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Sample records for lactose intolerance

  1. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Charlene M

    Although lactose intolerance is very common it is not a serious health condition. The diagnosis is relatively simple and minimally invasive. Treatment is geared towards a life-long plan of management. Persons who have difficulty digesting lactose will learn by trial and error what food items cause distress and learn to avoid offending milk sugars. In addition many products are available over-the-counter to aid in digestion of lactose. Often these additives enable the person to consume lactose. Adequate amounts of calcium may be consumed by eating a carefully chosen diet containing lactose free sources of calcium in order to maintain healthy bone, nerve, and muscle development. PMID:15662762

  2. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in infant feeding, but its impact decreases as the child gets older and consumes less milk and dairy products. Congenital lactose intolerance is a very rare condition. However, lactase activity may be low and need to mature during the first weeks of life in many infants. However, the evidence that unabsorbed lactose is causing infantile crying and colic is contradictory. Unabsorbed lactose has a bifidogenic effect and improves calcium absorption. Lactose malabsorption may occur secondary and thus temporally to other etiologies such as infectious gastroenteritis, cow's milk allergy and celiac disease. One the cause is treated, lactase activity will gradually return to normal. The vast majority of Asian children will develop late onset congenital lactase deficiency. However, this entity only exceptionally causes symptoms before the age of 4-5 years. Symptoms are abdominal cramps, flatulence and watery, acid stools, and decrease the quality of life but lactose intolerance is not associated with "true disease". The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and confirmed with a lactose breath test, if needed. These patients need to have a lifetime long reduced lactose intake to improve their quality of life. PMID:26715083

  3. Lactose Intolerance (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Lactose Intolerance KidsHealth > For Kids > Lactose Intolerance Print A ... LAK-tose in-TAHL-er-ents). What Is Lactose Intolerance? People who have lactose intolerance have trouble ...

  4. Lactose Intolerance (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Lactose Intolerance KidsHealth > For Teens > Lactose Intolerance Print A ... dairy than her body can handle. What Is Lactose Intolerance? Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest ...

  5. What Is Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Lactose Intolerance: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is lactose intolerance? People who are lactose intolerant have trouble ...

  6. Lactose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Lactase deficiency; Milk intolerance; Disaccharidase deficiency; Dairy product intolerance ... make the lactase enzyme so they can digest milk, including breast milk. Babies born too early (premature) ...

  7. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. After eating foods with lactose in them, you ... get enough of it from your diet, since milk and foods made with milk are the most ...

  8. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names for the three types of ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lactose intolerance lactose intolerance Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, ...

  10. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ice cream sundae or a cool glass of milk at lunch means an afternoon of cramps, gas, ... by problems digesting lactose, the main sugar in milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance happens when the ...

  11. Management of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Tamm, A

    1994-01-01

    The management of lactose intolerance comprises two parts: (1) the basic principles of treatment in persons intolerant to a dietary dose of lactose, and (2) main manoeuvres to reduce the lactose content in food, and/or consumption of special products of milk or exogenous lactase enzyme. The tactics of management depend on the type of hypolactasia, the severity of intolerance, and on the age of the patient. Special attention is paid to the development of lactose intolerance in some patients via iatrogenic mechanisms such as certain drugs, gastric surgery and ionizing radiation. PMID:8042018

  12. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is lactose intolerance diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... people think that they or their children are lactose intolerant without being tested or diagnosed. 1 As ...

  13. Lactose intolerance in infants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cathy

    Cathy Taylor describes the pathophysiology and aetiology of lactose intolerance and how to diagnose and treat it. Management of the infant by the primary health care team is discussed, with emphasis on advice and nutritional support that can be recommended to parents. PMID:16700234

  14. Lactose intolerance and health.

    PubMed Central

    Wilt, Timothy J; Shaukat, Aasma; Shamliyan, Tatyana; Taylor, Brent C; MacDonald, Roderick; Tacklind, James; Rutks, Indulis; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Kane, Robert L; Levitt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We systematically reviewed evidence to determine lactose intolerance (LI) prevalence, bone health after dairy-exclusion diets, tolerable dose of lactose in subjects with diagnosed LI, and management. DATA SOURCES We searched multiple electronic databases for original studies published in English from 1967-November 2009. REVIEW METHODS We extracted patient and study characteristics using author's definitions of LI and lactose malabsorption. We compared outcomes in relation to diagnostic tests, including lactose challenge, intestinal biopsies of lactase enzyme levels, genetic tests, and symptoms. Fractures, bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) were compared in categories of lactose intake. Reported symptoms, lactose dose and formulation, timing of lactose ingestion, and co-ingested food were analyzed in association with tolerability of lactose. Symptoms were compared after administration of probiotics, enzyme replacements, lactose-reduced milk and increasing lactose load. RESULTS Prevalence was reported in 54 primarily nonpopulation based studies (15 from the United States). Studies did not directly assess LI and subjects were highly selected. LI magnitude was very low in children and remained low into adulthood among individuals of Northern European descent. For African American, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian populations LI rates may be 50 percent higher in late childhood and adulthood. Small doses of lactose were well tolerated in most populations. Low level evidence from 55 observational studies of 223,336 subjects indicated that low milk consumers may have increased fracture risk. Strength and significance varied depended on exposure definitions. Low level evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of children (seven RCTs) and adult women (two RCTs) with low lactose intake indicated that dairy interventions may improve BMC in select populations. Most individuals with LI can tolerate up to 12 grams of lactose, though symptoms became more prominent at doses above 12 grams and appreciable after 24 grams of lactose; 50 grams induced symptoms in the vast majority. A daily divided dose of 24 grams was generally tolerated. We found insufficient evidence that use of lactose reduced solution/milk, with lactose content of 0-2 grams, compared to a lactose dose of greater than 12 grams, reduced symptoms of lactose intolerance. Evidence was insufficient for probiotics (eight RCTs), colonic adaptation (two RCTs) or varying lactose doses (three RCTs) or other agents (one RCT). Inclusion criteria, interventions, and outcomes were variable. Yogurt and probiotic types studied were variable and results either showed no difference in symptom scores or small differences in symptoms that may be of low clinical relevance. CONCLUSIONS There are race and age differences in LI prevalence. Evidence is insufficient to accurately assess U.S. population prevalence of LI. Children with low lactose intake may have beneficial bone outcomes from dairy interventions. There was evidence that most individuals with presumed LI or LM can tolerate 12-15 grams of lactose (approximately 1 cup of milk). There was insufficient evidence regarding effectiveness for all evaluated agents. Additional research is needed to determine LI treatment effectiveness. PMID:20629478

  15. Lactose intolerance: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of intestinal lactase, the enzyme required for lactose digestion, can result in symptoms of gastrointestinal malabsorption, or lactose intolerance. The knowledge needed for accurate nursing assessment, diagnostic procedural care, teaching, and referral of affected patients is reviewed. PMID:19331294

  16. Lactose intolerance among Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Sowers, M F; Winterfeldt, E

    1975-07-01

    Thirty-three Mexican Americans between the ages of 9 and 60 were interviewed and tested for lactose intolerance. The participants of the study included 16 children and 17 persons not related by birth, including the parents of the children. Determination of lactose intolerance was based on a rise of less than 25mg/100 ml of blood glucose as measured by an Ames Dextrostix/Reflectance Meter following consumption of a lactose load. Forty-seven percent of the 17 nonrelated Mexican Americans were lactose intolerant. There was a marked relationship between low rise in blood glucose and symptoms of diarrhea, flatulence, and distention. Sixteen children from four families had an incidence of 50 per cent intolerance. The findings of intolerance in two successive generations of three families and in both sexes of the families adds support to the contention that lactose intolerance has a genetic basis, without sex predilection. PMID:1146721

  17. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests. PMID:26715078

  18. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y T; Minocha, A

    2000-01-01

    Lactose intolerance affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Although the presentation is frequently atypical, it should be part of the differential diagnosis when evaluating nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. We review the terminology, types of lactase deficiencies, diagnostic procedures, and management. PMID:11126094

  19. Lactose Intolerance: A Guide for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Lactose Intolerance Posted under Health Guides . Updated 6 November ... of all races and ethnic backgrounds. What is lactose? Lactose is a natural sugar found in milk ...

  20. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy. PMID:24443063

  1. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. PMID:26715082

  2. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2015 What Is Lactose Intolerance? Lactose intolerance is a common problem. It ...

  3. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-10

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance. PMID:26917535

  4. Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Melvin B

    2006-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition presents an updated review of lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Differences between primary, secondary, congenital, and developmental lactase deficiency that may result in lactose intolerance are discussed. Children with suspected lactose intolerance can be assessed clinically by dietary lactose elimination or by tests including noninvasive hydrogen breath testing or invasive intestinal biopsy determination of lactase (and other disaccharidase) concentrations. Treatment consists of use of lactase-treated dairy products or oral lactase supplementation, limitation of lactose-containing foods, or dairy elimination. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports use of dairy foods as an important source of calcium for bone mineral health and of other nutrients that facilitate growth in children and adolescents. If dairy products are eliminated, other dietary sources of calcium or calcium supplements need to be provided. PMID:16951027

  5. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy. PMID:26550699

  6. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  7. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied. PMID:26477616

  8. What I Need to Know about Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español What I need to know about Lactose Intolerance Page Content On this page: ... and break easily. [ Top ] How does my doctor know if I have lactose intolerance? Your doctor will ...

  9. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-09-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  10. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-01-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  11. Lactose intolerance: an unnecessary risk for low bone density.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    The potential for lactose intolerance causes 25-50 million Americans and an unknown number of people around the world to avoid milk. Milk avoidance is a significant risk factor for low bone density. Individuals who avoid milk, due to intolerance or learned aversion, consume significantly less calcium and have poorer bone health and probable higher risk of osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance is easily managed by: (1) regular consumption of milk that adapts the colon bacteria and facilitates digestion of lactose; (2) consumption of yogurts and cheeses and other dairy foods low in lactose; consumption of dairy foods with meals to slow transit and maximize digestion, and use of lactose-digestive aids. As dairying spreads around the world to new markets and dairy foods become the dominant source of calcium in these markets, the potential for lactose intolerance will grow. Management of lactose intolerance globally will require both education and product development. PMID:21335997

  12. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frhauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  13. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  14. Systemic lactose intolerance: a new perspective on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Matthews, S B; Waud, J P; Roberts, A G; Campbell, A K

    2005-03-01

    Intolerance to certain foods can cause a range of gut and systemic symptoms. The possibility that these can be caused by lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose added to many foods and drinks inadequately labelled, confusing diagnosis based on dietary removal of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. This, with a 48 hour record of gut and systemic symptoms and a six hour breath hydrogen test, provides a new approach to the clinical management of lactose intolerance. The key is the prolonged effect of dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labelled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the wide range of systemic symptoms caused by lactose intolerance. This has important implications for the management of irritable bowel syndrome, and for doctors of many specialties. PMID:15749792

  15. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  16. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  17. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    He, T; Venema, K; Priebe, M G; Welling, G W; Brummer, R-J M; Vonk, R J

    2008-08-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the fermentation metabolites and how these processes would play a role in the pathophysiology of lactose intolerance. We suggest that the balance between the removal and production rate of osmotic-active components (lactose, and intermediate metabolites, e.g. lactate, succinate, etc.) in the colon is a key factor in the development of symptoms. The involvement of the colon may provide the basis for designing new targeted strategies for dietary and clinical management of lactose intolerance. PMID:18573099

  18. [Pharmaceutical drugs containing lactose can as a rule be used by persons with lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Vinther, Siri; Rumessen, Jöri Johannes; Christensen, Mikkel

    2015-03-01

    Lactose is often used as an excipient in pharmaceutical drugs. Current evidence indicates that the amount of lactose in most drugs is not sufficient to cause symptoms in persons with lactose intolerance, although interindividual differences in sensitivity probably exist. Patient preferences and/or suboptimal treatment adherence could be reasons for considering lactose-free drug alternatives. PMID:25786702

  19. When to suspect lactose intolerance. Symptomatic, ethnic, and laboratory clues.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, R; Minocha, A

    1998-09-01

    Lactose intolerance is widespread, with adult-type hypolactasia being the predominant cause of lactose malabsorption. Daily ingestion of less than 240 mL of milk is well tolerated by most lactose-intolerant adults. Some persons with normal lactase activity may become symptomatic on consumption of products containing lactose. Lactose maldigestion may coexist in adults with irritable bowel syndrome and in children with recurrent abdominal pain. Management consists primarily of dietary changes. People who avoid dairy products should receive calcium supplementation and should be advised to read ingredient labels carefully. Several lactase replacement products are available, but their efficacy varies. PMID:9742907

  20. [Lactose and gluten intolerance: which to suscept?].

    PubMed

    Van Gossum, M; Mascart, F; Rickaert, F; Codden, T; Colonius, V

    2000-09-01

    Lactose intolerance affects millions of people world-wide and should be suspected specially when evaluating gastrointestinal symptoms in ethnic populations in which it is prevalent. Fortunately, once a diagnosis is made, management is fairly straightforward. The authors discuss symptoms and methods of detection and offer their recommendations for helping patients with this common disorder. Coeliac disease is the end result of 3 processes that culminate in intestinal damage: genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immunological based inflammation. Epidemiological studies based on serologic tests suggest that the prevalence of coeliac disease has been significantly underestimated. The classic sprue syndrome of steatorrhea and malnutrition may be less common than more subtle and often monosymptomatic presentations of the disease. The authors discuss the diagnostic criteria and the clinical utility of serologic tests. PMID:11068484

  1. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa…

  2. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa

  3. How Many People Are Affected or At Risk for Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... many people are affected or at risk for lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content How many people are lactose intolerant? The true number of people with lactose ...

  4. Dietary treatment of lactose intolerance in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Sinden, A A; Sutphen, J L

    1991-12-01

    During the past several years there have been many reports of alternative dietary therapies for primary and secondary lactose intolerance. We have learned that it is useful to feed through most episodes of mild diarrhea that previously would have been treated with clear liquid diets. Infant formulas, including both soy-protein and hydrolysate formulas with specially designed carbohydrate, protein, and fat components, are available to treat the infant with diarrheal syndromes and secondary lactase deficiency. Also, the diet can be supplemented with lactase. Specialized lactose-reduced products as well as cultured and fermented dairy products may be used in varying degrees for lactose-intolerant children. The ingestion of milk with food and fiber components in the diet has also been shown to improve symptoms of lactose intolerance. This review summarizes the essentials of diagnosis of and dietary therapy for lactose intolerance. Our findings indicate that a number of specialized formulas and products are available for successful dietary management of lactose intolerance in infants and children. PMID:1960350

  5. Recent advances in the management of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, D A; Kotz, C

    1989-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a concern for the majority of the world's population. Persons who experience symptoms following the consumption of milk should consult with their physician. Symptoms may be eliminated or reduced with good dietary management that includes: Limiting milk consumption to one glass at a time. Drinking milk with other foods rather than alone. Eating yogurts instead of fluid milk. Using enzyme tablets to predigest the lactose in milk or to supplement the body's own lactase. Possibly eating small amounts of dairy foods each day to adapt the colonic bacteria. For an additional review of the research findings on lactose intolerance and milk drinking, the reader is directed to reference 4, a very recent and complete review by Scrimshaw and Murray. For information on dietary management of lactose intolerance suitable for the consumer, contact your local affiliate of the National Dairy Council. PMID:2656797

  6. Familial aquagenic urticaria associated with familial lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Treudler, Regina; Tebbe, Beate; Steinhoff, Matthias; Orfanos, Constantin E

    2002-10-01

    Aquagenic urticaria is a rare disorder characterized by the occurrence of pruritus and wheals after temporary contact with water. The familial occurrence of aquagenic urticaria over 3 generations is reported here in association with familial lactose intolerance, a condition in which the enzyme lactase encoded on chromosome 2, is deficient. In two patients, a young man and his mother, we verified the appearance of pruritic hives 5 to 10 minutes after contact with water of any temperature. Other types of physical urticaria were absent, and mastocytosis was excluded by extensive laboratory investigations; lactose intolerance was confirmed in both patients by H(2)-exhalation test. In these patients the clinical symptoms did not respond to antihistamines or UV-radiation therapy. Four other members of the family had wheals from water contact, two of whom had lactose intolerance. Two other members had lactose intolerance only. Although the association of aquagenic urticaria with lactose intolerance may be coincidental, attention is drawn to the fact that the 2 conditions, known to be familial, may coexist in the same family, possibly based on an association of gene loci. PMID:12271310

  7. Dairy Intake, Dietary Adequacy, and Lactose Intolerance12

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated emphasis in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans on the importance of calcium in the adult American diet and the recommendation to consume 3 dairy servings a day, dairy intake remains well below recommendations. Insufficient health professional awareness of the benefits of calcium and concern for lactose intolerance are among several possible reasons, This mini-review highlights both the role of calcium (and of dairy, its principal source in modern diets) in health maintenance and reviews the means for overcoming lactose intolerance (real or perceived). PMID:23493531

  8. Lactose intolerance. Recognizing the link between diet and discomfort.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, L N; Pitchumoni, C S

    1994-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a common disorder encountered in clinical practice. Evaluation involves obtaining a thorough nutritional history and recognizing associations between diet and gastrointestinal complaints. Lack of suspicion of the problem can lead to expensive and invasive diagnostic procedures, which may further aggravate patients' anxiety and result in iatrogenic complications. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, simple dietary management may resolve symptoms completely. PMID:8278293

  9. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Judith K.; Miller, Gregory D.

    2002-01-01

    Federal health goals for the public have focused on reducing health disparities that exist between whites and various racial and ethnic groups. Many of the chronic diseases for which African Americans are at greater risk- hypertension, stroke, colon cancer, and obesity-may be exacerbated by a low intake of calcium and/or other dairy-related nutrients. For example, a low intake of dairy food nutrients, such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium, may contribute to the high risk of hypertension seen in African Americans. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study demonstrated that a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables (8 to 10 servings) and low-fat dairy foods (3 servings) significantly reduced blood pressure-and was twice as effective in African-American participants. Calcium and dairy food consumption is particularly low among African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Average intakes are near the threshold of 600 to 700 mg/day, below which bone loss and hypertension can result. Although lactose intolerance may be partly to blame for the low calcium intakes due to reduced dairy food consumption by minority populations, culturally determined food preferences and dietary practices learned early in life also play a role. The high incidence figures for primary lactose maldigestion among minority groups grossly overestimates the number who will experience intolerance symptoms after drinking a glass of milk with a meal. Randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials have demonstrated that by using a few simple dietary strategies, those who maldigest lactose (have low levels of the lactase enzyme) can easily tolerate a dairy-rich diet that meets calcium intake recommendations. Physicians and other health professionals can help their minority patients and the general public understand how to improve calcium nutrition by overcoming the surmountable barrier of lactose intolerance. At the same time they will be helping to reduce the incidence of calcium-related chronic diseases for which minority populations are at high risk. PMID:11853047

  10. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time. PMID:27188621

  11. Cows' milk protein intolerance: a possible association with gastroenteritis, lactose intolerance, and IgA deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M; Kilby, A; Walker-Smith, J A; France, N E; Wood, C B

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-five children with cows' milk protein intolerance were studied. Twenty had presented with an illness clinically indistinguishable from infantile gastroenteritis; an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was isolated from the stools in two children, and in six another member of the family simultaneously developed acute diarrhoea and vomiting. Twenty-three children had lactose intolerance secondary to cows' milk protein intolerance. Eight out of 20 children were found to be partially IgA deficient. An acute attack of gastroenteritis, in damaging the small mucosa, may act as a triggering mechanism in cows' milk protein intolerance, and a deficiency in IgA may be a predisposing factor in so far as it allows the patient to become sensitised to foreign protein. PMID:776336

  12. Novel Epoxy Activated Hydrogels for Solving Lactose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Elnashar, Magdy M. M.; Hassan, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 510%?w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3?U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11?U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's SH, NH, and OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, Km and Vmax, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2?h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel. PMID:25013804

  13. Novel epoxy activated hydrogels for solving lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Magdy M M; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2014-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance" is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5-10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's -SH, -NH, and -OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's -NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, K m and V max, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel. PMID:25013804

  14. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: What should be the best clinical management?

