-time math modeling, leading to real-time, hard-ware-in-the-loop validation and ultimately operator training is a necessary procedure for obtaining safe, reliable systems. This paper discusses the experience gained from the development of the X-29 digital flight control system, use of the laboratory for development, verification and validation, and how this test philosophy is applied to any system.

Rimer, Melvyn; Falco, Michael; Solan, Michael J.

1991-01-01

46

Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment.

Bossi, R.H.

1982-04-21

47

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR AREAS SOUTH OF PERCH AVENUE. "COLD" SERVICES NORTH OF PERCH. ADVANCED TEST REACTOR IN NEW SECTION WEST OF COLD SERVICES SECTION. NEW PERIMETER FENCE ENCLOSES BETA RAY SPECTROMETER, TRA-669, AN ATR SUPPORT FACILITY, AND ATR STACK. UTM LOCATORS HAVE BEEN DELETED. IDAHO NUCLEAR CORPORATION, FROM A BLAW-KNOX DRAWING, 3/1968. INL INDEX NO. 530-0100-00-400-011646, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

48

Problems and solutions in laboratory testing for hemophilia.  

PubMed

A diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B begins with clinical assessment of the patient and is facilitated by laboratory testing. The influence of the latter on a diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B is clear-a diagnosis cannot be made without laboratory confirmation of a deficiency of factor FVIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. Moreover, the degree of hemophilia severity is specifically characterized by laboratory test results. In turn, patient management, including choice and application of therapies, is influenced by the diagnosis, as well as by identification of respective disease severity. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to inappropriate management and unnecessary therapy, and thus to adverse outcomes. Moreover, identification of factor inhibitors in hemophilia will lead to additional and differential treatments, and incorrect identification of inhibitors or inhibitor levels may also lead to inappropriate management. Problems in hemophilia diagnosis or inhibitor detection can occur at any stage in the clinical diagnosis/laboratory interface, from the "pre-preanalytical" to "preanalytical" to "analytical" to "postanalytical" to "post-postanalytical." This report outlines the various problems in laboratory testing for hemophilia and provides various strategies or solutions to overcome these challenges. Although some outlined solutions are specific to the potential errors related to hemophilia, others are general in nature and can be applied to other areas of laboratory hemostasis. Key to improvement in this area is adoption of best practice by all involved, including clinicians, phlebotomists, and laboratories. Also key is the recognition that such errors may occur, and thus that clinicians should assess laboratory test results in the context of their patient's clinical history and follow-up any potential errors, thus avoid misdiagnoses, by requesting repeat testing on a fresh sample. PMID:24026910

Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Meijer, Piet; Jennings, Ian; Sioufi, John; Bonar, Roslyn A; Kitchen, Dianne P; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Lippi, Giuseppe

2013-10-01

49

Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Orndoff, Evelyne

2012-01-01

50

Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

2009-01-01

51

SINGLE LABORATORY EVALUATION OF PHYTOTOXICITY TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The phytotoxicity method is a screening test used to predict the potential impact of chemicals on seed germination and early seedling growth. An evaluation of the procedure was conducted in order to establish the data quality that could be achieved within a single laboratory and ...

52

Name ___________________________________________ Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

Solids $28 per sample (pH, conductivity, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, B, and % moistureName ___________________________________________ Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Texas AgriLife Extension Service B14 BIOSOLID SAMPLE INFORMATION FORM

53

49 CFR 199.107 - Drug testing laboratory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug testing laboratory. 199.107 Section 199.107 Transportation...CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.107 Drug testing laboratory....

2010-10-01

54

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory...

2013-10-01

55

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

... 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory...

2014-10-01

56

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory...

2011-10-01

57

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory...

2010-10-01

58

42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and...diagnostic tests. All diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory...

2012-10-01

59

Parachute Testing for Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2007-01-01

60

Extracting laboratory test information from biomedical text  

PubMed Central

Background: No previous study reported the efficacy of current natural language processing (NLP) methods for extracting laboratory test information from narrative documents. This study investigates the pathology informatics question of how accurately such information can be extracted from text with the current tools and techniques, especially machine learning and symbolic NLP methods. The study data came from a text corpus maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, containing a rich set of information on laboratory tests and test devices. Methods: The authors developed a symbolic information extraction (SIE) system to extract device and test specific information about four types of laboratory test entities: Specimens, analytes, units of measures and detection limits. They compared the performance of SIE and three prominent machine learning based NLP systems, LingPipe, GATE and BANNER, each implementing a distinct supervised machine learning method, hidden Markov models, support vector machines and conditional random fields, respectively. Results: Machine learning systems recognized laboratory test entities with moderately high recall, but low precision rates. Their recall rates were relatively higher when the number of distinct entity values (e.g., the spectrum of specimens) was very limited or when lexical morphology of the entity was distinctive (as in units of measures), yet SIE outperformed them with statistically significant margins on extracting specimen, analyte and detection limit information in both precision and F-measure. Its high recall performance was statistically significant on analyte information extraction. Conclusions: Despite its shortcomings against machine learning methods, a well-tailored symbolic system may better discern relevancy among a pile of information of the same type and may outperform a machine learning system by tapping into lexically non-local contextual information such as the document structure. PMID:24083058

Kang, Yanna Shen; Kayaalp, Mehmet

2013-01-01

61

Could light meal jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests?  

PubMed Central

Background: Presently the necessity of fasting time for coagulation tests is not standardized. Our hypothesis is that this can harm patient safety. This study is aimed at evaluating whether a light meal (i.e. breakfast) can jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests. Materials and methods: A blood sample was firstly collected from 17 fasting volunteers (12 h). Immediately after blood collection, the volunteers consumed a light meal. Then samples were collected at 1, 2 and 4 h after the meal. Coagulation tests included: activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin III (AT), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS). Differences between samples were assessed by Wilcoxon ranked-pairs test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Mean % differences were determined and differences between and baseline and 1, 2 and 4h samples were compared with reference change value (RCV). Results: A significantly higher % activity of AT was observed at 1 h and 4 h after meal vs. baseline specimen [113 (104–117) and 111 (107–120) vs. 109 (102–118), respectively; P = 0.029 and P = 0.016]. APTT at 2 h was found significantly lower than baseline samples [32.0 (29.9–34.8) vs. 34.1 (32.2–35.2), respectively; P = 0.041]. The results of both Fbg and PS tests were not influenced by a light meal. Furthermore, no coagulation tests had significant variation after comparison with RCV. Conclusion: A light meal does not influence the laboratory coagulation tests we assessed, but we suggest that the laboratory quality managers standardize the fasting time for all blood tests at 12 hours, to completely metabolize the lipids intake. PMID:25351352

Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

2014-01-01

62

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01

63

Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

E-print Network

as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and production. The Laboratory this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. The project brings the Laboratory of a highly successful environmental cleanup project at Material Disposal Area B," said Ed Worth, federal

64

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

Situ, Cindy H.

2010-01-01

65

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1993-06-01

66

Laboratory testing for secondary osteoporosis evaluation.  

PubMed

Osteoporosis has been classified into primary and secondary forms. All patients with osteoporosis should have measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum and urine calcium, and some estimation of renal function. There are a wide variety of disorders that lead to secondary osteoporosis, and the tests that confirm these diagnoses are described herein. Making the specific diagnosis is important because treatment of the underlying condition may be sufficient to lessen fracture risk, although some patients may also need usual treatment for osteoporosis. Laboratory testing in addition to a careful history and physical examination will often lead to diagnoses of treatable conditions. PMID:22333732

Adler, Robert A

2012-08-01

67

The laboratory test utilization management toolbox  

PubMed Central

Efficiently managing laboratory test utilization requires both ensuring adequate utilization of needed tests in some patients and discouraging superfluous tests in other patients. After the difficult clinical decision is made to define the patients that do and do not need a test, a wealth of interventions are available to the clinician and laboratorian to help guide appropriate utilization. These interventions are collectively referred to here as the utilization management toolbox. Experience has shown that some tools in the toolbox are weak and other are strong, and that tools are most effective when many are used simultaneously. While the outcomes of utilization management studies are not always as concrete as may be desired, what data is available in the literature indicate that strong utilization management interventions are safe and effective measures to improve patient health and reduce waste in an era of increasing financial pressure. PMID:24969916

Baird, Geoffrey

2014-01-01

68

Large area damage testing of optics  

SciTech Connect

The damage threshold specifications for the National Ignition Facility will include a mixture of standard small-area tests and new large-area tests. During our studies of laser damage and conditioning processes of various materials we have found that some damage morphologies are fairly small and this damage does not grow with further illumination. This type of damage might not be detrimental to the laser performance. We should therefore assume that some damage can be allowed on the optics, but decide on a maximum damage allowance of damage. A new specification of damage threshold termed {open_quotes}functional damage threshold{close_quotes} was derived. Further correlation of damage size and type to system performance must be determined in order to use this measurement, but it is clear that it will be a large factor in the optics performance specifications. Large-area tests have verified that small-area testing is not always sufficient when the optic in question has defect-initiated damage. This was evident for example on sputtered polarizer and mirror coatings where the defect density was low enough that the features could be missed by standard small- area testing. For some materials, the scale-length at which damage non-uniformities occur will effect the comparison of small-area and large-area tests. An example of this was the sub-aperture tests on KD*P crystals on the Beamlet test station. The tests verified the large-area damage threshold to be similar to that found when testing a small-area. Implying that for this KD*P material, the dominate damage mechanism is of sufficiently small scale-length that small-area testing is capable of determining the threshold. The Beamlet test station experiments also demonstrated the use of on-line laser conditioning to increase the crystals damage threshold.

Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Stolz, C. [and others

1996-04-26

69

Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

Wagner, R.N.

1997-01-17

70

The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies  

E-print Network

- 1 - The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies for Geothermal Monitoring-Dinger Geothermal Program Office, U. S. Navy, China Lake, CA 93555-6001 Keith.Richards-Dinge@navy.mil Keywords of three-component digital seismometers at the Coso geothermal area, California, supplemented by 14

Foulger, G. R.

71

Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

1987-02-01

72

Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

McAtee, R.E.

1991-09-01

73

Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

74

[Nursing] Test Pool Questions. Area II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual consists of area 2 test pool questions which are designed to assist instructors in selecting appropriate questions to help prepare practical nursing students for the Oklahoma state board exam. Multiple choice questions are utilized to facilitate testing of nursing 2 curriculum objectives. Each test contains questions covering each…

Watkins, Nettie; Patton, Bob

75

Electronics systems test laboratory testing of shuttle communications systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shuttle communications and tracking systems space to space and space to ground compatibility and performance evaluations are conducted in the NASA Johnson Space Center Electronics Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL). This evaluation is accomplished through systems verification/certification tests using orbiter communications hardware in conjunction with other shuttle communications and tracking external elements to evaluate end to end system compatibility and to verify/certify that overall system performance meets program requirements before manned flight usage. In this role, the ESTL serves as a multielement major ground test facility. The ESTL capability and program concept are discussed. The system test philosophy for the complex communications channels is described in terms of the major phases. Results of space to space and space to ground systems tests are presented. Several examples of the ESTL's unique capabilities to locate and help resolve potential problems are discussed in detail.

Stoker, C. J.; Bromley, L. K.

1985-01-01

76

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2012-04-01

77

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2013-04-01

78

19 CFR 151.71 - Laboratory testing for clean yield.  

...AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.71 Laboratory testing for clean...to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory...laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial...

2014-04-01

79

Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft  

SciTech Connect

Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

1981-10-01

80

Picatinny Arsenal 3000 Area Laboratory Complex Energy Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request by Picatinny Arsenal, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked by the Army to conduct an energy audit of the Arsenal’s 3000 Area Laboratory Complex. The objective of the audit was to identify life-cycle cost-effective measures that the Arsenal could implement to reduce energy costs. A “walk-through” audit of the facilities was conducted on December 7-8, 2009. Findings and recommendations are included in this document.

Brown, Daryl R.; Goddard, James K.

2010-05-01

81

CUBIC: laboratory testing of 'thin poly' CCDs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CUBIC, the Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument Using CCDs, is designed to make moderate resolution X-ray spectral measurements at spatial scales of a few degrees. While the energy range is nominally 200 eV - 10 keV, the CCDs have been designed to maximize the soft X-ray performance by using novel structures. The CUBIC CCDs, fabricated by Loral Fairchild, are 1024 X 1024 pixels in size, with 18 micrometers X 18 micrometers pixels. The CCDs use a new `thin poly' gate structure designed to maximize low energy quantum efficiency, while still retaining the advantages of front-side illumination and the high Charge Transfer Efficiency of a three-phase device. Being front-side illuminated, the design avoids the surface stability problems of backside illuminated devices. Fabrication of the first lot of CCDs and test structures has been completed, and we report laboratory camera testing of the CCDs at Penn State.

Skinner, Mark A.; Burrows, David N.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lumb, David H.; Nousek, John A.

1993-11-01

82

Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

Teate, Anthony A.

1997-01-01

83

Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

2010-02-01

84

DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO  

E-print Network

DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO NATIONAL University 1983 #12;DISPERSAL AND HARVEST OF SAGE GROUSE UTILIZING THE TEST REACTOR AREA ON THE IDAHO observations of sage grouse using the Test Reactor Area (TRA) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

85

UF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

): add $5 per sample. Test A. The pH and Lime Requirement Test provides the following information: · Soil and vegetable garden publications 3. Need only the soil pH test Test B. The Soil Fertility Test provides. Revised November 2013 SL136 LANDSCAPE & VEGETABLE GARDEN TEST FORM · Soil pH · Lime Requirement · P · K

Florida, University of

86

11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking north. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

87

19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking toward east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, machinery, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

88

18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing northwest corner. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

89

Teacher Testing and the Pacific Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper was to ascertain in some measure the direction teacher testing may take in the Pacific Area states other than Guam and Hawaii. Guam and Hawaii have installed teacher testing programs and have clearly established certification requirements that make it mandatory for teacher applicants to have baccalaureates. The other…

Adachi, Mitsuo

90

TESTING OF THE RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, nonelectrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. Positive results from initial deployment trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and the anticipated future potential use of RadBall throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further test, underpin, and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. The study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment were successful in that for each trial radiation tracks were visible. The deployment of RadBall can be accomplished in different ways depending on the size and characteristics of the contaminated area (e.g., a hot cell that already has a crane/manipulator available or highly contaminated room that requires the use of a remote control device with sensor and video equipment to position RadBall). This report also presents SRNL-designed RadBall accessories for future RadBall deployment (a harness, PODS, and robot).

Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

2010-02-10

91

Press room of the Crew reception Area, Lunar Receivng Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Room 190 of the Support and Administrative Facilities, Crew Reception Area (CRA), Lunar Receiving Laboratory, Bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas. The room is a debriefing room which facilitates indirect contact with the astronauts and CRA medical staff during quarantine periods. Also called the press room.

1967-01-01

92

Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

1994-06-01

93

CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

Farfan, E.

2009-11-23

94

The mass storage testing laboratory at GSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Industry-wide benchmarks exist for measuring the performance of processors (SPECmarks), and of database systems (Transaction Processing Council). Despite storage having become the dominant item in computing and IT (Information Technology) budgets, no such common benchmark is available in the mass storage field. Vendors and consultants provide services and tools for capacity planning and sizing, but these do not account for the complete set of metrics needed in today's archives. The availability of automated tape libraries, high-capacity RAID systems, and high- bandwidth interconnectivity between processor and peripherals has led to demands for services which traditional file systems cannot provide. File Storage and Management Systems (FSMS), which began to be marketed in the late 80's, have helped to some extent with large tape libraries, but their use has introduced additional parameters affecting performance. The aim of the Mass Storage Test Laboratory (MSTL) at Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop a test suite that includes not only a comprehensive check list to document a mass storage environment but also benchmark code. Benchmark code is being tested which will provide measurements for both baseline systems, i.e. applications interacting with peripherals through the operating system services, and for combinations involving an FSMS. The benchmarks are written in C, and are easily portable. They are initially being aimed at the UNIX Open Systems world. Measurements are being made using a Sun Ultra 170 Sparc with 256MB memory running Solaris 2.5.1 with the following configuration: 4mm tape stacker on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; 4GB disk device on SCSI 2 Fast/Wide; and Sony Petaserve on Fast/Wide differential SCSI 2.

Venkataraman, Ravi; Williams, Joel; Michaud, David; Gu, Heng; Kalluri, Atri; Hariharan, P. C.; Kobler, Ben; Behnke, Jeanne; Peavey, Bernard

1998-01-01

95

14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1120. Specifications ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 7 of 148; file no. 1320/58, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338 Rev. C, Date: 16 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

96

Laboratory tests of short intense envelope solitons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stability of short intense nonlinear wave groups propagating over deep water is tested in laboratory runs which are performed in the facility of the Technical University of Berlin. The strongly nonlinear simulation of quasi-steady nonlinear wave groups within the framework of the Euler equations is used to generate the surface elevation time series at a border of the water tank. Besides, the exact analytic solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation is used for this purpose. The time series is then transformed to a wave maker signal with use of a designed transfer algorithm. Wave group propagation along the tank was recorded by 4 distant gauges and by an array of 6 densely situated gauges. This setup allows to consider the wave evolution from 10 to 85 m from the wave maker, and to obtain the wave envelope shape directly from the instrumental data. In the experiments wave groups were characterized by the steepness values up to kAcr < 0.32 and kAtr < 0.24, where k is the mean wavenumber, Acr is the crest amplitude, and Atr is the trough amplitude; and the maximum local wave slope was up to 0.34. Wave breaking phenomenon was not observed in the experiments. Different mean wave numbers and wave groups of different intensities were considered. In some cases the wave groups exhibit noticeable radiation in the course of propagation, though the groups are not dispersed fully. The effect of finite water depth is found to be significant on the wave group stability. Intense wave groups have shorter time of adjustment, what in some sense may help them to manifest their individuality clearer. The experimental tests confirm recent numerical simulations of fully nonlinear equations, where very steep stable single and interacting nonlinear wave groups were reported [1-3]. The quasi-stationary wave groups observed in numerical and laboratory experiments are strongly nonlinear analogues of the nonlinear Schrodinger envelope solitons. The results emphasize the importance of long-living nonlinear wave groups in dynamics of intense sea waves. [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, A.O. Prokofiev, Eur. J. Mech. B / Fluids 25, 677 (2006). [2] A.I. Dyachenko, V.E. Zakharov, JETP Lett. 88, 307 (2008). [3] A.V. Slunyaev, JETP 109, 676 (2009).

Slunyaev, A.; Clauss, G. F.; Klein, M.; Onorato, M.

2012-04-01

97

[Standardization of laboratory tests for tuberculosis and their proficiency testing].  

PubMed

Explanations of proper collection procedures are imperative for accurate laboratory analysis. The quality of specimens collected and the proper transport of those specimens to the laboratory are critical to successful isolation of etiological agents. Most mycobacteria grow at a relatively slow rate. Therefore, the acid-fast smear plays an important role in the early diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. There are several methods of determining the acid-fast nature of an organism. In the carbolfuchsin procedures (Ziehl-Neelsen, Kinyoun), acid-fast organisms appear red, and in the fluorochrome procedures (auramine O, auramine-rhodamine, acridine orange), the acid-fast organisms fluoresce yellow to orange. Fluorochrome-stained slides may be directly restained with any of the carbolfuchsin staining procedures. This may be done to confirm a positive fluorochrome slide and to study organism morphology. In the last 10 years, there were many advances in the culture examinations of mycobacteria. The newly developed Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT), BacT/Alert, ESP Myco, MB Redox and KRD "Nichi B", biphasic Septi-Chek AFB and Myco-Acid, and radiometric BACTEC 460TB systems based on liquid media, proved to be significantly better than the egg-based solid media for the isolation of mycobacteria from clinical specimens. In addition to liquid-based medium, agar (Middlebrook 7H10 or 7H11)- or egg (Ogawa or Löwenstein-Jensen)-based media should be used in the primary isolation of mycobacteria. To identify mycobacteria, conventional biochemical tests are traditionally used. Key test can be used to identify species, or further preliminary grouping may be used. Other approaches to identifying some species of mycobacteria are available. They include niacin accumulation, p-nitrobenzoic acid and p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone tests for discrimination of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from mycobacteria other than M. tuberculosis (MOTT); DNA probe methods for identification or confirmation of the M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae; DNA-DNA hybridization method for identification of 22 Mycobacterium species; and gas-liquid chromatography or high performance liquid chromatography analyses for recognizing the patterns of the mycobacterial cell wall fatty acids or mycolic acids. The advantages of the last four methods are that they are capable of providing definitive identification within 2 to 5 h after adequate growth. Capilia TB is the newly developed immunochromatographic assay for rapid discrimination between the M. tuberculosis complex and MOTT bacilli. The kit can be easily used for rapid identification of the M. tuberculosis complex in combination with the culture systems based on liquid media. In addition, Capilia TB could correctly detect the M. tuberculosis complex from mixed cultures with the M. tuberculosis complex and MOTT bacilli. The WHO/IUATLD supranational reference laboratory (SRL) network was created in 1994, to ascertain the accuracy of the susceptibility test methods used in different laboratories across the world, and to allow comparability of the surveillance data gathered in countries participating in the Global Project on Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance. Today, the network has evolved and 23 SRLs actively participate. Results of five rounds of proficiency testing in the SRL network suggest that performance of the network has improved substantially through the years. This progress has been particularly evident for streptomycin and ethambutol sensitivity, which was very low in the first rounds of proficiency testing. In 1998 sensitivity for these two drugs was higher than 95%. For isoniazid and rifampin, sensitivity has been consistently high since the beginning of the Global Project. This indeed reflects the enhanced efforts made by the SRLs to improve their individual performance. PMID:14509226

Abe, Chiyoji

2003-08-01

98

10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking east. The control room is located in the center of the building and abuts the Test Cell 8, 9, and 10 and equipment room wings. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

99

Central Nevada Test Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Water level measurements were performed and water samples collected from the Central Nevada Test Area model validation wells in September 2006. Hydraulic head measurements were compared to previous observations; the MV wells showed slight recovery from the drilling and testing operation in 2005. No radioisotopes exceeded limits set in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan, and no significant trends were observed when compared to previous analyses.

