Sample records for lactobacillus casei dn-114

  1. Food Supplementation with Milk Fermented by Lactobacillus casei DN114 001 Protects Suckling Rats from Rotavirus-Associated Diarrhea1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Corinne Guerin-Danan; Jean-Claude Meslin; Aurore Chambard; Annie Charpilienne; Purificacion Relano; Christine Bouley; Jean Cohen; Claude Andrieux

    Group A rotavirus is the leading cause of diarrhea among children aged 3-36 mo worldwide. Introducing fermented milk products into the infant diet has been proposed for the prevention or treatment of rotavirus diarrhea. The preventive effect of milk fermented by the Lactobacillus casei strain DN-114 001 was studied in a model of germfree suckling rats supplemented daily fro md2o

  2. Diet Supplemented with Yoghurt or Milk Fermented by Lactobacillus casei DN114 001 Stimulates Growth and Brush-Border Enzyme Activities in Mouse Small Intestine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karine Thoreux; Daniel Balas; Christine Bouley; Françoise Senegas-Balas

    1998-01-01

    The nutritional benefits of lactic acid bacteria in fermented dairy products have been well documented, especially in terms of weight gain and feed efficiency, but not in terms of small intestine adaptation. The effects of a diet supplemented (30% wt\\/wt) with milk fermented either by Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 or yoghurt for 3 or 15 days were investigated in the

  3. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Casei DN-114 001 in Prevention of Radiation-Induced Diarrhea: Results From Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Nutritional Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Giralt, Jordi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: jgiralt@vhebron.net; Regadera, Jose Perez [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid (Spain); Verges, Ramona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain); Romero, Jesus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, Isabel de la [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia (Spain); Biete, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Villoria, Jesus [Medicest S. L. Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Cobo, Jose Maria [Red INDE, Barcelona (Spain); Guarner, Francisco [Department of Gastroenterology, Ciberehd, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 10{sup 8} CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. Results: A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Conclusion: Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale.

  4. Initiation of Protein Synthesis by a Labeled Derivative of the Lactobacillus casei DN114 001 Strain during Transit from the Stomach to the Cecum in Mice Harboring Human Microbiota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Oozeer; D. D. G. Mater; N. Goupil-Feuillerat; G. Corthier

    2004-01-01

    Although studies on the survival of bacteria in the digestive tract have been reported in the literature, little data are available on the physiological adaptation of probiotics to the digestive environment. In previous work, a transcriptional fusion system (i.e., luciferase genes under the control of a deregulated promoter) was used to demonstrate that a derivative of the Lactobacillus casei DN-114

  5. Lysate of Probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 Ameliorates Colitis by Strengthening the Gut Barrier Function and Changing the Gut Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zakostelska, Zuzana; Kverka, Miloslav; Klimesova, Klara; Rossmann, Pavel; Mrazek, Jakub; Kopecny, Jan; Hornova, Michaela; Srutkova, Dagmar; Hudcovic, Tomas; Ridl, Jakub; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background Probiotic bacteria can be used for the prevention and treatment of human inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the nature of active components and exact mechanisms of this beneficial effects have not been fully elucidated. Our aim was to investigate if lysate of probiotic bacterium L. casei DN-114 001 (Lc) could decrease the severity of intestinal inflammation in a murine model of IBD. Methodology/Principal Findings The preventive effect of oral administration of Lc significantly reduces the severity of acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis in BALB/c but not in SCID mice. In order to analyze how this beneficial effect interferes with well-known phases of intestinal inflammation pathogenesis in vivo and in vitro, we evaluated intestinal permeability using the FITC-labeled dextran method and analysed tight junction proteins expression by immunofluorescence and PCR. We also measured CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells proportion by FACS analysis, microbiota composition by pyrosequencing, and local cytokine production by ELISA. Lc leads to a significant protection against increased intestinal permeability and barrier dysfunction shown by preserved ZO-1 expression. We found that the Lc treatment increases the numbers of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), decreases production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-? and IFN-?, and anti-inflammatory IL-10 in Peyer's patches and large intestine, and changes the gut microbiota composition. Moreover, Lc treatment prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-? expression in RAW 264.7 cell line by down-regulating the NF-?B signaling pathway. Conclusion/Significance Our study provided evidence that even non-living probiotic bacteria can prevent the development of severe forms of intestinal inflammation by strengthening the integrity of intestinal barrier and modulation of gut microenvironment. PMID:22132181

  6. The association of yogurt starters with Lactobacillus casei DN 114.001 in fermented milk alters the composition and metabolism of intestinal microflora in germ-free rats and in human flora-associated rats.

    PubMed

    Djouzi, Z; Andrieux, C; Degivry, M C; Bouley, C; Szylit, O

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of milk and of various fermented milks on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora. Groups of eight rats were fed for 6 wk a diet containing 30% nonfermented milk (M), yogurt (Y), milk fermented with Lactobacillus casei (LcFM) or milk fermented with the association of L. casei DN 114.001 and yogurt starters (LcYFM). In the first study, the survival of the lactic acid bacteria from the fermented milks was assessed by bacterial enumeration in feces of germ-free rats (GF rats) fed milk or fermented milks. The metabolic activities of the lactic acid bacteria were studied in these rats by the measurement of glycolytic activities and products of bacterial fermentation, i.e., acetate and lactate (isoforms L and D). In a second study, the effects of fermented milks on the composition and metabolism [gas, glycolytic activities, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), alcohol and ammonia] of human flora were studied using human flora-associated rats (HF rats). In GF rats, the survival of L. casei in the feces did not differ between those fed the LcFM and LcYFM diets. L. bulgaricus was detected in the feces of the rats fed Y, whereas Streptoccus thermophilus was found in the feces of the LcYFM group. In HF rats, fecal concentration of Bifidobacteria was greater in the LcFM group than in the others. beta-Glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity was lower in rats fed LcFM and Y than in those fed M and LcYFM, whereas beta-galactosidase (3.2.1.23), alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1 20) and beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activities were higher in the LcYFM group compared with the others. Methane excretion was higher in rats fed Y than in other groups. Cecal SCFA concentrations did not differ in LcFM, Y and M groups, but total SCFA, acetate, propionate and butyrate were significantly greater in the LcYFM group. These results suggest that milk fermented with the combination of L. casei and yogurt starters leads to specific effects that are different from the simple addition of the effects found with yogurt and milk fermented with L. casei. These specific effects are potentially beneficial to human health. PMID:9349856

  7. Survival of Lactobacillus casei in the Human Digestive Tract after Consumption of Fermented Milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raish Oozeer; Antony Leplingard; Denis D. G. Mater; Agnes Mogenet; Rachel Michelin; Isabelle Seksek; Philippe Marteau; Joel Dore; Jean-Louis Bresson; Gerard Corthier

    2006-01-01

    The probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 (CNCM number I-1518) reduces the frequency or the duration of epi- sodes of acute diarrhea in young children (20, 21), increases the lactobacillus concentration in the gut microbiota of in- fants (10), and can modulate ex vivo production of proin- flammatory cytokines in Crohn's disease (4). Using mouse models harboring human microbiota, our

  8. Survival of Lactobacillus casei in the Human Digestive Tract after Consumption of Fermented Milk

    PubMed Central

    Oozeer, Raish; Leplingard, Antony; Mater, Denis D. G.; Mogenet, Agnès; Michelin, Rachel; Seksek, Isabelle; Marteau, Philippe; Doré, Joël; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Corthier, Gérard

    2006-01-01

    A human trial was carried out to assess the ileal and fecal survival of Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 ingested in fermented milk. Survival rates were up to 51.2% in the ileum and 28.4% in the feces. The probiotic bacterium has the capacity to survive during its transit through the human gut. PMID:16885316

  9. Plasmid-encoded ropiness production in Lactobacillus casei SSP. casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marisa Vescovo; G. L. Scolari; V. Bottazzi

    1989-01-01

    Summary Genetic determinants of the Muc+ character were investigated in two ropy strains,Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp.bulgaricus 201 andL. casei ssp.casei NCIB 4114, which secrete a large amount of slime in culture media. Plasmid DNA analysis revealed the presence of two plasmids (4.5 and 2.3 Mdal) inL. casei ssp.casei, whileL. delbrueckii ssp.bulgaricus was plasmid free, suggesting a chromosomal location of Muc+ character

  10. Genomic adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Takahata, Muneaki; Murakami, Masaru; Takaki, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Igimi, Shizunobu; Hattori, Masahira; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group) within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG), which we have previously reported. We confirmed that ATCC 393 is distinct from other strains previously described as L. paracasei. The core genome of 10 completely sequenced strains of the L. casei group comprised 1,682 protein-coding genes. Although extensive genome-wide synteny was found among the L. casei group, the genomes of ATCC 53103, JCM 8130, and ATCC 393 contained genomic islands compared with L. paracasei ATCC 334. Several genomic islands, including carbohydrate utilization gene clusters, were found at the same loci in the chromosomes of the L. casei group. The spaCBA pilus gene cluster, which was first identified in GG, was also found in other strains of the L. casei group, but several L. paracasei strains including COM0101 contained truncated spaC gene. ATCC 53103 encoded a higher number of proteins involved in carbohydrate utilization compared with intestinal lactobacilli, and extracellular adhesion proteins, several of which are absent in other strains of the L. casei group. In addition to previously fully sequenced L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei strains, the complete genome sequences of L. casei will provide valuable insights into the evolution of the L. casei group. PMID:24116025

  11. Protoplast fusion between Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeehn Yeeh; Young Bae Jo; Oh Chang Kwon

    1996-01-01

    From the fusion between Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus, 8 fusants were selected: Four were able to ferment maltose, lactose, galactose and mannose, but two had greater abilities of acid production than parents. Increased values of up to 7.6–8 % in ß -galactosidase activity were obtained from two when compared to that of L. acidophilus, whereas another 2 had activities

  12. Exopolysaccharides production in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei exploiting microfiltration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Schiraldi; V. Valli; A. Molinaro; M. Cartenì; M. De Rosa

    2006-01-01

    The physiology of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei, extensively used in the dairy industry, was studied in order to evaluate key parameters in the synthesis of exopolysaccharides and to improve their production through novel fermentation processes. Selected strains were studied in shake flasks and in fermentor experiments using glucose and lactose as main carbon sources and bacto casitone

  13. The physicochemical surface characteristics of Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Joseph Kiely; Norman F Olson

    2000-01-01

    The surface and interfacial properties of five strains of Lactobacillus casei, commonly found in cheese, were investigated in an attempt to identify surface properties that might be exploited to effect adsorption of the cells onto milk fat globules. All measures of surface hydrophobicity revealed these strains to be moderately hydrophobic compared to a reference strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis which was

  14. Genetic transformation of Lactobacillus casei by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Natori, Y; Kano, Y; Imamoto, F

    1990-04-01

    Lactobacillus casei IAM1045 was transformed with a plasmid pAM beta 1-1, a tra deleted derivative of pAM beta 1, by electroporation. Effective transformation was achieved in electroporation buffers of a wide range of pH values, and in all phases of cell growth tested, with highest frequency in the early log phase. Polyethylene glycol increased the transformation frequency, whereas divalent cations such as Mg2+, Ca2+ and Mn2+ at 0.25 mM decreased the frequency by 2 to 3 orders. Highly efficient transformation of approximately 10(-4)/viable cell was achieved under optimal conditions. A plasmid harboring the trpD, C, F, B and A genes from L casei RNL7 was introduced by electroporation into tryptophan auxotrophic L casei JCM1053. The resulting transformant was found to express the trp genes introduced. PMID:2116914

  15. Cell surface characteristics of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, C; Bouley, C; Cayuela, C; Bouttier, S; Bourlioux, P; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    1997-01-01

    Hydrophilic and electrostatic cell surface properties of eight Lactobacillus strains were characterized by using the microbial adhesion to solvents method and microelectrophoresis, respectively. All strains appeared relatively hydrophilic. The strong microbial adhesion to chloroform, an acidic solvent, in comparison with microbial adhesion to hexadecane, an apolar n-alkane, demonstrated the particularity of lactobacilli to have an important electron donor and basic character and consequently their potential ability to generate Lewis acid-base interactions with a support. Regardless of their electrophoretic mobility (EM), strains were in general slightly negatively charged at alkaline pH. A pH-dependent behavior concerning cell surface charges was observed. The EM decreased progressively with more acidic pHs for the L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains until the isoelectric point (IEP), i.e., the pH value for which the EM is zero. On the other hand, the EM for the L. rhamnosus strains was stable from pH 8 to pH 3 to 4, at which point there was a shift near the IEP. Both L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains were characterized by an IEP of around 4, whereas L. rhamnosus strains possessed a markedly lower IEP of 2. The present study showed that the cell surface physicochemical properties of lactobacilli seem to be, at least in part and under certain experimental conditions, particular to the bacterial species. Such differences detected between species are likely to be accompanied by some particular changes in cell wall chemical composition. PMID:9143109

  16. Reducing the Bitterness of Tuna (Euthynnus pelamis) Dark Meat with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabiano Cleber Bertoldi; Ernani S. Sant; Luiz H. Beirão

    Summary During the process of canning tuna fish, considerable amounts of dark tuna meat are left over because of its bitterness, which are then used in the production of animal food. Fermentation with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 was used as an alternative to reduce this bitter taste. Samples of meat were prepared, vacuum packed and then stored at

  17. Continuous production ofl-lactic acid from whey permeate by immobilized Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Krischke; Martin Schröder; Walter Trösch

    1991-01-01

    The production of l-lactic acid from whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, by fermentation with the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei was investigated. A fermentation medium consisting of permeate and supplements, which enables exponential growth of the organisms, was developed. A fast method for determination of free and immobilized biomass in solid-rich media, based on

  18. Quality attributes of yogurt with Lactobacillus casei and various prebiotics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kayanush J. Aryana; Paula McGrew

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of chain length of inulins on the characteristics of fat-free plain yogurt manufactured with Lactobacillus casei. Probiotic fat-free plain yogurts were manufactured using Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and L. casei. The treatments were inulins of short (P95), medium (GR) and long (HP) chain lengths. The inulins were incorporated at a concentration of 1.5g\\/100g

  19. Comparative analysis of iol clusters in Lactobacillus casei strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen Yi Zhang; Zhi Hong Sun; Dong Liang Yu; Caicike Airideng; Wei Chen; He Meng; He Ping Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to expand genetic knowledge of myo\\u000a -inositol (MI) metabolism in Lactobacillus casei. Twenty-four L. casei isolates of dairy origin were tested for the presence of iol cluster. PCR screening revealed eight strains encoded functions involved in MI utilization, of which one strain was able\\u000a to use MI as carbon source. To gain a deeper understanding

  20. Selective Enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Propionibacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Tharmaraj; N. P. Shah

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen bacteriological media were evaluated to assess their suitability to selectively enumerate Lactoba- cillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus ther- mophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidobacteria, and propioni- bacteria. Bacteriological media evaluated included Streptococcus thermophilus agar, pH modified MRS agar, MRS-vancomycine agar, MRS-bile agar, MRS- NaCl agar, MRS-lithium chloride agar, MRS-NNLP (na- lidixic acid, neomycin sulfate, lithium chloride and

  1. Lactobacillus casei prevents impaired barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Han, Dong Soo; Choi, Joo Hyun; Lee, A Reum; Park, Yoon Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The exact effect of probiotics on epithelial barrier function is not well understood. The aims of this study were to evaluate cytokine-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and to study the role of probiotics in the prevention of epithelial barrier dysfunction. Caco-2 cells grown on transwell chambers were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? or interferon (IFN)-? basolaterally. Probiotic, Lactobacillus casei, was added 1 h before cytokine stimulation. MAPK inhibitors were added 15 min before L. casei stimulation. The electrical resistance and paracellular permeability of Caco-2 monolayers were measured. Distribution of zonula occludens (ZO)-1 protein was assessed by immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses for ZO-1, p-Akt, and toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 were performed. Both TNF-? and IFN-? stimulation on Caco-2 cells decreased transepithelial resistance (TER), increased epithelial permeability, and decreased ZO-1 expression of Caco-2 cells. In contrast, pretreatment of L. casei reversed the cytokine-induced dysfunction of TER, epithelial permeability, and ZO-1 expression. Reversal of cytokine-induced dysfunction of TER and intestinal permeability by L. casei was abrogated with MAPK inhibitor treatment. Lactobacillus casei stimulation on Caco-2 cells increased TLR2 and p-Akt expression. Probiotic, L. casei, prevents cytokine-induced epithelial barrier dysfunctions in IECs. PMID:21143526

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus casei Lbs2

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Swati; Malar, Mathu; Das, Abhishek; Kumar Thakur, Bhupesh; Saha, Piu; Rashmi, H. M.; Batish, Virender K.; Grover, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    We report here a 3.2-Mb draft assembled genome of Lactobacillus casei Lbs2. The bacterium shows probiotic and immunomodulatory activities. The genome assembly and annotation will help to identify molecules and pathways responsible for interaction between the host immune system and the microbe. PMID:25540344

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei from Various Foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Özlem ERDO

    The aim of this study was to determine Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei isolated from yoghurt, different kinds of cheese and a traditional food named 'tarhana' (a fermented food made of a mixture of cereal, yoghurt and thyme), and to determine the antimicrobial activity and antibiotic resistance of these isolates. The identity of the culture was based on characteristics of

  4. Discrimination of dairy industry isolates of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Desai, A R; Shah, N P; Powell, I B

    2006-09-01

    Lactobacilli are a major part of the microflora of the gut and of many fermented dairy products, and are found in a variety of environments. Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Lactobacillus zeae form a closely related taxonomic group within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. The classification and nomenclature of these bacteria are controversial. In this study, relationships between these species were investigated using type strains and dairy industry isolates examined with DNA-based techniques and conventional carbohydrate use tests. Carbohydrate use patterns gave poor discrimination of some species, but DNA PCR using specific primers targeted to sequences of the 16S rRNA gene discriminated 4 types consistent with the currently recognized species. Pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis of chromosomal NotI restriction fragments identified 18 different band patterns from 21 independent Lactobacillus isolates and confirmed the identity of L. casei strains from 2 culture collections (CSCC 5203 and ASCC 290), both representing the type strain of L. casei. Some isolates were reclassified as L. rhamnosus, suggesting that the prevalence of L. rhamnosus as a natural component of the microflora of dairy foods and dairy environments has previously been underestimated. These methods can provide a practical basis for discrimination of the species and identification of individual industrial strains. PMID:16899667

  5. Pleiotropic effects of lactate dehydrogenase inactivation in Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosa Viana; María Jesús Yebra; José Luis Galán; Vicente Monedero; Gaspar Pérez-Martínez

    2005-01-01

    In lactic acid bacteria, conversion of pyruvic to lactic acid through the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) constitutes the final step of the homofermentative pathway. Lactobacillus casei has two characterized genes encoding Ldh activities. The ldhL gene codes for an L-Ldh, which specifically catalyzes the formation of l-lactate, whereas the hicD gene codes for a d-hydroxyisocaproate dehydrogenase (HicDH), which catalyzes

  6. Functional genomics of Lactobacillus casei establishment in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Licandro-Seraut, Hélène; Scornec, Hélène; Pédron, Thierry; Cavin, Jean-François; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the composition of the gut microbiota and its symbiotic contribution to key host physiological functions are well established, little is known as yet about the bacterial factors that account for this symbiosis. We selected Lactobacillus casei as a model microorganism to proceed to genomewide identification of the functions required for a symbiont to establish colonization in the gut. As a result of our recent development of a transposon-mutagenesis tool that overcomes the barrier that had prevented L. casei random mutagenesis, we developed a signature-tagged mutagenesis approach combining whole-genome reverse genetics using a set of tagged transposons and in vivo screening using the rabbit ligated ileal loop model. After sequencing transposon insertion sites in 9,250 random mutants, we assembled a library of 1,110 independent mutants, all disrupted in a different gene, that provides a representative view of the L. casei genome. By determining the relative quantity of each of the 1,110 mutants before and after the in vivo challenge, we identified a core of 47 L. casei genes necessary for its establishment in the gut. They are involved in housekeeping functions, metabolism (sugar, amino acids), cell wall biogenesis, and adaptation to environment. Hence we provide what is, to our knowledge, the first global functional genomics analysis of L. casei symbiosis. PMID:25024222

  7. Functional genomics of Lactobacillus casei establishment in the gut.

    PubMed

    Licandro-Seraut, Hélène; Scornec, Hélène; Pédron, Thierry; Cavin, Jean-François; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2014-07-29

    Although the composition of the gut microbiota and its symbiotic contribution to key host physiological functions are well established, little is known as yet about the bacterial factors that account for this symbiosis. We selected Lactobacillus casei as a model microorganism to proceed to genomewide identification of the functions required for a symbiont to establish colonization in the gut. As a result of our recent development of a transposon-mutagenesis tool that overcomes the barrier that had prevented L. casei random mutagenesis, we developed a signature-tagged mutagenesis approach combining whole-genome reverse genetics using a set of tagged transposons and in vivo screening using the rabbit ligated ileal loop model. After sequencing transposon insertion sites in 9,250 random mutants, we assembled a library of 1,110 independent mutants, all disrupted in a different gene, that provides a representative view of the L. casei genome. By determining the relative quantity of each of the 1,110 mutants before and after the in vivo challenge, we identified a core of 47 L. casei genes necessary for its establishment in the gut. They are involved in housekeeping functions, metabolism (sugar, amino acids), cell wall biogenesis, and adaptation to environment. Hence we provide what is, to our knowledge, the first global functional genomics analysis of L. casei symbiosis. PMID:25024222

  8. Comparative Genomics and Transcriptional Analysis of Prophages Identified in the Genomes of Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus salivarius, and Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Ventura; Carlos Canchaya; Valentina Bernini; Eric Altermann; Rodolphe Barrangou; Stephen McGrath; Marcus J. Claesson; Yin Li; Sinead Leahy; Carey D. Walker; Ralf Zink; Erasmo Neviani; Jim Steele; Jeff Broadbent; Todd R. Klaenhammer; Gerald F. Fitzgerald; Paul W. O'Toole; Douwe van Sinderen

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323, Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius UCC 118, and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 contain one (LgaI), four (Sal1, Sal2, Sal3, Sal4), and one (Lca1) distinguishable prophage se- quences, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that LgaI, Lca1, Sal1, and Sal2 prophages belong to the group of Sfi11-like pac site and cos site Siphoviridae, respectively. Phylogenetic investigation of these newly described

  9. Effects of a Lactobacillus casei Synbiotic on Serum Lipoprotein, Intestinal Microflora, and Organic Acids in Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Liong; N. P. Shah

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effec- tiveness of 3 synbiotic diets: 1) containing Lactobacillus casei ASCC 292 and fructooligosaccharides (LF diet); 2) containing L. casei ASCC 292 and maltodextrin (LM diet); and 3) containing L. casei ASCC 292, fructooligo- saccharide, and maltodextrin (LFM diet) to reduce se- rum cholesterol in male Wistar rats. The effect

  10. Anti-aflatoxigenic activity of Lactobacillus casei pseudoplantarum.

    PubMed

    Gourama, H; Bullerman, L B

    1997-02-01

    Lactobacillus casei pseudoplantarum 371 isolated from a silage inoculant was found to inhibit aflatoxins B1 and G1 biosynthesis by Aspergillus flavus subsp. parasiticus NRRI. 2999, in liquid medium. The inhibitory activity in the Lactobacillus cell-free supernatant was found to be sensitive to proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin, but resistant to pepsin. Lab-Lemco tryptone broth (LTB), supplemented with 20% of dialyzed protein concentrate of the supernatant, totally inhibited the production of aflatoxins B1 and G1. When the protein concentrate was digested with trypsin, the production of aflatoxins B1 and G1 was restored. The inhibitory activity of the supernatant was inactivated within 10 min at 100 degrees C. A. flavus grown in the Lactobacillus cell-free supernatant did not produce a mutagenic response in the Salmonella mutagenicity test. However, Lactobacillus casei pseudo plantarum 371 did not have an effect on aflatoxin production and mold growth as measured by ergosterol and plate count, when the organisms were inoculated together on sterile steamed rice. PMID:9039560

  11. Selective enumeration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Tharmaraj, N; Shah, N P

    2003-07-01

    Nineteen bacteriological media were evaluated to assess their suitability to selectively enumerate Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidobacteria, and propionibacteria. Bacteriological media evaluated included Streptococcus thermophilus agar, pH modified MRS agar, MRS-vancomycine agar, MRS-bile agar, MRS-NaCl agar, MRS-lithium chloride agar, MRS-NNLP (nalidixic acid, neomycin sulfate, lithium chloride and paramomycine sulfate) agar, reinforced clostridial agar, sugar-based (such as maltose, galactose, sorbitol, manitol, esculin) media, sodium lactate agar, arabinose agar, raffinose agar, xylose agar, and L. casei agar. Incubations were carried out under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at 27, 30, 37, 43, and 45 degrees C for 24, 72 h, and 7 to 9 d. S. thermophilus agar and aerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h were suitable for S. thermophilus. L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus could be enumerated using MRS agar (pH 4.58 or pH 5.20) and under anaerobic incubation at 45 degrees C for 72 h. MRS-vancomycine agar and anaerobic incubation at 43 degrees C for 72 h were suitable to enumerate L. rhamnosus. MRS-vancomycine agar and anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 72 h were selective for L. casei. To estimate the counts of L. casei by subtraction method, counts of L. rhamnosus on MRS-vancomycine agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h under anaerobic incubation could be subtracted from total counts of L. casei and L. rhamnosus enumerated on MRS-vancomycine agar at 37 degrees C for 72 h under anaerobic incubation. L. acidophilus could be enumerated using MRS-agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h or Basal agar-maltose agar at 43 degrees C for 72 h or BA-sorbitol agar at 37 degrees C for 72 h, under anaerobic incubation. Bifidobacteria could be enumerated on MRS-NNLP agar under anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 72 h. Propionibacteria could be enumerated on sodium lactate agar under anaerobic incubation at 30 degrees C for 7 to 9 d. A subtraction method was most suitable for counting propionibacteria in the presence of other lactic acid bacteria from a product. For this method, counts of lactic bacteria at d 3 on sodium lactate agar under anaerobic incubation at 30 degrees C were subtracted from counts at d 7 of lactic bacteria and propionibacteria. PMID:12906045

  12. Selective enumeration of Lactobacillus casei from yogurts and fermented milk drinks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramakanth R. Ravula; Nagendra P. Shah

    1998-01-01

    A selective medium (LC agar) was developed for enumeration of Lactobacillus casei populations from commercial yogurts and fermented milk drinks that may contain strains of yogurt bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacteria) and L. casei. Appropriate dilutions were pour-plated in specially formulated LC agar acidified to pH 5.1 and the plates incubated

  13. Taxonomic and Strain-Specific Identification of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 within the Lactobacillus casei Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophie Coudeyras; Helene Marchandin; Celine Fajon; Christiane Forestier

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria that are widespread in the environment, including the human diet and gastrointestinal tract. Some Lactobacillus strains are regarded as probiotics because they exhibit beneficial health effects on their host. In this study, the long-used probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 was characterized at a molecular level and compared with seven reference strains from the Lactobacillus casei

  14. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Production of Aspergillus flavus by Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Injeong

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei KC-324 was tested for its ability to inhibit aflatoxin production and mycelial growth of Aspergillus flavus ATCC 15517 in liquid culture. Aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis and mycelial growth were inhibited in both simultaneous culture and individual antagonism assays,suggesting that the inhibitory activity was due to extracellular metabolites produced in cell-free supernatant fluids of the cultured broth of L. casei KC-324. In cell-free supernatant fluids of all media tested,deMan,Rogosa and Sharpe broth,potato dextrose broth,and Czapek-Dox broth + 1% yeast extract showed higher antiaflatoxigenic activity. In these case, fungal growths, however, was not affected as measured by mycelial dry weight. The antiaflatoxigenic metabolites from L. casei KC-324 were produced over wide range of temperatures between 25? and 37?. However, these metabolites were not thermostable since the inhibitory activity of the supernatant was inactivated within 30 minutes at 100? and 121?. The inhibitory activity was not influenced by changing pH of supernatant between 4 and 10. However,the antiaflatoxigenic activity was slightly reduced at pH 10. PMID:24015075

  15. Functional analysis of the Lactobacillus casei BL23 sortases.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Provencio, Diego; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Collado, María Carmen; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Monedero, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    Sortases are a class of enzymes that anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria. Lactobacillus casei BL23 harbors four sortase genes, two belonging to class A (srtA1 and srtA2) and two belonging to class C (srtC1 and srtC2). Class C sortases were clustered with genes encoding their putative substrates that were homologous to the SpaEFG and SpaCBA proteins that encode mucus adhesive pili in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Twenty-three genes encoding putative sortase substrates were identified in the L. casei BL23 genome with unknown (35%), enzymatic (30%), or adhesion-related (35%) functions. Strains disrupted in srtA1, srtA2, srtC1, and srtC2 and an srtA1 srtA2 double mutant were constructed. The transcription of all four sortase encoding genes was detected, but only the mutation of srtA1 resulted in a decrease in bacterial surface hydrophobicity. The ?-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and cell wall proteinase activities of whole cells diminished in the srtA1 mutant and, to a greater extent, in the srtA1 srtA2 double mutant. Cell wall anchoring of the staphylococcal NucA reporter protein fused to a cell wall sorting sequence was also affected in the srtA mutants, and the percentages of adhesion to Caco-2 and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells were reduced for the srtA1 srtA2 strain. Mutations in srtC1 or srtC2 result in an undetectable phenotype. Together, these results suggest that SrtA1 is the housekeeping sortase in L. casei BL23 and SrtA2 would carry out redundant or complementary functions that become evident when SrtA1 activity is absent. PMID:23042174

  16. Functional Analysis of the Lactobacillus casei BL23 Sortases

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Provencio, Diego; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Collado, María Carmen; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2012-01-01

    Sortases are a class of enzymes that anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria. Lactobacillus casei BL23 harbors four sortase genes, two belonging to class A (srtA1 and srtA2) and two belonging to class C (srtC1 and srtC2). Class C sortases were clustered with genes encoding their putative substrates that were homologous to the SpaEFG and SpaCBA proteins that encode mucus adhesive pili in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Twenty-three genes encoding putative sortase substrates were identified in the L. casei BL23 genome with unknown (35%), enzymatic (30%), or adhesion-related (35%) functions. Strains disrupted in srtA1, srtA2, srtC1, and srtC2 and an srtA1 srtA2 double mutant were constructed. The transcription of all four sortase encoding genes was detected, but only the mutation of srtA1 resulted in a decrease in bacterial surface hydrophobicity. The ?-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and cell wall proteinase activities of whole cells diminished in the srtA1 mutant and, to a greater extent, in the srtA1 srtA2 double mutant. Cell wall anchoring of the staphylococcal NucA reporter protein fused to a cell wall sorting sequence was also affected in the srtA mutants, and the percentages of adhesion to Caco-2 and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells were reduced for the srtA1 srtA2 strain. Mutations in srtC1 or srtC2 result in an undetectable phenotype. Together, these results suggest that SrtA1 is the housekeeping sortase in L. casei BL23 and SrtA2 would carry out redundant or complementary functions that become evident when SrtA1 activity is absent. PMID:23042174

  17. Comparative genomic and functional analysis of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains marketed as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; Ribbera, Angela; Järvinen, Hanna M; Kant, Ravi; Pietilä, Taija E; Randazzo, Cinzia; Paulin, Lars; Laine, Pia K; Caggia, Cinzia; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Satokari, Reetta; Salminen, Seppo; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-03-01

    Four Lactobacillus strains were isolated from marketed probiotic products, including L. rhamnosus strains from Vifit (Friesland Campina) and Idoform (Ferrosan) and L. casei strains from Actimel (Danone) and Yakult (Yakult Honsa Co.). Their genomes and phenotypes were characterized and compared in detail with L. casei strain BL23 and L. rhamnosus strain GG. Phenotypic analysis of the new isolates indicated differences in carbohydrate utilization between L. casei and L. rhamnosus strains, which could be linked to their genotypes. The two isolated L. rhamnosus strains had genomes that were virtually identical to that of L. rhamnosus GG, testifying to their genomic stability and integrity in food products. The L. casei strains showed much greater genomic heterogeneity. Remarkably, all strains contained an intact spaCBA pilus gene cluster. However, only the L. rhamnosus strains produced mucus-binding SpaCBA pili under the conditions tested. Transcription initiation mapping demonstrated that the insertion of an iso-IS30 element upstream of the pilus gene cluster in L. rhamnosus strains but absent in L. casei strains had constituted a functional promoter driving pilus gene expression. All L. rhamnosus strains triggered an NF-?B response via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in a reporter cell line, whereas the L. casei strains did not or did so to a much lesser extent. This study demonstrates that the two L. rhamnosus strains isolated from probiotic products are virtually identical to L. rhamnosus GG and further highlights the differences between these and L. casei strains widely marketed as probiotics, in terms of genome content, mucus-binding and metabolic capacities, and host signaling capabilities. PMID:23315726

  18. Effect of Trehalose and Drying Process on the Survival of Encapsulated Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao Yan Li; Xi Guang Chen; Cheng Sheng Liu; Hong Ni Peng; Dong Su Cha

    2008-01-01

    Encapsulated Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was prepared by extrusion technology with rice shell powder and alginate followed by drying at 4°C. Drying at 4°C was beneficial to the survival of L. casei ATCC 393 compared with freeze drying. Trehalose had a positive effect on the survival of dried L. casei ATCC 393; the live cell numbers remained over 10 cfu\\/g after

  19. Identification of a Gene Cluster Enabling Lactobacillus casei BL23 To Utilize myoInositol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Yebra; M. Zuniga; S. Beaufils; G. Perez-Martinez; J. Deutscher; V. Monedero

    2007-01-01

    Genome analysis of Lactobacillus casei BL23 revealed that, compared to L. casei ATCC 334, it carries a 12.8-kb DNA insertion containing genes involved in the catabolism of the cyclic polyol myo-inositol (MI). Indeed, L. casei ATCC 334 does not ferment MI, whereas strain BL23 is able to utilize this carbon source. The inserted DNA consists of an iolR gene encoding

  20. The treatment of mice with Lactobacillus casei induces protection against Babesia microti infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Bautista-Garfias; M. B. Gómez; B. R. Aguilar; O. Ixta; F. Martínez; J. Mosqueda

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we report that administration of Lactobacillus casei confers protection to mice against the intracellular protozoan Babesia microti. Mice treated with L. casei orally or intraperitoneally were inoculated 7 days later with an infectious dose of B. microti. Mice treated with lactobacilli showed significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) compared to untreated mice. When mice were

  1. The sim Operon Facilitates the Transport and Metabolism of Sucrose Isomers in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Thompson; Nicholas Jakubovics; Bindu Abraham; Sonja Hess; Andreas Pikis

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of the genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 revealed two operons that might dissimilate the five isomers of sucrose. To test this hypothesis, cells of L. casei ATCC 334 were grown in a defined medium supplemented with various sugars, including each of the five isomeric disaccharides. Extracts prepared from cells grown on the sucrose isomers contained high levels

  2. Probiotic Cheese Production Using Lactobacillus casei Cells Immobilized on Fruit Pieces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Kourkoutas; L. Bosnea; S. Taboukos; C. Baras; D. Lambrou; M. Kanellaki

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei cells were immobilized on fruit (apple and pear) pieces and the immobilized biocata- lysts were used separately as adjuncts in probiotic cheese making. In parallel, cheese with free L. casei cellsandcheeseonlyfromrennetedmilkwereprepared. The produced cheeses were ripened at 4 to 6°C and the effect of salting and ripening time on lactose, lactic acid, ethanol concentration, pH, and lactic acid

  3. Microstructure and Physical Properties of a Reduced Fat Mozzarella Cheese Made Using Lactobacillus casei ssp. casei Adjunct Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard K. Merrill; Craig J. Oberg; William R. McManus; Miloslav Kalab; Donald J. McMahon

    1996-01-01

    Reduced fat Mozzarella cheese was produced usingStreptococcus thermophilusandLactobacillus helveticus, and either total or partial replacement ofL. helveticuswithLactobacillus caseissp.casei. Stretch, melt and cook colour were determined at 1, 7, 14, and 28 d. All cheeses decreased in stretch during the first 7 d of storage, but there were no significant differences between culture types. Reduced fat cheese made withL. helveticusandS. thermophilusshowed

  4. Some Factors Influencing the Autolysis of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. J. Kang; L.-P. Vézinz; S. Laberge; R. E. Simard

    1998-01-01

    ABSTRACT The autolysis,of lactic acid bacteria,is important,for cheese ripening. However, little information is cur- rently,available,on,the,characteristics,of autolytic enzymes,in Lactobacillus,bulgaricus,and,Lactobacil- lus casei spp. The current,study,showed,that tempera- ture, pH, NaCl concentration, and growth phase af- fect the rate and,extent,of autolysis,of Lb. bulgaricus and,Lb. casei when,autolysis,was,assessed,in 0.2 M NaCl at 40°C; the,rate and,extent,of autolysis,ap- peared,to be strain dependent.,Under,our experimen- tal conditions, extensive cell lysis

  5. Comparative Sequence Analyses of the Genes Coding for 16s rRNA of Lactobacillus casei-Related Taxa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATSUMI MORI; KOJI YAMAZAKI; TOMOHARU ISHIYAMA; KAYO KOBAYASH; HARUO SHINAN

    1997-01-01

    The primary structures of the 16s rRNA genes of the type strains of Lactobacillus casei and related taxa were determined by PCR DNA-sequencing methods. The sequences of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus zeae, Lacto- bacillus paracasei, and Lactobacillus rhumnosus were different. The K,,, values ranged from 0.0040 to 0.0126. On the basis of the K,,, values and the levels of DNA-DNA relatedness

  6. Augmentation of Cellular Immunity and Reduction of Influenza Virus Titer in Aged Mice Fed Lactobacillus casei Strain Shirota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuji Hori; Junko Kiyoshima; Kan Shida; Hisako Yasui

    2002-01-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota activates the cellular immune system and ameliorates influenza virus (IFV) titer in the nasal site in upper respiratory IFV infection by using aged mice. Natural killer activity of splenocytes and lung cells of aged mice fed an L. casei strain Shirota diet (L. casei strain Shirota group) was significantly (P

  7. Commercially available probiotic drinks containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 reduce antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Kottmann, Tanja; Alavi, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus-containing commercially available probiotic formulations in Germany during antibiotic treatment with an analysis of cost-efficiency. METHODS: In an observational study, we analyzed the frequency of bowel movements from 258 patients with infections in a primary care hospital in western Germany; 107 of the patients were offered a probiotic drink containing at least 10 billion cultures of Lactobacillus casei DN 114001 b.i.d. The economic analysis was based on the costs of patient isolation vs preventive intake of probiotics. In a second pilot study, two commercially available probiotic drinks with different Lactobacillus casei strains were directly compared in 60 patients in a randomized controlled fashion. RESULTS: In the first study, the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) was significantly reduced in the intervention group (6.5% vs 28.4%), and the duration of AAD in days was significantly shorter (1.7 ± 1.1 vs 3.1 ± 2.1). Higher age and creatinine and lower albumin were identified as risk factors for AAD. Ampicillin was the antibiotic with the highest rate of AAD (50%) and with the greatest AAD reduction in the probiotic group (4.2%, relative risk reduction 92%). The economic analysis showed a cost advantage of nearly 60000 €/year in a department of this size. The second study confirmed the preventive effect of the drink with Lactobacillus casei DN114001; however, there were no advantages found for the other tested probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota. CONCLUSION: In contrast to a drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota, a commercially available probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN 114001 cost-efficiently reduces the prevalence of AAD during antibiotic treatment. PMID:25400470

  8. Enhancement of resistance in mice treated with Lactobacillus casei: Effect on Trichinella spiralis infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R Bautista-Garfias; O Ixta; M Orduña; F Mart??nez; B Aguilar; A Cortés

    1999-01-01

    The ability of viable Lactobacillus casei, administered by an intraperitoneal route, to induce resistance in mice against Trichinella spiralis infection was tested. The percent reduction of adult worms in the intestine 5 days after T. spiralis infection observed in L. casei-treated animals, compared with those of the control group, fluctuated between 70.9 and 88.5%; reductions of larvae per gram of

  9. Effect of alginate concentrations on survival of microencapsulated Lactobacillus casei NCDC298

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mandal; A. K. Puniya; K. Singh

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the tolerance of Lactobacillus casei NCDC-298 encapsulated in different alginate concentrations (2%, 3% or 4%), to low pH (1.5), high bile salt concentration (1% or 2%) and heat processing (55, 60 or 65°C for 20min). The release of encapsulated cells in simulated aqueous solution of colonic pH was also assessed. The survival of encapsulated L. casei was

  10. Evaluation of culture media for enumeration of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium animalis in the presence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kátia Gianni de Carvalho Lima; Monika Francisca Kruger; Jorge Behrens; Maria Teresa Destro; Mariza Landgraf; Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo Franco

    2009-01-01

    The study compared the growth capability of probiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus La05, Lactobacillus casei Lc01 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb12) and non-probiotic (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) cultures on twenty-one culture media grouped according to selectivity: non-selective agars, selective agars without antibiotics and MRS agars containing different combinations of lithium chloride, cystein, bile salts and antibiotics. Four of these media

  11. Reduction of Sulfide, Ammonia Compounds, and Adhesion Properties of Lactobacillus casei Strain KE99 In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Naidu; X. Xie; D. A. Leumer; S. Harrison; M. J. Burrill; E. A. Fonda

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus casei strain KE99 to reduce sulfide, ammonia, and to adhere to bio-surfaces was characterized and compared with three lactobacillus\\u000a reference strains. Sulfide reduction by strain KE99 in MRS broth increased exponentially after 10-h growth and reached a maximum\\u000a (>300 ppm reduction) within 48 h. KE99 demonstrated a maximum reduction of sulfide under anaerobic (341 ppm) growth

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid plca36 isolated from Lactobacillus casei Zhang

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenyi Zhang; Dongliang Yu; Zhihong Sun; Xia Chen; Qiuhua Bao; He Meng; Songnian Hu; Heping Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The complete 36,487bp sequence of plasmid plca36 from Lactobacillus casei Zhang was determined. Plca36 contains 44 predicted coding regions, and to 23 of them functions could be assigned. For the first time, we identified a relBE toxin–antitoxin (TA) locus in a Lactobacillus genus, perhaps indicating a potential role for plca36 in host survival under extreme nutritional stress. A region encoding

  13. Comparison of fecundity and offspring immunity in zebrafish fed Lactobacillus rhamnosus CICC 6141 and Lactobacillus casei BL23.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chubin; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; He, Suxu; Dai, Yingying; Zhao, Huiying; Zhou, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of probiotic effects on zebrafish (Danio rerio), we compare the effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CICC 6141 (a highly adhesive strain) and Lactobacillus casei BL23 (a weakly adhesive strain), on zebrafish reproduction and their offsprings' innate level of immunity to water-borne pathogens. During probiotics treatments from 7 to 28 days, both the Lactobacillus strains, and especially L. casei BL23, significantly increased fecundity in zebrafish: higher rates of egg ovulation, fertilization, and hatching were observed. Increased densities of both small and large vitellogenic follicles, seen in specimens fed either Lactobacillus strain, demonstrated accelerated oocyte maturation. Feeding either strain of Lactobacillus upregulated gene expression of leptin, kiss2, gnrh3, fsh, lh, lhcgr, and paqr8, which were regarded to enhance fecundity and encourage oocyte maturation. Concomitantly, the gene expression of bmp15 and tgfb1 was inhibited, which code for local factors that prevent oocyte maturation. The beneficial effects of the Lactobacillus strains on fecundity diminished after feeding of the probiotics was discontinued, even for the highly adhesive gut Lactobacillus strain. Administering L. rhamnosus CICC 6141 for 28 days was found to affect the innate immunity of offspring derived from their parents, as evinced by a lower level of alkaline phosphatase activity in early larval stages. This study highlights the effects of probiotics both upon the reproductive process and upon the offsprings' immunity during early developmental stages. PMID:24129154

  14. Enhancement of host resistance against Listeria infection by Lactobacillus casei: Role of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.

    1984-05-01

    Among the 10 species of the genus Lactobacillus, L. casei showed the strongest protective action against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. The activity of L. casei differed with regard to the dose of administration. The anti-L. monocytogenes resistance in mice intravenously administered 5.5 X 10(7), 2.8 X 10(8), or 1.1 X 10(9) L. casei cells was most manifest at ca. 2, 2 and 13, and 3 to 21 days after its administration, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes in the liver of mice injected with L. casei (10(7), 10(8), or 10(9) cells) 48 h after infection was suppressed, particularly when 10(8) or 10(9) L. casei cells were given 2 or 13 days before the induced infection, respectively. This suppression of L. monocytogenes growth was overcome by carrageenan treatment or X-ray irradiation. (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into the liver DNA increased 13 days after administration of L. casei, and augmentation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation during 6 to 48 h after infection was dependent on the dose of L. casei. Peritoneal macrophage accumulation observed 1 to 5 days after intraperitoneal injection of UV-killed L. monocytogenes was markedly enhanced when the mice were treated with L. casei cells 13 days before macrophage elicitation. Therefore, the enhanced host resistance by L. casei to L. monocytogenes infection may be mediated by macrophages migrating from the blood stream to the reticuloendothelial system in response to L. casei injection before or after L. monocytogenes infection.

  15. LIMITING GALACTOSE REQUIREMENT FOR CITRATE UTILIZATION BY LACTOBACILLUS CASEI IS ANNULLED IN CHEDDAR CHEESE EXTRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conditions required for citrate utilization by Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 were identified. Citrate is utilized by this microorganism in modified chemically defined media as an energy source, solely in the presence of limiting concentrations of other more readily metabolized carbon sources (i.e. ga...

  16. The effect of fermented milk containing lactobacillus casei on the immune response to exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Pujol; J. Huguet; F. Drobnic; M. Banquells; O. Ruiz; P. Galilea; N. Segarra; S. Aguilera; A. Burnat; J. A. Mateos; E. Postaire

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence that exhaustive exercise produces depression of the immune system, especially on the number and activity of Natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, fermented milk has been shown to moderate the immune response by inducing NK activity. The present work was carried out to determine if a Lactobacillus casei (LC) fermented milk supplemented diet would provide

  17. Effect of B vitamin supplementation on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ik-Keun Yoo; Ho Nam Chang; Eun Gyo Lee; Yong Keun Chang; Seung-Hyeon Moon

    1997-01-01

    Various nitrogen sources were compared with yeast extract (YE) in terms of their usefulness for efficient lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus. None of these nitrogen sources gave lactic acid concentrations as high as that for YE during 48 h of fermentation. On the basis of the amount of B vitamins in YE, various amounts of five essential

  18. Lactic acid production by immobilized Lactobacillus casei in recycle batch reactor: a step towards optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Appadurai Senthuran; Vasanthe Senthuran; Rajni Hatti-Kaul; Bo Mattiasson

    1999-01-01

    Different nutritional and process parameters influencing lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei, adsorbed to Poraver beads in a recycle batch reactor system, were studied in an attempt to set up a system having a long operational lifetime and permitting use of high substrate concentrations for maximal conversion to the product. The presence of lactose, even as a minor fraction of

  19. Purification and amino acid sequence of lactocin 705, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus casei CRL 705

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Palacios; G. Vignolo; M. E. FarÍas; A. P. de Ruiz Holgado; G. Oliver; F. Sesma

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei CRL 705, isolated from a dry fermented sausage, produces an antibacterial peptide which is active against Listeria monocytogenes. Previous studies have shown that this compound is potentially useful to control food-borne pathogens in ground meat. In view of the potential application of this antimicrobial substance in food fermentation, a detailed biochemical analysis of this peptide is required. In

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori by Lactobacillus casei Strain Shirota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Sgouras; P. Maragkoudakis; K. Petraki; B. Martinez-Gonzalez; E. Eriotou; S. Michopoulos; G. Kalantzopoulos; E. Tsakalidou; A. Mentis

    2004-01-01

    We studied the potential inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (from the fermented milk product Yakult (Yakult Ltd., Tokyo, Japan)) on Helicobacter pylori by using (i) in vitro inhibition assays with H. pylori SS1 (Sydney strain 1) and nine H. pylori clinical isolates and (ii) the in vivo H. pylori SS1 mouse model of infection over a period of

  1. Cell-free supernatants from probiotic Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG decrease colon cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Juanita; Lane, Michelle A; Maitin, Vatsala

    2012-08-01

    Probiotics have been shown to have a preventative role in colorectal carcinogenesis but research concerning their prophylactic potential in the later stages of colorectal cancer, specifically metastasis is limited. This study explored the potential of cell-free supernatants (CFS) from 2 probiotic Lactobacillus sp., Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, to inhibit colon cancer cell invasion by influencing matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and levels of the tight junction protein zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) in cultured metastatic human colorectal carcinoma cells. HCT-116 cells were treated with CFS from L. casei, L. rhamnosus, or Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (a gut commensal); or with uninoculated bacterial growth media. Treatment with CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased colorectal cell invasion but treatment with CFS from B. thetaiotaomicron did not. CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased MMP-9 and increased ZO-1 protein levels. L. rhamnosus CFS also lowered MMP-9 activity. To begin elucidating the secreted bacterial factor conveying these responses, Lactobacillus sp. CFS were fractionated into defined molecular weight ranges and cell invasion assessed. Fractionation revealed that the inhibitory activity was contained primarily in the >100 kDa and 50-100 kDa fractions, suggesting the inhibitory compound may be a macromolecule such as a protein, nucleic acid, or a polysaccharide. PMID:22830611

  2. Evaluation of the role of environmental factors in the human gastrointestinal tract on the behaviour of probiotic cultures of Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Lactobacillus casei LC01 by the use of a semi-dynamic in vitro model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katia Gianni De Carvlho; Monika Francisca Kruger; Danielle Nader Furtado; Svetoslav Dimitrov Todorov; Bernadette Dora Gombossy De Melo Franco

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of gastrointestinal environmental factors (pH, digestive enzymes, food components, medicaments)\\u000a on the survival ofLactobacillus casei Shirota andLactobacillus casei LC01, using a semi-dynamicin vitro model that simulates the transit of microorganisms through the human GIT. The strains were first exposed to different simulated\\u000a gastric juices for different periods of time (0, 30, 60 and 120 min),

  3. Administration of yoghurt or lactobacillus casei to malnourished mice: Comparative effect on lymphoid cells and mucosal reconditioning of the intestine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graciela Agüero; Sara Sanchez; Silvia Fernandez; Cristina Allori; Aida P. De Ruiz Holgado; Gabriela Perdigón

    1996-01-01

    The comparative effect of the administration of viable Lactobacillus casei and yoghurt on mucosal immunity, body weight and the recovery of intestinal microvilli was studied in malnourished mice. L. casei and yoghurt induced an increase in the number of cells producing IgA and IgM, yoghurt being more effective than L. casei. In both treatments, the number of CD4 or CD8

  4. Impact of heat-inactivated Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei strains on cytokine responses in whole blood cell cultures of children with atopic dermatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Cukrowska; I. Rosiak; E. Klewicka; I. Motyl; M. Schwarzer; Z. Libudzisz; H. Kozakova

    2010-01-01

    Heat-inactivated Lactobacillus casei LOCK 0900, L. casei LOCK 0908 and Lactobacillus paracasei LOCK 0919 strains, applied to blood cell cultures obtained from children with atopic dermatitis induced production of anti-allergic\\u000a TH1 cytokines (interleukin-12, interleukin-18, interferon-?, tumor necrosis factor-?) and regulatory transforming growth factor-?1), but did not stimulate pro-allergic interleukin-5. The lactobacilli-mixture remarkably enhanced the TH1 response compared to single strains.

  5. Validation of reference genes for real-time quantitative PCR studies in gene expression levels of Lactobacillus casei Zhang

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenjing ZhaoYan; Yan Li; Pengfei Gao; Zhihong Sun; Tiansong Sun; Heping Zhang

    Lactobacillus casei Zhang, a potential probiotic strain isolated from homemade koumiss in Inner Mongolia of China, has been sequenced and deposited\\u000a in GenBank. Real-time quantitative PCR is one of the most widely used methods to study related gene expression levels of Lactobacillus casei Zhang. For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data using one or more

  6. Continuous-flow automation of the Lactobacillus casei serum folate assay.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, G B

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the continuous-flow automation of the serum folate assay using Lactobacillus casei. The total incubation period is approximately four hours. The growth response of the organism to folate is estimated by measuring the rate of reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC). A simple continuous culture apparatus is used to grow the inoculum. Supplementation of the assay medium is necessary to obtain parallel results. A statistical assessment shows a favourable comparison with the whole-serum tube assay using a chloramphenicol resistant strain of L. casei. The method is less sensitive to inhibitory substances than the tube assay. PMID:415069

  7. Continuous production of l (+)-lactic acid by Lactobacillus casei in two-stage systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Bruno-Bárcena; A. L. Ragout; P. R. Córdoba; F. Siñeriz

    1999-01-01

    A two-stage two-stream chemostat system and a two-stage two-stream immobilized upflow packed-bed reactor system were used\\u000a for the study of lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp casei. A mixing ratio of D\\u000a 12\\/D\\u000a 2?=?0.5 (D?=?dilution rate) resulted in optimum production, making it possible to generate continuously a broth with high lactic acid\\u000a concentration (48?g?l?1) and with a lowered overall

  8. On the benefit of whey-cultured Lactobacillus casei in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Niri, S F; Abdolghaffari, A H; Fallah-Benakohal, S; Hosseinpour-Feizi, M; Mahdaviani, P; Jamalifar, H; Baeeri, M; Dehghan, G; Abdollahi, M

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the prophylactic and therapeutic effect of whey-cultured Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) in a murine model of colitis. Colitis was induced by intracolonic administration of a mixture of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)/absolute ethanol in male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into 5 groups including sham (normal group), control (vehicle-treated), positive control (dexamethasone 1 mg/kg/day, orally), prevention (10(8) cfu L. casei/day, orally, 14 days before induction of colitis), and treatment (10(8) cfu L. casei/day, orally, 14 days after induction of colitis). After 14-days treatment, the animals were sacrificed on the day 15. Distal colons were removed for examining histological and biochemical assays. Biomarkers including TNF-?, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured in the homogenate of colon. Results indicated an apparent improvement in colon histopathology scores, TNF-?, MPO, and LPO in the treatment group, whereas prevention group did not demonstrate positive efficacy in prevention of colonic damage. It is concluded that L. casei grown in whey culture is very effective in ameliorating both biochemical and histopathological markers of colitis if used post induction of colitis but not if used before induction of colitis. The difference between effects of L. casei when used pre-colitis and post-colitis confirms its mechanism of action as an anti toxic stress agent. Further studies should be made in IBD patients. PMID:21893695

  9. The genome of the virulent phage Lc-Nu of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus , and comparative genomics with Lactobacillus casei phages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Tuohimaa; K.-A. Riipinen; K. Brandt; T. Alatossava

    2006-01-01

    Summary.  The complete 36,466-bp genome sequence of the virulent phage Lc-Nu of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus was determined. The linear dsDNA with a GC-content of 44.2% contained 3? single-stranded cohesive ends of 12 nucleotides.\\u000a A total of 51 putative open reading frames (orfs) were predicted. Lc-Nu showed to be evolutionary closely related to the temperate\\u000a Lactobacillus casei phages phi AT3 and A2.