    PubMed

    Usai-Satta, Paolo; Scarpa, Mariella; Oppia, Francesco; Cabras, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is the incomplete hydrolysis of lactose due to lactase deficiency, which may occur as a primary disorder or secondary to other intestinal diseases. Primary adult-type hypolactasia is an autosomal recessive condition resulting from the physiological decline of lactase activity. Different methods have been used to diagnose LM. Lactose breath test represents the most reliable technique. A recent consensus conference has proposed the more physiological dosage of 25 g of lactose and a standardized procedure for breath testing. Recently a new genetic test, based on C/T13910 polymorphism, has been proposed for the diagnosis of adult-type hypolactasia, complementing the role of breath testing. LM represents a well-known cause of abdominal symptoms although only some lactose malabsorbers are also intolerants. Diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward. Many non-malabsorber subjects diagnose themselves as being lactose intolerant. Blind lactose challenge studies should be recommended to obtain objective results. Besides several studies indicate that subjects with lactose intolerance can ingest up to 15 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms. Therefore a therapeutic strategy consists of a lactose restricted diet avoiding the nutritional disadvantages of reduced calcium and vitamin intake.Various pharmacological options are also available. Unfortunately there is insufficient evidence that these therapies are effective. Further double-blind studies are needed to demonstrate treatment effectiveness in lactose intolerance. PMID:22966480

  15. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: What should be the best clinical management?

    PubMed Central

    Usai-Satta, Paolo; Scarpa, Mariella; Oppia, Francesco; Cabras, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is the incomplete hydrolysis of lactose due to lactase deficiency, which may occur as a primary disorder or secondary to other intestinal diseases. Primary adult-type hypolactasia is an autosomal recessive condition resulting from the physiological decline of lactase activity. Different methods have been used to diagnose LM. Lactose breath test represents the most reliable technique. A recent consensus conference has proposed the more physiological dosage of 25 g of lactose and a standardized procedure for breath testing. Recently a new genetic test, based on C/T13910 polymorphism, has been proposed for the diagnosis of adult-type hypolactasia, complementing the role of breath testing. LM represents a well-known cause of abdominal symptoms although only some lactose malabsorbers are also intolerants. Diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward. Many non-malabsorber subjects diagnose themselves as being lactose intolerant. Blind lactose challenge studies should be recommended to obtain objective results. Besides several studies indicate that subjects with lactose intolerance can ingest up to 15 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms. Therefore a therapeutic strategy consists of a lactose restricted diet avoiding the nutritional disadvantages of reduced calcium and vitamin intake.Various pharmacological options are also available. Unfortunately there is insufficient evidence that these therapies are effective. Further double-blind studies are needed to demonstrate treatment effectiveness in lactose intolerance. PMID:22966480

  16. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in multiethnic sample of adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, between 30 and 50 million Americans have the potential for lactose-intolerance symptoms. However, lactose-intolerance prevalence rates in practical life settings may be lower than originally suggested. The goal of thi...

  17. Lactose intolerance and African Americans: implications for the consumption of appropriate intake levels of key nutrients.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    Lactose intolerance is a complex condition that is complicated by cultural beliefs and perceptions about the consumption of dairy products. These attitudes about dairy may contribute to inadequate intake of key nutrients that may impact conditions that contribute to health disparities in African Americans. While a complex health problem, lactose intolerance is easy to treat. However, no treatment can improve the body's ability to produce lactase. Yet, symptoms can be controlled through dietary strategies. This position paper emphasizes the importance of using patient and provider-level strategies in order to reduce the risks to the health of African Americans that may accrue as a result of dairy nutrient deficiency. Evaluation and assessment of interventions tested is critical so that evidence-based approaches to addressing dairy nutrient deficiency and lactose Intolerance can be created. Lastly, it is essential for physicians to communicate key messages to their patients. Since dairy nutrients address important health concerns, the amelioration of lactose intolerance is an investment in health. Lactose intolerance is common, is easy to treat, and can be managed. It is possible to consume dairy even in the face of a history of maldigestion or lactose intolerant issues. Gradually increasing lactose in the diet--drinking small milk portions with food, eating yogurt, and consuming cheese--are effective strategies for managing lactose intolerance and meeting optimal dairy needs. PMID:19899495

  18. Hypolactasia: a common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lember, Margus

    2012-01-01

    Adult‑type hypolactasia (lactase nonpersistence or lactase deficiency) is the most common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose intolerance and primary lactose malabsorption. Clinical presentation of the condition includes symptoms resulting from bacterial fermentation of undigested lactose in the colon, which gives rise to gas bloat, increased motility, and loose stools. Diagnosis of the disease is based on clinical symptoms, biochemical, functional, histochemical and genetic tests. Treatment includes dietary restrictions, namely, use of low‑lactose milk, in which lactose has been prehydrolyzed, or non‑lactose milk. PMID:23222197

  19. Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

    2013-01-01

    Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance. PMID:24079212

  20. Dietary management of lactose intolerance--lactase treated milk versus soya milk.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Gupta, S

    1993-01-01

    Transient lactose intolerance secondary to infective diarrhoea is common in developing countries, & soya milk formula is commonly prescribed for its management. Lactose predigested milk feeding was done in 70 patients of test group while withdrawing lactose diet & 84.3% had control of motions with absent lactose in stool despite challenge feed, 3 days after withdrawal of lactose diet. 83.3% patients in control group fed soya milk had such improvement but the incidence of feed refusal was 30% in this group as compared to only 2.8% in lactaid group. Vomiting after feed was also found in 10% of babies fed soya milk as compared to none in lactaid group, thus proving superiority of lactaid in management of lactose intolerance diarrhoea. PMID:8514340

  1. Fructose and lactose intolerance and malabsorption testing: the relationship with symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, C H; Materna, A; Wermelinger, C; Schuler, J

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of fructose and lactose intolerance and malabsorption with the symptoms of different functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) remains unclear. Aim To investigate the prevalence of fructose and lactose intolerance (symptom induction) and malabsorption and their association with clinical gastrointestinal (GI) as well as non-GI symptoms in FGID and the outcome of dietary intervention. Methods Fructose and lactose intolerance (defined by positive symptom index) and malabsorption (defined by increased hydrogen/methane) were determined in 1372 FGID patients in a single centre using breath testing. Results were correlated with clinical symptoms in different FGID Rome III subgroups. The effectiveness of a targeted saccharide-reduced diet was assessed after 6–8 weeks. Results Intolerance prevalence across all FGIDs was 60% to fructose, 51% to lactose and 33% to both. Malabsorption occurred in 45%, 32% and 16% respectively. There were no differences in intolerance or malabsorption prevalence between FGID subgroups. FGID symptoms correlated with symptoms evoked during testing (r = 0.35–0.61. P < 0.0001), but not with malabsorption. Non-GI symptoms occurred more commonly in patients with intolerances. Methane breath levels were not associated with constipation using several cut-off thresholds. Adequate symptom relief was achieved in >80% of intolerant patients, irrespective of malabsorption. Conclusions Fructose and lactose intolerances are common in FGID and associated with increased non-GI symptoms, but not with specific FGID subtypes. Symptoms experienced during breath testing, but not malabsorption, correlate with FGID symptoms. Effective symptom relief with dietary adaptation is not associated with malabsorption. Mechanisms relating to the generation of GI and non-GI symptoms due to lactose and fructose in FGID need to be explored further. PMID:23574302

  2. Prevalence and Symptom Correlation of Lactose Intolerance in the North East Part of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Shil, B C; Saha, S K; Chowdhury, M; Perveen, I; Banik, R; Rahman, M H

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to see the prevalence of lactose intolerance and symptom correlation following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers in the north east part of Bangladesh. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, diarrhea and others were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 50gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥1.1mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM) i.e., lactose intolerance. Sensitivity and specificity of different symptoms were then found out. A total of 171 volunteers (male 123, female 48) with a mean age 34.08 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 82.5% (n=141, M=100, F=41) subjects. Symptoms mostly experience by the lactose malabsorbers were diarrhea 93(66.0%), borborygmi 80(56.7%), abdominal pain 31(22.0%) and flatulence 32(22.7%). LM prevalence was found to increase with increasing number of symptoms up to 3 symptoms. A week positive correlation (r=0.205, P=0.007) was found between the number of symptoms and proportion of subjects having positive lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance among healthy adults of North East part of our country is as common as in other Asian countries including China and Malaysia. But LM is higher than that of Europeans and south Indians. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated with LM. PMID:26931253

  3. Effect of a single dose of lactase on symptoms and expired hydrogen after lactose challenge in lactose-intolerant subjects.

    PubMed

    Sanders, S W; Tolman, K G; Reitberg, D P

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a single dose or oral lactase on symptoms, breath hydrogen concentration, and glucose absorption in lactose-intolerant subjects challenged with lactose was studied. Volunteers underwent a lactose challenge test; those whose breath hydrogen concentrations increased 20 ppm or more and who met other criteria were admitted as subjects. After fasting, the subjects were given three chewable lactase tablets (total lactase dose, 9900 FCC units) or placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind, crossover manner. The subjects also consumed 8 oz of whole milk in which 37.5 g of lactose powder was dissolved (total lactose content, 50 g). The washout period between lactose challenges was at least one week. Breath hydrogen and plasma glucose concentrations were measured before and at intervals after the challenges, and the subjects completed symptom-evaluation questionnaires every eight hours for four days. Twenty-four subjects completed the study. The maximum mean breath hydrogen concentration was significantly lower after lactase treatment than after placebo treatment. In 21 subjects, the area under the hydrogen concentration-time curve (AUC) was lower after lactase than after placebo; three subjects had hydrogen AUCs more than 300 ppm.hr lower. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose levels. Subjective ratings of the severity of abdominal cramping, belching, flatulence, and diarrhea were lower during the first eight hours after challenge in lactase-treated subjects; ratings for bloating were lower during the next eight hours. Single doses of a chewable lactase tablet reduced the concentration of expired hydrogen and symptoms of lactose intolerance after a lactose challenge. PMID:1534729

  4. Effect of Raw Milk on Lactose Intolerance: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mummah, Sarah; Oelrich, Beibei; Hope, Jessica; Vu, Quyen; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study aimed to determine whether raw milk reduces lactose malabsorption and/or lactose intolerance symptoms relative to pasteurized milk. METHODS We performed a crossover trial involving 16 adults with self-reported lactose intolerance and lactose malabsorption confirmed by hydrogen (H2) breath testing. Participants underwent 3, 8-day milk phases (raw vs 2 controls: pasteurized, soy) in randomized order separated by 1-week washout periods. On days 1 and 8 of each phase, milk consumption was 473 mL (16 oz); on days 2 to 7, milk dosage increased daily by 118 mL (4 oz), beginning with 118 mL (4 oz) on day 2 and reaching 710 mL (24 oz) on day 7. Outcomes were area under the breath H2 curve (AUC ∆H2) and self-reported symptom severity (visual analog scales: flatulence/gas, audible bowel sounds, abdominal cramping, diarrhea). RESULTS AUC ∆H2 (mean ± standard error of the mean) was higher for raw vs pasteurized on day 1 (113 ± 21 vs 71 ± 12 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .01) but not day 8 (72 ± 14 vs 74 ± 15 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .9). Symptom severities were not different for raw vs pasteurized on day 7 with the highest dosage (P >.7). AUC ∆H2 and symptom severities were higher for both dairy milks compared with soy milk. CONCLUSIONS Raw milk failed to reduce lactose malabsorption or lactose intolerance symptoms compared with pasteurized milk among adults positive for lactose malabsorption. These results do not support widespread anecdotal claims that raw milk reduces the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24615309

  5. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-09-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  6. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-01-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  7. Lactose intolerance: a non-allergic disorder often managed by allergologists.

    PubMed

    Perino, A; Cabras, S; Obinu, D; Cavalli Sforza, L

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world's population, while secondary bypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. This condition is known as lactose intolerance. Lactase non-persistence is the ancestral state, whilst two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lactase gene have been associated with lactase persistence. These are C/T 13910 and G/A 22018 substitutions. Lactase persistence, this Mendelian dominant trait, only became advantageous after the invention of agriculture, when milk from domesticated animals became available for adults to drink. Lactase persistence is then strongly correlated with the diary history of the population. Diagnosis is assessed clinically by elimination of dietary lactose or, better, by non-invasive tests including hydrogen breath test and genetic test. In patients with lactase non-persistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous beta-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation. PMID:19496347

  8. Properties of porcine and yogurt lactobacilli in relation to lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Tannock, G W

    1997-10-01

    Lactobacilli that had been isolated from the stomach of piglets were tested for properties relevant to the production of fermented milk products for consumption by lactose-intolerant humans. The strains were characterized for beta-galactosidase activity, the ability to reduce the lactose concentration of milk, viability, and pH of the fermented milk over a 30-d period. Strains that had favorable attributes were studied further, and the optimal pH for beta-galactosidase activity, ability to grow in the presence of bile salts, and ability to deconjugate bile salts were determined. Commercial yogurts were also examined to determine whether products varied in characteristics that might affect tolerance of milk products by lactose-intolerant subjects. The Lactobacillus sp. isolated from pigs had lower beta-galactosidase activity than did Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains ATCC 11842 and NCDO 1489 and strains of lactobacilli isolated from yogurt. The beta-galactosidase activity of all strains decreased rapidly once the fermented milk was stored at 4 degrees C. Strain JB10, originating in the stomach contents of the piglets, had properties that were useful for the manufacture of fermented milk products for lactose-intolerant humans. Milk fermented by this strain had a lactose concentration of about 4.0% and contained 6.6 x 10(6) cfu/ml after storage at 4 degrees C for 20 d. Strain JB10 produced a beta-galactosidase that was active at pH 5.5 (35% of the activity at pH 7.0) and was not inhibited by the presence of bile acids in the culture medium. Beta-Galactosidase activity and lactose concentration varied among yogurts. PMID:9361203

  9. Do patients with lactose intolerance exhibit more frequent comorbidities than patients without lactose intolerance? An analysis of routine data from German medical practices

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Rebecca; Kostev, Karel; Gothe, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in food intolerances poses a burgeoning problem in our society. Food intolerances not only lead to physical impairment of the individual patient but also result in a high socio-economic burden due to factors such as the treatment required as well as absenteeism. The present study aimed to explore whether lactose intolerant (LI) patients exhibit more frequent comorbidities than non-LI patients. Methods The study was conducted on a case-control basis and the results were determined using routine data analysis. Routine data from the IMS Disease Analyzer database were used for this purpose. A total of 6,758 data records were processed and analyzed. Results There were significant correlations between LI and the incidence of osteoporosis, changes in mental status, and the presence of additional food intolerances. Comparing 3,379 LI vs. 3,379 non-LI patients, 34.5% vs. 17.7% (P<0.0001) suffered from abdominal pain; 30.6% vs. 17.2% (P<0.0001) from gastrointestinal infections; and 20.9% vs. 16.0% (P=0.0053) from depression. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were the highest for fructose intolerance (n=229 LI vs. n=7 non-LI; OR 31.06; P<0.0001), irritable bowel syndrome (n=247 LI vs. n=44 non-LI; OR 5.23; P<0.0001), and bloating (n=351 LI vs. n=68 non-LI; OR 4.94; P<0.0001). Conclusion The study confirms that LI should not be regarded as an isolated illness but considered a possible trigger for further diseases. Additional research is necessary to assert more precise statements. PMID:27065730

  10. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins; de Medeiros, Pedro Henrique Quintela Soares; Havt, Alexandre; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Cid, David A C; de Moura Gondim Prata, Mara; Soares, Alberto Melo; Guerrant, Richard L; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Lima, Aldo Ângelo Moreira

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymorphisms C>T-13910 and G>A-22018 were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction and validated by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: Lactose-intolerant patients presented with more symptoms of flatulence (81.4%), bloating (68.5%), borborygmus (59.3%) and diarrhea (46.3%) compared with non-lactose-intolerant patients (p<0.05). We observed a significant association between the presence of the alleles T-13910 and A-22018 and the lactose-tolerant phenotype (p<0.05). After evaluation of the biochemical blood test results for lactose, we found that the most effective cutoff for glucose levels obtained for lactose malabsorbers was <15 mg/dL, presenting an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve greater than 80.3%, with satisfactory values for sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: These data corroborate the association of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (C>T-13910 and G>A-22018) with lactose tolerance in this population and suggest clinical management for patients with lactose intolerance that considers single nucleotide polymorphism detection and a change in the biochemical blood test cutoff from <25 mg/dL to <15 mg/dL. PMID:26934237

  11. Improving lactose digestion and symptoms of lactose intolerance with a novel galacto-oligosaccharide (RP-G28): a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance (LI) is a common medical problem with limited treatment options. The primary symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, flatulence, and cramping. Limiting dairy foods to reduce symptoms contributes to low calcium intake and the risk for chronic disease. Adaptation of the colon bacteria to effectively metabolize lactose is a novel and potentially useful approach to improve lactose digestion and tolerance. RP-G28 is novel galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS) being investigated to improve lactose digestion and the symptoms of lactose intolerance in affected patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled study was conducted at 2 sites in the United States. RP-G28 or placebo was administered to 85 patients with LI for 35 days. Post-treatment, subjects reintroduced dairy into their daily diets and were followed for 30 additional days to evaluate lactose digestion as measured by hydrogen production and symptom improvements via a patient-reported symptom assessment instrument. Results Lactose digestion and symptoms of LI trended toward improvement on RP-G28 at the end of treatment and 30 days post-treatment. A reduction in abdominal pain was also demonstrated in the study results. Fifty percent of RP-G28 subjects with abdominal pain at baseline reported no abdominal pain at the end of treatment and 30 days post treatment (p = 0.0190). RP-G28 subjects were also six times more likely to claim lactose tolerance post-treatment once dairy foods had been re-introduced into their diets (p = 0.0389). Conclusions Efficacy trends and favorable safety/tolerability findings suggest that RP-G28 appears to be a potentially useful approach for improving lactose digestion and LI symptoms. The concurrent reduction in abdominal pain and improved overall tolerance could be a meaningful benefit to lactose intolerant individuals. Study registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01113619. PMID:24330605

  12. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2015-09-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only β-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  13. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only β-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  14. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Enzyme Catalysis; Enzyme Activity in Formulations for Lactose-Intolerant Infants.

    PubMed

    Altas, Margarida C; Kudryashov, Evgeny; Buckin, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    The paper introduces ultrasonic technology for real-time, nondestructive, precision monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in solutions and in complex opaque media. The capabilities of the technology are examined in a comprehensive analysis of the effects of a variety of diverse factors on the performance of enzyme β-galactosidase in formulations for reduction of levels of lactose in infant milks. These formulations are added to infant's milk bottles prior to feeding to overcome the frequently observed intolerance to lactose (a milk sugar), a serious issue in healthy development of infants. The results highlight important impediments in the development of these formulations and also illustrate the capability of the described ultrasonic tools in the assessment of the performance of enzymes in complex reaction media and in various environmental conditions. PMID:27018312

  15. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... nonfat milk solids," "buttermilk," "malted milk," "margarine," and "sweet" or "sour cream." Some breads, dry cereals, cookies, ... 4899 Internet: www.eatright.org Last modified on November 13, 2014 at 01:44:33 PM GI ...

  16. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... regular milk. Lactase products. People can use lactase tablets and drops when they eat or drink milk ... and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health ...

  17. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones, such as canned salmon and sardines, and dark green vegetables, such as spinach. Manufacturers may also ... To learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical ...

  18. Self-perceived lactose intolerance results in lower intakes of calcium and dairy foods and is associated with hypertension and diabetes in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-perceived lactose intolerance may result in adverse dietary modifications; thus, more studies are needed to understand the prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance and how it relates to calcium intake and selected health conditions. The objective was to examine the effects of self-perce...