Brad Lyles; Jenny Chapman; John Healey; David Gillespie

2006-09-30

100

Current issues of personnel and laboratory practices in genetic testing  

PubMed Central

As genetic testing is an area with implications extending far beyond that of the primary patient, it is appropriately an area that is under increased scrutiny. To ensure that high quality is maintained in the delivery of genetic services, several agencies have developed standards and guidelines. The present article summarises important recommendations made by the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG), the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the US Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as they relate to genetic testing. Some of the standards are based on voluntary compliance, whereas others have the force of regulation. They all address issues of personnel credentials, laboratory operations, and the most critical quality assurance and control measures for diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of various agencies. In most instances, the standards promulgated by these agencies are offered as minimum criteria. The exact impact of these regulations on the practice of medical genetics has yet to be established. Images PMID:8558555

Mark, Hon Fong Louie; Kelly, Thaddeus; Watson, Michael S; Hoeltge, Gerald; Miller, Wayne A; Beauregard, Laurent

1995-01-01

101

New technologies to improve laboratory testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several core technologies that are having, or will have, an impact on the clinical laboratory are discussed. These include instrument-related technologies such as computer technology, chemometrics, robotics, sensors, and biological technologies such as cell fusion and recombinant DNA.

Burtis, C. A.

102

Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV- 15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research effort of the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers was to obtain a preliminary, high quality database of far-field acoustics for terminal area operations of the XV-15 at a takeoff gross weight of approximately 14,000 lbs for various glide slopes, airspeeds, rotor tip speeds, and nacelle tilt angles. The test also was used to assess the suitability of the Crows Landing complex for full scale far-field acoustic testing. This was the first acoustic flight test of the XV-15 aircraft equipped with ATB involving approach and level flyover operations. The test involved coordination of numerous personnel, facilities and equipment. Considerable effort was made to minimize potential extraneous noise sources unique to the region during the test. Acoustic data from the level flyovers were analyzed, then compared with data from a previous test of the XV-15 equipped with Standard Metal Blades

SantaMaria, O. L.; Wellman, J. B.; Conner, D. A.; Rutledge, C. K.

1991-01-01

103

Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is in the Hot Creek Valley of south-central Nevada, approximately 70 miles northeast of Tonopah. The CNTA consists of three parcels totaling 2,560 acres. The parcels are spaced approximately 3 miles apart along a roughly north-south line. The total acreage is currently withdrawn from all forms of appropriation associated with mining laws and leasing. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), acquired the CNTA in the early 1960s to develop alternative sites to the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) for underground nuclear testing. Three emplacement boreholes (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4) were drilled on the three parcels at the CNTA for underground nuclear testing. The initial underground nuclear test at CNTA, Faultless, was conducted in borehole UC-1 at a depth of 3,199 feet below ground surface on January 19, 1968. The yield of the Faultless test was estimated to be 0.2 to 1 megaton. Its purpose was to evaluate the environmental and structural effects that might be expected if subsequent, higher-yield underground nuclear tests were conducted in this vicinity. The test resulted in a down-dropped fault block visible at land surface. In addition, seismic results supported the indication that the site was not favorable for larger detonations. The nuclear detonation created a cavity with a radius of approximately 328 feet. The Faultless test did not release any radioactivity at the surface, and no additional tests were conducted at the CNTA.

None

2009-04-01

104

Using Laboratory Models to Test Treatment  

PubMed Central

Rationale: Opioids are commonly used to relieve dyspnea, but clinical data are mixed and practice varies widely. Objectives: Evaluate the effect of morphine on dyspnea and ventilatory drive under well-controlled laboratory conditions. Methods: Six healthy volunteers received morphine (0.07 mg/kg) and placebo intravenously on separate days (randomized, blinded). We measured two responses to a CO2 stimulus: (1) perceptual response (breathing discomfort; described by subjects as “air hunger”) induced by increasing partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) during restricted ventilation, measured with a visual analog scale (range, “neutral” to “intolerable”); and (2) ventilatory response, measured in separate trials during unrestricted breathing. Measurements and Main Results: We determined the PetCO2 that produced a 60% breathing discomfort rating in each subject before morphine (median, 8.5 mm Hg above resting PetCO2). At the same PetCO2 after morphine administration, median breathing discomfort was reduced by 65% of its pretreatment value; P < 0.001. Ventilation fell 28% at the same PetCO2; P < 0.01. The effect of morphine on breathing discomfort was not significantly correlated with the effect on ventilatory response. Placebo had no effect. Conclusions: (1) A moderate morphine dose produced substantial relief of laboratory dyspnea, with a smaller reduction of ventilation. (2) In contrast to an earlier laboratory model of breathing effort, this laboratory model of air hunger established a highly significant treatment effect consistent in magnitude with clinical studies of opioids. Laboratory studies require fewer subjects and enable physiological measurements that are difficult to make in a clinical setting. Within-subject comparison of the response to carefully controlled laboratory stimuli can be an efficient means to optimize treatments before clinical trials. PMID:21778294

Adams, Lewis; O'Donnell, Carl R.; Gilman, Sean A.; Lansing, Robert W.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.

2011-01-01

105

In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

1991-05-01

106

100 area excavation treatability test plan  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01

107

Contextualizing Laboratory Administered Aural Comprehension Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental test consisting of dialogue with intermittent pauses for responses and a white noise accompaniment was given to non-English speakers who were candidates for admission to the English Department at Bar Ilan University in order to evaluate aural comprehension. Development of the test and results are reported. (RM)

Seliger, Herbert W.; Whiteson, Valerie

1975-01-01

108

National Media Laboratory media testing results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The government faces a crisis in data storage, analysis, archive, and communication. The sheer quantity of data being poured into the government systems on a daily basis is overwhelming systems ability to capture, analyze, disseminate, and store critical information. Future systems requirements are even more formidable: with single government platforms having data rate of over 1 Gbit/sec, greater than Terabyte/day storage requirements, and with expected data archive lifetimes of over 10 years. The charter of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is to focus the resources of industry, government, and academia on government needs in the evaluation, development, and field support of advanced recording systems.

Mularie, William

1993-01-01

109

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN...INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Test Procedures...Accreditation Program for the Efficiency of Electric Motors field of...NIST/NVLAP and its Efficiency of Electric Motors...

2011-01-01

110

10 CFR 431.18 - Testing laboratories.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN...INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Test Procedures...Accreditation Program for the Efficiency of Electric Motors field of...NIST/NVLAP and its Efficiency of Electric Motors...

2012-01-01

111

Laboratory Tests - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Khmer) Korean (???) Oromo (Afaan Oromo) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tigrinya (tigrinya) Ukrainian (??????????) ... Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Return to top Somali (af Soomaali) 24-Hour Urine Test Baarid Kaadi ...

112

Structures Test Laboratory (STL). User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the STL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Zipay, John J.

2011-01-01

113

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

Smith, D. F., LLNL

1998-05-01

114

EVALUATION OF THREE OIL SPILL LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA evaluated three laboratory Methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and currently required by regulation) in the United States, the Swirling Flask Test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-Dilution Test (used in France and other Eu...

115

Equipment qualification testing evaluation experiences at Sandia National Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USNRC has sponsored a number of programs at Sandia National Laboratories specifically addressing safety-related equipment qualification. The most visible of these programs has been the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program. Other relevant programs have included the Equipment Qualification Methodology Research Test program (CAP). Over a ten year period these programs have collectively tested numerous types of safety-related equipment. Some

L. D. Bustard; F. J. Wyant; L. L. Bonzon; K. T. Gillen

1986-01-01

116

COMPUTERIZED LABORATORY NOTEBOOK CONCEPT FOR GENETIC TOXICOLOGY EXPERIMENTATION AND TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

We describe a microcomputer system utilizing the Computerized Laboratory Notebook (CLN) concept developed in our laboratory for the purpose of automating the Battery of Leukocyte Tests (BLT). The BLT was designed to evaluate blood specimens for toxic, immunotoxic, and genotoxic e...

117

MANUAL FOR THE EVALUATION OF LABORATORIES PERFORMING AQUATIC TOXICITY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This manual describes guidelines and standardized procedures for conducting on-site audits and evaluations of laboratories performing toxicity tests. ncluded are pre-survey information activities, on-site evaluation activities, evaluation criteria, organizational history and labo...

118

76 FR 10500 - Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories Fees AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...the approach it uses for calculating the fees the Agency charges Nationally Recognized...and also is requiring prepayment of these fees. This adjustment increases the...

2011-02-25

119

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. Panoramic shot from atop Power Plant, Coal Testing Laboratory (left), Aerial Tramway Loading Terminal (center), and Huber Breaker (right) Photograph taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

120

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01

121

Laboratory tests for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare hematological disorder that is often suspected in a patient presenting with non-immune hemolytic anemia associated with pancytopenia or venous thrombosis. This disorder is a consequence of acquired somatic mutations in the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIG-A) gene in the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of patients. The presence of these mutations leads to production of blood cells with decreased glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface proteins, making red blood cells derived from the clone more sensitive to complement mediated hemolysis. The diagnosis of PNH may be difficult in some cases due a low proportion of PNH cells in the blood and occasionally due to difficulties in selecting the most appropriate diagnostic studies. The latest generation of tests allow for detection of very small populations of PNH cells, for following the natural course and response to therapy of the disease, and for helping to decide when to initiate therapy with monoclonal antibody targeting the terminal complement protein C5 (Eculizumab), anticoagulation, and in some cases allogeneic HSC transplant. In this article, we review the different diagnostic tests available to clinicians for PNH diagnosis. PMID:24127129

Preis, Meir; Lowrey, Christopher H

2014-03-01

122

Laboratory tests for reactive barrier design.  

PubMed

Owing to limitations of pump-and-treat, several technologies are being investigated for groundwater treatment. One of the most promising is the treatment of contaminants through the use of reactive barriers installed in situ, especially in the case of aquifers contaminated with chlorinated solvents. This work presents results of batch and column tests with metallic iron and some chlorinated solvents (1,2-DCA, 1,1,2-TCA and TCE). Such tests provided means to evaluate the degradation rates of these compounds and their byproducts. It is concluded that the reductive dechlorination with metallic iron can have different results, depending on the type of contaminant. Some contaminants may not present any degradation, or they have a half-life time so high that the use of the reactive barrier technology may not be practical. Furthermore, the formation of chlorinated byproducts, eventually more toxic than the original contaminant and that are not degradable using this same technology, emphasises that the treatment of aquifers should be sequential. PMID:15177731

Gusmão, Alexandre Duarte; de Campos, Tácio Mauro Pereira; Nobre, Manoel de Melo Maia; Vargas, Eurípedes do Amaral

2004-07-01

123

Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

Taylor, J.M.

1993-06-01

124

Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

Taylor, J.M.

1993-01-01

125

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...AGRICULTURE AGREEMENT ON THE INTERNATIONAL CARRIAGE OF PERISHABLE...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for...

2014-01-01

126

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...AGRICULTURE AGREEMENT ON THE INTERNATIONAL CARRIAGE OF PERISHABLE...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for...

2013-01-01

127

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...AGRICULTURE AGREEMENT ON THE INTERNATIONAL CARRIAGE OF PERISHABLE...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for...

2011-01-01

128

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...AGRICULTURE AGREEMENT ON THE INTERNATIONAL CARRIAGE OF PERISHABLE...stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates...stations, U.S. ATP testing laboratories, and fees for...

2012-01-01

129

Harmonization of laboratory testing - Current achievements and future strategies.  

PubMed

Harmonization in laboratory testing is more far-reaching than merely analytical harmonization. It includes all aspects of the total testing process from the "pre-pre-analytical" phase through analysis to the "post-post-analytical" phase. Harmonizing the pre-analytical phase requires use of standardized operating procedures for correct test selection, sample collection and handling, while standardized test terminology, and units and traceability to ISO standard 17511 are required to ensure equivalency of measurement results. Use of harmonized reference intervals and decision limits for analytes where platforms share allowable bias requirements will reduce inaccurate clinical interpretation and unnecessary laboratory testing. In the post-analytical phase, harmonized procedures for the management of critical laboratory test results are required to improve service quality and ensure patient safety. Monitoring of the outcomes of harmonization activities is through surveillance by external quality assessment schemes that use commutable materials and auditing of the "pre-pre-analytical" and "post-post-analytical" phases. Successful implementation of harmonization in laboratory testing requires input by all stakeholders, including the clinical laboratory community, diagnostics industry, clinicians, professional societies, IT providers, consumer advocate groups and governmental bodies. PMID:24001695

Tate, Jillian R; Johnson, Roger; Barth, Julian; Panteghini, Mauro

2014-05-15

130

Small UAS Test Area at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the areas that Dryden Flight Research Center has set up for testing small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). It also reviews the requirements and process to use an area for UAS test.

Bauer, Jeffrey T.

2008-01-01

131

Laboratory testing of closure cap repair techniques  

SciTech Connect

Landfill design requires a low permeability closure cap as well as a low permeability liner. The Savannah River Site, in South Carolina, has approximately 85 acres of mixed waste landfills covered with compacted kaolin clay. Maintaining low permeability of the clay cap requires both that the permeability of the compacted clay itself remain low and that the integrity of the barrier be maintained. Barrier breaches typically result from penetration by roots or animals, and especially cracks caused by uneven settling or desiccation. In this study, clay layers, 0.81 m in diameter and 7.6 cm thick, were compacted in 7 lysimeters to simulate closure caps. The hydraulic conductivity of each layer was measured, and the compacted clay layers (CCL`s) were cracked by drying. Then various repair techniques were applied and the effectiveness of each repair was assessed by remeasuring the hydraulic conductivity. Finally the repaired CCL was again dried and measured to determine how the repair responded to the conditions that caused the original failure. For a full report of this investigation see Persoff et al. Six repair techniques have been tested, four of which involve the use of injectable barrier liquids colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX) described below: (I) covering the crack with a bentonite geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), (ii) recompaction of new kaolinite at STD+3 moisture content joined to existing kaolinite that had dried and shrunk, (iii) direct injection of colloidal silica to a crack, (iv) injection of colloidal silica (CS) to wells in an overlying sand layer, (v) direct injection of polysiloxane to a crack, and (vi), injection of polysiloxane (PSX) to wells in an overlying soil layer.

Persoff, P.; Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Tuck, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)] [and others

1996-10-01

132

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PROFESSIONAL TURF Soil Testing Laboratory AND  

E-print Network

, soil moisture or compaction, or climatic conditions. An evaluation of soil fertility and pH matter, phosphorus, potassium, pH ­ lime requirement, and estimated texture. Soluble salts, $7 ­ testingUNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PROFESSIONAL TURF Soil Testing Laboratory AND LAWN, GARDEN and LANDSCAPE

Blanchette, Robert A.

133

Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume  

E-print Network

- 1 - Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume May 22, 2013 Data a chromium plume in the regional aquifer. The purpose of the pumping tests is to refine understanding to remove chromium. Chromium concentrations in the plume exceed state and federal standards for groundwater

134

The Phillips Laboratory capillary pumped loop test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An ammonia capillary pumped loop (CPL) test facility has been designed, fabricated, subject to acceptance tests, and assembled at Phillips Laboratory. Its intent is to support a wide range of Air Force programs, bringing CPL technology to flight readiness for operational systems. The facility provides a high degree of modularity and flexibility with several heating and cooling options, and capability

Donald F. Gluck; Marc C. Kaylor

1996-01-01

135

Closing the brain-to-brain loop in laboratory testing.  

PubMed

Abstract The delivery of laboratory services has been described 40 years ago and defined with the foremost concept of "brain-to-brain turnaround time loop". This concept consists of several processes, including the final step which is the action undertaken on the patient based on laboratory information. Unfortunately, the need for systematic feedback to improve the value of laboratory services has been poorly understood and, even more risky, poorly applied in daily laboratory practice. Currently, major problems arise from the unavailability of consensually accepted quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing. This, in turn, does not allow clinical laboratories to calculate a budget for the "patient-related total error". The definition and use of the term "total error" refers only to the analytical phase, and should be better defined as "total analytical error" to avoid any confusion and misinterpretation. According to the hierarchical approach to classify strategies to set analytical quality specifications, the "assessment of the effect of analytical performance on specific clinical decision-making" is comprehensively at the top and therefore should be applied as much as possible to address analytical efforts towards effective goals. In addition, an increasing number of laboratories worldwide are adopting risk management strategies such as FMEA, FRACAS, LEAN and Six Sigma since these techniques allow the identification of the most critical steps in the total testing process, and to reduce the patient-related risk of error. As a matter of fact, an increasing number of laboratory professionals recognize the importance of understanding and monitoring any step in the total testing process, including the appropriateness of the test request as well as the appropriate interpretation and utilization of test results. PMID:21663564

Plebani, Mario; Lippi, Giuseppe

2011-07-01

136

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31

137

Evaluation of three oil spill laboratory dispersant effectiveness tests  

SciTech Connect

EPA evaluated three laboratory methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and currently required by regulation) in the United States, the Swirling Flask Test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-Dilution Test (used in France and other European countries). Six test oils and three dispersants were evaluated; dispersants were applied to the oil at an average 1:10 ratio (dispersant to oil) for each of the three laboratory methods. A screening criterion was established that required a combination that gave at least 20 percent effectiveness results. The selected combination turned out to be Prudhoe Bay crude oil (an EPA-American Petroleum Institute Standard Reference Oil) and the dispersant Corexit 9527. EPA's evaluation concluded that the three tests give similar precision results, but that the Swirling Flask Test was fastest, cheapest, simplest, and required least operator skill.

Sullivan, D.; Farlow, J.; Sahatjian, K.A.

1993-01-01

138

Half cell operations test of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preparations and tests are underway at the N-15 site in Waxahachie, Texas, to obtain operational parameters and characteristics for the 100-m-long 50-mm-aperture half cell of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) collider. The first power phase of this test refers to the accelerator system string test. The experimental procedure is described. These measurements are being added to the previous information

A. D. McInturff; S. Augustynowicz; W. Burgett; R. Coombes; C. Dickey; T. Dombeck; W. Feitz; R. Flora; J. Gannon; D. Haenni; P. Kraushaar; M. Levin; M. McAshan; G. Mulholland; D. Murray; W. Robinson; T. Savord; F. Spinos; G. Tool; D. Wallis; D. Voy; J. Zbasnik

1993-01-01

139

Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory  

E-print Network

Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory This pamphlet summarizes the questions you or your neighbors raised about groundwater treatment systems National Laboratory have been listening to the concerns of the community about groundwater

140

76 FR 49491 - Medicare Program; Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Section 3113: The Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration...temporary code under the Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Demonstration...participate in the Treatment of Certain Complex Diagnostic Laboratory Tests...

2011-08-10

141

42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

...for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.508 Section 414.508 Public...Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. For a new clinical diagnostic...

2014-10-01

142

78 FR 22536 - Procedural Manual for the Election Assistance Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission's Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...publication of Voting System Test Laboratories Program Manual...public comment period on EAC Web site...for becoming an EAC accredited test laboratory and guidelines...

2013-04-16

143

49 CFR 40.81 - What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false What laboratories may be used for DOT drug testing? 40.81 Section 40.81 Transportation...PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.81 What laboratories...

2010-10-01

144

42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. ...AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test....

2010-10-01

145

42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. ...AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test....

2011-10-01

146

Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods  

SciTech Connect

Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

1996-05-01

147

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

148

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Electrical Power Systems Test Operations: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Electrical Power Systems Test Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Salinas, Michael J.

2012-01-01

149

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01

150

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01

151

Site Characterization and Monitoring of Technical Area 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In 1959-1961, subcritical hydronuclear safety experiments were conducted at Technical Area (TA) 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These underground experiments were designed and conducted to investigate safety issues. Seventy hydronuclear safety, tracer, and containment test experiments were conducted in 1-m or 2-m diameter shafts at depths ranging between 9 m and 33 m. The subsurface radiological and metals inventory consists of about 40 kg of plutonium, 93 kg of uranium-235, 170 kg of uranium-238, 11 kg of beryllium, and possibly more than 90,000 kg of lead. Explosives used in the experiments consisted largely of TNT, RDX, HMX, and barium nitrate. It is highly likely that the explosives, except for the barium component, were completely consumed by the detonations. Hydronuclear safety test shafts were drilled, test materials were placed at the bottom of the shafts, shafts were backfilled with sand or local crushed tuff, tests were detonated, subsidence in the shafts were backfilled, and cement caps were poured over the test shafts. The diameter of the affected detonation zones is believed to be less than 6 m. Most test shafts were drilled on an 8-m grid spacing in four main areas within TA-49.

Levitt, D. G.; Kisiel, K. C.; Newell, D. L; Hopkins, J. K.; Criswell, C. W.; Woodworth, L. A.

2003-02-25

152

Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

1988-01-01

153

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26

154

DESCRIPTION OF RISK REDUCTION ENGINEERING LABORATORY TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

An onsite team of multidisciplined engineers and scientists conduct research and provide technical services in the areas of testing, design, and field implementation for both solid and hazardous waste management. Engineering services focus on the design and implementation of...