  10. Genome Sequence and Comparative Genome Analysis of Lactobacillus casei: Insights into Their Niche-Associated Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Thompson, Rebecca; Budinich, Mateo F.; Broadbent, Jeff R.

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is remarkably adaptable to diverse habitats and widely used in the food industry. To reveal the genomic features that contribute to its broad ecological adaptability and examine the evolution of the species, the genome sequence of L. casei ATCC 334 is analyzed and compared with other sequenced lactobacilli. This analysis reveals that ATCC 334 contains a high number of coding sequences involved in carbohydrate utilization and transcriptional regulation, reflecting its requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. A comparison of the genome sequences of ATCC 334 to L. casei BL23 reveals 12 and 19 genomic islands, respectively. For a broader assessment of the genetic variability within L. casei, gene content of 21 L. casei strains isolated from various habitats (cheeses, n = 7; plant materials, n = 8; and human sources, n = 6) was examined by comparative genome hybridization with an ATCC 334-based microarray. This analysis resulted in identification of 25 hypervariable regions. One of these regions contains an overrepresentation of genes involved in carbohydrate utilization and transcriptional regulation and was thus proposed as a lifestyle adaptation island. Differences in L. casei genome inventory reveal both gene gain and gene decay. Gene gain, via acquisition of genomic islands, likely confers a fitness benefit in specific habitats. Gene decay, that is, loss of unnecessary ancestral traits, is observed in the cheese isolates and likely results in enhanced fitness in the dairy niche. This study gives the first picture of the stable versus variable regions in L. casei and provides valuable insights into evolution, lifestyle adaptation, and metabolic diversity of L. casei. PMID:20333194

  11. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later challenged with a lethal dose of C. albicans. The data indicated that the vaccine elicited a strong IgG response and increased the survival rate of the vaccinated mice. Furthermore, L. casei acted as a potent adjuvant and induced high antibody titers that were comparable to those induced by strong adjuvants such as the cholera toxin. Overall, the molecular display method can be used to rapidly develop vaccines that can be conveniently administered and require minimal processing.

  12. Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells Promotes an Immunosuppressive Phenotype in Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Tiittanen, Minna; Keto, Joni; Haiko, Johanna; Mättö, Jaana; Partanen, Jukka; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of the immunological tolerance and homeostasis in the gut is associated with the composition of the intestinal microbiota. We here report that cultivation of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 in the presence of human intestinal epithelial cells promotes functional changes in bacteria. In particular, the interaction enhanced the immunosuppressive phenotype of L. casei as demonstrated by the ability of L. casei to generate functional regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results indicate microbe-host cross-talk that changes features of microbes, and suggest that in vitro simulation of epithelial cell interaction can reveal functional properties of gut microbes more accurately than conventional cultivation. PMID:24244309

  13. Metabolism of azo dyes by Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 and effects of various factors on decolorization.

    PubMed

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Takenaka, Shinji; Kuntiya, Ampin; Klayraung, Srikarnjana; Murakami, Shuichiro; Aoki, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 was isolated from soil of a dairy wastewater treatment plant and selected as the most active azo dye degrader of 19 isolates. Growing cells and freely suspended cells of this strain completely degraded methyl orange, thereby decolorizing the medium. The strain stoichiometrically converted methyl orange to N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, which were identified by HPLC, GC, and GC-MS analyses. The enzyme activity responsible for the cleavage of the azo bond of methyl orange was localized to the cytoplasm of cells grown on modified MRS medium containing methyl orange. The effect of sugars, oligosaccharides, organic acids, metal ions, pHs, oxygen and temperatures on methyl orange decolorization by freely suspended cells was investigated. The optimal conditions for the decolorization of methyl orange by the Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 are incubation at 35 degrees C and pH 6 with sucrose provided as the energy source. PMID:17254626

  14. Functional Analysis of the p40 and p75 Proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23

    PubMed Central

    Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yan, Fang; Polk, D. Brent; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains carry two genes encoding homologues of p40 and p75 from L. rhamnosus GG, two secreted proteins which display anti-apoptotic and cell protective effects on human intestinal epithelial cells. p40 and p75 carry cysteine, histidine-dependent aminohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and NLPC/P60 domains, respectively, which are characteristic of proteins with cell-wall hydrolase activity. In L. casei BL23 both proteins were secreted to the growth medium and were also located at the bacterial cell surface. The genes coding for both proteins were inactivated in this strain. Inactivation of LCABL_00230 (encoding p40) did not result in a significant difference in phenotype, whereas a mutation in LCABL_02770 (encoding p75) produced cells that formed very long chains. Purified glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-p40 and -p75 fusion proteins were able to hydrolyze the muropeptides from L. casei cell walls. Both fusions bound to mucin, collagen and to intestinal epithelial cells and, similar to L. rhamnosus GG p40, stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation in mouse intestine ex vivo. These results indicate that extracellular proteins belonging to the machinery of cell-wall metabolism in the closely related L. casei/paracasei-L. rhamnosus group are most likely involved in the probiotic effects described for these bacteria PMID:21178363

  15. Lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus casei in free cell form and immobilised on gluten pellets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Chronopoulos; A. Bekatorou; E. Bezirtzoglou; A. Kaliafas; A. A. Koutinas; R. Marchant; I. M. Banat

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of the fermentation of a range of carbohydrate substrates, at various temperatures, was carried out using a commercial Lactobacillus casei strain in a free cell form and immobilised on gluten pellets. This strain required yeast extract, l-cysteine · HCl and Mn2+ at 5, 0.5 and 0.1 g l-1, respectively, for maximum growth and lactic acid production. Sugar

  16. Intracellular Esterase from Lactobacillus casei LILA: Nucleotide Sequencing, Purification, and Characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Fenster; K. L. Parkin; J. L. Steele

    2003-01-01

    An esterase gene (estC) was isolated from a genomic library of Lactobacillus casei LILA. The estC gene con- sisted of a 777 bp open reading frame encoding a puta- tive peptide of 28.9 kDa. A recombinant EstC fusion protein containing a C-terminal six-histidine tag was constructed and purified to electrophoretic homogene- ity. Characterization of EstC revealed that it was a

  17. Probiotic effects of Lactobacillus casei on DSS-induced ulcerative colitis in mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Herías; J. F. J. G. Koninkx; J. G. Vos; J. H. J. Huis in't Veld; J. E. van Dijk

    2005-01-01

    We tested the effect of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) on the murine model of ulcerative colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate. The effect of LcS was tested either as a prophylactic 10 days before the onset of the disease, simultaneously with ulcerative colitis induction or continued 10 days after the disease was induced. LcS was not able to prevent

  18. l-lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei fermentation using different fed-batch feeding strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaofeng Ding; Tianwei Tan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the l-lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei fermentation using different fed-batch feeding strategies was studied. The effects of different fed-batch methods such as pulse fed-batch, constant feed rate fed-batch, constant residual glucose concentration fed-batch and exponential fed-batch on the fermentation of l-lactic acid were determined. According to the results of experiments, exponential fed-batch culture is an effective

  19. Comparative study of Bifidobacterium animalis , Escherichia coli , Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii probiotic properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flaviano S. Martins; Aparecida A. Silva; Angélica T. Vieira; Flávio H. F. Barbosa; Rosa M. E. Arantes; Mauro M. Teixeira; Jacques Robert Nicoli

    2009-01-01

    The present work investigates some probiotic properties of four different microorganisms (Bifidobacterium animalis var. lactis BB-12, Escherichia coli EMO, Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii). In vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to compare cell wall hydrophobicity, production of antagonistic substances,\\u000a survival capacity in the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice without pathological consequence, and immune modulation\\u000a by stimulation of

  20. By-product formation in cell-recycled continuous culture of Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ik-Keun Yoo; Ho Nam Chang; Eun Gyo Lee; Yong Keun Chang; Seung-Hyeon Moon

    1997-01-01

    While the volumetric productivity of lactic acid increased in continuous culture of Lactobacillus casei with cell recycle, enhanced formation of by-products such as acetate, formate, ethanol, and D-lactate was observed in the cell-recycled fermenter compared with a simple chemostat at a similar range of dilution rate. The increased formation of by-product which was significantly dependent on substrate limitation resulted from

  1. The Phosphotransferase System of Lactobacillus casei: Regulation of Carbon Metabolism and Connection to Cold Shock Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicente Monedero; Alain Mazé; Grégory Boël; Manuel Zúñiga; Sophie Beaufils; Axel Hartke; Josef Deutscher

    2007-01-01

    Genome sequencing of two different Lactobacillus casei strains (ATCC334 and BL23) is presently going on and preliminary data revealed that this lactic acid bacterium possesses numerous carbohydrate transport systems probably reflecting its capacity to proliferate under varying environmental conditions. Many carbohydrate transporters belong to the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), but all different kinds of non-PTS transporters are present as well

  2. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of Lactobacillus casei phage PL1 lysis genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Kashige; Y. Nakashima; F. Miake; K. Watanabe

    2000-01-01

    Summary.  ?The genes encoding the host cell wall-lytic proteins were searched in the genome DNA of phage PL-1 active against Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27092 by comparing the amino acid sequences with those of others using a computer software of the DDBJ data base. The\\u000a gene regions found were cloned into E. coli by inserting PCR-amplified DNA fragments into the EcoRI site

  3. Assessment of Aerobic and Respiratory Growth in the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Ianniello, Rocco G.; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Rossi, Franca; Iacumin, Lucilla; Comi, Giuseppe; Coppola, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    One hundred eighty four strains belonging to the species Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus were screened for their ability to grow under aerobic conditions, in media containing heme and menaquinone and/or compounds generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), in order to identify respiratory and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes. Most strains were able to cope with aerobic conditions and for many strains aerobic growth and heme or heme/menaquinone supplementation increased biomass production compared to anaerobic cultivation. Only four L. casei strains showed a catalase-like activity under anaerobic, aerobic and respiratory conditions and were able to survive in presence of H2O2 (1 mM). Almost all L. casei and L. paracasei strains tolerated menadione (0.2 mM) and most tolerated pyrogallol (50 mM), while L. rhamnosus was usually resistant only to the latter compound. This is the first study in which an extensive screening of oxygen and oxidative stress tolerance of members of the L. casei group has been carried out. Results allowed the selection of strains showing the typical traits of aerobic and respiratory metabolism (increased pH and biomass under aerobic or respiratory conditions) and unique oxidative stress response properties. Aerobic growth and respiration may confer technological and physiological advantages in the L. casei group and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes could be exploited in several food industry applications. PMID:24918811

  4. Enhanced bacterial tumor delivery by modulating the EPR effect and therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Nakamura, Hideaki; Shin, Takashi; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    Bacteria of micrometer size could accumulate in tumor based on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. We report here Lactobacillus casei (L. casei), a nonpathogenic facultatively anaerobic bacterium, preferentially accumulated in tumor tissues after intravenously (i.v.) injection; at 24 h, live bacteria were found more in the tumor, whereas the bacteria in normal tissues including the liver and spleen were cleared rapidly. The tumor-selective accumulation and growth of L. casei is probably due to the EPR effect and the hypoxic tumor environment. Moreover, the bacterial tumor delivery was significantly increased by a nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroglycerin (NG, 10-70 times) and an angiotensin II converting enzyme inhibitor, enalapril (6-18 times). Consequently significant suppression of tumor growth was found in a colon cancer C26 model, and more remarkable antitumor effect was achieved when L. casei was combined with NG, probably by modulating the host nonspecific immune responses; tumor necrosis factor-? significantly increased in tumor after the treatment, as well as NO synthase activity and myleoperoxidase activity. These findings suggest the potential of L. casei as a candidate for targeted bacterial antitumor therapy, especially in combine with NG or other vascular mediators. PMID:25041982

  5. Assessment of aerobic and respiratory growth in the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Ianniello, Rocco G; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Rossi, Franca; Iacumin, Lucilla; Comi, Giuseppe; Coppola, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    One hundred eighty four strains belonging to the species Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus were screened for their ability to grow under aerobic conditions, in media containing heme and menaquinone and/or compounds generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), in order to identify respiratory and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes. Most strains were able to cope with aerobic conditions and for many strains aerobic growth and heme or heme/menaquinone supplementation increased biomass production compared to anaerobic cultivation. Only four L. casei strains showed a catalase-like activity under anaerobic, aerobic and respiratory conditions and were able to survive in presence of H2O2 (1 mM). Almost all L. casei and L. paracasei strains tolerated menadione (0.2 mM) and most tolerated pyrogallol (50 mM), while L. rhamnosus was usually resistant only to the latter compound. This is the first study in which an extensive screening of oxygen and oxidative stress tolerance of members of the L. casei group has been carried out. Results allowed the selection of strains showing the typical traits of aerobic and respiratory metabolism (increased pH and biomass under aerobic or respiratory conditions) and unique oxidative stress response properties. Aerobic growth and respiration may confer technological and physiological advantages in the L. casei group and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes could be exploited in several food industry applications. PMID:24918811

  6. Genome –Scale Reconstruction of Metabolic Networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A

    PubMed Central

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J.; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Steele, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications. PMID:25365062

  7. Comparative effect of the adjuvant capacity of Lactobacillus casei and lipopolysaccharide on the intestinal secretory antibody response and resistance to Salmonella infection in mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Perdigón; S. Alvarez; N. Gobbato; M. V. De Budeguer; A. A. P. De Ruiz Holgado

    1995-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the effect of Lactobacillus casei lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a mixture of L. casei plus LPS used as oral adjuvants on the increase of mucosal immunity. The ability of these substances to protect against enteric infection was also studied. It was demonstrated that treatment with viable L. casei mixed with LPS and administered

  8. Selective enumeration of Lactobacillus casei in yoghurt-type fermented milks based on a 15°C incubation temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude P. Champagne; Denis Roy; Alain Lafond

    1997-01-01

    A procedure was developed to enumerate selectively Lactobacillus casei populations in yoghurt-type fermented milks that can also contain strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium infantis. Commercial LBS agar was acidified to pH 5.4, and the plates were incubated at 15°C for 14 days under anaerobic conditions. Acidification prevented the development of streptococci, and incubation

  9. Reconstruction and analysis of the genome-scale metabolic model of Lactobacillus casei LC2W.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nan; Liu, Jie; Ai, Lianzhong; Liu, Liming

    2015-01-10

    Lactobacillus casei LC2W is a recently isolated probiotic lactic acid bacterial strain, which is widely used in the dairy and pharmaceutical industries and in clinical medicine. The first genome-scale metabolic model for L. casei, composed of 846 genes, 969 metabolic reactions, and 785 metabolites, was reconstructed using both manual genome annotation and an automatic SEED model. Then, the iJL846 model was validated by simulating cell growth on 15 reported carbon sources. The iJL846 model explored the metabolism of L. casei on a genome scale: (1) explanation of the genetic codes-metabolic functions of 342 genes were reannotated in this model; (2) characterization of the physiology-10 amino acids and 7 vitamins were identified to be essential nutrients for L. casei LC2W growth; (3) analyses of metabolic pathways-the transport and metabolism of the 17 essential nutrients and exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis-were performed; (4) exploration of metabolic capacity was conducted-for lactate, the importance of genes in its biosynthetic pathways was evaluated, and the requirements of amino acids were predicted for mixed acid fermentation; for flavor compounds, the effects of oxygen were analyzed, and three new knockout targets were selected for acetoin production; for EPS, 11 types of nutrients in the rich medium and important reactions in the biosynthetic pathway were identified that enhanced EPS production. In conclusion, the iJL846 model serves as a useful tool for understanding and engineering the metabolism of this probiotic strain. PMID:25452194

  10. Overexpression of Lactobacillus casei d-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid Dehydrogenase in Cheddar Cheese†

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Jeffery R.; Gummalla, Sanjay; Hughes, Joanne E.; Johnson, Mark E.; Rankin, Scott A.; Drake, Mary Anne

    2004-01-01

    Metabolism of aromatic amino acids by lactic acid bacteria is an important source of off-flavor compounds in Cheddar cheese. Previous work has shown that ?-keto acids produced from Trp, Tyr, and Phe by aminotransferase enzymes are chemically labile and may degrade spontaneously into a variety of off-flavor compounds. However, dairy lactobacilli can convert unstable ?-keto acids to more-stable ?-hydroxy acids via the action of ?-keto acid dehydrogenases such as d-hydroxyisocaproic acid dehydrogenase. To further characterize the role of this enzyme in cheese flavor, the Lactobacillus casei d-hydroxyisocaproic acid dehydrogenase gene was cloned into the high-copy-number vector pTRKH2 and transformed into L. casei ATCC 334. Enzyme assays confirmed that ?-keto acid dehydrogenase activity was significantly higher in pTRKH2:dhic transformants than in wild-type cells. Reduced-fat Cheddar cheeses were made with Lactococcus lactis starter only, starter plus L. casei ATCC 334, and starter plus L. casei ATCC 334 transformed with pTRKH2:dhic. After 3 months of aging, the cheese chemistry and flavor attributes were evaluated instrumentally by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by descriptive sensory analysis. The culture system used significantly affected the concentrations of various ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, and esters and one sulfur compound in cheese. Results further indicated that enhanced expression of d-hydroxyisocaproic acid dehydrogenase suppressed spontaneous degradation of ?-keto acids, but sensory work indicated that this effect retarded cheese flavor development. PMID:15294819

  11. Lactobacillus casei reduces susceptibility to type 2 diabetes via microbiota-mediated body chloride ion influx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Guo, Xiao; Guo, Jianlin; He, Qiuwen; Li, He; Song, Yuqin; Zhang, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota mediated low-grade inflammation is involved in the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In this study, we used a high fat sucrose (HFS) diet-induced pre-insulin resistance and a low dose-STZ HFS rat models to study the effect and mechanism of Lactobacillus casei Zhang in protecting against T2DM onset. Hyperglycemia was favorably suppressed by L. casei Zhang treatment. Moreover, the hyperglycemia was connected with type 1 immune response, high plasma bile acids and urine chloride ion loss. This chloride ion loss was significantly prevented by L. casei via upregulating of chloride ion-dependent genes (ClC1-7, GlyR?1, SLC26A3, SLC26A6, GABAA?1, Bestrophin-3 and CFTR). A shift in the caecal microflora, particularly the reduction of bile acid 7?-dehydroxylating bacteria, and fecal bile acid profiles also occurred. These change coincided with organ chloride influx. Thus, we postulate that the prevention of T2DM onset by L. casei Zhang may be via a microbiota-based bile acid-chloride exchange mechanism. PMID:25133590

  12. Effects of a fermented milk drink containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on the human NK-cell activity.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko

    2007-03-01

    Nine healthy middle-aged and 10 elderly volunteers drank fermented milk containing 4 x 10(10) live cells of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota daily for 3 wk, and their natural killer (NK) activity and other immunological functions were examined. In the experiments with middle-aged volunteers, NK activity significantly increased (P<0.01) 3 wk after the start of intake, elevated NK cell activity remained for the next 3 wk, and this effect was particularly prominent in the low-NK-activity individuals. In the experiments with elderly volunteers, NK activity significantly decreased (P<0.01) in the control group 3 wk after the start of intake; however, the intake of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota maintained the NK activity. These results suggest that daily intake of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota provides a positive effect on NK-cell activity. PMID:17311976

  13. ISL 1 : a new transposable element in Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariko Shimizu-Kadota; Mayumi Kiwaki; Hideo Hirokawa; Nobuo Tsuchida

    1985-01-01

    The genome structures of a temperate Lactobacillus phage, ?FSW, and its virulent mutants, ?FSVs, were examined by restriction, heteroduplex and nucleotide-sequence analyses. The results showed that two out of three ?FSVs had the same 1.3 kbp insertion (designated as ISL1) at different positions in the ?FSW sequence. ISL1 was 1,256 bp long and contained at least two long open reading

  14. Lactobacillus casei improves resistance to pneumococcal respiratory infection in malnourished mice.

    PubMed

    Villena, Julio; Racedo, Silvia; Agüero, Graciela; Bru, Elena; Medina, Marcela; Alvarez, Susana

    2005-06-01

    We studied the effect of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 used as a supplement in a repletion diet on the resistance to Streptococcus pneumoniae respiratory infection in malnourished mice. Weaned mice were malnourished after they consumed a protein-free diet (PFD) for 21 d. Malnourished mice were fed a balanced conventional diet (BCD) with or without supplemental L. casei for 7, 14, or 21 consecutive days, or BCD for 7 d with L. casei supplementation on d 6 and 7 (7dBCD+2dLc). The malnourished control (MNC) group was fed only the PFD, whereas well-nourished control (WNC) mice consumed the BCD ad libitum. Mice were challenged with S. pneumoniae at the end of each dietary treatment. Lung colonization and bacteremia were significantly greater in MNC than in WNC. Normalization of the immune response occurred in malnourished mice fed the BCD for 21 d. L. casei supplementation reduced the time required for a normal response from 21 to 7 d. Mice administered the 7dBCD+2dLc repletion treatment had a more effective pathogen clearance from blood and significantly lower lung damage than MNC. This treatment improved both the number of leukocytes and neutrophils in blood and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) and the bactericidal function of phagocytic cells to levels that did not differ from those of WNC. In the 7dBCD+2dLc mice, antipneumococcal IgA in BAL was higher than in WNC, whereas antipneumococcal IgG in serum and BAL did not differ. This study suggests that the addition of L. casei to the repletion diet has a beneficial effect because it accelerates the recovery of the innate immune response and improves the specific immune mechanisms against an S. pneumoniae respiratory infection in malnourished mice. PMID:15930453

  15. Synthesis of Fucosyl-N-Acetylglucosamine Disaccharides by Transfucosylation Using ?-l-Fucosidases from Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Carbajo, Rodrigo J.; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Monedero, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    AlfB and AlfC ?-l-fucosidases from Lactobacillus casei were used in transglycosylation reactions, and they showed high efficiency in synthesizing fucosyldisaccharides. AlfB and AlfC activities exclusively produced fucosyl-?-1,3-N-acetylglucosamine and fucosyl-?-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. The reaction kinetics showed that AlfB can convert 23% p-nitrophenyl-?-l-fucopyranoside into fucosyl-?-1,3-N-acetylglucosamine and AlfC at up to 56% into fucosyl-?-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:23542622

  16. Strain identification of probiotic Lactobacillus casei-related isolates with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Roy; Pierre Ward; Daniel Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Typing of reference strains and isolates identified as Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus was carried out using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses. Strains of L. paracasei were mainly grouped in the same cluster as those of L. casei. The RAPD fingerprints of strains ATCC 393 and ATCC 15820 differ from those of the L. rhamnosus

  17. Vancomycin-resistant Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus casei synthesize cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursors that terminate in lactate.

    PubMed Central

    Handwerger, S; Pucci, M J; Volk, K J; Liu, J; Lee, M S

    1994-01-01

    The emergence of acquired high-level resistance among Enterococcus species has renewed interest in mechanisms of resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in gram-positive bacteria. In Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, resistance is encoded by the van gene cluster and is due to the production of a peptidoglycan precursor terminating in D-alanyl-D-lactate, to which vancomycin does not bind. Most Leuconostoc and many Lactobacillus species are intrinsically resistant to high levels of glycopeptide antibiotics, but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. To determine whether the mechanisms of resistance are similar in intrinsically resistant bacteria, cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursors were isolated from Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus casei and analyzed by mass spectrometry, revealing structures consistent with UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys-(L-Ala)-D-Ala-D-lactate and UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-lactate, respectively. PMID:8282706

  18. La inoculación de Lactobacillus casei en ratones NIH induce una respuesta protectora contra la infección por Trypanosoma cruzi (cepa Ninoa) The inoculation of Lactobacillus casei in NIH mice induces a protective response against Trypanosoma cruzi (Ninoa strain) infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Ramón; María del Carmen; Torres Álvarez; Federico Martínez Gómez

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus casei administered orally or intraperitoneally to NIH mice, on the experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi Ninoa strain. Twenty three NIH mice were randomly distributed into three groups, which were treated seven days before the infection with 12 ? 104 Trypanosoma cruzi, Ninoa strain. The animals in the

  19. Sequencing and analysis of three plasmids from Lactobacillus casei TISTR1341 and development of plasmid-derived Escherichia coli–L. casei shuttle vectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marutpong Panya; Viraphong Lulitanond; Sithichoke Tangphatsornruang; Wises Namwat; Rungnapha Wannasutta; Namfon Suebwongsa; Baltasar Mayo

    Pyrosequencing followed by conventional PCR and sequencing was used to determine the complete nucleotide sequence of three\\u000a plasmids (pRCEID2.9, pRCEID3.2, and pRCEID13.9) from the Lactobacillus casei strain TISTR1341. The plasmid sequences were found to be almost identical, respectively, to those of pLA106, pLA105, and\\u000a pLA103 from Lactobacillus acidophilus strain TK8912, suggesting that these strains may be related. Sequence analysis and

  20. Production of free fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid in probiotic dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei during fermentation and storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hariom Yadav; Shalini Jain; P. R. Sinha

    2007-01-01

    The production of free fatty acids (FFAs) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in probiotic dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. casei during fermentation and 10d of storage at 4°C was evaluated and compared with control dahi. The total FFAs in terms of acid degree values significantly increased during fermentation and storage of both types of dahi samples. In addition, gas

  1. LACTOBACILLUS CASEI METABOLIC POTENTIAL TO UTILIZE CITRATE AS AN ENERGY SOURCE IN RIPENING CHEESE: A BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research describes a unique PCAC for Lactobacillus casei. Additionally, it describes the citric acid catabolism end-product by this non-starter lactic acid bacteria during growth, and under conditions similar to those present in ripening cheese. It provides insights on pathways preferably util...

  2. Malt combing nuts as a nutrient supplement to whey permeate for producing lactic by fermentation with Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatjana Pauli; John J. Fitzpatrick

    2002-01-01

    Malt combing nuts (MCN) is a low value byproduct from the malting industry. It provides a cheap source of nitrogen and vitamins and has potential for being applied as a nutrient supplement in fermentations to produce lactic acid. This work investigates the supplementation of whey permeate with MCN to produce lactic acid by fermentation with Lactobacillus casei, and compares it

  3. Predictive modelling of Lactobacillus casei KN291 survival in fermented soy beverage.

    PubMed

    Zieli?ska, Dorota; Dorota, Zieli?ska; Ko?o?yn-Krajewska, Danuta; Danuta, Ko?o?yn-Krajewska; Goryl, Antoni; Antoni, Goryl; Motyl, Ilona

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to construct and verify predictive growth and survival models of a potentially probiotic bacteria in fermented soy beverage. The research material included natural soy beverage (Polgrunt, Poland) and the strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) - Lactobacillus casei KN291. To construct predictive models for the growth and survival of L. casei KN291 bacteria in the fermented soy beverage we design an experiment which allowed the collection of CFU data. Fermented soy beverage samples were stored at various temperature conditions (5, 10, 15, and 20°C) for 28 days. On the basis of obtained data concerning the survival of L. casei KN291 bacteria in soy beverage at different temperature and time conditions, two non-linear models (r(2)= 0.68-0.93) and two surface models (r(2)=0.76-0.79) were constructed; these models described the behaviour of the bacteria in the product to a satisfactory extent. Verification of the surface models was carried out utilizing the validation data - at 7°C during 28 days. It was found that applied models were well fitted and charged with small systematic errors, which is evidenced by accuracy factor - Af, bias factor - Bf and mean squared error - MSE. The constructed microbiological growth and survival models of L. casei KN291 in fermented soy beverage enable the estimation of products shelf life period, which in this case is defined by the requirement for the level of the bacteria to be above 10(6) CFU/cm(3). The constructed models may be useful as a tool for the manufacture of probiotic foods to estimate of their shelf life period. PMID:24500482

  4. 16S rRNA PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of Oral Lactobacillus casei Group and Their Phenotypic Appearances

    PubMed Central

    Piwat, S.; Teanpaisan, R.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a 16S rRNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify the species level of Lactobacillus casei group and to investigate their characteristics of acid production and inhibitory effect. PCR-DGGE has been developed based on the 16S rRNA gene, and a set of HDA-1-GC and HDA-2, designed at V2-V3 region, and another set of CARP-1-GC and CARP-2, designed at V1 region, have been used. The bacterial strains included L. casei ATCC 393, L. paracasei CCUG 32212, L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469, L. zeae CCUG 35515, and 46 clinical strains of L. casei/paracasei/rhamnosus. Inhibitory effect against Streptococcus mutans and acid production were examined. Results revealed that each type species strain and identified clinical isolate showed its own unique DGGE pattern using CARP1-GC and CARP2 primers. HDA1-GC and HDA2 primers could distinguish the strains of L. paracasei from L. casei. It was found that inhibitory effect of L. paracasei was stronger than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. The acid production of L. paracasei was lower than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. In conclusion, the technique has been proven to be able to differentiate between closely related species in L. casei group and thus provide reliable information of their phenotypic appearances. PMID:24191230

  5. 16S rRNA PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of Oral Lactobacillus casei Group and Their Phenotypic Appearances.

    PubMed

    Piwat, S; Teanpaisan, R

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a 16S rRNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify the species level of Lactobacillus casei group and to investigate their characteristics of acid production and inhibitory effect. PCR-DGGE has been developed based on the 16S rRNA gene, and a set of HDA-1-GC and HDA-2, designed at V2-V3 region, and another set of CARP-1-GC and CARP-2, designed at V1 region, have been used. The bacterial strains included L. casei ATCC 393, L. paracasei CCUG 32212, L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469, L. zeae CCUG 35515, and 46 clinical strains of L. casei/paracasei/rhamnosus. Inhibitory effect against Streptococcus mutans and acid production were examined. Results revealed that each type species strain and identified clinical isolate showed its own unique DGGE pattern using CARP1-GC and CARP2 primers. HDA1-GC and HDA2 primers could distinguish the strains of L. paracasei from L. casei. It was found that inhibitory effect of L. paracasei was stronger than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. The acid production of L. paracasei was lower than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. In conclusion, the technique has been proven to be able to differentiate between closely related species in L. casei group and thus provide reliable information of their phenotypic appearances. PMID:24191230

  6. Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Formerly Lactobacillus casei) LOCK900.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Koryszewska-Baginska, Anna; Bardowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus LOCK900 fulfills the criteria required for probiotic strains. In this study, we report a whole-genome sequence of this isolate and compare it with other L. rhamnosus complete genome sequences already published. PMID:23950137

  7. Cloning and sequence determination of the valS gene, encoding valyl-tRNA synthetase in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B V; Toy, J; Sit, T L; Bognar, A L

    1993-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the valS gene from Lactobacillus casei and the predicted amino acid sequence of its valyl-tRNA synthetase product have been determined. An open reading frame coding for a protein of 901 amino acids was found. A clone containing the intact L. casei valS gene functionally complemented the temperature-sensitive growth of the valS mutant strain 236c of Escherichia coli. The valS gene and the downstream folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene are transcribed in the same direction but are separated by a putative transcription terminator. Images PMID:8468307

  8. Selective and differential enumerations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium spp. in yoghurt--a review.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Rabia; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-10-01

    Yoghurt is increasingly being used as a carrier of probiotic bacteria for their potential health benefits. To meet with a recommended level of ?10(6) viable cells/g of a product, assessment of viability of probiotic bacteria in market preparations is crucial. This requires a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria in yoghurt such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. casei and Bifidobacterium. This chapter presents an overview of media that could be used for differential and selective enumerations of yoghurt bacteria. De Man Rogosa Sharpe agar containing fructose (MRSF), MRS agar pH 5.2 (MRS 5.2), reinforced clostridial prussian blue agar at pH 5.0 (RCPB 5.0) or reinforced clostridial agar at pH 5.3 (RCA 5.3) are suitable for enumeration of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus when the incubation is carried out at 45°C for 72h. S. thermophilus (ST) agar and M17 are recommended for selective enumeration of S. thermophilus. Selective enumeration of Lb. acidophilus in mixed culture could be made in Rogosa agar added with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-?-d-glucopyranoside (X-Glu) or MRS containing maltose (MRSM) and incubation in a 20% CO2 atmosphere. Lb. casei could be selectively enumerated on specially formulated Lb. casei (LC) agar from products containing yoghurt starter bacteria (S. thermophilus and Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus), Lb. acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp. and Lb. casei. Bifidobacterium could be enumerated on MRS agar supplemented with nalidixic acid, paromomycin, neomycin sulphate and lithium chloride (MRS-NPNL) under anaerobic incubation at 37°C for 72h. PMID:21807435

  9. The linkage between the polysaccharide and mucopeptide components of the cell wall of Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Knox, K. W.; Hall, Elizabeth A.

    1965-01-01

    1. The linkage between the polysaccharide and mucopeptide components of the cell wall of Lactobacillus casei is rapidly hydrolysed under mild acid-hydrolysis conditions. 2. The release of the polysaccharide is accompanied by the hydrolysis of an N-acetylhexosaminide linkage. The N-acetylhexosamine residue readily forms chromogen and it is concluded that it is substituted on C(3) by the adjacent sugar. 3. Continued heating of the polysaccharide in acid results in a slower release of reactive N-acetylhexosamine due to the hydrolysis of glycosidic linkages within the polysaccharide. 4. After the linkage between the polysaccharide and mucopeptide has been hydrolysed, acid phosphatase will release approx. 40% of the total phosphorus as inorganic phosphate. 5. It is concluded that the polysaccharide component of the cell wall is joined through its reducing end group to a phosphate grouping in the mucopeptide. PMID:5837777

  10. Effect of immobilized Lactobacillus casei on volatile compounds of heat treated probiotic dry-fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Sidira, Marianthi; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Kanellaki, Maria; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the amount of immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat grains on the generation of volatile compounds during the production of heat treated probiotic dry-fermented sausages was investigated. For comparison reasons, sausages containing free L. casei cells or no starter culture as well as a similar commercial product were also included in the study. Samples ripened for 8days and heat treated to 70-72°C for 8-10min were subjected to Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The starter culture affected significantly the production of volatile compounds. The highest content of esters and alcohols was observed in the sample containing 30g of immobilized cells/kg of stuffing mixture, while the highest concentration of organic acids was observed in the sausages with no starter culture. In contrast, the commercial product contained the lowest concentration of volatiles. Principal component analysis of the semi-quantitative data revealed that the volatile composition was affected primarily by the nature and concentration of the starter culture. PMID:25704702

  11. Antagonistic activity exerted in vitro and in vivo by Lactobacillus casei (strain GG) against Salmonella typhimurium C5 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hudault, S; Liévin, V; Bernet-Camard, M F; Servin, A L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antagonistic properties of Lactobacillus casei GG exerted in vitro against Salmonella typhimurium C5 in a cellular model, cultured enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, to those exerted in vivo in an animal model, C3H/He/Oujco mice. Our results show that a 1-h contact between the invading strain C5 and either the culture or the supernatant of L. casei GG impeded the invasion by the Salmonella strain in Caco-2 cells, without modifying the viability of the strain. After neutralization at pH 7, no inhibition of the invasion by C5 was observed. The antagonistic activity of L. casei GG was examined in C3H/He/Oujco mice orally infected with C5 as follows: (i) L. casei GG was given daily to conventional animals as a probiotic, and (ii) it was given once to germ-free animals in order to study the effect of the population of L. casei GG established in the different segments of the gut. In vivo experiments show that after a single challenge with C5, this strain survives and persists at a higher level in the feces of the untreated conventional mice than in those of the treated group. In L. casei GG germ-free mice, establishment of L. casei GG in the gut significantly delayed the occurrence of 100% mortality of the animals (15 days after C5 challenge versus 9 days in germ-free mice [P < 0.01]). Cecal colonization level and translocation rate of C5 to the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver were significantly reduced during the first 2 days post-C5 challenge, although the L. casei GG population level in the gut dramatically decreased in these animals. PMID:9023930

  12. Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Formerly Lactobacillus casei) LOCK908.

    PubMed

    Koryszewska-Baginska, Anna; Bardowski, Jacek; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus LOCK908, a patented probiotic strain (Polish patent no. 209987), was isolated from the feces of a healthy 6-year-old girl. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of LOCK908 and identify genes likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPSs). PMID:24558250

  13. A Novel Lactobacillus casei LP1 Producing 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid, a Bifidogenic Growth Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jo-Eun; Kim, Tae-Jung; Moon, Gi-Seong

    2015-01-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (DHNA) is a bifidogenic growth stimulator (BGS) and could be a functional food ingredient since bifidobacteria are beneficial for human health. For that reason, lactic acid bacteria producing DHNA have been screened. A lactic acid bacterium LP1 strain isolated from a natural cheese was confirmed to produce DHNA, analyzed by a HPLC method. The strain was identified as Lactobacillus casei by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The cell-free supernatant of fermented whey produced by L. casei LP1 presented the BGS activity for three bifidobacterial strains such as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis KCTC 3127, Bifidobacterium bifidum KCTC 3202, and Bifidobacterium breve KCTC 3220 which were human-originated. To the best of our knowledge, a L. casei strain which can produce DHNA was firstly identified in this study. PMID:25866754

  14. 454 pyrosequencing reveals changes in the faecal microbiota of adults consuming Lactobacillus casei Zhang.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Zhuang; Sun, Zhihong; Gesudu, Qimu; Kwok, Laiyu; Menghebilige; Zhang, Heping

    2014-06-01

    Probiotics are believed to help to maintain a healthy balance of the human gut microbiota. Lactobacillus casei Zhang (LcZ) is a novel potential probiotic isolated from the naturally fermented food koumiss. To better understand the impact of this potential probiotic on human intestinal microbiota, 24 subjects were randomly recruited for a longitudinal study: the subjects were required to consume LcZ for 28 days, and faecal samples were collected prior to, during and after the LcZ consumption phase. Alterations in the gut microbiota were monitored using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction(q-PCR) technologies. We found that the consumption of LcZ significantly altered the composition of intestinal microbiota (P < 0.001) and the gut microbiota diversity. Further analysis at the genus level revealed a positive correlation between LcZ and Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium, Propionibacterium, Bifidobacterium and an unidentified genus from Bacteroidaceae and Lachnospiraceae and a negative correlation between LcZ administration and the presence of Clostridium, Phascolarctobacterium, Serratia, Enterococcus, Shigella and Shewanella. Furthermore, these changes were confirmed by q-PCR data. PMID:24702028

  15. Effect of salt on cell viability and membrane integrity of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum as observed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of varying sodium chloride concentrations (0-5%) on viability and membrane integrity of three probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum, using conventional technique and flow cytometry. Double staining of cells by carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and propidium iodide (PI) enabled to evaluate the effect of NaCl on cell esterase activity and membrane integrity. Observations from conventional culture technique were compared with findings from flow cytometric analysis on the metabolic activities of the cells and a correlation was observed between culturability and dye extrusion ability of L. casei and B. longum. However, a certain population of L. acidophilus was viable as per the plate count method but its efflux activity was compromised. Esterase activity of most bacteria reduced significantly (P < 0.05) during one week storage at NaCl concentrations greater than 3.5%. The study revealed that L. casei was least affected by higher NaCl concentrations among the three probiotic bacteria, as opposed to B. longum where the cF extrusion performance was greatly reduced during 1 wk storage. The metabolic activity and salt resistance of L. casei was found to be highest among the bacteria studied. PMID:25846931

  16. Coexpression of bile salt hydrolase gene and catalase gene remarkably improves oxidative stress and bile salt resistance in Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guohong WangSheng; Sheng Yin; Haoran An; Shangwu Chen; Yanling Hao

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) encounter various types of stress during industrial processes and gastrointestinal transit. Catalase\\u000a (CAT) and bile salt hydrolase (BSH) can protect bacteria from oxidative stress or damage caused by bile salts by decomposing\\u000a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or deconjugating the bile salts, respectively. Lactobacillus\\u000a casei is a valuable probiotic strain and is often deficient in both CAT and

  17. Suppressive effects of the oral administration of Lactobacillus casei on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA\\/1 mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ikuo Kato; Kazuko Endo-Tanaka; Teruo Yokokura

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the oral administration of the viable bacterium Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS), on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA\\/1 mice. Male DBA\\/1 mice were immunized with an emulsion of 100 ?g of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The mice were then given orally a suspension of LcS or distilled

  18. Immobilization of kefir and Lactobacillus casei on brewery spent grains for use in sourdough wheat bread making

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stavros Plessas; Marillena Trantallidi; Argyro Bekatorou; Maria Kanellaki; Poonam Nigam; Athanasios A. Koutinas

    2007-01-01

    New types of bread were produced employing baker’s yeast, kefir or Lactobacillus casei immobilized on brewer’s spent grains. Bread was produced either by the straight-dough or the sourdough method. All the studied biocatalysts and their corresponding sourdoughs were found efficient for breadmaking. Good rising was achieved and the produced breads had good overall quality and remained fresher for longer, compared

  19. The dnaK gene as a molecular marker for the classification and discrimination of the Lactobacillus casei group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chien-Hsun Huang; Fwu-Ling Lee

    2011-01-01

    It is hard to accurately identify specific species of the Lactobacillus casei group using phenotypic techniques alone. Some strains of this species group are considered to be probiotic and are widely\\u000a applied in the food industry. In this study, we compared the use of two phylogenetic markers, the 16S rRNA and dnaK genes, for species discrimination of the members of

  20. Utilization of Natural Fucosylated Oligosaccharides by Three Novel ?-l-Fucosidases from a Probiotic Lactobacillus casei Strain ?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J.

    2011-01-01

    Three putative ?-l-fucosidases encoded in the Lactobacillus casei BL23 genome were cloned and purified. The proteins displayed different abilities to hydrolyze natural fucosyloligosaccharides like 2?-fucosyllactose, H antigen disaccharide, H antigen type II trisaccharide, and 3?-, 4?-, and 6?-fucosyl-GlcNAc. This indicated a possible role in the utilization of oligosaccharides present in human milk and intestinal mucosa. PMID:21097595

  1. Utilization of natural fucosylated oligosaccharides by three novel alpha-L-fucosidases from a probiotic Lactobacillus casei strain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J

    2011-01-01

    Three putative ?-L-fucosidases encoded in the Lactobacillus casei BL23 genome were cloned and purified. The proteins displayed different abilities to hydrolyze natural fucosyloligosaccharides like 2'-fucosyllactose, H antigen disaccharide, H antigen type II trisaccharide, and 3'-, 4'-, and 6'-fucosyl-GlcNAc. This indicated a possible role in the utilization of oligosaccharides present in human milk and intestinal mucosa. PMID:21097595

  2. Immunogenicity of orally administrated recombinant Lactobacillus casei Zhang expressing Cryptosporidium parvum surface adhesion protein P23 in mice.

    PubMed

    Geriletu; Xu, Rihua; Jia, Honglin; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Xuan, Xuenan; Zhang, Heping

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, an intestinal apicomplexan parasite, is a significant cause of diarrheal diseases in both humans and animals. What is more, there is no promising strategy for controlling cryptosporidiosis. In this study, the P23 immunodominant surface protein of C. parvum sporozoites was stably expressed in the Lactobacillus casei Zhang strain and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a mouse model. The molecular weight (23 kDa) and immunogenicity of p23 gene expressed by L. casei Zhang were similar to that of the native P23 protein. Oral immunization with control L. casei Zhang and recombinant L. casei Zhang-p23 activated the mucosal immune system to elicit serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA in mice. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines such as IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-? in splenocytes of mice was detected by real-time PCR after oral immunization. P23-specific immunocyte activation was also verified. These findings indicate that the live L. casei Zhang vector may be a new tool for the production of mucosal vaccines against cryptosporidiosis in animals. PMID:21336991

  3. Constitutive Delivery of Bovine ?-Lactoglobulin to the Digestive Tracts of Gnotobiotic Mice by Engineered Lactobacillus casei?

    PubMed Central

    Hazebrouck, S.; Oozeer, R.; Adel-Patient, K.; Langella, P.; Rabot, S.; Wal, J.-M.; Corthier, G.

    2006-01-01

    The gut microbiota is critical for maturation of the immune system. Recent evidence suggests that early establishment of lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota, during neonatal colonization or by probiotic supplementation, could prevent the development of allergic disorders. Postnatal maturation of the gut immune system with allergen-producing lactobacilli colonizing the digestive tract could then affect the development of further allergic sensitization. In this paper, we describe construction of a recombinant Lactobacillus casei strain that can constitutively deliver bovine ?-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen, to the guts of gnotobiotic mice. The blg gene was inserted into the L. casei chromosome downstream of an endogenous promoter. BLG production was improved by fusing the propeptide LEISSTCDA (LEISS) to the BLG mature moiety. This led to a 10-fold increase in LEISS-BLG production compared to the production obtained without the propeptide and also led to enhanced secretion corresponding to 5% of the total production. After inoculation into germfree C3H/HeN mice, the genetic stability of the recombinant strain and in vivo BLG production were confirmed for at least 10 weeks. BLG stimulation of spleen cells from mice monoassociated with the BLG-producing lactobacilli induced secretion of the Th1 cytokine gamma interferon and, to a lesser extent, the Th2 cytokine interleukin-5. No BLG-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, or IgA was detected in sera or in fecal samples. These results suggest that gut colonization with allergen-producing lactobacilli could provide a useful model for studying the modulation of allergic disorders. PMID:16997983

  4. Characterization of Nitrite Degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-mei; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Xin-yue; Xu, Xi-lin; Wu, Hui; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ? 0.01). Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4+The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L) after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2?>NO?>N2O?>N2), rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA), because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4+. PMID:24755671

  5. Characterization of nitrite degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-mei; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Xin-yue; Xu, Xi-lin; Wu, Hui; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ? 0.01). Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4(+). The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L) after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2(-)>NO->N2O->N2), rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA), because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4(+). PMID:24755671

  6. Enhanced Immunological Memory Responses to Listeria monocytogenes in Rodents, as Measured by Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH), Adoptive Transfer of DTH, and Protective Immunity, following Lactobacillus casei Shirota Ingestion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. de Waard; E. Claassen; G. C. A. M. Bokken; B. Buiting; J. Garssen; J. G. Vos

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of orally administered Lactobacillus casei Shirota (L. casei) on immunological memory, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and acquired cellular resistance (ACR). The studies were performed in animal models in which the animals were rendered immune by a primary Listeria monocytogenes infection. It was shown that orally administered viable L. casei, and not heat-killed L.

  7. Induction of Immune Responses in Mice after Intragastric Administration of Lactobacillus casei Producing Porcine Parvovirus VP2 Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yigang; Li, Yijing

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was selected as an antigen delivery vehicle for mucosal immunization against porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection. A 64-kDa fragment of PPV major protective antigen VP2 protein was used as the parvovirus antigen model. A recombinant Lactobacillus expressing VP2 protein was constructed with plasmid pPG611.1, where expression and localization of the VP2 protein from recombinant Lc393-rPPV-VP2 was detected via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. Both local mucosal and systemic immune responses against PPV were induced in BALB/c mice immunized orally with the recombinant Lactobacillus expressing VP2 protein. The induced antibodies demonstrated neutralizing effects on PPV infection. These data indicated that the use of recombinant lactobacilli could be a valuable strategy for future vaccine development of PPV. PMID:17827311

  8. Simultaneous Production of Biosurfactants and Bacteriocins by Probiotic Lactobacillus casei MRTL3

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepansh; Singh Saharan, Baljeet

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are ubiquitous and well-known commensal bacteria in the human and animal microflora. LAB are extensively studied and used in a variety of industrial and food fermentations. They are widely used for humans and animals as adjuvants, probiotic formulation, and dietary supplements and in other food fermentation applications. In the present investigation, LAB were isolated from raw milk samples collected from local dairy farms of Haryana, India. Further, the isolates were screened for simultaneous production of biosurfactants and bacteriocins. Biosurfactant produced was found to be a mixture of lipid and sugar similar to glycolipids. The bacteriocin obtained was found to be heat stable (5?min at 100°C). Further, DNA of the strain was extracted and amplified by the 16S rRNA sequencing using universal primers. The isolate Lactobacillus casei MRTL3 was found to be a potent biosurfactant and bacteriocin producer. It seems to have huge potential for food industry as a biopreservative and/or food ingredient. PMID:24669225

  9. Probiotic activities of Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus: in vitro adherence to intestinal cells and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Forestier, C; De Champs, C; Vatoux, C; Joly, B

    2001-03-01

    The interest of probiotics as remedies for a broad number of gastrointestinal and other infectious diseases has gained wide interest over the last few years, but little is known about their underlying mechanism of action. In this study, the probiotic activities of a human isolate of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus strain (Lcr35) were investigated. Using intestinal Caco-2 cell line in an in vitro model, we demonstrated that this strain exhibited adhesive properties. The inhibitory effects of Lcr35 organisms on the adherence of three pathogens, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and Klebsiella pneumoniae, were determined. A decrease in the number of adhering pathogens was observed, using either preincubation, postincubation or coincubation of the pathogens with Lcr35. Moreover, the antibacterial activities of cell-free Lcr35 supernatant was examined against nine human pathogenic bacteria, ETEC, EPEC, K. pneumoniae, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis and Clostridium difficile. The growth of all strains was inhibited, as measured by determining the number of viable bacteria over time, but no bactericidal activity was detected in this in vitro assay. Together, these findings suggest that this probiotic strain could be used to prevent colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by a large variety of pathogens. PMID:11316370

  10. A murine oral model for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and immunomodulation with Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Meagan A.; Steele, James L.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) the causative agent of Johne's disease, is one of the most serious infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. Due to the chronic nature of this disease and no feasible control strategy, it is essential to have an efficient animal model which is representative of the natural route of infection as well as a viable treatment option. In this report, we evaluated the effect of different doses of M. paratuberculosis in their ability to colonize murine tissues following oral delivery and the ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a nascent probiotic, to combat paratuberculosis. Oral inoculation of mice was able to establish paratuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Two consecutive doses of approximately 109 CFU per mouse resulted in a disseminated infection, whereas lower doses were not efficient to establish infection. All inoculated mice were colonized with M. paratuberculosis, maintained infection for up to 24 weeks post infection and generated immune responses that reflect M. paratuberculosis infection in cattle. Notably, oral administration of L. casei ATCC 334 did not reduce the level of M. paratuberculosis colonization in treated animals. Interestingly, cytokine responses and histology indicated a trend for the immunomodulation and reduction of pathology in animals receiving L. casei ATCC 334 treatment. Overall, a reproducible oral model of paratuberculosis in mice was established that could be used for future vaccine experiments. Although the L. casei ATCC 334 was not a promising candidate for controlling paratuberculosis, we established a protocol to screen other probiotic candidates. PMID:24551602

  11. The effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on the intestinal microflora and immune parameters in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Spanhaak; R. Havenaar; G. Schaafsma

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (L. casei Shirota) on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora, and immune parameters in humans.Subjects: Twenty healthy male subjects aged 40–65 years were selected.Design:A placebo-controlled trial was performed in which 10 subjects were randomly assigned to a control and 10 to a

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6-specific antitumor immunity is induced by oral administration of HPV16 E6-expressing Lactobacillus casei in C57BL\\/6 mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tae-Young Lee; Yang-Hyun Kim; Kyung-Soon Lee; Jeong-Ki Kim; Il-Han Lee; Jai-Myung Yang; Moon-Hee Sung; Jong-Sup Park; Haryoung Poo

    2010-01-01

    Given that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) against the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 (HPV16 E6) protein is important\\u000a for eradication of HPV16 E6-expressing cancer cells in the cervical mucosa, the HPV16 E6 protein may be a target for the mucosal\\u000a immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Here, we expressed the HPV16 E6 antigen on Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and investigated E6-specific CMI

  13. Effect of immobilized Lactobacillus casei on the evolution of flavor compounds in probiotic dry-fermented sausages during ripening.