  19. Efficacy of traditional rice-lentil-yogurt diet, lactose free milk protein-based formula and soy protein formula in management of secondary lactose intolerance with acute childhood diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Nizami, S Q; Bhutta, Z A; Molla, A M

    1996-06-01

    Secondary lactose intolerance is often a cause of prolongation of diarrhoeal episodes. As appropriate management of lactose intolerance is elimination of lactose from diet, expansive lactose free formulae are often prescribed in acute childhood diarrhoea without establishing diagnosis of lactose intolerance. Since cheap weaning diets made from locally available cereals have been found effective in management of persistent diarrhoea, we postulated that same weaning diet made of rice lentil and yogurt (K-Y diet) could be effectively used in management of acute childhood diarrhoea associated with secondary lactose intolerance. We compared this K-Y diet with milk protein-based lactose free and soy-protein formula. Thirty children between 3-18 months of age completed dietary trial for 72 h. Of these nine children received K-Y diet (Group A), four children received milk protein-based formula (Group B) and 11 children received soy protein formula (Group C). Stool frequency was significantly reduced in children in Group A (13 +/- 6 on day 1 to 6 +/- 5 on day 3) and in Group B (13 +/- 5 on day 1 to 7 +/- 4 on day 3), but not in Group C (13 +/- 4 on day 1 to 10 +/- 8 on day 3). No significant difference was observed in intake of diet, total calories intake, and fluid intake among the three groups. It is concluded that cheap weaning diet made of locally available cereals and yogurt can be used effectively in management of secondary lactose intolerance associated with acute childhood diarrhoea. PMID:8699577

  20. Adaptation to Lactose in Lactase Non Persistent People: Effects on Intolerance and the Relationship between Dairy Food Consumption and Evalution of Diseases.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Dairy foods contain complex nutrients which interact with the host. Yet, evolution of lactase persistence has divided the human species into those that can or cannot digest lactose in adulthood. Such a ubiquitous trait has differential effects on humanity. The literature is reviewed to explore how the divide affects lactose handling by lactase non persistent persons. There are two basic differences in digesters. Firstly, maldigesters consume less dairy foods, and secondly, excess lactose is digested by colonic microflora. Lactose intolerance in maldigesters may occur with random lactose ingestion. However, lactose intolerance without maldigestion tends to detract from gaining a clear understanding of the mechanisms of symptoms formation and leads to confusion with regards to dairy food consumption. The main consequence of intolerance is withholding dairy foods. However, regular dairy food consumption by lactase non persistent people could lead to colonic adaptation by the microbiome. This process may mimic a prebiotic effect and allows lactase non persistent people to consume more dairy foods enhancing a favorable microbiome. This process then could lead to alterations in outcome of diseases in response to dairy foods in lactose maldigesters. The evidence that lactose is a selective human prebiotic is reviewed and current links between dairy foods and some diseases are discussed within this context. Colonic adaptation has not been adequately studied, especially with modern microbiological techniques. PMID:26287234

  1. Adaptation to Lactose in Lactase Non Persistent People: Effects on Intolerance and the Relationship between Dairy Food Consumption and Evalution of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Dairy foods contain complex nutrients which interact with the host. Yet, evolution of lactase persistence has divided the human species into those that can or cannot digest lactose in adulthood. Such a ubiquitous trait has differential effects on humanity. The literature is reviewed to explore how the divide affects lactose handling by lactase non persistent persons. There are two basic differences in digesters. Firstly, maldigesters consume less dairy foods, and secondly, excess lactose is digested by colonic microflora. Lactose intolerance in maldigesters may occur with random lactose ingestion. However, lactose intolerance without maldigestion tends to detract from gaining a clear understanding of the mechanisms of symptoms formation and leads to confusion with regards to dairy food consumption. The main consequence of intolerance is withholding dairy foods. However, regular dairy food consumption by lactase non persistent people could lead to colonic adaptation by the microbiome. This process may mimic a prebiotic effect and allows lactase non persistent people to consume more dairy foods enhancing a favorable microbiome. This process then could lead to alterations in outcome of diseases in response to dairy foods in lactose maldigesters. The evidence that lactose is a selective human prebiotic is reviewed and current links between dairy foods and some diseases are discussed within this context. Colonic adaptation has not been adequately studied, especially with modern microbiological techniques. PMID:26287234

  2. Lactose Intolerance: Lack of Evidence for Short Stature or Vitamin D Deficiency in Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Setty-Shah, Nithya; Maranda, Louise; Candela, Ninfa; Fong, Jay; Dahod, Idris; Rogol, Alan D.; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The health consequences of lactose intolerance (LI) are unclear. Aims To investigate the effects of LI on stature and vitamin D status. Hypotheses LI subjects will have similar heights and vitamin D status as controls. Subjects and Methods Prepubertal children of ages 3-12 years with LI (n=38, age 8.61 ± 3.08y, male/female 19/19) were compared to healthy, age- and gender-matched controls (n=49, age 7.95±2.64, male/female 28/21). Inclusion criteria: prepubertal status (boys: testicular volume <3cc; girls: Tanner 1 breasts), diagnosis of LI by hydrogen breath test, and no history of calcium or vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L. Gender-adjusted midparental target height (MPTH) z-score was calculated using NCHS data for 18 year-old adults. Data were expressed as mean ± SD. Results There was no significant difference in 25(OH)D between the LI and non-LI subjects (60.1±21.1, vs. 65.4 ± 26.1 nmol/L, p = 0.29). Upon stratification into normal weight (BMI <85th percentile) vs. overweight/obese (BMI ≥85th percentile), the normal weight controls had significantly higher 25(OH)D level than both the normal weight LI children (78.3 ± 32.6 vs. 62.9 ± 23.2, p = 0.025), and the overweight/obese LI children (78.3±32.6 vs. 55.3±16.5, p = 0.004). Secondly, there was no overall difference in height z-score between the LI children and controls. The normal weight LI patients had similar height as normal controls (-0.46 ± 0.89 vs. -0.71 ± 1.67, p = 0.53), while the overweight/obese LI group was taller than the normal weight controls (0.36 ± 1.41 vs. -0.71 ± 1.67, p = 0.049), and of similar height as the overweight/obese controls (0.36 ± 1.41 vs. 0.87 ± 1.45, p = 0.28). MPTH z-score was similar between the groups. Conclusion Short stature and vitamin D deficiency are not features of LI in prepubertal children. PMID:24205288

  3. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity. PMID:26371036

  4. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a 13C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity. PMID:26371036

  5. A pilot trial on subjects with lactose and/or oligosaccharides intolerance treated with a fixed mixture of pure and enteric-coated α- and β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Bertuccioli, Alexander; Marini, Eleonora; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Aim Lactose and complex carbohydrates maldigestion, common food intolerances due to low gut content of α- and β-galactosidase, lead to abdominal symptoms including pain, diarrhea, bloating, flatulence, and cramping. Commonly, intolerant patients are advised by physicians to avoid the offending foods (dairy foods, cereals, beans, etc). This food-limiting option, however, has possible nutritional risks. We have therefore evaluated the impact of using pure, enteric-coated α- plus β-galactosidase on gut symptoms in intolerant subjects instead of avoidance of the offending foods. Methods Sixteen subjects intolerant to lactose and/or complex carbohydrates were enrolled and evaluated in terms of gut symptoms with 1) uncontrolled diet, 2) diet devoid of offending foods, and 3) uncontrolled diet along with pure, enteric-coated α- and β-galactosidase (DDM Galactosidase®). Results Even with the uncontrolled diet, intolerant subjects treated with DDM Galactosidase® exhibited reduced gut symptoms (bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, and constipation) significantly better than the control treatment as well as having a diet devoid of offending foods. Conclusion DDM Galactosidase® is a valid and safe optional treatment to counteract lactose and complex carbohydrate intolerance in subjects who prefer not to avoid, at least partially, offending foods. PMID:25733920

  6. Lactose intolerance in persistent diarrhoea during childhood: the role of a traditional rice-lentil (Khitchri) and yogurt diet in nutritional management.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Nizami, S Q; Isani, Z

    1997-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is frequently encountered in children with persistent diarrhoea (PD). Selection of an appropriate milk-based formulation is a major management problem in the developing world. In a consecutive series of studies, we evaluated the role of feeding a traditional rice-lentil (khitchri) diet alone (KY) or in combination with either soy formula (KY-Soy) a dilute buffalo milk (KY-B), in children (age 6 months-3 years) with PD. Serial observations of stool output, caloric intake and weight gain of these children over a 14 day period indicated satisfactory tolerance of the KY diet with adequate weight gain. The weight gain and stool output was however higher in lactose intolerant children, with the worst results seen with K-Y and buffalo milk combination. While lactose intolerant children with PD do have higher. rates of therapeutic failure, our data indicates that a traditional diet and yogurt combination can be used satisfactorily for nutritional rehabilitation in over 80% of such children. PMID:9056732

  7. [Food intolerance].

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana

    2009-05-01

    Adverse food reactions are common in the general population. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the structure of food allergens and of the mechanisms involved is poor. In 1995 the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology suggested a classification based on the causative pathogenic mechanism. According to this classification, non-toxic reactions can be divided into food allergies when they recognize immunological mechanisms and food intolerance when there are no immunological implications. The treatment of food intolerance is avoidance of the particular food. There are specific treatments for some food intolerance (beta-galactosidases for the management of lactose intolerance). PMID:19627745

  8. Comparative uptake of calcium from milk and a calcium-rich mineral water in lactose intolerant adults: implications for treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Halpern, G M; Van de Water, J; Delabroise, A M; Keen, C L; Gershwin, M E

    1991-01-01

    Despite the links between low calcium (Ca) intake and age-related bone loss, hypertension, and colon cancer, the majority of Western populations have average daily Ca intakes substantially below recommended daily allowances. Although dietary products are widely known as a rich and valuable source of Ca in the diet, consumption of diary products is low and has been decreasing because of perceptions of excess calories and fat in the diet, as well as taste aversions. During the last decade, a marked increase in the consumption of bottled waters has occurred. Since some of these waters are characterized by high concentrations of Ca, we have studied Ca bioavailability from a Ca-rich water, using 15 lactose intolerant male individuals as subjects, and compared such bioavailability to that from milk. We report herein that the bioavailability of Ca from the water was generally as good as or better than that from milk, a food product well known for its very high Ca bioavailability. Indeed, in eight of 15 subjects, there was a higher level of Ca absorption from mineral water than from milk; bioavailability was equal in five of 15 subjects; in contrast, in two of 15 subjects, the bioavailability of Ca absorption from milk was greater than that from the mineral water. The potential implications of this observation for the prevention and management of age-related bone loss are important for preventive medicine and indicate a new, important source of dietary Ca for lactose intolerant individuals. PMID:1790046

  9. Beneficial effects of long-term consumption of a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Bifidobacterium breve Yakult may persist after suspension of therapy in lactose-intolerant patients.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Almeida CC; Lorena SL; Pavan CR; Akasaka HM; Mesquita MA

    2012-04-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of some probiotic strains for the management of lactose intolerance remains to be established.AIM: To evaluate the effects of a 4-week consumption of a probiotic product containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Bifidobacterium breve Yakult (10(7)-10(9) CFU of each strain) on symptoms and breath hydrogen exhalation after a lactose load in lactose-intolerant patients and whether the beneficial results persisted after probiotic discontinuation.METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with lactose maldigestion and intolerance participated in this study, which comprised 4 hydrogen breath tests: baseline condition (20 g lactose), after lactase ingestion (9000 FCC units), at the end of 4-week probiotic supplementation, and a follow-up test performed 3 months after probiotic discontinuation. For each test, the area under the breath hydrogen concentration vs time curve (AUC(180 min)) was calculated, and symptom scores were recorded.RESULTS: The probiotic combination significantly reduced symptom scores (P < .01) and breath hydrogen AUC (P = .04) compared with the baseline condition. The comparison with the lactase test showed that symptom scores were similar (P > .05), despite the significantly higher (P = .01) AUC values after probiotic use. In the follow-up test, symptom scores and breath hydrogen AUC values remained similar to those found at the end of probiotic intervention.CONCLUSION: Four-week consumption of a probiotic combination of L casei Shirota and B breve Yakult seems to improve symptoms and decrease hydrogen production intake in lactose-intolerant patients. These effects may persist for at least 3 months after suspension of probiotic consumption.

  10. Effects of Exogenous Lactase Administration on Hydrogen Breath Excretion and Intestinal Symptoms in Patients Presenting Lactose Malabsorption and Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ibba, Ivan; Gilli, Agnese; Boi, Maria Francesca; Usai, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To establish whether supplementation with a standard oral dose of Beta-Galactosidase affects hydrogen breath excretion in patients presenting with lactose malabsorption. Methods. Ninety-six consecutive patients positive to H2 Lactose Breath Test were enrolled. Mean peak H2 levels, the time to reach the peak H2, the time to reach the cut-off value of 20 ppm, the cumulative breath H2 excretion, the areas under the curve, and a Visual Analogical 10-point Scale for symptoms were calculated. Genotyping of the C/T-13910 variant was carried out. Results. Following the oral administration of Beta-Galactosidase, in 21.88% of the cases, H2 Lactose Breath Test became negative (Group A), while mean peak H2 levels (74.95 ppm versus 7.85), P < 0.0000, in 17.71% (Group B) were still positive, with the H2 level 20 ppm above the baseline, but the peak H2 levels were significantly lower than those observed at the baseline test (186.7 ppm versus 66.64), P < 0.0000, while in 60.41% (Group C) they were still positive with the peak H2 levels similar to those observed at the baseline test (94.43 versus 81.60 ppm). All 96 individuals tested presented the C/C-13910 genotype nonpersistence. Conclusions. The response to oral administration of Beta-Galactosidase in patients with symptoms of lactose malabsorption presents a significant variability. PMID:24967391

  11. Lactose intolerance genetic testing: is it useful as routine screening? Results on 1426 south-central Italy patients.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Guarino, Donatella; Annicchiarico, Eleonora Brigida; Lisci, Rosalia; Penitente, Romina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2015-01-15

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a widespread condition throughout the world, causing lactose malabsorption. Several studies suggested that the identification of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations, located upstream the gene encoding the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH), is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of hypolactasia. We evaluated the frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 variants in a central-south Italian population and the usefulness of lactase deficiency genetic testing in the clinic practice. The genomic DNA of 1426 patients and 1000 healthy controls from central-south Italy was isolated from peripheral whole blood and genotyped for the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms by high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) and sequencing. The frequencies of genotypes in the 1426 patients analysed were as follows: 1077 CC/GG (75.5%), 287 CT/GA (20.1%), 24 TT/AA (1.7%), 38 CC/GA (2.7%). Only 64 out of 1426 (4.5%) performed also L-BHT test, 29 of which were negative for L-BHT also in presence of different genotypes. Among the 35 individuals with L-BHT positive, 34 were CC/GG and only one CT/GA. Although lactose genetic test is a good predictor of persistence/non-persistence lactase in specific population, its use in the central-south Italy population should be limited given the high prevalence of the CCGG diplotype in normal individuals. PMID:25281930

  12. How Is Lactose Intolerance Managed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... take steps to minimize symptoms without giving up milk and milk products completely. Studies show that the following strategies can help 2 : Drink low-fat milk or fat-free milk in servings of one ...

  13. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. PMID:23495859

  14. [Food allergies and intolerances in children].

    PubMed

    Olives, J P; Breton, A

    1998-02-15

    Allergies and food intolerance together comprise the manifestations of "adverse food reaction". The best known and most common are: allergy to cow's milk proteins (prevalence 0.5% to 7.5%), intolerance to lactose (prevalence after weaning 5 to 100%) and gluten intolerance (prevalence 0.5%). Treatment of these conditions is based on management of the diet by exclusion (or reduction) of the responsible food or antigen. PMID:9781094

  15. Adult lactose digestion status and effects on disease

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adult assimilation of lactose divides humans into dominant lactase-persistent and recessive nonpersistent phenotypes. OBJECTIVES: To review three medical parameters of lactose digestion, namely: the changing concept of lactose intolerance; the possible impact on diseases of microbial adaptation in lactase-nonpersistent populations; and the possibility that the evolution of lactase has influenced some disease pattern distributions. METHODS: A PubMed, Google Scholar and manual review of articles were used to provide a narrative review of the topic. RESULTS: The concept of lactose intolerance is changing and merging with food intolerances. Microbial adaptation to regular lactose consumption in lactase-nonpersistent individuals is supported by limited evidence. There is evidence suggestive of a relationship among geographical distributions of latitude, sunhine exposure and lactase proportional distributions worldwide. DISCUSSION: The definition of lactose intolerance has shifted away from association with lactose maldigestion. Lactose sensitivity is described equally in lactose digesters and maldigesters. The important medical consequence of withholding dairy foods could have a detrimental impact on several diseases; in addition, microbial adaptation in lactase-nonpersistent populations may alter risk for some diseases. There is suggestive evidence that the emergence of lactase persistence, together with human migrations before and after the emergence of lactase persistence, have impacted modern-day diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Lactose maldigestion and lactose intolerance are not synonymous. Withholding dairy foods is a poor method to treat lactose intolerance. Further epidemiological work could shed light on the possible effects of microbial adaptation in lactose maldigesters. The evolutionary impact of lactase may be still ongoing. PMID:25855879

  16. Milk for Kids with Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself. If you take away a food, such as milk, your child might miss nutrients needed to grow ... Offer chocolate milk. It contains the same nutrients as white milk. But kids like chocolate milk and may be ...