155

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory based testing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching to sample memory test. Despite differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

2013-01-01

156

Prediction of sprint triathlon performance from laboratory tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated whether sprint triathlon performance can be adequately predicted from laboratory tests. Ten triathletes [mean (SEM), age 21.8 (0.3) years, height 179 (2) cm, body mass 67.5 (2.5) kg] performed two graded maximal exercise test in random order, either on their own bicycle which was mounted on an ergometer or on a treadmill, to determine their peak oxygen consumption ( V?O

R. Van Schuylenbergh; B. Vanden Eynde; P. Hespel

2004-01-01

157

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01

158

OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND LABORATORY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Discussions are presented for (1) the mechanism of action of chemical dispersants for oil spills, (2) factors affecting performance of dispersants and its measurement, (3) some common laboratory methods that have been used to test dispersant performance, (4) a brief summary of di...

159

Laboratory methods for testing the performance of acoustic rail dampers  

E-print Network

Laboratory methods for testing the performance of acoustic rail dampers M. Towarda and D. J@soton.ac.uk Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3739 #12;Rail dampers with distance of vibration transmitted along the rail (decay rate). These dampers, attached to the rail between

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

GATE AND VACUUM FLUSHING OF SEWER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this study was to test the performance of a traditional gate-flushing device and a newly-designed vacuum-flushing device in removing sediment from combined sewers and CSO storage tanks. A laboratory hydraulic flume was used to simulate a reach of sewer or storag...

161

Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

2010-01-01

162

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. AERIAL VIEW OF THE EAST TEST AREA DURING A SATURN I STATIC TEST. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN 1960 JUST PRIOR TO THE CHANGE OVER OF LAND, FACILITIES AND MISSION FROM ARMY/MICOM (MISSILE COMMAND) TO NASA/MSFC (MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER). MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

163

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

Not Available

1991-05-01

164

Comparison of Recuperator Alloy Degradation in Laboratory and Engine Testing  

SciTech Connect

In order to increase the efficiency of advanced microturbines, durable alloy foils are needed for their recuperators to operate at 650-700 C. Prior work has demonstrated that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr from austenitic alloys, leading to a reduction in lifetime for the thin-walled components in this application. New commercial alloy foils are being tested in both laboratory tests in humid air and in the exhaust gas of a modified 60 kW microturbine. Initial results are presented for a commercial batch of 80 {micro}m alloy 120 foil. The Cr consumption rates in laboratory testing were similar to those observed in previous testing. The initial results from the microturbine indicate a faster Cr consumption rate compared to the laboratory test, but longer term results are needed to quantify the difference. These results will help to verify a Cr consumption model for predicting lifetimes in this environment based on classical gas transport theory.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2006-01-01

165

Laboratory diagnosis and interpretation of tests for syphilis.  

PubMed Central

The lack of a method for demonstrating the presence of Treponema pallidum by growth necessitates the use of alternative methods. Traditionally, these methods are divided into direct detection methods (animal inoculation, dark-field microscopy, etc.) and serologic tests for the presence of patient antibody against T. pallidum. Serologic methods are further divided into two classes. One class, the nontreponemal tests, detects antibodies to lipoidal antigens present in either the host or T. pallidum; examples are the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and rapid plasma reagin and tests. Reactivity in these tests generally indicates host tissue damage that may not be specific for syphilis. Because these tests are easy and inexpensive to perform, they are commonly used for screening, and with proper clinical signs they are suggestive of syphilis. The other class of test, the treponemal tests, uses specific treponemal antigens. Confirmation of infection requires a reactive treponemal test. Examples of the treponemal tests are the microhemagglutination assay for antibodies to T. pallidum and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test. These tests are more expensive and complicated to perform than the nontreponemal tests. On the horizon are a number of direct antigen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and PCR techniques. Several of these techniques have shown promise in clinical trials for the diagnosis of congenital syphilis and neurosyphilis that are presently difficult to diagnose. PMID:7704889

Larsen, S A; Steiner, B M; Rudolph, A H

1995-01-01

166

University of Florida Natural Area Teaching Laboratory 2013 NATL Minigrant Program  

E-print Network

University of Florida Natural Area Teaching Laboratory 2013 NATL Minigrant Program Proposer Chris collected within the University of Florida's Natural Area Teaching Laboratory Project summary- Mosquitoes active collection technique will be a sweep net purchased from Bioquip (http://www.bioquip.com/search/DispProduct.asp

Slatton, Clint

167

Understanding laboratory testing in diagnostic uncertainty: a qualitative study in general practice.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Better knowledge of the professional's motives for ordering laboratory tests in the case of diagnostic uncertainty may lead to interventions directed at reducing unnecessary testing. AIM: To gain insight into the general practitioner's (GP's) motives for ordering laboratory tests for patients presenting with unexplained complaints. DESIGN OF STUDY: Semi-structured interviews based on surgery observations. SETTING: Twenty-one general practices in rural and urban areas of The Netherlands. METHOD: Investigation of the GP's perception of determinants of test-ordering behaviour in the situation of diagnostic uncertainty. The interviews were structured by evaluating the consultations and test-ordering performance of that day. RESULTS: Dutch GPs vary considerably in their motives for ordering tests. Numerous motives emerged from the data. Some examples of important themes include: personal routines; tolerance of diagnostic uncertainty; time pressure; and tactical motives for test ordering. Complying with the perceived needs of the patient for reassurance through testing is seen as an easy, cost- and time-effective strategy. A clear hierarchy in the determinants was not found. CONCLUSION: The decision to request laboratory testing is the result of a complex interaction of considerations that are often conflicting. Designers of interventions meant to improve the ordering of tests should be aware of the numerous determinants, and take contextual variables into account. PMID:12528582

van der Weijden, Trudy; van Bokhoven, Marloes A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van Hasselt, Cathelijne M; Grol, Richard P T M

2002-01-01

168

42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general...

2010-10-01

169

NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory Awarded Accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) provides a comprehensive array of acoustical testing services, including sound pressure level, sound intensity level, and sound-power-level testing per International Standards Organization (ISO)1 3744. Since its establishment in September 2000, the ATL has provided acoustic emission testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station acoustic emission requirements. The ATL consists of a 23- by 27- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic test chamber and a separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. The ATL employs a personal-computer-based data acquisition system that provides up to 26 channels of simultaneous data acquisition with real-time analysis (ref. 4). Specialized diagnostic tools, including a scanning sound-intensity system, allow the ATL's technical staff to support its clients' aggressive low-noise design efforts to meet the space station's acoustic emission requirement. From its inception, the ATL has pursued the goal of developing a comprehensive ISO 17025-compliant quality program that would incorporate Glenn's existing ISO 9000 quality system policies as well as ATL-specific technical policies and procedures. In March 2003, the ATL quality program was awarded accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for sound-power-level testing in accordance with ISO 3744. The NVLAP program is administered by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides third-party accreditation for testing and calibration laboratories. There are currently 24 NVLAP-accredited acoustical testing laboratories in the United States. NVLAP accreditation covering one or more specific testing procedures conducted in accordance with established test standards is awarded upon successful completion of an intensive onsite assessment that includes proficiency testing and documentation review. The ATL NVLAP accreditation currently applies specifically to its ISO 3744 soundpower- level determination procedure (see the photograph) and supporting ISO 17025 quality system, although all ATL operations are conducted in accordance with its quality system. The ATL staff is currently developing additional procedures to adapt this quality system to the testing of space flight hardware in accordance with International Space Station acoustic emission requirements.<

Akers, James C.; Cooper, Beth A.

2004-01-01

170

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH2) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN2 and LH2. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liujin

2006-03-01

171

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

SciTech Connect

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01

172

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01

173

Implementing a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in an Army Corps of Engineers' Water Quality Testing Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's environmental laboratory faces numerous challenge such as enhanced regulatory oversight, decreasing costs per tests, and numerous laboratory accreditations that are offered and\\/or required. Selecting the LIMS that will “fit” your laboratory is important, but so is finding a system that has the flexibility to conform to the changes that will be required by the laboratory over the years. These

Elizabeth Turner; Christine Paszko; Don Kolva

2001-01-01

174

Testing blackfly larvicides in the laboratory and in streams*  

PubMed Central

The early discovery that DDT is extremely effective in controlling blackfly larvae led to its widespread use in control programmes. Recent evidence that DDT accumulates in the food chain has made it desirable to investigate the effectiveness of other, less persistent, insecticides in reducing populations of blackfly larvae. A method of testing larvicides in troughs was developed and tests were carried out with a number of insecticides both in the troughs and in streams in New York State. Fourfold or fivefold differences in the susceptibility of larvae to different formulations of the same chemical were noted. In the laboratory, emulsions were less effective than oil solutions or wettable-powder suspensions. The effectiveness of emulsions under field conditions, noted in the course of their widespread use in Africa, may be due to the ease with which they become uniformly distributed throughout the water even when no special effort is made to ensure even distribution. When aircraft are used to apply larvicides in oil solution the insecticide is similarly distributed in fine droplets resulting in control at unusually low dosages. In trough tests and in streams, methoxychlor and DDT in oil solutions were about equally effective; carbaryl in wettable-powder suspension was highly effective in the laboratory but relatively greater concentrations were required in streams. Abate in oil solution was effective at low dosages in the laboratory and, in a single test, in a stream. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:5296399

Jamnback, H.; Frempong-Boadu, J.

1966-01-01

175

[Advances of laboratory testing for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis].  

PubMed

Rapid diagnosis and treatment are extensively important for preventing transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: In 1994, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, has published recommendations for the rapid diagnosis in the laboratories, in which smear result should be reported within 24 h, detection and identification within 10 to 14 days, and susceptibility within 15 to 30 days. New technologies, therefore, should be implemented in the laboratory. There have been significant advances in the practice of microbiology. Nucleic acid amplification, rapid culture system, antigen detection, and ATP assay system have provided new approaches to the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis. In the present paper, we review studies which evaluated the reliability, rapidity, and requisite diagnostic capability for each method. Furthermore, we propose an appropriate test algorithm in the clinical laboratories. PMID:12078041

Ichiyama, Satoshi

2002-05-01

176

Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.  

PubMed

This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked. PMID:21735375

Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

2011-07-01

177

Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

2007-02-01

178

Hydraulic and Hydromechanical Laboratory Testing of Large Crystalline Rock Cores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, fracture stiffness in rock samples is determined by means of hydromechanical laboratory testing. The aim is three-fold: to develop a procedure for sampling, to update testing equipment and to relate fracture stiffness to the geological history (e.g., stress history and fracture infillings). The hydraulic properties of twenty rock cores (diameter 190 mm, c. 100 mm high) from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory were tested in a permeameter cell under different isotropic pressures up to 2.5 MPa. The flow rate through individual fracture samples was recorded. Four of the samples were re-tested in the permeameter cell using an updated hydromechanical procedure with deformation measurement across the fracture. Four load cycles of gradually increasing cell pressure were applied, resulting in a clearly observed hysteresis effect in the first and second cycles. Hydraulic aperture changes calculated using the cubic law were compared with their mechanical equivalents. The aperture changes followed similar trends, although these differed between the samples. Fracture stiffness was determined from the tests, and the stiffness to hydraulic aperture relationship was found to follow previously published patterns linked to the storativity of fractures. Differences in stiffness are explained in the context of the geological history of individual samples, particularly their stress history. The paper presents a conceptualisation of the stiffness behaviour, which includes flow properties, geometric properties and the geological stress history of the tested samples.

Thörn, Johan; Ericsson, Lars O.; Fransson, Åsa

2015-01-01

179

In-flight and laboratory vacuum-friction test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coefficient of friction measurements were made for six unlubricated metal couples exposed to the space environment aboard the OV-1-13 spacecraft and exposed to laboratory vacuum. Materials studied included mutually soluble, partially soluble, and insoluble metal combinations. Two samples of each material couple were tested in space and in the laboratory using the disk and rider technique. Linear velocity was 0.10 cm/s (2.5 in/min) and rider normal load was 4.45 N (1 lb) for the gold versus silver couples and 8.90 N (2lb) for the other combinations. Results showed that friction data obtained in a clean ion-pumped laboratory vacuum of 10 to the minus 10 power materials with low mutual solubility can be correlated to operation in the vicinity of a typical scientific spacecraft that is exposed to an ambient pressure as low as 10 to the minus 12 power torr. The expected increase in coefficient of friction with solubility was shown. Material couples with high mutual solubility present the hazard of unpredictable drastic friction increase in orbit which may not be evident in laboratory testing at levels down to 10 to the minus 10 power torr. It was also shown that gross cold welding of unlubricated metals exposed to a satellite environment does not occur.

Devine, E. J.; Evans, H. E.; Leasure, W. A.

1973-01-01

180

GHASTLI-Gas Hydrate and Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methane hydrates exist beneath many continental margins and represent a huge potential alternate energy source. A custom-built laboratory test system is currently being used to study the formation and decomposition of gas hydrates at sea-floor pressures and temperatures and the physical, acoustic, electrical, and chemical properties of hydrate-sediment mixtures. A scanning electron microscope with a liquid-nitrogen cryogenic stage will be

W. J. Winters; J. S. Booth; W. P. Dillon; R. F. Commeau

1994-01-01

181

Device detecting neutral solar wind and laboratory tests.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GAS-2 was designed to detect neutral atoms of the solar wind with typical energies of about 1 keV. The coincidence technique separates fast atoms from the intense flux of photons from the Sun. The energy of detected hydrogen atoms is estimated using the time-of-flight method. The device was built for the RELIKT-2 spacecraft and was laboratory tested.

Kalinin, A. P.; Verigin, M. I.; Gdalevich, G. L.; Safronov, A. Yu.; Hlond, M.

1995-12-01

182

Interpretation of laboratory tests for canine Cushing's syndrome.  

PubMed

Hypercortisolism (HC) is a common disease in dogs. This article will review the laboratory tests that are available for diagnosis of HC and laboratory tests for differentiating between causes of HC. An emphasis will be made on the clinical process that leads to the decision to perform those tests and common misconceptions and issues that arise when performing them. To choose between the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulation test and the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST), the advantages and disadvantages of both tests should be considered, as well as the clinical presentation. If the index of suspicion of HC is high and other diseases have been appropriately ruled out, the specificity of the ACTH stimulation test is reasonably high with an expected high positive predictive value. Because of the low sensitivity, a negative result in the ACTH stimulation test should not be used to rule out the diagnosis of HC. The LDDST is more sensitive but also less specific and affected more by stress. A positive result on the urine cortisol:creatinine ratio does not help to differentiate HC from other diseases. A negative result on the urine cortisol:creatinine ratio indicates that the diagnosis of HC is very unlikely. The LDDST is useful in differentiating pituitary-dependent HC from an adrenal tumor in about two thirds of all dogs with HC. Differentiation of HC from diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, and hypothyroidism cannot be based solely on endocrine tests. Clinical signs, imaging studies, histopathology, and response to treatment should all be considered. PMID:21596349

Gilor, Chen; Graves, Thomas K

2011-05-01

183

Proposals for ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) support to Tiber LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). [Engineering Test Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the interests and capabilities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in their proposals to support the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) project. Five individual proposals are cataloged separately. (FI)

L. A. Berry; M. W. Rosenthal; M. J. Saltmarsh; T. E. Shannon; J. Sheffield

1987-01-01

184

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA\\/NSO)

T P Rose; A B Kersting; L J Harris; G B Hudson; D K Smith; R W Williams; D R Loewen; E J Nelson; P G Allen; F J Ryerson; G A Pawloski; C A Laue; J E Moran

2003-01-01

185

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA\\/NSO) through the Defense

H W Culham; G F Eaton; V Genetti; Q Hu; A B Kersting; R E Lindvall; J E Moran; G A Blasiyh Nuno; B A Powell; T P Rose; M J Singleton; R W Williams; M Zavarin; P Zhao

2008-01-01

186

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1983  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

187

Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area FY 1999 progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results from fiscal year (FY) 1999 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) work-for-others project. This report is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL to document the migration of radionuclides and controls of radionuclide

D K Smith; G F Eaton; T P Rose; J E Moran; A Brachmann; J E McAninch; A B Kersting; V V Romanovski; R E Martinelli; J K Jr Werner

2000-01-01

188

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

189

Dementia workup. Deciding on laboratory testing for the elderly.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To review Canadian Consensus Conference on the Assessment of Dementia (CCCAD) guidelines for laboratory evaluation of dementia, and to make recommendations to family physicians based on these guidelines and other literature. DATA SOURCES: English-language data sources from 1992 to March 1997 were searched on MEDLINE using the MeSH headings dementia, dementia/diagnosis, and cognition. Key words relating to specific laboratory tests or conditions, such as neurosyphilis or vitamin B12, were also used. STUDY SELECTION: Original research articles using prospective and retrospective methods were accepted. Articles reviewing the general investigation of potentially reversible dementia were included, as were articles looking at the sensitivity, specificity, and utility of investigations for specific conditions causing dementia. SYNTHESIS: Family physicians are not always aware of CCCAD recommendations for the investigation of dementia. There was C-level evidence for use of CCCAD core investigations (complete blood count and electrolyte, glucose, calcium, and thyroid levels) and for tests to be done "when the clinical situation warrants" (B12 levels, computed tomography scan of the head, and testing for syphilis). CONCLUSIONS: The CCCAD guidelines were supported by most literature on the workup of dementia. Prospective cohort studies suggest use of clinical judgment in ordering laboratory investigations. No controlled trials were available, and most recommendations arose from consensus rather than from research evidence. The prevalence of reversible dementias is likely lower than previously believed, which further supports a selective approach to investigations. Identification of reversible causes and exacerbating factors is still the goal. PMID:9678278

Frank, C.

1998-01-01

190

Characterization of Neutron Test Facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR-III) and Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), with a variety of test environments, have been used for many years at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for radiation effects testing. Dosimetry has played a crucial role in their operation and characterization, and neutron energy spectral determinations have advanced as progress was made in the available nuclear data and spectrum adjustment techniques. This paper presents a historical perspective of the neutron energy spectra for several environments and their impact on several integral parameters of particular interest to facility users.

Vehar, D. W.; Griffin, P. J.; King, D. B.; Depriest, K. R.; Williams, J. G.

2009-08-01

191

Proposal for Campus Natural Area and Outdoor Teaching Laboratory  

E-print Network

, burning, or logging. Consequently it is dominated by a mixture of large hardwoods. The few mature loblolly pines presumably mark where large trees were wind felled. This type of forest is considered the climax and added, clay from the Health Center site was spread over a portion of the area, a large retention pond

Slatton, Clint

192

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-09-01

193

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G B; Currie, J W

1992-03-01

194

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-05-01

195

Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This report contains Appendix B which provides all of the laboratory summary data sheets for the Area 6 SCEPs closure activities.

NONE

1997-11-01

196

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

197

10 CFR 26.153 - Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...certified laboratories for testing urine specimens. 26.153 Section...Using certified laboratories for testing urine specimens. (a) Licensees...Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs [published in the...

2010-01-01

198

49 CFR 40.89 - What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it...PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.89 What is validity...

2010-10-01

199

42 CFR 493.807 - Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing. 493.807 Section 493.807 Public...REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing § 493.807 Condition:...

2010-10-01

200

49 CFR 40.99 - How long does the laboratory retain specimens after testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...How long does the laboratory retain specimens after testing? 40.99 Section 40.99 Transportation...PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.99 How long does the...

2010-10-01

201

Average properties of nuclear test areas and media at the USERDA Nevada Test Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data have gradually been accumulated on the physical properties of ; nuclear test sites at the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration ; (USERDA) Nevada Test Site (NTS) since underground testing began there in 1957. ; These data have been stored in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) K-Division ; Test Effects Data Bank. This report briefly describes the principal

L. D. Ramspott; N. W. Howard

1975-01-01

202

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25

203

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2013-03-01

204

Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

2006-11-01

205

Digital Audio Radio Broadcast Systems Laboratory Testing Nearly Complete  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the completion of phase one of the digital audio radio (DAR) testing conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. This satellite, satellite/terrestrial, and terrestrial digital technology will open up new audio broadcasting opportunities both domestically and worldwide. It will significantly improve the current quality of amplitude-modulated/frequency-modulated (AM/FM) radio with a new digitally modulated radio signal and will introduce true compact-disc-quality (CD-quality) sound for the first time. Lewis is hosting the laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes. Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes each, making a total of nine systems being tested. The nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on-channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent-channel (IBAC), and new bands. The laboratory testing was conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. Subjective assessments of the audio recordings for each of the nine systems was conducted by the Communications Research Center in Ottawa, Canada, under contract to the Electronic Industries Association. The Communications Research Center has the only CCIR-qualified (Consultative Committee for International Radio) audio testing facility in North America. The main goals of the U.S. testing process are to (1) provide technical data to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) so that it can establish a standard for digital audio receivers and transmitters and (2) provide the receiver and transmitter industries with the proper standards upon which to build their equipment. In addition, the data will be forwarded to the International Telecommunications Union to help in the establishment of international standards for digital audio receivers and transmitters, thus allowing U.S. manufacturers to compete in the world market.

2005-01-01

206

Digesting all the options: Laboratory testing for celiac disease.  