    PubMed

    Sidira, Marianthi; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Kanellaki, Maria; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2015-02-01

    The effect of immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat grains on the generation of volatile compounds in probiotic dry-fermented sausages during ripening was investigated. For comparison reasons, sausages containing free L. casei cells or no starter culture were also included in the study. Samples were collected after 1, 28 and 45days of ripening and subjected to SPME GC/MS analysis. Both the probiotic culture and the ripening process affected significantly the concentration of all volatile compounds. The significantly highest content of total volatiles, esters, alcohols and miscellaneous compounds was observed in sausages containing the highest amount of immobilized culture (300g/kg of stuffing mixture) ripened for 45days. Principal component analysis of the semi-quantitative data revealed that primarily the concentration of the immobilized probiotic culture affected the volatile composition. PMID:25306510

  14. The effect of medium redox potential on the folate-limited growth of Lactobacillus casei var. rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Tennant, G B

    1976-01-01

    The medium redox potential (Eh) influenced the folate-limited growth of Lactobacillus casei; the growth response was maximal at an Eh of +120 mV (pH 6-35). At raised Eh serum folate would support less growth than pteroylglutamic acid, and the response to N5-methyl tetrahydrofolic acid was intermediate between them. Pteroylglutamic acid was not destroyed during 24 h incubation at 37 degrees C in medium with Eh values between +40 and +440 mV. Destruction of N5-methyl tetrahydrofolic acid occurred within 24 h when the medium Eh was greater than +125 mV. Folate was taken up rapidly by L. casei with an Eh optimum at +270 mV. PMID:812947

  15. Analysis of the Lactobacillus casei supragenome and its influence in species evolution and lifestyle adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The broad ecological distribution of L. casei makes it an insightful subject for research on genome evolution and lifestyle adaptation. To explore evolutionary mechanisms that determine genomic diversity of L. casei, we performed comparative analysis of 17 L. casei genomes representing strains collected from dairy, plant, and human sources. Results Differences in L. casei genome inventory revealed an open pan-genome comprised of 1,715 core and 4,220 accessory genes. Extrapolation of pan-genome data indicates L. casei has a supragenome approximately 3.2 times larger than the average genome of individual strains. Evidence suggests horizontal gene transfer from other bacterial species, particularly lactobacilli, has been important in adaptation of L. casei to new habitats and lifestyles, but evolution of dairy niche specialists also appears to involve gene decay. Conclusions Genome diversity in L. casei has evolved through gene acquisition and decay. Acquisition of foreign genomic islands likely confers a fitness benefit in specific habitats, notably plant-associated niches. Loss of unnecessary ancestral traits in strains collected from bacterial-ripened cheeses supports the hypothesis that gene decay contributes to enhanced fitness in that niche. This study gives the first evidence for a L. casei supragenome and provides valuable insights into mechanisms for genome evolution and lifestyle adaptation of this ecologically flexible and industrially important lactic acid bacterium. Additionally, our data confirm the Distributed Genome Hypothesis extends to non-pathogenic, ecologically flexible species like L. casei. PMID:23035691

  16. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  17. Biochemical characterization and substrate profiling of a new NADH-dependent enoate reductase from Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiuzhen; Ren, Jie; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2012-06-10

    Carbon-carbon double bond of ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl compounds can be reduced by enoate reductase (ER), which is an important reaction in fine chemical synthesis. A putative enoate reductase gene from Lactobacillus casei str. Zhang was cloned into pET-21a+ and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) host cells. The encoded enzyme (LacER) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and treatment in an acidic buffer. This enzyme was identified as a NADH-dependent enoate reductase, which had a K(m) of 0.034 ± 0.006 mM and k(cat) of (3.2 ± 0.2) × 10³ s?¹ toward NADH using 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Its K(m) and k(cat) toward substrate 2-cyclohexen-1-one were 1.94 ± 0.04 mM and (8.4 ± 0.2) × 10³ s?¹, respectively. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at pH 8.0-9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 50-55°C, and LacER was relatively stable below 60 °C. The enzyme was active toward aliphatic alkenyl aldehyde, ketones and some cyclic anhydrides. Substituted groups of cyclic ?,?-unsaturated ketones and its ring size have positive or negative effects on activity. (R)-(-)-Carvone was reduced to (2R,5R)-dihydrocarvone with 99% conversion and 98% (diasteromeric excess: de) stereoselectivity, indicating a high synthetic potential of LacER in asymmetric synthesis. PMID:22579387

  18. Impact of different cryoprotectants on the survival of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei/paracasei during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Jofré, A; Aymerich, T; Garriga, M

    2014-11-01

    The production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried probiotic/starter cultures is of paramount importance for the food industry. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of glucose, lactose, trehalose, and skim milk applied alone or combined upon the survival of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, Lactobacillus casei/paracasei CTC1677 and L. casei/paracasei CTC1678 during freeze-drying and after 39 weeks of storage at 4 and 22 °C. Immediately after freeze-drying, the percentage of survivors was very high (?94%) and only slight differences were observed among strains and cryoprotectants. In contrast, during storage, survival in the dried state depended on the cryoprotectant, temperature and strain. For all the protectants assayed, the stability of the cultures was remarkably higher when stored under refrigeration (4 °C). Under these conditions, skim milk alone or supplemented with trehalose or lactose showed the best performance (reductions ?0.9 log units after 39 weeks of storage). The lowest survival was observed during non-refrigerated storage and with glucose and glucose plus milk; no viable cells left at the end of the storage period. Thus, freeze-drying in the presence of appropriate cryoprotectants allows the production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried cultures ready for incorporation in high numbers into food products as starter/potential probiotic cultures. PMID:25380798

  19. Joint effect of nitrogen sources and B vitamin supplementation of date juice on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aicha Nancib; Nabil Nancib; Djalal Meziane-Cherif; Abdelhafid Boubendir; Michel Fick; Joseph Boudrant

    2005-01-01

    The use of date juice as a substrate for lactic acid production was investigated. Various nitrogen sources were compared with yeast extract for efficient lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus. Among different nitrogen sources added to date juice (yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, tryptic soy, urea, peptone, and casein hydrolysate), yeast extract was the most efficient. The effect of

  20. In vitro and in vivo release of cytostatic factors from Lactobacillus casei -elicited peritoneal macrophages after stimulation with tumor cells and immunostimulants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shusuke Hashimoto; Koji Nomoto; Masato Nagaoka; Teruo Yokokura

    1987-01-01

    The effect of tumor cells and immunostimulants on the release of cytostatic factors (CF) from Lactobacillus casei YIT 9018 (LC)-, Corynebacterium parvum (CP)- or peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages (PM) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Significant release of CF into the culture medium from PM elicited with LC was induced by seven of eight mitomycin C-pretreated tumor cell lines and

  1. Insertion of bacteriophage ?FSW into the chromosome of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (S-1): Characterization of the attachment sites and the integrase gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariko Shimizu-Kadota; Mayumi Kiwaki; Saeko Sawaki; Yukio Shirasawa; Harue Shibahara-Sone; Tomoyuki Sako

    2000-01-01

    The integrase gene (int) on the genome of ?FSW, which is a temperate bacteriophage of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (formerly denoted as S-1), and the four attachment sites on the genomes of the phage and its host were characterized by sequencing. The ?FSW integrase was found to belong to the integrase family of site-specific tyrosine recombinase. The attachment sites shared

  2. Lactic acid production from deproteinized whey by mixed cultures of free and coimmobilized Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis cells using fedbatch culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Roukas; P. Kotzekidou

    1998-01-01

    The production of lactic acid from deproteinized whey by mixed cultures of free and coimmobilized Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis cells in batch and fedbatch culture was investigated. Fedbatch culture proved to be a better fermentation system for the production of lactic acid than batch culture. The maximum lactic acid concentration (46 g l?1) in fedbatch culture was obtained with

  3. The effect of supplementation by different nitrogen sources on the production of lactic acid from date juice by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nabil Nancib; Aicha Nancib; Amel Boudjelal; Chouki Benslimane; Fabrice Blanchard; J Boudrant

    2001-01-01

    Production of lactic acid from date juice by fermentation has been studied using Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus as the producer organism. The optimum substrate concentration, expressed in its glucose content, was 60 g l?1. Various nitrogen sources were compared with yeast extract in terms of their efficiency for lactic acid production. None of these nitrogen sources gave lactic acid concentrations

  4. Lactobacillus casei strain GG in the treatment of infants with acute watery diarrhea: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN67363048

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Salazar-Lindo; Percy Miranda-Langschwager; Miguel Campos-Sanchez; Elsa Chea-Woo; R Bradley Sack

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjuvant therapy to ORT with probiotic bacteria for infants with acute watery diarrhea has been under active investigation. Most studies have been done in the developed world showing benefit only for viral mild gastroenteritis. We evaluated the effect of a milk formula containing one billion (109) cfu\\/ml of Lactobacillus casei strain GG (LGG) upon duration and severity of diarrhea

  5. Characterization of pMC11, a plasmid with dual origins of replication isolated from Lactobacillus casei MCJ and construction of shuttle vectors with each replicon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengjun; Lin, Jinzhong; Ma, Chengjie; Zhao, Shumiao; She, Qunxin; Liang, Yunxiang

    2014-07-01

    Many lactic acid bacteria carry different plasmids, particularly those that replicate via a theta mechanism. Here we describe Lactobacillus casei MCJ(CCTCC AB20130356), a new isolate that contains pMC11, carrying two distinct theta-type replicons. Each replicon contained an iteron in the origin of replication (oriV1 or oriV2) and a gene coding for the replicase (RepA_1 or RepB_1), both of which are essential for plasmid replication. Escherichia coli/Lactobacillus shuttle vectors were constructed with each replicon, yielding pEL5.7 and pEL5.6 that are based on oriV2 and oriV1 replicons, respectively. These plasmids showed distinct properties: pEL5.7 was capable of replicating in L. casei MCJ?1 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactic LBCH-1 but failed to do so in two other tested lactobacilli strains whereas pEL5.6 replicated in three different strains, including L. casei MCJ?1, L. casei NJ, Lactobacillus paracasei LPC-37 and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactic LBCH-1. Plasmid stability was studied: pEL5.6 and pEL5.7 were very stably maintained in L. casei, as the loss rate was lower than 1 % per generation. pEL5.7 was also stable in L. delbrueckii subsp. lactic LBCH-1 with the loss rate estimated to be 3 %. These vectors were employed to express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) using the promoter of S-layer protein SlpA from Lactobacillus acidophilus. And a growth-phase regulated expression of GFP was observed in different strains. In conclusion, these shuttle vectors provide efficient genetic tools for DNA cloning and heterologous gene expression in lactobacilli. PMID:24652065

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus L34 and Lactobacillus casei L39 suppress Clostridium difficile-induced IL-8 production by colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the main cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and colitis known as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD).With increased severity and failure of treatment in CDAD, new approaches for prevention and treatment, such as the use of probiotics, are needed. Since the pathogenesis of CDAD involves an inflammatory response with a massive influx of neutrophils recruited by interleukin (IL)-8, this study aimed to investigate the probiotic effects of Lactobacillus spp. on the suppression of IL-8 production in response to C. difficile infection. Results We screened Lactobacillus conditioned media from 34 infant fecal isolates for the ability to suppress C. difficile-induced IL-8 production from HT-29 cells. Factors produced by two vancomycin-resistant lactobacilli, L. rhamnosus L34 (LR-L34) and L.casei L39 (LC-L39), suppressed the secretion and transcription of IL-8 without inhibiting C. difficile viability or toxin production. Conditioned media from LR-L34 suppressed the activation of phospho-NF-?B with no effect on phospho-c-Jun. However, LC-L39 conditioned media suppressed the activation of both phospho-NF-?B and phospho-c-Jun. Conditioned media from LR-L34 and LC-L39 also decreased the production of C. difficile-induced GM-CSF in HT-29 cells. Immunomodulatory factors present in the conditioned media of both LR-L34 and LC-L39 are heat-stable up to 100°C and?>?100 kDa in size. Conclusions Our results suggest that L. rhamnosus L34 and L. casei L39 each produce factors capable of modulating inflammation stimulated by C. difficile. These vancomycin-resistant Lactobacillus strains are potential probiotics for treating or preventing CDAD. PMID:24989059

  7. Malic Enzyme and Malolactic Enzyme Pathways Are Functionally Linked but Independently Regulated in Lactobacillus casei BL23

    PubMed Central

    Landete, José María; Ferrer, Sergi; Monedero, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is the only lactic acid bacterium in which two pathways for l-malate degradation have been described: the malolactic enzyme (MLE) and the malic enzyme (ME) pathways. Whereas the ME pathway enables L. casei to grow on l-malate, MLE does not support growth. The mle gene cluster consists of three genes encoding MLE (mleS), the putative l-malate transporter MleT, and the putative regulator MleR. The mae gene cluster consists of four genes encoding ME (maeE), the putative transporter MaeP, and the two-component system MaeKR. Since both pathways compete for the same substrate, we sought to determine whether they are coordinately regulated and their role in l-malate utilization as a carbon source. Transcriptional analyses revealed that the mle and mae genes are independently regulated and showed that MleR acts as an activator and requires internalization of l-malate to induce the expression of mle genes. Notwithstanding, both l-malate transporters were required for maximal l-malate uptake, although only an mleT mutation caused a growth defect on l-malate, indicating its crucial role in l-malate metabolism. However, inactivation of MLE resulted in higher growth rates and higher final optical densities on l-malate. The limited growth on l-malate of the wild-type strain was correlated to a rapid degradation of the available l-malate to l-lactate, which cannot be further metabolized. Taken together, our results indicate that L. casei l-malate metabolism is not optimized for utilization of l-malate as a carbon source but for deacidification of the medium by conversion of l-malate into l-lactate via MLE. PMID:23835171

  8. Malic enzyme and malolactic enzyme pathways are functionally linked but independently regulated in Lactobacillus casei BL23.

    PubMed

    Landete, José María; Ferrer, Sergi; Monedero, Vicente; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    Lactobacillus casei is the only lactic acid bacterium in which two pathways for l-malate degradation have been described: the malolactic enzyme (MLE) and the malic enzyme (ME) pathways. Whereas the ME pathway enables L. casei to grow on l-malate, MLE does not support growth. The mle gene cluster consists of three genes encoding MLE (mleS), the putative l-malate transporter MleT, and the putative regulator MleR. The mae gene cluster consists of four genes encoding ME (maeE), the putative transporter MaeP, and the two-component system MaeKR. Since both pathways compete for the same substrate, we sought to determine whether they are coordinately regulated and their role in l-malate utilization as a carbon source. Transcriptional analyses revealed that the mle and mae genes are independently regulated and showed that MleR acts as an activator and requires internalization of l-malate to induce the expression of mle genes. Notwithstanding, both l-malate transporters were required for maximal l-malate uptake, although only an mleT mutation caused a growth defect on l-malate, indicating its crucial role in l-malate metabolism. However, inactivation of MLE resulted in higher growth rates and higher final optical densities on l-malate. The limited growth on l-malate of the wild-type strain was correlated to a rapid degradation of the available l-malate to l-lactate, which cannot be further metabolized. Taken together, our results indicate that L. casei l-malate metabolism is not optimized for utilization of l-malate as a carbon source but for deacidification of the medium by conversion of l-malate into l-lactate via MLE. PMID:23835171

  9. Inhibition of the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus and Lactobacillus casei by oral peroxidase systems in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lumikari, M; Soukka, T; Nurmio, S; Tenovuo, J

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, Strep. sobrinus and Lactobacillus casei were grown in glucose-supplemented, sterilized, human whole saliva, adjusted to pH 5, 6 or 7. Components of the antibacterial peroxidase system--hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) and hypothiocyanite ions (OSCN-)--were generated by adding exogenous H2O2 to sterilized saliva containing endogenous peroxidases and thiocyanate (SCN-) ions. HOSCN/OSCN- generation was proportional to the amount of H2O2 added, and more HOSCN/OSCN- was detected in saliva at pH 7 than at pH 5. However, the growth of mutans streptococci and L. casei was inhibited at pH 5 by HOSCN/OSCN-, whereas no inhibition was found at pH 7. The findings show that (a) sufficient amount of HOSCN/OSCN- will inhibit the growth of cariogenic bacteria in human saliva at pH 5; (b) this amount of HOSCN/OSCN- can be generated in saliva by exogenously added H2O2; and (c) peroxidase systems have stronger antistreptococcal effects in human whole saliva than in phosphate buffer. PMID:1905532

  10. Beneficial effect of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and L-carnitine combination in preference to each in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moeinian, Mahsa; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Mozaffari, Shilan; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Baeeri, Maryam; Navaea-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the beneficial effect of the combination of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei, and L-carnitine in a rat colitis model. METHODS: Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral butyrate, L-carnitine, Lactobacillus casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups included negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic, histopathological examinations, and biomarkers such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interlukin-1? (IL-1?), myeloperoxidase (MPO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and ferric reduced ability of plasma (FRAP) were determined in the colon. RESULTS: The combination therapy exhibited a significant beneficial effect in alleviation of colitis compared to controls. Overall changes in reduction of TNF-? (114.66 ± 18.26 vs 171.78 ± 9.48 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), IL-1? (24.9 ± 1.07 vs 33.06 ± 2.16 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), TBARS (0.2 ± 0.03 vs 0.49 ± 0.04 ?g/mg protein, P < 0.01), MPO (15.32 ± 0.4 vs 27.24 ± 3.84 U/mg protein, P < 0.05), and elevation of FRAP (23.46 ± 1.2 vs 15.02 ± 2.37 ?mol/L, P < 0.05) support the preference of the combination therapy in comparison to controls. Although the monotherapies were also effective in improvement of colitis markers, the combination therapy was much better in improvement of colon oxidative stress markers including FRAP, TBARS, and MPO. CONCLUSION: The present combination is a suitable mixture in control of experimental colitis and should be trialed in the clinical setting. PMID:25152589

  11. Suppressive Effect on Activation of Macrophages by Lactobacillus casei Strain Shirota Genes Determining the Synthesis of Cell Wall-Associated Polysaccharides ?

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Emi; Serata, Masaki; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Although many Lactobacillus strains used as probiotics are believed to modulate host immune responses, the molecular natures of the components of such probiotic microorganisms directly involved in immune modulation process are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the function of polysaccharide moiety of the cell wall of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota as a possible immune modulator which regulates cytokine production by macrophages. A gene survey of the genome sequence of L. casei Shirota hunted down a unique cluster of 10 genes, most of whose predicted amino acid sequences had similarities to various extents to known proteins involved in biosynthesis of extracellular or capsular polysaccharides from other lactic acid bacteria. Gene knockout mutants of eight genes from this cluster resulted in the loss of reactivity to L. casei Shirota-specific monoclonal antibody and extreme reduction of high-molecular-mass polysaccharides in the cell wall fraction, indicating that at least these genes are involved in biosynthesis of high-molecular-mass cell wall polysaccharides. By adding heat-killed mutant cells to mouse macrophage cell lines or to mouse spleen cells, the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-10, and IL-6 was more stimulated than by wild-type cells. In addition, these mutants additively enhanced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 production by RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells, while wild-type cells significantly suppressed the IL-6 production of RAW 264.7. Collectively, these results indicate that this cluster of genes of L. casei Shirota, which have been named cps1A, cps1B, cps1C, cps1D, cps1E, cps1F, cps1G, and cps1J, determine the synthesis of the high-molecular-mass polysaccharide moiety of the L. casei Shirota cell wall and that this polysaccharide moiety is the relevant immune modulator which may function to reduce excessive immune reactions during the activation of macrophages by L. casei Shirota. PMID:18552190

  12. Short-chain organic acids produced on glucose, lactose, and citrate media by Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus casei, and Enterobacter aerogenes strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Urdaneta; D. Raffe; A. Ferrer; B. Sulbarán de Ferrer; L. Cabrera; M. Pérez

    1995-01-01

    Three strains of Enterococcus faecalis, three of Lactobacillus casei and two of Enterobacter aerogenes, isolated from commercial Palmita-type cheese were cultured in peptone-yeast extract broth with glucose (PYG), lactose (PYL), or citrate (PYC) added as the main carbon sources. The short-chain volatile and non-volatile organic acids were extracted and their concentration determined by GC with a FID detector. The identity

  13. An Esterase Gene from Lactobacillus casei Cotranscribed with Genes Encoding a Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System and Regulated by a LevR-Like Activator and ?54 Factor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María J. Yebra; Rosa Viana; Vicente Monedero; Josef Deutscher; Gaspar Pérez-Martínez

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for

  14. Characterization of the cysK2ctl1-cysE2 gene cluster involved in sulfur metabolism in Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Biljana Bogicevic; Stefan Irmler; Reto Portmann; Leo Meile; Hélène Berthoud

    The up- and downstream regions of ctl1 and ctl2 that encode a cystathionine lyase were analyzed in various Lactobacillus casei strains. ctl1 and ctl2 were found to be part of a gene cluster encoding two other open reading frames. One of the two open reading frames precedes ctl1 and encodes a putative cysteine synthase. The other open reading frame lies

  15. Comparison of Ribotyping, Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis in Typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tynkkynen, Soile; Satokari, Reetta; Saarela, Maria; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Saxelin, Maija

    1999-01-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  16. Comparison of ribotyping, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei strains.

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, S; Satokari, R; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Saxelin, M

    1999-09-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  17. Transposon Mutagenesis of Probiotic Lactobacillus casei Identifies asnH, an Asparagine Synthetase Gene Involved in Its Immune-Activating Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139. PMID:24416179

  18. Transposon mutagenesis of probiotic Lactobacillus casei identifies asnH, an asparagine synthetase gene involved in its immune-activating capacity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139. PMID:24416179

  19. Characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group based on the profiling of ribosomal proteins coded in S10-spc-alpha operons as observed by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroaki; Torimura, Masaki; Kitahara, Maki; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hotta, Yudai; Tamura, Hiroto

    2012-10-01

    The taxonomy of the members of the Lactobacillus casei group is complicated because of their phylogenetic similarity and controversial nomenclatural status. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of ribosomal proteins coded in the S10-spc-alpha operon, termed S10-GERMS, was applied in order to classify 33 sample strains belonging to the L. casei group. A total of 14 types of ribosomal protein genes coded in the operon were first sequenced from four type strains of the L. casei group (L. casei JCM 1134(T), L. paracasei subsp. paracasei JCM 8130(T), L. paracasei subsp. tolerans JCM 1171(T), and L. rhamnosus JCM 1136(T)) together with L. casei JCM 11302, which is the former type strain of 'L. zeae'. The theoretical masses of the 14 types of ribosomal proteins used as biomarkers were classified into five types and compiled into a ribosomal protein database. The observed ribosomal proteins of each strain, identified by MALDI-TOF MS, were categorized into types based on their masses, summarized as ribosomal protein profiles, and they were used to construct a phylogenetic tree. The 33 sample strains, together with seven genome-sequenced strains, could be classified into four major clusters, which coincided precisely with the taxa of the (sub)species within the L. casei group. Three "ancient" strains, identified as L. acidophilus and L. casei, were correctly re-identified as L. paracasei subsp. paracasei by S10-GERMS. S10-GERMS would thus appear to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic characterization, with considerable potential for management of culture collections. PMID:23099260

  20. The administration of milk fermented by the probiotic Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 exerts an immunomodulatory effect against a breast tumour in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Félix; Carino, Silvia; Perdigón, Gabriela; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    Antitumour activity is one of the health-promoting effects attributed to probiotics specially analysed from preclinical models, mostly murine. Here, the effect of milk fermented by the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus casei CRL 431, on a murine breast cancer model was analysed. Mice were fed with milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei or unfermented milk before and after tumour injection. Rate of tumour development, cytokines in serum, IgA, CD4, CD8, F4/80 and cytokines positive cells in mammary glands were determined. Microvasculature in the tumour tissues was monitored. The effect of fermented milk administration after tumour injection was also evaluated. It was observed that probiotic administration delayed or blocked tumour development. This effect was associated to modulation of the immune response triggered by the tumour. The area occupied by blood vessels decreased in the tumours from mice given fermented milk which agrees with their small tumours, and fewer side effects. Finally, it was observed that probiotic administration after tumour detection was also beneficial to delay the tumour growth. In conclusion, we showed in this study the potential of milk fermented by the probiotic Lactobacillus casei CRL431 to stimulate the immune response against this breast tumour, avoiding or delaying its growth when it was preventively administrated and also when the administration started after tumour cells injection. PMID:24646876

  1. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  2. Anti-infective activities of lactobacillus strains in the human intestinal microbiota: from probiotics to gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2014-04-01

    A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  3. Four weeks supplementation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8® shows modest effect on triacylglycerol in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bjerg, A T; Kristensen, M; Ritz, C; Stark, K D; Holst, J J; Leser, T D; Wellejus, A; Astrup, A

    2015-03-01

    The microbiota has been shown to have the potential to affect appetite and blood lipids positively in animal studies. We investigated if four weeks supplementation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8® (L. casei W8) had an effect on subjective appetite sensation, ad libitum energy intake, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose and insulin response in humans. Secondarily, we explored potential effects on blood lipids, fatty acids and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) activity in humans as well as SCD1 expression in piglets given L. casei W8 for two weeks. 64 healthy participants completed the double-blinded, randomised, controlled, parallel four weeks study with supplementation of L. casei W8 (1010 cfu) or placebo capsules. A meal test was conducted before and after the intervention, where subjective appetite, ad libitum energy intake, GLP-1, glucose and insulin response were measured. Additionally fasting blood lipids and fatty acids concentrations were measured. Sixteen piglets were randomised into two groups: L. casei W8 (1010 cfu/day) as top dressing on morning fed or no treatment. After two weeks piglets were sacrificed and tissue from ileum, jejunum and skeletal muscle were sampled for mRNA analyses of SCD1 expression. Compared to placebo, L. casei W8 did not affect appetite, ad libitum energy intake, GLP-1, glucose and insulin response and total, high-density or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels after four weeks intervention. Triacylglycerol decreased in the L. casei W8 group compared to placebo at week 4 (P=0.03). The C16:1n-7/C16:0 ratio, reflecting SCD1 activity, tended to decrease when having L. casei W8 (P=0.06) compared to placebo. Muscle SCD1 expression decreased in piglets supplemented with L. casei W8 compared to control. In conclusion, supplementation with L. casei W8 did not affect appetite parameters, glucose or insulin responses; but appear to be able to lower triacylglycerol levels, possibly by reducing its production. PMID:25245572

  4. Lectin microarray reveals binding profiles of Lactobacillus casei strains in a comprehensive analysis of bacterial cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-07-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  5. Melting curve analysis of a groEL PCR fragment for the rapid genotyping of strains belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group of species.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Ranjan; Taverniti, Valentina; Balzaretti, Silvia; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2015-04-01

    Lactobacillus casei group (Lcs) consists of three phylogenetically closely related species (L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus), which are widely used in the dairy and probiotic industrial sectors. Strategies to easily and rapidly characterize Lcs are therefore of interest. To this aim, we developed a method according to a technique known as high resolution melting analysis (HRMa), which was applied to a 150bp groEL gene fragment. The analysis was performed on 53 Lcs strains and 29 strains representatives of species that are commonly present in dairy and probiotic products and can be most probably co-isolated with Lcs strains. DNA amplification was obtained only from Lcs strains, demonstrating the specificity of the groEL primers designed in this study. The HRMa clustered Lcs strains in three groups that exactly corresponded to the species of the L. casei group. A following HRMa separated the 39 L. paracasei strains in two well distinct intraspecific groups, indicating the possible existence of at least two distinct genotypes inside the species. Nonetheless, the phenotypic characterization demonstrated that the genotypes do not correspond to the two L. paracasei subspecies, namely paracasei and tolerans. In conclusion, the melting curve analysis developed in this study is demonstrably a simple, labor-saving, and rapid strategy obtain the genotyping of a bacterial isolate and simultaneously potentially confirm its affiliation to the L. casei group of species. The application of this method to a larger collection of strains may validate the possibility to use the proposed HRMa protocol for the taxonomic discrimination of L. casei group of species. In general, this study suggests that HRMa can be a suitable technique for the genetic typization of Lactobacillus strains. PMID:25801971

  6. Regulation of Metabolic Flux in Lactobacillus casei for Lactic Acid Production by Overexpressed ldhL Gene with Two-Stage Oxygen Supply Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Long-Yun

    2015-01-28

    This study describes a novel strategy to regulate the metabolic flux for lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei. The ldhL gene encoding L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) was overexpressed in L. casei, and a two-stage oxygen supply strategy (TOS) that maintained a medium oxygen supply level during the early fermentation phase, and a low oxygen supply level in the later phase was carried out. As a consequence, a maximum L-LDH activity of 95.6 U/ml was obtained in the recombinant strain, which was over 4-fold higher than that of the initial strain. Under the TOS for L. casei (pMG-ldhL), the maximum lactic acid concentration of 159.6 g/l was obtained in 36 h, corresponding to a 62.8% increase. The results presented here provide a novel way to regulate the metabolic flux of L. casei for lactic acid production in different fermentation stages, which is available to enhance organic acid production in other strains. PMID:25179900

  7. The measurement of serum pyridoxal by a microbiological assay using Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Barbara B.; Peart, M. Barbara; Fulford-Jones, Catherine E.

    1970-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the assay of serum pyridoxal using L. casei. Bound pyridoxal phosphate in serum is converted by acid hydrolysis to pyridoxal for which this organism is specific. This method proved to be considerably more sensitive than other methods so far reported in the literature. Serum pyridoxal concentrations were measured in 151 control subjects aged 17 to 80 years. The range of concentrations found was 1·5 to 13·5 ng/ml which compared well with values obtained by most workers measuring pyridoxal phosphate by enzymatic methods. A marked fall with age was confirmed, and levels in women of childbearing age were lower than in men of comparable age. Subnormal serum pyridoxal concentrations were found in 62% of patients with sideroblastic anaemia and in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, coeliac disease, and in pregnant women at term. PMID:5420735

  8. Effects of Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Bifidobacterium breve, and oligofructose-enriched inulin on colonic nitrogen-protein metabolism in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    De Preter, Vicky; Vanhoutte, Tom; Huys, Geert; Swings, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc; Rutgeerts, Paul; Verbeke, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    Pre- and/or probiotics can cause changes in the ecological balance of intestinal microbiota and hence influence microbial metabolic activities. In the present study, the influence of oligofructose-enriched inulin (OF-IN), Lactobacillus casei Shirota, and Bifidobacterium breve Yakult on the colonic fate of NH3 and p-cresol was investigated. A randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in 20 healthy volunteers to evaluate the influence of short- and long-term administration of OF-IN, L. casei Shirota, B. breve Yakult, and the synbiotic L. casei Shirota + OF-IN. The lactose[15N,15N]ureide biomarker was used to study the colonic fate of NH3. Urine and fecal samples were analyzed for 15N content by combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometery and for p-cresol content by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RT-PCR was applied to determine the levels of total bifidobacteria. Both short- and long-term administration of OF-IN resulted in significantly decreased urinary p-cresol and 15N content. The reduction of urinary 15N excretion after short-term OF-IN intake was accompanied by a significant increase in the 15N content of the fecal bacterial fraction. However, this effect was not observed after long-term OF-IN intake. In addition, RT-PCR results indicated a significant increase in total fecal bifidobacteria after long-term OF-IN intake. Long-term L. casei Shirota and B. breve Yakult intake showed a tendency to decrease urinary 15N excretion, whereas a significant decrease was noted in p-cresol excretion. In conclusion, dietary addition of OF-IN, L. casei Shirota, and B. breve Yakult results in a favorable effect on colonic NH3 and p-cresol metabolism, which, in the case of OF-IN, was accompanied by an increase in total fecal bifidobacteria. PMID:16990449

  9. Effect of different antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serna, Alaíde; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) could cause inhibition of the growth of Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) or whether this microorganism is able to use some of them as the sole carbon source, considering that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy drink fermented with LcS could help to prevent the appearance or improve the healing of gastric ulcers. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), sodium acetylsalicylate (SAS), acetaminophen, sodium naproxen, and sodium ibuprofen were added as the sole carbon source to a basal medium and tested for biodegradation by LcS. The same NSAIDs were added in different concentrations to disks and plated on MRS Agar to test the possible inhibitory effect of these compounds on LcS. Also, the resistance of LcS to 12 different antibiotics was studied on MRS agar. None of the NSAIDs tested could be used by LcS as the sole carbon source at the assayed concentrations. In the case of the disk diffusion method, sodium naproxen showed inhibition zones for the 500-?g disks and sodium ibuprofen was inhibitory for the 250- and 500-?g disks. However, when the macrobroth dilution method was used, the growth of LcS was inhibited by ASA, SAS, acetaminophen, and sodium ibuprofen. This strain showed resistance to the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole with trimethoprim, pefloxacin, and gentamicin. This is the first study on the effect of NSAIDs on probiotic bacteria. The results of the biodegradation test indicate that the simultaneous consumption of NSAIDs and a dairy beverage with LcS is not likely to change the bioavailability of the drugs. PMID:21104082

  10. The effect of a commercial probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on oral health in healthy dentate people

    PubMed Central

    Sutula, Justyna; Coulthwaite, Lisa Ann; Thomas, Linda Valerie; Verran, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Background In the past decade, the use of probiotic-containing products has been explored as a potential alternative in oral health therapy. A widely available probiotic drink, Yakult, was evaluated for oral health applications in this longitudinal study. Selected oral health parameters, such as levels and composition of salivary and tongue plaque microbiota and of malodorous gases, in dentate healthy individuals were investigated for changes. The persistence of the probiotic strain in the oral cavity was monitored throughout the study period. Methods A three-phase study (7 weeks) was designed to investigate simultaneously the effect of 4-week consumption of the probiotic-containing milk drink Yakult on the microbiota of saliva and dorsum tongue coating in healthy dentate people (n = 22) and levels of volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) in morning breath. Study phases comprised one baseline visit, at which ‘control’ levels of oral parameters were obtained prior to the probiotic product consumption; a 4-week period of daily consumption of one 65 ml bottle of Yakult, each bottle containing a minimum of 6.5×109 viable cells of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS); and a 2-week washout period. The microbial viability and composition of saliva and tongue dorsum coating were assessed using a range of solid media. The presence of LcS in the oral cavity was investigated using a novel selective medium, ‘LcS Select’. Portable sulphur monitors Halimeter® and OralChromaTM were used to measure levels of VSCs in morning breath. Results Utilization of the LcS Select medium revealed a significant (p < 0.05) but temporary and consumption-dependent presence of LcS in saliva and tongue plaque samples from healthy dentate individuals (n = 19) during the probiotic intervention phase. LcS was undetectable with culture after 2 weeks of ceasing its consumption. Morning breath scores measured with Halimeter and OralChroma were not significantly affected throughout the trial, except in a small number of individual cases where Halimeter scores were significantly reduced during the probiotic intervention period. Natural fluctuations in resident acidogenic populations, and numbers of Candida and anaerobic species, including malodourous Gram-negative anaerobes, were unaffected. Conclusion While no broad ecological changes in the mouth were induced by consumption of Yakult in healthy dentate individuals, findings of this study confirm the temporary and intake-dependent presence of LcS. Future studies could focus on subjects at greater risk of oral infection, where ill-defined microbiota (e.g. an increased presence of periopathogens) or clinically diagnosed halitosis might be significantly affected by consumption of this probiotic. PMID:24179468

  11. Lactobacillus casei Ferments the N-Acetylglucosamine Moiety of Fucosyl-?-1,3-N-Acetylglucosamine and Excretes l-Fucose

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Rubio-del-Campo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We have previously characterized from Lactobacillus casei BL23 three ?-l-fucosidases, AlfA, AlfB, and AlfC, which hydrolyze in vitro natural fucosyl-oligosaccharides. In this work, we have shown that L. casei is able to grow in the presence of fucosyl-?-1,3-N-acetylglucosamine (Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc) as a carbon source. Interestingly, L. casei excretes the l-fucose moiety during growth on Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc, indicating that only the N-acetylglucosamine moiety is being metabolized. Analysis of the genomic sequence of L. casei BL23 shows that downstream from alfB, which encodes the ?-l-fucosidase AlfB, a gene, alfR, that encodes a transcriptional regulator is present. Divergently from alfB, three genes, alfEFG, that encode proteins with homology to the enzyme IIAB (EIIAB), EIIC, and EIID components of a mannose-class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) are present. Inactivation of either alfB or alfF abolishes the growth of L. casei on Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc. This proves that AlfB is involved in Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc metabolism and that the transporter encoded by alfEFG participates in the uptake of this disaccharide. A mutation in the PTS general component enzyme I does not eliminate the utilization of Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc, suggesting that the transport via the PTS encoded by alfEFG is not coupled to phosphorylation of the disaccharide. Transcriptional analysis with alfR and ccpA mutants shows that the two gene clusters alfBR and alfEFG are regulated by substrate-specific induction mediated by the inactivation of the transcriptional repressor AlfR and by carbon catabolite repression mediated by the catabolite control protein A (CcpA). This work reports for the first time the characterization of the physiological role of an ?-l-fucosidase in lactic acid bacteria and the utilization of Fuc-?-1,3-GlcNAc as a carbon source for bacteria. PMID:22544237

  12. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) as a new tool for the identification of species belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group and comparison with species-specific PCRs and multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Iacumin, Lucilla; Ginaldi, Federica; Manzano, Marisa; Anastasi, Veronica; Reale, Anna; Zotta, Teresa; Rossi, Franca; Coppola, Raffaele; Comi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The correct identification and characterisation of bacteria is essential for several reasons: the classification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has changed significantly over the years, and it is important to distinguish and define them correctly, according to the current nomenclature, avoiding problems in the interpretation of literature, as well as mislabelling when probiotic are used in food products. In this study, species-specific PCR and HRM (high-resolution melting) analysis were developed to identify strains belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group and to classify them into L. casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. HRM analysis confirmed to be a potent, simple, fast and economic tool for microbial identification. In particular, 201 strains, collected from International collections and attributed to the L. casei group, were examined using these techniques and the results were compared with consolidated molecular methods, already published. Seven of the tested strains don't belong to the L. casei group. Among the remaining 194 strains, 6 showed inconsistent results, leaving identification undetermined. All the applied techniques were congruent for the identification of the vast majority of the tested strains (188). Notably, for 46 of the strains, the identification differed from the previous attribution. PMID:25475306

  13. Identification and functional characterization of AclB, a novel cell-separating enzyme from Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Ting; Kong, Jian; Wang, Hui-Li

    2015-06-16

    Autolysis of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) was favorable for the development of flavor compounds during cheese manufacture. Among these bacteria, Lb. casei was regarded as the most important microbiota involved in cheese processes. In this study, a novel autolysin named AclB was identified in the genome of Lb. casei BL23 and its modular structure was predicted through bioinformatic approaches. Subsequently, its transcription profile in the exponential phase, hydrolytic activities against cell walls, enzymatic properties under different conditions, physiological function via gene inactivation and upregulation assays, as well as potential applications to NSLAB's autolysis were fully investigated. According to the results, AclB was recognized as a species-specific cell-separating enzyme, responsible for cell separation after cell division in Lb. casei BL23. The purified AclB showed considerable hydrolyzing activities towards cell walls, indicating its enzymatic nature as peptidoglycan hydrolase, or autolysin. The highest activity of AclB was determined at pH5.0 and 37°C, and the expression vector constructed based on AclB was shown to facilitate the controlled lysis of Lb. casei BL23 hosts. In summary, this study provided insight into the enzymatic properties of a novel autolysin involved in cell separation of Lb. casei BL23, which is promising to accelerate cheese ripening and improve cheese quality. PMID:25797034

  14. Recombinant fusion protein of cholera toxin B subunit with YVAD secreted by Lactobacillus casei inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1 beta secretion in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus species are used as bacterial vectors to deliver functional peptides to the intestine because they are delivered live to the intestine, colonize the mucosal surface, and continue to produce the desired protein. Previously, we generated a recombinant Lactobacillus casei secreting the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), which can translocate into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) through GM1 ganglioside. Recombinant fusion proteins of CTB with functional peptides have been used as carriers for the delivery of these peptides to IECs because of the high cell permeation capacity of recombinant CTB (rCTB). However, there have been no reports of rCTB fused with peptides expressed or secreted by Lactobacillus species. In this study, we constructed L. casei secreting a recombinant fusion protein of CTB with YVAD (rCTB–YVAD). YVAD is a tetrapeptide (tyrosine–valine–alanine–aspartic acid) that specifically inhibits caspase-1, which catalyzes the production of interleukin (IL)-1?, an inflammatory cytokine, from its inactive precursor. Here, we examined whether rCTB–YVAD secreted by L. casei binds to GM1 ganglioside and inhibits caspase-1 activation in Caco-2 cells used as a model of IECs. Results We constructed the rCTB–YVAD secretion vector pSCTB–YVAD by modifying the rCTB secretion vector pSCTB. L. casei secreting rCTB–YVAD was generated by transformation with pSCTB–YVAD. Both the culture supernatant of pSCTB–YVAD-transformed L. casei and purified rCTB–YVAD bound to GM1 ganglioside, as did the culture supernatant of pSCTB-transformed L. casei and purified rCTB. Interestingly, although both purified rCTB–YVAD and rCTB translocated into Caco-2 cells, regardless of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), only purified rCTB–YVAD but not rCTB inhibited LPS-induced caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1? secretion in Caco-2 cells, without affecting cell viability. Conclusions The rCTB protein fused to a functional peptide secreted by L. casei can bind to GM1 ganglioside, like rCTB, and recombinant YVAD secreted by L. casei may exert anti-inflammatory effects in the intestine. Therefore, rCTB secreted by L. casei has potential utility as a vector for the delivery of YVAD to IECs. PMID:24884459

  15. The efficacy of ampicillin and Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus in the active management of preterm premature rupture of membranes remote from term

    PubMed Central

    Kavak, Salih Burcin; Kavak, Ebru; Ilhan, Rasit; Atilgan, Remzi; Arat, Ozgur; Deveci, Ugur; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the treatment efficacy of ampicillin prophylaxis accompanied by Lactobacillus casei rhamnosus over the latency period following preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Methods Records of 40 patients who presented with PPROM between 230/7–316/7 weeks were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n=20), treated with ampicillin; and group 2 (n=20), treated with ampicillin plus L. casei rhamnosus. Clinical and laboratory parameters were compared. Delta (?) values of each laboratory parameter were calculated by subtracting the value at delivery from the values at admission to the clinic. Results Gestational weeks at delivery (28.1±0.3 weeks versus 31.5±0.4 weeks), latency periods (12.3±1.5 days versus 41.4±4.4 days), 5-minute APGAR scores (6.8±0.1 versus 7.8±0.1), and birth weights (1,320±98 g versus 1,947±128 g) were significantly higher in group 2. White blood cell (WBC) (12,820±353/mm3 versus 11,107±298/mm3), and neutrophil counts (10.7±0.5×103/L versus 8.2±0.5×103/L) were significantly lower in group 2 at delivery. The ?WBC (2,295±74/mm3 versus ?798±?406/mm3), ?C-reactive protein (5±0.04 mg/L versus 1.6±0.2 mg/L), and ?neutrophil (3±0.2×103/L versus 0.2±?0.1×103/L) were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion It seems that addition of L. casei rhamnosus to ampicillin prolongs the latency period in patients with PPROM remote from term. PMID:25210439

  16. A prospective uncontrolled trial of fermented milk drink containing viable Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota in the treatment of HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Toshio; Saito, Mineki; Usuku, Koichiro; Nose, Hirohisa; Izumo, Shuji; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    2005-10-15

    Ten patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) were treated in an uncontrolled preliminary trial by oral administration of viable Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) containing fermented milk. HTLV-1 provirus load, motor function, neurological findings, and immunological parameters were evaluated after 4 weeks. Although LcS did not change the frequencies or absolute numbers of all the examined cell surface phenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, NK cell activity was significantly increased after 4 weeks of oral administration of LcS preparation. Improvements in spasticity (modified Ashworth Scale scores) and urinary symptoms were also seen after LcS treatment. No adverse effect was observed in all the 10 patients throughout the study period. Our results indicated that LcS may be a safe and beneficial agent for the treatment of HAM/TSP; therefore randomized controlled studies are warranted. PMID:15961107

  17. SpaCBA sequence instability and its relationship to the adhesion efficiency of Lactobacillus casei group isolates to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Corinna; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka; Borkowska, Monika; Schmidt, Marcin T

    2014-01-01

    The ability to adhere to enterocytes is one of the key features of probiotics. This process involves a number of factors, among which the important role of pili was demonstrated. Some Lactobacillus species are confirmed to have heterotrimeric spaCBA type pili. The aim of this study was to identify spaCBA pili in strains of selected Lactobacillus spp. and assess the impact of their presence and sequence polymorphism on the adhesion of these strains to enterocytes. Total 20 bacterial strains of L. rhamnosus, L. casei and L. paracasei were tested. The presence of pilus specific proteins coding genes spaA, spaB and spaC was verified by PCR in order to identify the presence of sequence polymorphism in the genes possibly affecting the structure of the spaCBA pilus. To correlate spaCBA polymorphism to adhesion capability the adhesion assay was carried out using Caco-2 cell line. The effectiveness of the adhesion was measured using a scintillation counter. The Lactobacillus strains analyzed showed the adhesion to Caco-2 enterocytes capability from 0.6% to 19.6%. The presence of spaCBA pili is a factor increasing the adhesion efficiency of Lactobacillus spp. to Caco-2 enterocytes. Lack of these structures on the surface of bacterial cells results in the reduction in adhesion efficiency, indicating its important role in the adhesion process. But not in all cases the correlation between the presence of protein spaCBA structures and adhesion efficiency was observed, what may indicate the important role of other factors in adhesion of analyzed strains to Caco-2 cells. PMID:24927238

  18. Effect of growth conditions on production of rhamnose-containing cell wall and capsular polysaccharides by strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Wicken, A J; Ayres, A; Campbell, L K; Knox, K W

    1983-01-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus possessing two cell wall polysaccharides, a hexosamine-containing H-polysaccharide and a rhamnose-containing R-polysaccharide, were examined for the effect of growth conditions on the production of these two components. In strain NCTC 6375, R- and H-polysaccharides accounted for an estimated 44 and 20%, respectively, of the cell wall for organisms grown in batch culture with glucose as the carbohydrate source. Growth on fructose-containing media reduced the amount of R-polysaccharide by approximately 50% without affecting the amount of H-polysaccharide. Subculture of fructose-grown organisms in glucose restored the original proportions of the two polysaccharides. Galactose- and sucrose-grown cells behaved similarly to glucose-grown cells with respect to polysaccharide production, whereas growth in rhamnose or ribose showed values close to those for fructose-grown cells. Continuous culture of strain NCTC 6375 for more than 100 generations showed a gradual and irreversible reduction of the R-polysaccharide to less than 5% of the cell wall and an increase of the H-polysaccharide to 40% of the cell wall. Other type culture strains of L. casei subsp. rhamnosus, NCIB 7473 and ATCC 7469, behaved similarly in batch and continuous culture. In contrast, strains of L. casei subsp. rhamnosus isolated at the Institute of Dental Research showed phenotypic stability with respect to the relative proportions of R- and H-polysaccharides in both batch and continuous culture. Changes in polysaccharide composition of type culture strains were also mirrored in changes in the immunogenicity of the two components and resistance to the rate of enzymic lysis of whole organisms. For L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strain NCTC 10302 the R-polysaccharide is present entirely as capsular material. The amount of R-polysaccharide produced was also markedly dependent on the carbohydrate component of the medium in batch culture and both dilution rate and nature of the limiting carbohydrate in continuous culture, varying over a 10-fold range, whereas the cell wall H-polysaccharide remained constant. PMID:6401290

  19. Utilization of d-Ribitol by Lactobacillus casei BL23 Requires a Mannose-Type Phosphotransferase System and Three Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bourand, A.; Yebra, M. J.; Boël, G.; Mazé, A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains 64H and BL23, but not ATCC 334, are able to ferment d-ribitol (also called d-adonitol). However, a BL23-derived ptsI mutant lacking enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was not able to utilize this pentitol, suggesting that strain BL23 transports and phosphorylates d-ribitol via a PTS. We identified an 11-kb region in the genome sequence of L. casei strain BL23 (LCABL_29160 to LCABL_29270) which is absent from strain ATCC 334 and which contains the genes for a GlpR/IolR-like repressor, the four components of a mannose-type PTS, and six metabolic enzymes potentially involved in d-ribitol metabolism. Deletion of the gene encoding the EIIB component of the presumed ribitol PTS indeed prevented d-ribitol fermentation. In addition, we overexpressed the six catabolic genes, purified the encoded enzymes, and determined the activities of four of them. They encode a d-ribitol-5-phosphate (d-ribitol-5-P) 2-dehydrogenase, a d-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase, a d-ribose-5-P isomerase, and a d-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase. In the first catabolic step, the protein d-ribitol-5-P 2-dehydrogenase uses NAD+ to oxidize d-ribitol-5-P formed during PTS-catalyzed transport to d-ribulose-5-P, which, in turn, is converted to d-xylulose-5-P by the enzyme d-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase. Finally, the resulting d-xylulose-5-P is split by d-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase in an inorganic phosphate-requiring reaction into acetylphosphate and the glycolytic intermediate d-glyceraldehyde-3-P. The three remaining enzymes, one of which was identified as d-ribose-5-P-isomerase, probably catalyze an alternative ribitol degradation pathway, which might be functional in L. casei strain 64H but not in BL23, because one of the BL23 genes carries a frameshift mutation. PMID:23564164

  20. Determination of the folate content in cladodes of nopal (Opuntia ficus indica) by microbiological assay utilizing Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 7469) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Escobar, Tania Breshkovskaya; Valverde-González, Maria Elena; Paredes-López, Octavio

    2010-05-26

    Prickly pear cactus has been an important food source in Mexico since ancient times due to its economical and ecological benefits and potential nutraceutical value. Nevertheless, studies on the nutritional aspects and health benefits have been scarce. The purpose of this study was to assess, apparently for the first time, the folate contents of cladodes of nopal by a microbiological assay, using Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 7469) in extracts that were enzymatically treated to release the bound vitamin, employing single, dual, and trienzymatic procedures, and using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We used Opuntia cladodes of different length sizes. The microbiological assay showed some differences among enzyme treatments and sizes of nopal; the trienzyme treatment (alpha-amylase-protease-conjugase) was more efficient in determining the folate content in nopal, giving 5.0 ng/g in the small size cladodes at 54 h of testing time, while ELISA showed no significant differences in the folate content among sizes of cladodes (5.5-5.62 ng/g at 0 min testing time). Both techniques may be used for the assessment of folate content in cladodes, but ELISA is more rapid and reliable. PMID:20441169

  1. Assembly of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid in Lactobacillus casei: mutants deficient in the D-alanyl ester content of this amphiphile

    SciTech Connect

    Ntamere, A.S.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1987-04-01

    D-Alanyl-lipoteichoic acid (D-alanyl-LTA) from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 contains a poly(glycerophosphate) moiety that is acylated with D-alanyl ester residues. The physiological function of these residues is not well understood. Five mutant strains of this organism that are deficient in the esters of this amphiphile were isolated and characterized. When compared with the parent, strains AN-1 and AN-4 incorporated less than 10% of D-(/sup 14/C)alanine into LTA, whereas AN-2, AN-3, and AN-5 incorporated 50%. The synthesis of D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA was virtually absent in the first group and was approximately 30% in the second group. The mutant strains synthesized and selected the glycolipid anchor for LTA assembly. In addition, all of the strains synthesized the poly(glycerophosphate) moiety of LTA to the same extent as did the parent or to a greater extent. It was concluded that the membranes from the mutant strains AN-1 and AN-4 are defective for D-alanylation of LTA even though acceptor LTA is present. Mutant strains AN-2 and AN-3 appear to be partially deficient in the amount of the D-alanine-activating enzyme. Aberrant morphology and defective cell separation appear to result from this deficiency in D-alanyl ester content.

  2. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Classic Swine Fever Virus CD8+ T Lymphocyte Epitope and Porcine Parvovirus VP2 Antigen Coexpressed by Lactobacillus casei in Swine via Oral Vaccination ?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yigang; Cui, Lichun; Tian, Changyong; Zhang, Guocai; Huo, Guicheng; Tang, Lijie; Li, Yijing

    2011-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) are highly contagious pathogens, resulting in enormous economic losses in pig industries worldwide. Because vaccines play an important role in disease control, researchers are seeking improved vaccines that could induce antiviral immune responses against CSFV and PPV at the mucosal and systemic levels simultaneously. In this study, a genetically engineered Lactobacillus strain coexpressing the CSFV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope 290 and the VP2 antigen of PPV was developed, and its immunopotentiating capacity as an oral vaccine in pigs was analyzed. The data demonstrated that in the absence of any adjuvant, the recombinant Lactobacillus strain can efficiently stimulate mucosal and systemic CSFV-specific CD8+ CTL responses to protect pigs against CSFV challenge. Moreover, anti-PPV-VP2 serum IgG and mucosal IgA were induced in pigs immunized orally with the recombinant Lactobacillus strain, showing a neutralizing effect on PPV infection. The results suggest that the recombinant Lactobacillus microecological agent may be a valuable component of a strategy for development of a vaccine against CSFV and PPV. PMID:21940406

  3. Production of a Heterologous Nonheme Catalase by Lactobacillus casei: an Efficient Tool for Removal of H2O2 and Protection of Lactobacillus bulgaricus from Oxidative Stress in Milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatiana Rochat; Jean-Jacques Gratadoux; Alexandra Gruss; Gerard Corthier; Emmanuelle Maguin; Philippe Langella; Maarten van de Guchte

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to H2O2, a compound that they can paradoxically produce themselves, as is the case for Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14431 is one of the very few LAB strains able to degrade H2O2 through the action of a nonheme, manganese-dependent catalase (hereafter called MnKat). The MnKat gene was expressed in three catalase-deficient LAB

  4. Influence of a probiotic Lactobacillus casei strain on the colonisation with potential pathogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus in the nasopharyngeal space of healthy men with a low baseline NK cell activity.