  17. Diagnosis and clinical observation of lactose-free milk powder on treatment of neonatal diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Chang, Jing; Yao, Aimei; Hu, Yulian; Yuan, Yuxiao; Yu, Fengqin; Ma, Zhanmin; Wang, Guangzhou; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal lactose intolerance syndrome is a series of digestive system symptoms caused by the lack of lactase, and could not fully digest the lactose in breast milk or cow milk. Lactose is one of the disaccharides mainly existed in mammalian milk. Lactose content in breast milk is 7.2g/100ml, cow milk is 4.7g/100ml. Dairy products are the main energy sources for the newborn, and lactose provides 20% energy for infants. During the growth of the newborn, lactose not only play a significant role in energy supply, but also involve in the development of the brain growing. This study mainly studied the lactose development features, the reasons for lactose intolerance, and the measures to treat lactose deficiency. PMID:27005497

  18. Lactose digestion from yogurt: mechanism and relevance.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis A

    2014-05-01

    Yogurt is traditionally consumed throughout the world among populations who are seemingly unable to digest lactose. This review provides a historical overview of the studies that show lactose digestion and tolerance from yogurt by lactose-intolerant people. The lactose in yogurt is digested more efficiently than other dairy sources of lactose because the bacteria inherent in yogurt assist with its digestion. The bacterial lactase survives the acidic conditions of the stomach, apparently being physically protected within the bacterial cells and facilitated by the buffering capacity of yogurt. The increasing pH as the yogurt enters the small intestine and a slower gastrointestinal transit time allow the bacterial lactase to be active, digesting lactose from yogurt sufficiently to prevent symptoms in lactose-intolerant people. There is little difference in the lactase capability of different commercial yogurts, because they apparently contain Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in sufficient quantities (10(8) bacteria/mL). However, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to require cell membrane disruption to physically release the lactase. Compared with unflavored yogurts, flavored yogurts appear to exhibit somewhat reduced lactase activity but are still well tolerated. PMID:24695892

  19. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  20. Cosmetic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Broeckx, W; Blondeel, A; Dooms-Goossens, A; Achten, G

    1987-04-01

    A study of cosmetic intolerance has been undertaken in 5202 patients tested for possible contact dermatitis. Each patient has been evaluated by medical history and patch testing. Intolerance to cosmetics involved only 5.9% of the total population tested. If other possible sources of allergens (medication, occupation, hobbies etc) are associated, this figure rises to 11.7%. The origin of the cosmetic intolerance is more often an allergy than irritation. Soaps and shampoos are the most important types of cosmetics responsible for adverse reactions. The principal allergens are the fragrances, preservatives, hair dyes and the patients' own products. In this last category, the specific allergen has not always been detected. PMID:3595117

  1. Statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zahid

    2014-05-15

    The term statin intolerance refers to an inability to use statins because of muscle symptoms or elevated creatine kinase, and the major diagnostic challenge is to unambiguously link these to statin use. Roughly 5% to 10% of statin users develop statin intolerance, and because statin use is expected to increase--especially after recent updated guidelines have expanded the statin benefit groups--adverse effects from statins will become a growing issue. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology--and even the terminology--of statin-related muscle injury lacks clarity. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age, family history of myopathy and statin dose; many cases manifest only after patients are administered an interacting medication (e.g., azole antifungals, cimetidine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and cyclosporine). The diagnosis of myopathy remains challenging, especially because some patients can have normal serum creatine kinase levels despite demonstrable weakness and muscle biopsy-proven statin-induced myopathy. A statin withdrawal and rechallenge helps patients distinguish whether their myalgia symptoms are because of statins, but, in at least 1 clinical trial, even 5% of placebo-treated patients developed myalgias during a controlled withdrawal and rechallenge. No consensus exists for management of patients with statin intolerance. Many patients can eventually tolerate a statin but often at suboptimal doses. A subset of patients do well with nondaily regimens such as every other day or once weekly dosing. Some patients cannot tolerate statins at all, requiring nonstatin lipid-lowering medications--the benefit of which remains unclear with regard to preventing atherosclerotic events. Ultimately, statin intolerance undermines the drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lifelong lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, statin myopathy is a common challenge in lipid management, and further work is needed to establish a standard diagnostic criterion as well as treatment algorithms. PMID:24792743

  2. Management and treatment of lactose malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Massimo; Curigliano, Valentina; Santoro, Luca; Vastola, Monica; Cammarota, Giovanni; Manna, Raffaele; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2006-01-14

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world's population, while secondary hypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen causes gastrointestinal symptoms. The condition is known as lactose intolerance. In patients with lactase nonpersistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous beta-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, pharmacological and non pharmacological strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation. In this review the usefulness of these approaches is discussed and a therapeutic management with a flow chart is proposed. PMID:16482616

  3. Management and treatment of lactose malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, Massimo; Curigliano, Valentina; Santoro, Luca; Vastola, Monica; Cammarota, Giovanni; Manna, Raffaele; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world’s population, while secondary hypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen causes gastrointestinal symptoms. The condition is known as lactose intolerance. In patients with lactase nonpersistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous β-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, pharmacological and non pharmacological strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation. In this review the usefulness of these approaches is discussed and a therapeutic management with a flow chart is proposed. PMID:16482616

  4. Allergies and Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Intolerance The way in which celiac disease, gluten intolerance and wheat allergy are defined means a ... celiac disease may provide an incorrect diagnosis of gluten intolerance or wheat allergy. Understanding the differences between ...

  5. Chemical intolerance.

    PubMed

    Dantoft, Thomas M; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven; Skovbjerg, Sine

    2015-01-01

    Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI are available, the presence of the condition can only be established in accordance to criteria definitions. Numerous modes of action have been suggested to explain CI, with the most commonly discussed theories involving the immune system, central nervous system, olfactory and respiratory systems as well as altered metabolic capacity, behavioral conditioning and emotional regulation. However, in spite of more than 50 years of research, there is still a great deal of uncertainties regarding the event(s) and underlying mechanism( s) behind symptom elicitation. As a result, patients are often misdiagnosed or offered health care solutions with limited or no effect, and they experience being met with mistrust and doubt by health care professionals, the social care system and by friends and relatives. Evidence-based treatment options are currently unavailable, however, a person-centered care model based on a multidisciplinary treatment approach and individualized care plans have shown promising results. With this in mind, further research studies and health care solutions should be based on a multifactorial and interdisciplinary approach. PMID:26088215

  6. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  7. Optimization and shelf life of a low-lactose yogurt with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, A; Acha, R; Calleja, M-T; Chiralt-Boix, A; Wittig, E

    2012-07-01

    Lactose intolerance results in gastrointestinal discomfort and the malabsorption of certain nutrients, such as calcium. The replacement of milk with low-lactose and probiotic-enriched dairy products is an effective strategy of mitigating the symptoms of lactose intolerance. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) is a safe, immunity-stimulating probiotic. We have developed a process to increase the hydrolysis of lactose and HN001 growth in yogurt versus β-galactosidase (βG) concentration and enzymatic hydrolysis time (EHT) before bacterial fermentation. The objective of this study was to optimize the conditions by which yogurt is processed as a function of βG and EHT using a multifactorial design, with lactose content, HN001 growth, process time, and sensory quality as dependent variables. Further, the shelf life of the optimized yogurt was evaluated. In the optimization study, polynomials explained the dependent variables. Based on Pearson correlation coefficients, HN001 growth correlated positively with the hydrolysis of lactose. However, low lactose content and high HN001 count increased the fermentation time and lowered the sensory quality. The optimized conditions-using polynomials to obtain yogurt with >1 × 10(7) cfu of HN001/mL, <10 g of lactose/L, and a minimum overall sensory quality of 7 on the Karlsruhe scale-yielded a theoretical value of 910 neutral lactose units/kg for βG and 2.3h for EHT, which were validated in an industrial-scale assay. Based on a shelf-life study at 3 temperatures, the hydrolysis of lactose and the growth of HN001 continue during storage. Arrhenius equations were developed for the variables in the shelf-life study. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to develop a low-lactose yogurt to which HN001 has been added for lactose-intolerant persons who wish to strengthen their immune system. PMID:22720912

  8. Comparative tolerance of elderly from differing ethnic backgrounds to lactose-containing and lactose-free dairy drinks: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Rorick, M H; Scrimshaw, N S

    1979-03-01

    Milk intolerance was investigated in 87 healthy elderly individuals with a mean age of 77 years who were given 240 ml of a chocolate dairy drink twice in one week with a light lunch. No significant differences in symptomatic responses distinguished the subjects consuming a lactose-free (LF) drink from those consuming a drink containing 4.5% lactose (LC) under double-blind study conditions. Breath hydrogen analysis during lactose tolerance testing identified 23 malabsorbers, none of whom responded exclusively to the LC drink, although five were symptomatic on both days, and two had symptoms only on the day the LF drink was served. A similar percentage of absorbers (72%) and malabsorbers (70%) were asymptomatic on both days. Factors other than lactose malabsorption appeared to be responsible for the symptoms of intolerance reported, and most may have been psychosomatic in origin. PMID:374454

  9. Lactose: the milk sugar from a biotechnological perspective.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ana C; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Polaina, Julio

    2004-01-01

    Lactose is a very important sugar because of its abundance in the milk of humans and domestic animals. Lactose is a valuable asset as a basic nutrient and the main substrate in fermentative processes that led to the production of fermented milk products, such as yogurt and kefir. In some instances, lactose also can be a problem as the causative agent of some diseases, such as lactose intolerance and galactosemia, or for being a by-product generated in huge amounts by the cheese industry. The study of the biochemical reactions leading to the synthesis and assimilation of lactose has provided valuable models for the understanding of biosynthetic and catabolic processes. Lactose-hydrolyzing enzymes are structurally and phylogenetically related to different types of beta-galactosidases and bacterial cellobiases involved in the enzymatic degradation of cellulose. Biotransformation of lactose, by either enzymatic or fermentative procedures, is important for different types of industrial applications in dairy and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:15969327

  10. The diagnosis and management of patients with lactose-intolerance.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sherry L; Attel, Susan

    2013-07-10

    Approximately 70% of the world's population is lactase deficient. This article reviews the evolutionary history of lactase deficiency, recent recommendations to establish screening, and clinical practice guidelines for increased diagnosis of this important, yet often misunderstood condition of malabsorption. PMID:23778177

  11. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  12. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  13. Streamlined analysis of lactose-free dairy products.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Gertrud E; Morlock, Lauritz P; Lemo, Carot

    2014-01-10

    Functional food for lactose-intolerant consumers and its global prevalence has created a large market for commercially available lactose-free food products. The simplest approach for detection and quantitation of lactose in lactose-free dairy products was developed. A one-step sample preparation was employed and the resulting 10% sample solution was directly subjected to the chromatographic system. LODs down to 0.04 mg/L were obtained for dairy products by application volumes up to 250 μL on a rectangular start zone, which is the lowest LOD reported in matrix so far. The highly matrix-robust, streamlined approach was demonstrated for a broad range of dairy products, even with high fat and protein contents. The mean recovery rate for 11 types of dairy products spiked at the strictest lactose content discussed (0.01%) was 90.5±10.5% (n=11). The mean repeatability for 11 dairy products spiked at the 0.01% level was 1.3±1.0% (n=11). It is the simplest approach with regard to sample preparation at low running costs (0.3 Euro or 0.4 USD/analysis) and fast analysis time (3 min/analysis). It enabled an efficient product screening, and at the same time, the quantitation of lactose in relevant samples. This streamlined analysis is highly attractive to the field of food safety and quality control of lactose-free dairy products, for which a limit value for lactose is expected soon in the EU. This methodological concept can be transferred to other challenging fields. PMID:24360255

  14. A novel correlation for rapid lactose determination in milk by a cryoscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Carmen; Barrera, Ignacio; Blanco, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    Residual lactose in special milk was systematically determined for people with lactose intolerance by means of a rapid on-line measurement of the cryoscopic point. A proposed cryoscopic procedure was compared to 2 conventional yet highly laborious methods: the enzymatic procedure with spectrophotometric control and the polarimetric method. Several experiments with different mixtures of both semi-skimmed and low-lactose milk were performed. A lineal relationship was found between lactose concentration and freezing point, the analytical equation for which shows a close relationship regarding the 3 methods used. The advantages of the cryoscopic procedure include speed in obtaining results and operational simplicity at a low cost, better monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis kinetics, and greater control over the production process for delactosed milk. The equation obtained also enables prediction of the lactose percentage in commercial milk by a simple measurement of freezing point. PMID:17225605

  15. Effect of a lactase preparation on lactose content and osmolality of preterm and term infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S J; Rogers, R R; Lombard, K A

    1991-01-01

    Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency often follows acute gastroenteritis. In such situations, a lactose-free formula may be indicated for preterm infants. Therefore, the effect of addition of lactase on the lactose content and osmolality of preterm and term infant formulas was studied. Lactose content of formulas at room temperature was decreased by approximately 50% 1 hour after addition of lactase. Concentration of lactose was reduced by 70% or more after 2 hours in all formulas. Because of the higher initial lactose concentration in term formulas, it took 24 hours to reach the same absolute lactose concentration (10 g/kg formula) found in preterm formulas after 2 hours. There was a moderate increase in osmolality in preterm formulas. The increase was greater in term formulas because of the greater initial concentration of lactose. The addition of lactase appears to be a suitable method for reduction of lactose content of preterm and term formulas, although the increase in osmolality of term formulas may preclude their clinical use. PMID:1942472

  16. Lactose Tolerance Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be ... Lactose Tolerance Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ...

  17. Intolerance of Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Meghan L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and progressive neurologic condition that, by its nature, carries uncertainty as a hallmark characteristic. Although all patients face uncertainty, there is variability in how individuals cope with its presence. In other populations, the concept of “intolerance of uncertainty” has been conceptualized to explain this variability such that individuals who have difficulty tolerating the possibility of future occurrences may engage in thoughts or behaviors by which they attempt to exert control over that possibility or lessen the uncertainty but may, as a result, experience worse outcomes, particularly in terms of psychological well-being. This topical review introduces MS-focused researchers, clinicians, and patients to intolerance of uncertainty, integrates the concept with what is already understood about coping with MS, and suggests future steps for conceptual, assessment, and treatment-focused research that may benefit from integrating intolerance of uncertainty as a central feature. PMID:26300700

  18. Preparation of lactose-free pasteurized milk with a recombinant thermostable ?-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance is a common health concern causing gastrointestinal symptoms and avoidance of dairy products by afflicted individuals. Since milk is a primary source of calcium and vitamin D, lactose intolerant individuals often obtain insufficient amounts of these nutrients which may lead to adverse health outcomes. Production of lactose-free milk can provide a solution to this problem, although it requires use of lactase from microbial sources and increases potential for contamination. Use of thermostable lactase enzymes can overcome this issue by functioning under pasteurization conditions. Results A thermostable ?-glucosidase gene from Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerecisiae a-factor secretory signal and expressed in Pichia pastoris strain X-33. The recombinant enzyme was purified by a one-step method of weak anion exchange chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH for this ?-glucosidase activity was 100C and pH6.0, respectively. The enzyme activity was not significantly inhibited by Ca2+. We tested the additive amount, hydrolysis time, and the influence of glucose on the enzyme during pasteurization and found that the enzyme possessed a high level of lactose hydrolysis in milk that was not obviously influenced by glucose. Conclusions The thermostablity of this recombinant ?-glucosidase, combined with its neutral pH activity and favorable temperature activity optima, suggest that this enzyme is an ideal candidate for the hydrolysis of lactose in milk, and it would be suitable for application in low-lactose milk production during pasteurization. PMID:24053641

  19. Lactose maldigestion, calcium intake and osteoporosis in African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-Americans.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K A; Savaiano, D A

    2001-04-01

    Dietary calcium is critical for the development of the human skeleton and likely plays an important role in the prevention of osteoporosis. Dairy products provide approximately three-fourths of calcium consumed in the diet and are the most concentrated sources of this essential nutrient. One obstacle that likely interferes with calcium consumption among many ethnic groups is lactose maldigestion. The real or perceived occurrence of intolerance symptoms after dairy food consumption may cause maldigesters to avoid dairy products. Several investigators have observed a relationship between lactose maldigestion, dietary calcium and osteoporosis in Caucasian populations. Research on ethnically diverse populations is necessary to better understand how lactose maldigestion influences the risk for osteoporosis. Low calcium intakes, a greater than previously thought potential for low bone density and extensive lactose maldigestion among Hispanic-American and Asian-American populations may create an elevated risk for osteoporosis. Dietary management strategies for lactose maldigesters to increase calcium consumption include consuming (1) dairy foods with meals, (2) yogurts, (3) calcium-fortified foods, (4) using lactose digestive aids and (5) including dairy foods daily in the diet to enhance colonic metabolism of lactose. PMID:11349943

  20. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  1. Perceived milk intolerance is related to bone mineral content in 10-13 year-old female adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine associations among lactose maldigestion status, perceived milk intolerance (PMI), dietary calcium intake and bone mineral content in early adolescent females. Methodology: Subjects were 291 girls who participated in a sub-study of the multiple-...

  2. Lactose causes heart arrhythmia in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Wann, Kenneth T; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2004-10-01

    The cladoceran Daphnia pulex is well established as a model for ecotoxicology. Here, we show that D. pulex is also useful for investigating the effects of toxins on the heart in situ and the toxic effects in lactose intolerance. The mean heart rate at 10 degrees C was 195.9+/-27.0 beats/min (n=276, range 89.2-249.2, >80% 170-230 beats/min). D. pulex heart responded to caffeine, isoproteronol, adrenaline, propranolol and carbachol in the bathing medium. Lactose (50-200 mM) inhibited the heart rate by 30-100% (K(1/2)=60 mM) and generated severe arrhythmia within 60 min. These effects were fully reversible by 3-4 h. Sucrose (100-200 mM) also inhibited the heart rate, but glucose (100-200 mM) and galactose (100-200 mM) had no effect, suggesting that the inhibition by lactose or sucrose was not simply an osmotic effect. The potent antibiotic ampicillin did not prevent the lactose inhibition, and two diols known to be generated by bacteria under anaerobic conditions were also without effect. The lack of effect of l-ribose (2 mM), a potent inhibitor of beta-galactosidase, supported the hypothesis that lactose and other disaccharides may affect directly ion channels in the heart. The results show that D. pulex is a novel model system for studying effects of agonists and toxins on cell signalling and ion channels in situ. PMID:15465669

  3. Lactose nutrition in lactase nonpersisters.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Lactose handling by the human gut by most people, beyond being breast-fed, has been considered a disorder rather than physiological. A non-human mammalian milk source is novel for the majority. During the first 6 months of life, when neonates and infants are best breast-fed, lactose along with other macronutrients, provides energy, but may have other functions as well. At birth, babies are endowed with their mother's vaginal microbiome, but not if they are born by Caesarean section. How much maternal milk lactose survives the infant's small intestine and is processed by this unique gut microbiome and to what end is still uncertain, but no lactose or galactose appears in the faeces. Once intestinal lactase activity declines in most infants, lactose may enhance innate immunity through the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), which is best achieved by lactose synergy with other colonic fermentation metabolites such as butyrate. It is of interest whether this lactose function or a variant of it persists. It might not be evident when lactase is persistent, as it is in most people of northern European ancestry. Population genomics indicate that lactase persistence became prevalent only about 3000-1000 BC, the Bronze Age of Eurasia. Gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) in lactase nonpersisters who consume dairy foods are partly dose dependent and not usually evident with single lactose intakes≤25 g per day. Spreading intake across the day reduces the risk as can various dietary patterns. Nevertheless, individual differences in GIS lactose sensitivity may merit public health and clinical consideration. PMID:26715080

  4. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  5. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  6. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  7. Teaching lactose metabolism: A Complex Challenge Faced with a Simple Kit.

    PubMed

    Monti-Hughes, Andrea; Alonso, Manuel; Garófalo, Judith; Burgos, Hilda Isabel; Stella, Carlos Alberto

    2007-09-01

    We developed an experimental didactic proposal to teach both carbohydrate metabolism and lactose intolerance as the disease related to that metabolism. Therefore, we implemented an empirical strategy consisting of inexpensive and nontoxic components for which students do not need to know any of the laboratory techniques. The fact that students were able to discuss their own results obtained from the experiments performed in their classroom gave them an additional motivation to learn the subject. PMID:21591124

  8. [Food Allergy and Intolerance : Distinction, Definitions and Delimitation].

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Waßmann-Otto, Anja; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Immunologically mediated hypersensitivity to foods is defined as food allergy, mainly due to immunglobulins of class E (IgE) triggering immediate reactions (type I hypersensitivity) with possible involvement of mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract, and the vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on (early) IgE sensitization against animal (e. g., cow's milk, hen's eggs) or plant proteins (e. g. peanut, hazelnut or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, IgE against pollen proteins (e. g., birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross-reactions to stone and pit fruits). Non-immunological food intolerance reactions are mostly based on carbohydrate malassimilation (e. g., lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption) and are rarely due to pseudo-allergies (e. g., flavors, dyes, preservatives) primarily in patients with chronic urticaria. Common intestinal symptoms are mainly due to functional disorders (e. g., irritable bowel disease), rarely because of inflammatory intestinal diseases (e. g., celiac disease). Histamine intolerance, gluten hypersensitivity, and so-called food type III hypersensitivities are controversial diagnoses. The aforementioned disease entities/models are of variable importance for the affected individuals, the public health system, and society in general. PMID:27215624

  9. Acidogenic fermentation of lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaalita, W.S.; Pinder, K.L.; Lo, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Cheese whey is the main component of waste streams from cheese manufacturing plants. Whey is a high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) effluent that must be reduced before the streams are sent to the sewer. It is proposed in this article that the production of methane by anaerobic fermentation would be the best use of this stream, especially for small plants. Single-stage fermentation of lactose, the main component of whey, results in a very low pH and a stalled process. Two-phase fermentation will eliminate this problem. The acidogenic stage of fermentation has been studied at pH of between 4 and 6.5. The nature of the main products of the reaction have been found to be pH dependent. Below a pH of 4.5 a gas (CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/) is produced along with ethanol, acetate, and butyrate. Above a pH of 4.5 no gas was produced and the liquid products included less ethanol and butyrate and more acetate. A separate study on the conditions for gas formation showed that if the pH dropped for a short time below 4.5 gases were formed at all subsequent pH. This would indicate a change in population distribution due to the period at a low pH. By assuming that the desired products from the acidogenic stage were butyrate, acetate, and no gases, the optimum pH range was found to be between 6.0 and 6.5.