PubMed

Abstract Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated disorder that is triggered by ingestion of gluten and related proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. Under conditions of increased intestinal permeability, gluten-derived peptides can travel across the intestinal epithelium and undergo deamidation catalyzed by the tissue transglutaminase (TTG) enzyme. This renders them immunogenic in individuals expressing specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ heterodimers. The resulting immune response is characterized by the production of antibodies against both deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) and TTG, generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activation of cytotoxic T cells. This response damages the intestinal epithelium resulting in the wide range of gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms observed in those with celiac disease. Celiac disease diagnosis has traditionally been based on biopsy and histological examination of the small intestine. While this approach is still considered the gold standard, it is invasive and susceptible to both false-positive and false-negative results. Several laboratory tests have become available to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease, and are the focus of this review. These include serological tests for celiac disease-specific antibodies such as anti-endomysial antibodies, anti-TTG antibodies and anti-DGP antibodies of both the immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) class, genetic tests to elucidate HLA DQ status and ancillary tests such as total IgA. While some have suggested that laboratory tests may replace intestinal biopsy in specific circumstances, others maintain that this procedure remains a critical component of celiac disease diagnosis. We review the analytical methodology, strengths, weaknesses, diagnostic performance and clinical utility of the various laboratory tests for celiac disease. Potential future markers and tests that are now considered obsolete are also discussed. Current clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease from the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the American College of Gastroenterology and the World Gastroenterology Organisation are summarized, and important differences between these guidelines are highlighted. PMID:25244521

Barakauskas, Vilte E; Lam, Grace Y; Estey, Mathew P

2014-12-01

207

LABORATORY SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS, SEDIMENT CHEMISTRY AND DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SEDIMENTS FROM THE KEWEENAW WATERWAY, MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Acute laboratory sediment toxicity tests using the water flea Daphnia magna and the burrowing mayfly nymph Hexagenia limbata were conducted on sediments from two areas of the Keweenaw Waterway, Michigan, to determine whether the tests reflected the condition of benthic macroinver...

208

Current Concepts in Laboratory Testing to Guide Antimicrobial Therapy  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is indicated for pathogens contributing to an infectious process that warrants antimicrobial therapy if susceptibility to antimicrobials cannot be predicted reliably based on knowledge of their identity. Such tests are most frequently used when the etiologic agents are members of species capable of demonstrating resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Some organisms have predictable susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ie, Streptococcus pyogenes to penicillin), and empirical therapy for these organisms is typically used. Therefore, AST for such pathogens is seldom required or performed. In addition, AST is valuable in evaluating the activity of new and experimental compounds and investigating the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Several laboratory methods are available to characterize the in vitro susceptibility of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. When the nature of the infection is unclear and the culture yields mixed growth or usual microbiota (wherein the isolates usually bear little relationship to the actual infectious process), AST is usually unnecessary and results may, in fact, be dangerously misleading. Phenotypic methods for detection of specific antimicrobial resistance mechanisms are increasingly being used to complement AST (ie, inducible clindamycin resistance among several gram-positive bacteria) and to provide clinicians with preliminary direction for antibiotic selection pending results generated from standardized AST (ie, ?-lactamase tests). In addition, molecular methods are being developed and incorporated by microbiology laboratories into resistance detection algorithms for rapid, sensitive assessment of carriage states of epidemiologically and clinically important pathogens, often directly from clinical specimens (ie, presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in fecal specimens). PMID:22386185

Jenkins, Stephen G.; Schuetz, Audrey N.

2012-01-01

209

4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northeast. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northeast. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault, and that on the right houses Test Cell 10 (environmental). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

210

5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 10 (environmental), and that on the right houses Test Cell 9 (fuel) and the fuel storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

211

Feasibility study of an orbiting laboratory for testing CSI technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept for an orbiting laboratory for testing Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology is described. The CSI-Star concept reflects a lower cost, higher risk approach. The concept supports demonstration and validation testing for critical CSI technologies at a cost of $20M to $26M with a 1-year reliability of approximately 0.9. The Ball Aerospace QuickStar bus is the carrier for the CSI test article. QuickStar is launched as a secondary payload on the McDonnell Douglas Delta 2. The QuickStar/Delta 2 approach is flight proven. The CSI test article is a 20 foot, 1 Hz, truss beam which is deployed from the QuickStar bus. The test article is well instrumented for quality system identification. The laboratory provides three layers of active control consisting of global vibration suppression along the truss beam, vibration isolation between the beam and instrument platforms, and vibration compensation through the use of gimbaled platforms which point lasers relative to optical sensor targets. The configuration simulates the dynamics of multi-instrument science platforms such as those of the Earth Observation System (EOS) while maintaining strong ties to astrophysics missions such as the Optical Interferometer. Uplink/downlink services and a reprogrammable computer provide flexibility for long-term investigations by members of the CSI community (NASA, DoD, academia, and industry). CSI-Star fills the gap between short-term experiments, which have been conducted primarily on the Shuttle, and future science missions which require the technology. The on-orbit maturity of CSI technology must be established to obtain acceptance by project managers and to promote injection of the technology into future science missions.

Bicos, Andrew S.; Loboda, Gregory G.

1993-01-01

212

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01

213

Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications (journal articles, presentations, outreach support, and other reports), but will not be attributed to a specific vendor.

Not Available

2011-12-01

214

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

215

Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk moduli of the samples measured using this technique were consistent with those measured using more conventional methods. The second technique involved performing triaxial tests under lateral strain control. By limiting the lateral strain to zero by controlling the applied confining pressure while loading the specimen axially in compression, one can maintain a right-circular cylindrical geometry even under large deformations. This technique is preferred over standard triaxial testing methods which result in inhomogeneous deformation or "barreling". Manifestations of the inhomogeneous deformation included non-uniform stress states, as well as unrealistic Poisson's ratios (> 0.5) or those that vary significantly along the length of the specimen. Zero lateral strain controlled tests yield a more uniform stress state, and admissible and uniform values of Poisson's ratio. Hansen, F.D., Knowles, M.K., et al. 1997. Description and Evaluation of a Mechanistically Based Conceptual Model for Spall. SAND97-1369. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

2011-12-01

216

Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments  

SciTech Connect

This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

1991-01-01

217

28. View of data test area for DR data take ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

218

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01

219

Changing trends in laboratory testing in the United States: a personal, historical perspective.  

PubMed

This article reflects on my nearly 40 years providing clinical and laboratory genetic services. It reviews the evolution of laboratory and genetic testing from their grant-supported academic research to current complexities. Changes in the economic and academic landscape parallel technological innovations in laboratory testing. My career trajectory parallels the newer trend of genetic testing. I began in academics, working as a student and postdoctoral fellow in academic laboratories that also provided clinical testing services. Next came time in a small molecular laboratory performing diagnosis and testing services. My current position is with a national commercial laboratory company. PMID:23078665

Strom, Charles M

2012-12-01

220

En route noise annoyance laboratory test: Preliminary results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until recently concerns about the impact of aircraft noise on people have centered around the takeoff and landing operations of aircraft in the vicinity of airport terminals. The development of the advanced turboprop (propfan) engine, modifications to air corridors, and the desire to maintain a natural environment in national parks and recreation areas have now focused attention on the impact at ground level of the en route noise produced by aircraft at cruise conditions and altitudes. Compared to terminal area noise, en route noise is characterized by relatively low noise levels, lack of high frequency spectral content, and long durations. Much research has been directed towards understanding and quantifying the annoyance caused by terminal area aircraft noise, but relatively little research has been conducted for en route noise. To address this need, a laboratory experiment was conducted to quantify the annoyance of people on the ground to en route noise generated by aircraft at cruise conditions. The objectives of the experiment are to determine the annoyance prediction ability of noise measurement procedures and corrections when applied to en route noise; to determine differences in annoyance response to en route noise and takeoff/landing noise; and to determine differences in annoyance response to advanced turboprop en route noise and conventional jet en route noise.

Mccurdy, David A.

1990-01-01

221

Rutting Performance of Airport Hot-Mix Asphalt Characterized by Laboratory Performance Testing, Full-Scale Accelerated Pavement Testing, and Finite Element Modeling  

E-print Network

potential laboratory tests, (b) comparisons of laboratory tests results to full-scale accelerated pavement test results, and (c) analyses of results from finite element simulations. The laboratory study evaluated of the repeated load test, the static creep...

Rushing, John Ford

2014-04-25

222

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 219 - Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing B Appendix...Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing The following...currently designated to conduct post-accident toxicological analysis under...

2012-10-01

223

Development of a Fan-Filter Unit Test Standard, Laboratory Validations, and its Applications across Industries  

E-print Network

Filter Unit Test Standard, Laboratory Validations, and its Applications across IndustriesFilter Unit Test Standard, Laboratory Validations, and its Applications across Industriesindustries to evaluate and advance filtration technologies using fan-filter

Xu, Tengfang

2008-01-01

224

33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...laboratories, and to the Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project. (c) References. ...Laboratories. (3) Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project, St. Anthony Falls Laboratory...equipment developed at the Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project. Equipment of this...

2010-07-01

225

RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

Farfan, E.

2010-07-08

226

RadBallTM Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBallTM, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Harpring, Larry J.; Gordon, John R.; Blessing, Ronald; Rusty Coleman, J.; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

2010-11-01

227

Portable nondestructive testing and dynamic test diagnostics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the most complete NDT facilities worldwide. In addition to many fixed pieces of equipment, the Laboratory has a very wide range of NDT and dynamic test diagnostic equipment that can be taken to the job site. Most of the equipment described here was procured for a specific purpose to support a program consistent with the nuclear weapons mission of Los Alamos. However, through the years, the equipment has found use in many other applications both within and external to weapons research, development, and testing. Various combinations of these equipments form unique capabilities, as demonstrated by the applications. The portable equipment is mainly applied to problems where the process or object under study cannot be brought into an NDT laboratory.

Fry, D.A.; Brooks, G.H.; Bryant, L.E.; Guerrero, A.; Valdez, J.E.

1994-11-01

228

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2012-07-01

229

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2013-07-01

230

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2010-07-01

231

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2014-07-01

232

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2011-07-01

233

75 FR 34463 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Request for Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Request for...Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' The purpose of the public...oversight of laboratory developed tests (LDTs). FDA is seeking input...301-840-0200 or refer to the meeting web page at...

2010-06-17

234

Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 49 x 10(exp 6)/ft (1.3 x 10(exp 7)/m to 19 x 10(exp 6/ft) and 1.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 19 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.39 x 10(exp 7)/m to 62 x 10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.36 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.2 x 10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for the wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 12% or better of the experimental data.

Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

2008-01-01

235

Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

2009-01-01

236

10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...testing facility, or HHS-certified laboratory; (2) Chain-of-custody documents (other than forms recording specimens...5) All test data (including calibration curves and any calculations used in determining test results); (6) Test...

2010-01-01

237

10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...testing facility, or HHS-certified laboratory; (2) Chain-of-custody documents (other than forms recording specimens...5) All test data (including calibration curves and any calculations used in determining test results); (6) Test...

2011-01-01

238

Laboratory-scale testing of non-consumable anode materials: Inert Electrodes Program  

SciTech Connect

Development of inert anode materials for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum is one of the major goals of the Inert Electrodes Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objectives of the Materials Development and Testing Task include the selection, fabrication, and evaluation of candidate non-consumable anode materials. Research performed in FY 1987 focused primarily on the development and evaluation of cermets that are based on the two-phase oxide system NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and contain a third, electrically conductive metal phase composed primarily of copper and nickel. The efforts of this task were focused on three areas: materials fabrication, small-scale materials testing, and laboratory-scale testing. This report summarizes the development and testing results of the laboratory-scale testing effort during FY 1987. The laboratory-scale electrolysis testing effort was instrumental in partially determining electrolysis cell operating parameters. Although not optimized, NiO/endash/NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4//endash/Cu-based cermets were successfully operated for 20 h in cryolite-based electrolytes ranging in bath ratios from 1.1 to 1.35, in electrolytes that contained 1.5 wt % LiF, and at conditions slightly less than Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ saturation. The operating conditions that lead to anode degradation have been partly identified, and rudimentary control methods have been developed to ensure proper operation of small electrolysis cells using nonconsumable anodes. 11 figs., 1 tab.

Marschman, S.C.

1989-03-01

239

7 CFR 3300.91 - List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false List of approved testing stations, approved testing laboratories, and fees for certificates. 3300...BE USED FOR SUCH CARRIAGE (ATP); INSPECTION, TESTING, AND CERTIFICATION OF SPECIAL EQUIPMENT...

2010-01-01

240

Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

Peters, W.R.

1993-08-01

241

Isolation rates of Brucella melitensis in an endemic area and implications for laboratory safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective study was conducted to assess the potential threat posed by processing blood cultures to clinical microbiology\\u000a laboratory personnel working in an area endemic for Brucella melitensis in southern Israel. The computerized laboratory records for the 2002–2009 period were reviewed, and the proportion of aerobic\\u000a vials from which Brucella organisms were isolated out of the total number of positive

A. A. Shemesh; P. Yagupsky

242

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2011-01-01

243

Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

2012-01-01

244

Interference of medical contrast media on laboratory testing.  

PubMed

The use of contrast media such as organic iodine molecules and gadolinium contrast agents is commonplace in diagnostic imaging. Although there is widespread perception that side effects and drug interactions may be the leading problems caused by these compounds, various degrees of interference with some laboratory tests have been clearly demonstrated. Overall, the described interference for iodinate contrast media include inappropriate gel barrier formation in blood tubes, the appearance of abnormal peaks in capillary zone electrophoresis of serum proteins, and a positive bias in assessment of cardiac troponin I with one immunoassay. The interference for gadolinium contrast agents include negative bias in calcium assessment with ortho-cresolphthalein colorimetric assays and occasional positive bias using some Arsenazo reagents, negative bias in measurement of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and zinc (colorimetric assay), as well as positive bias in creatinine (Jaffe reaction), total iron binding capacity (TIBC, ferrozine method), magnesium (calmagite reagent) and selenium (mass spectrometry) measurement. Interference has also been reported in assessment of serum indices, pulse oximetry and methaemoglobin in samples of patients receiving Patent Blue V. Under several circumstances the interference was absent from manufacturer-supplied information and limited to certain type of reagents and/or analytes, so that local verification may be advisable to establish whether or not the test in use may be biased. Since the elimination half-life of these compounds is typically lower than 2 h, blood collection after this period may be a safer alternative in patients who have received contrast media for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24627717

Lippi, Giuseppe; Daves, Massimo; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

2014-01-01

245

Interference of medical contrast media on laboratory testing  

PubMed Central

The use of contrast media such as organic iodine molecules and gadolinium contrast agents is commonplace in diagnostic imaging. Although there is widespread perception that side effects and drug interactions may be the leading problems caused by these compounds, various degrees of interference with some laboratory tests have been clearly demonstrated. Overall, the described interference for iodinate contrast media include inappropriate gel barrier formation in blood tubes, the appearance of abnormal peaks in capillary zone electrophoresis of serum proteins, and a positive bias in assessment of cardiac troponin I with one immunoassay. The interference for gadolinium contrast agents include negative bias in calcium assessment with ortho-cresolphthalein colorimetric assays and occasional positive bias using some Arsenazo reagents, negative bias in measurement of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and zinc (colorimetric assay), as well as positive bias in creatinine (Jaffe reaction), total iron binding capacity (TIBC, ferrozine method), magnesium (calmagite reagent) and selenium (mass spectrometry) measurement. Interference has also been reported in assessment of serum indices, pulse oximetry and methaemoglobin in samples of patients receiving Patent Blue V. Under several circumstances the interference was absent from manufacturer-supplied information and limited to certain type of reagents and/or analytes, so that local verification may be advisable to establish whether or not the test in use may be biased. Since the elimination half-life of these compounds is typically lower than 2 h, blood collection after this period may be a safer alternative in patients who have received contrast media for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24627717

Lippi, Giuseppe; Daves, Massimo; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

2014-01-01

246

Field and laboratory test plan for improving refrigerator/freezer energy testing procedures  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the Phase I tasks of ASHRAE Research Project, RP-427, ''Determination of Validity of Refrigerator/Freezer Energy Testing.'' Refrigerators, refrigerator/freezers, and freezers sold in the United States are currently required to display a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) label that lists the estimated yearly energy cost of operating the appliance, determined from a Department of Energy (DOE) defined laboratory test standard procedure. As design features for refrigerator/freezeres have been improved to increase energy efficiency, the present DOE test procedure has not been evaluated to determine the effect on energy consumption experienced in the field. The relative change in field energy consumption due to these changes in design parameters, such as insulation thickness or compressor efficiencies, may not be reflected in DOE test results. As new design features are added to the appliances, a determination must be made as to their benefit to the consumer. It was concluded that the validity of the present test procedure could not be characterized. To determine whether the present procedure is valid, a field test program and a modified laboratory experimental program were developed to determine the expected ''average'' field (household) energy consumption as a function of physical and design parameters.

Stewart, W.E.

1987-06-01

247

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-05-22

248

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31

249

GHASTLI-Gas Hydrate and Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrates exist beneath many continental margins and represent a huge potential alternate energy source. A custom-built laboratory test system is currently being used to study the formation and decomposition of gas hydrates at sea-floor pressures and temperatures and the physical, acoustic, electrical, and chemical properties of hydrate-sediment mixtures. A scanning electron microscope with a liquid-nitrogen cryogenic stage will be used to examine the hydrate crystals and sediment grains. The goals are to understand interrelationships of natural factors and the formation of gas hydrates in marine sediment. The authors will also examine hydrate dissociation characteristics and measure sediment properties before, during, and after the formation of hydrates to better understand their influence on possible methane extraction. The test system consists of a fluid-filled vessel that can apply a maximum external pressure of 25 MPa (equivalent to a 2400-m water depth) to a cylindrical sediment specimen. Because internal specimen pore pressure can also be controlled, hundreds of meters of overburden pressure can be applied. A heat exchanger on the upper surface of the test specimen not only allows application of appropriate temperatures, it also creates a unidirectional cooling from downward through the sample at the same time that methane gas is slowly percolated upward to induce hydrate formation. Hydrate formation can be quantitatively monitored by electrical resistivity sensors placed around the perimeter of the specimen. Acoustic velocity (both P- and S-wave) can also be measured vertically through the sample, as can shear strength, pore pressure, and permeability, all at in-situ conditions.

Winters, W.J.; Booth, J.S.; Dillon, W.P.; Commeau, R.F. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

1994-08-01

250

21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. 312...Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests....

2012-04-01

251

21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. 312...Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests....

2013-04-01

252

21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.  

...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. 312...Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests....

2014-04-01

253

21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. 312...Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312...investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests....

2011-04-01

254

42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. ...AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests ...of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test....

2011-10-01

255

42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. ...AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests ...of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test....

2010-10-01

256

Safety Review of TOF Test Area July 1, 2008  

E-print Network

to collect noise rates (~1hr), then turned off no water cooling #12;Replace three large tables with one (different from run-7 test area setup) gas distribution same as Run-7, except now have TOFgas system fan for the final water cooling system discuss/review the plan and budget for theTPC support fixture Week of July 7

Llope, William J.

257

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01

258

Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

Morrey, E.V.

1996-03-01

259

Development of a novel SCADA system for laboratory testing.  

PubMed

This document summarizes the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system that allows communication with, and controlling the output of, various I/O devices in the renewable energy systems and components test facility RESLab. This SCADA system differs from traditional SCADA systems in that it supports a continuously changing operating environment depending on the test to be performed. The SCADA System is based on the concept of having one Master I/O Server and multiple client computer systems. This paper describes the main features and advantages of this dynamic SCADA system, the connections of various field devices to the master I/O server, the device servers, and numerous software features used in the system. The system is based on the graphical programming language "LabVIEW" and its "Datalogging and Supervisory Control" (DSC) module. The DSC module supports a real-time database called the "tag engine," which performs the I/O operations with all field devices attached to the master I/O server and communications with the other tag engines running on the client computers connected via a local area network. Generic and detailed communication block diagrams illustrating the hierarchical structure of this SCADA system are presented. The flow diagram outlining a complete test performed using this system in one of its standard configurations is described. PMID:15272800

Patel, M; Cole, G R; Pryor, T L; Wilmot, N A

2004-07-01

260

Variable area radial turbine fabrication and test program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variable area radial turbine with a moveable nozzle sidewall was experimentally evaluated. The turbine was designed for an advanced variable capacity gas turbine rotorcraft engine. The turbine has a mass flow rate of 2.27 kg/sec (5.0 lbs/sec), and a rotor inlet temperature of 1477K (2200 F). Testing was conducted at a reduced inlet temperature, but the aerodynamic parameters and Reynolds numbers were duplicated. Overall performance was obtained for a range of nozzle areas from 50% to 100% of the maximum area. The test program determined the effect on performance of: (1) Moving the hub or shroud sidewall; (2) Sidewall-vane clearance leakage; (3) Vaneless space geometry change; and (4) Nozzle cooling flows. Data were obtained for a range of pressure ratios and speeds and are presented in a number of performance maps.

Rogo, C.

1986-01-01

261

Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a refrigerator capable of removing 850 Watts at 20 Kelvin (shown in green). The refrigerator and most of its supporting equipment will be kept in a standard shipping container (shown in pink). Currently, GODU is in the fabrication process and some of the large components have already been purchased.

Holland, Katherine

2013-01-01

262

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tests - 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and supports the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 3 LLNL test locations in areas 2 and 12: Kennebec in U2af, Cumberland in U2e, and Yuba in U12b.10.