    PubMed

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Seifert, Stephanie; Kramlich, Jeannette; Bub, Achim; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Watzl, Bernhard

    2014-11-23

    The effect of a daily intake of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) on the colonisation of pathogens, specifically streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, in the nose and throat of healthy human volunteers with low natural killer cell activity, was investigated in a randomised and controlled intervention study. The study consisted of a 2-week run-in phase, followed by a 4-week intervention phase. The probiotic treatment group received a fermented milk drink with LcS, while the placebo group received an equally composed milk drink without the probiotic additive. To isolate potential pathogenic streptococci and Staph. aureus, samples from the pharynx, as well as of both middle nasal meati, were taken, once after the run-in phase and once at the end of the intervention phase. Isolated bacteria were identified as either Staph. aureus and ?- or ?-haemolytic streptococci in a polyphasic taxonomical approach based on phenotypic tests, amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis genotyping, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representative strains. Salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) was used as marker of protective mucosal immunity to evaluate whether LcS treatment influenced SIgA production. No statistically significant effect could be determined for intervention with LcS on the incidence of Staph. aureus in the nasal space, Staph. aureus in the pharyngeal space or for ?-haemolytic streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the pharyngeal space. Thus, the intervention did not influence the nasopharyngeal colonisation with Gram-positive potential pathogens. Production of salivary SIgA as a potential means of microbiota modulation was also not affected. PMID:25416927

  5. Effects of biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus casei on gtfB, gtfC, and ftf gene expression level in S. mutans by real-time RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Omid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Kamali, Sara; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Eslami, Gilda; Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Salehi, Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Streptococci are the pioneer strains in plaque formation and Streptococcus mutans are the main etiological agent of dental plaque and caries. In general, biofilm formation is a step-wise process, which begins by adhesion of planktonic cells to the surfaces. Evidences show that expression of glucosyltransferase B and C (gtfB and gtfC) and fructosyltransferase (ftf) genes play critical role in initial adhesion of S. mutans to the tooth surface which results in formation of dental plaques and consequently caries and other periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of biosurfactants produced by a probiotic strain; Lactobacillus casei (ATCC39392) on gene expression profile of gftB/C and tft of S. mutans (ATCC35668) using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: The application of the prepared biosurfactant caused dramatic down regulation of all the three genes under study. The reduction in gene expression was statistically highly significant (for gtfB, P > 0.0002; for gtfC, P > 0.0063, and for ftf, P > 0.0057). Conclusion: Considerable downregulation of all three genes in the presence of the prepared biosurfactant comparing to untreated controls is indicative of successful inhibition of influential genes in bacterial adhesion phenomena. In view of the importance of glucosyltransferase gene products for S.mutans attachment to the tooth surface which is the initial important step in biofilm production and dental caries, further research in this field may lead to an applicable alternative for successful with least adverse side effects in dental caries prevention. PMID:25538917

  6. [Biological effect of extracellular peptide factor from Lateococcus japonicas subsp. casei on probiotic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Kharchenko, N V; Novikova, T M; Cherdyntseva, T A

    2014-01-01

    The biological effect of the extracellular peptide reactivating factor (RF) from Luteococcus casei on cells of probiotic cultures was studied. The RF showed the protective and reactivating effects on the Bifidobacterium bifidum cells under the action of bile salts and an acidic stress. Also, it acted as a cryoprotector during lyophilisation and long-term culture storage. The RF and the L. casei culture liquid (CL) were shown to have bifidogenic properties. The degree of protection and reactivation of lactic-acid bacteria under the action of bile salts depended on the particular strain properties. The maximum degree of protection (more than thirteen-fold) and reactivation (close to three-fold) was found in Lactobacillus casei, while the minimum values were characteristic of Lactobacillus reuterii. The resistance of lactobacilli to bile was increased in the row of L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, and L. reuterii correlating with the RF protection degree. PMID:25707114

  7. A comparative study and phage typing of silage-making Lactobacillus bacteriophages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsumi Doi; Ye Zhang; Yousuke Nishizaki; Akiko Umeda; Sadahiro Ohmomo; Seiya Ogata

    2003-01-01

    To investigate basic characteristics of 10 virulent phages active on silage-making lactobacilli, morphological properties, host ranges, protein composition and genome characterization were separated into five groups based on host ranges and basic properties. The seven phages of groups I, II and V were active on Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus. Phage ?PY4 (group III) infected both L. casei and Lactobacillus

  8. Diversity of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in feces of herbivores, omnivores and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Futagawa-Endo, Yuka; Dicks, Leon M T

    2010-12-01

    The Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium population in the feces of 26 animals (16 species) were studied by culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. Lactobacilli were detected from a few herbivores, all carnivores and some omnivores. Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus salivarius, Lactobacillus vaginalis and Lactobacillus ingluviei were the most dominant lactobacilli in carnivores. These species were, however, not predominant in herbivores and omnivores. Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, usually present in raw plant material, were present in omnivores but not in carnivores. Bifidobacteria were detected in only four herbivores and two omnivores. Bifidobacterium pseudolongum was the only Bifidobacterium species detected in herbivores. Bifidobacteria detected in the two omnivores are phylogenetically not closely related to known species and are possible novel species in the genus. PMID:21034840

  9. In vitro evaluation of the probiotic and functional potential of Lactobacillus strains isolated from fermented food and human intestine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dayong; Li, Chang; Qin, Yanqing; Yin, Ronglan; Du, Shouwen; Ye, Fei; Liu, Cunxia; Liu, Hongfeng; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Jin, Ningyi

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the functional and probiotic characteristics of eight indigenous Lactobacillus strains in vitro. The selected lactobacilli include strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salicinius, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. All strains tolerated both pH 2 for 3 h and 1% bile salt for 24 h. The strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 were the most adhesive strains producing the highest quantity of EPS. Although a wide variation in the ability of the eight strains to deplete cholesterol and nitrite, antagonize pathogens, scavenge free radical, and stimulate innate immune response were observed, the strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 showed the widest range of these useful traits. Taken together, the strains CICC 23174 and CGMCC 1.557 exhibited the best probiotic properties with the potential for use in the production of probiotic fermented foods. PMID:25046742

  10. Lactobacillus saniviri sp. nov. and Lactobacillus senioris sp. nov., isolated from human faeces.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kaihei; Kudo, Yuko; Watanabe, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    Two Gram-stain-positive strains, YIT 12363(T) and YIT 12364(T), were isolated from human faeces. They were rod-shaped, non-motile, asporogenous, facultatively anaerobic and did not exhibit catalase activity. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA, pheS and rpoA gene sequences demonstrated that the novel strains were members of the genus Lactobacillus. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the type strains of Lactobacillus casei (95.3% similarity), Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (95.6%), Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans (95.3%) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (95.4%) were the closest neighbours to strain YIT 12363(T). For strain YIT 12364(T), the highest similarity values were observed with the type strains of Lactobacillus diolivorans, Lactobacillus parafarraginis and Lactobacillus rapi (95.8, 96.0 and 96.0%, respectively). Phenotypic and genotypic features demonstrated that these strains each represent a separate novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, and the names Lactobacillus saniviri sp. nov. (type strain YIT 12363(T)=JCM 17471(T)=DSM 24301(T)) and Lactobacillus senioris sp. nov. (type strain YIT 12364(T)=JCM 17472(T)=DSM 24302(T)), respectively, are proposed. PMID:21515698

  11. Stable integration and expression of heterologous genes in several lactobacilli using an integration vector constructed from the integrase and attP sequences of phage ?AT3 isolated from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Fen; Lo, Ta-Chun; Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2013-04-01

    An integration vector capable of stably integrating and maintaining in the chromosomes of several lactobacilli over hundreds of generations has been constructed. The major integration machinery used is based on the ?AT3 integrase (int) and attP sequences determined previously. A novel core sequence located at the 3' end of the tRNA(leu) gene is identified in Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 14931 as the integration target by the integration vector though most of such sequences found in other lactobacilli are similar to that determined previously. Due to the lack of an appropriate attB site in Lactococcus lactis MG1363, the integration vector is found to be unable to integrate into the chromosome of the strain. However, such integration can be successfully restored by cotransforming the integration vector with a replicative one harboring both attB and erythromycin resistance sequences into the strain. Furthermore, the integration vector constructed carries a promoter region of placT from the chromosome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus TCELL-1 which is used to express green fluorescence and luminance protein genes in the lactobacilli studied. PMID:23064454

  12. Molecular analysis and clinical significance of Lactobacillus spp. recovered from clinical specimens presumptively associated with disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raquel M; Hulten, Kristina G; Bui, Uyen; Clarridge, Jill E

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus spp. are part of the normal human flora and are generally assumed to be nonpathogenic. We determined the genotypic identification of >100 Lactobacillus isolates from clinical specimens in the context of presumed pathogenic potential (e.g., recovered as the single/predominant isolate from a sterile site or at ?10(5) CFU/ml from urine). This study assessed the clinical significance and the frequency of occurrence of each Lactobacillus sp. We identified 16 species of Lactobacillus by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, 10 of which could not be associated with disease. While Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Lactobacillus paracasei were associated with infections, L. gasseri was also a common colonizing/contaminating species. Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii were associated with at least one infection. Species commonly used in probiotic products (e.g., L. rhamnosus and L. casei) were identical, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, to our isolates associated with disease. Human isolates of Lactobacillus spp. have differing site associations and levels of clinical significance. Knowing the niche and pathogenic potential of each Lactobacillus sp. can be of importance to both clinical microbiology and the food and probiotic supplement industry. PMID:24131686

  13. Molecular Analysis and Clinical Significance of Lactobacillus spp. Recovered from Clinical Specimens Presumptively Associated with Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Raquel M.; Hulten, Kristina G.; Bui, Uyen

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus spp. are part of the normal human flora and are generally assumed to be nonpathogenic. We determined the genotypic identification of >100 Lactobacillus isolates from clinical specimens in the context of presumed pathogenic potential (e.g., recovered as the single/predominant isolate from a sterile site or at ?105 CFU/ml from urine). This study assessed the clinical significance and the frequency of occurrence of each Lactobacillus sp. We identified 16 species of Lactobacillus by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, 10 of which could not be associated with disease. While Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Lactobacillus paracasei were associated with infections, L. gasseri was also a common colonizing/contaminating species. Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii were associated with at least one infection. Species commonly used in probiotic products (e.g., L. rhamnosus and L. casei) were identical, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, to our isolates associated with disease. Human isolates of Lactobacillus spp. have differing site associations and levels of clinical significance. Knowing the niche and pathogenic potential of each Lactobacillus sp. can be of importance to both clinical microbiology and the food and probiotic supplement industry. PMID:24131686

  14. Oxygen-Dependent Regulation of the Expression of the Catalase Gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTIAN HERTEL; GUDRUN SCHMIDT; MARC FISCHER; KATJA OELLERS; WALTER P. HAMMES

    1998-01-01

    The catalase gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli UM2, Lactobacillus casei LK1, and Lactobacillus curvatus LTH1432. The last host is a catalase-deficient plasmid-cured derivative of a starter organism used in meat fermentation. The regulation of katA expression was found to be the same in L. sakei LTH677 and the recombinant strains. The addition

  15. Detection, partial purification and characterization of bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 isolated from freshwater fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiba Prosad Banerjee; Krushna Chandra Dora; Supratim Chowdhury

    Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 was isolated from freshwater fish, capable of producing bacteriocin that had broad spectrum of inhibition (3200 AU\\/ml)\\u000a against Escherichia coli MTCC 1563, Enterococcus faecalis MTCC 2729, Lactobacillus casei MTCC 1423, Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The antimicrobial activity of crude supernatant fluid was stable after heating at 121 °C for 60 min and declined\\u000a thereafter. Stability

  16. Molecular characterization of Lactobacillus plantarum DMDL 9010, a strain with efficient nitrite degradation capacity.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yong-tao; Liu, Dong-mei; Luo, Tong-hui; Chen, Gu; Wu, Hui; Li, Li; Yu, Yi-gang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites commonly found in food, especially in fermented vegetables, are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. A Lactobacillus strain (Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010) was previously isolated from fermented vegetables by our group, and is not yet fully characterized. A number of phenotypical and genotypical approaches were employed to characterize Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010. Its nitrite degradation capacity was compared with four other Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 719, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricu 1.83, Streptococcus thermophilus 1.204, and lactobacillus plantarum 8140, on MRS medium. Compared to these four Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had a significantly higher nitrite degradation capacity (P<0.001). Based on 16S rDNA sequencing and sequence comparison, Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 was identified as either Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus pentosus. To further identify this strain, the flanking regions (922 bp and 806 bp upstream and downstream, respectively) of the L-lactate dehydrogenase 1 (L-ldh1) gene were amplified and sequenced. Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had 98.92 and 76.98% sequence identity in the upstream region with L. plantarum WCFS1 and L. pentosus IG1, respectively, suggesting that Lactobacillu sp. DMDL 9010 is an L. plantarum strain. It was therefore named L. plantarum DMDL 9010. Our study provides a platform for genetic engineering of L. plantarum DMDL 9010, in order to further improve its nitrite degradation capacity. PMID:25423449

  17. Molecular Characterization of Lactobacillus plantarum DMDL 9010, a Strain with Efficient Nitrite Degradation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yong-tao; Liu, Dong-mei; Luo, Tong-hui; Chen, Gu; Wu, Hui; Li, Li; Yu, Yi-gang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites commonly found in food, especially in fermented vegetables, are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. A Lactobacillus strain (Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010) was previously isolated from fermented vegetables by our group, and is not yet fully characterized. A number of phenotypical and genotypical approaches were employed to characterize Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010. Its nitrite degradation capacity was compared with four other Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 719, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricu 1.83, Streptococcus thermophilus 1.204, and lactobacillus plantarum 8140, on MRS medium. Compared to these four Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had a significantly higher nitrite degradation capacity (P<0.001). Based on 16S rDNA sequencing and sequence comparison, Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 was identified as either Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus pentosus. To further identify this strain, the flanking regions (922 bp and 806 bp upstream and downstream, respectively) of the L-lactate dehydrogenase 1 (L-ldh1) gene were amplified and sequenced. Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had 98.92 and 76.98% sequence identity in the upstream region with L. plantarum WCFS1 and L. pentosus IG1, respectively, suggesting that Lactobacillu sp. DMDL 9010 is an L. plantarum strain. It was therefore named L. plantarum DMDL 9010. Our study provides a platform for genetic engineering of L. plantarum DMDL 9010, in order to further improve its nitrite degradation capacity. PMID:25423449

  18. Characteristics of bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus LA1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajiv I Dave; Nagendra P Shah

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriocin produced by L. acidophilus LA-1 (referred to as acidophilicin LA-1) was studied. Acidophilicin LA-1 was active against seven strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii sp. bulgaricus (2501, 2505, 1515, 2517, 2519, LB-3 and LB-4), one strain each of L. casei (2603), L. helveticus (2700) and L. jugurti (2819), but not against other lactic acid bacteria. The production of bacteriocin occurred

  19. Viability of commercial probiotic cultures (L. acidophilus, Bifidobacterium sp., L. casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus) in cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Kailasapathy, Kasipathy; Tran, Lai

    2006-04-25

    Six batches of cheddar cheese were manufactured containing different combinations of commercially available probiotic cultures from three suppliers. Duplicate cheeses contained the organisms of each supplier, a Bifidobacterium spp. (each supplier), a Lactobacillus acidophilus (2 suppliers), and either Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, or Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Using selective media, the different strains were assessed for viability during cheddar cheese maturation over 32 weeks. The Bifidobacterium sp. remained at high numbers with the three strains being present in cheese at 4 x 10(7), 1.4 x 10(8), and 5 x 10(8) CFU/g after 32 weeks. Similarly the L. casei (2 x 10(7) CFU/g), L. paracasei (1.6 x 10(7) CFU/g), and L. rhamnosus (9 x 10(8) CFU/g) strains survived well; however, the L. acidophilus strains performed poorly with both decreasing in a similar manner to be present at 3.6 x 10(3) CFU/g and 4.9 x 10(3) CFU/g after 32 weeks. This study indicates that cheddar cheese is a good vehicle for a variety of commercial probiotics but survival of L. acidophilus strains will need to be improved. PMID:16478637

  20. Performance in nondairy drinks of probiotic L. casei strains usually employed in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Mario; Cárdenas, Pamela; Staffolani, Martín; Ciappini, María C; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    The increase in vegetarianism as dietary habit and the increased allergy episodes against dairy proteins fuel the demand for probiotics in nondairy products. Lactose intolerance and the cholesterol content of dairy products can also be considered two additional reasons why some consumers are looking for probiotics in other foods. We aimed at determining cell viability in nondairy drinks and resistance to simulated gastric digestion of commercial probiotic lactobacilli commonly used in dairy products. Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and L. casei BGP 93 were added to different commercial nondairy drinks and viability and resistance to simulated gastric digestion (pH 2.5, 90 min, 37 °C) were monitored along storage (5 and 20 °C). For both strains, at least one nondairy drink was found to offer cell counts around 7 log orders until the end of the storage period. Changes in resistance to simulated gastric digestion were observed as well. Commercial probiotic cultures of L. casei can be added to commercial fruit juices after a carefull selection of the product that warrants cell viability. The resistance to simulated gastric digestion is an easy-to-apply in vitro tool that may contribute to product characterization and may help in the choice of the food matrix when no changes in cell viability are observed along storage. Sensorial evaluation is mandatory before marketing since the product type and storage conditions might influence the sensorial properties of the product due to the possibility of growth and lactic acid production by probiotic bacteria. PMID:23527588

  1. Characterisation and preliminary lipid-lowering evaluation of Lactobacillus isolated from a traditional Serbian dairy product.

    PubMed

    Zaviši?, G; Risti?, S; Petrièevi?, S; Novakovi? Jovanovi?, J; Jana? Petkovi?, B; Strahini?, I; Piperski, V

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the potential probiotic properties of indigenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Serbian homemade cheese. Seventeen LAB strains were isolated and characterised using standard protocols. One of the strains showed several probiotic properties: survival at low pH and in bile salts solution, antimicrobial activity, susceptibility to antibiotics and adhesion to hexodecane. DNA analysis identified the isolate as Lactobacillus casei, hereafter named L. casei 5s. The lipid lowering effect of L. casei 5s was evaluated in vivo using a hyperlipidemic rat model. Orally administered L. casei 5s significantly decreased the elevated total serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and attenuated macro vesicular steatosis in the liver. Moreover, L. casei 5s improved the intestinal microbial balance in favour of lactobacilli, while decreasing the number of Escherichia coli cells. The bacteria were re-isolated and identified from the surface of the intestinal mucosa and from the faecal samples of treated animals, indicating adhesiveness and colonisation ability. The results of an acute oral toxicity study in mice and the absence of translocation to other organs demonstrated the safety of the strain. In conclusion, L. casei 5s demonstrated promising probiotic potential and might be a good candidate for more detailed investigations. PMID:24889894

  2. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of Fecal Lactobacillus Species in Infants Receiving a Prebiotic Infant Formula

    PubMed Central

    Haarman, Monique; Knol, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The developing intestinal microbiota of breast-fed infants is considered to play an important role in the priming of the infants' mucosal and systemic immunity. Generally, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus predominate the microbiota of breast-fed infants. In intervention trials it has been shown that lactobacilli can exert beneficial effects on, for example, diarrhea and atopy. However, the Lactobacillus species distribution in breast-fed or formula-fed infants has not yet been determined in great detail. For accurate enumeration of different lactobacilli, duplex 5? nuclease assays, targeted on rRNA intergenic spacer regions, were developed for Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The designed and validated assays were used to determine the amounts of different Lactobacillus species in fecal samples of infants receiving a standard formula (SF) or a standard formula supplemented with galacto- and fructo-oligosaccharides in a 9:1 ratio (OSF). A breast-fed group (BF) was studied in parallel as a reference. During the 6-week intervention period a significant increase was shown in total percentage of fecal lactobacilli in the BF group (0.8% ± 0.3% versus 4.1% ± 1.5%) and the OSF group (0.8% ± 0.3% versus 4.4% ± 1.4%). The Lactobacillus species distribution in the OSF group was comparable to breast-fed infants, with relatively high levels of L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, and L. casei. The SF-fed infants, on the other hand, contained more L. delbrueckii and less L. paracasei compared to breast-fed infants and OSF-fed infants. An infant milk formula containing a specific mixture of prebiotics is able to induce a microbiota that closely resembles the microbiota of BF infants. PMID:16597930

  3. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements. PMID:23764214

  4. Endocarditis of the native aortic valve caused by Lactobacillus jensenii.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Soumya; Davila, Carlos Daniel; Chennupati, Anupama; Rubin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram-positive anaerobic rods or coccobacilli, commonly found as commensals in human mucosa. Rarely, they can cause serious infections such as infective endocarditis (IE), and the most frequently implicated species causing serious infections are L. casei and L. rhamnosus. IE caused by Lactobacillus jensenii is very rare, with only six reported cases so far, to the best of our knowledge. We present a case of native aortic valve endocarditis caused by L. jensenii, complicated by root abscess and complete heart block, and requiring emergent surgical intervention. PMID:25750218

  5. Probiotic features of two oral Lactobacillus isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zavisic, Gordana; Petricevic, Sasa; Radulovic, Zeljka; Begovic, Jelena; Golic, Natasa; Topisirovic, Ljubisa; Strahinic, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we checked lactobacilli strains of human origin for their potential as probiotic. Samples were collected from oral mucosa of 16 healthy individuals, out of which twenty isolates were obtained and two of them were selected and identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (G1) and L. casei (G3). Both isolates exhibited antagonistic action towards pathogenic microorganisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella abony, and Clostridium sporogenes, but not on the growth of Candida albicans. The bacteriocin activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6358-P was shown only by L. plantarum G1. Moreover, the isolates G1 and G3 showed good viability in the acid gastric environment and in the gut environment containing bovine bile salts. The viability of G1 and G3 isolates in the gastrointestinal tract, and the adhesion to the intestinal mucosa were also confirmed in vivo. The biochemical tests of blood samples revealed lower levels of serum triglycerides and cholesterol, as well as reduced activity of alkaline phosphatase in all lactobacilli-treated Wistar rats, compared to control ones. No toxicity for NMRI Ham mice was observed. According to our experimental results, these findings imply that L. plantarum G1 and L. casei G3 could be characterized as potential probiotics. PMID:24031847

  6. Production of Succinic Acid from Citric Acid and Related Acids by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kaneuchi, Choji; Seki, Masako; Komagata, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    A number of Lactobacillus strains produced succinic acid in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth to various extents. Among 86 fresh isolates from fermented cane molasses in Thailand, 30 strains (35%) produced succinic acid; namely, 23 of 39 Lactobacillus reuteri strains, 6 of 18 L. cellobiosus strains, and 1 of 6 unidentified strains. All of 10 L. casei subsp. casei strains, 5 L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strains, 6 L. mali strains, and 2 L. buchneri strains did not produce succinic acid. Among 58 known strains including 48 type strains of different Lactobacillus species, the strains of L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. parvus produced succinic acid to the same extent as the most active fresh isolates, and those of L. alimentarius, L. collinoides, L. farciminis, L. fructivorans (1 of 2 strains tested), L. malefermentans, and L. reuteri were also positive, to lesser extents. Diammonium citrate in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth was determined as a precursor of the succinic acid produced. Production rates were about 70% on a molar basis with two fresh strains tested. Succinic acid was also produced from fumaric and malic acids but not from dl-isocitric, ?-ketoglutaric, and pyruvic acids. The present study is considered to provide the first evidence on the production of succinic acid, an important flavoring substance in dairy products and fermented beverages, from citrate by lactobacilli. PMID:16347795

  7. Fermentation adaptability of three probiotic Lactobacillus strains to oat, germinated oat and malted oat substrates.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ponce, A; Nevárez-Morillón, G; Ortega-Rívas, E; Pérez-Vega, S; Salmerón, I

    2014-10-01

    Functional foods targeting the improvement of gastrointestinal health are widely recognized; of these, dairy-based probiotics are the most popular. Thus, the design of nondairy probiotics applying fruits, vegetables and cereals has raised great interest in the healthy food sector. The objective of this work was to assess the potential of germinated and malted oat substrates to support the growth of the probiotic cultures Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Fermentations were carried out with distinctive oat substrates at inoculum levels of 3, 5 and 7% v/v, substrate concentrations of 3, 5 and 7% w/v and with sucrose addition 1·5% w/v. Lag phase profiles, maximum growth rates and maximal growths were evaluated; protein and sugar contents were also quantified. There was no significant effect (P > 0·05) of the inoculum size on the fermentation kinetics; however, oat media significantly affected the growth kinetics. In simple oat media, Lact. acidophilus exhibited biphasic growth patterns. Lactobacillus growth patterns were significantly affected (P < 0·05) by the supplementation with protein sources. The germination and malting processes significantly improved oats nutrient characteristics demonstrating to be adequate substrates for the fermentation with probiotic lactobacilli. Significance and impact of the study: In this work, the effect of oat media composition and fermentation conditions on the growth kinetics of three probiotic lactobacilli was determined. The variation in the inoculum levels did not have a significant effect on the probiotic cultures growth. Results revealed that protein supplemented simple, germinated and malted oat enhanced the cell viability of the probiotic lactobacilli; Lactobacillus casei exhibited better growth adaptability. The results also highlight that different weight in volume oat substrate concentrations has particular effects on Lact. casei growth kinetics. Our results contribute to a better understanding of oat-based media formulations as substrates for probiotic cultures. PMID:24979232

  8. Inhibition of initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis by biosurfactants from Lactobacillus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Velraeds, M M; van der Mei, H C; Reid, G; Busscher, H J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, 15 Lactobacillus isolates were found to produce biosurfactants in the mid-exponential and stationary growth phases. The stationary-phase biosurfactants from lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus fermentum B54, and Lactobacillus acidophilus RC14 were investigated further to determine their capacity to inhibit the initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis 1131 to glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The initial deposition rate of E. faecalis to glass with an adsorbed biosurfactant layer from L. acidophilus RC14 or L. fermentum B54 was significantly decreased by approximately 70%, while the number of adhering enterococci after 4 h of adhesion was reduced by an average of 77%. The surface activity of the biosurfactants and their activity inhibiting the initial adhesion of E. faecalis 1131 were retained after dialysis (molecular weight cutoff, 6,000 to 8,000) and freeze-drying. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the freeze-dried biosurfactants from L. acidophilus RC14 and L. fermentum B54 were richest in protein, while those from L. casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469 had relatively high polysaccharide and phosphate contents. PMID:8787394

  9. Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov., isolated from faeces of Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Amselle, Megan; Beck, Brian J; Popham, David L; Whittaker, Paul; Wang, Hua; Kerrigan, Elizabeth; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2012-09-01

    Three strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the faeces of apparently healthy wild Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in 2010 by cultivating faecal LAB on Rogosa SL agar under aerobic conditions. These three isolates were found to share 99.9 % gene sequence similarity of their 16S rRNA, their 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer region (ITS), partial 23S rRNA, rpoB, rpoC, rpoA and pheS gene sequences. However, the three strains exhibited lower levels of sequence similarity of these genetic targets to all known LAB, and the phylogenetically closest species to the geese strains were Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus saniviri. In comparison to L. casei ATCC 393(T), L. paracasei ATCC 25302(T), L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469(T) and L. saniviri DSM 24301(T), the novel isolates reacted uniquely in tests for cellobiose, galactose, mannitol, citric acid, aesculin and dextrin, and gave negative results in tests for l-proline arylamidase and l-pyrrolydonyl-arylamidase, and in the Voges-Proskauer test. Biochemical tests for cellobiose, aesculin, galactose, gentiobiose, mannitol, melezitose, ribose, salicin, sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, turanose, amygdalin and arbutin could be used for differentiation between L. saniviri and the novel strains. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, and phylogenetic data, the three isolates represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SL1108(T) (= ATCC BAA-2142(T) = LMG 26001(T) = DSM 23927(T)) and two additional strains are SL1170 and SL60106. PMID:22021580

  10. Brevibacterium casei isolated as a cause of relapsing peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi; Abdelsalam, Mohamed Said; Alsunaid, Mohammed Sunaid; Hussein, Maged Hassan

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of relapsing peritonitis in a 33-year-old woman on automated peritoneal dialysis. End-stage renal disease was secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with lupus nephritis. The organism isolated was Brevibacterium casei that was not readily identified, delaying appropriate management with an extended antibiotic course. Definite management of B casei peritonitis was peritoneal dialysis catheter removal. PMID:24648477

  11. The biofilm mode of life boosts the anti-inflammatory properties of Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Aurélie; Aoudia, Nabil; Jego, Gaëtan; Chluba, Johanna; Yousfi, Nadhir; Briandet, Romain; Deschamps, Julien; Gasquet, Benoît; Monedero, Vicente; Garrido, Carmen; Guzzo, Jean

    2014-12-01

    The predominant form of life for microorganisms in their natural habitats is the biofilm mode of growth. The adherence and colonization of probiotic bacteria are considered as essential factors for their immunoregulatory function in the host. Here, we show that Lactobacillus casei?ATCC334 adheres to and colonizes the gut of zebrafish larvae. The abundance of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of macrophages were low when inflammation was induced in probiotic-fed animals, suggesting that these bacteria have anti-inflammatory properties. We treated human macrophage-differentiated monocytic THP-1 cells with supernatants of L.?casei?ATCC334 grown in either biofilm or planktonic cultures. TNF-? production was suppressed and the NF-?B pathway was inhibited only in the presence of supernatants from biofilms. We identified GroEL as the biofilm supernatant compound responsible, at least partially, for this anti-inflammatory effect. Gradual immunodepletion of GroEL demonstrated that the abundance of GroEL and TNF-? were inversely correlated. We confirmed that biofilm development in other Lactobacillus species affects the immune response. The biofilms supernatants of these species also contained large amounts of GroEL. Thus, our results demonstrate that the biofilm enhances the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus sp. and that secreted GroEL is involved in this beneficial effect. PMID:25052472

  12. Tailoring the probiotic potential of non-starter Lactobacillus strains from ripened Parmigiano Reggiano cheese by in vitro screening and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Bianchi, Aldo; Mottolese, Giovanni; Lemmetti, Federico; Giudici, Paolo

    2014-04-01

    Non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) inhabiting fermented food have been recently revised as source of probiotic strains. Here, we in vitro assessed the potential probiotic aptitude of a de-replicated set of NSLAB previously isolated from long ripened Parmigiano Reggiano cheeses (22 Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 18 Lactobacillus paracasei, 3 Lactobacillus casei, 2 Lactobacillus harbinensis, and 2 Lactobacillus fermentum). Most strains showed moderate to good resistance to biological barriers, including bile salts, lysozyme, and simulated gastric and pancreatic juices. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against seven antimicrobials belonging to different categories showed that most strains are susceptible towards all the antibiotics, with the exception of vancomycin and streptomycin. The strains lost the streptomycin resistance when assayed on agar medium containing 0.5% bile salts, suggesting that detergent-like properties of cholic acids increase membrane permeability and mediate streptomycin susceptibility. No isolate showed bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activities, supporting that bile salts resistance and BSH activity are unpaired traits. Finally, NSLAB strains had moderate to high auto-aggregative and hydrophobic phenotypes, whereas two subsets of 22 and 8 strains co-aggregated with Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica s. typhimurium, respectively. A multivariate analysis was effective to segregate one L. casei and two L. rhamnosus strains showing physiological characteristics compatible with probiotic properties. PMID:24290648

  13. Pathogenic relevance of Lactobacillus: a retrospective review of over 200 cases.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J P; Lee, T A; Bolanos, J T; Danziger, L H

    2005-01-01

    Given that Lactobacillus has been reported to be the causative pathogen in many types of infection despite debate regarding the organism's clinical significance, a literature review was conducted to investigate the treatments and outcomes of Lactobacillus infections reported to date. In this article, the characteristics of over 200 reported cases of Lactobacillus-associated infections are summarized. Lactobacillus was found to be frequently associated with endocarditis and bacteremia. Lactobacillus was also associated with a variety of other infections including, but not limited to, peritonitis, abscesses, and meningitis. The species casei and rhamnosus were the most common. The isolates tended to be most sensitive to erythromycin and clindamycin and most resistant to vancomycin. The species that was most sensitive to vancomycin was acidophilus. The overall mortality rate was nearly 30%. There was a significant association between mortality and polymicrobial infection (P=0.004). In the subset of patients with bacteremia, increased mortality was associated with inadequate treatment (P=0.001) and polymicrobial bacteremia (P=0.044). PMID:15599646

  14. Phytase activity from Lactobacillus spp. in calcium-fortified soymilk.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anne Lise; Wilcox, Gisela; Walker, Karen Z; Shah, Nagandra P; Ashton, John F; Stojanovska, Lily

    2010-08-01

    The presence of phytate in calcium-fortified soymilk may interfere with mineral absorption. Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce the enzyme phytase that degrades phytates and therefore may potentially improve mineral bioavailability and absorption. This study investigates the phytase activity and phytate degradation potential of 7 strains of LAB including: Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4962, ATCC33200, ATCC4356, ATCC4161, L. casei ASCC290, L. plantarum ASCC276, and L. fermentum VRI-003. Activity of these bacteria was examined both in screening media and in calcium-fortified soymilk supplemented with potassium phytate. Most strains produced phytase under both conditions with L. acidophilus ATCC4161 showing the highest activity. Phytase activity in fortified soymilk fermented with L. acidophilus ATCC4962 and L. acidophilus ATCC4161 increased by 85% and 91%, respectively, between 12 h and 24 h of fermentation. All strains expressed peak phytase activity at approximately pH 5. However, no phytate degradation could be observed. PMID:20722939

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG as an Effective Probiotic for Murine Giardiasis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Nisha; Tiwari, Ram Prakash; Shukla, Geeta

    2011-01-01

    The gut microflora is an important constituent in the intestinal mucosal barrier and has been introduced as the concept of probiotic therapy that beneficially affects the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to explore the protective potential of various lactobacilli strains for murine giardiasis. By experimentation, it was found that the probiotic supplementation of either Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, or L. rhamnosus GG, 7 days prior to inoculation with G. lamblia trophozoites, reduced the rate of cyst excretion compared with Giardia-infected mice. Interestingly, L. GG was found to be the most effective probiotic in reducing the duration of giardia cycle and acts as an effective prophylactic probiotic for murine giardiasis but needs to be clinically correlated due to entirely different human microflora. PMID:21760784

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus casei Suppress Escherichia coli-Induced Chemokine Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinji Toki; Shinji Kagaya; Miwa Shinohara; Hiroshi Wakiguchi; Takashi Matsumoto; Yoshihisa Takahata; Fumiki Morimatsu; Hirohisa Saito; Kenji Matsumoto

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, some strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been reported to prevent the development of atopic dermatitis and to improve allergic symptoms, especially in young children. However, the mechanisms involved in these effects are not fully understood. Intestinal microbiota play critical roles in the development of host immune development and are recognized and regulated by the host through

  17. Inhibition of proton-translocating ATPases of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei by fluoride and aluminum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. Sturr; Robert E. Marquis

    1990-01-01

    One of the major effects of fluoride on oral bacteria is a reduction in acid tolerance, and presumably also in cariogenicity. The reduction appears to involve transport of protons across the cell membrane by the weak acid HF to dissipate the pH gradient, and also direct inhibition of the F1F0, proton-translocating ATPases of the organisms, especially for Streptococcus mutans. This

  18. Folate assay of foods by traditional and tri-enzyme treatments using cryoprotected Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashok K Shrestha; Jayashree Arcot; Janet Paterson

    2000-01-01

    Variables affecting the efficacy of the microbiological assay of folate in foods were examined. Spinach, fortified bread and two ready-to-eat breakfast cereals were extracted with or without autoclaving and centrifugation. Autoclaving and centrifugation lowered the yield of total folate in all foods. The food sample, after digestion with protease and ?-amylase was deconjugated with chicken pancreas or human plasma (tri-enzyme

  19. Lactobacillus casei Abundance Is Associated with Profound Shifts in the Infant Gut Microbiome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Cox; Yvonne J. Huang; Kei E. Fujimura; Jane T. Liu; Michelle McKean; Homer A. Boushey; Mark R. Segal; Eoin L. Brodie; Michael D. Cabana; Susan V. Lynch; Thomas Bell

    2010-01-01

    Not Available Bibtex entry for this abstract Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences) Find Similar Abstracts: Use: Authors Title Return: Query Results Return items starting with number Query Form Database: Astronomy Physics arXiv e-prints

  20. Hwangryun-Haedok-Tang Fermented with Lactobacillus casei Suppresses Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ki-Shuk; Kim, Taesoo; Ha, Hyunil; Cho, Chang-Won; Kim, Han Sung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2012-01-01

    Hwangryun-haedok-tang (HRT) is the common recipe in traditional Asian medicine, and microbial fermentation is used for the conventional methods for processing traditional medicine. We investigated the inhibitory effect of the n-butanol fraction of HRT (HRT-BU) and fHRT (fHRT-BU) on the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone-marrow-derived macrophages. mRNA expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes were evaluated by real-time QPCR. The activation of signaling pathways was determined by western blot analysis. The marker compounds of HRT-BU and fHRT-BU were analyzed by HPLC. The inhibitory effect of HRT or fHRT on ovariectomy-induced bone loss were evaluated using OVX rats with orally administered HRT, fHRT (300, 1000?mg/kg), or its vehicle for 12 weeks. fHRT-BU significantly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, and phosphorylation of p38, IKK?/?, and NF-?Bp65 compared to HRT-BU. In addition, fHRT-BU also significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of Nf?b2, TNF-?, NFATc1, TRAP, ATPv0d2, and cathepsin K. Furthermore, administration of fHRT had a greater effect on the increase of BMD, and greater improved bone microstructure of the femora than that of HRT in ovariectomy rats. This study demonstrated that bacterial fermentation enhances the inhibitory effect of HRT on osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. These results suggest that fermented HRT might have the beneficial effects on bone disease by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. PMID:23082080

  1. Probiotic Lactobacillus strains protect against myelosuppression and immunosuppression in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Salva, Susana; Marranzino, Gabriela; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela; Alvarez, Susana

    2014-09-01

    This work evaluated the capacity of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus casei CRL431 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1506, to protect against myelosuppression and immunosuppression in cyclophosphamide (Cy)-treated mice. Changes in mature granulocytes and progenitor cells in bone marrow (BM) and blood were studied. In addition, the ability of probiotics to accelerate the recovery of the immune response against the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans was evaluated. We demonstrated for the first time that the preventive treatment with immunomodulatory lactobacilli such as L. casei CRL431 or L. rhamnosus CRL1506 was able to increase immature myeloid progenitors in the BM, allowing an early recovery of myeloid cells after Cy administration. Probiotic lactobacilli were also capable to induce an early recovery of neutrophils in blood, improve phagocytic cells recruitment to infectious sites and increase the resistance against the opportunistic pathogen C. albicans. Although deeper studies regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of probiotic actions are needed, these findings support the idea that strains like CRL431 and CRL1506 may accelerate the recovery of Cy-caused immunosuppression by immunopotentiating myeloid cells. Then, probiotic lactobacilli have the potential to be used as alternatives for lessening chemotherapy-induced immunosuppression in cancer patients. PMID:24975836

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Diverse Lactobacillus Species Present in Advanced Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Roy; Nadkarni, Mangala A.; Chhour, Kim-Ly; Martin, F. Elizabeth; Jacques, Nicholas A.; Hunter, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Our previous analysis of 65 advanced dental caries lesions by traditional culture techniques indicated that lactobacilli were numerous in the advancing front of the progressive lesion. Production of organic acids by lactobacilli is considered to be important in causing decalcification of the dentinal matrix. The present study was undertaken to define more precisely the diversity of lactobacilli found in this environment and to quantify the major species and phylotypes relative to total load of lactobacilli by real-time PCR. Pooled DNA was amplified by PCR with Lactobacillus genus-specific primers for subsequent cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequence comparisons, 18 different phylotypes of lactobacilli were detected, including strong representation of both novel and gastrointestinal phylotypes. Specific PCR primers were designed for nine prominent species, including Lactobacillus gasseri, L. ultunensis, L. salivarius, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, L. crispatus, L. delbrueckii, L. fermentum, and L. gallinarum. More than three different species were identified as being present in most of the dentine samples, confirming the widespread distribution and numerical importance of various Lactobacillus spp. in carious dentine. Quantification by real-time PCR revealed various proportions of the nine species colonizing carious dentine, with higher mean loads of L. gasseri and L. ultunensis than of the other prevalent species. The findings provide a basis for further characterization of the pathogenicity of Lactobacillus spp. in the context of extension of the carious lesion. PMID:15243071

  3. Accumulation of Polyphosphate in Lactobacillus spp. and Its Involvement in Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Cristina; Blasco, Amalia; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate (poly-P) is a polymer of phosphate residues synthesized and in some cases accumulated by microorganisms, where it plays crucial physiological roles such as the participation in the response to nutritional stringencies and environmental stresses. Poly-P metabolism has received little attention in Lactobacillus, a genus of lactic acid bacteria of relevance for food production and health of humans and animals. We show that among 34 strains of Lactobacillus, 18 of them accumulated intracellular poly-P granules, as revealed by specific staining and electron microscopy. Poly-P accumulation was generally dependent on the presence of elevated phosphate concentrations in the culture medium, and it correlated with the presence of polyphosphate kinase (ppk) genes in the genomes. The ppk gene from Lactobacillus displayed a genetic arrangement in which it was flanked by two genes encoding exopolyphosphatases of the Ppx-GppA family. The ppk functionality was corroborated by its disruption (LCABL_27820 gene) in Lactobacillus casei BL23 strain. The constructed ppk mutant showed a lack of intracellular poly-P granules and a drastic reduction in poly-P synthesis. Resistance to several stresses was tested in the ppk-disrupted strain, showing that it presented a diminished growth under high-salt or low-pH conditions and an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results show that poly-P accumulation is a characteristic of some strains of lactobacilli and may thus play important roles in the physiology of these microorganisms. PMID:24375133

  4. Selective and differential enumerations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium spp. in yoghurt — A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rabia Ashraf; Nagendra P. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Yoghurt is increasingly being used as a carrier of probiotic bacteria for their potential health benefits. To meet with a recommended level of ?106 viable cells\\/g of a product, assessment of viability of probiotic bacteria in market preparations is crucial. This requires a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria in yoghurt such as

  5. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Tobias C; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Eile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13N(T) (?=?DSM 26257(T)?=?CCUG 63287(T)), Bin4N(T) (?=?DSM 26254(T)?=?CCUG 63291(T)), Hon2N(T) (?=?DSM 26255(T)?=?CCUG 63289(T)), Hma8N(T) (?=?DSM 26256(T)?=?CCUG 63629(T)), Hma2N(T) (?=?DSM 26263(T)?=?CCUG 63633(T)), Bma5N(T) (?=?DSM 26265(T)?=?CCUG 63301(T)) and Biut2N(T) (?=?DSM 26262(T)?=?CCUG 63631(T)). PMID:24944337

  6. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Èile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckiisubgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13NT (?=?DSM 26257T?=?CCUG 63287T), Bin4NT (?=?DSM 26254T?=?CCUG 63291T), Hon2NT (?=?DSM 26255T?=?CCUG 63289T), Hma8NT (?=?DSM 26256T?=?CCUG 63629T), Hma2NT (?=?DSM 26263T?=?CCUG 63633T), Bma5NT (?=?DSM 26265T?=?CCUG 63301T) and Biut2NT (?=?DSM 26262T?=?CCUG 63631T). PMID:24944337

  7. Lactobacillus mudanjiangensis sp. nov., Lactobacillus songhuajiangensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus nenjiangensis sp. nov., isolated from Chinese traditional pickle and sourdough.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chun Tao; Li, Chun Yan; Yang, Li Jie; Huo, Gui Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Three Gram-stain-positive bacterial strains, 11050(T), 7-19(T) and 11102(T), were isolated from traditional pickle and sourdough in Heilongjiang Province, China. These bacteria were characterized by a polyphasic approach, including 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, pheS gene sequence analysis, rpoA gene sequence analysis, dnaK gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, determination of DNA G+C content, DNA-DNA hybridization and an analysis of phenotypic features. Strain 11050(T) belonged to the Lactobacillus plantarum species group and shared 98.0-98.4?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and 84.7-88.9?% dnaK gene sequence similarities with type strains of Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum, Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, Lactobacillus fabifermentans and Lactobacillus xiangfangensis and had 75.9-80.7?% pheS gene sequence similarities and 90.7-92.5?% rpoA gene sequence similarities with Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum LMG 6907(T), Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis LMG 9205, Lactobacillus pentosus LMG 10755(T), Lactobacillus paraplantarum LMG 16673(T), Lactobacillus fabifermentans LMG 24284(T) and Lactobacillus xiangfangensis 3.1.1(T), respectively. Strain 7-19(T) was phylogenetically related to Lactobacillus thailandensis, Lactobacillus pantheris and Lactobacillus sharpeae, having 94.1-96.7?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, 71.5-82.3?% pheS gene sequence similarities and 71.2-83.4?% rpoA gene sequence similarities with type strains of Lactobacillus thailandensis, Lactobacillus pantheris and Lactobacillus sharpeae, respectively. Strain 11102(T) was phylogenetically related to Lactobacillus oligofermentans, Lactobacillus suebicus, Lactobacillus vaccinostercus and Lactobacillus hokkaidonensis. Strain 11102(T) had 99.2?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, 81.3?% pheS gene sequence similarity and 96.1?% rpoA gene sequence similarity with Lactobacillus oligofermentans LMG 22743(T), respectively. Strain 11102(T) shared 96.0-96.8?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, 73.3-81.0?% pheS gene sequence similarities and 74.6-76.9?% rpoA gene sequence similarities with type strains of Lactobacillus suebicus, Lactobacillus vaccinostercus and Lactobacillus hokkaidonensis, respectively. Based upon the data from polyphasic characterization obtained in the present study, three novel species, Lactobacillus mudanjiangensis sp. nov., Lactobacillus songhuajiangensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus nenjiangensis sp. nov., are proposed and the type strains are 11050(T) (?=?LMG 27194(T)?=?CCUG 62991(T)), 7-19(T) (?=?LMG 27191(T)?=?NCIMB 14832(T)?=?CCUG 62990(T)) and 11102(T) (?=?LMG 27192(T)?=?NCIMB 14833(T)), respectively. PMID:23950151

  8. Phospholipids of Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, D B; Megson, G; Harty, D W; Riba, I; Gaskell, S J

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus phospholipid molecular species were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Prominent anions were consistent with presence of the phosphatidylglycerols PG(37:2), PG(36:2), PG(35:1), PG(34:1), and PG(33:1). Diglycosyldiacylglycerol molecular species were also observed, although nitrogen-containing phospholipids were absent. An anion of m/z 759 was derived from an apparently novel type of lipid. PMID:7592401

  9. Comparative evaluation of selected strains of lactobacilli for the development of antioxidant activity in milk

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCDC08, Lactobacillus plantarum NCDC25, Lactobacillus casei subsp. bulgaricus NCDC08)NCDC25 (Lactobacillus plantarum NCDC25)NCDC17(Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei NCDC17)NCDC. casei NCDC17, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDC24, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NCDC63

  10. Ripening of Emmental Cheese Wrapped in Foil with and without Addition of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei . I. Microbial, Chemical, Rheological and Sensorial Investigations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P Bachmann; U Bütikofer; R Badertscher; M Dalla Torre; P Lavanchy; U Bühler-Moor; B Nick; J Jimeno; R Warmke; W Grosch; R Sieber; J. O Bosset

    1997-01-01

    The present work describes the ripening of eight quarters of raw milk Swiss Emmental cheese loaves which were packaged at 3 months in a plastic sheet. The loaves were manufactured with and without addition ofL. caseisubsp.caseito the usual starter cultures. Samples were taken at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of ripening. The following parameters were measured and statistically compared:

  11. Probiotic attributes of autochthonous Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of human origin.

    PubMed

    Pithva, Sheetal; Shekh, Satyamitra; Dave, Jayantilal; Vyas, Bharatkumar Rajiv Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the probiotic potential of indigenous autochthonous Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains isolated from infant feces and vaginal mucosa of healthy female. The survival of the selected strains and the two reference strains (L. rhamnosus GG and L. casei Actimel) was 67-81 % at pH 2 and 70-80 % after passage through the simulated gastrointestinal fluid. These strains are able to grow in the presence of 4 % bile salt, 10 % NaCl, and 0.6 % phenol. The cell surface of L. rhamnosus strains is hydrophilic in nature as revealed by bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) assay. Despite this, L. rhamnosus strains showed mucin adherence, autoaggregation and coaggregation properties that are strain-specific. In addition, they produce bile salt hydrolase (BSH) and ?-galactosidase activities. L. rhamnosus strains exhibit antimicrobial activity against food spoilage organisms and gastrointestinal pathogens, as well as Candida and Aspergillus spp. L. rhamnosus strains have similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern, and resistance to certain antibiotics is intrinsic or innate. The strains are neither haemolytic nor producer of biogenic amines such as histamine, putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine. Lyophilized cells of L. rhamnosus Fb exhibited probiotic properties demonstrating potential of the strain for technological suitability and in the preparation of diverse probiotic food formulations. PMID:24682879

  12. Coexpression and secretion of endoglucanase and phytase genes in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Yuxin; Cai, Bei; Cao, Pinghua; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    A multifunctional transgenic Lactobacillus with probiotic characteristics and an ability to degrade ?-glucan and phytic acid (phytate) was engineered to improve nutrient utilization, increase production performance and decrease digestive diseases in broiler chickens. The Bacillus subtilis WL001 endoglucanase gene (celW) and Aspergillus fumigatus WL002 phytase gene (phyW) mature peptide (phyWM) were cloned into an expression vector with the lactate dehydrogenase promoter of Lactobacillus casei and the secretion signal peptide of the Lactococcus lactis usp45 gene. This construct was then transformed into Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 that had been isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of broilers. Heterologous enzyme production and feed effectiveness of this genetically modified L. reuteri strain were investigated and evaluated. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the molecular mass of phyWM and celW was approximately 48.2 and 55 kDa, respectively, consistent with their predicted molecular weights. Endoglucanase and phytase activities in the extracellular fraction of the transformed L. reuteri culture were 0.68 and 0.42 U/mL, respectively. Transformed L. reuteri improved the feed conversion ratio of broilers from 21 to 42 days of age and over the whole feeding period. However, there was no effect on body weight gain and feed intake of chicks. Transformed L. reuteri supplementation improved levels of ash, calcium and phosphorus in tibiae at day 21 and of phosphorus at day 42. In addition, populations of Escherichia coli, Veillonella spp. and Bacteroides vulgatus were decreased, while populations of Bifidobacterium genus and Lactobacillus spp. were increased in the cecum at day 21. PMID:25050780

  13. Coexpression and Secretion of Endoglucanase and Phytase Genes in Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Yuxin; Cai, Bei; Cao, Pinghua; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    A multifunctional transgenic Lactobacillus with probiotic characteristics and an ability to degrade ?-glucan and phytic acid (phytate) was engineered to improve nutrient utilization, increase production performance and decrease digestive diseases in broiler chickens. The Bacillus subtilis WL001 endoglucanase gene (celW) and Aspergillus fumigatus WL002 phytase gene (phyW) mature peptide (phyWM) were cloned into an expression vector with the lactate dehydrogenase promoter of Lactobacillus casei and the secretion signal peptide of the Lactococcus lactis usp45 gene. This construct was then transformed into Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 that had been isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of broilers. Heterologous enzyme production and feed effectiveness of this genetically modified L. reuteri strain were investigated and evaluated. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the molecular mass of phyWM and celW was approximately 48.2 and 55 kDa, respectively, consistent with their predicted molecular weights. Endoglucanase and phytase activities in the extracellular fraction of the transformed L. reuteri culture were 0.68 and 0.42 U/mL, respectively. Transformed L. reuteri improved the feed conversion ratio of broilers from 21 to 42 days of age and over the whole feeding period. However, there was no effect on body weight gain and feed intake of chicks. Transformed L. reuteri supplementation improved levels of ash, calcium and phosphorus in tibiae at day 21 and of phosphorus at day 42. In addition, populations of Escherichia coli, Veillonella spp. and Bacteroides vulgatus were decreased, while populations of Bifidobacterium genus and Lactobacillus spp. were increased in the cecum at day 21. PMID:25050780

  14. Lactobacillus species isolated from vaginal secretions of healthy and bacterial vaginosis-intermediate Mexican women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus jensenii, L. iners, L. crispatus and L. gasseri are the most frequently occurring lactobacilli in the vagina. However, the native species vary widely according to the studied population. The present study was performed to genetically determine the identity of Lactobacillus strains present in the vaginal discharge of healthy and bacterial vaginosis (BV) intermediate Mexican women. Methods In a prospective study, 31 strains preliminarily identified as Lactobacillus species were isolated from 21 samples collected from 105 non-pregnant Mexican women. The samples were classified into groups according to the Nugent score criteria proposed for detection of BV: normal (N), intermediate (I) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). We examined the isolates using culture-based methods as well as molecular analysis of the V1–V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence analysis was performed to reject clones. Results Clinical isolates (25/31) were classified into four groups based on sequencing and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene: L. acidophilus (14/25), L. reuteri (6/25), L. casei (4/25) and L. buchneri (1/25). The remaining six isolates were presumptively identified as Enterococcus species. Within the L. acidophilus group, L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. jensenii and L. crispatus. L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. brevis were also isolated, and were placed in the L. reuteri, L. casei and L. buchneri groups, respectively. ERIC profile analysis showed intraspecific variability amongst the L. gasseri and L. fermentum species. Conclusions These findings agree with previous studies showing that L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii are consistently present in the healthy vaginal ecosystem. Additional species or phylotypes were detected in the vaginal microbiota of the non-pregnant Mexican (Hispanic-mestizo) population, and thus, these results further our understanding of vaginal lactobacilli colonisation and richness in this particular population. PMID:23617246

  15. Effects of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii strain La1 on autonomic nerves and blood glucose in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Toshihiko; Tanida, Mamoru; Niijima, Akira; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Nobuaki; Fukushima, Yoichi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2006-10-12

    Oral administration of Lactobacillus casei reportedly reduces blood glucose concentrations in a non-insulin-dependent diabetic KK-Ay mouse model. In order to determine if other lactobacillus strains affect glucose metabolism, we evaluated the effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 (LJLa1) strain on glucose metabolism in rats. Oral administration of LJLa1 via drinking water for 2 weeks inhibited the hyperglycemia induced by intracranial injection of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG). We found that the hyperglucagonemic response induced by 2DG was also suppressed by LJLa1. Oral administration of LJLa1 for 2 weeks also reduced the elevation of blood glucose and glucagon levels after an oral glucose load in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In addition, we recently observed that intraduodenal injection of LJLa1 reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and enhanced gastric vagal nerve activity, suggesting that LJLa1 might affect glucose metabolism by changing autonomic nerve activity. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of intraduodenal administration of LJLa1 on adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats, since the autonomic nervous system, including the adrenal sympathetic nerve, may be implicated in the control of the blood glucose levels. Indeed, we found that ASNA was suppressed by intraduodenal administration of LJLa1, suggesting that LJLa1 might improve glucose tolerance by reducing glucagon secretion via alteration of autonomic nerve activities. PMID:16893554

  16. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16?S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3?h, 0.3% bile salts for 4?h, and 1.9?mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3?h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  17. Effect of water activity and protective solutes on growth and subsequent survival to air-drying of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium cultures.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Claude P; Raymond, Yves; Simon, Jean-Paul

    2012-08-01

    Probiotic cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus were grown in media having water activities (a (w)) adjusted between 0.99 and 0.94 with NaCl or with a mixture of glycerol and sucrose in order to find conditions of osmotic stress which would still allow for good growth. Cultures grown at a (w)?=?0.96 or 0.99 were then recovered by centrifugation, added to a sucrose-phosphate medium and air-dried. In some assays, a 2-h osmotic stress was applied to the cell concentrate prior to air-drying. Assays were also carried out where betaine, glutamate and proline (BGP) supplements were added as protective compounds to the growth or drying media. For most strains, evidence of osmotic stress and benefits of BGP supplementation on growth occurred at a (w)?=?0.96. Growing the cells in complex media adjusted at a (w)?=?0.96 did not enhance their subsequent survival to air-drying, but applying the 2-h osmotic stress did. Addition of the BGP supplements to the growth medium or in the 2-h stress medium did not enhance survival to air-drying. Furthermore, addition of BGP to a sucrose-phosphate drying medium reduced survival of the cultures to air-drying. This study provides preliminary data for producers of probiotics who wish to use air-drying in replacement of freeze-drying for the stabilization of cultures. PMID:22350318

  18. LACTOBACILLUS ARIZONENSIS IS A LATER HETEROTYPIC SYNONYM OF LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ‘Lactobacillus plantarum-group’ encompasses the taxa L. plantarum subsp. plantarum, L. plantarum subsp. argentoratensis, L. paraplantarum, L. pentosus and L. arizonensis. In this study, the phylogenetic position of L. arizonensis was examined using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-specific methodo...