  10. Acidogenic fermentation of lactose.

    PubMed

    Kisaalita, W S; Pinder, K L; Lo, K V

    1987-07-01

    Cheese whey is the main component of waste streams from cheese manufacturing plants. Whey is a high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) effluent that must be reduced before the streams are sent to the sewer. It is proposed in this article that the production of methane by anaerobic fermentation would be the best use of this stream, especially for small plants. Single-stage fermentation of lactose, the main component of whey, results in a very low pH and a stalled process. Two-phase fermentation will eliminate this problem. The acidogenic stage of fermentation has been studied at pH of between 4 and 6.5. The nature of the main products of the reaction have been found to be pH dependent. Below a pH of 4.5 a gas (CO(2) and H(2)) is produced along with ethanol, acetate, and butyrate. Above a pH of 4.5 no gas was produced, and the liquid products included less ethanol and butyrate and more acetate. A separate study on the conditions for gas formation showed that if the pH dropped for a short time below 4.5 gases were formed at all subsequent pH. This would indicate a change in population distribution due to the period at a low pH. By assuming that the desired products from the acidogenic stage were butyrate, acetate, and no gases, the optimum pH range was found to be between 6.0 and 6.5. PMID:18576587

  11. Hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Rellos, P; Cox, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI, OMIM 22960), caused by catalytic deficiency of aldolase B (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, EC 4.1.2.13), is a recessively inherited condition in which affected homozygotes develop hypoglycaemic and severe abdominal symptoms after taking foods containing fructose and cognate sugars. Continued ingestion of noxious sugars leads to hepatic and renal injury and growth retardation; parenteral administration of fructose or sorbitol may be fatal. Direct detection of a few mutations in the human aldolase B gene on chromosome 9q facilitates the genetic diagnosis of HFI in many symptomatic patients. The severity of the disease phenotype appears to be independent of the nature of the aldolase B gene mutations so far identified. It appears that hitherto there has been little, if any, selection against mutant aldolase B alleles in the population: in the UK, approximately 1.3% of neonates harbour one copy of the prevalent A149P disease allele. The ascendance of sugar as a major dietary nutrient, especially in western societies, may account for the increasing recognition of HFI as a nutritional disease and has shown the prevalence of mutant aldolase B genes in the general population. The severity of clinical expression correlates well with the immediate nutritional environment, age, culture, and eating habits of affected subjects. Here we review the biochemical, genetic, and molecular basis of human aldolase B deficiency in HFI, a disorder which responds to dietary therapy and in which the principal manifestations of disease are thus preventable. Images PMID:9610797

  12. Sugar intolerance complicating acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Trounce, J Q; Walker-Smith, J A

    1985-01-01

    Sugar intolerance occurred in 31 of 200 children admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis. In 28 this was transient and settled rapidly, but in the remaining three it indicated a more serious and persistent problem. The most important predisposing factor was viral infection, in particular with rotavirus. The current regimen for the management of sugar intolerance complicating acute gastroenteritis at this hospital is outlined. PMID:4062353

  13. Food allergy and food intolerance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J A

    1985-01-01

    Adverse reactions to foods and food additives include those that involve an immune mechanism of reaction (food allergies) and those that are non-immunological in nature (food intolerance). The signs and symptoms of food allergy usually involve the skin and gastrointestinal tract and are "classic" allergic symptoms. Food intolerance occurs more frequently at all ages. A number of food additives have been implicated in food intolerance, as none involve an immune mechanism of reaction. The role of food additives in food intolerance is not well established in many cases, has been discounted in others and continues to be the subject of current research. Although the history of events concerning an adverse reaction is important and gives clues to the specific type of problem (food allergy versus food intolerance), confirmation of the reaction is sometimes desirable. This can be done either by use of a standard elimination diet of non-allergic foods, followed by open challenge or by DBFC for more difficult situations. Food allergy skin testing and other in vitro immunologic tests may be helpful as supplemental information in those cases where food allergy is suspected. The best treatment for an adverse reaction to food is avoidance. Unproven and unapproved diagnostic (e.g., leukocytotoxic test) and therapeutic techniques (e.g., sublinqual neutralization) are not recommended in food allergy management. PMID:3857245

  14. Dairy sensitivity, lactose malabsorption, and elimination diets in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, S

    1997-02-01

    The ability of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to tolerate dairy products and the guidance they receive from physicians and nutritionists on this subject are important considerations in the management of their IBD. Although most affected persons are able to consume a glass of milk daily without discomfort, additional consideration must be given to specific factors that can be relevant to certain individuals. The declaration by patients that they are "dairy sensitive" may be related to lactose intolerance or malabsorption, the long-chain triacylglycerol content of milk, allergy to milk proteins, as well as psychologic factors and the misconception that dairy products can be detrimental to their health. The prevalence of lactose malabsorption is significantly greater in patients with Crohn disease involving the small bowel than it is in patients with Crohn disease involving the colon or ulcerative colitis. In the latter colonic conditions the prevalence of lactose malabsorption is mainly determined by ethnic risk, which is based on genetic factors. In addition, lactose malabsorption in Crohn disease of the small bowel may be determined by factors other than lactase enzyme activity, such as bacterial overgrowth and/or small bowel transit time. Physicians differ widely in the advice they give their patients: some dogmatically advise avoidance of dairy products when the diagnosis is made whereas others discount the possible role of dairy in the management of IBD. IBD patients avoid dairy products more than they would need to based on the prevalence of lactose malabsorption and/or milk intolerance, probably partly because of incorrect patient perceptions and arbitrary advice from physicians and authors of popular diet books. Adequate scientific and clinical information is now available to permit recommendations about the intake of dairy products for each IBD patient. PMID:9022546

  15. Carbohydrate intolerance and kidney stones in children in the Goldfields.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, D N; Spencer, J L; Jeffries-Stokes, C A

    2003-07-01

    Renal stones have been reported as a common finding in Australian Aboriginal children. The stones are predominantly urate in composition. We report on five children with nephrolithiasis from the Goldfields region of Western Australia. All were diagnosed when under 5 years of age, the majority being under 3 years. All five children also had lactose intolerance, and we postulate that carbohydrate malabsorption, together with the ensuing chronic diarrhoea and intraluminal breakdown of sugars by enteric bacteria may result in a situation of chronic metabolic acidosis. Chronic metabolic acidosis can lead to protein catabolism, increased urate excretion and the formation of renal stones. Carbohydrate intolerance may be an aetiological factor in the development of renal stones and possibly chronic renal disease, particularly in Aboriginal Australians. Renal disease represents one of the most significant factors affecting the health of Australian Aboriginal people. The incidence of end stage renal failure in this population exceeds that of non-Aboriginals by a factor of 13:1, and this disproportionate figure is increasing. It is likely that chronic renal damage is multifactorial; however, it is probable that at least some aetiological factors have their onset during childhood. PMID:12887672

  16. Redefining lactose as a conditional prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2004-03-01

    Lactose in dairy products is maldigested by up to 70% to 75% of the world's population and many people may therefore suffer symptoms reminiscent of irritable bowel syndrome. As a result, most research to date has concentrated on ways of improving lactose tolerance to enhance dairy as a source of nutrition. However, research on other possible benefits of lactose and its maldigestion has lagged. In view of an exponential growth in the understanding of intestinal microfloral host interactions and the expanding therapeutical potential of probiotics, a reassessment of the role of lactose as a potential prebiotic in lactase nonpersistent subjects is required. Gibson and Roberfroid introduced the concept of prebiotics and outlined definitive requirements for such a compound. The present article examines scientific and clinical knowledge about the properties of lactose and argues that in lactase nonpersistent subjects, lactose qualifies as a prebiotic. PMID:15054489

  17. Effect of temperature on the lactose hydrolytic capacity of a lactase derived from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R E; Corona, E; Rosales, F; Schneider, F E; Rodriguez, O; Pineda, O

    1990-02-01

    In vitro studies of lactose hydrolysis in milk with 20-125 neutral lactase units (NLUs) carried out at 38.0 degrees C for 15 min with a beta-galactosidase derived from Kluyveromyces lactis (Lactaid, Lactaid Inc, Pleasantville, NJ) resulted in 85-95% of the hydrolysis observed with standard incubation conditions (24 h at 4-5 degrees C with 1000 NLU/L). Thirty-three lactose-maldigesting Guatemalan subjects, 16 children and 17 adults, were challenged with oral doses of lactose in milk (children aged less than 12 mo, 2 g/kg body wt; children aged 12-24 mo, 15 g/kg body wt; older children and adults, 18 g/kg body wt) preincubated for 20 min at 38 +/- 0.5 degrees C with 50-125 NLU Lactaid. Under these conditions the subjects consumed milk without presenting any signs of intolerance. Furthermore, their breath-hydrogen excretion showed a 91-93% reduction when compared with a similar load of milk containing nonhydrolyzed lactose. PMID:2106255

  18. [Trial of milk with low-lactose contents in acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Brunser, O; Araya, M; Espinoza, J; Cruchet, S; Pacheco, I

    1990-01-01

    Fifty infants with acute diarrhea (less than or equal to 5 days of duration) were refed with either a low-lactose formula (experimental group, N = 25) or whole powdered cow's milk (control group, N = 25). During a two-month follow up etiology, clinical course, changes of anthropometric parameters and tolerance to the milk products were evaluated. The etiology of diarrhoea, the mean duration of the episodes (3.6 +/- 1.9 and 3.9 +/- 1.9 days in the experimental and control group, respectively) and the clinical course were comparable in both groups. Nutritional parameters remained unchanged during and after the episode. In two children (8.3%) of the control group stools continued to be liquid, fecal pH was 5 and reducing substances were positive. They had to be refed with the low-lactose product to induce remission of the symptoms. Both products were well tolerated. These findings suggest that availability of low-lactose formulae may be advantageous in the clinical management of infants with acute diarrhea and evidence of lactose intolerance. PMID:2136689

  19. [Intolerance reactions of the skin].

    PubMed

    Sacher, R

    1987-07-01

    Intolerance reactions of the skin in which a decision is made on allergic and toxic genesis have increased in significance in recent years. Whereas antibodies blocking bacterial or viral antigens are formed in the normergic immune reaction, nonblocking antibodies to animal, plant or chemical heterologous substances are formed in an allergy as a result of an misdirected immunological reaction. Sensitization is favored by a) large structure and protein affinity of the allergen, b) irritation of the affected part of the skin by fungi or chemicals and c) genetic predisposition. Depending on the clinical manifestation, a distinction is made between inhaled allergens (bronchial asthma, hay fever), allergens ingested with the food (food allergy) and allergens which have come in contact with the skin (immediate reaction - urticaria, late reaction - contact eczema). Intolerance reactions of the skin which can be ruled out as the cause of an allergy are designated as toxic. Acute toxic reactions are based on violent or intensively physical (heat, cold, radiation), chemical (acids, alkalis, heavy metal salts, oils, solvents) or microbial damage to the skin (infection by fungi, bacteria, viruses). The degenerative eczema as the most important form of chronic toxic intolerance reaction arises by weak but continuously acting longterm mechanical or chemical exposures. PMID:2957865

  20. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... readily accessible source of calcium and are fortified with vitamin D and other nutrients. Therefore... low intake of vitamin D can lead to the development of rickets, especially in those of African descent... with vitamin D and other nutrients, they are often more expensive and less widely available...

  1. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life. PMID:26242570

  2. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kovacova-Hanuskova E; Buday T; Gavliakova S; Plevkova J

    2015-09-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life.

  3. In vivo lactose digestion in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L; McClead, R E; Cordero, L

    1996-11-01

    In vitro studies of intestinal lactase activity and breath-hydrogen studies have suggested that the capacity for lactose digestion in preterm infants is less than the usual intake. To explore this question using an in vivo approach, we determined the fraction of dietary lactose hydrolyzed to glucose (and galactose) in 14 preterm infants with a gestational age of 26-31 wk at the time of birth but a postconceptional age of 31-37 wk at the time of study. The percentage of lactose digested was estimated after 6-h, primed, constant gastric infusions of [1-(13)C]glucose and D-[-1-(13)C]lactose on alternate days. A coefficient of lactose fermentation was derived from the rates of pulmonary excretion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Mean (+/- SD) lactose digestion was 79 +/- 26%. There was a significant inverse rank (r = -0.799, P < 0.01) and linear (r = -0.587, P < 0.05) correlation between this variable and postconceptional age. The percentage of lactose fermented averaged 35 +/- 27%. PMID:8901788

  4. Effects of lactose-containing vs lactose-free infant formula on postprandial superior mesenteric artery flow in term infants.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Schroeder VA; Mattioli LF; Kilkenny TA; Belmont JM

    2014-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary dextrose and fructose may promote vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. In certain infant populations, altered postprandial mesenteric hyperemia (PPH) may increase risk for feeding intolerance.OBJECTIVE: To compare superior mesenteric artery (SMA) PPH following feeds of lactose-containing (LC) formula vs lactose-free (LF; dextrose + sucrose) formula.METHODS: In a 2 × 2 crossover study with 6 term newborns, 3 received LC first followed by LF 3 hours later. The remaining 3 received the reverse order. Ultrasound measures of pre- and postprandial SMA flow, diameter, and resistance were taken 5 minutes preprandial and 10, 30, and 40 minutes postprandial.RESULTS: Mean ± SD age and weight (n = 6) were 24.1 ± 2.3 hours and 3.1 ± 0.21 kg. Formula intake was similar for LC and LF (22.5 ± 2.8 mL and 25 ± 1.8 mL, respectively; P = .076). Both formulas increased SMA flow at 10 and 30 minutes. However, postprandial flow was greater for LC overall (P = .004) and especially at 30 minutes (LC 103 ml/min, 52% increase vs LF 92.7 ml/min, 31% increase; P = .014). For both formulas, vasodilation was seen at 10 and 30 minutes and was overall significantly greater following LC than following LF (9.1% VS 6.5%; P = .028). Both formulas elicited significant decreases in sma vascular resistance over the 10- to 30-minute period (overall P = .016). However, decreases did not differ across formulas (P = .672).CONCLUSIONS: The LC formula elicited a greater SMA PPH response than did LF. SMA flow for both formulas was within normal limits; thus, differences are likely inconsequential for a term newborn. However, in a vulnerable preterm infant, differences may become significant.

  5. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were

  6. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  7. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  8. Review article: lactose--a potential prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, A

    2002-09-01

    Lactose maldigestion, which affects a large majority of the world's population, has been mostly linked with uncomfortable symptoms. In addition, dairy consumption is variably blamed or recommended for a number of ill effects. There is, however, emerging evidence that certain lactic acid-producing bacteria, which selectively consume prebiotics, may be beneficial against some lower intestinal diseases. Lactose maldigestion and lactose should perhaps be re-evaluated as a potential provider of such a prebiotic. This historical and observational review discusses lactose and argues the opinion that it has prebiotic potential. Moreover, in maldigesters, natural ingestion or lack thereof may be relevant in the pathogenesis of diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:12197838

  9. Development and shelf-life determination of pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed skim milk.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A E C; Silva E Alves, A T; Gallina, D A; Trento, F K H S; Zacarchenco, P B; Van Dender, A G F; Moreno, I; Ormenese, R C S C; Spadoti, L M

    2014-09-01

    The segment of the world population showing permanent or temporary lactose intolerance is quite significant. Because milk is a widely consumed food with an high nutritional value, technological alternatives have been sought to overcome this dilemma. Microfiltration combined with pasteurization can not only extend the shelf life of milk but can also maintain the sensory, functional, and nutritional properties of the product. This studied developed a pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed (delactosed) skim milk (PMLHSM). Hydrolysis was performed using β-galactosidase at a concentration of 0.4mL/L and incubation for approximately 21h at 10±1°C. During these procedures, the degree of hydrolysis obtained (>90%) was accompanied by evaluation of freezing point depression, and the remaining quantity of lactose was confirmed by HPLC. Milk was processed using a microfiltration pilot unit equipped with uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) ceramic membranes with a mean pore size of 1.4 μm and UTP of 60 kPa. The product was submitted to physicochemical, microbiological, and sensory evaluations, and its shelf life was estimated. Microfiltration reduced the aerobic mesophilic count by more than 4 log cycles. We were able to produce high-quality PMLHSM with a shelf life of 21 to 27d when stored at 5±1°C in terms of sensory analysis and proteolysis index and a shelf life of 50d in regard to total aerobic mesophile count and titratable acidity. PMID:25022681

  10. Oxidation of lactose with bromine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Byung Y; Montgomery, Rex

    2005-12-12

    Oxidation of lactose by bromine in an aqueous buffered solution was conducted as a model experiment to examine the glycosidic linkage cleavage occurring during the oxidation of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. The resulting oxidation products, after reduction with sodium borodeuteride, were characterized by GLC-MS analyses of the per-O-methyl or per-O-Me3Si derivatives. Most of the products were carboxylic acids, of which lactobionic acid was major. Minor products, identified after partial fractionation on a BioGel P-2 column, comprised oxalic acid; glyceric acid; threonic and erythronic acids; tartaric acid; lyxonic, arabinonic, and xylonic acids; galactonic and gluconic acids; galactosylerythronic acid; galactosylarabinonic acid; galactosylarabinaric acid; galacturonosylarabinonic acid; and galactosylglucaric acid. No keto acids were identified. Galactose was detected as 1-deuteriogalactitol, the presence of which, together with the C6 aldonic acids, supported a galactosidic bond cleavage. Galactosylarabinonic acid was the major constituent (7.5%) among minors, and others constituted 0.2-3.7% of the principal lactobionic acid. These products together comprised 29% of the lactobionic acid, more than half (17%) of which were accounted for by the galactosidic linkage cleavage, supporting the significant decrease in molecular weight seen earlier in the bromine-oxidized polysaccharides by glycosidic cleavage. PMID:16202397

  11. Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Entenmann, Andreas; Karall, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Schimkowitsch, Alexander; Amann, Anton; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is caused by insufficient enzymatic degradation of the disaccharide by intestinal lactase. Although hydrogen (H2) breath tests (HBTs) are routinely applied to diagnose LM, false-negative results are not uncommon. Thirty-two pediatric patients (19 females, 13 males) were included in this prospective study. After oral lactose administration (1 g kg(-1) bodyweight to a maximum of 25 g), breath H2 was measured by electrochemical detection. HBT was considered positive if H2 concentration exceeded an increase of  ⩾20 ppm from baseline. In addition to H2, exhaled methane (CH4), blood glucose concentrations and clinical symptoms (flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea) were monitored. A positive HBT indicating LM was found in 12/32 (37.5%) patients. Only five (41.7%, 5/12) of these had clinical symptoms during HBT indicating lactose intolerance (LI). Decreased blood glucose concentration increments (⩽20 mg dL(-1) (⩽1.1 mmol L(-1))) were found in 3/5 of these patients. CH4 concentrations  ⩾10 ppm at any time during the test were observed in 5/32 (15.6%) patients and in 9/32 (28.1%) between 1 ppm and 9 ppm above baseline after lactose ingestion. In patients with positive HBT 10/12 (83.3%) showed elevated CH4 (>1 ppm) above baseline in breath gas, whereas in patients with negative HBT this figure was only 4/17 (23.5%). In addition to determining H2 in exhaled air, documentation of clinical symptoms, measurement of blood glucose and breath CH4 concentrations may be helpful in deciding whether in a given case an HBT correctly identifies patients with clinically relevant LM. PMID:26934035

  12. Mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Buckey, J. C.; Gaffney, F. A.; Lane, L. D.; Levine, B. D.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Post-flight orthostatic intolerance is a dramatic physiological consequence of human adaptation to microgravity made inappropriate by a sudden return to 1-G. The immediate mechanism is almost always a failure to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, specifically perfusion of the central nervous system, but vestibular dysfunction may occasionally be the primary cause. Orthostatic intolerance is present in a wide range of clinical disorders of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. The intolerance that is produced by spaceflight and 1-G analogs (bed rest, head-down tilt at a moderate angle, water immersion) is different from its clinical counterparts by being only transiently present in subjects who otherwise have normal cardiovascular and regulatory systems. However, the same set of basic pathophysiological elements should be considered in the analysis of any form of orthostatic intolerance.