Pawloski, G A

2011-02-28

263

Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through

B. G. Blaylock; M. L. Frank; F. O. Hoffman; L. A. Hook; G. W. Suter; J. A. Watts

1992-01-01

264

LABORATORY CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL POSTER (Post Near Chemical Waste Storage Area)  

E-print Network

WSTPS.rtf LABORATORY CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL POSTER (Post Near Chemical Waste Storage Area) Excess Chemicals and Chemical Wastes · Toxic and Flammable Chemicals - These cannot go down the drain. Call Environmental Health and Safety (EHSO) at x-2723 for collection. · Corrosive Chemicals (Acids & Bases) - When

Oliver, Douglas L.

265

Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

1995-02-01

266

A prospective analysis of laboratory tests and imaging studies to detect hepatic lesions  

SciTech Connect

A prospective study of the ability of laboratory tests and liver imaging tests to detect hepatic metastases was performed. Eighty patients at risk for hepatic metastases but without clinical evidence of disease were tested with 13 laboratory tests and three liver imaging tests. No single laboratory test had greater than 65% accuracy in the detection of hepatic lesions. No combination of the laboratory tests increased this accuracy. If the laboratory tests were used with one of the liver imaging tests such as scintiscan, ultrasound, and computerized tomography, the accuracy was improved in some combinations to 76%. The CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) assay when analyzed in patients with colorectal primaries had an accuracy of 79%. The results show that the laboratory tests alone are not sufficiently accurate to detect liver metastases. Additional accuracy can be obtained by the combined use of a single liver imaging test and selected laboratory tests. Use of all the liver imaging tests and laboratory tests lowers the accuracy and increases the expense and thus is unnecessary.

Kemeny, M.M. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD); Sugarbaker, P.H.; Smith, T.J.; Edwards, B.K.; Shawker, T.; Vermess, M.; Jones, A.E.

1982-02-01

267

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01

268

10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.  

...handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug...

2014-01-01

269

42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a sufficient number of cytotechnologists who meet the qualifications specified in § 493.1483 to...

2010-10-01

270

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories  

Cancer.gov

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Prevalence in Individuals Undergoing Clinical Testing at Myriad Genetic Laboratories Amie M. Deffenbaugh, BS, Lynn Anne Burbidge, BS, Julia Reid, MStat, Walter W. Noll, MD Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT

271

40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing  

...Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment...AND EQUIPMENT Pt. 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory...next within a 20-second transition phase. During the transition...

2014-07-01

272

40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment...AND EQUIPMENT Pt. 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory...next within a 20-second transition phase. During the transition...

2012-07-01

273

40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment...AND EQUIPMENT Pt. 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory...next within a 20-second transition phase. During the transition...

2010-07-01

274

Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff  

SciTech Connect

Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs.

Sharpe, C.J.; Daemen, J.J.

1991-03-01

275

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility: research highlights and plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has served as a user facility for accelerator science for over a quarter of a century. In fulfilling this mission, the ATF offers the unique combination of a high-brightness 80 MeV electron beam that is synchronized to a 1 TW picosecond CO2 laser. We unveil herein our plan to considerably expand the ATF's floor space with an upgrade of the electron beam's energy to 300 MeV and the CO2 laser's peak power to 100 TW. This upgrade will propel the ATF even further to the forefront of research on advanced accelerators and radiation sources, supporting the most innovative ideas in this field. We discuss emerging opportunities for scientific breakthroughs, including the following: plasma wakefield acceleration studies in research directions already active at the ATF; laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), where the longer laser wavelengths are expected to engender a proportional increase in the beam's charge while our linac will assure, for the first time, the opportunity to undertake detailed studies of seeding and staging of the LWFA; proton acceleration to the 100-200 MeV level, which is essential for medical applications; and others.

Pogorelsky, I. V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

2014-08-01

276

Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to

R. R. Lee; A. H. Curtis; L. M. Houlberg; S. T. Purucker; M. L. Singer; M. F. Tardiff; D. A. Wolf

1994-01-01

277

Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1994-04-01

278

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01

279

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2011-10-01

280

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2013-10-01

281

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Urobilinogen. (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests—visual color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation...

2012-10-01

282

An Alternative to the Physiological Psychology Laboratory: Identification of an Unknown Drug Through Behavioral Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory project introduced physiological psychology students to research by requiring them to identify an unknown drug given to laboratory animals. Students read material about drugs and animal drug studies, designed behavioral tests, constructed the testing apparatus, conducted the tests, and wrote progress reports. (SR)

Schumacher, Susan J.

1982-01-01

283

Pyrolysis Research: Bioenergy Testing and Analysis Laboratory BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

into Refinery-grade Crude Oil Following are the steps for upgrading bio-oil into refinery-grade crude oil bio-oil from various kinds of feedstocks. Laboratory Equipment Laboratory equipment includes a high-pressure reactor, a mobile pyrolysis system, and a hydrogenator, all pictured in this document. Upgrading Bio-oil

284

L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application  

SciTech Connect

The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

Wood, D.C.

2001-06-26

285

The Phillips Laboratory capillary pumped loop test facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ammonia capillary pumped loop (CPL) test facility has been designed, fabricated, subject to acceptance tests, and assembled at Phillips Laboratory. Its intent is to support a wide range of Air Force programs, bringing CPL technology to flight readiness for operational systems. The facility provides a high degree of modularity and flexibility with several heating and cooling options, and capability for elevation (+/- 15 in.), tilt (+/-60°) and transport length variation. It has a 182 by 44 by 84 inch envelope, an expected heat load capability of 2500 W, and a temperature range of 0 to 50 °C. The evaporator section has two plates with four capillary pumps (CPs) each, with a starter pump on one plate. The CPs are 5/8 in., with TAG aluminum 6063-T6 casing and UHMW polyethylene wicks. The active lengths are 15 and 30 inch with both 10 and 15 micron wicks. The individual CPs have thermal and hydraulic isolation capability, and are removable. The transport section consists of stainless steel lines in a serpentine configuration, a 216 in3 free volume reservoir, and a mechanical pump. The vapor transport line contains a capillary device (which can be bypassed) for vapor blockage during startup. The condenser consists of two separately valved, parallel cold plates each with a downstream noncondensible gas trap. Cooling of up to 1500 W at -50 °C is provided by an FTS Systems chiller using Flourinert FC-72. An enclosure/exhaust system is provided for safety and emergency venting of ammonia. An ammonia charge station performs or supports the functions of proof pressure, flushing with ammonia, purging with gaseous nitrogen, evacuation of all or part of the CPL to 20 microns, and charging. Instrumentation consists of over 116 thermocouples, five of which are internal; one absolute and six differential pressure transducers; eleven watt transducers, and a reservoir load cell. The data acquisition system consists of a temperature scanner, Bernoulli drive, and two Macintosh computers using LabView software. Data scanning and storage as rapid as once every three seconds for thermocouples and once per 0.6 seconds for transducers is supported.

Gluck, Donald F.; Kaylor, Marc C.

1996-03-01

286

Rory O. Maguire, Extension Nutrient Management Specialist, Virginia Tech Steven E. Heckendorn, Manager, Soil Testing Laboratory, Virginia Tech  

E-print Network

and special tests consist of the following: Routine Test soil/water pH (WpH) buff, Manager, Soil Testing Laboratory, Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Soil Testing Laboratory Publication 452..............................................................................................................................4 Water pH Determination

Liskiewicz, Maciej

287

An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-09-07

288

The Laboratory Diagnosis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Emerging Laboratory Tests for an Emerging Pathogen  

PubMed Central

The 2003 pandemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) profiled the ability of modern diagnostic microbiology and molecular biology to identify, isolate and characterize, within weeks, a previously unknown viral infectious pathogen. The culprit, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was detected in patient specimens by traditional cell culture using an unusual cell line for respiratory viruses, Vero E6, and by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the polymerase 1 B region of the genome. In addition, serologic assays were rapidly developed, and the genome of this large virus was sequenced within one month of its spread to North America. At the present time, diagnostics have progressed to the point that RT-PCR has a sensitivity approaching 80% within the first few days of onset of illness, while serology has a sensitivity close to 100% on convalescent sera taken >21 days after illness onset. Viral culture remains a method confined to biosafety level III laboratories. The specificity of RT-PCR and serology remains to be conclusively defined, but in most studies to date seems to be >90%. Serologic cross-reactivity with human coronaviruses causing the common cold may be a problem with some serologic assays. The early development of SARS-CoV diagnostics is now being replaced by refinement and optimization of these assays. Although at the present time we do not have a test that will definitively rule in or rule out SARS at the time of initial presentation of a patient with a respiratory infection, modifications of existing assays will hopefully result in our ability to make this diagnosis with a high degree of accuracy in the future. PMID:18458711

Richardson, Susan E.; Tellier, Raymond; Mahony, James

2004-01-01

289

100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.

Not Available

1993-08-01

290

Asbestos-cement panels test report, 100K Area, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The 105KE/105KW reactor facilities were constructed in the mid-1950s. The 105KE/105KW fuel-basin roof panels are in a radiation controlled area where there is smearable contamination. The roof panels in all of the inspected areas were constructed from corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C) panels. The corrugated A/C roof panels exhibit common signs of aging including cracking, chipping, spalling, or a combination of these processes. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has engaged Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. (WJE) to perform laboratory and field tests on A/C roof panels of the 105KW building and also to make recommendations for panel replacement, maintenance, or upgrade that will maintain the structural integrity of the roof panels for an additional 20 years of service. This report contains the results of laboratory and in-situ testing performed by WJE. A Roof Proof Load Test Plan was prepared for WJE and approved by WHC. Conclusions and recommendations based on test results are presented for the 190-KE wall panels and 105KW roof panels.

Moustafa, S.E. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner and Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Wiss, Janney, Elstner and Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-12-01

291

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...tests for human luteinizing hormone; (4) Urine pregnancy tests—visual color comparison tests; (5) Erythrocyte sedimentation rate—non-automated; (6) Hemoglobin—copper sulfate—non-automated; (7) Blood glucose by glucose...

2010-10-01

292

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01

293

How to plan and produce your laboratory test catalog.  

PubMed

Creating the lab catalog is a multi-disciplinary crash course in laboratory science, writing, publishing, marketing, business administration, and graphic design. These eight steps will take you from start to finish in completing a showcase catalog. PMID:10339258

Nordenson, N J

1998-12-01

294

Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

1991-01-01

295

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory-based testing.  

PubMed

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory-housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch-screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching-to-sample memory test. Despite the differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

2013-05-01

296

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, B.H.

2002-05-13

297

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, Bruce Harley

2002-08-01

298

Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.  

SciTech Connect

The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-12

299

Sandia National Laboratories Electrochemical Storage System Abuse Test Procedure Manual  

SciTech Connect

The series of tests described in this report are intended to simulate actual use and abuse conditions and internally initiated failures that may be experienced in electrochemical storage systems (ECSS). These tests were derived from Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, user input, and historical abuse testing. The tests are to provide a common framework for various ECSS technologies. The primary purpose of testing is to gather response information to external/internal inputs. Some tests and/or measurements may not be required for some ECSS technologies and designs if it is demonstrated that a test is not applicable, and the measurements yield no useful information.

Unkelhaeuser, Terry; Smallwood David

1999-07-01

300

Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Romero, Andy

2012-01-01

301

20 CFR 416.919k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and other services. We may purchase medical examinations, including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function studies, electrocardiograms, and...

2011-04-01

302

20 CFR 404.1519k - Purchase of medical examinations, laboratory tests, and other services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and other services. We may purchase medical examinations, including psychiatric and psychological examinations, X-rays and laboratory tests (including specialized tests, such as pulmonary function studies, electrocardiograms, and...

2011-04-01

303

Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing  

EPA Science Inventory

While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

304

Hanford 100N Area Apatite Emplacement: Laboratory Results of Ca-Citrate-PO4 Solution Injection and Sr90 Immobilization in 100N Sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes laboratory scale studies investigating the remediation of Sr-90 by Ca-citrate-PO4 solution injection\\/infiltration to support field injection activities in the Hanford 100N area. This study is focused on experimentally testing whether this remediation technology can be effective under field scale conditions to mitigate Sr-90 migration 100N area sediments into the Columbia River. Sr-90 is found primarily adsorbed to

James E. Szecsody; Carolyn A. Burns; Robert C. Moore; Jonathan S. Fruchter; Vincent R. Vermeul; Mark D. Williams; Donald C. Girvin; James P. McKinley; Michael J. Truex; Jerry L. Phillips

2007-01-01

305

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1987  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

306

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1984  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

307

Laboratory and on-road evaluations of cabin air filters using number and surface area concentration monitors.  

PubMed

An automotive cabin air filter's effectiveness for removing airborne particles was determined both in a laboratory wind tunnel and in vehicle on-road tests. The most penetrating particle size for the test filter was approximately 350 nm, where the filtration efficiency was 22.9 and 17.4% at medium and high fan speeds, respectively. The filtration efficiency increased for smaller particles and was 43.9% for 100 nm and 72.0% for 20 nm particles at a medium fan speed. We determined the reduction in passenger exposure to particles while driving in freeway traffic caused by a vehicle ventilation system with a cabin air filter installed. Both particle number and surface area concentration measurements were made inside the cabin and in the surrounding air. At medium fan speed, the number and surface area concentration-based exposure reductions were 65.6 +/- 6.0% and 60.6 +/- 9.4%, respectively. To distinguish the exposure reduction contribution from the filter alone and the remainder of the ventilation system, we also performed tests with and without the filter in place using the surface area monitors. The ventilation system operating in the recirculation mode with the cabin air filter installed provided the maximum protection, reducing the cabin particle concentration exponentially over time and usually taking only 3 min to reach 10 microm2/cm3 (a typical office air condition) under medium fan speed. PMID:18589976

Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Pui, David Y H; Kuehn, Thomas H

2008-06-01

308

Continuous Improvement in Battery Testing at the NASA/JSC Energy System Test Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas conducts development and qualification tests to fulfill Energy System Division responsibilities relevant to ASA programs and projects. EST A has historically called upon a variety of fluid, mechanical, electrical, environmental, and data system capabilities spread amongst five full-service facilities to test human and human supported spacecraft in the areas of propulsion systems, fluid systems, pyrotechnics, power generation, and power distribution and control systems. Improvements at ESTA are being made in full earnest of offering NASA project offices an option to choose a thorough test regime that is balanced with cost and schedule constraints. In order to continue testing of enabling power-related technologies utilized by the Energy System Division, an especially proactive effort has been made to increase the cost effectiveness and schedule responsiveness for battery testing. This paper describes the continuous improvement in battery testing at the Energy Systems Test Area being made through consolidation, streamlining, and standardization.

Boyd, William; Cook, Joseph

2003-01-01

309

Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs.

Ellison, A.J.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-06-01

310

Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Battery Test Operations User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Battery Test Operations. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Salinas, Michael

2012-01-01

311

Source Areas Investigation Plan and Recommendation for Removal Actions at Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Source Area Investigation Plan and Recommendation for Removal Action (SAIP\\/RRA) was prepared in support of the regulatory working group for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. The purpose of the plan is to focus the investigation of and initiate potential groundwater seepage control actions for contaminant source areas at WAG 5. The SAIP\\/RRA addresses four

T. J. Newsom; S. Blair; D. S. Hicks; R. H. Ketelle

1993-01-01

312

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. "TEST TRACK, STATION '0' THROUGH '200' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-OC-1-57-75, Drawing No. AF-6009-15, sheet 53 of 96, D.O. Series No. AF 1394/73, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296 Rev. C, Date: 19 NOV 59. Drawing includes plan, section, and details of track. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

313

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-01

314

Reflective Cracking Study: First-level Report on Laboratory Shear Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains a summary of the laboratory repeated load shear tests on mixes used as overlays on the Reflective Cracking Study Test Track at the Richmond Field Station. Evaluation of the results of the laboratory study on shear response of the overlay mixes reported herein included the effects of mix temperatures, air-void content, aging, mixing and compaction conditions, aggregate

Bor-Wen Tsai; David Jones; John T Harvey; Carl L. Monismith; I. Guada; J Signore

2008-01-01

315

A comparison of relative toxicity rankings by some small-scale laboratory tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small-scale laboratory tests for fire toxicity, suitable for use in the average laboratory hood, are needed for screening and ranking materials on the basis of relative toxicity. The performance of wool, cotton, and aromatic polyamide under several test procedures is presented.

Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

1977-01-01

316

Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide  

E-print Network

1 Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory Educational Version 2.0 User Guide Jeffrey W of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software, version 2.0. Using the VCCTL software, a user may create 3D microstructures of cement paste made with clinker, calcium sulfate, fly ash, slag

Magee, Joseph W.

317

Renewable Energy System Test and Support Laboratory , T L Pryor2  

E-print Network

ACRELab Renewable Energy System Test and Support Laboratory T Spooner1 , T L Pryor2 , N Wilmot3 , G for Renewable Energy AUSTRALIA Abstract ACRELab is a new testing laboratory for Renewable Energy (RE) systems. It is located at the headquarters of the Australian CRC for Renewable Energy (ACRE) on the Murdoch University

318

Continual planning and scheduling for managing patient tests in hospital laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital laboratories perform examination tests upon patients, in order to assist medical diagnosis or therapy progress. Planning and scheduling patient requests for examination tests is a complicated problem because it concerns both minimization of patient stay in hospital and maximization of laboratory resources utilization. In the present paper, we propose an integrated patient-wise planning and scheduling system which supports the

Catherine C Marinagi; Constantine D. Spyropoulos; Christos Papatheodorou; Stavros Kokkotos

2000-01-01

319

COMPARISON OF P-NITROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION IN FIELD AND LABORATORY TEST SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Acclimation of microbial communities exposed to p-nitrophenol (PNP) was measured in laboratory test systems and in a freshwater pond. Laboratory tests were conducted in shake flasks with water, shake flasks with water and sediment, eco-cores, and two sizes of microcosm. The sedim...

320

Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

1990-08-01

321

A rapid amphipod reproduction test for sediment quality assessment: In situ bioassays do not replicate laboratory bioassays.  

PubMed

An underlying assumption of laboratory-based toxicity tests is that the sensitivity and exposure of organisms in the laboratory is comparable to that in the field. We sought to make a comparison between field-based and laboratory-based sediment toxicity tests using a recently developed rapid amphipod reproduction test that encompasses gametogenesis, fertilization, and embryo development before hatching. The test species, Melita plumulosa, is an epibenthic, detritivorous amphipod native to Eastern Australia. Test sediments were sourced from Lake Macquarie, a large saltwater lagoon located 100 km north of Sydney (New South Wales, Australia) that has received heavy-metal pollution over many decades, primarily from a Pb/Zn smelter but also from collieries, coal-fired power stations, and urban areas. This has led to a north-south trace-metal concentration gradient, including Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu, in the sediments of Lake Macquarie. Sediments from these northern bays were demonstrated to reduce amphipod fecundity in laboratory-based tests. For the current study, the amphipod reproduction test has been modified for use in situ. In situ test chambers were deployed at the mouth of Cockle Creek, Lake Macquarie. Sediments that were demonstrated to reduce fecundity of M. plumulosa in the laboratory reproduction test were not similarly toxic when amphipods were exposed to the same sediments in situ. Factors related to the regular tidal renewal of overlying water likely altered exposure profiles in situ, including the provision of additional or alternative nutrition that obviated the need for amphipods to interact with the contaminated sediments, and a washout effect that prevented the accretion of dissolved zinc in the overlying water. PMID:20862754

Mann, Reinier M; Hyne, Ross V; Simandjuntak, Desiree L; Simpson, Stuart L

2010-11-01

322

42 CFR 493.15 - Laboratories performing waived tests.  

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...Nitrite; (vii) pH; (viii) Protein... (2) Fecal occult blood; (3) Ovulation tests...color comparison tests for human luteinizing hormone...non-automated; (7) Blood glucose by glucose...

2014-10-01

323

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01

324

FRACTIONAL CRYSALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition.

HERTING DL

2007-11-29

325

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

DOE Data Explorer

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

326

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

SciTech Connect

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

2014-07-29

327

Laboratory testing of the voids of a fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory studies of rock fractures are aimed at understanding their mechanical and hydrological behavior. Because the fracture surfaces are not ideal planes, they enclose a void space of complex shape, and are only partially in contact. The geometry of the voids and contacts controls both the mechanical and the hydrological behavior. The mechanical response is strongly dependent on the contact

S. Gentier; D. Billaux; L. van Vliet

1989-01-01

328

Laboratory testing of displacement and load induced fretting  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptually new simulation system for the laboratory investigation of fretting wear is described. Fretting vibrations are generated either directly by oscillating a linear relative displacement device of constant stroke between the contacting bodies or indirectly by oscillating the applied contact load resulting in a cyclic radial expansion of the contact zone. The principles of both actuation mechanisms are outlined

H. Mohrbacher; J.-P. Celis; J. R. Roos

1995-01-01

329

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

SciTech Connect

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01

330

Hydraulic tests of emergency cooling system: L-Area  

SciTech Connect

The delay in L-Area startup provided an opportunity to obtain valuable data on the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) which will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level. ECS flow is a major input to the FLOOD code which calculates reactor ECS power limits. The FLOOD code assesses the effectiveness of the ECS cooling capacity by modeling the core and plenum hydraulics under accident conditions. Presently, reactor power is not limited by the ECS cooling capacity (power limit). However, the manual calculations of ECS flows had been recently updated to include piping changes (debris strainer, valve changes, pressure release systems) and update fitting losses. Both updates resulted in reduced calculated ECS flows. Upon completion of the current program to update, validate, and document, reactor power may be limited under certain situations by ECS cooling capacity for some present reactor charge designs. A series of special hydraulic tests (Reference 1, 3) were conducted in L-Area using all sources of emergency coolant including the ECS pumps (Reference 2). The tests provided empirical hydraulic data on the ECS piping. These data will be used in computer models of the system as well as manual calculations of ECS flows. The improved modeling and accuracy of the flow calculations will permit reactor operation at the highest safe power level with respect to an ECS power limit.