  19. Evaluation of plastic-composite supports in repeated fed-batch biofilm lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus casei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana Carmela Velázquez; Anthony L. Pometto III; Kai-Lai G. Ho; Ali Demirci

    2001-01-01

    A customized stirred-tank biofilm reactor was designed for plastic-composite supports (PCS). In repeated-batch studies, the PCS-biofilm reactors outperformed the suspended-cell reactors by demonstrating higher lactic acid productivities (2.45 g l-1 h-1 vs 1.75 g l-1 h-1) and greater glucose consumption rates (3.27 g l-1 h-1 vs 2.09 g l-1 h-1). In the repeated fed-batch studies, reactors were spiked periodically with

  20. Ability of probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN 114001 to bind or\\/and metabolise heterocyclic aromatic amines in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana Nowak; Zdzislawa Libudzisz

    2009-01-01

    Introduction  Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) are compounds with high mutagenic potential, formed when meat is cooked at high temperatures\\u000a of 150–300 °C. These compounds contribute to development of colon and gastric cancer. Western diet provides a lot of HCA and\\u000a influences the available substrates for the intestinal microbiota which can activate HCA to direct acting mutagens. On the\\u000a other hand, lactic acid

  1. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation in vitro by bovine caseins hydrolyzed with Lactobacillus casei GG–derived enzymes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yelda Sütas; Esa Soppi; Hannu Korhonen; Eeva-Liisa Syväoja; Maija Saxelin; Timo Rokka; Erika Isolauri

    1996-01-01

    Background:Processing of proteins in the gut and activation of T-cell suppression leads to systemic hyporesponsiveness to ingested protein antigens. Objective:The study was designed to determine whether lactobacilli, a major part of human intestinal microflora, can contribute to degradation of food antigens in the gut and modify their immunoactivities. Methods:Lymphocyte transformation tests were carried out in healthy adults to determine the

  2. Intraspecific variation of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus in sensitivity towards various bacteriocins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Carl; J. J. Leisner; J. Swings; M. Vancanneyt

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-two strains belonging to the Lactobacillus plantarum species group were identified and typed. They represented 32 clones of Lactobacillus plantarum and 7 clones of Lactobacillus pentosus. Sensitivity of all strains towards bacteriocins of four different producer strains was investigated using a deferred inhibition test (DIT). Substantial intra-specific variation in sensitivity of clones was observed towards bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria producing

  3. Probiotic and technological properties of Lactobacillus spp. strains from the human stomach in the search for potential candidates against gastric microbial dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Susana; Leite, Analy M. O.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-01-01

    This work characterizes a set of lactobacilli strains isolated from the stomach of healthy humans that might serve as probiotic cultures. Ten different strains were recognized by rep-PCR and PFGE fingerprinting among 19 isolates from gastric biopsies and stomach juice samples. These strains belonged to five species, Lactobacillus gasseri (3), Lactobacillus reuteri (2), Lactobacillus vaginalis (2), Lactobacillus fermentum (2) and Lactobacillus casei (1). All ten strains were subjected to a series of in vitro tests to assess their functional and technological properties, including acid resistance, bile tolerance, adhesion to epithelial gastric cells, production of antimicrobial compounds, inhibition of Helicobacter pylori, antioxidative activity, antibiotic resistance, carbohydrate fermentation, glycosidic activities, and ability to grow in milk. As expected, given their origin, all strains showed good resistance to low pH (3.0), with small reductions in counts after 90 min exposition to this pH. Species- and strain-specific differences were detected in terms of the production of antimicrobials, antagonistic effects toward H. pylori, antioxidative activity and adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. None of the strains showed atypical resistance to a series of 16 antibiotics of clinical and veterinary importance. Two L. reuteri strains were deemed as the most appropriate candidates to be used as potential probiotics against microbial gastric disorders; these showed good survival under gastrointestinal conditions reproduced in vitro, along with strong anti-Helicobacter and antioxidative activities. The two L. reuteri strains further displayed appropriated technological traits for their inclusion as adjunct functional cultures in fermented dairy products. PMID:25642213

  4. Probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus suppresses DMH-induced procarcinogenic fecal enzymes and preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci in early colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Angela; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Diet makes an important contribution to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk implying risks for CRC are potentially reducible. Therefore, the probiotics have been suggested as the prophylactic measure in colon cancer. In this study, different probiotics were used to compare their protective potential against 1,2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced chemical colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats. Animals belonging to different probiotic groups were fed orally with 1 × 10(9) lactobacilli daily for 1 week, and then a weekly injection of DMH was given intraperitoneally for 6 wks with daily administration of probiotic. Lactobacillus GG and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated animals had maximum percent reduction in ACF counts. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) in fecal nitroreductase activity was observed in L.casei + DMH and L.plantarum + DMH-treated rats whereas ?-glucuronidase activity decreased in L.GG + DMH and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated rats. Animals treated with Bifidobacterium bifidum + DMH had significant decreased ?-glucosidase activity. However, not much difference was observed in the colon morphology of animals belonging to various probiotic + DMH-treated rats compared with DMH-treated alone. The results indicated that probiotics, L.GG, and L.acidophilus can be used as the better prophylactic agents for experimental colon carcinogenesis. PMID:23368917

  5. A selective differential medium for Lactobacillus plantarum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carmen Bujalance; Maria Jiménez-Valera; Encarnacion Moreno; Alfonso Ruiz-Bravo

    2006-01-01

    The quantification of exogenous lactobacilli in faecal samples is frequently required for the evaluation of the intestinal colonization by probiotic bacteria. In this study, a selective and differential medium, designated LPSM, was developed for the culture of exogenous Lactobacillus plantarum. In quantitative assays, LPSM showed a sensitivity similar to those of enriched and Lactobacillus-adapted media. The presence of ciprofloxacin made

  6. Detection, partial purification and characterization of bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 isolated from freshwater fish: Bacteriocin from Lb. brevis FPTLB3.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiba Prosad; Dora, Krushna Chandra; Chowdhury, Supratim

    2013-02-01

    Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 was isolated from freshwater fish, capable of producing bacteriocin that had broad spectrum of inhibition (3200 AU/ml) against Escherichia coli MTCC 1563, Enterococcus faecalis MTCC 2729, Lactobacillus casei MTCC 1423, Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The antimicrobial activity of crude supernatant fluid was stable after heating at 121 °C for 60 min and declined thereafter. Stability of antimicrobial activity was observed at pH range of 2.0 to 8.0. Its active principle was proteinaceous in nature since the bacteriocin was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but not by other non-proteolytic enzymes. Mitomycin C and UV light did not affect the activity of the bacteriocin, while chloroform extraction completely destroyed their activity. Exposure to surfactant resulted in an increase in titre, except Nonidet P-40, which led to total loss of activity. No bacteriocin adsorption was detected at pH 1 to 2, whereas 100% bacteriocin adsorption was found at pH 6.5. Based on Tricine SDS-PAGE the estimated molecular mass of bacteriocin was 54 kDa. No plasmid was found to present in the isolate. PMID:24425883

  7. Biosynthesis of Lipoteichoic Acid in Lactobacillus rhamnosus: Role of DltD in d-Alanylation

    PubMed Central

    Debabov, Dmitri V.; Kiriukhin, Michael Y.; Neuhaus, Francis C.

    2000-01-01

    The dlt operon (dltA to dltD) of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 7469 encodes four proteins responsible for the esterification of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by d-alanine. These esters play an important role in controlling the net anionic charge of the poly (GroP) moiety of LTA. dltA and dltC encode the d-alanine–d-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl) and d-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp), respectively. Whereas the functions of DltA and DltC are defined, the functions of DltB and DltD are unknown. To define the role of DltD, the gene was cloned and sequenced and a mutant was constructed by insertional mutagenesis of dltD from Lactobacillus casei 102S. Permeabilized cells of a dltD::erm mutant lacked the ability to incorporate d-alanine into LTA. This defect was complemented by the expression of DltD from pNZ123/dlt. In in vitro assays, DltD bound Dcp for ligation with d-alanine by Dcl in the presence of ATP. In contrast, the homologue of Dcp, the Escherichia coli acyl carrier protein (ACP), involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, was not bound to DltD and thus was not ligated with d-alanine. DltD also catalyzed the hydrolysis of the mischarged d-alanyl–ACP. The hydrophobic N-terminal sequence of DltD was required for anchoring the protein in the membrane. It is hypothesized that this membrane-associated DltD facilitates the binding of Dcp and Dcl for ligation of Dcp with d-alanine and that the resulting d-alanyl–Dcp is translocated to the primary site of d-alanylation. PMID:10781555

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG suspected infection in a newborn with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Krawczenko, I; Paprzycka, M; Korbal, P; Wiatrzyk, A; Krysztopa-Grzybowska, K; Polak, M; Czajka, U; Luty?ska, A

    2014-12-01

    A disseminated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 infection was suspected in a 6 day-old newborn with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) symptoms, treated empirically with antibiotics and given L. rhamnosus GG with the aim of preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complications. The level of C-reactive protein on day 5 compared with day 2 was increased in spite of negative urine and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. The blood sampled on day 6 was found to be positive for lactobacilli, and the isolate was pre-identified as L. rhamnosus or Lactobacillus casei on day 11. The strain identity was then verified as L. rhamnosus GG through PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. Genotyping with the rep-PCR and AFLP methods confirmed the 100% genetic similarity for both the strain isolated from patient blood and the probiotic product. The newborn became touch-sensitive, cried a lot, had worsening laboratory test results, and increased inflammation parameters, but no fever was observed. After a further 9 days of antibiotic therapy, blood cultures became negative, and laboratory tests improved on day 25. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 27 days. IUGR with a possible link to L. rhamnosus GG bacteraemia might be a new potential risk group, beside patients with organ failure, immunocompromised status and dysfunctional gut barrier mechanisms, for which safe use of probiotics needs careful attention. Universally accepted or improved guidelines for the safer administration of probiotics in risk groups are urgently needed. This report should not discourage the use of probiotics, but should highlight the need for their careful use in IUGR patients. PMID:25035097

  9. Gut Balance, a synbiotic supplement, increases fecal Lactobacillus paracasei but has little effect on immunity in healthy physically active individuals

    PubMed Central

    West, Nicholas P.; Pyne, David B.; Cripps, Allan; Christophersen, Claus T.; Conlon, Michael A.; Fricker, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Synbiotic supplements, which contain multiple functional ingredients, may enhance the immune system more than the use of individual ingredients alone. A double blind active controlled parallel trial over a 21 day exercise training period was conducted to evaluate the effect of Gut BalanceTM, which contains Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (L. casei 431®), Bifidobacterium animalis ssp lactis (BB-12®), Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5®), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG®), two prebiotics (raftiline and raftilose) and bovine whey derived lactoferrin and immunoglobulins with acacia gum on fecal microbiota, short chain fatty acids (SCFA), gut permeability, salivary lactoferrin and serum cytokines. All subjects randomized were included in the analysis. There was a 9-fold (1.2-fold to 64-fold; 95% confidence intervals p = 0.03) greater increase in fecal L. paracasei numbers with Gut BalanceTM compared with acacia gum supplementation. Gut BalanceTM was associated with a 50% (-12% to 72%; p = 0.02) smaller increase in the concentration of serum IL-16 in comparison to acacia gum from pre- to post-study. No substantial effects of either supplement were evident in fecal SCFA concentrations, measures of mucosal immunity or GI permeability. Clinical studies are now required to determine whether Gut BalanceTM may exert beneficial GI health effects by increasing the recovery of fecal L. paracasei. Both supplements had little effect on immunity. Twenty-two healthy physically active male subjects (mean age = 33.9 ± 6.5 y) were randomly allocated to either daily prebiotic or synbiotic supplementation for 21 day. Saliva, blood, urine and fecal samples were collected pre-, mid- and post-intervention. Participants recorded patterns of physical activity on a self-reported questionnaire. PMID:22572834

  10. Gut Balance, a synbiotic supplement, increases fecal Lactobacillus paracasei but has little effect on immunity in healthy physically active individuals.

    PubMed

    West, Nicholas P; Pyne, David B; Cripps, Allan W; Christophersen, Claus T; Conlon, Michael A; Fricker, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Synbiotic supplements, which contain multiple functional ingredients, may enhance the immune system more than the use of individual ingredients alone. A double blind active controlled parallel trial over a 21 d exercise training period was conducted to evaluate the effect of Gut Balance™, which contains Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (L. casei 431®), Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (BB-12®), Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5®), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG®), two prebiotics (raftiline and raftilose) and bovine whey derived lactoferrin and immunoglobulins with acacia gum on fecal microbiota, short chain fatty acids (SCFA), gut permeability, salivary lactoferrin and serum cytokines. All subjects randomized were included in the analysis. There was a 9-fold (1.2-fold to 64-fold; 95% confidence intervals p = 0.03) greater increase in fecal L. paracasei numbers with Gut Balance™ compared with acacia gum supplementation. Gut Balance™ was associated with a 50% (-12% to 72%; p = 0.02) smaller increase in the concentration of serum IL-16 in comparison to acacia gum from pre- to post-study. No substantial effects of either supplement were evident in fecal SCFA concentrations, measures of mucosal immunity or GI permeability. Clinical studies are now required to determine whether Gut Balance™ may exert beneficial GI health effects by increasing the recovery of fecal L. paracasei. Both supplements had little effect on immunity. Twenty two healthy physically active male subjects (mean age = 33.9 ± 6.5y) were randomly allocated to either daily prebiotic or synbiotic supplementation for 21 d. Saliva, blood, urine and fecal samples were collected pre-, mid and post-intervention. Participants recorded patterns of physical activity on a self-reported questionnaire. PMID:22572834

  11. Oxygen-Dependent Regulation of the Expression of the Catalase Gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Christian; Schmidt, Gudrun; Fischer, Marc; Oellers, Katja; Hammes, Walter P.

    1998-01-01

    The catalase gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli UM2, Lactobacillus casei LK1, and Lactobacillus curvatus LTH1432. The last host is a catalase-deficient plasmid-cured derivative of a starter organism used in meat fermentation. The regulation of katA expression was found to be the same in L. sakei LTH677 and the recombinant strains. The addition of H2O2 to anaerobic cultures, as well as a switch to aerobic conditions, resulted in a strong increase in KatA activity. The expression was investigated in more detail with L. sakei LTH677 and L. curvatus LTH4002. The recombinant strain LTH4002 did not accumulate H2O2 under glucose-limited aerobic conditions and remained viable in the stationary phase. Under inductive conditions, the katA-specific mRNA and the apoenzyme were synthesized de novo. Deletion derivatives of the katA promoter were produced, and the regulatory response was investigated by fusion to the ?-glucuronidase reporter gene gusA and expression in L. sakei LTH677. The fact that gene expression was subject to induction was confirmed at the level of transcription and protein synthesis. A small putative regulatory sequence of at least 25 bp was identified located upstream of the ?35 site. Competition experiments performed with L. sakei LTH677 harboring the fusion constructs consisting of the katA promoter and gusA revealed that an activator protein is involved in the transcriptional induction of katA. PMID:9546173

  12. Efficient System for Directed Integration into the Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus gasseri Chromosomes via Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Russell, W. M.; Klaenhammer, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method is described for the generation of site-specific chromosomal integrations in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus gasseri. The strategy is an adaptation of the lactococcal pORI system (K. Leenhouts, G. Venema, and J. Kok, Methods Cell Sci. 20:35–50, 1998) and relies on the simultaneous use of two plasmids. The functionality of the integration strategy was demonstated by the insertional inactivation of the Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM lacL gene encoding ?-galactosidase and of the Lactobacillus gasseri ADH gusA gene encoding ?-glucuronidase. PMID:11526048

  13. Stimulation of macrophages by immunobiotic Lactobacillus strains: influence beyond the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marranzino, Gabriela; Villena, Julio; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana

    2012-11-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr1505), L. rhamnosus CRL1506 (Lr1506) and L. casei CRL431 (Lc431) are able to stimulate intestinal immunity, but only Lr1505 and Lc431 are able to stimulate immunity in the respiratory tract. With the aim of advancing the understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in stimulation of distant mucosal sites, this study evaluated the effects of orally administered probiotics on the functions of alveolar and peritoneal macrophages. Compared to a control group, these three lactobacilli were able to significantly increase phagocytic and microbicidal activities of peritoneal macrophages. After intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic Candida albicans, mice treated with immunobiotics had significantly lower pathogen counts in infected organs. Moreover, lactobacilli-treated mice had a stronger immune response against C. albicans. On the other hand, only Lc1505 and Lc431 were able to improve activity of and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages. Only in these two groups was there better resistance to respiratory challenge with C. albicans, which correlated with improved respiratory immune response. The results of this study suggest that consumption of some probiotic strains could be useful for improving resistance to infections in sites distant from the gut by increasing the activity of macrophages at those sites. PMID:22846065

  14. Biofilm disruption potential of a glycolipid biosurfactant from marine Brevibacterium casei.

    PubMed

    Kiran, George Seghal; Sabarathnam, Balu; Selvin, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The antibiofilm activity of a glycolipid biosurfactant isolated from the marine actinobacterium Brevibacterium casei MSA19 was evaluated against pathogenic biofilms in vitro. The isolate B. casei MSA19 was a potential biosurfactant producer among the 57 stable strains isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra. The biosurfactant production was optimized under submerged fermentation. The purified glycolipid showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum bactericidal concentration ratio, the glycolipid was determined as bacteriostatic. The glycolipid biosurfactant disrupted the biofilm formation under dynamic conditions. The disruption of the biofilm by the MSA19 glycolipid was consistent against mixed pathogenic biofilm bacteria. Therefore, the glycolipid biosurfactant can be used as a lead compound for the development of novel antibiofilm agents. PMID:20528933

  15. Development of a carotenoid shuttle vector for Lactobacillus

    E-print Network

    White, Kevin E

    1996-01-01

    The following studies describe the construction of a plasmid vector, using E. coli as a host, designed to shuttle a carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster between E. coli and L. casei, and evaluate the structural stability of the plasmid...

  16. Lactobacillus oeni sp. nov., from wine.

    PubMed

    Mañes-Lázaro, Rosario; Ferrer, Sergi; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Pardo, Isabel

    2009-08-01

    Ten Lactobacillus strains, previously isolated from different Bobal grape wines from the Utiel-Requena Origin Denomination of Spain, were characterized phylogenetically, genotypically and phenotypically. The 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and phylogenetic analysis showed that they form a tight phylogenetic clade that is closely related to reference strains Lactobacillus satsumensis NRIC 0604T, 'Lactobacillus uvarum' 8 and Lactobacillus mali DSM 20444T. DNA-DNA hybridization results confirmed the separation of the strains from other Lactobacillus species. Genotypically, the strains could be differentiated from their closest neighbours by 16S amplified rDNA restriction analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. The strains were Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic rods that did not exhibit catalase activity. Phenotypically, they could be distinguished from their closest relatives by several traits such as their inabilities to grow at pH 3.3, to ferment sucrose, amygdalin and arbutin or to hydrolyse aesculin. The characteristics of the ten wine isolates suggest that they represent a novel species, for which the name Lactobacillus oeni sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 59bT (=CECT 7334T=DSM 19972T). PMID:19567555

  17. Lactobacillus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bifidobacterium (HOWARU Protect). Treating a bowel condition called ulcerative colitis. Some research suggests that taking a specific combination ... treat chronic pouchitis, a complication of surgery for ulcerative colitis. Continuous treatment for one year with a specific ...

  18. Fermented milks from Enterococcus faecalis TH563 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Note Fermented milks from Enterococcus faecalis TH563 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp strains isolated from Italian dairy products, Enterococcus faecalis TH563 or Lactobacillus delbrueckii of these strains for determining bioactive properties in dairy products. fermented milk / Enterococcus faecalis

  19. Genomic Diversity of Lactobacillus salivarius? †

    PubMed Central

    Raftis, Emma J.; Salvetti, Elisa; Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Strains of Lactobacillus salivarius are increasingly employed as probiotic agents for humans or animals. Despite the diversity of environmental sources from which they have been isolated, the genomic diversity of L. salivarius has been poorly characterized, and the implications of this diversity for strain selection have not been examined. To tackle this, we applied comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to 33 strains derived from humans, animals, or food. The CGH, based on total genome content, including small plasmids, identified 18 major regions of genomic variation, or hot spots for variation. Three major divisions were thus identified, with only a subset of the human isolates constituting an ecologically discernible group. Omission of the small plasmids from the CGH or analysis by MLST provided broadly concordant fine divisions and separated human-derived and animal-derived strains more clearly. The two gene clusters for exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis corresponded to regions of significant genomic diversity. The CGH-based groupings of these regions did not correlate with levels of production of bound or released EPS. Furthermore, EPS production was significantly modulated by available carbohydrate. In addition to proving difficult to predict from the gene content, EPS production levels correlated inversely with production of biofilms, a trait considered desirable in probiotic commensals. L. salivarius displays a high level of genomic diversity, and while selection of L. salivarius strains for probiotic use can be informed by CGH or MLST, it also requires pragmatic experimental validation of desired phenotypic traits. PMID:21131523

  20. Fermentation of sorghum dough by genus Lactobacillus

    E-print Network

    Clark, Susie Hong Nguyen

    1980-01-01

    produced a lower acidity and higher pH as compared with the pH and acidity of dough fermented by a combination of yeast and Lactobacillus. Yeast did affect the amount of acidity produced in early stages of fermentation with isolated Lactobacillus. Five... 13 14 16 36 39 42 45 48 63 65 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Results of carbohydrate fermentation tests of 6 chosen strains of lactobacilli Page 15 2 Split Plot Analysis of Variance of factors affecting pH and titratable acidity...

  1. Influence of Lactobacillus spp. from an Inoculant and of Weissella and Leuconostoc spp. from Forage Crops on Silage Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yimin; Benno, Yoshimi; Ogawa, Masuhiro; Ohmomo, Sadahiro; Kumai, Sumio; Nakase, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Lactobacillus spp. from an inoculant and Weissella and Leuconostoc spp. from forage crops were characterized, and their influence on silage fermentation was studied. Forty-two lactic acid-producing cocci were obtained from forage crops and grasses. All isolates were gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci that produced gas from glucose, and produced more than 90% of their lactate in the d-isomer form. These isolates were divided into groups A and B by sugar fermentation patterns. Two representative strains from the two groups, FG 5 and FG 13, were assigned to the species Weissella paramesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively, on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. Strains FG 5, FG 13, and SL 1 (Lactobacillus casei), isolated from a commercial inoculant, were used as additives to alfalfa and Italian ryegrass silage preparations. Lactic acid bacterium counts were higher in all additive-treated silages than in the control silage at an early stage of ensiling. During silage fermentation, inoculation with SL 1 more effectively inhibited the growth of aerobic bacteria and clostridia than inoculation with strain FG 5 or FG 13. SL 1-treated silages stored well. However, the control and FG 5- and FG 13-treated silages had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher pH and butyric acid and ammonia nitrogen contents and significantly (P < 0.05) lower lactate content than SL 1-treated silage. Compared with the control silage, SL 1 treatments reduced the proportion of d-(?)-lactic acid, gas production, and dry matter loss in two kinds of silage, but the FG 5 and FG 13 treatments gave similar values in alfalfa silages and higher values (P < 0.05) in Italian ryegrass silage. The results confirmed that heterofermentative strains of W. paramesenteroides FG 5 and L. pseudomesenteroides FG 13 did not improve silage quality and may cause some fermentation loss. PMID:9687461

  2. Influence of lactobacillus spp. from An inoculant and of weissella and leuconostoc spp. from forage crops on silage fermentation

    PubMed

    Cai; Benno; Ogawa; Ohmomo; Kumai; Nakase

    1998-08-01

    Lactobacillus spp. from an inoculant and Weissella and Leuconostoc spp. from forage crops were characterized, and their influence on silage fermentation was studied. Forty-two lactic acid-producing cocci were obtained from forage crops and grasses. All isolates were gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci that produced gas from glucose, and produced more than 90% of their lactate in the D-isomer form. These isolates were divided into groups A and B by sugar fermentation patterns. Two representative strains from the two groups, FG 5 and FG 13, were assigned to the species Weissella paramesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, respectively, on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. Strains FG 5, FG 13, and SL 1 (Lactobacillus casei), isolated from a commercial inoculant, were used as additives to alfalfa and Italian ryegrass silage preparations. Lactic acid bacterium counts were higher in all additive-treated silages than in the control silage at an early stage of ensiling. During silage fermentation, inoculation with SL 1 more effectively inhibited the growth of aerobic bacteria and clostridia than inoculation with strain FG 5 or FG 13. SL 1-treated silages stored well. However, the control and FG 5- and FG 13-treated silages had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher pH and butyric acid and ammonia nitrogen contents and significantly (P < 0. 05) lower lactate content than SL 1-treated silage. Compared with the control silage, SL 1 treatments reduced the proportion of D-(-)-lactic acid, gas production, and dry matter loss in two kinds of silage, but the FG 5 and FG 13 treatments gave similar values in alfalfa silages and higher values (P < 0.05) in Italian ryegrass silage. The results confirmed that heterofermentative strains of W. paramesenteroides FG 5 and L. pseudomesenteroides FG 13 did not improve silage quality and may cause some fermentation loss. PMID:9687461

  3. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  4. Lactobacillus salivarius 1077 (NRRL B-50053) bacteriocin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactobacillus salivarius 1077 (NRRL B-50053) was isolated from poultry intestinal materials after demonstrating in-vitro anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity. The isolate was then used for in-vitro fermentation. The protein content of the cell-free supernatant from the spent medium was precipitated ...

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF MANNITOL PRODUCTION BY LACTOBACILLUS INTERMEDIUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, a naturally occurring polyol, is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, medicine, and chemical industry. We have discovered that Lactobacillus intermedius NRRL B-3693 is an exceptionally good producer of mannitol. Therefore, we have investigated whether an industrial fermentation proce...

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 Electron Transport Chains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. W. Brooijmans; Vos de W. M; J. Hugenholtz

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 requires both heme and menaquinone to induce a respiration-like behavior under aerobic conditions. Addition of these compounds enhanced both biomass production, without progressive acidification, and the oxygen consumption rate. When both heme- and menaquinone were present, L. plantarum WCFS1 was also able to reduce nitrate. The ability to reduce nitrate was severely inhibited by the glucose levels

  7. Bactericidal activity of culture fluid components of Lactobacillus fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3, and their capacity to modulate adhesion of Candida albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anokhina, I V; Kravtsov, E G; Protsenko, A V; Yashina, N V; Yermolaev, A V; Chesnokova, V L; Dalin, M V

    2007-03-01

    Antagonistic activities of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21), L. casei ATCC 27216, and L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 and bactericidal activity of lactobacillus culture fluid towards E. coli strain K12, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis test cultures were studied. The bactericidal effect of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation (pH 6.0) on the test cultures was dose-dependent. Adhesion of C. albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epitheliocytes was more pronounced for strains isolated from women with asymptomatic infection than for strains isolated from women with manifest forms. L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation modulated adhesion of yeast-like fungi only if the fungal strain was initially highly adherent. PMID:18225764

  8. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus Isolates against Salmonella typhi In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daim, Amira; Hassouna, Nadia; Hafez, Mohamed; Ashor, Mohamed Seif Aldeen; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Enteric fever is a global health problem, and rapidly developing resistance to various drugs makes the situation more alarming. The potential use of Lactobacillus to control typhoid fever represents a promising approach, as it may exert protective actions through various mechanisms. Methods. In this study, the probiotic potential and antagonistic activities of 32 Lactobacillus isolates against Salmonella typhi were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity of cell free supernatants of Lactobacillus isolates, interference of Lactobacillus isolates with the Salmonella adherence and invasion, cytoprotective effect of Lactobacillus isolates, and possibility of concurrent use of tested Lactobacillus isolates and antibiotics were evaluated by testing their susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents, and their oxygen tolerance was also examined. Results. The results revealed that twelve Lactobacillus isolates could protect against Salmonella typhi infection through interference with both its growth and its virulence properties, such as adherence, invasion, and cytotoxicity. These Lactobacillus isolates exhibited MIC values for ciprofloxacin higher than those of Salmonella typhi and oxygen tolerance and were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Conclusion. The tested Lactobacillus plantarum isolates can be introduced as potential novel candidates that have to be subjected for in vivo and application studies for treatment and control of typhoid fever. PMID:24191248

  9. Modulation of Toll-like receptor ligands and Candida albicans-induced cytokine responses by specific probiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Theo S; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Jacobs, Cor; Joosten, Leo A B; van't Land, Belinda; Garssen, Johan; Netea, Mihai G

    2012-07-01

    Probiotics have been proposed as modulators of gut inflammation, especially in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In order to be able to use them in these clinical conditions, their capacity to modulate immune responses towards other stimuli or microorganisms has to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, three different potentially probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium breve (NumRes 204), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NumRes1) and Lactobacillus casei (DN-114 001), have been studied for their potential to modulate responses to stimulation with pure pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) ligands or to the gut commensal fungus Candida albicans. Cytokine production induced by PRR ligands or C. albicans was assessed in conditions of simultaneous stimulation or preincubation of primary immune cells with Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus spp. Results indicate that simultaneous stimulation leads to potentiation of IL-1? and IL-6 production, while the TNF? and IFN-? production was inhibited. In settings of pre-incubation with these potentially probiotic strains, lower production of TNF? was observed in the presence of B. breve. Moreover, C. albicans-induced IL-17 production was decreased after pre-incubation with both Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus probiotic strains. Whereas C. albicans induced cytokines are dampened by the tested probiotic strains, TNF? and IL-6 production by pure pattern-recognition receptor ligands are potentiated. Interestingly, an important role of Toll-like receptor 9 signalling that involves JNK kinase in the modulatory effects of these probiotic strains has been identified. In conclusion, specific probiotic strains exhibit cross-tolerance effects towards other inflammatory stimuli, especially C. albicans, which might have beneficial effects on gut inflammation. PMID:22521032

  10. Recombinant lactobacillus for fermentation of xylose to lactic acid and lactate

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K. (Golden, CO); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Littleton, CO); Mc Millan, James D. (Boulder, CO); Finkelstein, Mark (Fort Collins, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus MONT4 is provided which has been genetically engineered with xylose isomerase and xylulokinase genes from Lactobacillus pentosus to impart to the Lactobacillus MONT4 the ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass containing xylose to lactic acid.

  11. Effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains in children with atopic dermatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vibeke Rosenfeldt; Eva Benfeldt; Susanne Dam Nielsen; Kim Fleischer Michaelsen; Dorthe Lisbeth Jeppesen; Niels Henrik Valerius; Anders Paerregaard

    2003-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that oral bacteriotherapy with probiotics might be useful in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical and anti-inflammatory effect of probiotic supplementation in children with AD. Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 2 probiotic Lactobacillus strains (lyophilized Lactobacillus rhamnosus 19070-2 and Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 122460)

  12. A selective differential medium for Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Bujalance, Carmen; Jiménez-Valera, Maria; Moreno, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso

    2006-09-01

    The quantification of exogenous lactobacilli in faecal samples is frequently required for the evaluation of the intestinal colonization by probiotic bacteria. In this study, a selective and differential medium, designated LPSM, was developed for the culture of exogenous Lactobacillus plantarum. In quantitative assays, LPSM showed a sensitivity similar to those of enriched and Lactobacillus-adapted media. The presence of ciprofloxacin made LPSM inhibitory to most intestinal bacteria, including endogenous acid lactic bacteria, whereas exogenous L. plantarum strains grew producing a yellow color caused by acid production from sorbitol in the presence of bromocresol purple. The results showed that LPSM is suitable for detection and enumeration of L. plantarum in faecal samples. PMID:16554099

  13. Biofilm formation by vaginal Lactobacillus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, G; Mitchell, E; Salazar, M

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm formation by nonpathogenic bacteria is responsible for their stable maintenance in vivo ecosystems as it promotes long-term permanence on the host's vaginal mucosa. Biofilm formation by Lactobacilli has been reported in vitro but not in vivo. We hypothesize the presence of biofilm formation in vivo could be also documented by microscope photographs (MP) of wet mounts obtained from uninfected vaginal samples satisfying rigorous scientific identification criteria. We analyzed 400 MP from our database, and we were able to determine that 12 MP from 6 different patients contained clues of the formation of biofilm by Lactobacilli. The most probable lactobacillus involved is presumed to be Lactobacillus jensenii. The documentation of biofilm formation by vaginal Lactobacilli at fresh wet mount preparation is significant and has several important clinical preventive and therapeutic implications. PMID:25725906

  14. The Effects of Heat-Killed Wild-Type Lactobacillus casei Shirota on Allergic Immune Responses in an Allergy Mouse Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lay Hong Lim; Hai Yan Li; Chiung Hui Huang; Bee Wah Lee; Yuan Kun Lee; Kaw Yan Chua

    2009-01-01

    Background: Probiotics are used as a management strategy for allergic diseases, but their effects on allergic responses in sensitized allergic individuals remain unclear. This study explored the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics on allergen-specific allergic reactions in an allergy mouse model. Methods: C57BL\\/6 mice were presensitized by epicutaneous patching with recombinant Der p 2, and were subsequently administered orally with either

  15. Protective Effect of Lactobacillus casei Strain Shirota on Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection in Infant Rabbits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHINAGA OGAWA; KENSUKE SHIMIZU; KOJI NOMOTO; MASATOSHI TAKAHASHI; MASAAKI WATANUKI; RYUICHIRO TANAKA; TETSUYA TANAKA; TAKASHI HAMABATA; SHINJI YAMASAKI; YOSHIFUMI TAKEDA

    2001-01-01

    We examined colonization patterns of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), concentrations of Shiga toxins (Stxs) and specific immunoglobulin A (lgA) against Stxs and STEC bacterial cell surface antigen in various portions of the gastrointestinal tract in an infant rabbit infection model. After inoculation of 3- day-old infant rabbits with STEC strain 89020087 at low doses (;103 CFU\\/body), numbers of colonizing

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain 90sk and Lactobacillus brevis Strain 15f: Focusing on Neurotransmitter Genes.

    PubMed

    Yunes, Roman A; Klimina, Ksenia M; Emelyanov, Kirill V; Zakharevich, Natalia V; Poluektova, Elena U; Danilenko, Valery N

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strain 90sk and Lactobacillus brevis strain 15f were isolated from human intestinal microbiota. Both strains synthesize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. Detailed genome analyses will help to understand the role of GABA in the interaction of bacteria with human intestinal cells. PMID:25883284

  17. In vitro antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus fermentum and lactobacillus salivarius and their fermentative broth on periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling-Ju; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Chen, Wei-Jen; Hsieh, Chu-Yang; Wang, Pi-Chieh; Chen, Chung-Shih; Wang, Lina; Yang, Chi-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    As lactobacilli possess an antagonistic growth property, these bacteria may be beneficial as bioprotective agents for infection control. However, whether the antagonistic growth effects are attributed to the lactobacilli themselves or their fermentative broth remains unclear. The antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum as well as their fermentative broth were thus tested using both disc agar diffusion test and broth dilution method, and their effects on periodontal pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro at different concentrations and for different time periods were also compared. Both Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum and their concentrated fermentative broth were shown to inhibit significantly the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, although different inhibitory effects were observed for different pathogens. The higher the counts of lactobacilli and the higher the folds of concentrated fermentative broth, the stronger the inhibitory effects are observed. The inhibitory effect is demonstrated to be dose-dependent. Moreover, for the lactobacilli themselves, Lactobacillus fermentum showed stronger inhibitory effects than Lactobacillus salivarius. However, the fermentative broth of Lactobacillus fermentum showed weaker inhibitory effects than that of Lactobacillus salivarius. These data suggested that lactobacilli and their fermentative broth exhibit antagonistic growth activity, and consumption of probiotics or their broth containing lactobacilli may benefit oral health. PMID:24031966

  18. Eruca sativa Might Influence the Growth, Survival under Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions and Some Biological Features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fratianni, Florinda; Pepe, Selenia; Cardinale, Federica; Granese, Tiziana; Cozzolino, Autilia; Coppola, Raffaele; Nazzaro, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa). The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing not only the antioxidant activity of the medium, but also their own antioxidant power and antimicrobial activity; L. rhamnosus was not affected in the same manner. Overall, the presence of vegetables might help to boost, in specific cases, some of the characteristics of lactobacilli, including antioxidant and antimicrobial power. PMID:25275269

  19. Oral Probiotic Control Skin Inflammation by Acting on Both Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hacini-Rachinel, Feriel; Gheit, Hanane; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoit; Dif, Fariel; Nancey, Stéphane; Kaiserlian, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are believed to alleviate allergic and inflammatory skin disorders, but their impact on pathogenic effector T cells remains poorly documented. Here we show that oral treatment with the probiotic bacteria L. casei (DN-114 001) alone alleviates antigen-specific skin inflammation mediated by either protein-specific CD4+ T cells or hapten-specific CD8+ T cells. In the model of CD8+ T cell-mediated skin inflammation, which reproduces allergic contact dermatitis in human, inhibition of skin inflammation by L. casei is not due to impaired priming of hapten-specific IFN?-producing cytolytic CD8+ effector T cells. Alternatively, L. casei treatment reduces the recruitment of CD8+ effector T cells into the skin during the elicitation (i.e. symptomatic) phase of CHS. Inhibition of skin inflammation by L. casei requires MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells but not CD1d-restricted NK-T cells. L casei treatment enhanced the frequency of FoxP3+ Treg in the skin and increased the production of IL-10 by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in skin draining lymph nodes of hapten-sensitized mice. These data demonstrate that orally administered L. casei (DN-114 001) efficiently alleviate T cell-mediated skin inflammation without causing immune suppression, via mechanisms that include control of CD8+ effector T cells and involve regulatory CD4+ T cells. L. casei (DN-114 001) may thus represent a probiotic of potential interest for immunomodulation of T cell-mediated allergic skin diseases in human. PMID:19300508

  20. Study of antagonistic effects of Lactobacillus strains as probiotics on multi drug resistant (MDR) bacteria isolated from urinary tract infections (UTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Atiyeh; Kasra-Kermanshahi, Roha; Gharavi, Sara; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Saffarian, Parvaneh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by bacteria is one of the most frequent infections in human population. Inappropriate use of antibiotics, often leads to appearance of drug resistance in bacteria. However, use of probiotic bacteria has been suggested as a partial replacement. This study was aimed to assess the antagonistic effects of Lactobacillus standard strains against bacteria isolated from UTI infections. Materials and Methods: Among 600 samples; those with ?10,000 cfu/ml were selected as UTI positive samples. Enterococcus sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter sp., and Escherichia coli were found the most prevalent UTI causative agents. All isolates were screened for multi drug resistance and subjected to the antimicrobial effects of three Lactobacillus strains by using microplate technique and the MICs amounts were determined. In order to verify the origin of antibiotic resistance of isolates, plasmid curing using ethidium bromide and acridine orange was carried out. Results: No antagonistic activity in Lactobacilli suspension was detected against test on Enterococcus and Enterobacter strains and K. pneumoniae, which were resistant to most antibiotics. However, an inhibitory effect was observed for E. coli which were resistant to 8-9 antibiotics. In addition, L. casei was determined to be the most effective probiotic. Results from replica plating suggested one of the plasmids could be related to the gene responsible for ampicillin resistance. Conclusion: Treatment of E. coli with probiotic suspension was not effective on inhibition of the plasmid carrying hypothetical ampicillin resistant gene. Moreover, the plasmid profiles obtained from probiotic-treated isolates were identical to untreated isolates. PMID:24847423

  1. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry. PMID:25239531

  2. Lactobacillus silagei sp. nov., isolated from orchardgrass silage.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Kitahara, Maki; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Masuda, Takaharu; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tajima, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-reaction-positive, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming and catalase-negative rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated IWT126(T), was isolated from orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) silage preserved in Hachimantai, Iwate, Japan. The isolate showed growth at 15-45 °C, pH 3.5-7.5 and with 4.0?% (w/v) NaCl. The cell wall peptidoglycan did not contain meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the DNA G+C content was 45.6 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were C16?:?0 and C19?:?1 cyclo 9,10. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain IWT126(T) was classified as a member of the genus Lactobacillus and was most closely related to Lactobacillus odoratitofui YIT 11304(T) (98.7?%), Lactobacillus similis JCM 2765(T) (98.5?%), Lactobacillus collinoides JCM 1123(T) (97.6?%), Lactobacillus paracollinoides DSM 15502(T) (97.6?%) and Lactobacillus kimchicus DCY51(T) (96.9?%). Based on sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase ?-subunit (pheS) gene, strain IWT126(T) was well separated from its phylogenetic neighbours in the genus Lactobacillus. Based on physiological, biochemical and genotypic results, as well as low DNA-DNA relatedness to recognized phylogenetic relatives in the genus Lactobacillus, classification of strain IWT126(T) as a representive of a novel species named Lactobacillus silagei sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IWT126(T) (?=?JCM 19001(T)?=?DSM 27022(T)). PMID:23919960

  3. High-level mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by oral administration with Lactobacillus-expressed porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) S1 region combined with Lactobacillus-expressed N protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di-qiu; Ge, Jun-wei; Qiao, Xin-yuan; Jiang, Yan-ping; Liu, Song-mei; Li, Yi-jing

    2012-03-01

    To develop effective mucosal vaccine formulation against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection, the DNA fragments encoding spike protein immunodominant region S1 and nucleocapsid N of PEDV were inserted into pPG1 (surface-displayed) or pPG2 (secretory) plasmids followed by electrotransformation into Lactobacillus casei (Lc) to yield four recombinant strains: PG1-S1, PG2-S1, PG1-N, and PG2-N. After intragastric administration, it was observed that live Lc-expressing S1 protein combined with Lc-expressing N protein could elicit much more potent mucosal and systemic immune responses than the former alone (P < 0.001), however slightly inferior to the latter alone (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the surface-displayed mixture (PG1-S1+ PG1-N) revealed stronger immunogenicity than the secretory mixture (PG2-S1+ PG2-N) as well as PEDV-neutralizing potency in vitro (P < 0.001). On 49th day after the last immunization, splenocytes were prepared from mice immunized with surface-displayed mixture, secretory mixture and negative control to be stimulated by purified N and S protein, respectively. The results of ELISA analysis showed that N protein was capable of inducing a higher level of IL-4 (P < 0.001) and IFN-? (P < 0.001) than S1 protein in the immunized mice. Taken together, Lc-expressed N protein as molecular adjuvant or immunoenhancer was able to effectively facilitate the induction of mucosal and systemic immune responses by Lc-expressing S1 region. PMID:22134641

  4. Electron Micrograph of the Meat Spoilage Bacterium Lactobacillus sake

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Society For Microbiology

    2003-09-22

    This image is of the meat spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus sake. This strain was originally isolated from a vacuum-packaged meat product. To enhance its aesthetic appeal, the original black and white image was colored using Adobe Photoshop.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus oryzae Strain SG293T

    PubMed Central

    Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Mochizuki, Takako; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2014-01-01

    We report the 1.86-Mb draft genome and annotation of Lactobacillus oryzae SG293T isolated from fermented rice grains. This genome information may provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the fermentation of rice grains. PMID:25169865

  6. Antimicrobial substance from a human Lactobacillus strain.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, M; Jacobus, N V; Deneke, C; Gorbach, S L

    1987-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain GG, which was isolated from the feces of a normal person, produced a substance with potent inhibitory activity against a wide range of bacterial species. It inhibited anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium spp., Bacteroides spp., Bifidobacterium spp.), members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., as demonstrated by a microbiological assay; however, it did not inhibit other lactobacilli. The inhibitory activity occurred between pH 3 and 5 and was heat stable. Bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli was demonstrated at a dilution of 1:128. The inhibitory substance was distinct from lactic and acetic acids. It had a low molecular weight (less than 1,000) and was soluble in acetone-water (10:1). Because of these characteristics, the inhibitory material could not be considered a bacteriocin; it most closely resembled a microcin, which has been associated previously with members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:3307619

  7. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health. PMID:25176247

  8. Lactobacillus faecis sp. nov., isolated from animal faeces.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Futagawa-Endo, Yuka; Salminen, Seppo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Dicks, Leon

    2013-12-01

    Three lactic acid bacteria were isolated from faeces of a jackal (Canis mesomelas) and raccoons (Procyron lotor). The isolates formed a subcluster in the Lactobacillus salivarius phylogenetic group, closely related to Lactobacillus animalis, Lactobacillus apodemi and Lactobacillus murinus, by phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness revealed that the isolates belonged to the same taxon and were genetically separated from their phylogenetic relatives. The three strains were non-motile, obligately homofermentative and produced l-lactic acid as the main end-product from d-glucose. The strains metabolized raffinose. The major cellular fatty acids in the three strains were C16?:?0, C18?:?1?9c and C19?:?1 cyclo 9,10. Based on the data provided, it is concluded that the three strains represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus faecis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AFL13-2(T) (?=?JCM 17300(T)?=?DSM 23956(T)). PMID:23907223

  9. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mitchell L.; Shah, Divya; Jain, Poonam; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55?mg/1010?cfu) in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33?mg/1010?cfu) of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic. PMID:25295259

  10. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonize our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesized in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesized free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilization of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile. PMID:24399996

  11. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1924 Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1924 Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1924 Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum...Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1924 Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactobacillus fermentum. It contains the enzyme urease (CAS Reg. No. 9002-13-5), which facilitates the...

  16. Recombinant lactobacillus for fermentation of xylose to lactic acid and lactate

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Franden, M.A.; McMillan, J.D.; Finkelstein, M.

    1998-08-25

    A recombinant Lactobacillus MONT4 is provided which has been genetically engineered with xylose isomerase and xylulokinase genes from Lactobacillus pentosus to impart to the Lactobacillus MONT4 the ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass containing xylose to lactic acid. 4 figs.

  17. Propionic acid production by cofermentation of Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus diolivorans in sourdough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chonggang; Brandt, Markus J; Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    Cooperative metabolism of lactobacilli in silage fermentation converts lactate to propionate. This study aimed to determine whether propionate production by Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus diolivorans can be applied for bread preservation. Propionate formation was observed in cofermentation with L. buchneri and L. diolivorans in modified MRS broth as well as sourdough with low, medium and high ash contents. 48 mM of propionate was formed in sourdough with medium ash content, but only 9 and 28 mM propionate were formed in sourdoughs prepared from white wheat flour or whole wheat flour, respectively. Acetate levels were comparable in all three sourdoughs and ranged from 160 to 175 mM. Sourdough fermented with L. buchneri and L. diolivorans was used in breadmaking and its effect on fungal spoilage was compared to traditional sourdough or propionate addition to straight doughs. Bread slices were inoculated with Aspergillus clavatus, Cladosporium spp., Mortierella spp. or Penicillium roquefortii. The use of 20% experimental sourdough inhibited growth of three of the four moulds for more than 12 days. The use of 10% experimental sourdough deferred growth of two moulds by one day. Bread from traditional sourdough with added acetate had less effect in inhibiting mould growth. In conclusion, cofermentation with L. buchneri and L. diolivorans represents a process to increase antifungal capacities of bread. PMID:20227604

  18. Lactobacillus rossiae, a Vitamin B12 Producer, Represents a Metabolically Versatile Species within the Genus Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Maria; Bottacini, Francesca; Fosso, Bruno; Kelleher, Philip; Calasso, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Ventura, Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; van Sinderen, Douwe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rossiae is an obligately hetero-fermentative lactic acid bacterium, which can be isolated from a broad range of environments including sourdoughs, vegetables, fermented meat and flour, as well as the gastrointestinal tract of both humans and animals. In order to unravel distinctive genomic features of this particular species and investigate the phylogenetic positioning within the genus Lactobacillus, comparative genomics and phylogenomic approaches, followed by functional analyses were performed on L. rossiae DSM 15814T, showing how this type strain not only occupies an independent phylogenetic branch, but also possesses genomic features underscoring its biotechnological potential. This strain in fact represents one of a small number of bacteria known to encode a complete de novo biosynthetic pathway of vitamin B12 (in addition to other B vitamins such as folate and riboflavin). In addition, it possesses the capacity to utilize an extensive set of carbon sources, a characteristic that may contribute to environmental adaptation, perhaps enabling the strain's ability to populate different niches. PMID:25264826

  19. Lactobacillus salivarius: bacteriocin and probiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, S; Manai, M; Kergourlay, G; Prévost, H; Connil, N; Chobert, J-M; Dousset, X

    2013-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) antimicrobial peptides typically exhibit antibacterial activity against food-borne pathogens, as well as spoilage bacteria. Therefore, they have attracted the greatest attention as tools for food biopreservation. In some countries LAB are already extensively used as probiotics in food processing and preservation. LAB derived bacteriocins have been utilized as oral, topical antibiotics or disinfectants. Lactobacillus salivarius is a promising probiotic candidate commonly isolated from human, porcine, and avian gastrointestinal tracts (GIT), many of which are producers of unmodified bacteriocins of sub-classes IIa, IIb and IId. It is a well-characterized bacteriocin producer and probiotic organism. Bacteriocins may facilitate the introduction of a producer into an established niche, directly inhibit the invasion of competing strains or pathogens, or modulate the composition of the microbiota and influence the host immune system. This review gives an up-to-date overview of all L. salivarius strains, isolated from different origins, known as bacteriocin producing and/or potential probiotic. PMID:24010610

  20. Health-Promoting Properties of Lactobacillus helveticus

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus is an important industrial thermophilic starter that is predominantly employed in the fermentation of milk for the manufacture of several cheeses. In addition to its technological importance, a growing body of scientific evidence shows that strains belonging to the L. helveticus species have health-promoting properties. In this review, we synthesize the results of numerous primary literature papers concerning the ability of L. helveticus strains to positively influence human health. Several in vitro studies showed that L. helveticus possesses many common probiotic properties, such as the ability to survive gastrointestinal transit, adhere to epithelial cells, and antagonize pathogens. In vivo studies in murine models showed that L. helveticus could prevent gastrointestinal infections, enhance protection against pathogens, modulate host immune responses, and affect the composition of the intestinal microbiota. Interventional studies and clinical trials have also demonstrated a number of health-promoting properties of L. helveticus. Finally, several studies suggested that specific enzymatic activities of L. helveticus could indirectly benefit the human host by enhancing the bioavailability of nutrients, removing allergens and other undesired molecules from food, and producing bioactive peptides through the digestion of food proteins. In conclusion, this review demonstrates that in light of the scientific literature presented, L. helveticus can be included among the bacterial species that are generally considered to be probiotic. PMID:23181058

  1. Genome Instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Douwe; van IJcken, Wilfred; Venema, Koen

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the genomic islands LGGISL1,2. The deleted DNA segments consist of 34 genes in one isolate and 84 genes in the other and are flanked by identical insertion elements. Among the missing genes are the spaCBA genes, which encode pilin subunits involved in adhesion to mucus and persistence of the strains in the human intestinal tract. Subsequent quantitative PCR analyses of six commercial probiotic products confirmed that two more products contain a heterogeneous population of L. rhamnosus GG variants, including genotypes with or without spaC. These results underline the relevance for quality assurance and control measures targeting genome stability in probiotic strains and justify research assessing the effect of genetic rearrangements in probiotics on the outcome of in vitro and in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:23354703

  2. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Molenaar, Douwe; van IJcken, Wilfred; Venema, Koen; Kort, Remco

    2013-04-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the genomic islands LGGISL1,2. The deleted DNA segments consist of 34 genes in one isolate and 84 genes in the other and are flanked by identical insertion elements. Among the missing genes are the spaCBA genes, which encode pilin subunits involved in adhesion to mucus and persistence of the strains in the human intestinal tract. Subsequent quantitative PCR analyses of six commercial probiotic products confirmed that two more products contain a heterogeneous population of L. rhamnosus GG variants, including genotypes with or without spaC. These results underline the relevance for quality assurance and control measures targeting genome stability in probiotic strains and justify research assessing the effect of genetic rearrangements in probiotics on the outcome of in vitro and in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:23354703

  3. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    PubMed Central

    Cremonesi, Paola; Chessa, Stefania; Castiglioni, Bianca

    2013-01-01

    The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of Lactobacillus helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract. As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones. PMID:23335916

  4. Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 electron transport chains.