  13. Is It Food Allergy or Food Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Is It Food Allergy or Food Intolerance? Food allergy is ... down the sugar, bacteria in the gut break it down, which forms gas, which in turn causes ...

  14. Frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis patients using methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS questionnaire).

    PubMed

    Fatimah, Nibah; Salim, Babur; Nasim, Amjad; Hussain, Kamran; Gul, Harris; Niazi, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by applying the methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS) questionnaire and to see the effect of dose and concomitant use of other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS) on methotrexate (MTX) intolerance. For the descriptive study, non-probability sampling was carried out in the Female Rheumatology Department of Fauji Foundation Hospital (FFH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. One hundred and fifty diagnosed cases of RA using oral MTX were selected. The MISS questionnaire embodies five elements: abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and behavioural symptoms. The amplitude of each element was ranked from 0 to 3 being no complaint (0 points), mild (1 point), moderate (2 points) and severe (3 points). A cut-off score of 6 and above ascertained intolerance by the physicians. A total of 33.3 % of the subjects exhibited MTX intolerance according to the MISS questionnaire. Out of which, the most recurring symptom of all was behavioural with a value of 44 % whereas vomiting was least noticeable with a figure of 11 %. About 6.6 % of the women with intolerance were consuming DMARDs in conjunction with MTX. Those using the highest weekly dose of MTX (20 mg) had supreme intolerance with prevalence in 46.2 % of the patients. The frequency of intolerance decreased with a decrease in weekly dose to a minimum of 20 % with 7.5 mg of MTX. MTX intolerance has moderate prevalence in RA patients and if left undetected, the compliance to use of MTX as a first-line therapy will decrease. Methotrexate intolerance is directly proportional to the dose of MTX taken. Also, there is no upstroke seen in intolerance with the use of other disease-modifying agents. PMID:27053094

  15. Effect of fiber on breath hydrogen response and symptoms after oral lactose in lactose malabsorbers.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K N; Welsh, J D; Manion, C V; Ficken, V J

    1982-06-01

    The effect of ingesting cellulose, pectin, and psyllium with orally administered lactose in water or milk was tested in six lactose malabsorbers. Breath hydrogen tests were used to evaluate lactose malabsorption and mouth-to-cecum transit times. Addition of psyllium significantly reduced the breath hydrogen response, and symptoms in each subject; whereas, less diminution of expired hydrogen was seen after cellulose or pectin was added. The effect of each fiber on gastric emptying rates of an equal volume liquid meal was evaluated in three volunteers. Pectin had no effect, while the cellulose and psyllium modestly delayed emptying at approximately 30 min. PMID:6282106

  16. [Analgesic intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Reiss, Gilfe; Reiss, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Analgesic intolerance brings on cutaneous, respiratory and/or gastrointestinal reactions. This review provides an overview of sensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory-drugs (NSAR) and its management. The full clinical picture of analgetic intolerance--the association of bronchial asthma (with severe acute attacks), sensitivity to NSAR and nasal polyps--is commonly summarized as the "Samter triad". The symptoms include chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, asthma bronchiale, gastrointestinal ulcers, angioedema, and urticaria. The prevalence of analgetic intolerance in the general population ranges from 0.6 to 2.5%. Clinical reactions after ingestion of NSAR are often obvious in the further progress of disease. In order to initiate early therapy the diagnosis of analgesic intolerance should occur before the complete picture of analgesic intolerance is obvious. Carefully controlled challenge tests with acetyl salicylic acid or other NSAR are performed as the diagnostic but not potential undamaged tool of choice. Adaptive desensitization (Aspirin desensitization therapy) is currently the single causal therapy. Severe asthma and reactions after ingestion of NSAR are avoided. Frequency of endonasal revision surgery is reduced after desensitization. PMID:20088346

  17. Food allergy and food intolerance in childhood.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P B

    1999-01-01

    Food intolerance is a reproducible adverse reaction to a specific food ingredient that is not psychologically based. Food allergy is a form of food intolerance in which there is evidence that the response is caused by an immunological reaction to food. Other mechanisms of food intolerance include enzyme defects (e.g. lactase deficiency), pharmacological effects (e.g. histamine), toxic properties (e.g. haemagglutinating lectins) and irritants (e.g. spices). Food allergy in children is a highly contentious subject and there is often a striking lack of published evidence from which to base clinical decisions. The true prevalence of food allergy in children is unknown, although there is evidence of an increasing incidence of allergic reactions to some foods, especially peanuts. Our understanding of why some children are unable to tolerate certain foods (e.g. cow's milk, egg), or how they grow out of this intolerance, is very poor. Symptoms of food allergy in children are diverse and include vomiting, poor weight gain, abdominal pain, malabsorption, cough, wheeze, rhinitis, atopic eczema, urticaria and angioedema. Despite the lack of objective data to support the notion that food intolerance contributes to behaviour in children, this is a belief firmly held by many parents and some professionals. The gold standard for diagnosing food intolerance is the double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). There is often a poor correlation between the results of food provocation tests and those of skin prick tests of radioallergosorbent tests for specific food antibodies. For proven food allergy, elimination diets are the mainstay of management. In children these must be closely supervised to avoid nutritional deficiency and compromise of growth. Some children who have had severe (anaphylactic) reactions after food need to have a supply of self-injectable adrenaline made available to their parents and teachers and must also practice strict avoidance of the offending food. PMID:11132467

  18. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lucília; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity. PMID:21326922

  19. Differential impact of lactose/lactase phenotype on colonic microflora

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Shrier, Ian; Heilpern, Debra; Je, Jung Sung; Park, Sunghoon; Chong, George; Lalonde, Catherine; Cote, Louis-Francois; Lee, Byong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to digest lactose divides the worlds population into two phenotypes that may be risk variability markers for several diseases. Prebiotic effects likely favour lactose maldigesters who experience lactose spilling into their colon. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of fixed-dose lactose solutions on fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in digesters and maldigesters, and to determine whether the concept of a difference in ability to digest lactose is supported. METHODS: A four-week study was performed in 23 lactose mal-digesters and 18 digesters. Following two weeks of dairy food withdrawal, subjects ingested 25 g of lactose twice a day for two weeks. Stool bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts pre- and postintervention were measured as the primary outcome. For secondary outcomes, total anaerobes, Enterobacteriaceae, beta-galactosidase and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity in stool, as well as breath hydrogen and symptoms following lactose challenge tests, were measured. RESULTS: Lactose maldigesters had a mean change difference (0.72 log10 colony forming units/g stool; P=0.04) in bifidobacteria counts compared with lactose digesters. Lactobacilli counts were increased, but not significantly. Nevertheless, reduced breath hydrogen after lactose ingestion correlated with lactobacilli (r=?0.5; P<0.001). Reduced total breath hydrogen and symptom scores together, with a rise in fecal enzymes after intervention, were appropriate, but not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Despite failure to achieve full colonic adaptation, the present study provided evidence for a differential impact of lactose on microflora depending on genetic lactase status. A prebiotic effect was evident in lactose maldigesters but not in lactose digesters. This may play a role in modifying the mechanisms of certain disease risks related to dairy food consumption between the two phenotypes. PMID:20559580

  20. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  1. Construction of lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose fermentation into ethanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Guo, Xuewu; Shen, Tong; Dong, Jian; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2013-04-01

    Two lactose-consuming diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, AY-51024A and AY-51024M, were constructed by expressing the LAC4 and LAC12 genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the host strain AY-5. In AY-51024A, both genes were targeted to the ATH1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to abolish the activity of acid/neutral trehalase. In AY-51024M, both genes were respectively integrated into the MIG1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to relieve glucose repression. Physiologic studies of the two transformants under anaerobic cultivations in glucose and galactose media indicated that the expression of both LAC genes did not physiologically burden the cells, except for AY-51024A in glucose medium. Galactose consumption was initiated at higher glucose concentrations in the MIG1 deletion strain AY-51024M than in the corresponding wild-type strain and AY-51024A, wherein galactose was consumed until glucose was completely depleted in the mixture. In lactose medium, the Sp. growth rates of AY-51024A and AY-51024M under anaerobic shake-flasks were 0.025 and 0.067 h(-1), respectively. The specific lactose uptake rate and ethanol production of AY-51024M were 2.50 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 23.4 g l(-1), respectively, whereas those of AY-51024A were 0.98 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 24.3 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively. In concentrated cheese whey powder solutions, AY-51024M produced 63.3 g l(-1) ethanol from approximately 150 g l(-1) initial lactose in 120 h, conversely, AY-51024A consumed 63.7 % of the initial lactose and produced 35.9 g l(-1) ethanol. Therefore, relieving glucose repression is an effective strategy for constructing lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae. PMID:23344501

  2. Lactose uptake driven by galactose efflux in Streptococcus thermophilus: Evidence for a galactose-lactose antiporter

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.W.; Ponne, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Galactose-nonfermenting (Gal{sup {minus}}) Streptococcus thermophilus TS2 releases galactose into the extracellular medium when grown in medium containing excess lactose. Starved and de-energized Gal{sup {minus}} cells, however, could be loaded with galactose to levels approximately equal to the extracellular concentration (0 to 50 mM). When loaded cells were separated from the medium and resuspended in fresh broth containing 5 mM lactose, galactose efflux occurred. De-energized, galactose-loaded cells, resuspended in buffer or medium, accumulated ({sup 14}C)lactose at a greater rate and to significantly higher intracellular concentrations than unloaded cells. Uptake of lactose by loaded cells was inhibited more than that by unloaded cells in the presence of extracellular galactose, indicating that a galactose gradient was involved in the exchange system. When de-energized, galactose-loaded cells were resuspended in carbohydrate-free medium at pH 6.7, a proton motive force ({Delta}p) of 86 to 90 mV was formed, whereas de-energized, nonloaded cells maintained a {Delta}p of about 56 mV. However, uptake of lactose by loaded cells occurred when the proton motive force was abolished by the addition of an uncoupler or in the presence of a proton-translocating ATPase inhibitor. These results support the hypothesis that galactose efflux in Gal{sup {minus}} S. thermophilus is electrogenic and that the exchange reaction (lactose uptake and galactose efflux) probably occurs via an antiporter system.

  3. Intolerance of uncertainty in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    Summers, Berta J; Matheny, Natalie L; Sarawgi, Shivali; Cougle, Jesse R

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a transdiagnostic construct associated with several anxiety and related disorders. Three studies were conducted to explore the potential relationship between IU and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Study 1 revealed a positive relationship between IU and BDD symptoms above symptoms of anxiety and depression in an unselected student sample (N=88). Study 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between IU and BDD symptoms above negative affectivity and intolerance of ambiguity in a community sample (N=116). Study 3 found that a clinical BDD sample (N=23) reported greater IU than healthy controls (N=20), though this relationship was accounted for by symptoms of anxiety and depression. Greater IU predicted functional impairment in the clinical sample above BDD symptoms and past-week anxiety and depression. The observed relationship between IU and BDD symptoms provides preliminary support for the relevance of IU to this population. PMID:26688272

  4. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  5. Seafood Allergy, Toxicity, and Intolerance: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka

    2016-04-01

    Seafood allergies have been increasing their presence in the last 2 decades. Allergic reactions to seafood can range from mild urticarial and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Ingestion of seafood infested with Anisakis larvae can cause a disease known as anisakiasis with symptoms similar to true seafood allergy. Furthermore, some adverse reactions to seafood including histamine fish poisoning (HFP), and intolerance to histamine can trigger clinical symptoms, which, although nonallergic in origin, are similar to true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Because seafood allergy usually remains a lifelong food allergy, this review focuses on the current knowledge on fish and shellfish allergens and emphasizes the importance of differentiating seafood allergy from other allergy-like reactions (anisakiasis, HFP, and intolerance to histamine). Key teaching points: • Fish and shellfish are potent allergens that can provoke serious IgE antibody-mediated adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. • Sensitization to seafood allergens can be achieved by ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. • Shellfish major allergen, tropomyosin, shares significant homology to arthropods (dust mites and cockroaches). • Accidental exposures to seafood products cross-contaminated with fish or shellfish allergens (hidden allergens) during processing may present a health risk for sensitive individuals. • Allergens of fish parasite A. simplex present common hidden allergens in seafood, particularly in raw and undercooked home-made fish dishes. • Symptoms caused by HFP, histamine intolerance, and anisakiasis are similar to true seafood allergy. PMID:26252073

  6. Food intolerance and allergy--a review.

    PubMed

    Lessof, M H

    1983-01-01

    Specific food intolerance needs to be distinguished from obsessional states in which those who are affected have an aversion to numerous foods. Even in cases where specific food intolerance can be demonstrated, the diagnosis of food allergy depends on additional evidence that the patient's reaction is based on an abnormal immunological response. In food allergy, skin and laboratory tests may detect the presence of an IgE-mediated reaction, particularly in patients with asthma or eczema and especially where the foods involved are highly allergenic--such as egg, fish, nuts and milk. However, many patients with proven food intolerance have negative tests, suggesting that other immunological or non-immunological mechanisms are responsible. Laboratory tests for non-IgE reactions are unreliable. Where it is difficult to show a connection between individual foods and an allergic response--as in patients with urticaria provoked by food additives--one of the reasons for diagnostic difficulty is that the offending substances may be present in a wide range of common foods. If the diagnosis is to be firmly established in such cases, it is necessary to show that symptoms remit on an elimination diet and recur after a placebo-controlled challenge. PMID:6351151

  7. Idiopathic orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Upright posture imposes a substantial gravitational stress on the body, for which we are able to compensate, in large part because of the autonomic nervous system. Alteration in autonomic function, therefore, may lead to orthostatic intolerance. On one extreme, patients with autonomic failure caused by degenerative loss of autonomic function are severely disabled by orthostatic hypotension and may faint whenever they stand up. Fortunately, such patients are relatively rare. On the other hand, disabling orthostatic intolerance can develop in otherwise normal young people. These patients can be severely impaired by symptoms of fatigue, tachycardia, and shortness of breath when they stand up. The actual incidence of this disorder is unknown, but these patients make up the largest group of patients referred to centers that specialize in autonomic disorders. We will review recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to orthostatic intolerance, therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients, and areas in which more research is needed.

  8. A Radiochemical Biotechnological Approach: Preliminary Study of Lactose Uptake Rate by Kefir Cells, Using {sup 14}C-labeled Lactose, in Anaerobic Fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Golfinopoulos, A.; Soupioni, M.; Kanellaki, M.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2008-08-14

    The effect of initial lactose concentration on lactose uptake rate by kefir free cells, during the lactose fermentation, was studied in this work. For the investigation {sup 14}C-labelled lactose was used due to the fact that labeled and unlabeled molecules are fermented in the same way. The results illustrated lactose uptake rates are about up to two fold higher at lower initial (convolution sign)Be densities as compared with higher initial (convolution sign)Be densities.

  9. A Radiochemical Biotechnological Approach: Preliminary Study of Lactose Uptake Rate by Kefir Cells, Using 14C-labeled Lactose, in Anaerobic Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, A.; Soupioni, M.; Kanellaki, M.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of initial lactose concentration on lactose uptake rate by kefir free cells, during the lactose fermentation, was studied in this work. For the investigation 14C-labelled lactose was used due to the fact that labeled and unlabeled molecules are fermented in the same way. The results illustrated lactose uptake rates are about up to two fold higher at lower initial ∘Bé densities as compared with higher initial ∘Bé densities.

  10. Adaptation of a manometric biosensor to measure glucose and lactose.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Delwiche, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    A manometric sensor previously developed to measure urea was modified to measure glucose and lactose through enzymatic oxidation. Change in pressure in an enclosed cavity was correlated to the depletion of oxygen resulting from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose or lactose. The response of the sensor was linear and could be made adjustable over a large range by adjusting the amount of sample loaded into the fixed volume reactor. Because of the slow mutarotation of glucose, the oxidation of glucose was not allowed to proceed to completion. Therefore, the precision of the sensor (approximately 0.2 mM in a range from 0 to 5 mM) was limited by variations in the oxidation rate of glucose by glucose oxidase. Because the assay for lactose measured glucose subsequent to the hydrolysis of lactose by beta-galactosidase, the same degree of precision was observed in lactose. Milk lactose, typically at concentrations of about 150 mM, was estimated using the lactose assay after first diluting the samples. For many fluids such as milk, the use of manometric sensors for oxidizable substrates may be preferable to optical and electrochemical methods because they are robust and suffer a low degree of optical and chemical interferences. Glucose and lactose are representative of many important oxidizable substrates, which may be determined in this manner, many of which do not suffer from limitations caused by mutarotation. In theory, detection limits less than 1 microM may be achieved using these methods. PMID:12445450

  11. Intolerance of responsibility for internal conflict.

    PubMed

    Coen, S J

    1989-01-01

    A type of patient is described, who has marked intolerance of taking responsibility for his internal conflicts so as to confront them, analyze them, and change. Defensive repetition in pathological object relations aims to avoid what is wrong within and to engage another so as to protect oneself. Genetic, dynamic, and technical aspects of such defensive, dependent relating are considered. Responsibility for oneself and for what is within oneself is held to be terrifying--more than anyone can bear on his own. How destructiveness has become, and remains, so terrifying is discussed. PMID:2632630

  12. Systems Analysis of Lactose Metabolism in Trichoderma reesei Identifies a Lactose Permease That Is Essential for Cellulase Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Christa; Bååth, Jenny A.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei colonizes predecayed wood in nature and metabolizes cellulose and hemicellulose from the plant biomass. The respective enzymes are industrially produced for application in the biofuel and biorefinery industry. However, these enzymes are also induced in the presence of lactose (1,4-0-ß-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucose), a waste product from cheese manufacture or whey processing industries. In fact, lactose is the only soluble carbon source that induces these enzymes in T. reesei on an industrial level but the reason for this unique phenomenon is not understood. To answer this question, we used systems analysis of the T. reesei transcriptome during utilization of lactose. We found that the respective CAZome encoded all glycosyl hydrolases necessary for cellulose degradation and particularly for the attack of monocotyledon xyloglucan, from which ß-galactosides could be released that may act as the inducers of T. reesei’s cellulases and hemicellulases. In addition, lactose also induces a high number of putative transporters of the major facilitator superfamily. Deletion of fourteen of them identified one gene that is essential for lactose utilization and lactose uptake, and for cellulase induction by lactose (but not sophorose) in pregrown mycelia of T. reesei. These data shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei metabolizes lactose and offers strategies for its improvement. They also illuminate the key role of ß-D-galactosides in habitat specificity of this fungus. PMID:23690947

  13. CALCIUM AND ZINC ABSORPTION FROM LACTOSE-CONTAINING AND LACTOSE-FREE INFANT FORMULAS 1-4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Calcium absorption is enhanced by the presence of lactose, but the quantitative significance of this effect in infant formulas is uncertain. It is also not known whether lactose affects zinc absorption. Objective: We measured the absorption of calcium and zinc from infant formulas by ...