Hinton, J H

1988-01-01

331

Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01

332

Use of ruggedness testing to develop an inter-laboratory testing protocol for mortar-cement mortar  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, ASTM approved a specification for a new product, called mortar cement, intended for use in applications requiring masonry with high tensile bond strength. An inter-laboratory testing program is planned; the objectives will include the determination of intra-and inter-laboratory coefficients of variation of bond-wrench results for that product. Prior to conducting the inter-laboratory testing program, it is necessary to set the test procedures and variables to be used. Some of those procedures (such as the precise control of flow, the use of jigs, templates and drop hammers to construct prisms, and bag curing), have already been found to reduce the variability of bond-wrench results, are included in ASTM C1329-96, Standard Specification for Mortar Cement, and ASTM C1357-96, Standard Test Methods for Evaluating Bond Strength, and will be used in the inter-laboratory study. However, other test procedures must still be established. To do so, and prior to the inter-laboratory study, a pilot ruggedness study was conducted; the objective was to determine which additional factors should be controlled during the inter-laboratory study. In this paper, the conduct and results of that ruggedness study are presented and discussed in the light of current bond-wrench testing procedures, and specific changes are recommended to ASTM bond-wrench testing standards.

Ponce, L.G.; Klingner, R.E.; Melander, J.M.

1999-07-01

333

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01

334

Determination of geomechanical properties and collapse potential of a caliche by in situ and laboratory tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Working in complex grounds have always been difficult for engineering geologists because of the heterogenous nature of such geo-materials, which results in different behaviors under stresses. The caliches outcropping in the Adana basin and its close vicinity are selected as the study material because of their highly complex nature and also understanding their mechanical behaviour and collapse potential is too difficult, although their aerial extent is large in the region. For this reason, investigation of the collapse potential and mechanical behaviour of the caliches by applying new approaches besides the conventional in situ and laboratory tests is the purpose of the study. The study includes five main stages such as measurements of caliche profiles, in situ tests (plate loading), sampling, shooting photographs for photoanalyses and laboratory studies. Four different levels such as hard pan; silty, sandy layer; gravelly, blocky layer and clayey level are described for the caliches employed. The hard pan level is a weak rock with an average uniaxial compressive strength of 11.89 MPa while the others have typical soil characteristics. A series of plate loading tests are applied on the blocky, gravelly level of the caliche to determine the modulus of elasticity. The modulus of elasticity and the allowable bearing capacity are determined between 28.6-65.3 and 1.5-2.0 MPa, respectively. To determine the grain size distribution curve, in addition to sieve analyses, a photoanalysis technique is also applied and a combination procedure between the results from both sieve analyses and photoanalyses is introduced and the grain size curves for the blocky, gravelly level of the caliche are obtained. According to the results of collapse potential index tests performed on the samples collected from 20 locations of the study area, the soft pan level of the caliche has slight to moderate degree of collapse indices. In the final stage, various simple and statistically meaningful empirical equations are proposed for the indirect determination of the collapse index by employing simple paramateres.

Zorlu, K.; Kasapoglu, K. E.

2009-02-01

335

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01

336

Mars Science Laboratory Sample Acquisition, Sample Processing and Handling: Subsystem Design and Test Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling subsystem for the Mars Science Laboratory is a highly-mechanized, Rover-based sampling system that acquires powdered rock and regolith samples from the Martian surface, sorts the samples into fine particles through sieving, and delivers small portions of the powder into two science instruments inside the Rover. SA/SPaH utilizes 17 actuated degrees-of-freedom to perform the functions needed to produce 5 sample pathways in support of the scientific investigation on Mars. Both hardware redundancy and functional redundancy are employed in configuring this sampling system so some functionality is retained even with the loss of a degree-of-freedom. Intentional dynamic environments are created to move sample while vibration isolators attenuate this environment at the sensitive instruments located near the dynamic sources. In addition to the typical flight hardware qualification test program, two additional types of testing are essential for this kind of sampling system: characterization of the intentionally-created dynamic environment and testing of the sample acquisition and processing hardware functions using Mars analog materials in a low pressure environment. The overall subsystem design and configuration are discussed along with some of the challenges, tradeoffs, and lessons learned in the areas of fault tolerance, intentional dynamic environments, and special testing

Jandura, Louise

2010-01-01

337

Comparison of ability tests administered online and in the laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the Internet, the global medium of the future, expands exponentially, it has become increasingly relevant to scientific\\u000a research. So far, there is but little evidence that online testing is suitable for collecting ability-test data. The present\\u000a article aims to shed light on some aspects of the issue by comparing the performance in a computer-administered ability test\\u000a of one lab

Jan Marten Ihme; Franziska Lemke; Kerstin Lieder; Franka Martin; Jonas C. Müller; Sabine Schmidt

2009-01-01

338

Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

Schaschl, Leslie

2011-01-01

339

Testing general relativity in space-borne and astronomical laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of space-based experiments and astronomical observations designed to test the theory of general relativity is surveyed. Consideration is given to tests of post-Newtonian gravity, searches for feeble short-range forces and gravitomagnetism, improved measurements of parameterized post-Newtonian parameter values, explorations of post-Newtonian physics, tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, observational tests of post-Newtonian orbital effects, and efforts to detect quadrupole and dipole radiation damping. Recent numerical results are presented in tables.

Will, Clifford M.

1989-01-01

340

NNWSI waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report: January-June 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project is investigating the tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste form under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and the performance of experiments designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1986. This report summarizes progress during the period January--June 1987, 19 refs., 17 figs., 20 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1988-11-01

341

Evaluation of Laboratory Kinetic Test Methods for Measuring Rates of Weathering  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   A study was conducted to compare laboratory kinetic test methods for predicting acid rock drainage rates of weathering. Five\\u000a laboratory kinetic test protocols (standard humidity cells, non-aerated cells, tall cells, shaken cells and NP depletion columns)\\u000a were evaluated by comparing sulfate release and NP depletion rates, and predicted time to acidity (defined as pH 6). Our tests\\u000a indicate that

Scott Frostad; Bern Klein; Richard W. Lawrence

2002-01-01

342

Laboratory Tests of Gravitational Physics Using a Cryogenic Torsion Pendulum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress and plans are reported for a program of gravitational physics experiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large amplitude torsional oscillation. The program includes a UC Irvine project to measure the gravitational constant G and joint UC Irvine-U. Washington projects to test the gravitational inverse square law at a range of about 10 cm and to test the weak equivalence principle.

Berg, E. C.; Bantel, M. K.; Cross, W. D.; Inoue, T.; Newman, R. D.; Steffen, J. H.; Moore, M. W.; Boynton, P. E.

2006-02-01

343

Synthesis and Testing of the Insecticide Carbaryl: A Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Carbaryl, 1-naphthyl-N-methylcarbamate, is the biodegradable (soft) insecticide most commonly marketed by the Union Carbide Corporation under the trade name of Sevin. Procedures for the synthesis and testing of carbaryl and for the testing of some compounds similar to carbaryl are provided. Equations showing its synthesis from methyl isocyanate…

Thadeo, Peter F.; Mowery, Dwight F.

1984-01-01

344

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Frequency of sampling —(1) Microbiological. Samples of raw milk for testing shall be taken as prescribed in § 58.135. Representative...dry cottage cheese shall be tested for moisture only. (ii) pH. Representative samples shall be taken of finished...

2013-01-01

345

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

...Frequency of sampling —(1) Microbiological. Samples of raw milk for testing shall be taken as prescribed in § 58.135. Representative...dry cottage cheese shall be tested for moisture only. (ii) pH. Representative samples shall be taken of finished...

2014-01-01

346

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Frequency of sampling —(1) Microbiological. Samples of raw milk for testing shall be taken as prescribed in § 58.135. Representative...dry cottage cheese shall be tested for moisture only. (ii) pH. Representative samples shall be taken of finished...

2011-01-01

347

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Frequency of sampling —(1) Microbiological. Samples of raw milk for testing shall be taken as prescribed in § 58.135. Representative...dry cottage cheese shall be tested for moisture only. (ii) pH. Representative samples shall be taken of finished...

2012-01-01

348

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01

349

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1980  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne ...

350

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-01-01

351

Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

1992-09-01

352

7 CFR 58.523 - Laboratory and quality control tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...representative samples shall be taken of finished cottage cheese; (2) Chemical —(i) Milkfat and Moisture. Representative samples shall be taken of cottage cheese; dry cottage cheese shall be tested for moisture only. (ii)...

2010-01-01

353

Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 17 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the drilling and installation of groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 17. WAG 17 is composed of approximately 23 acres and is located in Bethel Valley about 3,100 ft east of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area. The facilities in WAG 17 constitute the ORNL Services Area

J. A. Mortimore; M. L. Ebers

1994-01-01

354

Laboratory Test of Newton's Second Law for Small Accelerations  

SciTech Connect

We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5x10{sup -14} m/s{sup 2}.

Gundlach, J. H.; Schlamminger, S.; Spitzer, C. D.; Choi, K.-Y.; Woodahl, B. A.; Coy, J. J.; Fischbach, E. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Physics Department, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Earth and Space Science Department, Saint Joseph's College, Rensselaer, Indiana 47978 (United States); Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2007-04-13

355

Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.  

PubMed

Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles. PMID:20426275

Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

2010-03-01

356

6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southwest. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 9 (fuel), and that on the right houses the equipment room. The corrugated aluminum shed that is taller than the main building in the left foreground houses a citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room), the interior of which may be seen in CO-88-A-21. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

357

Modeling and testing of EVs — Preliminary study and laboratory development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and

Guang-Ya Yang; Francesco Marra; Arne Hejde Nielsen; Chresten Traholt

2011-01-01

358

A Laboratory Test for the Examination of Alactic Running Performance  

PubMed Central

A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg) participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s-1. The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2), an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml), the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W), and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N). The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01) as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01). The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for any other running discipline. Key Points New testing procedure for the evaluation of alactic running performance. 10s treadmill sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity similar to a bob sleigh start. Treadmill motor is used with inverted polarity to establish mechanical resistance rather than acceleration. Highly significant correlations found between test criteria and alactic performance measures. PMID:24501570

Kibele, Armin; Behm, David

2005-01-01

359

A laboratory test for the examination of alactic running performance.  

PubMed

A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg) participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s(-1). The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2), an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml), the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W), and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N). The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01) as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01). The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for any other running discipline. Key PointsNew testing procedure for the evaluation of alactic running performance.10s treadmill sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity similar to a bob sleigh start.Treadmill motor is used with inverted polarity to establish mechanical resistance rather than acceleration.Highly significant correlations found between test criteria and alactic performance measures. PMID:24501570

Kibele, Armin; Behm, David

2005-12-01

360

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast from hill north of structure. The building wing in the right foreground houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. Test Cell 10 is located in the center background, Test Cell 9 is at the far left, and the equipment room is in the immediate left foreground. The control room is in the center of the structure and abuts the aforementioned test cell and equipment room wings. This structure served as a facility for testing, handling, and storage of Titan II's hydrazine- and nitrogen teteroxide-based propellant system components for compatability determinations. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

361

Laboratory testing of a flexible boom for ice management  

SciTech Connect

Combating oil spills in the Arctic is a major challenge. Drilling or producing oil or gas in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) may allow booms to be deployed upstream of an offshore structure to clear the water of ice, thereby enabling conventional oil spill countermeasures to be used. Such a boom would be kept in place by two ice-going service vessels or by moored buoys. SINTEF NHL and NRC have performed a number of small-scale tests with a flexible boom in the NRC ice basin in Ottawa. The purpose of the tests was to measure the effectiveness of using a flexible boom for collecting ice, and to determine the loads associated with collecting the ice. In the tests, various boom configurations were towed against a broken ice field consisting of ice pieces typically 50--100 mm across and 30 mm thick. The ice concentration was usually 10/10, but it was reduced to 8/10 and 5/10 for two tests. The boom was towed at speeds of 20 and 50 mm-s[sup [minus]1]. Both the width of the boom and the slackness of the boom were varied over reasonable ranges. Two six-component dynamometers were used to support the boom. Thus, the force components on each end of the boom were measured. Further, two video cameras were used to record the effectiveness of each boom configuration. In this paper, the full results of this test program are presented and the application of the test results to the full-scale situation are discussed. The tests show that, under certain conditions, the use of boom is feasible for ice management in oil-contaminated water.

Loeset, S. (SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway). Norwegian Hydrotechnical Lab.); Timco, G.W. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1993-08-01

362

Seed dressing pesticides on springtails in two ecotoxicological laboratory tests.  

PubMed

Terrestrial ecotoxicological tests are powerful tools for assessing the ecological risks that pesticides pose to soil invertebrates, but they are rarely used to evaluate seed dressing pesticides. This study investigated the effects of seed dressing pesticides on survival and reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola), using standardized ecotoxicological tests (after ISO guidelines with few adaptations for tropical conditions). Commercial formulations of five seed dressing pesticides were tested individually in Tropical Artificial Soil (TAS): the insecticides imidacloprid, fipronil, thiametoxam, and the fungicides captan and carboxin+thiram. Thiametoxam, captan, and carboxin+thiram were only lethal to F. candida at the highest concentration tested (1000mg of active ingredient kg(-1) of dry soil). Imidacloprid and fipronil were lethal at lower concentrations (100 and 10mg a.i. kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively), however, these concentrations were much higher than those predicted (PEC) for soil. Imidacloprid and fipronil were the most toxic pesticides in both tests, reducing significantly collembolan reproduction (EC20=0.02 and 0.12mga.i.kg(-1) soil d.w, respectively). Further studies under more realistic conditions are needed, since imidacloprid and fipronil reduced collembolan reproduction at concentrations below or close to their respective PECs. PMID:24785712

Alves, Paulo Roger L; Cardoso, Elke J B N; Martines, Alexandre M; Sousa, José Paulo; Pasini, Amarildo

2014-07-01

363

Test of a LYSO calorimeter prototype readout by large-area Silicon PhotoMultipliers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger-Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (˜ 106). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9 ˜ 18X0 LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4 × 4 mm2 SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter has been tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100-500 MeV energy range.

Guffanti, D.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Vallazza, E.; Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.

2014-06-01

364

HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

KIRK WINTERHOLLER

2008-02-25

365

ChemCam for Mars Science Laboratory rover, undergoing pre-flight testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners developed a laser instrument, ChemCam, that will ride on the elevated mast of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The system allows Curiosity to "zap" rocks from a distance, reading their chemical composition through spectroscopic analysis. In this video, laboratory shaker-table testing of the instrument ensures that all of its components are solidly attached and resistant to damage from the rigors of launch, travel and landing.

None

2011-10-20

366

[Approval of ISO/IEC 17025 and quality control of laboratory testing].  

PubMed

First section of Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) was approved by ISO/IEC 17025 as a laboratory having an appropriate laboratory testing technique. NIHS is the first national laboratory approved by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS has also been accepted the appropriate technique and facility for the BSL3 level pathogens by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS is necessary to take an external audit almost every year. This approval is renewed every 4 years. PMID:21381399

Yamamoto, Shigeki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Machii, Kenji; Igimi, Shizunobu

2010-01-01

367

ChemCam for Mars Science Laboratory rover, undergoing pre-flight testing  

ScienceCinema

Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners developed a laser instrument, ChemCam, that will ride on the elevated mast of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The system allows Curiosity to "zap" rocks from a distance, reading their chemical composition through spectroscopic analysis. In this video, laboratory shaker-table testing of the instrument ensures that all of its components are solidly attached and resistant to damage from the rigors of launch, travel and landing.

None

2014-08-12

368

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of a New Rapid Test for Detecting Wuchereria bancrofti Antigen in Human Blood  

PubMed Central

Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) guidelines call for using filarial antigen testing to identify endemic areas that require mass drug administration (MDA) and for post-MDA surveillance. We compared a new filarial antigen test (the Alere Filariasis Test Strip) with the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test that has been used by the GPELF for more than 10 years. Laboratory testing of 227 archived serum or plasma samples showed that the two tests had similar high rates of sensitivity and specificity and > 99% agreement. However, the test strip detected 26.5% more people with filarial antigenemia (124/503 versus 98/503) and had better test result stability than the card test in a field study conducted in a filariasis-endemic area in Liberia. Based on its increased sensitivity and other practical advantages, we believe that the test strip represents a major step forward that will be welcomed by the GPELF and the filariasis research community. PMID:23690552

Weil, Gary J.; Curtis, Kurt C.; Fakoli, Lawrence; Fischer, Kerstin; Gankpala, Lincoln; Lammie, Patrick J.; Majewski, Andrew C.; Pelletreau, Sonia; Won, Kimberly Y.; Bolay, Fatorma K.; Fischer, Peter U.

2013-01-01

369

Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

NONE

1996-02-09

370

FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

2009-01-01

371

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

372

Laboratory Evaluation of a Dual Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for HIV and Syphilis Infection.  

PubMed

New dual tests for HIV and syphilis have been developed. Our study aimed to evaluate the laboratory performance of a dual rapid immunodiagnostic test for HIV and syphilis. Our evaluation showed high performance of this dual rapid test, which should be considered for implementation to increase screening coverage and efficiency. PMID:25378568

Bristow, Claire C; Leon, Segundo R; Ramos, Lourdes B; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Konda, Kelika A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

2015-01-01

373

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01

374

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 219 - Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pt. 219, App. B Appendix B to Part 219—Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing The following laboratory is currently designated to conduct post-accident toxicological analysis under subpart C of this part:......

2010-10-01

375

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 219 - Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pt. 219, App. B Appendix B to Part 219—Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing The following laboratory is currently designated to conduct post-accident toxicological analysis under subpart C of this part:......

2011-10-01

376

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 219 - Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pt. 219, App. B Appendix B to Part 219—Designation of Laboratory for Post-Accident Toxicological Testing The following laboratory is currently designated to conduct post-accident toxicological analysis under subpart C of this part: Quest......

2013-10-01

377

Development and application of a preference test system to evaluate housing conditions for laboratory rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improved knowledge of the ethological needs of laboratory animals can be used not only to verify current guidelines on laboratory animal housing, but also to refine these guidelines if desirable. Carefully chosen experiments can provide valid information about preferences or aversions towards specific housing conditions. The results of preference tests should be interpreted carefully and considered with results from direct

H. J. M. Blom; G. Van Tintelen; V. Baumans; J. Van Den Broek; A. C. Beynen

1995-01-01

378

Fractional horsepower DC motor tests in virtual laboratory by Internet access  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fractional-horsepower dc motor test series performed in a remote controlled virtual laboratory by Internet access was developed. Nowadays the remote controlled industrial systems have got great importance worldwide. The internet access has become general and the Ethernet cabling has been entirely applied in industry. The new virtual laboratory introduces users into the application of the most sophisticated emerging remote

A. Va?radi; L. Szentirmai; T. Szarka

2010-01-01

379

Laboratory MCAO test-bed for developing wavefront sensing concepts  

E-print Network

. Beckers, "Adaptive optics schemes for future extremely large telescopes," Opt. Eng. 41, 1065-1072 (2002 optical bench test-bed for developing new wavefront sensing concepts for Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics adaptive optics," in ESO symposium on Large Telescopes and Their Instrumentation (European Southern

Dainty, Chris

380

Biochemical laboratory tests in viral hepatitis and other hepatic diseases  

PubMed Central

The differential diagnosis between viral hepatitis and other liver diseases (particularly obstructive jaundice) is often difficult on purely clinical grounds. Damage to the liver causes changes in the pattern of the serum enzymes and this has led to the development in recent years of a number of enzyme tests. The authors have amassed evidence to show that the most useful of these is determination of the levels of serum glutamic oxalacetic and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGOT and SGPT), coupled with calculation of the SGOT/SGPT ratio. It is characteristic of viral hepatitis that both levels are greatly increased, but the SGOT/SGPT ratio, normally greater than one, falls considerably below his figure. In a few cases of obstructive jaundice, the serum transaminase picture may initially resemble that in viral hepatitis, but the differential diagnosis can be established by repeating the determinations at intervals. Other enzyme tests, such as determination of alkaline phosphatase and leucylaminopeptidase, may be used to confirm the biliary obstruction. Flocculation tests and electrophoretic determination of the plasma protein picture, while of limited value in the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis, are useful in conjunction with the serum transaminase test for assessing the activity of the disease and any tendency to progress towards “active” chronic hepatitis or post-hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:14292063

De Ritis, Fernando; Giusti, Giuseppe; Piccinino, Felice; Cacciatore, Luigi

1965-01-01

381

Laboratory longitudinal diffusion tests: 2. Parameter estimation by inverse analysis.  