    PubMed

    Brooijmans, R J W; de Vos, W M; Hugenholtz, J

    2009-06-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 requires both heme and menaquinone to induce respiration-like behavior under aerobic conditions. The addition of these compounds enhanced both biomass production, without progressive acidification, and the oxygen consumption rate. When both heme and menaquinone were present, L. plantarum WCFS1 was also able to reduce nitrate. The ability to reduce nitrate was severely inhibited by the glucose levels that are typically found in L. plantarum growth media (1 to 2% [vol/vol] glucose). In contrast, comparable mannitol levels did not inhibit the reduction of nitrate. L. plantarum reduced nitrate with concomitant formation of nitrite and ammonia. Genes that encode a bd-type cytochrome (cydABCD) and a nitrate reductase (narGHJI) were identified in the genome of L. plantarum. The narGHJI operon is part of a cluster of genes that includes the molybdopterin cofactor biosynthesis genes and narK. Besides a menaquinone source, isogenic mutants revealed that cydA and ndh1 are required for the aerobic-respiration-like response and narG for nitrate reduction. The ndh1 mutant was still able to reduce nitrate. The existence of a nonredundant branched electron transport chain in L. plantarum WCFS1 that is capable of using oxygen or nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor is proposed. PMID:19346351

  5. Vaginal Lactobacillus: biofilm formation in vivo – clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ventolini, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli provide protection against intrusive pathogenic bacteria. Some Lactobacillus spp. produce in vitro a thick, protective biofilm. We report in vivo formation of biofilm by vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii. The biofilm formation was captured in fresh wet-mount microscopic samples from asymptomatic patients after treatment for recurrent bacterial vaginitis. In vivo documentation of biofilm formation is in our opinion noteworthy, and has significant clinical implications, among which are the possibility to isolate, grow, and therapeutically utilize lactobacilli to prevent recurrent vaginal infections and preterm labor associated with vaginal microbial pathogens. PMID:25733930

  6. Characterisation of the microbiota of rice sourdoughs and description of Lactobacillus spicheri sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Meroth, Christiane B; Hammes, Walter P; Hertel, Christian

    2004-03-01

    The microbiota of two industrially processed rice sourdoughs was characterised by bacteriological culture in combination with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S/28S rDNA sequence analysis. Rice sourdough I was continuously propagated for several years by back-slopping every week, whereas sourdough II was processed by using a commercial starter culture and back-slopping daily for three days. In rice sourdough II Candida krusei and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus kimchii, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus pontis dominated at the first day of fermentation. RAPD analysis of lactobacilli revealed identical profiles for each of the species except for L. fermentum and L. pontis indicating the presence of different strains. Fluctuations within the LAB community during fermentation were monitored by PCR-DGGE. L. pontis decreased in numbers over time and L. curvatus became dominant after 3 days of fermentation. Rice sourdough I contained S. cerevisiae, Lactobacillus paracasei (present with three different RAPD types), Lactobacillus paralimentarius, and a Lactobacillus strain which could not be allotted to any valid species. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed Lactobacillus brevis as the closest relative (97.3% sequence similarity). Differences in some phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA relatedness indicated that the strain represents a new Lactobacillus species, for which the name Lactobacillus spicheri is proposed. PMID:15046303

  7. Protein O-glucosylation in Lactobacillus buchneri

    PubMed Central

    Anzengruber, Julia; Pabst, Martin; Neumann, Laura; Sekot, Gerhard; Heinl, Stefan; Grabherr, Reingard; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Based on the previous demonstration of surface (S-) layer protein glycosylation in Lactobacillus buchneri 41021/251 and because of general advantages of lactic acid bacteria for applied research, protein glycosylation in this bacterial species was investigated in detail. The cell surface of L. buchneri CD034 is completely covered with an oblique 2D crystalline array (lattice parameters, a =5.9 nm; b =6.2 nm; ? ~ 77°) formed by self-assembly of the S-layer protein SlpB. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses revealed that SlpB is the most abundant protein and that it is O-glycosylated at four serine residues within the sequence S152-A-S154-S155-A-S157 with, on average, seven Glc(?1-6) residues, each. Subcellular fractionation of strain CD034 indicated a sequential order of SlpB export and glucosylation as evidenced by lack of glucosylation of cytosolic SlpB. Protein glycosylation analysis was extended to strain L. buchneri NRRL B-30929 where an analogous glucosylation scenario could be detected, with the S-layer glycoprotein SlpN containing an O-glycosylation motif identical to that of SlpB. This corroborates previous data on S-layer protein glucosylation of strain 41021/251 and let us propose a species-wide S-layer protein O-glucosylation in L. buchneri targeted at the sequence motif S-A-S-S-A-S. Search of the L. buchneri genomes for the said glucosylation motif revealed one further ORF, encoding the putative glycosyl-hydrolase LbGH25B and LbGH25N in L. buchneri CD034 and NRRL B-30929, respectively, for which we have indications of a glycosylation comparable to that of the S-layer proteins. These findings demonstrate the presence of a distinct protein O-glucosylation system in Gram-positive and beneficial microbes. PMID:24162649

  8. Description of Lactobacillus iwatensis sp. nov., isolated from orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) silage, and Lactobacillus backii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Kitahara, Maki; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Masuda, Takaharu; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tajima, Kiyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Two bacterial strains, designated IWT246(T) and IWT248, were isolated from orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) silage from Iwate prefecture, Japan, and examined for a taxonomic study. Both organisms were rod-shaped, Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic and homofermentative. The cell wall did not contain meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major fatty acids were C18?:?1?9c and C19 cyclo 9,10/:1. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA, pheS and rpoA gene sequences revealed that these strains were novel and belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the isolates were most closely related to the type strains of the following members of the genus Lactobacillus: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. coryniformis (96.7?% similarity), L. coryniformis subsp. torquens (96.6?%), L. bifermentans (95.5?%) and L. rennini (94.1?%). However, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of both IWT246(T) and IWT248 were 99.7?% similar to that of 'Lactobacillus backi' JCM 18665; this name has not been validly published. Genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses confirmed that these novel strains occupy a unique taxonomic position. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments demonstrated genotypic separation of the novel isolates from related Lactobacillus species. The name Lactobacillus iwatensis sp. nov. is proposed for the novel isolates, with strain IWT246(T) (?=?JCM 18838(T)?=?DSM 26942(T)) as the type strain. Our results also suggest that 'L. backi' does represent a novel Lactobacillus species. The cells did not contain meso-diaminopimelic acid in their cell-wall peptidoglycan and the major fatty acids were C16?:?0, C19 cyclo 9,10/:1 and summed feature 10 (one or more of C18?:?1?11c, C18?:?1?9t, C18?:?1?6t and unknown ECL 17.834). We therefore propose the corrected name Lactobacillus backii sp. nov., with the type strain JCM 18665(T) (?=?LMG 23555(T)?=?DSM 18080(T)?=?L1062(T)). PMID:23687059

  9. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii using alginate and gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Flores, Walfred; Ramos-Ramírez, Emma Gloria; Salazar-Montoya, Juan Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    Sodium alginate (SA) at 2% (w/v) and low acylated gellan gum (LAG) at 0.2% (w/v) were used to microencapsulate Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii spp lactis by employing the internal ionic gelation technique through water-oil emulsions at three different stirring rates: 480, 800 and 1200 rpm. The flow behavior of the biopolymer dispersions, the activation energy of the emulsion, the microencapsulation efficiency, the size distribution, the microcapsules morphology and the effect of the stirring rate on the culture viability were analyzed. All of the dispersions exhibited a non-Newtonian shear-thinning flow behavior because the apparent viscosity decreased in value when the shear rate was increased. The activation energy was calculated using the Arrhenius-like equation; the value obtained for the emulsion was 32.59 kJ/mol. It was observed that at 400 rpm, the microencapsulation efficiency was 92.83%, whereas at 800 and 1200 rpm, the stirring rates reduced the efficiency to 15.83% and 4.56%, respectively, evidencing the sensitivity of the microorganisms to the shear rate (13.36 and 20.05 s(-1)). Both optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed spherical microcapsules with irregular topography due to the presence of holes on its surface. The obtained size distribution range was modified when the stirring rate was increased. At 400 rpm, bimodal behavior was observed in the range of 20-420 ?m; at 800 and 1200 rpm, the behavior became unimodal and the range was from 20 to 200 ?m and 20 to 160 ?m, respectively. PMID:23987441

  10. Development of an amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum silage strain expressing the Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, A; Hols, P; Jore, J; Leer, R J; O'Connell, M; Delcour, J

    1994-01-01

    An amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum silage strain with the starch-degrading ability displayed by Lactobacillus amylovorus was developed. An active fragment of the gene coding for alpha-amylase production in L. amylovorus was cloned and integrated into the chromosome of the competitive inoculant strain L. plantarum Lp80 at the cbh locus. The alpha-amylase gene fragment was also introduced into L. plantarum Lp80 on an autoreplicative plasmid. Both constructions were also performed in the laboratory strain L. plantarum NCIB8826. All four recombinant strains secreted levels of amylase ranging from 23 to 69 U/liter, compared with 47 U/liter for L. amylovorus. Secretion levels were higher in L. plantarum NCIB8826 than in L. plantarum Lp80 derivatives and were higher in recombinant strains containing autoreplicative plasmids than in the corresponding integrants. The L. plantarum Lp80 derivative containing the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase gene fragment integrated into the host chromosome secreted alpha-amylase to a level comparable to that of L. amylovorus and was stable over 50 generations of growth under nonselective conditions. It grew to a higher cell density than either the parent strain or L. amylovorus in MRS medium containing a mixture of starch and glucose as the fermentable carbohydrate source. This recombinant alpha-amylolytic L. plantarum strain would therefore seem to have considerable potential as a silage inoculant for crops such as alfalfa, in which water-soluble carbohydrate levels are frequently low but starch is present as an alternative carbohydrate source. Images PMID:7986030

  11. Development of an amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum silage strain expressing the Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase gene.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, A; Hols, P; Jore, J; Leer, R J; O'Connell, M; Delcour, J

    1994-10-01

    An amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum silage strain with the starch-degrading ability displayed by Lactobacillus amylovorus was developed. An active fragment of the gene coding for alpha-amylase production in L. amylovorus was cloned and integrated into the chromosome of the competitive inoculant strain L. plantarum Lp80 at the cbh locus. The alpha-amylase gene fragment was also introduced into L. plantarum Lp80 on an autoreplicative plasmid. Both constructions were also performed in the laboratory strain L. plantarum NCIB8826. All four recombinant strains secreted levels of amylase ranging from 23 to 69 U/liter, compared with 47 U/liter for L. amylovorus. Secretion levels were higher in L. plantarum NCIB8826 than in L. plantarum Lp80 derivatives and were higher in recombinant strains containing autoreplicative plasmids than in the corresponding integrants. The L. plantarum Lp80 derivative containing the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase gene fragment integrated into the host chromosome secreted alpha-amylase to a level comparable to that of L. amylovorus and was stable over 50 generations of growth under nonselective conditions. It grew to a higher cell density than either the parent strain or L. amylovorus in MRS medium containing a mixture of starch and glucose as the fermentable carbohydrate source. This recombinant alpha-amylolytic L. plantarum strain would therefore seem to have considerable potential as a silage inoculant for crops such as alfalfa, in which water-soluble carbohydrate levels are frequently low but starch is present as an alternative carbohydrate source. PMID:7986030

  12. Improvement of Riboflavin Production by Lactobacillus fermentum Isolated from Yogurt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Jayashree; J. Rajendhran; K. Jayaraman; G. Kalaichelvan; P. Gunasekaran

    2011-01-01

    The riboflavin production by Lactobacillus fermentum isolated from yogurt was improved by inactivation of folE gene. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) serves as the precursor for both folate as well as riboflavin biosynthesis. The folE gene of Lb. fermentum, which codes for GTP cyclohydrolase I was inactivated by the insertion of erythromycin resistance gene cassette through recombination and the riboflavin production by

  13. High pressure-sensitive gene expression in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. F. Vogel; M. Pavlovic; S. Hörmann; M. A. Ehrmann

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacte- rium used in food biotechnology. It is necessary to investigate many aspects of a model organism to elucidate mechanisms of stress re- sponse, to facilitate preparation, application and performance in food fermentation, to understand mechanisms of inactivation, and to iden- tify novel tools for high pressure biotechnology. To investigate the mechanisms of

  14. Antibacterial Effect of the Adhering Human Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain LB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIE-HELENE COCONNIER; VANESSA LIEVIN; MARIE-FRANCOISE BERNET-CAMARD; SYLVIE HUDAULT; ALAIN L. SERVIN

    1997-01-01

    The spent culture supernatant of the human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB produces an antibacterial activity against a wide range of gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. It decreased the in vitro viability of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Kleb- siella pneumoniae, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp. In contrast, it did not inhibit lactobacilli and bifidobacteria.

  15. Molecular Diversity within Lactobacillus helveticus as Revealed by Genotypic Characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GIORGIO GIRAFFA; MONICA GATTI; LIA ROSSETTI; LUCIA SENINI; ERASMO NEVIANI

    2000-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus is a homofermentative thermophilic lactic acid bacterium that is used in the manu- facture of Swiss type and long-ripened Italian cheeses, such as Emmental, Grana, and Provolone cheeses. Substantial differences in several technologically important characteristics are found among L. helveticus strains isolated from natural dairy starter cultures. In the present study we investigated the genotypic diver- sity of

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diversity and functional properties of Lactobacillus

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lactobacillus is the largest and, perhaps, the most important genus of lactic acid bacteria, representatives vegetable or plant fermentations. It is one of a group of mesophilic lactobacilli which may become cheeses, respectively, survived simulated gastrointestinal conditions and were considered to be acid

  17. Diacetyl production and growth of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on multiple substrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Jyoti; A. K. Suresh; K. V. Venkatesh

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a heterolactic acid bacterium, which can be used to produce flavour compounds like diacetyl and acetoin. Various startegies have been applied to improve the growth rate and diacetyl yield. The use of multiple substrates affected growth as well as the yield of diacetyl. Growth on a medium containing glucose demonstrated a diauxic growth profile, with the second

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of Lactobacillus reuteri 121 reuteransucrase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kralj; G. H. van Geel-Schutten; M. J. E. C. van der Maarel; L. Dijkhuizen

    2004-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri strain 121 uses sucrose for synthesis of a unique, soluble glucan (‘reuteran’) with mainly ?-(1?4) glucosidic linkages. The gene (gtfA) encoding this glucansucrase enzyme had previously been characterized. Here, a detailed biochemical and molecular analysis of the GTFA enzyme is presented. This is believed to be the first report describing reuteransucrase enzyme kinetics and the oligosaccharides synthesized with

  19. Probiotic characteristics of Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from tulum cheese.

    PubMed

    Tulumo?lu, ?ener; Kaya, Halil ?brahim; ?im?ek, Ömer

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic characteristics of Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from Tulum cheese. Seven L. fermentum strains were selected among the isolated and identified lactobacillus strains due to their abundance. When the gastric condition was considered, L. fermentum LP3 and LP4 were able to tolerate pH 2.5 and 1% bile salt. All L. fermentum strains had similar enzymatic activity and antibiotic resistance pattern but the highest antagonistic effect was detected within LP3, LP4 and LP6. Cholesterol assimilation amount of L. fermentum strains ranged between 12.1 and 45.3% in MRS and 20.7-71.1% in MRS with bile. The highest cholesterol assimilation in MRS and MRS with bile was occurred by LP3 and LP4, respectively. L. fermentum LP2 adhered to caco-2 cells more than Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG where LP3, LP4 and LP5 adhered at similar level. In conclusion, L. fermentum LP3 and LP4 fulfilled sufficient criteria to be probiotics for use as a starter culture in the production of tulum cheese or other dairy products. Also this study indicated that some food-associated Lactobacillus strains non-predominant for gut biota have significant probiotic potential. PMID:25270832

  20. Functional properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejae; Yoon, Hongsup; Ji, Yosep; Kim, Hannah; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Jieun; Shin, Heuynkil; Holzapfel, Wilhelm

    2011-01-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented vegetable product generally consumed raw as a side-dish with practically every meal. Twelve mild acid producing facultatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus strains were selected for their potential as starter cultures for fermentation of kimchi, and evaluated for their functional properties. Eleven strains were identified as Lactobacillus sakei and one as Lactobacillus plantarum. The strains identified as L. sakei differed in some physiological features; of particular interest was the fact that 9 of these strains produced L(+) lactic acid from glucose in presence of acetate. All strains were able to survive gastrointestinal conditions simulating stomach and duodenum passage. In addition, they showed higher adherence to HT-29 cells than Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a commercial probiotic strain used worldwide. These strains also showed antimicrobial activity against a number of food-borne pathogens. Their ability to lower cholesterol was demonstrated by BSH (bile salt hydrolytic) activity, and cholesterol assimilation tests in vitro. The results suggest the probiotic potential of these strains for use in kimchi fermentation. PMID:21215484

  1. Lactobacillus plantarum mediated fermentation of Psidium guajava L. fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravish; Suryanarayana, Lakshminarayana Chikkanayakanahalli; Chandrashekara, Karunakara Alageri; Krishnan, Padma; Kush, Anil; Ravikumar, Puja

    2015-04-01

    Sixteen hour fermentation of the white flesh raw guava Lucknow 49 cultivar using Lactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2912 was taken up for enhancing the antioxidant potential. The fermented guava product with high antioxidant potential, total phenolic content and short and medium chain fatty acids can be used as functional food. PMID:25300190

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus against microbial flora of cervicovaginal infections

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Shouri, Raju Naidu Devanaboyaina; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the probiotic nature of Lactobacillus in preventing cervical pathogens by studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial activity against vaginal pathogens. Methods Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy vaginal swabs on selective media and different pathogenic bacteria were isolated by using different selective media. The Lactobacillus strains were tested for the production of hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobial compounds along with probiotic properties. Results Of the 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains, strain 1, 3 and 6 are high hydrogen peroxide producers and the rest were low producers. Results of pH and amines tests indicated that pH increased with fishy odour in the vaginal fluids of cervicovaginal infection patients when compared with vaginal fluids of healthy persons. The isolates were found to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-capsule forming and catalase-negative bacilli. The results of antimicrobial activity of compounds indicated that 280 and 140 µg/mL was the minimum concentration to inhibit the growth of both pathogens and test organisms respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Lactobacillus producing antimicrobial compounds inhibits the growth of cervical pathogens, revealing that the hypothesis of preventing vaginal infection by administering probiotic organisms has a great appeal to patients, which colonize the vagina to help, restore and maintain healthy vagina.

  3. Freezing resistance improvement of Lactobacillus reuteri by using cell immobilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jen-Horng Tsen; Hui-Ying Huang; Yeu-Pyng Lin; V. An-Erl King

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri shows certain beneficial effects to human health and is recognized as a probiotic. However, its application in frozen foods is still not popular because of its low survival during freezing and frozen storage. Cell immobilization technique could effectively exert protection effects to microbial cells in order to enhance their endurance to unfavorable environmental conditions as well as to

  4. Probiotic-Associated Aspiration Pneumonia Due to Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sean T.; Afolabi, Folashade; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are low-virulence, commensal organisms of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and are commonly used as “probiotic supplements.” Herein, we describe an episode of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis with bacterial superinfection secondary to administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in an 11-month-old female with trisomy 21. PMID:24899028

  5. Lactobacillus frigidus n.sp. Isolated from Brewery Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Bhandari; T. K. Walker

    1953-01-01

    SUMMARY: Details are given of a new species of the genus Lactobacillus isolated from a sample of brewery yeast. The cells appear as short thick rods, mainly in pairs and small clumps. This organism, which ferments arabinose, xylose, glucose, fructose, mannose and sucrose, has the low optimum temperature of 22-23' and fails to grow above 30'. It has been named

  6. Notes on the Phylogenetic Background to Lactobacillus Taxonomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. H. G. Davis

    1964-01-01

    SUMMARY Speculations about the phylogeny and natural relationships of and within the genus Lactobacillus are made, based upon current taxonomic knowledge. Phylogenetic speculation has long held a fascination for biologists who interest themselves in taxonomy and it remains to be seen whether the recent invasion of this field by computers will render this fascination fatal. The present notes are an

  7. Heat shock response in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Huet, Claude; Crecchio, Carmine; Fox, Patrick F; Gobbetti, Marco

    2004-03-01

    Heat stress resistance and response were studied in strains of Lactobacillus plantarum. Stationary-phase cells of L. plantarum DPC2739 had decimal reduction times (D values) (D value was the time that it took to reduce the number of cells by 1 log cycle) in sterile milk of 32.9, 14.7, and 7.14 s at 60, 72, and 75 degrees C, respectively. When mid-exponential-phase cells were used, the D values decreased. The temperature increases which caused a 10-fold reduction in the D value ranged from 9 to 20 degrees C, depending on the strain. Part of the cell population treated at 72 degrees C for 90 s recovered viability during incubation at 7 degrees C in sterile milk for 20 days. When mid-exponential- or stationary-phase cells of L. plantarum DPC2739 were adapted to 42 degrees C for 1 h, the heat resistance at 72 degrees C for 90 s increased ca. 3 and 2 log cycles, respectively. Heat-adapted cells also showed increased growth at pH 5 and in the presence of 6% NaCl. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins expressed by control and heat-adapted cells revealed changes in the levels of expression of 31 and 18 proteins in mid-exponential- and stationary-phase cells, respectively. Twelve proteins were commonly induced. Nine proteins induced in the heat-adapted mid-exponential- and/or stationary-phase cells of L. plantarum DPC2739 were subjected to N-terminal sequencing. These proteins were identified as DnaK, GroEL, trigger factor, ribosomal proteins L1, L11, L31, and S6, DNA-binding protein II HlbA, and CspC. All of these proteins have been found to play a role in the mechanisms of stress adaptation in other bacteria. Antibodies against GroES detected a protein which was induced moderately, while antibodies against DnaJ and GrpE reacted with proteins whose level of expression did not vary after heat adaptation. This study showed that the heat resistance of L. plantarum is a complex process involving proteins with various roles in cell physiology, including chaperone activity, ribosome stability, stringent response mediation, temperature sensing, and control of ribosomal function. The physiological mechanisms of response to pasteurization in L. plantarum are fundamental for survival in cheese during manufacture. PMID:15006751

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel CO2-Tolerant Lactobacillus Strain from Crystal Geyser, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. U.; Major, J. R.; Omelon, C. R.; Shanahan, T. M.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    Capnophiles are microbes that grow in CO2 enriched environments. Cultured capnophiles generally, grow in 2 to 25% CO2, or 0.02 to 0.25 atm. When CO2 is sequestered in deep saline aquifers, the newly created high CO2 environment may select for capnophlic organisms. In this study, a capnophile was isolated from Crystal Geyser, a CO2 spring along the Little Grand Wash Fault, UT, a site being investigated as an analogue to CO2 sequestration. Crystal Geyser periodically erupts with CO2 charged water, indicating the presence of very high CO2 pressures below the subsurface, similar to sequestration conditions. Biomass was sampled by pumping springwater from approximately 10 m below the surface through filters. Filters were immediately placed in selective media within pressure vessels where they were pressurized to 10 atm in the field. Subsequent recultures produced an isolate, designated CG-1, that is most closely (99%) related to Lactobacillus casei on the strain level. CG-1 grows in tryptic soy broth, in PCO2 ranging from 0 atm to 10 atm, 40 times higher than pressures of previously cultured capnophiles. At 25 atm, growth is inhibited though survival can be as long as 5 days. At 50 atm, survival is poor, with sterilization occurring by 24 hours. Growth is optimal between pH values of 6 to 8, though sluggish if no CO2 is present. Its optimal salinity is 0.25 M NaCl though growth is observed ranging from 0 to 1 M NaCl. Growth is observed between 25o to 45o C, but optimal at 25oC. It consumes long-chained carbon molecules such as glucose, sucrose, and crude oil, and exhibits poor growth when supplied with lactate, acetate, formate, and pyruvate. The organism likely performs lactic acid fermentation as it requires no electron acceptors for growth and produces no acid, gas, and sulfide in triple sugar iron agar slants. CG-1 also expresses a variety of lipids, most notably cyclopropyl C19 (cycC19), or lactobacillic acid, characteristic of organisms belonging to the Lactobacilli. At 1 atm PCO2, CG-1 largely expresses monounsaturated fatty acids. At 10 atm, this changes to an increase saturated fatty acids and cycC19 consistent with a cell size decrease. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the organism as rod shaped at 1 atm. At 10 atm, the organism appears smaller, amorphous, and surrounded by a sheath. However, invaginations present in the cell at this pressure indicate cell division at high PCO2. Isolation of this organism shows that viable microbial populations can exist during CO2 sequestration and these organisms will likely contribute to changes in geochemistry and permeability of saline aquifers, which can affect the overall fate of stored CO2. Furthermore, its tolerance and reliance on CO2 pressures higher than any other known capnophile means this organism should be classified as a new kind of extremeophile, a hyper-capnophile.

  9. The Effects of Two Lactobacillus plantarum Strains on Rat Lipid Metabolism Receiving a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Salaj, Rastislav; Štofilová, Jana; Šoltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance. PMID:24470789

  10. Characterization of Indigenous Lactobacillus Strains for Probiotic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mojgani, Naheed; Hussaini, Fatimah; Vaseji, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Background: Probiotics are defined as adequate amount of live microorganisms able to confer health benefits on the host. Currently, most commercially available probiotic products in the market belong to genera Lactobacillus. Traditional dairy products are usually rich source of Lactobacillus strains with significant health benefits. In order to evaluate the probiotic potential of these bacteria, it is essential to assess their health benefits, efficacy, and safety. Objectives: The probiotic efficacy of two Lactobacillus strains namely Lactobacillus pentosus LP05 and L. brevis LB32 was evaluated. They were previously isolated from ewes’ milk in a rural area in East Azerbaijan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The selected isolates were tested for certain phenotypic characters and identified to genus and species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and species specific primers. Further analysis included acid and bile resistance, antagonistic activity, cholesterol removing ability, survival in simulated gastric and upper intestine contents, aggregation and coaggregation properties. Finally, the adhering ability of the selected Lactobacillus strains to epithelial cells was tested using Caco-2 cell lines. Results: The selected isolates tolerated bile salt concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 3%, however their coefficient of inhibition were varied. Both isolates hydrolyzed bile and grew at pH values of 3, 4, and 5, while isolate LP05 was not able to hydrolyze arginine. Based on 16s rRNA gene sequencing and species-specific primers, the isolates were identified as L. brevis LB32 and L. pentosus LP05. In contrast to simulated gastric conditions, the growth rate of the isolates in alkaline conditions of upper intestine increased significantly with the passage of time reaching its maximum in 24 hours. These 2 isolates inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. Furthermore, L. brevis LB32 was able to reduce approximately 86% of cholesterol compared to L. pentosus LP05, which showed only 69% of reduction. Higher aggregation and coaggregation percentage and adherence to Caco-2 cell line was observed in L. pentosus LP05 compared to L. brevis LB32. Conclusions: This research study proved the presence of viable probiotic LAB microflora in the ewe milk with enhanced health benefits. The 2 selected Lactobacillus strains could be exploited in dairy or pharmaceutical industry in future.

  11. Use of Hydrolysates from Yellowfin Tuna ( Thunnus albacares ) Heads as a Complex Nitrogen Source for Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reza Safari; Ali Motamedzadegan; Mahmoudreza Ovissipour; Joe Mack Regenstein; Asbjorn Gildberg; Barbara Rasco

    Two different peptones obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) head waste have been shown to be effective in promoting the growth of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1332, Lactobacillus acidophilus PTCC 1643, Lactobacillus casei PTCC 1608, Lactobacillus delbrukii PTCC 1333, Lactobacillus plantarum PTCC 1058, Lactococcus lactis PTCC 1336, and Lactobacillus sakei PTCC

  12. Identification of lactobacilli from sourdough and description of Lactobacillus pontis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Vogel, R F; Böcker, G; Stolz, P; Ehrmann, M; Fanta, D; Ludwig, W; Pot, B; Kersters, K; Schleifer, K H; Hammes, W P

    1994-04-01

    The microflora of sourdough preparations was investigated by examining the physiological characteristics, whole-cell protein patterns, and 16S rRNA sequences of Lactobacillus isolates. Strains isolated from sourdough were placed in the species Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus sanfrancisco, and Lactobacillus reuteri. 16S rRNA sequences were determined for L. brevis, Lactobacillus fructivorans, Lactobacillus fermentum, L. sanfrancisco, and L. reuteri, and oligonucleotide probes for fast specific identification of these sourdough lactobacilli were deduced. The physiological characteristics, protein patterns, and 16S rRNA sequences of these organisms were compared with data for other sourdough lactobacilli and additional reference strains. Strains of a Lactobacillus species were isolated from rye sourdough; these strains may account for most of the flora in sourdough made from wheat or rye. These organisms were differentiated from other sourdough lactobacilli by their protein pattern, 16S rRNA sequence, G + C content, and physiological properties. The 16S rRNA sequence of this species was determined, and we constructed a phylogenetic tree which reflected the relationships of this species to other lactobacilli. This organism is closely related to L. reuteri. A new Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus pontis, is proposed. The type strain is L. pontis LTH 2587 (= DSM 8475 = LMG 14187). We describe a general strategy in which a polyphasic approach was used to characterize a new species. PMID:8186088

  13. Assimilation ofCholesterol byLactobacillus acidophilust

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. GILLILAND; C. R. NELSON; C. MAXWELL

    1985-01-01

    Considerable variation was found among strains ofLactobacillus acidophilus isolated fromthefecal flora of pigs withregard totheability togrow well inthepresenceofbile andtoassimilate cholesterol fromalaboratory growth medium.Theuptake ofcholesterol occurred onlywhentheculture(s) was growing inthepresenceof bile underanaerobic conditions. Consumption ofL.acidophilus RP32,which was selected forits ability togrow wellinthepresenceofbile andtoassimilate cholesterol fromthelaboratory medium,significantly inhibited increases inserum cholesterol levels ofpigs(P< 0.05) feda high-cholesterol diet. Consumption ofL. acidophilus P47,which was

  14. Distribution of Megaplasmids in Lactobacillus salivarius and Other Lactobacilli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yin Li; Carlos Canchaya; Fang Fang; Emma Raftis; Kieran A. Ryan; Jan-Peter van Pijkeren; Douwe van Sinderen; Paul W. O'Toole

    2007-01-01

    The genome of Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 includes a 242-kb megaplasmid, pMP118. We now show that 33 strains of L. salivarius isolated from humans and animals all harbor a megaplasmid, which hybridized with the repA and repE replication origin probes of pMP118. Linear megaplasmids that did not hybridize with the pMP118 repA probe were also found in some strains of L.

  15. Lactobacillus surface layer proteins: structure, function and applications.

    PubMed

    Hynönen, Ulla; Palva, Airi

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial surface (S) layers are the outermost proteinaceous cell envelope structures found on members of nearly all taxonomic groups of bacteria and Archaea. They are composed of numerous identical subunits forming a symmetric, porous, lattice-like layer that completely covers the cell surface. The subunits are held together and attached to cell wall carbohydrates by non-covalent interactions, and they spontaneously reassemble in vitro by an entropy-driven process. Due to the low amino acid sequence similarity among S-layer proteins in general, verification of the presence of an S-layer on the bacterial cell surface usually requires electron microscopy. In lactobacilli, S-layer proteins have been detected on many but not all species. Lactobacillus S-layer proteins differ from those of other bacteria in their smaller size and high predicted pI. The positive charge in Lactobacillus S-layer proteins is concentrated in the more conserved cell wall binding domain, which can be either N- or C-terminal depending on the species. The more variable domain is responsible for the self-assembly of the monomers to a periodic structure. The biological functions of Lactobacillus S-layer proteins are poorly understood, but in some species S-layer proteins mediate bacterial adherence to host cells or extracellular matrix proteins or have protective or enzymatic functions. Lactobacillus S-layer proteins show potential for use as antigen carriers in live oral vaccine design because of their adhesive and immunomodulatory properties and the general non-pathogenicity of the species. PMID:23677442

  16. Probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Tibetan kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongchen; Lu, Yingli; Wang, Jinfeng; Yang, Longfei; Pan, Chenyu; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Tibetan kefir grains. Three Lactobacillus isolates identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus LA15, Lactobacillus plantarum B23 and Lactobacillus kefiri D17 that showed resistance to acid and bile salts were selected for further evaluation of their probiotic properties. The 3 selected strains expressed high in vitro adherence to Caco-2 cells. They were sensitive to gentamicin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol and resistant to vancomycin with MIC values of 26 µg/ml. All 3 strains showed potential bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity, cholesterol assimilation and cholesterol co-precipitation ability. Additionally, the potential effect of these strains on plasma cholesterol levels was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats in 4 treatment groups were fed the following experimental diets for 4 weeks: a high-cholesterol diet, a high-cholesterol diet plus LA15, a high-cholesterol diet plus B23 or a high-cholesterol diet plus D17. The total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the serum were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in the LAB-treated rats compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet without LAB supplementation. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in groups B23 and D17 were significantly (P<0.05) higher than those in the control and LA15 groups. Additionally, both fecal cholesterol and bile acid levels were significantly (P<0.05) increased after LAB administration. Fecal lactobacilli counts were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the LAB treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, the 3 strains were detected in the rat small intestine, colon and feces during the feeding trial. The bacteria levels remained high even after the LAB administration had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that these strains may be used in the future as probiotic starter cultures for manufacturing novel fermented foods. PMID:23894554

  17. Physiological responses to folate overproduction in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arno Wegkamp; Astrid E Mars; Magda Faijes; Douwe Molenaar; Ric CH de Vos; Sebastian MJ Klaus; Andrew D Hanson; Willem M de Vos; Eddy J Smid

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using a functional genomics approach we addressed the impact of folate overproduction on metabolite formation and gene expression in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. We focused specifically on the mechanism that reduces growth rates in folate-overproducing cells. RESULTS: Metabolite formation and gene expression were determined in a folate-overproducing- and wild-type strain. Differential metabolomics analysis of intracellular metabolite pools indicated that the

  18. d-(-)-Mandelic acid dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus curvatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Werner Hummel; Horst Schiitte; Maria-Regina Kula

    1988-01-01

    Production, purification and characterization of the NAD(H)-dependent d-mandelate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus curvatus was studied. An enzyme level of about 150 U\\/1 could be obtained by anaerobic cultivation in liquid broth. The specific enzyme activity in the crude extract was 1—3 U\\/mg. Purification by liquidliquid extraction and ion exchange chromatography led to a preparation of 2100 U\\/mg. The molecular weight of

  19. Synthesis of arginine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine by Lactobacillus arabinosus

    E-print Network

    Ory, Robert Louis

    1954-01-01

    of serine does not appear to go through the oxidation level of formate in the synthesis of methyl groups. They suggest that leucovorin, if it is the biological form of folic acid, has a function other than as a carrier of these one-carbon units.... TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION..........................................1 REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE ON THE BIOLOGICAL SYNTHESIS OF AMINO ACIDS ........................5 SECTION I. THE BIOLOGICAL SYNTHESIS OF ARGININE BY LACTOBACILLUS ARABINOSUS...

  20. The genomes and comparative genomics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katja-Anneli Riipinen; Päivi Forsman; Tapani Alatossava

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages are a great source of genetic diversity. Here, the genome sequences of Lb. delbrueckii phages LL-Ku, c5 and JCL1032 were analyzed in detail, and the genetic diversity of Lb. delbrueckii phages belonging to different taxonomic groups was explored. The lytic isometric group b phages LL-Ku (31,080 bp) and c5 (31,841 bp) showed a minimum nucleotide sequence identity of 90%

  1. Modelling the acidifying activity profile of Lactobacillus bulgaricus cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Torrestiana; E. Fuente; C. Lacroix; L. Choplin

    1994-01-01

    A model that fully describes the typical pH(t) profile representing the lactic acid production kinetics of Lactobacillus bulgaricus cultures is reported. The model, a four-parameter function [pH = (A-D)\\/(1 + (t\\/C)B) + D], is able to fit any change on the experimental pH-time curves, due to variations on the inoculum cell concentration of the culture. The four fitting parameters(A, B,

  2. Characterisation of the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota associated with preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Petricevic, Ljubomir; Domig, Konrad J.; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Sandhofer, Michael J.; Fidesser, Maria; Krondorfer, Iris; Husslein, Peter; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Kiss, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The presence of an abnormal vaginal microflora in early pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm delivery. There is no investigation on vaginal flora dominated by lactic acid bacteria and possible association with preterm delivery. We assessed the dominant vaginal Lactobacillus species in healthy pregnant women in early pregnancy in relation to pregnancy outcome. We observed 111 low risk pregnant women with a normal vaginal microflora 11 + 0 to 14 + 0 weeks of pregnancy without subjective complaints. Vaginal smears were taken for the identification of lactobacilli using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Pregnancy outcome was recorded as term or preterm delivery (limit 36 + 6 weeks of gestation). The diversity of Lactobacillus species in term vs. preterm was the main outcome measure. L. iners alone was detected in 11 from 13 (85%) women who delivered preterm. By contrast, L. iners alone was detected in only 16 from 98 (16%) women who delivered at term (p < 0.001). Fifty six percent women that delivered at term and 8% women that delivered preterm had two or more vaginal Lactobacillus spp. at the same time. This study suggests that dominating L. iners alone detected in vaginal smears of healthy women in early pregnancy might be associated with preterm delivery. PMID:24875844

  3. Heat resistance of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Jordan, K N; Cogan, T M

    1999-08-01

    Mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. are the dominant organisms in mature Cheddar cheese. The heat resistance of broth grown cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum DPC1919 at temperatures between 50 and 57.5 degrees C, Lact. plantarum DPC2102 at temperatures between 48 and 56 degrees C and Lact. paracasei DPC2103 at temperatures between 50 and 67.5 degrees C was determined. The z-values for Lact. plantarum DPC1919, Lact. Plantarum DPC2102 and Lact. paracasei DPC2103 were 6.7 degrees C, 6.2 degrees C and 5.3 degrees C, respectively. Lactobacillus paracasei DPC2103 showed evidence of injury and recovery, especially at higher temperatures. Milk grown cultures of strains DPC2102 and DPC2103 showed greater heat resistance than broth grown cultures, tailing of the death curves and a nonlinear z-curve. Of the three strains, Lact. paracasei DPC2103 had the potential to survive pasteurization temperatures, whether grown in milk or broth. PMID:10499302

  4. Diet alters probiotic Lactobacillus persistence and function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Tachon, Sybille; Lee, Bokyung; Marco, Maria L

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of host diet on the intestinal persistence and gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum?WCFS1 in healthy and health-compromised, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-treated mice. Mice fed either a low-fat chow diet (CD) or high fat and sucrose Western diet (WD) received 10(9) L.?plantarum?WCFS1 cells for five consecutive days. Lactobacillus plantarum persistence was 10- to 100-fold greater in the intestines of WD-fed compared with CD-fed mice. TNBS, an intestinal irritant that induces the development of inflammatory bowel disease-like symptoms, resulted in up to a 10(4) -fold increase in L.?plantarum survival in the digestive tract relative to healthy animals. Expression levels of 12 metabolic and gut-inducible L.?plantarum genes were differentially affected by diet and TNBS administration. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA transcripts from the indigenous intestinal microbiota showed that WD resulted in significant reductions in proportions of metabolically active indigenous Lactobacillus species and increases in the Desulfovibrionaceae family. Feeding L.?plantarum?WCFS1 resulted in lower levels of colitis and higher concentrations of colonic IL-10 and IL-12 in WD and not CD-fed mice. Interactions between probiotics, nutritional components and the intestinal bacteria should be considered when examining for probiotic-mediated effects and elucidating mechanisms of probiotic function in the mammalian gut. PMID:24118739

  5. Plant extract enhances the viability of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus acidophilus in probiotic nonfat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Michael, Minto; Phebus, Randall K; Schmidt, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    A commercial plant extract (prepared from olive, garlic, onion and citrus extracts with sodium acetate (SA) as a carrier) was evaluated to extend the viability of yogurt starter and probiotic bacteria as a means to enhance the shelf life of live and active culture, probiotic nonfat yogurt. Yogurts prepared from three different formulas (0.5* plant extract, 0.25* SA, or no supplement) and cultures (yogurt starter plus Bifidobacterium animalis,Lactobacillus acidophilus, or both probiotics) were assessed weekly during 29 days of storage at 5°C. Supplemented yogurt mixes had greater buffering capacities than non-supplemented yogurt mixes. At the end of storage, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and L. acidophilus counts in supplemented yogurts were greater compared with non-supplemented yogurts. Supplementation did not affect Streptococcus thermophilus and B. animalis counts. Hence the greater buffering capacity of yogurt containing plant extract could enhance the longevity of the probiotics, L. bulgaricus and L. acidophilus, during storage. PMID:25650127

  6. Plant extract enhances the viability of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus acidophilus in probiotic nonfat yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Minto; Phebus, Randall K; Schmidt, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    A commercial plant extract (prepared from olive, garlic, onion and citrus extracts with sodium acetate (SA) as a carrier) was evaluated to extend the viability of yogurt starter and probiotic bacteria as a means to enhance the shelf life of live and active culture, probiotic nonfat yogurt. Yogurts prepared from three different formulas (0.5* plant extract, 0.25* SA, or no supplement) and cultures (yogurt starter plus Bifidobacterium animalis,Lactobacillus acidophilus, or both probiotics) were assessed weekly during 29 days of storage at 5°C. Supplemented yogurt mixes had greater buffering capacities than non-supplemented yogurt mixes. At the end of storage, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and L. acidophilus counts in supplemented yogurts were greater compared with non-supplemented yogurts. Supplementation did not affect Streptococcus thermophilus and B. animalis counts. Hence the greater buffering capacity of yogurt containing plant extract could enhance the longevity of the probiotics, L. bulgaricus and L. acidophilus, during storage. PMID:25650127

  7. Synergistic impact of Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum and vincristine on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    ASHA; GAYATHRI, DEVARAJA

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. is the most dominant probiotic strain of bacteria. Evidence indicates that the consumption of Lactobacillus sp. reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in animal models. The present study was carried out to determine whether administration of Lactobacillus fermentum/ Lactobacillus plantarum alone or in combination with vincristine have a synergistic impact on the control of colorectal cancer in an animal model. Mice with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH) hydrochloride-induced colon cancer were fed with L. fermentum and L. plantarum isolated along with vincristine. An increase in body weight, a decrease in ammonia concentration, a decrease in ? glucosidase and ? glucuronidase enzyme activity and a reduction in the number of crypts in the mice in the pre-carcinogen-induced group was noted when compared to these variables in the post-carcinogen-induced group. The body weight of the mice fed L. fermentum along with vincristine was increased (6.5 g), and was found to be 3.5 times higher compared to that of the control. A marked decrease in the ammonia concentration (240 mg), and ? glucosidase (0.0023 IU) and ? glucopyranose enzyme activity (0.0027 IU) was observed; 22.59% less ammonia concentration, 73.26% less ? glucosidase activity and 56.46% less ? glucuronidase enzyme activity was noted when compared to the control. A significant reduction in the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) (90%) was observed when compared to the control. Maximum protection was observed in the mice fed the probiotics and vincristine prior to cancer induction. Among the different dietary combinations tested in the present study, L. fermentum and vincristine showed a more extensive reduction in ammonia concentration, ? glucosidase, ? glucuronidase activity and the number of ACF. PMID:22970015

  8. Stability evaluation of freeze-dried Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in oral capsules

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, M.; Abedi, D.; Varshosaz, J.; Najjarzadeh, M.; Mirlohi, M.; Tavakoli, N.

    2012-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a common preservation technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Various studies have investigated the effect of different cryoprotectants on probiotics during freeze-drying. However, information on the effect of cryoprotectants on the stability of some Lactobacillus strains during freeze-drying seems scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish production methods for preparation of oral capsule probiotics containing Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus. It was also of interest to examine the effect of various formulations of cryoprotectant media containing skim milk, trehalose and sodium ascorbate on the survival rate of probiotic bacteria during freeze-drying at various storage temperatures. Without any cryoprotectant, few numbers of microorganisms survived. However, microorganisms tested maintained higher viability after freeze-drying in media containing at least one of the cryoprotectants. Use of skim milk in water resulted in an increased viability after lyophilization. Media with a combination of trehalose and skim milk maintained a higher percentage of live microorganisms, up to 82%. In general, bacteria retained a higher number of viable cells in capsules containing freeze-dried bacteria with sodium ascorbate after three months of storage. After this period, a marked decline was observed in all samples stored at 23°C compared to those stored at 4°C. The maximum survival rate (about 72-76%) was observed with media containing 6% skim milk, 8% trehalose and 4% sodium ascorbate. PMID:23181077

  9. A simple identification method for vaginal secretions using relative quantification of Lactobacillus DNA.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masanori; Gamo, Shinsuke; Okiura, Tatsuyuki; Nishimukai, Hiroaki; Asano, Migiwa

    2014-09-01

    In criminal investigations there are some cases in which identifying the presence of vaginal secretions provides crucial evidence in proving sexual assault. However, there are no methods for definitively identifying vaginal secretions. In the present study, we focused on Lactobacillus levels in vaginal secretions and developed a novel identification method for vaginal secretions by relative quantification based on real time PCR. We designed a Lactobacillus conserved region primer pair (LCP) by aligning 16S rRNA gene sequences from major vaginal Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus jensenii), and selected the human specific primer pair (HSP) as an endogenous control for relative quantification. As a result, the ?Ct (?Ct=Ct[LCP]-Ct[HSP]) values of vaginal secretions (11 out of 12 samples) were significantly lower than those of saliva, semen and skin surface samples, and it was possible to discriminate between vaginal secretions and other body fluids. For the one remaining sample, it was confirmed that the predominant species in the microflora was not of the Lactobacillus genus. The ?Ct values in this study were calculated when the total DNA input used from the vaginal secretions was 10pg or more. Additionally, the ?Ct values of samples up to 6-months-old, which were kept at room temperature, remained unchanged. Thus, we concluded in this study that the simple ?Ct method by real time PCR is a useful tool for detecting the presence of vaginal secretions. PMID:24905338

  10. Adhesion of Lactobacillus species in urine and phosphate buffer to silicone rubber and glass under flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. W. Millsap; G. Reid; H. C. van der Mei; H. J. Busscher

    1997-01-01

    Coating uroepithelial cells or catheter materials with lactobacilli has been shown to retard the development of a uropathogenic biofilm, with biosurfactant production and strong adhesion being two prerequisite properties of the Lactobacillus strains to be employed. In this paper, adhesion of six selected Lactobacillus strains to silicone rubber and glass in urine and in a phosphate buffer was studied using

  11. The barrier to HIV transmission provided by genital tract Lactobacillus colonization.

    PubMed

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Spear, Gregory T

    2014-06-01

    While resistance to HIV transmission is due to multiple mechanisms such as the epithelium, a lower genital tract microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus appears to play an important role. This article reviews selected recent research on genital tract microbiota in women including how microbiota impacts HIV resistance and factors affecting Lactobacillus colonization. PMID:24661438

  12. Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from fermented soybean meal.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-huan; Chen, Yi-sheng; Lee, Tzu-tai; Chang, Yu-chung; Yu, Bi

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-reaction-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped lactic acid bacterium, designated strain S215(T), was isolated from fermented soybean meal. The organism produced d-lactic acid from glucose without gas formation. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed that strain S215(T) had 98.74-99.60?% sequence similarity to the type strains of three species of the genus Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus farciminis BCRC 14043(T), Lactobacillus futsaii BCRC 80278(T) and Lactobacillus crustorum JCM 15951(T)). A comparison of two housekeeping genes, rpoA and pheS, revealed that strain S215(T) was well separated from the reference strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that strain S215(T) had DNA related to the three type strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus (33-66?% relatedness). The DNA G+C content of strain S215(T) was 36.2 mol%. The cell walls contained peptidoglycan of the d-meso-diaminopimelic acid type and the major fatty acids were C18?:?1?9c, C16?:?0 and C19?:?0 cyclo ?10c/C19?:?1?6c. Phenotypic and genotypic features demonstrated that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S215(T) (?=?NBRC 109509(T)?=?BCRC 80582(T)). PMID:25281727

  13. Detection and identification of Lactobacillus bacteria found in the honey stomach of the giant honeybee

    E-print Network

    Detection and identification of Lactobacillus bacteria found in the honey stomach of the giant and species of Lactobacillus from the honey stomach of the Asiatic giant honeybee, Apis dorsata. Samples acid bacteria (LAB) found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans, honeybees (Rada et al. 1997; Killer

  14. Reduced biogenic amine contents in sauerkraut via addition of selected lactic acid bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed A. Rabie; Hassan Siliha; Soher el-Saidy; Ahmed A. el-Badawy; F. Xavier Malcata

    2011-01-01

    The contents of free amino acids and biogenic amines in spontaneously fermented sauerkraut, inoculated or not with specific lactic acid bacterium strains, were monitored throughout 45d of storage. The strains tested were Lactobacillus plantarum 2142, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei 2763 and Lactobacillus curvatus 2771. In both the control and the experiments, the total amino acid contents increased with time –

  15. Lactobacillus species as biomarkers and agents that can promote various aspects of vaginal health

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Malik, Shweta; Imholz, Nicole; Lebeer, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast number of microorganisms collectively referred to as the human microbiota. One of the main microbiota body sites is the female genital tract, commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp., in approximately 70% of women. Each individual species can constitute approximately 99% of the ribotypes observed in any individual woman. The most frequently isolated species are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus iners. Residing at the port of entry of bacterial and viral pathogens, the vaginal Lactobacillus species can create a barrier against pathogen invasion since mainly products of their metabolism secreted in the cervicovaginal fluid can play an important role in the inhibition of bacterial and viral infections. Therefore, a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota appears to be a good biomarker for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. This balance can be rapidly altered during processes such as menstruation, sexual activity, pregnancy and various infections. An abnormal vaginal microbiota is characterized by an increased diversity of microbial species, leading to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. Information on the vaginal microbiota can be gathered from the analysis of cervicovaginal fluid, by using the Nugent scoring or the Amsel's criteria, or at the molecular level by investigating the number and type of Lactobacillus species. However, when translating this to the clinical setting, it should be noted that the absence of a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota does not appear to directly imply a diseased condition or dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the widely documented beneficial role of vaginal Lactobacillus species demonstrates the potential of data on the composition and activity of lactobacilli as biomarkers for vaginal health. The substantiation and further validation of such biomarkers will allow the design of better targeted probiotic strategies.

  16. Augmentation of antimicrobial metronidazole therapy of bacterial vaginosis with oral probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC14: randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kingsley Anukam; Emmanuel Osazuwa; Ijeoma Ahonkhai; Michael Ngwu; Gibson Osemene; Andrew W. Bruce; Gregor Reid

    2006-01-01

    This study enrolled 125 premenopausal women diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by presence of vaginal irritation, discharge and ‘fishy’ odor, and Nugent criteria and detection of sialidase enzyme. The subjects were treated with oral metronidazole (500mg) twice daily from days 1 to 7, and randomized to receive oral Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 (1×109) and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 (1×109) or placebo twice

  17. Characterization of reutericyclin produced by Lactobacillus reuteri LTH2584.

    PubMed

    Gänzle, M G; Höltzel, A; Walter, J; Jung, G; Hammes, W P

    2000-10-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri LTH2584 exhibits antimicrobial activity that can be attributed neither to bacteriocins nor to the production of reuterin or organic acids. We have purified the active compound, named reutericyclin, to homogeneity and characterized its antimicrobial activity. Reutericyclin exhibited a broad inhibitory spectrum including Lactobacillus spp., Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria innocua. It did not affect the growth of gram-negative bacteria; however, the growth of lipopolysaccharide mutant strains of Escherichia coli was inhibited. Reutericyclin exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Staphylococcus aureus, and B. subtilis and triggered the lysis of cells of L. sanfranciscensis in a dose-dependent manner. Germination of spores of B. subtilis was inhibited, but the spores remained unaffected under conditions that do not permit germination. The fatty acid supply of the growth media had a strong effect on reutericyclin production and its distribution between producer cells and the culture supernatant. Reutericyclin was purified from cell extracts and culture supernatant of L. reuteri LTH2584 cultures grown in mMRS by solvent extraction, gel filtration, RP-C(8) chromatography, and anion-exchange chromatography, followed by rechromatography by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Reutericyclin was characterized as a negatively charged, highly hydrophobic molecule with a molecular mass of 349 Da. Structural characterization (A. Höltzel, M. G. Gänzle, G. J. Nicholson, W. P. Hammes, and G. Jung, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39:2766-2768, 2000) revealed that reutericyclin is a novel tetramic acid derivative. The inhibitory activity of culture supernatant of L. reuteri LTH2584 corresponded to that of purified as well as synthetic reutericyclin. PMID:11010877

  18. Megaplasmid pMP118 of Lactobacillus salivarius

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul W. O'Toole; Emma J. Raftis

    \\u000a \\u000a Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 habours a multiple-replicon genome, including a 242 kb megaplasmid designated pMP118. pMP118 carries a number of contingency\\u000a genes, which work in conjunction with chromosomally encoded genes and pathways to broaden the metabolic flexibility of this\\u000a strain. This increases the potential viability of UCC118 in the competitive environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Annotation\\u000a and functional studies have indicated

  19. Lactobacillus hokkaidonensis sp. nov., isolated from subarctic timothy grass (Phleum pratense L.) silage.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Kitahara, Maki; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tajima, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Four strains of Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, catalase-negative and non-motile lactic acid bacteria, LOOC260(T), LOOC253, LOOC273 and LOOC279, were isolated from timothy grass (Phleum pratense L.) silage produced in Hokkaido, a subarctic region of Japan. These isolates grew at 4-37 °C, indicating the psychrotolerant nature of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rRNA and pheS gene sequences, as well as biochemical and physiological characteristics, indicated that these four strains were members of the genus Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain LOOC260(T) demonstrated that the closest neighbours were the type strains of Lactobacillus suebicus (97.7 %), Lactobacillus oligofermentans (96.7 %) and Lactobacillus vaccinostercus (96.7 %). Strain LOOC260(T) showed low levels of DNA-DNA association with Lactobacillus suebicus JCM 9504(T) (14.7 ± 3.5 %), Lactobacillus oligofermentans JCM 16175(T) (15.1 ± 4.8 %) and Lactobacillus vaccinostercus JCM 1716(T) (10.7 ± 3.0 %). The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major fatty acids were C18 : 1?9c and C19 : 1 cyclo 9,10. On the basis of phenotypic, physiological and phylogenetic evidence, these isolates represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus hokkaidonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LOOC260(T) ( = JCM 18461(T) = DSM 26202(T)). PMID:23223820

  20. The genome of the Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis temperate phage EV3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacteriophages infection modulates microbial consortia and transduction is one of the most important mechanism involved in the bacterial evolution. However, phage contamination brings food fermentations to a halt causing economic setbacks. The number of phage genome sequences of lactic acid bacteria especially of lactobacilli is still limited. We analysed the genome of a temperate phage active on Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, the predominant strain in type I sourdough fermentations. Results Sequencing of the DNA of EV3 phage revealed a genome of 34,834 bp and a G?+?C content of 36.45%. Of the 43 open reading frames (ORFs) identified, all but eight shared homology with other phages of lactobacilli. A similar genomic organization and mosaic pattern of identities align EV3 with the closely related Lactobacillus vaginalis ATCC 49540 prophage. Four unknown ORFs that had no homologies in the databases or predicted functions were identified. Notably, EV3 encodes a putative dextranase. Conclusions EV3 is the first L. sanfranciscensis phage that has been completely sequenced so far. PMID:24308641

  1. Debittering of Protein Hydrolysates by Lactobacillus LBL-4 Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Tchorbanov, Bozhidar; Marinova, Margarita; Grozeva, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Yoghurt strain Lactobacillus LBL-4 cultivated for 8–10?h at pH ~6.0 was investigated as a considerable food-grade source of intracellular aminopeptidase. Cell-free extract manifesting >200?AP U/l was obtained from cells harvested from 1?L culture media. Subtilisin-induced hydrolysates of casein, soybean isolate, and Scenedesmus cell protein with degree of hydrolysis 20–22% incubated at 45°C for 10?h by 10 AP?U/g peptides caused an enlarging of DH up to 40–42%, 46–48%, and 38–40% respectively. The DH increased rapidly during the first 4?h, but gel chromatography studies on BioGel P-2 showed significant changes occurred during 4–10?h of enzyme action when the DH increased gradually. After the digestion, the remained AP activity can be recovered by ultrafiltration (yield 40–50%). Scenedesmus protein hydrolysate with DH 20% was inoculated by Lactobacillus LBL-4 cells, and after 72?h cultivation the DH reached 32%. The protein hydrolysates (DH above 40%) obtained from casein and soybean isolate (high Q value) demonstrated a negligible bitterness while Scenedesmus protein hydrolysates (low Q value) after both treatments were free of bitterness. PMID:21876793

  2. Two genes encoding the beta-galactosidase of Lactobacillus sake.

    PubMed

    Obst, M; Meding, E R; Vogel, R F; Hammes, W P

    1995-12-01

    The beta-galactosidase of Lactobacillus sake DSM 20017 is encoded by two genes located on its chromosome. These genes designated lacL and lacM were cloned in Escherichia coli NM 554 on an 8.65 kbp HindIII fragment inserted in vector pRB473. Deletion analysis of the originally cloned fragment revealed that both genes are required for the formation of a functional beta-galactosidase. lacL and lacM are transcribed as a single transcript of approximately 2.9 kbp starting 34 bp upstream of the translational start codon. The proteins derived from lacL and lacM share only 18-59% homology with other beta-galactosidases. The genes encoding the beta-galactosidase are scattered with multiple direct and inverted repeats of 9-12 bp. However, comparison with the plasmid-encoded Leuconostoc lactis beta-galactosidase revealed equal distribution of conserved amino acid residues and suggests that the genes have a common origin. Specific deletions or insertions resulting from the presence of the repeats were not observed. The L. sake beta-galactosidase was phenotypically expressed in E. coli NM 554 and Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1432. Its two genes can be used to replace antibiotic reporter genes to develop food-grade vectors and alpha-complementation systems for self-cloning in meat lactobacilli. PMID:8574399

  3. Sepsis associated with Lactobacillus bacteremia in a patient with ischemic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hrishikesh S.; Khoury, Charbel C.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus species is a known commensal of the mouth, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tract. However, its isolation on blood cultures is often overlooked and attributed to bench contamination. We present a case of a 58-year-old immunocompetent male who initially presented with altered mental status, but developed sepsis from Lactobacillus bacteremia during his hospital course, while on mechanical ventilation. He was found to have ischemic colitis on colonoscopy. His condition improved with antibiotics and supportive management. Using this example of ischemic colitis, we stress that in the right clinical setting, Lactobacillus bacteremia is a harbinger for a serious underlying pathology and should not be ignored. PMID:25249745

  4. Difference in Degradation Patterns on Inulin-type Fructans among Strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus paracasei

    PubMed Central

    TSUJIKAWA, Yuji; NOMOTO, Ryohei; OSAWA, Ro

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains were assessed for their degradation patterns of various carbohydrates with specific reference to inulin-type fructans in comparison with those of Lactobacillus paracasei strains. Firstly, growth curves on glucose, fructose, sucrose and inulin-type fructans with increasing degrees of fructose polymerization (i.e., 1-kestose, fructo-oligosaccharides and inulin) of the strains were compared. L. paracasei DSM 20020 grew well on all these sugars, while the growth rates of the 4 L. delbrueckii strains were markedly higher on the fructans with a greater degree of polymerization than on fructose and sucrose. Secondly, sugar compositions of spent cultures of the strains of L. delbrueckii and L. paracasei grown in mMRS containing either the fructans or inulin were determined by thin layer chromatography, in which the spent cultures of L. paracasei DSM 20020 showed spots of short fructose and sucrose fractions, whereas those of the L. delbrueckii strains did not show such spots at all. These results suggest that, unlike the L. paracasei strains, the L. delbrueckii strains do not degrade the inulin-type fructans extracellularly, but transport the fructans capable of greater polymerization preferentially into their cells to be degraded intracellularly for their growth. PMID:24936375

  5. Antibiotic Resistances of Yogurt Starter Cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, T; Smiley, M B

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 15 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were tested for resistance to 35 antimicrobial agents by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Approximately 35% of the isolates had uncharacteristic resistance patterns. PMID:16345654

  6. Bacteriophage endolysins expressed in yeast kill strains of Lactobacillus that contaminate fermentations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the challenges facing the fuel ethanol industry is the management of bacterial contamination during fermentation. Species of Lactobacillus are the predominant contaminants that reduce ethanol yields and cause “stuck” fermentations, decreasing the profitability of biofuel production with expen...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus kunkeei AR114 Isolated from Honey Bee Gut.