  14. Systems analysis of lactose metabolism in Trichoderma reesei identifies a lactose permease that is essential for cellulase induction.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Christa; Bååth, Jenny A; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei colonizes predecayed wood in nature and metabolizes cellulose and hemicellulose from the plant biomass. The respective enzymes are industrially produced for application in the biofuel and biorefinery industry. However, these enzymes are also induced in the presence of lactose (1,4-0-ß-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucose), a waste product from cheese manufacture or whey processing industries. In fact, lactose is the only soluble carbon source that induces these enzymes in T. reesei on an industrial level but the reason for this unique phenomenon is not understood. To answer this question, we used systems analysis of the T. reesei transcriptome during utilization of lactose. We found that the respective CAZome encoded all glycosyl hydrolases necessary for cellulose degradation and particularly for the attack of monocotyledon xyloglucan, from which ß-galactosides could be released that may act as the inducers of T. reesei's cellulases and hemicellulases. In addition, lactose also induces a high number of putative transporters of the major facilitator superfamily. Deletion of fourteen of them identified one gene that is essential for lactose utilization and lactose uptake, and for cellulase induction by lactose (but not sophorose) in pregrown mycelia of T. reesei. These data shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei metabolizes lactose and offers strategies for its improvement. They also illuminate the key role of ß-D-galactosides in habitat specificity of this fungus. PMID:23690947

  15. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Wilson, Thad E; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-04-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. PMID:26723547

  16. Chemical Intolerance in Primary Care Settings: Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Katerndahl, David A.; Bell, Iris R.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Miller, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study extends previous community-based studies on the prevalence and clinical characteristics of chemical intolerance in a sample of primary care clinic patients. We evaluated comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders, functional status, and rates of health care use. METHODS A total of 400 patients were recruited from 2 family medicine clinic waiting rooms in San Antonio, Texas. Patients completed the validated Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI) to assess chemical intolerance; the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) screen for possible psychiatric disorders; the DartmouthNorthern New England Primary Care Cooperative Information Project (Dartmouth COOP) charts for functional status; and the Healthcare Utilization Questionnaire. RESULTS Overall, 20.3% of the sample met criteria for chemical intolerance. The chemically intolerant group reported significantly higher rates of comorbid allergies and more often met screening criteria for possible major depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse disorder, as well as somatization disorder. The total number of possible mental disorders was correlated with chemical intolerance scores (P <.001). Controlling for demographics, patients with chemical intolerance were significantly more likely to have poorer functional status, with trends toward increased medical service use when compared with nonchemically intolerant patients. After controlling for comorbid psychiatric conditions, the groups differed significantly only regarding limitations of social activities. CONCLUSIONS Chemical intolerance occurs in 1 of 5 primary care patients yet is rarely diagnosed by busy practitioners. Psychiatric comorbidities contribute to functional limitations and increased health care use. Chemical intolerance offers an etiologic explanation. Symptoms may resolve or improve with the avoidance of salient chemical, dietary (including caffeine and alcohol), and drug triggers. Given greater medication intolerances in chemical intolerance, primary care clinicians could use the QEESI to identify patients for appropriate triage to comprehensive nonpharmacologic care. PMID:22778124

  17. Adaptive evolution of a lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-03-01

    The construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that ferment lactose has biotechnological interest, particularly for cheese whey fermentation. A flocculent lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae recombinant expressing the LAC12 (lactose permease) and LAC4 (beta-galactosidase) genes of Kluyveromyces lactis was constructed previously but showed poor efficiency in lactose fermentation. This strain was therefore subjected to an evolutionary engineering process (serial transfer and dilution in lactose medium), which yielded an evolved recombinant strain that consumed lactose twofold faster, producing 30% more ethanol than the original recombinant. We identified two molecular events that targeted the LAC construct in the evolved strain: a 1,593-bp deletion in the intergenic region (promoter) between LAC4 and LAC12 and a decrease of the plasmid copy number by about 10-fold compared to that in the original recombinant. The results suggest that the intact promoter was unable to mediate the induction of the transcription of LAC4 and LAC12 by lactose in the original recombinant and that the deletion established the transcriptional induction of both genes in the evolved strain. We propose that the tuning of the expression of the heterologous LAC genes in the evolved recombinant was accomplished by the interplay between the decreased copy number of both genes and the different levels of transcriptional induction for LAC4 and LAC12 resulting from the changed promoter structure. Nevertheless, our results do not exclude other possible mutations that may have contributed to the improved lactose fermentation phenotype. This study illustrates the usefulness of simple evolutionary engineering approaches in strain improvement. The evolved strain efficiently fermented threefold-concentrated cheese whey, providing an attractive alternative for the fermentation of lactose-based media. PMID:18245248

  18. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable

  19. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Roy, Amy K.; Furr, Jami M.; Gotimer, Kristin; Beidas, Rinad S.; Dugas, Michel J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has contributed to our understanding of excessive worry and adult anxiety disorders, but there is a paucity of research on IU in child samples. This gap is due to the absence of a psychometrically sound measure of IU in youth. The present study adapted parallel child- and parent-report forms of the Intolerance of

  20. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  1. [Isolation and characterization of lactose-fermenting yeasts Candida kefyr].

    PubMed

    Ianieva, O D; Voronina, H O; Pidhors'kyĭ, V S

    2013-01-01

    The search for lactose-fermenting yeast strains has been conducted among 162 strains isolated from various plants and 28 yeast strains isolated from cheese. Four yeast strains have been shown to ferment lactose. They have been identified as Candida kefyr. Specific beta-galactosidase activity of the studied strains grown on lactose-containing medium was 1501-2113 U/g cell. The ethanol production by strains C. kefyr C24 and C30 was significantly inhibited by the increase in substrate concentration (100 g/l). PMID:24437197

  2. [Selection of thermophilic lactose-fermenting yeast strains].

    PubMed

    Ianeva, O D; Sichkar', S V; Voronina, A A; Podgorskiĭ, V S

    2012-01-01

    The screening and selection of lactose-fermenting yeasts among 97 collection yeast strains belonging to different taxonomic groups has been conducted to obtain ethanol from whey. The strains (n=18) (1 strain of K. lactis. 16 strains of K. marxianus and 1 strain of C. kefyr) fermented lactose at 48 degrees C and 15 selected strains rapidly consumed lactose within 24-48 h of cultivation. The presence of 6% of ethanol in the medium resulted in a considerable growth inhibition (more than 80%) of the selected strains. PMID:23293829

  3. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Vicki J.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps unsurprisingly, the greatest ability to emerge from burial in all other species was from shallow (2 cm) burial. Although survival was consistently highly dependent on duration and depth of burial as expected, emergence behaviour was not as easily predictable thereby confounding predictions. We conclude that responses to burial are highly species specific and therefore tolerance generalisations are likely to be oversimplifications. These data may be used to inform environmental impact models that allow forecasting of the cumulative impacts of seabed disturbance and may provide mitigation measures for the sustainable use of the seabed. PMID:26901775

  4. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps unsurprisingly, the greatest ability to emerge from burial in all other species was from shallow (2 cm) burial. Although survival was consistently highly dependent on duration and depth of burial as expected, emergence behaviour was not as easily predictable thereby confounding predictions. We conclude that responses to burial are highly species specific and therefore tolerance generalisations are likely to be oversimplifications. These data may be used to inform environmental impact models that allow forecasting of the cumulative impacts of seabed disturbance and may provide mitigation measures for the sustainable use of the seabed. PMID:26901775

  5. Failure to improve parameters of lactose maldigestion using the multiprobiotic product VSL3 in lactose maldigesters: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yesovitch, Rose; Cohen, Albert; Szilagyi, Andrew

    2004-02-01

    Lactose maldigestion is a common genetic trait in up to 70% of the world's population. In these subjects, the ingestion of lactose may lead to prebiotic effects which can be confirmed by measurement of breath hydrogen. After a period of continuous lactose ingestion, colonic bacterial adaptation is measurable as improved parameters of lactose digestion. There may be inherent benefits in this process of adaptation which may protect against some diseases. We attempt to link therapeutically beneficial probiotics (VSL3, Seaford Pharmaceuticals Inc, Ontario) with improvement in parameters of lactose maldigestion. Two groups of five subjects with maldigestion were fed one or four packets of VSL3 (one packet containing 450 x 10(9) live bacteria) before testing and then 17 days later. A 50 g lactose challenge was carried out before and after feeding. While there was a trend toward increasing rather than reducing of summed breath hydrogen, no statistically significant changes were observed between results from before testing and those from testing 17 days later. The authors conclude that direct consumption of the probiotic VSL3 may not improve parameters of lactose maldigestion without metabolic activation. In its present format, therefore, the test for colonic adaptation cannot be used to demonstrate direct bacterial embedding with VSL3. PMID:14997218

  6. Evolution of milk oligosaccharides and lactose: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Urashima, T; Fukuda, K; Messer, M

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian milk or colostrum contains up to 10% of carbohydrate, of which free lactose usually constitutes more than 80%. Lactose is synthesized within lactating mammary glands from uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-Gal) and glucose by a transgalactosylation catalysed by a complex of β4-galactosyltransferase and α-lactalbumin (α-LA). α-LA is believed to have evolved from C-type lysozyme. Mammalian milk or colostrum usually contains a variety of oligosaccharides in addition to free lactose. Each oligosaccharide has a lactose unit at its reducing end; this unit acts as a precursor that is essential for its biosynthesis. It is generally believed that milk oligosaccharides act as prebiotics and also as receptor analogues that act as anti-infection factors. We propose the following hypothesis. The proto-lacteal secretions of the primitive mammary glands of the common ancestor of mammals contained fat and protein including lysozyme, but no lactose or oligosaccharides because of the absence of α-LA. When α-LA first appeared as a result of its evolution from lysozyme, its content within the lactating mammary glands was low and lactose was therefore synthesized at a slow rate. Because of the presence of glycosyltransferases, almost all of the nascent lactose was utilized for the biosynthesis of oligosaccharides. The predominant saccharides in the proto-lacteal secretions or primitive milk produced by this common ancestor were therefore oligosaccharides rather than free lactose. Subsequent to this initial period, the oligosaccharides began to serve as anti-infection factors. They were then recruited as a significant energy source for the neonate, which was achieved by an increase in the synthesis of α-LA. This produced a concomitant increase in the concentration of lactose in the milk, and lactose therefore became an important energy source for most eutherians, whereas oligosaccharides continued to serve mainly as anti-microbial agents. Lactose, in addition, began to act as an osmoregulatory molecule, controlling the milk volume. Studies on the chemical structures of the milk oligosaccharides of a variety of mammalian species suggest that human milk or colostrum is unique in that oligosaccharides containing lacto-N-biose I (LNB) (Gal(β1 → 3)GlcNAc, type I) predominate over those containing N-acetyllactosamine (Gal(β1 → 4)GlcNAc, type II), whereas in other species only type II oligosaccharides are found or else they predominate over type I oligosaccharides. It can be hypothesized that this feature may have a selective advantage in that it may promote the growth of beneficial colonic bacteria, Bifidobacteria, in the human infant colon. PMID:22436215

  7. Biomass and lipids from lactose or whey by Trichosporon beigelii

    SciTech Connect

    Tahoun, M.K.; El-Merheb, Z.; Salem, A.; Youssef, A.

    1987-02-20

    The yeast Trichosporon beigelii produced the highest amount of biomass when grown in chemical-defined medium with a ratio of carbon source to nitrogen source of 30:1. On the other hand, carbon-limited medium (C-N ratio 2:1) enhanced unsaturated fatty acids synthesis. The yeast efficiently converted unsalted whey lactose to biomass, while sodium chloride in whey raised lactose assimilation to single-cell oil (SCO). 20 references.

  8. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to glucose promotes evolvability in lactose.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly N; Castillo, Gerardo; Wünsche, Andrea; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-02-01

    The selective history of a population can influence its subsequent evolution, an effect known as historical contingency. We previously observed that five of six replicate populations that were evolved in a glucose-limited environment for 2000 generations, then switched to lactose for 1000 generations, had higher fitness increases in lactose than populations started directly from the ancestor. To test if selection in glucose systematically increased lactose evolvability, we started 12 replay populations-six from a population subsample and six from a single randomly selected clone-from each of the six glucose-evolved founder populations. These replay populations and 18 ancestral populations were evolved for 1000 generations in a lactose-limited environment. We found that replay populations were initially slightly less fit in lactose than the ancestor, but were more evolvable, in that they increased in fitness at a faster rate and to higher levels. This result indicates that evolution in the glucose environment resulted in genetic changes that increased the potential of genotypes to adapt to lactose. Genome sequencing identified four genes-iclR, nadR, spoT, and rbs-that were mutated in most glucose-evolved clones and are candidates for mediating increased evolvability. Our results demonstrate that short-term selective costs during selection in one environment can lead to changes in evolvability that confer longer term benefits. PMID:26748670

  9. Fermentation of lactose by yeast cells secreting recombinant fungal lactase.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, S; Hartley, B S

    1993-12-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with a yeast multicopy expression vector carrying the cDNA for Aspergillus niger secretory beta-galactosidase under the control of ADH1 promoter and terminator were studied for their fermentation properties on lactose (V. Kumar, S. Ramakrishnan, T. T. Teeri, J. K. C. Knowles, and B. S. Hartley, Biotechnology 10:82-85, 1992). Lactose was hydrolyzed extracellularly into glucose and galactose, and both sugars were utilized simultaneously. Diauxic growth patterns were not observed. However, a typical biphasic growth was observed on a mixture of glucose and galactose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with transformants of a haploid S. cerevisiae strain, GRF167. Polyploid distiller's yeast (Mauri) transformants were selected simply on the basis of the cloned gene expression on X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) plates. Rapid and complete lactose hydrolysis and higher ethanol (0.31 g/g of sugar) and biomass (0.24 g/g of sugar) production were observed with distiller's yeast grown under aerobic conditions. A constant proportion (10%) of the population retained the plasmid throughout the fermentation period (48 h). Nearly theoretical yields of ethanol were obtained under anaerobic conditions on lactose, glucose, galactose, and whey permeate media. However, the rate and the amount of lactose hydrolysis were lower under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. All lactose-grown cells expressed partial galactokinase activity. PMID:8285714

  10. Linking flowability and granulometry of lactose powders.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Delaval, V; Traina, K; Vandewalle, N; Lumay, G

    2015-10-15

    The flowing properties of 10 lactose powders commonly used in pharmaceutical industries have been analyzed with three recently improved measurement methods. The first method is based on the heap shape measurement. This straightforward measurement method provides two physical parameters (angle of repose αr and static cohesive index σr) allowing to make a first screening of the powder properties. The second method allows to estimate the rheological properties of a powder by analyzing the powder flow in a rotating drum. This more advanced method gives a large set of physical parameters (flowing angle αf, dynamic cohesive index σf, angle of first avalanche αa and powder aeration %ae) leading to deeper interpretations. The third method is an improvement of the classical bulk and tapped density measurements. In addition to the improvement of the measurement precision, the densification dynamics of the powder bulk submitted to taps is analyzed. The link between the macroscopic physical parameters obtained with these methods and the powder granulometry is analyzed. Moreover, the correlations between the different flowability indexes are discussed. Finally, the link between grain shape and flowability is discussed qualitatively. PMID:26283279

  11. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    PubMed

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  12. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  13. Neural Correlates of Intolerance of Uncertainty in Clinical Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wever, Mirjam; Smeets, Paul; Sternheim, Lot

    2015-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty is a key contributor to anxiety-related disorders. Recent studies highlight its importance in other clinical disorders. The link between its clinical presentation and the underlying neural correlates remains unclear. This review summarizes the emerging literature on the neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty. In conclusion, studies focusing on the neural correlates of this construct are sparse, and findings are inconsistent across disorders. Future research should identify neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty in more detail. This may unravel the neurobiology of a wide variety of clinical disorders and pave the way for novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26185902

  14. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  15. Absorption of lactose from colon of newborn piglet.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D; Ailabouni, A H; Powers, P A; McClung, H J; Li, B U; Heitlinger, L A; Sloan, H R

    1991-07-01

    Piglets in three age groups (1-3, 9-11, and 16-25 days after birth) were used for in vivo colonic perfusions. Studies compared an isosmolar (312 mosM) with a high osmolar (551 mosM) solution and two equimolar substrates (with hexose concentrations of 73.1 mM), lactose and glucose-galactose. From the isosmolar perfusates, lactose absorption was 0.43 +/- 0.04 in the 18-20 day olds and 1.04 +/- 0.2 mumol.cm-1.min-1 in the 1-3 day olds; absorption from the glucose-galactose solution was negligible in all age groups (less than 0.05 +/- 0.05 mumol.cm-1.min-1). From the high osmolar perfusate, lactose absorption also exceeded that of glucose and galactose. In a third set of perfusion studies, the concentration of lactose was varied between 15 and 240 mM perfusate. Five-day-old animals absorbed 67% more lactose than 18-day-old animals; the right colon absorbed 57% more than the left. Lactose absorption, correlated with its concentration in the perfusate (r = 0.99), was nonsaturable at concentrations up to 240 mM, and was correlated with the uptake both of sodium (r2 = 0.59 for young and 0.64 for older neonates) and of chloride (r2 = 0.55 for young and 0.31 for older neonates). The results suggest that lactose may be removed from the colon without apparent cleavage by beta-galactosidase. PMID:1907103

  16. Endogenous circulating sympatholytic factor in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, R. E.; Winters, B.; Hales, M.; Barnett, T.; Schwinn, D. A.; Flavahan, N.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathotonic orthostatic hypotension (SOH) is an idiopathic syndrome characterized by tachycardia, hypotension, elevated plasma norepinephrine, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance provoked by assumption of an upright posture. We studied a woman with severe progressive SOH with blood pressure unresponsive to the pressor effects of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. We tested the hypothesis that a circulating factor in this patient interferes with vascular adrenergic neurotransmission. Preincubation of porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings with patient plasma produced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in vitro, abolished vasoconstriction to direct electrical stimulation, and had no effect on nonadrenergic vasoconstrictive stimuli (endothelin-1), PGF-2alpha (or KCl). Preincubation of vessels with control plasma was devoid of these effects. SOH plasma inhibited the binding of an alpha(1)-selective antagonist radioligand ([(125)I]HEAT) to membrane fractions derived from porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings, rat liver, and cell lines selectively overexpressing human ARs of the alpha(1B) subtype but not other AR subtypes (alpha(1A) and alpha(1D)). We conclude that a factor in SOH plasma can selectively and irreversibly inhibit adrenergic ligand binding to alpha(1B) ARs. We propose that this factor contributes to a novel pathogenesis for SOH in this patient. This patient's syndrome represents a new disease entity, and her plasma may provide a unique tool for probing the selective functions of alpha(1)-ARs.

  17. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a "final common pathway" for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  18. Intolerance of Ambiguity and Student Performance in Social Work Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Liane V.; Sherman, Edmund

    1987-01-01

    Social workers must assist people in coping with complex, often apparently insoluble, problems. Data are presented on the relationship between intolerance of ambiguity and a variety of performance and preference measures of 212 social work students. (Author/MH)

  19. Lactose particle engineering: Influence of ultrasound and anti-solvent on crystal habit and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougoulos, E.; Marziano, I.; Miller, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    This study focuses on ultrasound-assisted anti-solvent crystallization of lactose, expanding on previous studies and presenting, for the first time, the results of large scale implementation of sonocrystallization for lactose. The results further clarify the interplay between solution chemistry - namely the role of β-lactose - and crystallization, representing a step forward in the fine tuning of lactose properties for pharmaceutical manufacturing applications. Batches manufactured at laboratory and pilot scales were extensively characterised, including an approach for the quantification of β-lactose in α-lactose based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), which is described here.

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of lactose crystallization in gelatin gels.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Coupland, John N

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements (2.25 MHz center frequency) were used to follow bulk crystallization of lactose (43% and 46%) from gelatin (1.5% and 3%) gels at 25 °C, and compared to turbidity (500 nm) and isothermal calorimetric measurements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased slightly (approximately 0.5%) during crystallization while ultrasonic attenuation was low in the absence of lactose crystals and increased progressively during crystallization. The lag time before the onset of crystallization decreased and the maximum rate of increase in attenuation during crystallization increased with increasing lactose supersaturation but was not affected by gelatin concentration (P < 0.05). Similar results were seen in turbidity and isothermal calorimetric measurements. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements have the potential to measure crystallization kinetics in complex food matrices and to be applied on-line. Practical Application: Many foods contain crystals that affect their taste and texture (for example, lactose crystals can give a grainy defect in ice cream). The formation of crystals is often hard to predict so methods to measure the development of crystals inside real foods are useful. In this study, we show that as lactose crystallizes in a gelatin gel the ultrasonic attenuation--capacity to absorb sound--increases and can be related to the amount of crystals present. Ultrasound is easier to apply in real food processing than the existing methodologies. PMID:21535675

  1. Lactose semicarbazone as a marker for semicarbazide adulteration in milk.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant; Higgs, Kerianne

    2013-06-21

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to detect semicarbazide and lactose semicarbazone in milk was developed as part of a programme to set up methods for detecting the economically motivated adulteration of raw milk with nitrogen-containing compounds. The detection of semicarbazide was hampered by that fact that this compound tended to give broad, poor intensity peaks in the hydrophobic interaction chromatographic method employed. When spiked into milk at levels of 20-200 ppm, semicarbazide either partially or completely reacted with the matrix, which both increased the limit of detection of the method and made the setting of a threshold by using low level spikes almost impossible. Thus using lactose semicarbazone as a marker for semicarbazide addition to milk was investigated. Lactose semicarbazone was detected in semicarbazide-spiked milk, and its identity was confirmed by fragmentation analysis and comparison with the synthesised compound. The level of lactose semicarbazone correlated with the amount of semicarbazide added to the milk, and the acidic conditions employed in the extraction method appeared to enhance the sensitivity of detection by driving the semicarbazone-forming reaction towards completion. Thus lactose semicarbazone can be used as a marker for the addition of semicarbazide to milk; however, both compounds should be monitored during surveys looking for the semicarbazide adulteration of milk. PMID:23683401

  2. Crystallization of spray-dried lactose/protein mixtures in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawqi Barham, A.; Kamrul Haque, Md.; Roos, Yrjö H.; Kieran Hodnett, B.