PubMed

This study focuses on the verification of test interpretations for different state analyses of diffusion experiments. Part 1 of this study identified that steady, quasi-steady and equilibrium state analyses for the through- and in-diffusion tests with solution reservoirs are generally feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In Part 2 we investigate parameter identifiability in transient-state analysis of reservoir concentration variation using a numerical approach. For increased generality, the analytical models, objective functions and Jacobian matrix necessary for inverse analysis of transient-state data are reformulated using unified dimensionless parameters. In these dimensionless forms, the number of unknown parameters is reduced and a single dimensionless parameter represents the sorption property. The dimensionless objective functions are evaluated for individual test methods and parameter identifiability is discussed in relation to the sorption property. The effects of multiple minima and measurement error on parameter identifiability are also investigated. The main findings are that inverse problems for inlet and outlet reservoir concentration analyses are generally unstable and well-posed, respectively. Where the tracer is sorptive, the inverse problem for the inlet reservoir concentration analysis may have multiple minima. When insufficient measurement data is collected, multiple solutions may result and this should be taken into consideration when inversely analyzing data including that of inlet reservoir concentration. Verification of test interpretation by cross-checking different state analyses is feasible where the tracer is not highly sorptive. In an actual experiment, test interpretation validity is demonstrated through consistency between theory and practice for different state analyses. PMID:18353488

Takeda, M; Zhang, M; Nakajima, H; Hiratsuka, T

2008-04-28

382

Screening for Saponins Using the Blood Hemolysis Test. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment for undergraduate chemistry laboratories involving a chemical found in plants and some sea animals. Discusses collection and identification of material, a hemolysis test, preparation of blood-coated agar plates, and application of samples. (CW)

Sotheeswaran, Subramaniam

1988-01-01

383

Functional requirements of the borrow area and haul route for the Waste Area Grouping projects at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the mission and functional requirements for the development of a borrow area and the associated haul route to support closure and/or remediation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other WAGs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document specifies the basic functional requirements that must be met by the borrow area and haul route developed to produce low-permeability soil for the covers or caps at WAG 6.

Miller, D.G.

1992-09-01

384

Results of ground-water tracer tests using tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water tracer test were conducted at two sites in the radioactive-waste disposal area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1977 to 1982. The purpose of the tests was to determine if the regolith beds had weathered sufficiently to permit the substantial flow of water across them. About 50 curies of tritium dissolved in water were used as the tracer in one site, and about 100 curies at the other. Results demonstrated that ground water is able to flow through joints in the weathered bedding and that the direction of the water-table gradient is the primary factor governint flow direction. Nevertheless, the substantial lateral spread of the plume as it developed showed that bedding-plane openings can still exert a significant secondary influence on flow direction in weathered rock. About 3,500 water samples from the injection and observation wells were analyzed for tritium during the test period. Concentrations detected spanned 11 orders of magnitude. Measurable concentrations were still present in the two injection wells and most observation wells 5 years after the tracer was introduced. Matrix diffusion may have played a significant role in these tests. The process would account for the sustained concentrations of tritium at many of the observation wells, the long-term residual concentrations at the injection and observation wells, and the apparent slow movement of the centers of mass across the two well fields. The process also would have implications regarding aquifer remediation. Other tracer tests have been conducted in the regolith of the Conasauga Group. Results differ from the results described in this report.

Webster, D.A.

1996-01-01

385

EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an early step in preparing for future EVAs, astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. To date, neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA JSC’s Sonny Carter Training Facility have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the ISS. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial participants for human transportation into space, evaluations at the NBL will take on a new focus. In this session, Juniper Jairala briefly discussed the design of the NBL and, in more detail, described the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated. Robert Durkin discussed the new and potential types of uses for the NBL, including those by non-NASA external customers.

Jairala, Juniper; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph; Prince, Angela; Sipila, Stephanie; Ney, Zane; Parazynski, Scott; Thomason, Arthur

2012-01-01

386

EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASAs Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an early step in preparing for future EVAs, astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. To date, neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA JSC’s Sonny Carter Training Facility have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the ISS. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial participants for human transportation into space, evaluations at the NBL will take on a new focus. In this session, Juniper Jairala briefly discussed the design of the NBL and, in more detail, described the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated. Robert Durkin discussed the new and potential types of uses for the NBL, including those by non-NASA external customers.

Jairala, Juniper; Durkin, Robert

2012-01-01

387

EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As an early step in preparing for future EVAs, astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. To date, neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA JSC's Sonny Carter Training Facility have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the ISS. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial participants for human transportation into space, evaluations at the NBL will take on a new focus. In this session, Juniper Jairala briefly discussed the design of the NBL and, in more detail, described the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated. Robert Durkin discussed the new and potential types of uses for the NBL, including those by non-NASA external customers.

Jairala, Juniper; Durkin, Robert

2012-01-01

388

Laboratory diagnosis of bleeding disorders. Basic screening tests.  

PubMed

Five studies are important to the diagnosis of bleeding disorders: bleeding time (BT) (Simplate), platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). If the platelet count alone is low, the cause is usually peripheral destruction of platelets, immunothrombocytopenia, or an abnormality of bone marrow production. An abnormal bleeding time alone suggests a platelet aggregation defect that is most likely due to medication. When the aPTT is the only abnormal test and the patient has a definite history of bleeding, one of the hemophiliac states is present. An abnormal PT, with or without an abnormal aPTT but with normal results in the other three tests, indicates an abnormal reduction in the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors (II, VII, IX, X) or factor V. When the TT is abnormal, disseminated intravascular coagulation, the presence of plasma heparin, or a hepatopathy should be suspected. PMID:6334288

Palmer, R L

1984-12-01

389

Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Potassium recommendations applicable for  

E-print Network

80 75 70 65 60 50 40 GRAIN SORGHUM (1000 LBS/A) 20 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 5 GRAIN SORGHUM (10000 LBS/A) 150 140 130 120 110 105 100 95 90 80 70 GRAIN SORGHUM (1500 LBS/A) 20 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 5GRAIN SORGHUM (1500 LBS/A) 20 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 5 #12;Soil, Water and Forage Testing

390

Laboratory and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus testing  

PubMed Central

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with a wide spectrum of disease that ranges from self-limited skin warts to life-threatening cancers. Since HPV plays a necessary etiological role in cervical cancer, it is logical to use HPV as a marker for early detection of cervical cancer and precancer. Recent advances in technology enable the development of high-throughput HPV assays of different formats, including DNA-based, mRNA-based, high-risk group-specific and type-specific methods. The ultimate goal of these assays is to improve the accuracy and cost-effiectiveness of cervical screening programs. HPV testing has several potential advantages compared to cytology-based screening. However, since the cancer to transient infection ratio is always low in the general population, HPV test results are bound to have a low positive predictive value that may subject women to unnecessary follow-up investigations. The wide-spread administration of prophylactic HPV vaccine will substantially decrease the incidence of cancer and precancer. This poses a number of challenges to cytology-based screening, and the role of HPV testing is expected to increase. Finally, apart from technical and cost-effiectiveness considerations, one should also keep in mind the psycho-social impact of using sexually-transmitted agents as a marker for cancer screening. PMID:22913405

Chan, Paul K.S.; Picconi, María Alejandra; Cheung, Tak Hong; Giovannelli, Lucia; Park, Jong Sup

2012-01-01

391

Laboratory and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus testing.  

PubMed

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with a wide spectrum of disease that ranges from self-limited skin warts to life-threatening cancers. Since HPV plays a necessary etiological role in cervical cancer, it is logical to use HPV as a marker for early detection of cervical cancer and precancer. Recent advances in technology enable the development of high-throughput HPV assays of different formats, including DNA-based, mRNA-based, high-risk group-specific and type-specific methods. The ultimate goal of these assays is to improve the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of cervical screening programs. HPV testing has several potential advantages compared to cytology-based screening. However, since the cancer to transient infection ratio is always low in the general population, HPV test results are bound to have a low positive predictive value that may subject women to unnecessary follow-up investigations. The wide-spread administration of prophylactic HPV vaccine will substantially decrease the incidence of cancer and precancer. This poses a number of challenges to cytology-based screening, and the role of HPV testing is expected to increase. Finally, apart from technical and cost-effectiveness considerations, one should also keep in mind the psycho-social impact of using sexually-transmitted agents as a marker for cancer screening. PMID:22913405

Chan, Paul K S; Picconi, María Alejandra; Cheung, Tak Hong; Giovannelli, Lucia; Park, Jong Sup

2012-01-01

392

21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests... Section 312.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests ...A person may ship a biological product for...

2010-04-01

393

Assessing Groundwater Model Uncertainty for the Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to quantify the flow and transport model uncertainty for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). Six parameters were identified as uncertain, including the specified head boundary conditions used in the flow model, the spatial distribution of the underlying welded tuff unit, effective porosity, sorption coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficient, and the geochemical release function which describes nuclear glass dissolution. The parameter uncertainty was described by assigning prior statistical distributions for each of these parameters. Standard Monte Carlo techniques were used to sample from the parameter distributions to determine the full prediction uncertainty. Additional analysis is performed to determine the most cost-beneficial characterization activities. The maximum radius of the tritium and strontium-90 contaminant boundary was used as the output metric for evaluation of prediction uncertainty. The results indicate that combining all of the uncertainty in the parameters listed above propagates to a prediction uncertainty in the maximum radius of the contaminant boundary of 234 to 308 m and 234 to 302 m, for tritium and strontium-90, respectively. Although the uncertainty in the input parameters is large, the prediction uncertainty in the contaminant boundary is relatively small. The relatively small prediction uncertainty is primarily due to the small transport velocities such that large changes in the uncertain input parameters causes small changes in the contaminant boundary. This suggests that the model is suitable in terms of predictive capability for the contaminant boundary delineation.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman; Todd Mihevc

2002-06-14

394

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

Not Available

1993-08-01

395

Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

NONE

1994-12-01

396

Laboratory tests recommended by pharmacists in a skilled-nursing facility.  

PubMed

The types of laboratory tests recommended by pharmacists in a 185-bed skilled-nursing facility, the rate of physician acceptance of the recommendations, the reasons for and costs of the tests, and the outcomes of the tests were determined. Patients for whom laboratory tests had been recommended by a pharmacist from 1982 to 1987 were identified; this information had been taken from patients' charts during routine review by a pharmacist and entered into a computer database. The following information was recorded: type of laboratory test recommended, physician response to the recommendation, cost of the test, and outcome of the test. The investigator determined reasons for the recommendations by using the Department of Health and Human Services list of apparent irregularities that, if present, could indicate problems with drug therapy. During the study period, pharmacists requested 99 tests for 63 patients; physicians ordered 87 (87.9%) of those tests. Tests done most frequently were the SMA-6 (serum concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and carbon dioxide), serum concentrations of various drugs, and anticoagulation studies. The reasons given most frequently for requesting the tests were routine monitoring, the most recent results being more than six months old, suspected drug toxicity or drug-drug interactions, and the need for information to determine whether drug therapy should continue. Results of 36 of the tests prompted a change in drug therapy, whereas 56 tests indicated that the current therapy was appropriate and safe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2729304

Longe, R L

1989-05-01

397

Quality assurance plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) is concerned with design and construction (Sect. 2) and characterization and monitoring (Sect. 3). The basis for Sect. 2 is the Quality Assurance Plan for the Design and Construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the basis for Sect. 3 is the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Combining the two areas into one plan gives a single, overall document that explains the requirements and from which the individual QAPs and quality assurance project plans can be written. The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 QAP establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 project. Quality Assurance (QA) activities are subject to requirements detailed in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), QA Program and the Environmental Restoration (ER) QA Program, as well as to other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, subcontractors to Energy Systems, and architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 QAP will be supplemented by subproject QAPs that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject.

Not Available

1994-01-01

398

Aircraft Radiation Shield Experiments--Preflight Laboratory Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the past, measurements onboard a research Boeing 57F (RB57-F) aircraft have demonstrated that the neutron environment within the aircraft structure is greater than that in the local external environment. Recent studies onboard Boeing 737 commercial flights have demonstrated cabin variations in radiation exposure up to 30 percent. These prior results were the basis of the present study to quantify the potential effects of aircraft construction materials on the internal exposures of the crew and passengers. The present study constitutes preflight measurements using an unmoderated Cf-252 fission neutron source to quantify the effects of three current and potential aircraft materials (aluminum, titanium, and graphite-epoxy composite) on the fast neutron flux. Conclusions about the effectiveness of the three selected materials for radiation shielding must wait until testing in the atmosphere is complete; however, it is clear that for shielding low-energy neutrons, the composite material is an improved shielding material over aluminum or titanium.

Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Maiden, Donald L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Badavi, Francis F.; Conroy, Thomas; Braby, Leslie

1999-01-01

399

A laboratory facility for electric vehicle propulsion system testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The road load simulator facility located at the NASA Lewis Research Center enables a propulsion system or any of its components to be evaluated under a realistic vehicle inertia and road loads. The load is applied to the system under test according to the road load equation: F(net)=K1F1+K2F2V+K3 sq V+K4(dv/dt)+K5 sin theta. The coefficient of each term in the equation can be varied over a wide range with vehicle inertial representative of vehicles up to 7500 pounds simulated by means of flywheels. The required torque is applied by the flywheels, a hydroviscous absorber and clutch, and a drive motor integrated by a closed loop control system to produce a smooth, continuous load up to 150 horsepower.

Sargent, N. B.

1980-01-01

400

Good Clinical Laboratory Practices Improved Proficiency Testing Performance at Clinical Trials Centers in Ghana and Burkina Faso  

PubMed Central

Background The recent drive towards accreditation of clinical laboratories in Africa by the World Health Organization – Regional Office for Africa (WHO-AFRO) and the U.S Government is a historic step to strengthen health systems, provide better results for patients and an improved quality of results for clinical trials. Enrollment in approved proficiency testing (PT) programs and maintenance of satisfactory performance is vital in the process of accreditation. Passing proficiency testing surveys has posed a great challenge to many laboratories across sub-Saharan Africa. Our study was aimed at identifying the causes of unsatisfactory PT results in clinical research laboratories conducting or planning to conduct malaria vaccine trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Methodology PT reports for 2009 and 2010 from the College of American Pathologists (CAP) for the laboratories were reviewed as part of the process. Errors accounting for unsatisfactory results were classified into clerical, methodological, technical, problem with PT materials, and random errors. A training program on good clinical laboratory practices (GCLP) was developed for each center to address areas for improvement. Results The major cause of PT failure in the four centers was methodological. The application of GCLP improved the success rate in the PT surveys from 58% in 2009 to 88% in 2010. It also decreased the error rate on PT by 35%. Conclusion A previous report from the CAP- PT participating laboratories indicated that the major causes of error were clerical. These types of errors were predominantly made in laboratories in the US, with much more experience in quality control, and varied significantly from what we found. In our centers in sub-Saharan Africa, methodological errors, and not clerical errors, accounted for the vast majority of errors. A process was started for continuous improvement which has decreased methodological errors by 35%, but more improvement is needed. PMID:22768062

Ibrahim, Faisal; Dosoo, David; Kronmann, Karl C.; Ouedraogo, Issa; Anyorigiya, Thomas; Abdul, Haruna; Sodiomon, Sirima; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Koram, Kwadwo

2012-01-01

401

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01

402

Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

1996-09-01

403

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

SciTech Connect

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function properly throughout the entire test due to the UPS responding correctly to each power situation. The cryogenic control system isolated both the Utility(UV) and insulating(IV) vacuum systems as to preserve their vacua while the pumps were off. Once the vacuum pumps were reestablished the IV and UV vacua were put back on line to their respective pumps by the cryogenic control system. The instrument air is backed up by a high pressure trailer, regulated down to instrument air pressure and switches automatically on line through a check valve. During the time that the instrument air compressor was off, instrument air never went below 80 psig (high pressure regulator setting).

Markley, D.; /Fermilab

1991-01-24

404

Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, TA-54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

SciTech Connect

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Site 1-recently disturbed and Site 2-partially disturbed) at Area G, Technical Area 54 and a control site on Frijoles Mesa (Site 4) in 1995. Our objectives were (1) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify if the primary mode of contamination to small mammals is by surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least rive animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr , {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 3}H. Significantly higher (parametric West at p=0.05) levels of total U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu were detected in pelts than in carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Our results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses, which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0125) mean tritium concentration in carcasses than Site 2 or Site 4. In addition Site 1 also had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, p=0.0024) mean tritium concentration in pelts than Site 2 or Site 4. Site 2 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0499) mean {sup 239}Pu concentration in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 4.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

1997-01-01

405

Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the drilling and installation of 22 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. WAG 5 is located south of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory main plant area in Melton Valley and includes 33 solid waste management units. The wells at WAG 5 were drilled and developed between July 1987 and

J. A. Mortimore; M. L. Ebers

1994-01-01

406

EVALUATION OF MIXING ENERGY IN LABORATORY FLASKS USED FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTING  

EPA Science Inventory

The evaluation of dispersant effectiveness used for oil spills is commonly done using tests conducted in laboratory flasks. The success of a test relies on replication of the conditions at sea. We used a hot wire anemometer to characterize the turbulence characteristics in the s...

407

Laboratory Proficiency Testing as a Measure of National Food Safety and Biosecurity Preparedness  

E-print Network

Laboratory Proficiency Testing as a Measure of National Food Safety and Biosecurity Preparedness The National Center for Food Safety and Technology, Illinois Institute of Technology, 2 U.S. Food and Drug to instances of food safety and biosecurity. The FERN proficiency testing (PT) program is vital to routinely

Heller, Barbara

408

Accelerated laboratory corrosion test for materials and finishes used in naval aircraft. Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accelerated laboratory corrosion test has been developed to screen materials and finishes for use on naval aircraft. Sulfur dioxide is introduced at periodic intervals into a conventional salt fog chamber to simulate conditions produced by the carrier stack gas\\/marine environment. Procedures for conducting the test are described.

Ketcham

1977-01-01

409

Testing the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph on the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this

Sandrine J. Thomas; Rémi Soummer; Daren Dillon; Bruce Macintosh; Donald Gavel; Anand Sivaramakrishnan

2011-01-01

410

Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis and susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

These evidence-based guidelines have been produced after a literature review of the laboratory diagnosis and susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We have considered the detection of MRSA in screening samples and the detection of reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides in S. aureus. Recommendations are given for the identification of S. aureus and for suitable methods of susceptibility testing and

Derek F. J. Brown; David I. Edwards; Peter M. Hawkey; Donald Morrison

2005-01-01

411

LABORATORY TEST METHODS FOR POLISHING ASPHALT SURFACES AND1 PREDICTING THEIR SKID RESISTANCE2  

E-print Network

1 1/16 LABORATORY TEST METHODS FOR POLISHING ASPHALT SURFACES AND1 PREDICTING THEIR SKID RESISTANCE by traffic and the binder removal phase (typical for4 bituminous asphalt concrete). Accelerated ageing tests of asphalt pavement continuously evolves due to traffic actions and climatic2 conditions. For infrastructure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

LABORATORY TEST METHODS FOR POLISHING ASPHALT SURFACES AND1 PREDICTING THEIR SKID RESISTANCE2  

E-print Network

1 1/16 LABORATORY TEST METHODS FOR POLISHING ASPHALT SURFACES AND1 PREDICTING THEIR SKID RESISTANCE by traffic and the binder removal phase (typical for4 bituminous asphalt concrete). Accelerated ageing tests, polishing, ageing, modeling.17 hal-00851150,version1- #12;3 3/16 INTRODUCTION1 Skid resistance of asphalt

Boyer, Edmond

413

Using sheep preference, near infrared reflectance and laboratory tests for predicting voluntary intake  

E-print Network

Using sheep preference, near infrared reflectance and laboratory tests for predicting voluntary grown in 8 years, and measured VDMI (mean = 17.3, SD = 7.29 g/kg body weight) in Awassi sheep. We (1236, 1606, 1668, 1680 nm). We also offered straw to sheep in pair-preference tests lasting between 2

Boyer, Edmond

414

Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1, Text: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 4 is located south of the main facility along Lagoon Road. WAG 4 consists of three separate areas: Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land-burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; an experimental Pilot Pit Area, which includes a pilot-scale testing pit; and sections of two abandoned underground pipelines used for transporting liquid, low-level, radioactive waste. SWSA 4 is the largest site at WAG 4, covering approximately 23 acres. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low- and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data, collected during monitoring of the tributary to White Oak Creek as part of WAG 2 investigations as well as during previous studies conducted at WAG 4, indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk (DOE 1993). With recent corrective measures the proportion of the release has increased in 1995. A detailed discussion of the site history and previous investigations is presented in the WAG 4 Preliminary Assessment Report, ORNL/ER-271 (Energy Systems 1994b). In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation was initiated to pinpoint those trenches that are the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources.

NONE

1995-08-01

415

Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Data Management Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Data and Records Management Plan (DRMP) is to ensure that the ER environmental measurements data management process, from planning through measurement, recording, evaluation, analysis, use, reporting, and archival of data, is controlled in an efficient, comprehensive, and standardized manner. Proper organization will ensure that data and documentation are adequate to describe the procedures, events,and results of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 project. The data management process manages the life cycle of environmental measurements data from the planning of data for characterization and remediation decisions through the collection, review, and actual usage of the data for decision-making purposes to the long-term storage of the data. The nature of the decision-making process for an Environmental Restoration (ER) project is inherently repetitive. Existing data are gathered and evaluated to establish what is known about a site. Decisions regarding the nature of the contamination and potential remedial actions are formulated. Based upon the potential risk to human health and the environment, an acceptable level of uncertainty is defined for each remediation decision. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste.