    PubMed

    Porcellato, Davide; Frantzen, Cyril; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Umu, Ozgun C; Gabrielsen, Christina; Nes, Ingolf F; Amdam, Gro V; Diep, Dzung B

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus kunkeei is a common inhabitant in honey bee gut, being present in several parts of the world. Here, we describe the draft genome of L. kunkeei AR114, an isolate from late foraging season in Norway. PMID:25792062

  8. Inactivation of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleotide reductase by F2CTP: covalent modification

    E-print Network

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) from Lactobacillus leichmannii, a 76 kDa monomer using adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor, catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleotides and is rapidly (<30 ...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus kunkeei AR114 Isolated from Honey Bee Gut

    PubMed Central

    Frantzen, Cyril; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Umu, Ozgun C.; Gabrielsen, Christina; Nes, Ingolf F.; Amdam, Gro V.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus kunkeei is a common inhabitant in honey bee gut, being present in several parts of the world. Here, we describe the draft genome of L. kunkeei AR114, an isolate from late foraging season in Norway. PMID:25792062

  10. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used. PMID:25827218

  11. Characterization of a Feruloyl Esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Torres, María; Reverón, Inés; Mancheño, José Miguel; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is frequently found in the fermentation of plant-derived food products, where hydroxycinnamoyl esters are abundant. L. plantarum WCFS1 cultures were unable to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamoyl esters; however, cell extracts from the strain partially hydrolyze methyl ferulate and methyl p-coumarate. In order to discover whether the protein Lp_0796 is the enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic activity, it was recombinantly overproduced and enzymatically characterized. Lp_0796 is an esterase that, among other substrates, is able to efficiently hydrolyze the four model substrates for feruloyl esterases (methyl ferulate, methyl caffeate, methyl p-coumarate, and methyl sinapinate). A screening test for the detection of the gene encoding feruloyl esterase Lp_0796 revealed that it is generally present among L. plantarum strains. The present study constitutes the description of feruloyl esterase activity in L. plantarum and provides new insights into the metabolism of hydroxycinnamic compounds in this bacterial species. PMID:23793626

  12. Screening and identification of functional Lactobacillus specific for vegetable fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Song, Suhua; Huang, Xuhui; Feng, Chao; Liu, Guangquan; Huang, Jinqing; Xie, Mingyong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, functional lactic acid bacteria (LAB) specific for vegetable fermentation were screened from Chinese sauerkraut brine by designing purpose media. The selected LAB strains showed excellent tolerance to high concentrations of bile salt and acids. They can also survive passage through the simulated gastric fluid and may be able to reach to the intestine. Through the performance measurements of vegetable fermentation, one of these strains, NCU116 was found to have the best fermentation ability, and further subjected to a series of analyses including identification of physiological and biochemical characteristics, 16S rDNA and pheS sequencing. Taken together, the strain NCU116 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum. These results laid a good foundation for the fermentation research in the future. PMID:23278440

  13. Molecular characterization of three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus phages.

    PubMed

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-09-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  14. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Jolley, Keith A.; Bray, James E.; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population. PMID:25425319

  15. Production of cholera toxin B subunit in Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Slos, P; Dutot, P; Reymund, J; Kleinpeter, P; Prozzi, D; Kieny, M P; Delcour, J; Mercenier, A; Hols, P

    1998-12-01

    The intracellular expression of the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) was first achieved in Lactobacillus paracasei LbTGS1.4 with an expression cassette including the P25 promoter of Streptococcus thermophilus combined with the translation initiation region from the strongly expressed L. pentosus D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhD). Secretion of CTB was next attempted in L. paracasei LbTGS1.4 and L. plantarum NCIMB8826 with four different signal sequences from exported proteins of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis Usp45 and PrtP, Enterococcus faecalis unknown protein and S. pyogenes M6 protein). Host-dependent secretion of CTB was clearly observed: whereas none of the secretion cassettes led to detectable CTB in the extracellular fraction of L. paracasei LbTGS1.4, secretion of CTB molecules was clearly achieved with three of the selected signal sequences in L. plantarum NCIMB8826. PMID:9851032

  16. Stability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in prebiotic edible films.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, Christos; Behboudi-Jobbehdar, Solmaz; Yonekura, Lina; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian D

    2014-09-15

    The concept of prebiotic edible films as effective vehicles for encapsulating probiotic living cells is presented. Four soluble fibres (inulin, polydextrose, glucose-oligosaccharides and wheat dextrin) were selected as prebiotic co-components of gelatine based matrices plasticised with glycerol and used for the immobilisation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The addition of prebiotics was associated with a more compact and uniform film structure, with no detectable interspaces or micropores; probiotic inclusion did not significantly change the structure of the films. Glucose-oligosaccharides and polydextrose significantly enhanced L. rhamnosus GG viability during air drying (by 300% and 75%, respectively), whilst a 33% and 80% reduction in viable counts was observed for inulin and wheat dextrin. Contrarily, inulin was the most effective at controlling the sub-lethal effects on L. rhamnosus GG during storage. However, in all cases the supplementation of edible films with prebiotics ameliorated the storage stability of L. rhamnosus GG. PMID:24767059

  17. Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23 Modulates Urea Hydrolysis in the Murine Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Charlotte M.; Loach, Diane; Lawley, Blair; Bell, Tracey; Sims, Ian M.; O'Toole, Paul W.; Zomer, Aldert

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of in vivo (mouse stomach) and in vitro (laboratory culture) transcriptomes of Lactobacillus reuteri strain 100-23 were made by microarray analysis. These comparisons revealed the upregulation of genes associated with acid tolerance, including urease production, in the mouse stomach. Inactivation of the ureC gene reduced the acid tolerance of strain 100-23 in vitro, and the mutant was outcompeted by the wild type in the gut of ex-Lactobacillus-free mice. Urine analysis showed that stable isotope-labeled urea, administered by gavage, was metabolized to a greater extent in Lactobacillus-free mice than animals colonized by strain 100-23. This surprising observation was associated with higher levels of urease activity and fecal-type bacteria in the stomach digesta of Lactobacillus-free mice. Despite the modulation of urea hydrolysis in the stomach, recycling of urea nitrogen in the murine host was not affected since the essential amino acid isoleucine, labeled with a stable isotope, was detected in the livers of both Lactobacillus-free and 100-23-colonized animals. Therefore, our experiments reveal a new and unexpected impact of Lactobacillus colonization on urea hydrolysis in the murine gut. PMID:25063664

  18. Detection and activity of lactacin B, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Barefoot, S F; Klaenhammer, T R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 52 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were examined for production of bacteriocins. A majority (63%) demonstrated inhibitory activity against all members of a four-species grouping of Lactobacillus leichmannii, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus lactis. Four L. acidophilus strains with this activity also inhibited Streptococcus faecalis and Lactobacillus fermentum, suggesting a second system of antagonism. Under conditions eliminating the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide, no inhibition of other gram-positive or -negative genera was demonstrated by L. acidophilus. The agent produced by L. acidophilus N2 and responsible for inhibition of L. leichmannii, L. bulgaricus, L. helveticus, and L. lactis was investigated. Ultrafiltration studies indicated a molecular weight of approximately 100,000 for the crude inhibitor. The agent was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and retained full activity after 60 min at 100 degrees C (pH 5). Activity against sensitive cells was bactericidal but not bacteriolytic. These characteristics identified the inhibitory agent as a bacteriocin, designated lactacin B. Examination of strains of L. acidophilus within the six homology groupings of Johnson et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 30:53-68, 1980) demonstrated that production of the bacteriocin lactacin B could not be used in classification of neotype L. acidophilus strains. However, the usefulness of employing sensitivity to lactacin B in classification of dairy lactobacilli is suggested. Images PMID:6410990

  19. Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from Spanish natural cider.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Ana Isabel; Arahal, David R; Ibarburu, Idoia; Elizaquível, Patricia; Aznar, Rosa; Dueñas, M Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 were isolated from ropy natural ciders of the Basque Country, Spain, in 2007. Cells are Gram-stain positive, non-spore-forming, motile rods, facultative anaerobes and catalase-negative. The strains are obligately homofermentative (final product dl-lactate) and produce exopolysaccharides from sucrose. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the highest similarity to both isolates corresponded to the type strain of Lactobacillus vini (99.1?%), followed by Lactobacillus satsumensis (96.4?%), and Lactobacillus oeni (96.2?%), and for all other established species, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities were below 96?%. The species delineation of strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 was evaluated through RAPD fingerprinting. In addition, a random partial genome pyrosequencing approach was performed on strain CUPV261(T) in order to compare it with the genome sequence of Lactobacillus vini DSM 20605(T) and calculate indexes of average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Results permit the conclusion that strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CUPV261(T) (?=?CECT 8227(T)?=?KCTC 21012(T)). PMID:24899655

  20. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries. PMID:24961744

  1. Characterization of Two Virulent Phages of Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Briggiler Marcó, Mariángeles; Garneau, Josiane E.; Tremblay, Denise; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We characterized two Lactobacillus plantarum virulent siphophages, ATCC 8014-B1 (B1) and ATCC 8014-B2 (B2), previously isolated from corn silage and anaerobic sewage sludge, respectively. Phage B2 infected two of the eight L. plantarum strains tested, while phage B1 infected three. Phage adsorption was highly variable depending on the strain used. Phage defense systems were found in at least two L. plantarum strains, LMG9211 and WCSF1. The linear double-stranded DNA genome of the pac-type phage B1 had 38,002 bp, a G+C content of 47.6%, and 60 open reading frames (ORFs). Surprisingly, the phage B1 genome has 97% identity with that of Pediococcus damnosus phage clP1 and 77% identity with that of L. plantarum phage JL-1; these phages were isolated from sewage and cucumber fermentation, respectively. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of the cos-type phage B2 had 80,618 bp, a G+C content of 36.9%, and 127 ORFs with similarities to those of Bacillus and Lactobacillus strains as well as phages. Some phage B2 genes were similar to ORFs from L. plantarum phage LP65 of the Myoviridae family. Additionally, 6 tRNAs were found in the phage B2 genome. Protein analysis revealed 13 (phage B1) and 9 (phage B2) structural proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing such high identity between phage genomes infecting different genera of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:23042172

  2. Genetic Determinants of Reutericyclin Biosynthesis in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Lohans, Christopher T; Duar, Rebbeca; Zheng, Jinshui; Vederas, John C; Walter, Jens; Gänzle, Michael

    2015-03-15

    Reutericyclin is a unique antimicrobial tetramic acid produced by some strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. This study aimed to identify the genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis. Comparisons of the genomes of reutericyclin-producing L. reuteri strains with those of non-reutericyclin-producing strains identified a genomic island of 14 open reading frames (ORFs) including genes coding for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), homologues of PhlA, PhlB, and PhlC, and putative transport and regulatory proteins. The protein encoded by rtcN is composed of a condensation domain, an adenylation domain likely specific for d-leucine, and a thiolation domain. rtcK codes for a PKS that is composed of a ketosynthase domain, an acyl-carrier protein domain, and a thioesterase domain. The products of rtcA, rtcB, and rtcC are homologous to the diacetylphloroglucinol-biosynthetic proteins PhlABC and may acetylate the tetramic acid moiety produced by RtcN and RtcK, forming reutericyclin. Deletion of rtcN or rtcABC in L. reuteri TMW1.656 abrogated reutericyclin production but did not affect resistance to reutericyclin. Genes coding for transport and regulatory proteins could be deleted only in the reutericyclin-negative L. reuteri strain TMW1.656?rtcN, and these deletions eliminated reutericyclin resistance. The genomic analyses suggest that the reutericyclin genomic island was horizontally acquired from an unknown source during a unique event. The combination of PhlABC homologues with both an NRPS and a PKS has also been identified in the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum, suggesting that the genes in these organisms and those in L. reuteri share an evolutionary origin. PMID:25576609

  3. ?-Galactosidase with transgalactosylation activity from Lactobacillus fermentum K4.

    PubMed

    Liu, G X; Kong, J; Lu, W W; Kong, W T; Tian, H; Tian, X Y; Huo, G C

    2011-12-01

    The LacLM ?-galactosidase of Lactobacillus fermentum K4 is encoded by 2 consecutive genes, lacL (large subunit) and lacM (small subunit), that share 17 overlapping nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this enzyme was closely related to other Lactobacillus ?-galactosidases and provided significant insight into its common and distinct characteristics. We cloned both the lacL and lacM genes of L. fermentum K4 and heterologously expressed each in Escherichia coli, although the recombinant enzyme was only functional when both were expressed on the same plasmid. We evaluated the enzymatic properties of this species-specific LacLM ?-galactosidase and discovered that it acts as both a hydrolase, bioconverting lactose into glucose and galactose, and a transgalactosylase, generating prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). The recombinant ?-galactosidase showed a broad pH optimum and stability around neutral pH. The optimal temperature and Michaelis constant (K(m)) for the substrates o-nitrophenyl-?-D-galactopyranoside and lactose were, respectively, 40°C and 45 to 50°C and 1.31 mM and 27 mM. The enzyme activity was stimulated by some cations such as Na?, K?, and Mg²?. In addition, activity was also enhanced by ethanol (15%, wt/vol). The transgalactosylation activity of L. fermentum K4 ?-galactosidase effectively and rapidly generated GOS, up to 37% of the total sugars from the reaction. Collectively, our results suggested that the ?-galactosidase from L. fermentum K4 could be exploited for the formation of GOS. PMID:22118071

  4. In Vitro Activities of Ketolide HMR3647, Macrolides, and Other Antibiotics against Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Pediococcus Isolates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. ZARAZAGA; Y. SAENZ; A. PORTILLO; C. TENORIO; F. RUIZ-LARREA; R. DEL CAMPO; F. BAQUERO; C. TORRES

    1999-01-01

    Testing of susceptibility to 13 antibiotics was performed with 90 isolates of Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Pediococcus. MICs at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited by HMR3647, erythromycin, and cipro- floxacin were 0.015, 0.125 and 32 mg\\/ml, respectively. The penicillin MIC was >16 mg\\/ml against 26.2% of the studied Lactobacillus sp. isolates and 50% of Lactobacillus plantarum. HMR3647 showed

  5. Lactobacillus reuteri-Specific Immunoregulatory Gene rsiR Modulates Histamine Production and Immunomodulation by Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Hemarajata, P.; Gao, C.; Pflughoeft, K. J.; Thomas, C. M.; Saulnier, D. M.; Spinler, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    Human microbiome-derived strains of Lactobacillus reuteri potently suppress proinflammatory cytokines like human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by converting the amino acid l-histidine to the biogenic amine histamine. Histamine suppresses mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and cytokine production by signaling via histamine receptor type 2 (H2) on myeloid cells. Investigations of the gene expression profiles of immunomodulatory L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 highlighted numerous genes that were highly expressed during the stationary phase of growth, when TNF suppression is most potent. One such gene was found to be a regulator of genes involved in histidine-histamine metabolism by this probiotic species. During the course of these studies, this gene was renamed the Lactobacillus reuteri-specific immunoregulatory (rsiR) gene. The rsiR gene is essential for human TNF suppression by L. reuteri and expression of the histidine decarboxylase (hdc) gene cluster on the L. reuteri chromosome. Inactivation of rsiR resulted in diminished TNF suppression in vitro and reduced anti-inflammatory effects in vivo in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced mouse model of acute colitis. A L. reuteri strain lacking an intact rsiR gene was unable to suppress colitis and resulted in greater concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) in the bloodstream of affected animals. The PhdcAB promoter region targeted by rsiR was defined by reporter gene experiments. These studies support the presence of a regulatory gene, rsiR, which modulates the expression of a gene cluster known to mediate immunoregulation by probiotics at the transcriptional level. These findings may point the way toward new strategies for controlling gene expression in probiotics by dietary interventions or microbiome manipulation. PMID:24123819

  6. Loss of GD1-positive Lactobacillus correlates with inflammation in human lungs with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A; Utokaparch, Soraya; Elliott, W Mark; Hogg, James C; Hegele, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study assesses the relationship between contents of GD1 (glycerol dehydratase)-positive Lactobacillus, presence of Lactobacillus and the inflammatory response measured in host lung tissue in mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesise that there will be a loss of GD1 producing Lactobacillus with increasing severity of COPD and that GD1 has anti-inflammatory properties. Setting Secondary care, 1 participating centre in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Participants 74 individuals who donated non-cancerous portions of their lungs or lobes removed as treatment for lung cancer (normal lung function controls (n=28), persons with mild (GOLD 1) (n=21) and moderate (GOLD 2) COPD (n=25)). Outcome measures Primary outcome measure was GD1 positivity within each group and whether or not this impacted quantitative histological measures of lung inflammation. Secondary outcome measures included Lactobacillus presence and quantification, and quantitative histological measurements of inflammation and remodelling in early COPD. Results Total bacterial count (p>0.05) and prevalence of Lactobacillus (p>0.05) did not differ between groups. However, the GD1 gene was detected more frequently in the controls (14%) than in either mild (5%) or moderate (0%) COPD (p<0.05) samples. Macrophage and neutrophil volume fractions (0.012±0.005 (mean±SD) vs 0.026±0.017 and 0.005±0.002 vs 0.015±0.014, respectively) in peripheral lung tissue were reduced in samples positive for the GD1 gene (p<0.0035). Conclusions A reduction in GD1 positivity is associated with an increased tissue immune inflammatory response in early stage COPD. There is potential for Lactobacillus to be used as a possible therapeutic, however, validation of these results need to be completed before an anti-inflammatory role of Lactobacillus in COPD can be confirmed. PMID:25652802

  7. Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 – an antimicrobial and antioxidative probiotic

    PubMed Central

    Mikelsaar, Marika; Zilmer, Mihkel

    2009-01-01

    The paper lays out the short scientific history and characteristics of the new probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum strain ME-3 DSM-14241, elaborated according to the regulations of WHO/FAO (2002). L. fermentum ME-3 is a unique strain of Lactobacillus species, having at the same time the antimicrobial and physiologically effective antioxidative properties and expressing health-promoting characteristics if consumed. Tartu University has patented this strain in Estonia (priority June 2001, patent in 2006), Russia (patent in 2006) and the USA (patent in 2007). The paper describes the process of the identification and molecular typing of this probiotic strain of human origin, its deposition in an international culture collection, and its safety assessment by laboratory tests and testing on experimental animals and volunteers. It has been established that L. fermentum strain ME-3 has double functional properties: antimicrobial activity against intestinal pathogens and high total antioxidative activity (TAA) and total antioxidative status (TAS) of intact cells and lysates, and it is characterized by a complete glutathione system: synthesis, uptake and redox turnover. The functional efficacy of the antimicrobial and antioxidative probiotic has been proven by the eradication of salmonellas and the reduction of liver and spleen granulomas in Salmonella Typhimurium-infected mice treated with the combination of ofloxacin and L. fermentum strain ME-3. Using capsules or foodstuffs enriched with L. fermentum ME-3, different clinical study designs (including double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies) and different subjects (healthy volunteers, allergic patients and those recovering from a stroke), it has been shown that this probiotic increased the antioxidative activity of sera and improved the composition of the low-density lipid particles (LDL) and post-prandial lipids as well as oxidative stress status, thus demonstrating a remarkable anti-atherogenic effect. The elaboration of the probiotic L. fermentum strain ME-3 has drawn on wide international cooperative research and has taken more than 12 years altogether. The new ME-3 probiotic-containing products have been successfully marketed and sold in Baltic countries and Finland. PMID:19381356

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus strains with probiotic features from the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, MA; Bik, EM; Carlin, KP; Venn-Watson, SK; Jensen, ED; Jones, SE; Gaston, EP; Relman, DA; Versalovic, J

    2013-01-01

    Aims In order to develop complementary health management strategies for marine mammals, we used culture-based and culture-independent approaches to identify gastrointestinal lactobacilli of the common bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus. Methods and Results We screened 307 bacterial isolates from oral and rectal swabs, milk and gastric fluid, collected from 38 dolphins in the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program, for potentially beneficial features. We focused our search on lactobacilli and evaluated their ability to modulate TNF secretion by host cells and inhibit growth of pathogens. We recovered Lactobacillus salivarius strains which secreted factors that stimulated TNF production by human monocytoid cells. These Lact. salivarius isolates inhibited growth of selected marine mammal and human bacterial pathogens. In addition, we identified a novel Lactobacillus species by culture and direct sequencing with 96·3% 16S rDNA sequence similarity to Lactobacillus ceti. Conclusions Dolphin-derived Lact. salivarius isolates possess features making them candidate probiotics for clinical studies in marine mammals. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to isolate lactobacilli from dolphins, including a novel Lactobacillus species and a new strain of Lact. salivarius, with potential for veterinary probiotic applications. The isolation and identification of novel Lactobacillus spp. and other indigenous microbes from bottlenose dolphins will enable the study of the biology of symbiotic members of the dolphin microbiota and facilitate the understanding of the microbiomes of these unique animals. PMID:23855505

  9. Lactobacillus supplementation for diarrhoea related to chemotherapy of colorectal cancer: a randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, P; Ruotsalainen, T; Korpela, R; Saxelin, M; Ollus, A; Valta, P; Kouri, M; Elomaa, I; Joensuu, H

    2007-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy is frequently associated with diarrhoea. We compared two 5-FU-based regimens and the effect of Lactobacillus and fibre supplementation on treatment tolerability. Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (n=150) were randomly allocated to receive monthly 5-FU and leucovorin bolus injections (the Mayo regimen) or a bimonthly 5-FU bolus plus continuous infusion (the simplified de Gramont regimen) for 24 weeks as postoperative adjuvant therapy. On the basis of random allocation, the study participants did or did not receive Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation (1–2 × 1010 per day) and fibre (11?g guar gum per day) during chemotherapy. Patients who received Lactobacillus had less grade 3 or 4 diarrhoea (22 vs 37%, P=0.027), reported less abdominal discomfort, needed less hospital care and had fewer chemotherapy dose reductions due to bowel toxicity. No Lactobacillus-related toxicity was detected. Guar gum supplementation had no influence on chemotherapy tolerability. The simplified de Gramont regimen was associated with fewer grade 3 or 4 adverse effects than the Mayo regimen (45 vs 89%), and with less diarrhoea. We conclude that Lactobacillus GG supplementation is well tolerated and may reduce the frequency of severe diarrhoea and abdominal discomfort related to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. PMID:17895895

  10. Bile tolerance and its effect on antibiotic susceptibility of probiotic Lactobacillus candidates.

    PubMed

    Hyacinta, Májeková; Hana, Ki?ová Sepová; Andrea, Bilková; Barbora, ?isárová

    2015-05-01

    Before use in practice, it is necessary to precisely identify and characterize a new probiotic candidate. Eight animal lactobacilli and collection strain Lactobacillus reuteri CCM 3625 were studied from the point of saccharide fermentation profiles, bile salt resistance, antibiogram profiles, and influence of bile on sensitivity to antibiotics. Studied lactobacilli differed in their sugar fermentation ability determined by API 50CHL and their identification based on these profiles did not correspond with molecular-biological one in most cases. Survival of strains Lactobacillus murinus C and L. reuteri KO4b was not affected by presence of bile. The resistance of genus Lactobacillus to vancomycin and quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin) was confirmed in all strains tested. This study provides the new information about oxgall (0.5 and 1 %) effect on the lactobacilli antibiotic susceptibility. Antibiotic profiles were not noticeably affected, and both bile concentrations tested had comparable impact on the lactobacilli antibiotic sensitivity. Interesting change was noticed in L. murinus C, where the resistance to cephalosporins was reverted to susceptibility. Similarly, susceptibility of L. reuteri E to ceftazidime arose after incubation in both concentration of bile. After influence of 1 % bile, Lactobacillus mucosae D lost its resistance to gentamicin. On the base of gained outcomes, the best probiotic properties manifested L. reuteri KO4b, Lactobacillus plantarum KG4, and L. reuteri E due to their survival in the presence of bile. PMID:25413644

  11. Identification and adhesion profile of Lactobacillus spp. strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Ticiana Silva; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio; Donato, Tais Cremasco; Milbradt, Elisane Lenita; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Filho, Raphael Lucio Andreatti

    2014-01-01

    In the aviculture industry, the use of Lactobacillus spp. as a probiotic has been shown to be frequent and satisfactory, both in improving bird production indexes and in protecting intestine against colonization by pathogenic bacteria. Adhesion is an important characteristic in selecting Lactobacillus probiotic strains since it impedes its immediate elimination to enable its beneficial action in the host. This study aimed to isolate, identify and characterize the in vitro and in vivo adhesion of Lactobacillus strains isolated from birds. The Lactobacillus spp. was identified by PCR and sequencing and the strains and its adhesion evaluated in vitro via BMM cell matrix and in vivo by inoculation in one-day-old birds. Duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum were collected one, four, 12 and 24 h after inoculation. The findings demonstrate greater adhesion of strains in the cecum and an important correlation between in vitro and in vivo results. It was concluded that BMM utilization represents an important technique for triage of Lactobacillus for subsequent in vivo evaluation, which was shown to be efficient in identifying bacterial adhesion to the enteric tract. PMID:25477944

  12. Identification and functional characterization of Lactobacillus strains isolated from milk and Gioddu, a traditional Sardinian fermented milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ortu; G. E. Felis; M. Marzotto; A. Deriu; P. Molicotti; L. A. Sechi; F. Dellaglio; S. Zanetti

    2007-01-01

    Raw milk from Sardinian cows and sheep, and sheep's milk yoghurt (Gioddu), are food products that are poorly characterized in terms of the presence of mesophilic Lactobacillus strains, and may be good sources from which to isolate novel bacterial strains. Sixteen Lactobacillus strains were identified by genotypic and phenotypic methods from samples of sheep's milk (n=7), fermented sheep's milk (n=7)

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus sakei Strain wikim 22, Isolated from Kimchi in Chungcheong Province, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyeong In; Lee, Jina; Jang, Ja Young; Park, Hae Woong; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Tae-Woon; Kang, Mi Ran

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus sakei strain wikim 22, a Lactobacillus species isolated from kimchi in North Chungcheong Province, South Korea, having 155 contigs with 2,447 genes and an average G+C content of 40.61%. PMID:25502679

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus sakei Strain wikim 22, Isolated from Kimchi in Chungcheong Province, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyeong In; Lee, Jina; Jang, Ja Young; Park, Hae Woong; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Tae-Woon; Kang, Mi Ran; Lee, Jong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus sakei strain wikim 22, a Lactobacillus species isolated from kimchi in North Chungcheong Province, South Korea, having 155 contigs with 2,447 genes and an average G+C content of 40.61%. PMID:25502679

  15. Combination of Multiplex PCR and PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis for Monitoring Common Sourdough-Associated Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Settanni, Luca; Valmorri, Sara; van Sinderen, Douwe; Suzzi, Giovanna; Paparella, Antonello; Corsetti, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    A combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and a previously described multiplex PCR approach was employed to detect sourdough lactobacilli. Primers specific for certain groups of Lactobacillus spp. were used to amplify fragments, which were analyzed by DGGE. DGGE profiles obtained from Lactobacillus type strains acted as standards to analyze lactobacilli from four regional Abruzzo (central Italy) sourdoughs. PMID:16672538

  16. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Sieuwerts; D. Molenaar; Hijum van S. A. F. T; M. Beerthuyzen; M. J. A. Stevens; P. W. Janssen; C. J. Ingham; Bok de F. A. M; Vos de W. M; Hylckama Vlieg van J. E. T

    2010-01-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) is one of the best-described mixed-culture fermentations. These species are believed to stimulate each other's growth by the exchange of metabolites such

  17. Adhesion of Lactobacillus amylovorus to Insoluble and Derivatized Cornstarch Granules

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Syed H.; Harry-O'Kuru, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 70% of the cells in a suspension of the amylolytic bacterium Lactobacillus amylovorus bind to cornstarch granules within 30 min at 25°C. More than 60% of the bound bacteria were removed by formaldehyde (2%) or glycine (1 M) at pH 2.0. More than 90% of the bound bacteria were removed by MgCl2 (2 M; pH 7.0). Binding of L. amylovorus to cornstarch was inhibited in heat-killed cells and in cells that had been pretreated with glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, sodium azide, trypsin, or 1% soluble potato starch. Bacterial binding to cornstarch appeared to correlate with both the concentration of cornstarch in the suspension and the amylose content in the granules. The ability of L. amylovorus to adhere to cornstarch granules was reduced for granules that had been extracted with HCl-ethanol, HCl-methanol, HCl-propanol, or HCl-butanol. Chemical derivatization of cornstarch resulted in a wide variety of adhesion responses by these bacteria. For example, 2-O-butyl starch (degree of substitution, 0.09) enhanced adhesion, whereas two palmitate starches (degree of substitution, 0.48 and 0.09) exhibited reduced adhesion activities. 2-O-(2-hydroxybutyl) starch and starch-poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) ester showed adhesion activities similar to those of the nonderivatized starch controls. Images PMID:16348460

  18. CRISPR-Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR-Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR-Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR-Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR-Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR-Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR-Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR-Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  19. Timely approaches to identify probiotic species of the genus Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades the use of probiotics in food has increased largely due to the manufacturer’s interest in placing “healthy” food on the market based on the consumer’s ambitions to live healthy. Due to this trend, health benefits of products containing probiotic strains such as lactobacilli are promoted and probiotic strains have been established in many different products with their numbers increasing steadily. Probiotics are used as starter cultures in dairy products such as cheese or yoghurts and in addition they are also utilized in non-dairy products such as fermented vegetables, fermented meat and pharmaceuticals, thereby, covering a large variety of products. To assure quality management, several pheno-, physico- and genotyping methods have been established to unambiguously identify probiotic lactobacilli. These methods are often specific enough to identify the probiotic strains at genus and species levels. However, the probiotic ability is often strain dependent and it is impossible to distinguish strains by basic microbiological methods. Therefore, this review aims to critically summarize and evaluate conventional identification methods for the genus Lactobacillus, complemented by techniques that are currently being developed. PMID:24063519

  20. A Hydrolase from Lactobacillus sakei Moonlights as a Transaminase

    PubMed Central

    Sinz, Quirin; Freiding, Simone; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic transamination of amino acids yields ?-keto acids and is the initial step for the production of volatile compounds that contribute to the sensory perception of fermented foods such as salami. Lactobacillus sakei is one of the lactic acid bacterial strains commonly used in starter cultures. Although the genome sequence of L. sakei 23K lacks genes encoding typical branched-chain amino acid transaminases, transamination activity and the formation of amino acid-derived volatile metabolites could be demonstrated. A protein purified from L. sakei is held responsible for the transamination activity. By heterologous expression of the corresponding gene in Escherichia coli, we were able to characterize the transamination side activity of an enzyme annotated as a putative acylphosphatase (AcP). A transamination side activity of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was also discovered. Both enzymes showed substrate specificity toward branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. AcP also accepted l-methionine. Activity was optimal at neutral pH for both enzymes, whereas AcP showed a significantly higher temperature optimum (55°C) than that of HEWL (37°C). Kinetic parameters revealed high affinity toward l-leucine for AcP (Km = 1.85 mM) and toward l-isoleucine for HEWL (Km = 3.79 mM). AcP seems to play a major role in the metabolism of amino acids in L. sakei. PMID:23354716

  1. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and related probiotic genera.

    PubMed

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David W; Wassenaar, Trudy M

    2012-04-01

    Six bacterial genera containing species commonly used as probiotics for human consumption or starter cultures for food fermentation were compared and contrasted, based on publicly available complete genome sequences. The analysis included 19 Bifidobacterium genomes, 21 Lactobacillus genomes, 4 Lactococcus and 3 Leuconostoc genomes, as well as a selection of Enterococcus (11) and Streptococcus (23) genomes. The latter two genera included genomes from probiotic or commensal as well as pathogenic organisms to investigate if their non-pathogenic members shared more genes with the other probiotic genomes than their pathogenic members. The pan- and core genome of each genus was defined. Pairwise BLASTP genome comparison was performed within and between genera. It turned out that pathogenic Streptococcus and Enterococcus shared more gene families than did the non-pathogenic genomes. In silico multilocus sequence typing was carried out for all genomes per genus, and the variable gene content of genomes was compared within the genera. Informative BLAST Atlases were constructed to visualize genomic variation within genera. The clusters of orthologous groups (COG) classes of all genes in the pan- and core genome of each genus were compared. In addition, it was investigated whether pathogenic genomes contain different COG classes compared to the probiotic or fermentative organisms, again comparing their pan- and core genomes. The obtained results were compared with published data from the literature. This study illustrates how over 80 genomes can be broadly compared using simple bioinformatic tools, leading to both confirmation of known information as well as novel observations. PMID:22031452

  2. Acid Tolerance of Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum†

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L. C.; Fleming, H. P.; Hassan, H. M.

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we determined the internal cellular pH response of Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum to the external pH created by the microorganisms themselves or by lactic or acetic acids and their salts added to the growth medium. Growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides stopped when its internal pH reached 5.4 to 5.7, and growth of L. plantarum stopped when its internal pH reached 4.6 to 4.8. Variation in growth medium composition or pH did not alter the growth-limiting internal pH reached by these microorganisms. L. plantarum maintained its pH gradient in the presence of either 160 mM sodium acetate or sodium lactate down to an external pH of 3.0 with either acid. In contrast, the ?pH of Leuconostoc mesenteroides was zero at pH 4.0 with acetate and 5.0 with lactate. No differences were found between d-(?)- and l-(+)-lactic acid for the limiting internal pH for growth of either microorganism. The comparatively low growth-limiting internal pH and ability to maintain a pH gradient at high organic acid concentration may contribute to the ability of L. plantarum to terminate vegetable fermentations. PMID:16348238

  3. The Adsorption of Ochratoxin A by Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Ma?gorzata

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine ochratoxin A (OTA) binding by three lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species: Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and L. sanfranciscensis. Experiments were conducted using MRS medium and PBS buffer contaminated with 1000 ng/mL OTA and inoculated with live or thermally inactivated bacterial biomass at a concentration of 1 or 5 mg dry weight/mL. It was found that, depending on the strain and biomass density, live bacterial cells reduced OTA content by 16.9% to 35% in MRS medium and by 14.8% to 26.4% in PBS after 24 h of contact. OTA binding was higher in the case of thermally inactivated bacterial biomass (46.2% to 59.8%). The process is very rapid: OTA was removed from PBS as early as after 30 min of contact. The binding of the toxin by cells was partially reversible under the treatment by water and 1 M HCl. The results show that OTA is adsorbed to the surface structures of the cell wall, which is promoted not only by the hydrophobic properties of the cell wall, but also by electron donor-acceptor and Lewis acid-base interactions. PMID:25247265

  4. Variability of S-layer proteins in Lactobacillus helveticus strains.

    PubMed

    Wa?ko, Adam; Polak-Berecka, Magdalena; Kuzdrali?ski, Adam; Skrzypek, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    The presence of S-layer proteins in the cell envelope of Lactobacillus helveticus may be technologically important. S-layer proteins are the adhesion site for cell envelope proteinase, which forms the proteolytic pathway in bacteria. Eleven strains of L. helveticus were examined for the presence of S-layer proteins and slpH genes. S-layer proteins from six strains were identified and sequenced. Multiple alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences demonstrated a strong sequence conservation of all Slp studied. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of the cells revealed the typical cell wall architecture of the S-layer. This is the first report on characterisation of glycosylated S-layer proteins from different strains of L. helveticus. The amino acid composition, the secondary structure, and the physical properties of these proteins were found to be quite similar to those of S-layer proteins from other lactobacilli. However, PCR analysis revealed that five of the examined strains of L. helveticus did not have slpH genes. This finding suggests that S-layer protein genes cannot be considered as housekeeping genes and cannot be used as molecular markers for L. helveticus. PMID:24269654

  5. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG - host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is one of the most widely used probiotic strains. Various health effects are well documented including the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal infections and diarrhea, and stimulation of immune responses that promote vaccination or even prevent certain allergic symptoms. However, not all intervention studies could show a clinical benefit and even for the same conditions, the results are not univocal. Clearly, the host phenotype governed by age, genetics and environmental factors such as the endogenous microbiota, plays a role in whether individuals are responders or non-responders. However, we believe that a detailed knowledge of the bacterial physiology and the LGG molecules that play a key role in its host-interaction capacity is crucial for a better understanding of its potential health benefits. Molecules that were yet identified as important factors governing host interactions include its adhesive pili or fimbriae, its lipoteichoic acid molecules, its major secreted proteins and its galactose-rich exopolysaccharides, as well as specific DNA motifs. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to correlate specific health effects to these molecular effectors in LGG, and also in other probiotic strains. PMID:25186587

  6. Thermal, chemical, and photocatalytic inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Briggiler Marcó, Mariángeles; De Antoni, Graciela L; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2009-05-01

    The effect of several biocides, thermal treatments, and photocatalysis on the viability of four Lactobacillus plantarum phages was investigated. Times to achieve 99% inactivation (T99) of phages at 63, 72, and 90 degrees C were evaluated in four suspension media: deMan Rogosa Sharpe broth, reconstituted skim milk, a commercial EM-glucose medium, and Tris magnesium gelatin buffer. The four phages studied were highly resistant to 63 degrees C (T99 > 45 min); however, counts < 10 PFU/ml were achieved by heating at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Higher thermal resistance at 72 degrees C was observed when reconstituted skim milk and EM-glucose medium were assayed. Peracetic acid (0.15%, vol/vol) was an effective biocide for the complete inactivation of all phages studied within 5 min of exposure. Sodium hypochlorite (800 ppm) inactivated the phages completely within 30 min. Ethanol (100%) did not destroy phage particles even after 45 min. Isopropanol did not have any effect on phage viability. Phage counts < 50 PFU/ml were obtained within 180 min of photocatalytic treatment. The results obtained in this work are important for establishing adequate methods for inactivating phages in industrial plants and laboratory environments. PMID:19517728

  7. Lactobacillus equigenerosi Strain Le1 Invades Equine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Botha, Marlie; Botes, Marelize; Loos, Ben; Smith, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus equigenerosi strain Le1, a natural inhabitant of the equine gastrointestinal tract, survived pH 3.0 and incubation in the presence of 1.5% (wt/vol) bile salts for at least 2 h. Strain Le1 showed 8% cell surface hydrophobicity, 60% auto-aggregation, and 47% coaggregation with Clostridium difficile C6. Only 1% of the cells adhered to viable buccal epithelial cells and invaded the cells within 20 min after contact. Preincubation of strain Le1 in a buffer containing pronase prevented adhesion to viable epithelial cells. Preincubation in a pepsin buffer delayed invasion from 20 min to 1 h. Strain Le1 did not adhere to nonviable epithelial cells. Administration of L. equigenerosi Le1 (1 × 109 CFU per 50 kg body weight) to healthy horses did not increase white blood cell numbers. Differential white blood cell counts and aspartate aminotransferase levels remained constant. Glucose, lactate, cholesterol, and urea levels remained constant during administration with L. equigenerosi Le1 but decreased during the week after administration. PMID:22504808

  8. CRISPR–Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR–Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR–Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR–Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR–Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR–Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR–Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR–Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR–Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  9. Lactobacillus helveticus glycosyltransferases: from genes to carbohydrate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Laure; Newell, John; Porcelli, Ida; Vincent, Sébastien J F; Stingele, Francesca

    2002-05-01

    Bioactive carbohydrates are crucial in mediating essential biological processes, and their biosynthesis is an essential aspect to develop for a global view of their biological functions. Lactic acid bacteria display an array of diverse and complex carbohydrates and, therefore, are of particular interest. Here we present the identification of a novel exocellular polysaccharide structure and the corresponding gene cluster from Lactobacillus helveticus NCC2745. The development of a glycosyltransferase-specific enzymatic assay allowed the assignment of sugar specificities, which as a general approach will for the future permit a faster and more direct characterization of glycosyltransferase specificities. A model of the biosynthesis of the repeating unit is proposed. EpsE is a phosphoglucosyltransferase initiating the repeating unit biosynthesis by linking a glucose residue to a membrane-associated lipophilic acceptor. EpsF elongates the carbohydrate chain by forming an alpha(1,3)-Glcp linkage onto the first Glcp, whereas EpsG adds a backbone alpha(1,6)-Galp onto alpha-Glcp and EpsH attaches a alpha(1,6)-Glcp branch onto the first glucose residue. Finally, EpsI would add a beta(1,6)-Galp linkage onto alpha-Glcp terminating the sidechain and EpsJ would terminate the synthesis of the polysaccharides' repeating unit by forming a beta(1,3)-Galp linkage onto alpha-Galp. PMID:12070074

  10. Characterization of the most abundant Lactobacillus species in chicken gastrointestinal tract and potential use as probiotics for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Fang, Mingjian; Hu, Yanping; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-07-01

    The count and diffusion of Lactobacilli species in the different gastrointestinal tract (GI) regions of broilers were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the probiotic characteristics of six L. reuteri species isolated from broilers' GI tract were also investigated to obtain the potential target for genetic engineering. Lactobacilli had the highest diversity in the crop and the lowest one in the cecum. Compared with the lower GI tract, more Lactobacilli were found in the upper GI tract. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. johnsonii, L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. salivarius, and L. aviarius were the predominant Lactobacillus species and present throughout the GI tract of chickens. Lactobacillus reuteri was the most abundant Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 had good probiotic characteristics that would be a potential and desirable target for genetic engineering. PMID:24850302

  11. Human ?-amylase present in lower-genital-tract mucosal fluid processes glycogen to support vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; French, Audrey L; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Sullivan, Thomas H; Spear, William W; Landay, Alan; Micci, Sandra; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacillus colonization of the lower female genital tract provides protection from the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and from adverse pregnancy outcomes. While glycogen in vaginal epithelium is thought to support Lactobacillus colonization in vivo, many Lactobacillus isolates cannot utilize glycogen in vitro. This study investigated how glycogen could be utilized by vaginal lactobacilli in the genital tract. Several Lactobacillus isolates were confirmed to not grow in glycogen, but did grow in glycogen-breakdown products, including maltose, maltotriose, maltopentaose, maltodextrins, and glycogen treated with salivary ?-amylase. A temperature-dependent glycogen-degrading activity was detected in genital fluids that correlated with levels of ?-amylase. Treatment of glycogen with genital fluids resulted in production of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, the major products of ?-amylase digestion. These studies show that human ?-amylase is present in the female lower genital tract and elucidates how epithelial glycogen can support Lactobacillus colonization in the genital tract. PMID:24737800

  12. Lactobacillus and Pediococcus species richness and relative abundance in the vagina of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Gravett, Michael G.; Jin, Ling; Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Tao, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background The rhesus monkey is an important animal model to study human vaginal health to which lactic acid bacteria play a significant role. However, the vaginal lactic acid bacterial species richness and relative abundance in rhesus monkeys is largely unknown. Methods Vaginal swab samples were aseptically obtained from 200 reproductive aged female rhesus monkeys. Following Rogosa agar plating, single bacterial colonies representing different morphotypes were isolated and analyzed for whole-cell protein profile, species-specifc PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequence. Results A total of 510 Lactobacillus strains of 17 species and one Pediococcus acidilactici were identified. The most abundant species was L. reuteri, which colonized the vaginas of 86% monkeys. L. johnsonii was the second most abundant species, which colonized 36% of monkeys. The majority of monkeys were colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species. Conclusions The vaginas of rhesus monkeys are frequently colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species, dominated by L. reuteri. PMID:22429090

  13. Isolation and microencapsulation of Lactobacillus spp. from corn silage for probiotic application

    PubMed Central

    Kasra – Kermanshahi, R; Fooladi, J; Peymanfar, S

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Probiotics including strains of Lactobacillus spp. are living microorganisms including which are beneficial to human and animals health. In this study, Lactobacillus has been isolated from corn silage in a cold region of Iran by anaerobic culture. Materials and Methods The bacteriological and biochemical standard methods were used for identification and phenotypic characterization of isolated organism. To increase the stability of organism in the environment, we used microencapsulation technique using stabilizer polymers (Alginate and Chitosan). Results The isolated Lactobacillus spp. was able to ferment tested carbohydrates and grow at 10°C–50°C. Using microencapsulation, the stability and survival of this bacterium increased. Conclusion microencapsulation of lactic acid bacteria with alginate and chitosan coating offers an effective way of delivering viable bacterial cells to the colon and maintaining their survival during refrigerated storage. PMID:22347557

  14. Free Glycogen in Vaginal Fluids Is Associated with Lactobacillus Colonization and Low Vaginal pH

    PubMed Central

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Hotton, Anna L.; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Landay, Alan; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Spear, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH. Methods Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8–11 years. Results Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4) than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; p<0.001). The fraction of the microbiota consisting of Lactobacillus was highest in samples with high glycogen versus those with low glycogen (median?=?0.97 vs. 0.05, p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, having 1 vs. 0 male sexual partner in the past 6 months was negatively associated, while BMI ?30 was positively associated with glycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners. Conclusion These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization. PMID:25033265

  15. Lactobacillus bombi sp. nov., from the digestive tract of laboratory-reared bumblebee queens (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Killer, J; Votavová, A; Valterová, I; Vlková, E; Rada, V; Hroncová, Z

    2014-08-01

    Three bacterial strains belonging to the genus Lactobacillus were isolated from the digestive tracts of laboratory-reared bumblebee queens (Bombus terrestris) using MRS agar under anaerobic conditions. The isolates were identified according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as undescribed members of the genus Lactobacillus, with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (96.9?%) to the uncharacterized bacterial strain Lactobacillus sp. Mboho2r2 isolated from the stomach of a European honeybee (Apis mellifera). Lactobacillus tucceti was found to be the closest related species with a validly published name, with 92.9?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain. However, phylogenetic analyses based on different markers revealed that this species is phylogenetically very distant from the novel strains. The DNA G+C content of the proposed type strain BTLCH M1/2(T) is 37.8 mol%. The fatty acids C(19?:?1)?6c and/or C(19?:?0) cyclo ?10c/19?6, C(18?:?1)?9c and C(16?:?0) were predominant in all strains. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a phospholipid, seven glycolipids and two phosphoglycolipids were detected in the novel strains. Growth was observed at 47 °C. The peptidoglycan type A4? L-Lys-D-Asp was determined for strain BTLCH M1/2(T). Genotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analyses based on the phylogenetic markers hsp60, pheS, rpoA and tuf as well as phenotypic characteristics and the results of chemotaxonomic analyses confirmed that the new isolates belong to a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus bombi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BTLCH M1/2(T) (?=?DSM 26517(T)?=?CCM 8440(T)). PMID:24824637

  16. Plasmid Transduction Using Bacteriophage ?adh for Expression of CC Chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH?

    PubMed Central

    Damelin, Leonard H.; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage ?adh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp ?adh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes. PMID:20418431

  17. [Inhibitory activity of vaginal Lactobacillus bacteria on yeasts causing vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Strus, Magdalena; Brzychczy-W?och, Monika; Kucharska, Agnieszka; Gosiewski, Tomasz; Heczko, Piotr B

    2005-01-01

    Growing frequency of therapeutical failures of vulvovaginal candidiasis, resulting from resistance of certain species of Candida to imidazole agents, raises interest in the use of probiotics from Lactobacillus genera as prophylaxis. Unfortunately, little is known about inhibitory mechanisms of Lactobacillus on Candida. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of selected Lactobacillus species, representing the physiological vaginal flora, against Candida as well as investigation whether their inhibitory activity against Candida is related strictly to hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid production. 125 strains from vaginal smears of healthy women were classified by making use of phenotypic and genotypic methods. The majority of strains belonged to L. acidophilus: L. acidophilus sensu stricto, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. johnsonii as well as L. fermentum and L. plantarum species. Culture supernatants of selected 25 strains representing the isolated species were examined for their inhibitory activity against the growth of Candida albicans and C. glabrata. The results showed that the strongest and the fastest activity against C. albicans was demonstrated by L. delbrueckii strains, producing the largest quantities of hydrogen peroxide. On the other hand, extended activity, demonstrable after 24 hours, was shown by non-H2O2 producing L. plantarum supernatants. Growth of C. glabrata was not inhibited by any of the examined strains of Lactobacillus. Comparison of activity of live active cultures of Lactobacillus strains and their mixtures with this of pure H2O2 and lactic acid has shown that pure chemical compounds were less active than the cultures. This suggests that mixtures of Lactobacillus strains are in cooperation with each other using many different metabolites. PMID:16130291

  18. Characterization of Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins Produced by Lactobacillus ruminis and Related Motile Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Forde, Brian M.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Darby, Trevor; Coghlan, Avril; Nally, Kenneth; Ross, R. Paul; O’Toole, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus ruminis is one of at least twelve motile but poorly characterized species found in the genus Lactobacillus. Of these, only L. ruminis has been isolated from mammals, and this species may be considered as an autochthonous member of the gastrointestinal microbiota of humans, pigs and cows. Nine L. ruminis strains were investigated here to elucidate the biochemistry and genetics of Lactobacillus motility. Six strains isolated from humans were non-motile while three bovine isolates were motile. A complete set of flagellum biogenesis genes was annotated in the sequenced genomes of two strains, ATCC25644 (human isolate) and ATCC27782 (bovine isolate), but only the latter strain produced flagella. Comparison of the L. ruminis and L. mali DSM20444T motility loci showed that their genetic content and gene-order were broadly similar, although the L. mali motility locus was interrupted by an 11.8 Kb region encoding rhamnose utilization genes that is absent from the L. ruminis motility locus. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 motile bacteria indicated that Lactobacillus motility genes were most closely related to those of motile carnobacteria and enterococci. Transcriptome analysis revealed that motility genes were transcribed at a significantly higher level in motile L. ruminis ATCC27782 than in non-motile ATCC25644. Flagellin proteins were isolated from L. ruminis ATCC27782 and from three other Lactobacillus species, while recombinant flagellin of aflagellate L. ruminis ATCC25644 was expressed and purified from E. coli. These native and recombinant Lactobacillus flagellins, and also flagellate L. ruminis cells, triggered interleukin-8 production in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells in a manner suppressed by short interfering RNA directed against Toll-Like Receptor 5. This study provides genetic, transcriptomic, phylogenetic and immunological insights into the trait of flagellum-mediated motility in the lactobacilli. PMID:22808200

  19. Evaluation of phytate-degrading Lactobacillus culture administration to broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Askelson, Tyler E; Campasino, Ashley; Lee, Jason T; Duong, Tri

    2014-02-01

    Probiotics have been demonstrated to promote growth, stimulate immune responses, and improve food safety of poultry. While widely used, their effectiveness is mixed, and the mechanisms through which they contribute to poultry production are not well understood. Microbial phytases are increasingly supplemented in feed to improve digestibility and reduce antinutritive effects of phytate. The microbial origin of these exogenous enzymes suggests a potentially important mechanism of probiotic functionality. We investigated phytate degradation as a novel probiotic mechanism using recombinant Lactobacillus cultures expressing Bacillus subtilis phytase. B. subtilis phyA was codon optimized for expression in Lactobacillus and cloned into the expression vector pTRK882. The resulting plasmid, pTD003, was transformed into Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, and Lactobacillus gasseri. SDS-PAGE revealed a protein in the culture supernatants of Lactobacillus pTD003 transformants with a molecular weight similar to that of the B. subtilis phytase. Expression of B. subtilis phytase increased phytate degradation of L. acidophilus, L. gasseri, and L. gallinarum approximately 4-, 10-, and 18-fold over the background activity of empty-vector transformants, respectively. Phytase-expressing L. gallinarum and L. gasseri were administered to broiler chicks fed a phosphorus-deficient diet. Phytase-expressing L. gasseri improved weight gain of broiler chickens to a level comparable to that for chickens fed a control diet adequate in phosphorus, demonstrating proof of principle that administration of phytate-degrading probiotic cultures can improve performance of livestock animals. This will inform future studies investigating whether probiotic cultures are able to provide both the performance benefits of feed enzymes and the animal health and food safety benefits traditionally associated with probiotics. PMID:24271165

  20. Enhancing Nutritional Quality of Silage by Fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Jung, Min-Woong; Kim, Da Hye; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Jane, Mariamichael; Park, Hyung Su; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Jeon, Byong Tae; Choi, Ki Choon

    2014-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the nutritive profiles, microbial counts and fermentation metabolites in rye, Italian rye-grass (IRG) and barley supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum under the field condition, and its probiotic properties. After preparation of silage, the content of crude protein (CP), crude ash, acid detergent fiber (ADF), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF), microbes such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeast and fungi counts, and fermentation metabolites lactic acid, acetic acid and butyric acid was assessed. Results indicated that the content of ADF and NDF were significantly varied between rye, IRG and barley mediated silages. The content of CP was increased in L. plantarum supplemented with IRG, but slightly decreased in rye and barley mediated silages. The maximum LAB count was recorded at 53.10 × 10(7) cfu/g in rye, 16.18 × 10(7) cfu/g in IRG and 2.63 × 10(7) cfu/g in barley silages respectively. A considerable number of the yeasts were observed in the IRG silages than the rye silages (P < 0.05). The amount of lactic acid production is higher in L. plantarum supplemented silages as compared with control samples (P < 0.05). It was confirmed that higher amount of lactic acid produced only due to more number of LAB found in the silages. L. plantarum was able to survive at low pH and bile salt and the duodenum passage with the highest percentage of hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the strain was sensitive towards the antibiotics commonly used to maintain the microbes in food industrial setups. In conclusion, supplementation of L. plantarum is most beneficial in rye, IRG and barley silage preparations and probiotic characteristics of L. plantarum was an intrinsic feature for the application in the preparation of animal feeds and functional foods. PMID:25320437

  1. EPR polarization studies on Mn catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Meier, A E; Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1996-01-01

    The binuclear manganese active site of Mn catalase catalyzes redox disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide, forming dioxygen and water. We report here multifrequency EPR and microwave polarization studies of the catalytically active homovalent Mn2+ complex of Lactobacillus plantarum Mn catalase, resolving spectra from each of the thermally accessible multiplet states of the coupled complex by multivariate methods. The experimental spectra have been simulated using computational approaches for the binuclear cluster to predict both intensity and polarization for arbitrary values of the ground state parameters. These two spectroscopic properties define the nature of the ground state wavefunctions and so serve as a sensitive and quantitative measure of the inter-ion interactions in the reduced complex. Interpretation of the spectra in terms of a pair Hamiltonian that includes Heisenberg exchange, dipolar, single site zero field splitting, and Zeeman perturbations leads to the most complete ground state description of the active site metal centers. The results of this spectroscopic analysis support a picture of two high spin ions weakly coupled by exchange interactions (J = 40 cm-1) with relatively small dipole-dipole coupling and single site zero field splittings for the ligand-free reduced enzyme. The coupling between fluoride binding and protonation of the complex has been demonstrated by proton uptake studies. The binding of two fluoride ions in the active site dramatically changes the pair spectra, reflecting a substantially reduced J-coupling (J = 10.5 cm-1) that must be a consequence of perturbation of the bridging ligands. Anion binding to the binuclear Mn complex appears to result in poisoning of the active site by protons, possibly associated with insertion of fluoride into bridging positions of the dimanganese core. PMID:8555195

  2. Resistance of functional Lactobacillus plantarum strains against food stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Verónica; Quiberoni, Andrea; Reinhemer, Jorge; Suárez, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    The survival of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains (Lp 790, Lp 813 and Lp 998) with functional properties was studied taking into account their resistance to thermal, osmotic and oxidative stress factors. Stress treatments applied were: 52 °C-15 min (Phosphate Buffer pH 7, thermal shock), H2O2 0.1% (p/v) - 30 min (oxidative shock) and NaCl aqueous solution at 17, 25 and 30% (p/v) (room temperature - 1 h, osmotic shock). The osmotic stress was also evaluated on cell growth in MRS broth added of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% (p/v) of NaCl, during 20 h at 30 °C. The cell thermal adaptation was performed in MRS broth, selecting 45 °C for 30 min as final conditions for all strains. Two strains (Lp 813 and Lp 998) showed, in general, similar behaviour against the three stress factors, being clearly more resistant than Lp 790. An evident difference in growth kinetics in presence of NaCl was observed between Lp 998 and Lp 813, Lp998 showing a higher optical density (OD570nm) than Lp 813 at the end of the assay. Selected thermal adaptation improved by 2 log orders the thermal resistance of both strains, but cell growth in presence of NaCl was enhanced only in Lp 813. Oxidative resistance was not affected with this thermal pre-treatment. These results demonstrate the relevance of cell technological resistance when selecting presumptive "probiotic" cultures, since different stress factors might considerably affect viability or/and performance of the strains. The incidence of stress conditions on functional properties of the strains used in this work are currently under research in our group. PMID:25790993

  3. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    PubMed Central

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Boekhorst, Jos; van Kranenburg, Richard; Molenaar, Douwe; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Leer, Rob; Tarchini, Renato; Peters, Sander A.; Sandbrink, Hans M.; Fiers, Mark W. E. J.; Stiekema, Willem; Lankhorst, René M. Klein; Bron, Peter A.; Hoffer, Sally M.; Groot, Masja N. Nierop; Kerkhoven, Robert; de Vries, Maaike; Ursing, Björn; de Vos, Willem M.; Siezen, Roland J.