NONE

1995-03-01

416

Radionuclides in shallow groundwater at Solid Waste Storage Area 5 North, Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a compilation of groundwater monitoring data from Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) between November 1989 and September 1993. Monitoring data were collected as part of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program that was implemented in 1989 in response to DOE Order 5820.2A. SWSA 5 North was established for the retrievable storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in 1970. Four types of storage have been used within SWSA 5 North: bunkers, vaults, wells, and trenches. The fenced portion of SWSA 5 North covers about 3.7 ha (9 acres) in the White Oak Creek watershed south of ORNL. The area is bounded by White Oak Creek and two ephemeral tributaries of White Oak Creek. Since 1989, groundwater has been monitored in wells around SWSA 5 North. During that time, elevated gross alpha contamination (reaching as high as 210 Bq/L) has consistently been detected in well 516. This well is adjacent to burial trenches in the southwest corner of the area. Water level measurements in wells 516 and 518 suggest that water periodically inundates the bottom of some of those trenches. Virtually all of the gross alpha contamination is generated by Curium 244 and Americium 241. A special geochemical investigation of well 516 suggests that nearly all of the Curium 44 and Americium 241 is dissolved or associated with dissolved organic matter. These are being transported at the rate of about 2 m/year from the burial trenches, through well 516, to White Oak Creek, where Curium 244 has been detected in a few bank seeps. Concentrations at these seeps are near detection levels (<1 Bq/L).

Ashwood, T.L.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

1994-04-01

417

Approaches to quality management and accreditation in a genetic testing laboratory  

PubMed Central

Medical laboratories, and specifically genetic testing laboratories, provide vital medical services to different clients: clinicians requesting a test, patients from whom the sample was collected, public health and medical-legal instances, referral laboratories and authoritative bodies. All expect results that are accurate and obtained in an efficient and effective manner, within a suitable time frame and at acceptable cost. There are different ways of achieving the end results, but compliance with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15189, the international standard for the accreditation of medical laboratories, is becoming progressively accepted as the optimal approach to assuring quality in medical testing. We present recommendations and strategies designed to aid genetic testing laboratories with the implementation of a quality management system, including key aspects such as document control, external quality assessment, internal quality control, internal audit, management review, validation, as well as managing the human side of change. The focus is on pragmatic approaches to attain the levels of quality management and quality assurance required for accreditation according to ISO 15189, within the context of genetic testing. Attention is also given to implementing efficient and effective quality improvement. PMID:20720559

Berwouts, Sarah; Morris, Michael A; Dequeker, Elisabeth

2010-01-01

418

Syndromic surveillance using laboratory test requests: a practical guide informed by experience with two systems.  

PubMed

Syndromic surveillance systems can enhance early disease warning, endemic disease monitoring, or help to accumulate proof of disease freedom. In order to provide immediate feedback to achieve these goals, the health data sources scanned should be acquired continuously, in an automated fashion, and should be stored electronically. Recognizing that data from diagnostic test requests often meet these requirements, two systems designed to automatically extract surveillance information from animal laboratory databases have been developed and are described in this paper. These systems are designed to contribute to early disease detection, as well as the timely management of epidemiological information, in a province of Canada and in Sweden, the areas served by the diagnostic laboratories concerned. Classifying in-coming requests into syndromes, the first step, was the most time-consuming and the least portable step between the two systems. The remaining steps were more easily adjusted from one system to implementation in the other. These steps included: retrospective evaluation of data to create baseline profiles following the removal of excessive noise and aberrations; the identification of temporal effects; prospective evaluation of detection algorithms; and finally real-time monitoring and implementation. Building upon the institutions' existing data management software, all steps to use those data for the purposes of syndromic surveillance were set up using open source software; as a result this approach could be readily adopted by other institutions. Relatively straight-forward development and maintenance is expected to lead to the incorporation of these systems into each institution's surveillance processes, becoming an indispensable tool for diagnosticians and epidemiologists, as well as stimulating further technical development of such systems. PMID:24767815

Dórea, F C; Lindberg, A; McEwen, B J; Revie, C W; Sanchez, J

2014-10-01

419

XV-15 Low-Noise Terminal Area Operations Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test procedures related to XV-15 noise tests conducted by NASA-Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. are discussed. The tests. which took place during October and November 1995, near Waxahachie, Texas, documented the noise signature of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft at a wide variety of flight conditions. The stated objectives were to: -provide a comprehensive acoustic database for NASA and U.S. Industry -validate noise prediction methodologies, and -develop and demonstrate low-noise flight profiles. The test consisted of two distinct phases. Phase 1 provided an acoustic database for validating analytical noise prediction techniques; Phase 2 directly measured noise contour information at a broad range of operating profiles, with emphasis on minimizing 'approach' noise. This report is limited to a documentation of the test procedures, flight conditions, microphone locations, meteorological conditions, and test personnel used in the test. The acoustic results are not included.

Edwards, B. D.

1998-01-01

420

Laboratory tests evaluating the University of South Florida Mobile Data Acquisition System Type 2  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests of the University of South Florida Mobile Data Acquisition System, Version 2, were conducted to evaluate accuracy, susceptibility to temperature changes and vibration, and ease of operation. The collected data were also used to test the MDAS data analysis software package XRD11.EXE. Subject to identified accuracy differences and recommended calibration changes, the system is judged adequate. Confirming in-vehicle tests are planned.

Kiser, D.M. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mersman, C. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

1995-03-01

421

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23

422

Preanalytical variability: the dark side of the moon in laboratory testing.  

PubMed

Remarkable advances in instrument technology, automation and computer science have greatly simplified many aspects of previously tedious tasks in laboratory diagnostics, creating a greater volume of routine work, and significantly improving the quality of results of laboratory testing. Following the development and successful implementation of high-quality analytical standards, analytical errors are no longer the main factor influencing the reliability and clinical utilization of laboratory diagnostics. Therefore, additional sources of variation in the entire laboratory testing process should become the focus for further and necessary quality improvements. Errors occurring within the extra-analytical phases are still the prevailing source of concern. Accordingly, lack of standardized procedures for sample collection, including patient preparation, specimen acquisition, handling and storage, account for up to 93% of the errors currently encountered within the entire diagnostic process. The profound awareness that complete elimination of laboratory testing errors is unrealistic, especially those relating to extra-analytical phases that are harder to control, highlights the importance of good laboratory practice and compliance with the new accreditation standards, which encompass the adoption of suitable strategies for error prevention, tracking and reduction, including process redesign, the use of extra-analytical specifications and improved communication among caregivers. PMID:16599826

Lippi, Giuseppe; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Plebani, Mario

2006-01-01

423

Ebola virus disease, transmission risk to laboratory personnel, and pretransfusion testing.  

PubMed

As Ebola virus has infected thousands of individuals in West Africa, there is growing concern about the appropriate response of hospitals in developed nations caring for patients and handling laboratory specimens for patients suspected of Ebola virus disease (EVD). Guidelines for caring for EVD patients are proliferating rapidly from national and state public health authorities, professional societies, and individual hospitals. It is no surprise that they differ from one another, and some very conservative recommendations call for suspension of routine laboratory testing, including pretransfusion testing. EVD is transmitted by direct contact with blood, secretions, organs, and other body fluids and not by airborne routes. Based on experimental and observational data, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that clinicians follow contact and droplet precautions. Laboratory personnel are required to follow the blood-borne pathogen standard, especially the use of appropriate barriers consisting of gloves, gown, goggles, mask to cover nose and mouth, and plexiglass shield, where splashes of potentially infectious materials may be generated. Their recommendations are permissive of clinically appropriate laboratory testing, including pretransfusion testing, using barrier isolation precautions. Most individuals with suspected EVD will have a fever of another etiology, such as Plasmodium?falciparum malaria. We believe that forgoing all routine pretransfusion laboratory testing may result in a greater increase in poor clinical outcomes than any diminution in the risks to laboratory personnel will justify. It is imperative for all laboratory directors, working with institutional infection control and safety personnel, to evaluate their hospital policies for potentially infectious patients and provide a safe environment for their patients and employees. PMID:25403825

Katz, Louis M; Tobian, Aaron A R

2014-12-01

424

Laboratory informatics based evaluation of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genetic test overutilization  

PubMed Central

Background: Laboratory data can provide a wide range of information to estimate adherence to guidelines and proper utilization of genetic testing. The methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T variant has been demonstrated to have negligible utility in patient management. However, the testing of this variant remains pervasive. The purpose of this study was to develop methods to analyze concordance of clinician ordering practices with national guidelines. Methods: We used laboratory data to extract specific data elements including patient demographics, timestamps, physician ordering logs and temporal relationship to chemistry requests to examine 245 consecutive MTHFR tests ordered in 2011 at an academic tertiary center. A comprehensive chart review was used to identify indications for testing. These results were correlated with a retrospective analysis of 4,226 tests drawn at a range of hospitals requesting testing from a national reference laboratory over a 2-year period. MTHFR ordering practices drawn from 17 institutions were examined longitudinally from 2002 to 2011. Results: Indications for testing included cerebrovascular events (40.0%) and venous thrombosis (39.1%). Family history prompted testing in eight cases. Based on acceptable hypercoagulability guidelines recommending MTHFR C677T testing only in the presence of elevated serum homocysteine, 10.6% (22/207) of adult patients met an indicated threshold at an academic tertiary center. Among 77 institutions, 14.5% (613/4226) of MTHFR testing met recommendations. Conclusion: We demonstrate an effective method to examine discreet elements of a molecular diagnostics laboratory information system at a tertiary care institution and to correlate these findings at a national level. Retrospective examination of clinicians’ request of MTHFR C677T genetic testing strongly suggests that clinicians have failed to adjust their ordering practices in light of evolving scientific and professional organization recommendations. PMID:24392247

Cohen, David A.; Shirts, Brian H.; Jackson, Brian R.; Parker, Lisa S.

2013-01-01

425

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of Navarro-Interra LLC, and supports environmental restoration efforts by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office. Safety decisions must be made before a surface crater area, or potential surface crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and surface crater formation are input into their safety decisions. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the surface collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

Pawloski, G A

2011-01-03

426

Design philosophy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory infrared detector test facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To support the development of advanced infrared remote sensing instrumentation using line and area arrays, a test facility has been developed to characterize the detectors. The necessary performance characteristics of the facility were defined by considering current and projected requirements for detector testing. The completed facility provides the desired level of detector testing capability as well as providing ease of human interaction.

Burns, R.; Blessinger, M. A.

1983-01-01

427

Characterization of the ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Biology Area process wastewater  

SciTech Connect

In order for proper treatment of the Biology Area process wastewater to be affected and that a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) be met at the Y-12 Plant, both flow rates and potential wastewater-contained pollutants were measured. A two-phase sampling-and-analysis program determined that the only detrimental constituent in the wastewater is residual chlorine. In addition, flow-rate measurements indicated that the Biology Area discharge rates were decreasing with time as the Biology Division implemented a strict schedule for reducing its effluent flow rates and total pollutant loadings. As a result, the capital costs and potential annual operating costs were greatly reduced (by as much as $1 million and $750,000, respectively) by demonstrating that the Biology Area process wastewater could be sent to the City of Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility. A special treatment plant, to be built at the Y-12 Plant, would not be needed. Because of the presence of residual chlorine in the wastewater, the fragility of the wastewater solutions was tested over periods of 1 or 2 d to determine the best method of preserving the samples so that loss of the residual chlorine would be minimized. Refrigeration of the samples for as long as 8 h was found to be satisfactory; loss of residual chlorine in the wastewater was almost undetectable under these conditions. 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Armento, W.J.; Stephens, L.A.; Haught, C.F.; Blaise, D.E.

1989-01-01

428

Laboratory Tests  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab ...

429

Advantages and Limitations of Anticipating Laboratory Test Results from Regression- and Tree-Based Rules Derived from Electronic Health-Record Data  

PubMed Central

Laboratory testing is the single highest-volume medical activity, making it useful to ask how well one can anticipate whether a given test result will be high, low, or within the reference interval (“normal”). We analyzed 10 years of electronic health records—a total of 69.4 million blood tests—to see how well standard rule-mining techniques can anticipate test results based on patient age and gender, recent diagnoses, and recent laboratory test results. We evaluated rules according to their positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) and area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (ROC AUCs). Using a stringent cutoff of PPV and/or NPV?0.95, standard techniques yield few rules for sendout tests but several for in-house tests, mostly for repeat laboratory tests that are part of the complete blood count and basic metabolic panel. Most rules were clinically and pathophysiologically plausible, and several seemed clinically useful for informing pre-test probability of a given result. But overall, rules were unlikely to be able to function as a general substitute for actually ordering a test. Improving laboratory utilization will likely require different input data and/or alternative methods. PMID:24732572

Mohammad, Fahim; Theisen-Toupal, Jesse C.; Arnaout, Ramy

2014-01-01

430

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began testing small wind turbines (SWTs) through the Independent Testing project. Using competitive solicitation, five SWTs were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's NWTC is accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to conduct duration, power performance, safety and function, power quality, and noise tests to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. Results of the tests conducted on each of the SWTs are or will be available to the public on the NREL website. The results could be used by their manufacturers in the certification of the turbines or state agencies to decide which turbines are eligible for state incentives.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-04-01

431

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. 334.30 Section 334...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. (a) The area. The...Light. (b) The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the...

2012-07-01

432

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. 334.30 Section 334...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. (a) The area. The...Light. (b) The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the...

2013-07-01

433

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. 334.30 Section 334...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. (a) The area. The...Light. (b) The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the...

2014-07-01

434

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. 334.30 Section 334...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. (a) The area. The...Light. (b) The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the...

2011-07-01

435

33 CFR 334.30 - Gulf of Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. 334.30 Section 334...Maine off Pemaquid Point, Maine; naval sonobuoy test area. (a) The area. The...Light. (b) The regulations. (1) Sonobuoy drops will be made only in the...

2010-07-01

436

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10

437

Laboratory testing of TiB/sub 2/-based cathodes for electrolytic production of aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Experimental research was performed to evaluate TiB/sub 2/-based cathodes, which may be used for retrofitting existing commercial Hall-Heroult cells. Candidate cathode materials and retrofit designs were analyzed in laboratory-scale electrolysis tests and nonpolarized immersion tests in molten Al. The cathode materials and cathode attachment designs were selected based on a literature review (Schilling, Hagen, and Hart 1987) and previous experimental research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Hart et al. 1987). 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

Schilling, C.H.

1988-07-01

438

Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

2013-01-01

439

LEARNING AND MEMORY TESTS IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING: A CROSS-LABORATORY COMPARISON OF CONTROL DATA.  

EPA Science Inventory

The US EPA Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Study Test Guideline (OPPTS 870.6300) calls for functional tests to assess the impact of chemicals on cognitive function in offspring following maternal exposure. A test of associative learning and memory is to be conducted around th...

440

Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind"  

E-print Network

Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area B B' A A' C C' The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind" prediction Geological Survey Turkey Flat, USA Site Effects Test Area: "Blind" Test of Predicted Ground Response of a Shallow Stiff-Soil Site to the September 28, 2004 M6.0 Parkfield Earthquake Turkey Flat Working Group Stay

Oprsal, Ivo

441

43 CFR 3181.2 - Designation of unit area; depth of test well.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Designation of unit area; depth of test well. 3181.2 ...Designation of unit area; depth of test well. An application...and for determination of the depth of a test well may be filed...application shall be accompanied by a map or diagram on a...

2011-10-01

442

43 CFR 3181.2 - Designation of unit area; depth of test well.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Designation of unit area; depth of test well. 3181.2 ...Designation of unit area; depth of test well. An application...and for determination of the depth of a test well may be filed...application shall be accompanied by a map or diagram on a...

2012-10-01

443

43 CFR 3181.2 - Designation of unit area; depth of test well.  

... Designation of unit area; depth of test well. 3181.2 ...Designation of unit area; depth of test well. An application...and for determination of the depth of a test well may be filed...application shall be accompanied by a map or diagram on a...

2014-10-01

444

43 CFR 3181.2 - Designation of unit area; depth of test well.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Designation of unit area; depth of test well. 3181.2 ...Designation of unit area; depth of test well. An application...and for determination of the depth of a test well may be filed...application shall be accompanied by a map or diagram on a...

2013-10-01

445

Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 {micro}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 {micro}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 {micro}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted.

NONE

1996-10-11

446

Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ``closure`` in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document.

NONE

1995-09-01

447

Early implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program at Technical Area 54  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Technical Area (TA) 54 is currently in the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) phase of an expanded Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action program. Site characterization will focus on filling data gaps in a conceptual model constructed from existing information. An interim remedial measure involving vacuum extraction of a known organic vapor vadose zone plume will be modeled this year and hopefully implemented in fiscal year 1993. Long-term environmental restoration will probably involve vadose zone monitoring to confirm modeling predictions on the performance of existing disposal unit caps. However, it is possible that removal or in-situ treatment of some isolated bad actors'' will be necessary to ensure the long-term success of vapor extraction, or to remove surface hot spots that are unacceptably contributing contaminants to the surface water on air pathways. Public sentiment related to the long-term dedication of TA 54 as a waste disposal facility will have to be factored in early in the process to ensure that the most appropriate data are gathered during site characterization, and to instill confidence, both internally and external to LANL, that the ER Program Office is headed in the right direction at TA 54. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Krueger, J.W.

1991-01-01

448

UNSAT-H infiltration model calibration at the Subsurface Disposal Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Soil moisture monitoring data from the expanded neutron probe monitoring network located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were used to calibrate numerical infiltration models for 15 locations within and near the SDA. These calibrated models were then used to simulate infiltration into the SDA surficial sediments and underlying basalts for the entire operational period of the SDA (1952--1995). The purpose of performing the simulations was to obtain a time variant infiltration source term for future subsurface pathway modeling efforts as part of baseline risk assessment or performance assessments. The simulation results also provided estimates of the average recharge rate for the simulation period and insight into infiltration patterns at the SDA. These results suggest that the average aquifer recharge rate below the SDA may be at least 8 cm/yr and may be as high as 12 cm/yr. These values represent 38 and 57% of the average annual precipitation occurring at the INEL, respectively. The simulation results also indicate that the maximum evaporative depth may vary between 28 and 148 cm and is highly dependent on localized lithology within the SDA.

Martian, P.

1995-10-01

449

Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?  

PubMed

Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300?m). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices. PMID:25618819

Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

2015-04-01

450

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

451

Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area  

SciTech Connect

Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

2011-12-02

452

Acoustical Testing Laboratory Developed to Support the Low-Noise Design of Microgravity Space Flight Hardware  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has designed and constructed an Acoustical Testing Laboratory to support the low-noise design of microgravity space flight hardware. This new laboratory will provide acoustic emissions testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly for microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station limits on noise emissions. These limits have been imposed by the space station to support hearing conservation, speech communication, and safety goals as well as to prevent noise-induced vibrations that could impact microgravity research data. The Acoustical Testing Laboratory consists of a 23 by 27 by 20 ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive 34-in. fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These criteria, along with very low design background levels, will enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles, up to a full space station rack in size, that produce very little noise. Removable floor wedges will allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi/anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations but, alternatively, may be used as a noise-control enclosure for test articles that require the operation of noise-generating test support equipment.

Cooper, Beth A.

2001-01-01

453

Panel-based testing for inherited colorectal cancer: a descriptive study of clinical testing performed by a US laboratory  

PubMed Central

Next-generation sequencing enables testing for multiple genes simultaneously (‘panel-based testing’) as opposed to sequential testing for one inherited condition at a time (‘syndrome-based testing’). This study presents results from patients who underwent hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) panel-based testing (‘ColoNext™’). De-identified data from a clinical testing laboratory were used to calculate (1) frequencies for patient demographic, clinical, and family history variables and (2) rates of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain significance (VUS). The proportion of individuals with a pathogenic mutation who met national syndrome-based testing criteria was also determined. Of 586 patients, a pathogenic mutation was identified in 10.4%, while 20.1% had at least one VUS. After removing eight patients with CHEK2 mutations and 11 MUTYH heterozygotes, the percentage of patients with ‘actionable’ mutations that would clearly alter cancer screening recommendations per national guidelines decreased to 7.2%. Of 42 patients with an ‘actionable’ result, 30 (71%) clearly met established syndrome-based testing guidelines. This descriptive study is among the first to report on a large clinical series of patients undergoing panel-based testing for inherited CRC. Results are discussed in the context of benefits and concerns that have been raised about panel-based testing implementation. Conflict of interest Cristi Radford and Jill Dolinsky are full-time employees for the commercial laboratory Ambry Genetics, which performs ColoNext™ testing. Elizabeth Chao is a paid consultant for Ambry. Deborah Cragun, Meghan Caldwell, and Tuya Pal report no potential conflicts of interest. Specifically, they are not employed by Ambry, and they did not receive any financial or other incentives from Ambry. PMID:24506336

Cragun, D; Radford, C; Dolinsky, JS; Caldwell, M; Chao, E; Pal, T

2014-01-01

454

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2014-07-01

455

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2011-07-01

456

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2010-07-01

457

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2012-07-01

458

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2013-07-01

459

Testing of a cryogenic recooler heat exchanger at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has tested a recooler heat exchanger intended to be used in the cryogenic system of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The unit is required to transfer 225 Watts from a supercritical helium stream flowing at 100 g/s to a helium bath boiling at 4.25 K. Measurements made with heat loads of 50 to over 450 Watts on the unit indicate its cooling capacity is greater than 400 Watts, as expected, and it will be suitable for use in the RHIC ring. Presented are the modifications made to BNL`s MAGCOOL test facility that were necessary for testing, test procedure, and recooler performance.

Nicoletti, A.; Wu, K.C.

1993-09-01

460

Materials, processes and testing laboratory residential technical progress report, October-December 1980, January -February 1981  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Residential Photovoltaic Field Test and Applications Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established and is monitoring experimental residential test sites in various locations of the United States. These sites contain either real or simulated residences coupled with photovoltaic modules from several manufacturers as well as the necessary balance-of-system components. Tests reported include visual and electrical inspection of modules, flash testing, and determination of module I-V curves.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1981-04-15