    2003-01-01

    The 3,308,274-bp sequence of the chromosome of Lactobacillus plantarum strain WCFS1, a single colony isolate of strain NCIMB8826 that was originally isolated from human saliva, has been determined, and contains 3,052 predicted protein-encoding genes. Putative biological functions could be assigned to 2,120 (70%) of the predicted proteins. Consistent with the classification of L. plantarum as a facultative heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, the genome encodes all enzymes required for the glycolysis and phosphoketolase pathways, all of which appear to belong to the class of potentially highly expressed genes in this organism, as was evident from the codon-adaptation index of individual genes. Moreover, L. plantarum encodes a large pyruvate-dissipating potential, leading to various end-products of fermentation. L. plantarum is a species that is encountered in many different environmental niches, and this flexible and adaptive behavior is reflected by the relatively large number of regulatory and transport functions, including 25 complete PTS sugar transport systems. Moreover, the chromosome encodes >200 extracellular proteins, many of which are predicted to be bound to the cell envelope. A large proportion of the genes encoding sugar transport and utilization, as well as genes encoding extracellular functions, appear to be clustered in a 600-kb region near the origin of replication. Many of these genes display deviation of nucleotide composition, consistent with a foreign origin. These findings suggest that these genes, which provide an important part of the interaction of L. plantarum with its environment, form a lifestyle adaptation region in the chromosome. PMID:12566566

  4. Growth and Survival of Genetically Manipulated Lactobacillus plantarum in Silage

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, R.; O'Donnell, A. G.; Gilbert, H. G.; Hazlewood, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    The growth and persistence of two genetically manipulated forms of Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO (National Collection of Dairy Organisms) 1193 have been monitored in grass silage. Both recombinants contained pSA3, a shuttle vector for gram-positive organisms that encodes erythromycin resistance. In one of the recombinants, pSA3 was integrated onto the chromosome, whereas in the other, a pSA3 derivative designated pM25, which contains a Clostridium thermocellum cellulase gene cloned into pSA3, was maintained as an extrachromosomal element. This extrachromosomal element is a plasmid. Rifampin-resistant mutants were selected for the recombinants and the parent strain. When applied to minisilos at a rate of 106 CFU/g of grass, both the recombinants and the parent strain proliferated to dominate the epiphytic microflora and induced an increase in the decline in pH compared with that of the noninoculated silos. The presence of extra genetic material did not appear to disadvantage the bacterium in comparison with the parent strain. The selective recovery of both strains by using rifampin and erythromycin was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Interestingly, the free plasmid (pM25) appeared more stable in silage than was expected from studies in MRS broth. The plasmid was retained by 85% of the rifampin-resistant L. plantarum colonies isolated from a day 30 silo. These data answer an important question by showing that genetically manipulated recombinants of L. plantarum can proliferate and compete with epiphytic lactic acid bacteria in silage. Images PMID:16348752

  5. Optimization of the freeze-drying media and survival throughout storage of freeze-dried Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii for veterinarian probiotic applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Claudia Otero; María Carolina Espeche; María Elena Nader-Macías

    2007-01-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as vaginal probiotic cultures depends on the preservation technologies employed by the related industries.A full two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), considering medium and strain, of the decrease in bacterial viability during freeze-drying was applied. Lactobacillus gasseri CRL1421 was significantly more resistant than L. gasseri CRL1412 to the process. L. gasseri CRL1412 suspended in

  6. Molecular Cloning, Expression of minD Gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus VTCC-B-871 and Analyses to Identify Lactobacillus rhamnosus PN04 from Vietnam Hottuynia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tu Hoang Khue; Doan, Vinh Thi Thanh; Ha, Ly Dieu; Nguyen, Huu Ngoc

    2013-12-01

    The minD gene encoding an inhibitor cell division MinD homolog from Lactobacillus acidophilus VTCC-B-871 was cloned. We showed that there were 97 % homology between minD genes of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc705. Based on the analysis of the DNA sequence data from the L. rhamnosus genome project and sequenced minD gene of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871, a pair of primers was designed to identified the different minD genes from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356, L. rhamnosus ATCC 11443. Besides, the polymerase chain reaction product of minD gene was also obtained in L. rhamnosus PN04, a strain was isolated from Vietnamese Hottuynia cordata Thunb. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of MinD homologs from L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 with the other strains and compared the predicted three-dimension structure of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 MinD with Escherichia coli MinD, there are similarity that showed evolution of these strains. The overexpression of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 MinD in E. coli led to cell filamentation in IPTG and morphology changes in different sugar stresses, interestingly. The present study is the first report characterizing the Lactobacilus MinD homolog that will be useful in probiotic field. PMID:24426140

  7. Growth and kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum in the fermentation of edible Irish brown seaweeds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shilpi Gupta; Nissreen Abu-Ghannam; Amalia G. M. Scannell

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to see the applicability of using brown edible seaweeds as a sole source of nutrition for the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Growth kinetics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Lactobacillus plantarum) was studied using three species of edible Irish brown seaweeds Himanthalia elongata, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria saccharina. As part of the screening

  8. Growth and kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum in the fermentation of edible Irish brown seaweeds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shilpi Gupta; Nissreen Abu-Ghannam; Amalia G. M. Scannell

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to see the applicability of using brown edible seaweeds as a sole source of nutrition for the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Growth kinetics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Lactobacillus plantarum) was studied using three species of edible Irish brown seaweeds Himanthalia elongata, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria saccharina. As part of the screening

  9. Effect of malic acid on the growth kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fermentation kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum was studied in a specially designed broth formulated from commercially available, dehydrated components (YTA - yeast extract, trypticase, and ammonium sulfate) in batch and continuous culture. During batch growth in the absence of malic acid in t...

  10. Conversion of Biomass Hydrolysates and Other Substrates to Ethanol and Other Chemicals by Lactobacillus buchneri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Lactobacillus buchneri strain NRRL B-30929 can convert xylose and glucose into ethanol and chemicals. In this paper, L. buchneri NRRL B-30929 was initially compared with the type strains L. buchneri NRRL 1837 and DSM 5987 for growth and fermentation using single substrate derived from plant mater...

  11. Carbohydrate utilization and detection of a nucleotide hydrolase in Lactobacillus buchneri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactobacillus buchneri strains NRRL 1837, DSM 5987, and NRRL B-30929 were examined for capacity to metabolize various carbohydrates via growth and fermentation analyses. Carbon sources used for this study included D-melibiose, inosine, uridine, D-melezitose, maltotriose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, suc...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus acidophilus FSI4, Isolated from Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Iartchouk, Oleg; Kozyavkin, Sergei; Karamychev, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    A new Lactobacillus acidophilus strain, FSI4, isolated from yogurt, was isolated and sequenced in our laboratory. Our data, although supportive of previous conclusions regarding the remarkable stability of L. acidophilus species, indicate accumulating mutations in commercial L. acidophilus strains that warrant further study of the effect of damaged genes on the competitiveness of these bacteria in gut microbiota.

  13. Primary Structure and Functional Analysis of the Lysis Genes ofLactobacillus gasseriBacteriophage fadh

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BERNHARD HENRICH; BERNHARD BINISHOFER; ANDUDO BLASI

    1995-01-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage fadh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted

  14. Draft Genome of Chilean Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Gut Strain Lactobacillus kunkeei MP2.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Alejandro; Henríquez-Piskulich, Patricia; Sanchez, Carolina; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Moreno-Pino, Mario; Gómez, Marcela; Rodríguez Da Silva, Rafael; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Aldea, Patricia; Trombert, Annette N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus kunkeei strain MP2, isolated from a Chilean honeybee gut. The sequenced genome has a total size of 1.58 Mb distributed into 44 contigs and 1,356 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25301653

  15. Genome Sequence of the Heteropolysaccharide-Producing Strain Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Paul M.; Guinane, Caitriona M.; London, Lis E. E.; Kelleher, Philip R.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Caplice, Noel M.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide-synthesizing Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 is a heterofermentative strain, which has demonstrated cholesterol-lowering properties in an animal model of lipid-driven atherosclerosis. The genome revealed a plethora of homologues linked to carbohydrate metabolism and mucin binding. PMID:25593248

  16. Isolation and characterization of a Lactobacillus plantarum bacteriophage, ?JL-1, from a cucumber fermentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Lu; F. Breidt Jr; H. P. Fleminga; E. Altermann; T. R. Klaenhammer

    2003-01-01

    A virulent Lactobacillus plantarum bacteriophage, ?JL-1, was isolated from a commercial cucumber fermentation. The phage was specific for two related strains of L. plantarum, BI7 and its mutant (deficient in malolactate fermenting ability) MU45, which have been evaluated as starter cultures for controlled cucumber fermentation and as biocontrol microorganisms for minimally processed vegetable products. The phage genome of ?JL-1 was

  17. EFFECT OF SALT NUTRIENTS ON MANNITOL PRODUCTION BY LACTOBACILLUS INTERMEDIUS NRRL B-3693

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of four salt nutrients (ammonium citrate, sodium phosphate, magnesium sulfate, and manganese sulfate) on the production of mannitol by Lactobacillus intermedius NRRL B-3693 in a simplified medium containing 300 g fructose, 5 g soy peptone, and 50 g corn steep liquor per L in pH-controlle...

  18. Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius W24 on the compositional stability of oral microbial communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lien Chi Pham; Wilfred F. M. Röling; Anja C. Prosperi; Zewdu Terefework; Jacob M. ten Cate; Wim Crielaard; Egija Zaura

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms beneficial to gastrointestinal health. Although some strains are also known to possess positive effects on oral health, the effects of most intestinal probiotics on the oral microflora remain unknown. We assessed the ability of the intestinal probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius W24 to incorporate into and to affect the compositional stability and cariogenicity of oral microbial communities. Microtiter plates

  19. ISOLATION OF A LACTOBACILLUS SALIVARIUS: ITS BACTERIOCIN IS INHIBITORY TO CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI IN CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity among >1,200 isolates of lactic acid bacteria. One, Lactobacillus salivarius (NRRL B-30514), was selected for further study. The cell-free, ammonium sulfate precipitate from the broth culture was termed the crude antimicrobial preparation (CAP). Ten...

  20. Colonization and Immunomodulation by Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nana Valeur; Peter Engel; Noris Carbajal; Eamonn Connolly; Karin Ladefoged

    2004-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 is a probiotic (health-promoting) bacterium widely used as a dietary supplement. This study was designed to examine local colonization of the human gastrointestinal mucosa after dietary supplementation with L. reuteri ATCC 55730 and to determine subsequent immune responses at the colonized sites. In this open clinical investigation, 10 healthy volunteers and 9 volunteers with ileostomy underwent

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Maria Mercedes; Allievi, Mariana C.; Fina Martin, Joaquina; Waehner, Pablo M.; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Sanchez Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We present the 1,956,699-bp draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain ATCC 4356. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 99.96% similarity with L. acidophilus NCFM NC_006814.3 and 99.97% with La-14 NC_021181.2 genomes. PMID:25593259

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saskia van Hemert; Marjolein Meijerink; Douwe Molenaar; Peter A Bron; Paul de Vos; Michiel Kleerebezem; Jerry M Wells; Maria L Marco

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the

  3. Biodiversity-based identification and functional characterization of the mannose-specific adhesin of Lactobacillus plantarum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Pretzer; Johannes Snel; Douwe Molenaar; Anne Wiersma; Peter A. Bron; Jolanda Lambert; Vos de W. M; Roelof van der Meer; Mari A. Smits; Michiel Kleerebezem

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a frequently encountered inhabitant of the human intestinal tract, and some strains are marketed as probiotics. Their ability to adhere to mannose residues is a potentially interesting characteristic with regard to proposed probiotic features such as colonization of the intestinal surface and competitive exclusion of pathogens. In this study, the variable capacity of 14 L. plantarum strains

  4. Characterization and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from cheeses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miriam Zago; Maria Emanuela Fornasari; Domenico Carminati; Patricia Burns; Viviana Suàrez; Gabriel Vinderola; Jorge Reinheimer; Giorgio Giraffa

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-eight Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Italian and Argentinean cheeses were evaluated for probiotic potential. After a preliminary subtractive screening based on the presence of msa and bsh genes, 27 strains were characterized. In general, the selected strains showed high resistance to lysozyme, good adaptation to simulated gastric juice, and a moderate to low bile tolerance. The capacity to agglutinate

  5. Novel antibacterial polypeptide produced by Lactobacillus paracasei strain NRRL B-50314

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the production and characterization of a novel antibacterial polypeptide, designated as laparaxin, which is secreted by Lactobacillus paracasei NRRL B-50314. The crude laparaxin has antibacterial activity against a range of Gram-positive bacteria including the following: lactic a...

  6. Use of a lactobacillus-based probiotic culture to reduce Salmonella in day of hatch broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available Lactobacillus probiotic (FM-B11™ Ivesco LLC) (B11) significantly reduced Salmonella recovery from day-of-hatch chicks in several studies. For all experiments, day-of-hatch male broiler chicks (n=40 per pen) were challenged with approximately 10**4 cfu per chick of Salmonell...

  7. Proteomic Analyses of Ethanol Tolerance in Lactobacillus buchneri NRRL B-30929

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lactobacillus buchneri NRRL B-30929 strain, isolated from a fuel ethanol production facility, exhibits high tolerance to environmental ethanol concentrations. In this study, the ethanol tolerance trait was elucidated at the molecular level by using proteomics comparison and analyses. Cellular p...

  8. Novel antibacterial polypeptide laparaxin produced by Lactobacillus paracasei strain NRRL B-50314 via fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the production and characterization of a novel antibacterial polypeptide, designated laparaxin, which is secreted by Lactobacillus paracasei NRRL B-50314. Crude laparaxin has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including: lactic acid bacteria ...

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum effects on silage fermentation and in vitro microbial yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four alfalfa trials, one corn, and one bmr corn were treated with no inoculant (Control), Lactobacillus plantarum (MTD/1) and formic acid (FA), ensiled in 1-L mini-silos, and fermented for 60 d at room temperature (22 C). Mini-silos were opened and analyzed for fermentation characteristics and solub...

  10. Production of lactic acid by Lactobacillus rhamnosus with vitamin-supplemented soybean hydrolysate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunhoon Kwon; Pyung Cheon Lee; Eun Gyo Lee; Yong Keun Chang; Nam Chang

    2000-01-01

    Batch fermentation studies were performed to evaluate the potentials of a complex nitrogen source, soybean, as an alternative to yeast extract for the economical production of lactic acid by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. An enzyme-hydrolysate of soybean meal, Soytone, with an adequate supplementation of vitamins was found to be highly effective in supporting lactic acid production from glucose and lactose. The effects

  11. A comprehensive approach to determine the probiotic potential of human-derived Lactobacillus for industrial use.

    PubMed

    Gregoret, V; Perezlindo, M J; Vinderola, G; Reinheimer, J; Binetti, A

    2013-05-01

    Specific strains should only be regarded as probiotics if they fulfill certain safety, technological and functional criteria. The aim of this work was to study, from a comprehensive point of view (in vitro and in vivo tests), three Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus paracasei JP1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 64 and Lactobacillus gasseri 37) isolated from feces of local newborns, determining some parameters of technological, biological and functional relevance. All strains were able to adequately grow in different economic culture media (cheese whey, buttermilk and milk), which were also suitable as cryoprotectants. As selective media, LP-MRS was more effective than B-MRS for the enumeration of all strains. The strains were resistant to different technological (frozen storage, high salt content) and biological (simulated gastrointestinal digestion after refrigerated storage in acidified milk, bile exposure) challenges. L. rhamnosus 64 and L. gasseri 37, in particular, were sensible to chloramphenicol, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin, increased the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophage and induced the proliferation of IgA producing cells in small intestine when administered to mice. Even when clinical trails are still needed, both strains fulfilled the main criteria proposed by FAO/WHO to consider them as potential probiotics for the formulation of new foods. PMID:23498174

  12. Lactobacillus amylovorus, a new starch-hydrolyzing species from cattle waste-corn fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    The morphology, physiology and fermentation characteristics of this hitherto unrecognized species are described. The new Lactobacillus species can be differentiated from L. acidophilus, L. jensenii, and L. leichmannii on the basis of starch fermentation, G + C content, vitamin requirements and stereoisomerism of lactic acid produced. The type strain of L. amylovorus is NRRL B-4540. (Refs. 39).

  13. Effect of administration of Lactobacillus salivarius and lactic microflora in chick digestive tract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. ZACCONI; G. SCOLARI; P. G. SARRA

    Competitive exclusion against Salmonella by Lactobacillus salivarius and lac- tic microbial associations, was checked in chicks intestinal tract and compared with faecal microbial content from adult chickens. Moreover the weight increase of differently treated chicks was evaluated. The treatment of chicks with faecal suspension gave an high protec- tion factor towards Salmonella, but inhibited weight increase of animals. The addition

  14. In vitro inhibition of Eimeria tenella invasion by indigenous chicken Lactobacillus species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Tierney; H Gowing; D Van Sinderen; S Flynn; N McHardy; S Hallahan; G Mulcahy

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of indigenous chicken Lactobacillus species isolates from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract on Eimeria tenella invasion in vitro and to characterise the nature of inhibition, if any. The effects of competitive exclusion, steric interference and bacterial extracellular factors on E. tenella invasion were examined in an MDBK cell model.

  15. Preparation of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture for cucumber fermentations that can meet kosher guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method is described for growth of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture in jars of commercially available pasteurized fresh-pack kosher dill cucumbers so that jars can be used to inoculate commercial scale cucumber fermentation tanks. A procedure is also described to transfer lactic acid bacte...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Mannitol-Producing Strain Lactobacillus mucosae CRL573

    PubMed Central

    Bleckwedel, Juliana; Terán, Lucrecia C.; Bonacina, Julieta; Saavedra, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus mucosae CRL573, isolated from child fecal samples, efficiently converts fructose and/or sucrose into the low-calorie sugar mannitol when cultured in modified MRS medium at pH 5.0. Also, the strain is capable of producing bacteriocin. The draft genome sequence of this strain with potential industrial applications is presented here. PMID:25502678

  17. Lactobacillus tucceti sp. nov., a new lactic acid bacterium isolated from sausage.

    PubMed

    Chenoll, Empar; Carmen Macián, M; Aznar, Rosa

    2006-07-01

    Following the application of several molecular techniques strain R 19c, isolated from sausage by Reuter in 1970 and deposited at the DSMZ as Lactobacillus sp., has been identified as pertaining to a new species. It showed singular ISR-DdeI and ISR-HaeIII profiles that allowed its differentiation from 68 lactic acid bacteria reference strains analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences places this strain in the genus Lactobacillus within the Lactobacillus alimentarius group. Species L. versmoldensis is the closest phylogenetic neighbor with 96.3% sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed the independent status at species level of this strain. Species-specific primers for PCR detection of this new species have been developed. Phenotypically it can be distinguished from the closest relative L. versmoldensis by several traits such as the peptidoglycan type (L-Lys-Gly-D-Asp), acid production from L-rhamnose, D-mannitol and L-fucose and its inability to ferment d-galactose, d-melibiose and d-sucrose. The name Lactobacillus tucceti sp. nov. is proposed with strain R 19c(T) (=DSM 20183(T)= CECT 5920(T)) as the type strain. PMID:16824960

  18. Intraspecific Genotypic Characterization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains Intended for Probiotic Use and Isolates of Human Origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Vancanneyt; G. Huys; K. Lefebvre; V. Vankerckhoven; H. Goossens; J. Swings

    2006-01-01

    A set of 118 strains of the species Lactobacillus rhamnosus was collected, including probiotic strains, research strains with potential probiotic properties, food starter cultures, and human isolates. The majority of the strains were collected from companies, hospitals, or culture collections or were obtained after contacting authors who reported clinical case studies in the literature. The present work aimed to reveal

  19. Lactic acid production from enzyme-thinned corn starch using Lactobacillus amylovorus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Cheng; R. E. Mueller; S. Jaeger; R. Bajpai; E. L. Iannotti

    1991-01-01

    Summary An alternative process for industrial lactic acid production was deveooped using a starch degrading lactic acid producing organism,Lactobacillus amylovorus B-4542. In this process, saccharification takes place during the fermentation, eliminating the need for complete hydrolysis of the starch to glucose prior to fermentation. The cost savings of this alternative are substantial since it eliminates the energy input, separate reactor

  20. Phenotypic Characteristics and Probiotic Potentials of Lactobacillus spp. Isolated From Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Noohi, Nasrin; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhosein; Rohani, Mahdi; Talebi, Malihe; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus spp., have been considered as excellent probiotic microorganisms, because of their activities in reducing the enteric diseases and maintaining healthy poultry. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the phenotypic characteristics and the probiotic potentials of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from poultry. Materials and Methods: A total of 168 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from healthy six and twenty-one-day old chickens and their feed samples. The isolated bacteria were identified by morphological, biochemical, and molecular tests including Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Biochemical fingerprinting with Phene Plate system (Ph-P) was done and the acid and bile resistant lactobacilli were subjected to the antibiotic susceptibility test. Results: Amongst all of the examined LAB, 30.3% were resistant to bile and acid. Most of the isolated LAB (57.1%) belonged to the genus Lactobacillus with Lactobacillus brevis (78.1%) as the dominant species followed by L. reuteri (16.6%), L. plantarum (3%), and L. vaginalis (2%). The remaining isolates were identified as Pediococcus spp. (42.9%). The Ph-P cluster analysis of 75 L. brevis and 16 L. reuteri strains showed high phenotypic diversity. Whilst the results of Ph-P typing from L. reuteri strains showed low phenotypic variations especially among the strains sensitive to acid and bile salts. Conclusions: Overall, the results showed that some of the high potential probiotic LAB species existed in Iranian poultry. PMID:25485067

  1. Coexpression of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase genes in Lactobacillus brevis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 367 is able to metabolize xylose into lactate and acetate but not ethanol. In an attempt to transform L. brevis into an ethanologen that uses xylose, a Gram-positive gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced. This enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvat...

  2. Inhibition of in vitro growth of enteropathogens by new Lactobacillus isolates of human intestinal origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorenzo Drago; Maria Rita Gismondo; Alessandra Lombardi; Christoph de Haën; Luigia Gozzini

    1997-01-01

    Three human Lactobacillus strains, coded B21060, B21070 and B21190, have recently been isolated. The strains show a series of features (acid and bile resistance, adhesion to various types of mucosal cell) which make them particularly promising for the preparation of probiotic products. In the present study, the ability of the strains to inhibit the growth of pathogens in coculture was

  3. Dose-Dependent Immunomodulation of Human Dendritic Cells by the Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    with a down-regulation of DC-SIGN, MR and CD14. Measurement of the DC-secreted cytokines showed that Lcr35, Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35, on human monocyte-derived immature DCs, using a wide range of bacterial

  4. [Isolation and identification of bacteria of Lactobacillus genus from fermented products in diferent regions of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Vasyliuk, O M; Kovalenko, N K; Harmasheva, I L; Oleshchenko, L T

    2014-01-01

    Seventy one strains of lactobacilli were isolated from fermented animal and vegetable products. Morphological, physiological and biochemical properties of lactobacilli have been studied. Sixty seven strains were identified by molecular genetic methods and classified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of the isolated strains was shown. PMID:25000723

  5. A Probiotic, Lactobacillus fermentum ME3, Has Antioxidative Capacity in Soft Cheese Spreads with Different Fats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Järvenpää; R. L. Tahvonen; A. C. Ouwehand; M. Sandell; E. Järvenpää; S. Salminen

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a prototype of a functional spread cheese containing both a specific probiotic and n-3 fatty acids and to analyze the viability of the probi- otic and stability of n-3 fatty acids during 4 wk of shelf life. Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 (Lf ME-3) isolated from a healthy Estonian child has been shown to have probiotic and

  6. Rapid Differentiation and In Situ Detection of 16 Sourdough Lactobacillus Species by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Settanni, Luca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Rossi, Jone; Corsetti, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    A two-step multiplex PCR-based method was designed for the rapid detection of 16 species of lactobacilli known to be commonly present in sourdough. The first step of multiplex PCR was developed with a mixture of group-specific primers, while the second step included three multiplex PCR assays with a mixture of species-specific primers. Primers were derived from sequences that specify the 16S rRNA, the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region, and part of the 23S rRNA gene. The primer pairs designed were shown to exclusively amplify the targeted rrn operon fragment of the corresponding species. Due to the reliability of simultaneously identifying Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum, a previously described multiplex PCR method employing recA gene-derived primers was included in the multiplex PCR system. The combination of a newly developed, quick bacterial DNA extraction method from sourdough and this multiplex PCR assay allows the rapid in situ detection of several sourdough-associated lactobacilli, including the recently described species Lactobacillus rossii, and thus represents a very useful alternative to culture-based methodologies. PMID:15933001

  7. Lactobacillus fermentum Ess-1 with unique growth inhibition of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rönnqvist, Daniel; Forsgren-Brusk, Ulla; Husmark, Ulrika; Grahn-Håkansson, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize human isolates of Lactobacillus species for their capacity to interfere with the growth of different strains of Candida species in vitro in the search for a potential probiotic. Growth inhibition of Candida species was screened using an agar-overlay method. Inhibiting strains were selected to assay the effect of a cell-free Lactobacillus culture filtrate (LCF) on the growth of isolates of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. A total of 126 human Lactobacillus isolates was investigated. Eighteen isolates significantly inhibited the growth of C. albicans on agar. The LCF of one of these strains showed strong inhibition of both C. albicans and C. glabrata. This strain was genetically identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and designated L. fermentum Ess-1. Further tests to evaluate the probiotic potential of this strain indicated that L. fermentum Ess-1 strain is a promising probiotic for use in clinical trials to treat and prevent vulvo-vaginal candidiasis. PMID:17965352

  8. ISOLATION OF LACTOBACILLUS SALIVARIUS INHIBITORY TO CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI CHARACTERIZATION OF ASSOCIATED BACTERIOCIN, AND POULTRY TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated anti-Campylobacter activity among 11,790 isolates of lactic acid bacteria from poultry production environments. We measured zones of C. jejuni inhibition surrounding the candidate strains and observed 279 isolates exhibiting antagonism. One Lactobacillus salivarius strain, PVD32, was id...

  9. Proteomic analyses of ethanol tolerance in Lactobacillus buchneri NRRL B-30929

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lactobacillus buchneri NRRL B-30929 strain, isolated from a fuel ethanol production facility, exhibits high tolerance to environmental ethanol concentrations. This study aimed to identify proteins produced by B-30929 in response to environmental ethanol. Cellular proteins expressed by B-30929 gr...

  10. l-Alanine Auxotrophy of Lactobacillus johnsonii as Demonstrated by Physiological, Genomic, and Gene Complementation Approaches

    PubMed Central

    van der Kaaij, Hengameh; Desiere, Frank; Mollet, Beat; Germond, Jacques-Edouard

    2004-01-01

    Using a chemically defined medium without l-alanine, Lactobacillus johnsonii was demonstrated to be strictly auxotrophic for that amino acid. A comparative genetic analysis showed that all known genes involved in l-alanine biosynthesis are absent from the genome of L. johnsonii. This auxotrophy was complemented by heterologous expression of the Bacillus subtilis l-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:15006820

  11. Critical water activity for the preservation of Lactobacillus bulgaricus by vacuum drying

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Elizabeth Tymczyszyn; Rosario Díaz; Andrea Pataro; Natalia Sandonato; Andrea Gómez-Zavaglia; E. Anibal Disalvo

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was dried under vacuum at different temperatures and its preservation evaluated analyzing the evolution of three parameters throughout the process: lag time, percentage of membrane damage and ? potential.Microorganisms were dehydrated at 30, 45 and 70 °C in a vacuum centrifuge for different times. The aw achieved for each time of drying was correlated with the cell

  12. The production of glucans via glucansucrases from Lactobacillus satsumensis isolated from a fermented beverage starter culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several starter cultures used in the production of fermented beverages were screened for lactic acid bacteria that produced water-insoluble polysaccharides from sucrose. The strain producing the greatest amount was identified as Lactobacillus satsumensis by its 16S RNA sequence. This strain produc...

  13. Survival and therapeutic potential of probiotic organisms with reference to Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium spp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaila Kailasapathy; James Chin

    2000-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview on the use of probiotic organisms as live supplements, with particular emphasis on Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium spp. The therapeutic potential of these bacteria in fermented dairy products is dependent on their survival during manufacture and storage. Probiotic bacteria are increasingly used in food and pharmaceutical applications to balance disturbed intestinal microflora and related

  14. A LOW-COST MEDIUM FOR MANNITOL PRODUCTION BY LACTOBACILLUS INTERMEDIUS NRRL B-3693

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of mannitol by Lactobacillus intermedius NNRL B-3693, using molasses as an inexpensive carbon source, was evaluated. The bacterium produced mannitol (104.4 ± 0.6 g/L) from molasses and fructose syrups (1:1; total sugars, 150 g/L; fructose:glucose, 4:1) in 16 h. Several kinds of inex...

  15. Characterization of a Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T Lipoteichoic Acid with a Novel Glycolipid Anchor Structure

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Morita, Naoki; Fukiya, Satoru; Tomita, Satoru; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae

    2013-01-01

    We determined the chemical structure of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T. The repeating unit was comprised of glycerolphosphate and 2-alanylglycerolphosphate. The glycolipid anchor was tetrahexosylglycerol with two or three acyl groups. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a tetrahexose structure in an LTA glycolipid anchor. PMID:23503311

  16. Experimental Conditions for Nitrate Reduction by Certain Strains of the Genus Lactobacillus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rogosa

    1961-01-01

    SUMMARY Costilow & Humphreys's (1955) observation that certain strains of Lactobacillus plantarum reduced nitrates under certain conditions was confirmed. Two strains of L. fermenti also reduced nitrates. In static culture, agar and anaerobiosis were not essential for nitrate reduction, contrary to speculations in the literature. Nitrate reduction was possible only in media with restricted carbohydrate and with the pH value

  17. Optimization of media and fermentation conditions for the growth of Lactobacillus sakei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. LECHIANCOLE; A. RICCIARDI; E. PARENTE

    Factorial experiments, empirical model building and response surface analysis were used to optimize media composition and fermentation conditions for the propagation of Lactobacillus sakei, a species used as a starter in the manufacture of fermented sausages. Yeast extract, Lab-Lemco and, to a minor extent, Bacteriological peptone were found to be good sources of peptides and growth factors for L. sakei,

  18. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus fermentum Strain MTCC 8711, a Probiotic Bacterium Isolated from Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    Jayashree, Sathyanarayanan; Pooja, Sharma; Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Vishnu, Udayakumar; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum strain MTCC 8711 is a lactic acid bacterium isolated from yogurt. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this strain. The 2,566,297-bp-long genome consisted of a single chromosome and seven plasmids. The genome contains 2,609 protein-coding and 74 RNA genes. PMID:24072868

  19. Milk production response to feeding alfalfa silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mini-silo trials, silages treated with a Lactobacillus plantarum silage inoculant (Ecosyl, Yorkshire, UK) had increased in vitro rumen microbial biomass production compared to untreated. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage treated with this inoculant could produce a milk production r...

  20. Anaerobic Conversion of Lactic Acid to Acetic Acid and 1,2-Propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    PubMed Central

    Oude Elferink, Stefanie J. W. H.; Krooneman, Janneke; Gottschal, Jan C.; Spoelstra, Sierk F.; Faber, Folkert; Driehuis, Frank

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade lactic acid under anoxic conditions, without requiring an external electron acceptor. Each mole of lactic acid was converted into approximately 0.5 mol of acetic acid, 0.5 mol of 1,2-propanediol, and traces of ethanol. Based on stoichiometry studies and the high levels of NAD-linked 1,2-propanediol-dependent oxidoreductase (530 to 790 nmol min?1 mg of protein?1), a novel pathway for anaerobic lactic acid degradation is proposed. The anaerobic degradation of lactic acid by L. buchneri does not support cell growth and is pH dependent. Acidic conditions are needed to induce the lactic-acid-degrading capacity of the cells and to maintain the lactic-acid-degrading activity. At a pH above 5.8 hardly any lactic acid degradation was observed. The exact function of anaerobic lactic acid degradation by L. buchneri is not certain, but some results indicate that it plays a role in maintaining cell viability. PMID:11133436

  1. Consistent Condom Use Increases the Colonization of Lactobacillus crispatus in the Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liyan; Lv, Zhi; Su, Jianrong; Wang, Jianjie; Yan, Donghui; Wei, Jingjuan; Pei, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-hormonal contraception methods have been widely used, but their effects on colonization by vaginal lactobacilli remain unclear. Objective To determine the association between non-hormonal contraception methods and vaginal lactobacilli on women’s reproductive health. Methods The cross-sectional study included 164 healthy women between 18–45 years of age. The subjects were divided into different groups on the basis of the different non-hormonal contraception methods used by them. At the postmenstrual visit (day 21 or 22 of the menstrual cycle), vaginal swabs were collected for determination of Nugent score, quantitative culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of vaginal lactobacilli. The prevalence, colony counts and 16S rRNA gene expression of the Lactobacillus strains were compared between the different groups by Chi-square and ANOVA statistical analysis methods. Results A Nugent score of 0–3 was more common in the condom group (93.1%) than in the group that used an interuterine device(IUD) (75.4%), (p?=?0.005). The prevalence of H2O2-producing Lactobacillus was significantly higher in the condom group (82.3%) than in the IUD group (68.2%), (p?=?0.016). There was a significant difference in colony count (mean ± standard error (SE), log10colony forming unit (CFU)/ml) of H2O2-producing Lactobacillus between condom users (7.81±0.14) and IUD users (6.54±0.14), (p?=?0.000). The 16S rRNA gene expression (mean ± SE, log10copies/ml) of Lactobacillus crispatus was significantly higher in the condom group (8.09±0.16) than in the IUD group (6.03±0.18), (p?=?0.000). Conclusion Consistent condom use increases the colonization of Lactobacillus crispatus in the vagina and may protect against both bacterial vaginosis (BV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PMID:23894682

  2. Antibacterial properties of composite resins incorporating silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Sami, Lida; Hendi, Sareh; AliKhani, Mohammad-Yousef; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries was partly ascribed to lack of antibacterial properties in composite resin. Silver and zinc nanoparticles are considered to be broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of composite resins containing 1% silver and zinc-oxide nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. Materials and Methods Ninety discoid tablets containing 0%, 1% nano-silver and 1% nano zinc-oxide particles were prepared from flowable composite resin (n = 30). The antibacterial properties of composite resin discs were evaluated by direct contact test. Diluted solutions of Streptococcus mutans (PTCC 1683) and Lactobacillus (PTCC 1643) were prepared. 0.01 mL of each bacterial species was separately placed on the discs. The discs were transferred to liquid culture media and were incubated at 37? for 8 hr. 0.01 mL of each solution was cultured on blood agar and the colonies were counted. Data was analyzed with Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results Composites containing nano zinc-oxide particles or silver nanoparticles exhibited higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The effect of zinc-oxide on Streptococcus mutans was significantly higher than that of silver (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the antibacterial activity against Lactobacillus between composites containing silver nanoparticles and those containing zinc-oxide nanoparticles. Conclusions Composite resins containing silver or zinc-oxide nanoparticles exhibited antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. PMID:24790923

  3. Global transcriptome response in Lactobacillus sakei during growth on ribose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus sakei is valuable in the fermentation of meat products and exhibits properties that allow for better preservation of meat and fish. On these substrates, glucose and ribose are the main carbon sources available for growth. We used a whole-genome microarray based on the genome sequence of L. sakei strain 23K to investigate the global transcriptome response of three L. sakei strains when grown on ribose compared with glucose. Results The function of the common regulated genes was mostly related to carbohydrate metabolism and transport. Decreased transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in glucose metabolism and the L-lactate dehydrogenase was observed, but most of the genes showing differential expression were up-regulated. Especially transcription of genes directly involved in ribose catabolism, the phosphoketolase pathway, and in alternative fates of pyruvate increased. Interestingly, the methylglyoxal synthase gene, which encodes an enzyme unique for L. sakei among lactobacilli, was up-regulated. Ribose catabolism seems closely linked with catabolism of nucleosides. The deoxyribonucleoside synthesis operon transcriptional regulator gene was strongly up-regulated, as well as two gene clusters involved in nucleoside catabolism. One of the clusters included a ribokinase gene. Moreover, hprK encoding the HPr kinase/phosphatase, which plays a major role in the regulation of carbon metabolism and sugar transport, was up-regulated, as were genes encoding the general PTS enzyme I and the mannose-specific enzyme II complex (EIIman). Putative catabolite-responsive element (cre) sites were found in proximity to the promoter of several genes and operons affected by the change of carbon source. This could indicate regulation by a catabolite control protein A (CcpA)-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mechanism, possibly with the EIIman being indirectly involved. Conclusions Our data shows that the ribose uptake and catabolic machinery in L. sakei is highly regulated at the transcription level. A global regulation mechanism seems to permit a fine tuning of the expression of enzymes that control efficient exploitation of available carbon sources. PMID:21702908

  4. PRODUCTION OF MANNITOL BY LACTOBACILLUS INTERMEDIUS NRRL B-3693 IN FED-BATCH AND CONTINUOUS CELL-RECYCLE FERMENTATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved fermentation processes were developed for the production of mannitol by a heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium (Lactobacillus intermedius NRRL B-3693). A fed-batch fermentation protocol overcame limitations caused by high substrate concentrations. The process was developed using prima...

  5. Enzymatic fractionation of the antimicrobial peptides casocidin and isracidin by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cumulative effect of peptidase and protease activities associated with cells of Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (LB) was evaluated on the milk-protein based antimicrobial peptides casocidin and isracidin. Reaction mixtures of casocidin or isracidin...

  6. Inactivation of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleotide reductase by F2CTP: adenosylcobalamin destruction and formation of a nucleotide based radical

    E-print Network

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR, 76 kDa) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is a class II RNR that requires adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor. It catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleotides ...

  7. GASTROENTEROLOGY 2004;127:826–837 Lactobacillus paracasei Normalizes Muscle Hypercontractility in a Murine Model of Postinfective Gut Dysfunction

    E-print Network

    Elena F. Verdú; Premysl Bercík; Gabriela E. Bergonzelli; Patricia Blennerhasset; Florence Rochat; Muriel Fiaux; Robert Mansourian; Stephen M. Collins

    dysfunction in postinfective irritable bowel syndrome are unknown. We tested whether probiotics influence persistent muscle hypercontractility in mice after recovery from infection with Trichinella spiralis and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Mice were gavaged with Lactobacillus

  8. Colicin E2 Expression in Lactobacillus brevis DT24, A Vaginal Probiotic Isolate, against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Disha

    2014-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to combat the urinary tract infection in women. During menstruation elevated protein concentration and increase in oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations with decrease in vaginal Lactobacilli all together contribute to urinary tract infections. Lactobacillus species are a predominant member of the vaginal microflora and are critical in the prevention of a number of urogenital diseases. In order to increase antimicrobial potential of vaginal Lactobacilli, bacteriocin colicin E2 which has specific activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli has been overexpressed in vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24. Recombinant Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 showed much higher inhibitory activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli than wild type L. brevis DT24 in vitro. Efficacy of probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 expressing colicin E2 protein is required for further in vivo evaluation. PMID:24649377

  9. Detection and Identification of Gastrointestinal Lactobacillus Species by Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Species-Specific PCR Primers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Walter; G. W. Tannock; A. Tilsala-Timisjarvi; S. Rodtong; D. M. Loach; K. Munro; T. Alatossava

    2000-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments obtained by PCR amplification of the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to detect the presence of Lactobacillus species in the stomach contents of mice. Lactobacillus isolates cultured from human and porcine gastrointestinal samples were identified to the species level by using a combination of DGGE and species-specific PCR

  10. Bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus plantarum ST16Pa isolated from papaya ( Carica papaya) — From isolation to application: Characterization of a bacteriocin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svetoslav D. Todorov; Hervé Prévost; Martine Lebois; Xavier Dousset; Jean Guy LeBlanc; Bernadette D. G. M. Franco

    2011-01-01

    Strain ST16PA, isolated from papaya was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on biochemical tests, PCR with species-specific primers and 16S rDNA sequencing. L. plantarum ST16PA produces a 6.5kDa bacteriocin, active against different species from genera Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus and different serotypes of Listeria spp. The peptide is inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but not when treated with

  11. In Vitro Prevention of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Damages in Epithelial Barrier Function by Various Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Hsuan-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lactobacillus shows beneficial anti-inflammatory effects on Salmonella infection. The maintenance of the tight junction (TJ) integrity plays an importance role in avoiding bacterial invasion. Whether Lactobacillus could be used to regulate the TJ protein expression and distribution in inflamed intestinal epithelial cells was determined. Methods. Using the transwell coculture model, Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was apically added to polarized Caco-2 cells cocultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the basolateral compartment. LPS-stimulated Caco-2 cells were incubated with various Lactobacillus strains. TJ integrity was determined by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance across Caco-2 monolayer. Expression and localization of TJ proteins (zonula-occludens- (ZO-) 1) were determined by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results. Various strains of Lactobacillus were responsible for the different modulations of cell layer integrity. LPS was specifically able to disrupt epithelial barrier and change the location of ZO-1. Our data demonstrate that Lactobacillus could attenuate the barrier disruption of intestinal epithelial cells caused by Salmonella LPS administration. We showed that Lactobacillus strains are associated with the maintenance of the tight junction integrity and appearance. Conclusion. In this study we provide insight that live probiotics could improve epithelial barrier properties and this may explain the potential mechanism behind their beneficial effect in vivo. PMID:23840201

  12. Apoptosis of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell (CAL-27) induced by Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Guoliang; ZHANG, Jie; WANG, Xinyu; YANG, Wenqin; SUN, Zhihui; KUMAR, Chaurasia Nitesh; GUAN, Hong; GUAN, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites on viability of CAL-27 cells and apoptosis in CAL-27 cells. Methods Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites 1 and 2 (LM1 and LM2) were obtained by culturing Lactobacillus sp. A-2 in reconstituted whey medium and whey-inulin medium; the cultured CAL-27 cells were treated with different concentrations of LM1 and LM2 (0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 mg/mL) and assayed by methyl thiazolyltetrazolium (MTT) method; morphological changes of apoptotic cell were observed under fluorescence microscopy by acridine orange (Ao) fluorescent staining; flow cytometry method (FCM) and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to detect the apoptosis of CAL-27 cells treated LM1 and LM2. Results The different concentrations of LM1 and LM2 could restrain the growth of CAL-27 cells, and in a dose-dependent manner; the apoptosis of CAL-27 cells was obviously induced and was time-dependent. Conclusions Viability of CAL-27 cells was inhibited by Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites; Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites could induce CAL-27 cells apoptosis; study on the bioactive compounds in the Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites and their molecular mechanism is in progress. PMID:25141199

  13. In vitro immunomodulatory activity of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 and Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713: two probiotic strains isolated from human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Dong, Honglin; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2010-12-01

    Commensal bacteria, including some species of lactobacilli commonly present in human breast milk, appear to colonize the neonatal gut and contribute to protection against infant infections, suggesting that lactobacilli could potentially modulate immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential of two Lactobacillus strains isolated from human milk to modulate the activation and cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets in vitro. Moreover, these effects were compared to the same probiotic species of non-milk origin. Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 at 10?, 10? and 10? bacteria/mL were co-cultured with PBMC (10?/mL) from 8 healthy donors for 24 h. Activation status (CD69 and CD25 expressions) of natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+), total T cells (CD3+), cytotoxic T cells (CD8+) and CD4+ T cells was determined by flow cytometry. Regulatory T cells (Treg) were also quantified by intracellular Foxp3 evaluation. Regarding innate immunity, NK cells were activated by addition of both Lactobacillus strains, and in particular, the CD8+ NK subset was preferentially induced to highly express CD69 (~90%, p<0.05). With respect to acquired immunity, approximately 9% of CD8+ T cells became activated after co-cultivation with L. fermentum or L salivarius. Although CD4+ T cells demonstrated a weaker response, there was a preferential activation of Treg cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) after exposure to both milk probiotic bacteria (p<0.05). Both strains significantly induced the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines, including TNF?, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, and GM-CSF, but some strain-specific effects were apparent. This work demonstrates that L salivarius CECT5713 and L. fermentum CECT5716 enhanced both natural and acquired immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of NK and T cell subsets and the expansion of Treg cells, as well as the induction of a broad array of cytokines. PMID:20219262

  14. Administration of probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri K7 during pregnancy and lactation changes mouse mesenteric lymph nodes and mammary gland microbiota.

    PubMed

    Treven, P; Mrak, V; Bogovi? Matijaši?, B; Horvat, S; Rogelj, I

    2015-04-01

    The milk and mammary gland (MG) microbiome can be influenced by several factors, such as mode of delivery, breastfeeding, maternal lifestyle, health status, and diet. An increasing number of studies show a variety of positive effects of consumption of probiotics during pregnancy and breastfeeding on the mother and the newborn. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral administration of probiotics Lactobacillus gasseri K7 (LK7) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) during pregnancy and lactation on microbiota of the mouse mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), MG, and milk. Pregnant FVB/N mice were fed skim milk or probiotics LGG or LK7 resuspended in skim milk during gestation and lactation. On d 3 and 8 postpartum, blood, feces, MLN, MG, and milk were analyzed for the presence of LGG or LK7. The effects of probiotics on MLN, MG, and milk microbiota was evaluated by real-time PCR and by 16S ribosomal DNA 454-pyrosequencing. In 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LGG group and in 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LK7 group, more than 1×10(3) of live LGG or LK7 bacterial cells were detected, respectively, whereas no viable LGG or LK7 cells were detected in the control group. Live lactic acid bacteria but no LGG or LK7 were detected in blood, MLN, and MG. Both probiotics significantly increased the total bacterial load as assessed by copies of 16S ribosomal DNA in MLN, and a similar trend was observed in MG. Metagenomic sequencing revealed that both probiotics increased the abundance of Firmicutes in MG, especially the abundance of lactic acid bacteria. The Lactobacillus genus appeared exclusively in MG from probiotic groups. Both probiotics influenced MLN microbiota by decreasing diversity (Chao1) and increasing the distribution of species (Shannon index). The LGG probiotic also affected the MG microbiota as it increased diversity and distribution of species and proportions of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These results provide evidence that probiotics can modulate the bacterial composition of MLN and MG microbiota in ways that could improve the health of the MG and, ultimately, the health of the newborn. PMID:25622869

  15. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghua; Yuan, Lixia; Deng, Jun; Yang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells), or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus) C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK, and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection.

  16. Purification and characterization of a novel exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus sp. Ca6.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Imen; Slima, Sirine Ben; Chaabane, Hela; Riadh, Ben Salah

    2015-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of ten lactic acid bacterial strains to produce exopolysaccharides (EPS) on MRS broth containing 4% sucrose. A maximum EPS production yield of 2.4g/l was obtained by strain Lactobacillus sp. Ca6. The results from thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance chromatography (HPLC) analyses showed that the EPS produced was a polymer of glucose. Further FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups corresponding to a typical EPS. In addition to EPS production, Lactobacillus sp. Ca6 displayed good probiotic properties (antimicrobial activities and sensitivity to several antibiotics) and resistance to acidic condition (pH 2) and 5% bile bovine. Overall, the findings indicate that this strain has a number of promising properties that make it a potential promising candidate for future application as a food additive. PMID:25597428

  17. A food additive with prebiotic properties of an ?-d-glucan from Lactobacillus plantarum DM5.

    PubMed

    Das, Deeplina; Baruah, Rwivoo; Goyal, Arun

    2014-08-01

    An ?-d-glucan produced by Lactobacillus plantarum DM5 was explored for in vitro prebiotic activities. Glucan-DM5 demonstrated 21.6% solubility, 316.9% water holding capacity, 86.2% flocculation activity, 71.4% emulsification activity and a degradation temperature (Td) of 292.2°C. Glucan-DM5 exhibited lowest digestibility of 0.54% by artificial gastric juice, 0.21% by intestinal fluid and 0.32% by ?-amylase whereas the standard prebiotic inulin, showed 25.23%, 5.97% and 19.13%, hydrolysis, respectively. Prebiotic activity assay of glucan-DM5 displayed increased growth of probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus acidophilus, but did not support the growth of non-probiotic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes. The overall findings indicated that glucan from L. plantarum DM5 can serve as a potential prebiotic additive for food products. PMID:24857877

  18. Microbial ketonization of ginsenosides F1 and C-K by Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Jung, Sun Young; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Dae-Young; Min, Jin-Woo; Wang, Chao; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Ginsenosides are the major pharmacological components in ginseng. We isolated lactic acid bacteria from Kimchi to identify microbial modifications of ginsenosides. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain DCY65-1 belongs to the genus Lactobacillus and is most closely related to Lactobacillus brevis. On the basis of TLC and HPLC analysis, we found two metabolic pathways: F1 ? 6?,12?-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-?-D-glucopyranoside and C-K ? 12?-hydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-?-D-glucopyranoside. These results suggest that strain DCY65-1 is capable of potent ketonic decarboxylation, ketonizing the hydroxyl group at C-3. The F1 metabolite had a more potent inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase than did the substrate. Therefore, the F1 and C-K derivatives may be more pharmacologically active compounds, which should be further characterized. PMID:25262121

  19. Lactobacillus priming of the respiratory tract: heterologous immunity and protection against lethal pneumovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Crespo, Katia E.; Chan, Calvin C.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Percopo, Caroline M.; Rigaux, Peter; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2013-01-01

    We showed previously that wild-type mice primed via intranasal inoculation with live or heat-inactivated Lactobacillus species were fully (100%) protected against the lethal sequelae of infection with the virulent pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a response that is associated with diminished expression of proinflammatory cytokines and diminished virus recovery. We show here that 40% of the mice primed with live Lactobacillus survived when PVM challenge was delayed for 5 months. This robust and sustained resistance to PVM infection resulting from prior interaction with an otherwise unrelated microbe is a profound example of heterologous immunity. We undertook the present study in order to understand the nature and unique features of this response. We found that intranasal inoculation with L. reuteri elicited rapid, transient neutrophil recruitment in association with proinflammatory mediators (CXCL1, CCL3, CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-alpha and IL-17A) but not Th1 cytokines. IFN? does not contribute to survival promoted by Lactobacillus-priming. Live L. reuteri detected in lung tissue underwent rapid clearance, and was undetectable at 24 hrs after inoculation. In contrast, L. reuteri peptidoglycan (PGN) and L. reuteri genomic DNA (gDNA) were detected at 24 and 48 hours after inoculation, respectively. In contrast to live bacteria, intranasal inoculation with isolated L. reuteri gDNA elicited no neutrophil recruitment, had minimal impact on virus recovery and virus-associated production of CCL3, and provided no protection against the negative sequelae of virus infection. Isolated PGN elicited neutrophil recruitment and proinflammatory cytokines but did not promote sustained survival in response to subsequent PVM infection. Overall, further evaluation of the responses leading to Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity may provide insight into novel antiviral preventive modalities. PMID:23274789

  20. Survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum in commercial yoghurt during refrigerated storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nagendra P. Shah; Warnakulasuriya E. V. Lankaputhra; Margaret L. Britz; William S. A. Kyle

    1995-01-01

    Samples of five brands of commercial yoghurt were obtained directly from the processors and enumeration of viable Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum and determination of pH was carried out at three-day intervals over a five-week period. Three of the five products contained 107–108 g?1 viable cells of L. acidophilus, whereas the other two products contained ? 105 of this organism