    2006-10-01

    An in situ crystallization technique with X-ray diffraction analysis complemented by ex situ scanning electron microscopy and chromatographic analysis of the α/( α+ β) solid-state anomeric ratios has been developed to study the crystallization of lactose/protein mixtures in humid air. This technique was used to determine changes in phase composition and morphology during crystallization. Following an induction period during which water is sorbed, crystallization is rapid and the predominant phase observed using the in situ method in spray-dried lactose/sodium-caseinate, albumin and gelatin is α-lactose monohydrate. However, in the case of spray-dried lactose/whey protein isolate (WPI) the predominant phase that appears is the α/ β mixed phase with smaller amounts of α-lactose monohydrate. With pure lactose the α/ β mixed phase appears as a transient shortly after the onset of crystallization and α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose both appear as stable crystalline phases at longer times. Another transient phase with 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8° was observed in spray-dried lactose/albumin. This phase decomposed as α-lactose monohydrate developed. Three phases seem to persist in the case of spray-dried lactose/gelatin, namely the phase with peaks at 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8°, α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose for the duration of the in situ experiment.

  3. Genetic Construction of Lactose-Utilizing Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Patricia M.; Haas, Michael J.; Somkuti, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris, the producer of xanthan gum, possesses a β-galactosidase of very low specific activity. Plasmid pGC9114 (RP1::Tn951), generated by the transposition of the lactose transposon Tn951 to RP1, was conjugally transferred into XN1, a nalidixic acid-resistant derivative of X. campestris NRRL B-1459S-4L. Transfer occurred on membrane filters and in broth. The β-galactosidase gene of Tn951 was expressed in X. campestris. The specific activity of β-galactosidase in transconjugants was over 200-fold higher than that in XN1, and transconjugants grew as well in lactose-based media as in glucose-based media. The lactose-utilizing transconjugants could potentially be used to produce xanthan gum from cheese whey. Images PMID:16346464

  4. Quantification of lactose using ion-pair RP-HPLC during enzymatic lactose hydrolysis of skim milk.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Anzmann, Theresa; Fischer, Lutz

    2012-12-15

    The correct labelling of dairy foods as "lactose-free" requires a suitably sensitive and valid analytical method for the quantification of lactose in complex food matrices. Thus, an ion-pair RP-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of lactose, glucose and galactose in original skim milk was investigated. The samples derived from an enzymatic lactose hydrolysis approach (0.5L) using the commercial β-galactosidase Godo-YNL2. After derivatisation with p-aminobenzoic acid and sodium cyanoborohydride, the samples were injected on a RP-C(18) column. Tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulphate was used as the ion-pair reagent in the eluent system. The sugars were quantified using photometric- (UV; 303 nm) and fluorescence-detection (λ(ex) 313 nm, λ(em) 358 nm). The overall run time was 27 min. The limits of detection (LOD) were estimated at 2 mgL(-1) (UV detection) and at 0.13 mgL(-1) (fluorescence detection). The limits of quantification were 6 mgL(-1) (UV detection) and 0.45 mgL(-1) (fluorescence detection). Thus, this analytical method is suitable for sensitive lactose quantification in milk systems of less than 10 mgL(-1). PMID:22980818

  5. Management of lactose maldigestion by consuming milk containing lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Lin, M Y; Yen, C L; Chen, S H

    1998-01-01

    The influence of nonfermented milk containing L. acidophilus or L. bulgaricus on lactose utilization by lactose maldigesters was investigated. Nonfermented milks containing L. acidophilus or L. bulgaricus at 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/ml were prepared using 2% low-fat milk. Lactose maldigestion was monitored by measuring breath hydrogen at hourly intervals for 8 hr following consumption of 400 ml of each diet. Nonfermented milk containing L. acidophilus B at 10(8) CFU/ml were not effective in reducing breath hydrogen and symptoms. Nonfermented milk containing L. acidophilus B at 10(9) CFU/ml only slightly decreased breath hydrogen production; however, the symptoms were significantly improved. Nonfermented milks containing L. bulgaricus 449 at 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/ml were effective in reducing breath hydrogen and symptoms. The results for bulgaricus milk were all significant. In this study, L. acidophilus B and L. bulgaricus 449 were chosen because of their similar beta-galactosidase activity and bile sensitivity. L. acidophilus and L. bulgaricus are both thermophilic lactobacilli and an active transport (permease) system is found in both species for lactose transport. The major factor affecting in vivo lactose digestion in this study appears to be the bacterial cell wall/membrane structures. That the cell wall/membrane structures of L. acidophilus are different from those of L. bulgaricus can be indirectly proven by the results of sonication time for maximum beta-galactosidase activity measurement. The results of this study indicate that L. bulgaricus is usually a better choice than L. acidophilus for manufacturing nonfermented milks for lactose maldigesters. PMID:9508514

  6. [Selection and study of potent lactose-fermenting yeasts].

    PubMed

    Golubev, V I; Golubev, N V

    2004-01-01

    Whey-fermenting Kluyveromyces cultures were revealed among 105 yeast strains assimilating lactose. Eighteen most potent strains isolated from milk products fermented galactose, sucrose, and raffinose, in addition to lactose. Many yeast strains fermented inulin. Most strains were resistant to cycloheximide and grew in medium containing glucose, NaCl, and ethanol at concentrations of up to 50, 11-12, and 10-12%, respectively (4 degrees C). Three strains had mycocinogenic activity. After fermentation of whey with selected yeast strains at 30 degrees C for 2-3 days, ethanol concentration was 4-5%. PMID:15283337

  7. Assessing the re-crystallization behaviour of amorphous lactose using the RH-perfusion cell.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Inga-Lis; Steckel, Hartwig; Trunk, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Many different reports have studied the crystallization behaviour of lactose, e.g., by exposing samples of amorphous lactose to different relative humidity at constant temperatures. However, only few reports are available investigating the formation of alpha-lactose monohydrate and beta-lactose during re-crystallization. Applying the static ampoule method in the microcalorimeter, the enthalpies of amorphous lactose were reported to be constantly 32 and 48 J/g, respectively, considering the mutarotation of lactose at 25 degrees C and 58% RH, 75% RH and 100% RH. In this study, an alternative microcalorimetric technique, the relative humidity-perfusion cell (RH-perfusion cell) was chosen. The RH-perfusion cell is able to deliver a constant and controlled flow of humidified air to the sample. Investigated compounds were purely amorphous lactose and different powder mixtures of lactose. They consisted of alpha-lactose monohydrate (Pharmatose 325M), beta-lactose (Pharmatose DCL21) or a combination (1:1) thereof as carriers, and different concentrations of amorphous lactose. The determination of the enthalpy of desorption of the just re-crystallization lactose by the RH-perfusion cell was used to discriminate whether the monohydrate or the anhydrous form of lactose was produced. Differences in the re-crystallization behaviour of lactose at 25 degrees C and 58-100% RH were found. At 60-80% RH purely amorphous lactose showed a high heat of desorption which can be attributed to a very high content of formed beta-lactose. Powder mixtures containing high contents of amorphous lactose (8% and 15%, respectively) blended with alpha-lactose monohydrate as a carrier resulted in similar results at the same RH ranges. The high amount of beta-lactose can be due to the equilibrium anomeric composition. Whereas powder mixtures containing beta-lactose as a carrier and amorphous lactose in a concentration of 1%, 8% and 15%, respectively, formed less beta-lactose than the mixtures containing alpha-lactose monohydrate as a carrier. At a relative humidity of 90% none of the powder mixtures showed desorption as to the fact that in all cases only alpha-lactose monohydrate was formed at the surface of the re-crystallized lactose. Furthermore, mixtures of alpha-lactose monohydrate and beta-lactose (1:1) and 8% amorphous lactose were investigated. An increase in formed alpha-lactose monohydrate by increasing RH was found. To consolidate the results, the same mixtures were re-crystallized at different RH in desiccators and subsequently investigated in the solution calorimeter. The results of the pre-mix were confirmed by the solution calorimeter. In summary, purely amorphous lactose and mixtures containing alpha-lactose monohydrate as a carrier show different re-crystallization behaviour compared to mixtures containing beta-lactose as a carrier. PMID:16527465

  8. Characterization of the lactose transport system in the strain Bifidobacterium bifidum DSM 20082.

    PubMed

    Krzewinski, F; Brassart, C; Gavini, F; Bouquelet, S

    1996-06-01

    Lactose was fermented but not assimilated by the strain Bifidobacterium bifidum DSM 20082. The sugar uptake was measured with lactose 14C. Km and V(max) values were respectively 2.6 mM and 12.11 nmol/min/mg of cell protein. The lactose transport system and the beta-D-galactosidase were stimulated when the cells were grown with lactose, but isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside had no effect. Lactose uptake was inhibited by compounds which interfered with proton and metal ionophore. Na+, Li+, or K+ did not affect incorporation of lactose. Furthermore, the lactose uptake decreased when an inhibitor of ATP synthesis was used. From the results of this study, the stain contained an active lactose transport system, probably a proton symport as described for Escherichia coli but with a different regulation system. PMID:8640105

  9. Galactooligosaccharide and Sialyllactose Content in Commercial Lactose Powders from Goat and Cow Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung-Seob; Oh, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used infant formulas contain lactose originating from cow milk. Goat milk has recently been claimed to be nutritionally more effective for infants than other milks. In baby foods, much emphasis is placed on the concentrations of intestinal microflora-promoting oligosaccharides, which are generally transferred into lactose from milk during crystallization process. Here we show that higher level of free sialic acid is present in goat lactose powder compared to cow lactose powder. Without proteinase K treatment, the amount of 3-sialyllactose and 6-sialyllactose were similar in goat and cow lactose powders. However, after proteolysis, 6-sialyllactose was present at higher levels in goat than in cow lactose powder. Galactooligosaccharides, a group of prebiotics, are present in milk in the form of glycoproteins. Galactooligosaccharide content was also higher in goat lactose powder than in cow lactose powder. PMID:26761881

  10. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  11. Biohydrogen production from lactose: influence of substrate and nitrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Moreno, R; Fierro, J; Fernández, C; Cuetos, M J; Gómez, X

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen produced from renewable sources may be considered the energy vector of the future. However, reducing process costs is imperative in order to achieve this goal. In the present research, the effect of nitrogen (N), initial pH and substrate content for starting up the dark fermentative process was studied using the response surface methodology. Anaerobic digested dried sludge (biosolid pellets) was used as the inoculum. Synthetic wastewater was used as the substrate in batch reactors. A decrease in H2 production was observed with the increase in N and lactose concentrations. This drop was considerably greater when the concentration of lactose was at its lower level. Although the increase in lactose concentration results in a lower H2 production, the effect of N on the response is attenuated at higher levels of lactose. On the other hand, the effect of initial pH on the fermentation system was not significant. The evaluation on the process under semi-continuous conditions was performed using anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs). The process was evaluated at different C/N ratios using synthetic wastewater. Results showed higher hydrogen yields with the gradual decrease in nitrogen content. The addition of cheese whey to the ASBR resulted in a H2 production rate of 0.18 L H2 L(-1) d(-1). PMID:25799253

  12. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  13. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis. PMID:24509933

  14. Sodium Oxybate Intolerance Associated with Familial Serum Acylcarnitine Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Our case describes clinical features of two families defined by joint phenotypes: sodium oxybate intolerance and elevated serum acylcarnitines. Oxybate intolerance variably presents as either cervical dystonia or sleep-related eating disorder. Our objective is to identify biological markers which predict a poor response to sodium oxybate as a treatment for disturbed sleep. Familial inheritance pattern, genotype analysis, multiorgan system involvement, and response to treatment suggest the presence of a secondary cause of fatty oxidation defect, i.e., mitochondrial disorder. Our case report supports the possible conclusion that variance in human mitochondrial metabolism may affect sodium oxybate tolerability. Citation: Berner J. Sodium oxybate intolerance associated with familial serum acylcarnitine elevation. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(1):71-72. PMID:23319908

  15. Management of malnourished children with acute diarrhoea and sugar intolerance.

    PubMed

    Beau, J P; Fontaine, O; Garenne, M

    1990-04-01

    A protocol of nutritional rehabilitation using fermented milk, vegetable oil and caster sugar has been tested on 54 Senegalese children, aged 6-36 months, admitted with acute diarrhoea and malnutrition. At the time of admission, 39 per cent of children were dehydrated and 26 per cent had sugar intolerance. In the course of treatment three went home against medical advice and one died from acute pneumonia with respiratory-heart failure. Among the cases of marasmus there were no differences in mean weight gain between children with sugar intolerance and others despite a longer duration of diarrhoea in the first group. Furthermore, the experimental protocol has never been compromised because of worsening diarrhoea or weight loss. These results indicate that a formula based on fermented milk together with oral rehydration can be used to treat malnourished children with acute diarrhoea and sugar intolerance. PMID:2355409

  16. Management of malnourished children with acute diarrhoea and sugar intolerance.

    PubMed

    Beau, J P; Fontaine, O; Garenne, M

    1989-12-01

    A protocol of nutritional rehabilitation using fermented milk, vegetable oil, and castor sugar has been tested on 54 Senegalese children age 6-36 months admitted with acute diarrhoea and malnutrition. At time of admission, 39 per cent of children were dehydrated and 26 per cent had sugar intolerance. In the course of treatment three absconded and one died from acute pneumonia with respiratory and heart failure. Among those with marasmus there were no differences in mean weight gains between children with sugar intolerance and others, despite a longer duration of diarrhoea in the first group. Furthermore, the treatment protocol has never been compromised because of worsening diarrhoea or weight loss. These results indicate that a formula based on fermented milk together with oral rehydration can be used to treat malnourished children with acute diarrhoea and sugar intolerance. PMID:2514280

  17. Cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy: an important contributing cause of secondary sugar intolerance in young infants with acute infective enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Davis, K; Robinson, M J; Boey, C G; Sumithran, E; Yadav, M; Lam, S K; Puthucheary, S D

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cows' milk protein (CMP) on the mucosal disaccharidases was investigated in 23 infants with acute infective enteritis. Jejunal biopsies performed before and after cows' milk provocation were subjected to histological examination and to mucosal disaccharidase enzyme (lactase, sucrase, and maltase) analyses. After milk challenge, changes in mucosal histology were observed in 18 infants, in 17 of them the levels of all 3 mucosal disaccharidases were much reduced. 10 of these infants developed diarrhoea and, in 6, the stools were positive for reducing sugar. It is concluded that CMP has a deleterious effect on the jejunal mucosa of young infants recovering from infective enteritis, so that in the management of young infants with sugar intolerance secondary to infective enteritis, CMP and lactose should be excluded from the diet. PMID:570376

  18. Determination of lactose and xylose malabsorption in preruminant diarrheic calves.

    PubMed Central

    Nappert, G; Hamilton, D; Petrie, L; Naylor, J M

    1993-01-01

    In preliminary studies feeding the poorly absorbed carbohydrate sorbitol at 2.3 g/kg body weight as an indication of maximal fermentative capacity failed to produce the expected large increase in breath hydrogen excretion but did produce a transient diarrhea in five out of six control calves. Twelve healthy control and eighteen diarrheic calves were fed lactose or D-xylose on consecutive days at 1.15 g/kg body weight and a concentration of 46 g/L. Breath and blood samples were collected at 1 h intervals from 0 to 7 h. After administration of lactose, there was a significant increase in breath hydrogen excretion in diarrheic versus control calves. The increase in plasma glucose concentrations was delayed in diarrheic calves but the area under the absorption curve was similar in control and diarrheic calves. After administration of D-xylose, breath hydrogen excretion did not increase significantly but plasma D-xylose concentrations were significantly reduced in diarrheic calves. The pathogens commonly isolated from the feces were Cryptosporidium species, rotavirus and coronavirus. The number of pathogens and the severity of the calves' acid-base deficit were not related to the severity of carbohydrate malabsorption. Decreased absorption of lactose and D-xylose may be the result of intestinal villous atrophy caused by viral or parasite infection. It was concluded that carbohydrate malabsorption rather than a specific lactose maldigestion is a significant problem in diarrheic calves. Diarrheic calves appear to digest and absorb lactose when fed in small amounts. Images Fig. 1. PMID:8395329

  19. Surface modification of lactose inhalation blends by moisture.

    PubMed

    Watling, C P; Elliott, J A; Scruton, C; Cameron, R E

    2010-05-31

    We present an investigation of the effects of relative humidity (RH) on lactose powders during storage, with the aims of determining the humidity conditions under which lactose inhalation blends are stable, and characterising the surface changes that occur as a result of water condensation. Lactose inhalation powders manufactured by milling and sieving were stored in environments of RH from 32% to 100% (at room temperature) and changes in surface properties were observed using BET nitrogen adsorption, environmental scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis. We found that the specific surface area of all lactose powders decreased during storage, with the rate of decrease and final drop being larger at higher RH (ranging from a 62% decrease at 100% RH to a 34% decrease at 32% RH, at room temperature). The specific surface area decrease corresponded to a reduction in the volume of fine particles (<5 microm) in the blend. Two effects were found to contribute to the decrease in specific surface area: the smoothing of coarse particles, attributed to the surface fine particles undergoing deliquescence due to their enhanced solubility by the Kelvin effect (i.e. due to their greater curvature and consequently greater surface energy), and solid bridging between fine particles in agglomerates, such that loose fine particles disappeared from the powder blend, having bonded with coarser particles. These changes in particle properties resulting from moisture exposure are expected to influence the fine particle fraction of drug released from the powder blends, and the observation that lactose inhalation blends were unstable even at 32% RH could potentially be a concern for the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20156536

  20. Dry powder inhalers: mechanistic evaluation of lactose formulations containing salbutamol sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kaialy, Waseem; Ticehurst, Martyn; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2012-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between physicochemical properties and aerosolisation performance of different grades of lactose. In order to get a wide range of physicochemical properties, various grades of lactose namely Flowlac 100 (FLO), Lactopress anhydrous 250 (LAC), Cellactose 80 (CEL), Tablettose 80 (TAB), and Granulac 200 (GRA) were used. The different lactose grades were carefully sieved to separate 63-90 μm particle size fractions and then characterised in terms of size, shape, density, flowability, and solid state. Formulations were prepared by blending each lactose with salbutamol sulphate (SS) at ratio of 67.5:1 (w/w), and then evaluated in terms of SS content uniformity, lactose-SS adhesion properties, and in vitro aerosolisation performance delivered from the Aerolizer. Sieved lactose grades showed similar particle size distributions (PSDs) and good flow properties but different particle shape, particle surface texture, and particle solid state. Content uniformity assessments indicated that lactose particles with rougher surface produced improved SS homogeneity within DPI formulation powders. Lactose-SS adhesion assessments indicated that lactose particles with more elongated shape and the rougher surface showed smaller adhesion force between lactose and salbutamol sulphate. Lactose powders with higher bulk density and higher tap density produced smaller emission (EM) and higher drug loss (DL) of SS. In vitro aerosolisation for various lactose grades followed the following rank order in terms of deposition performance: GRA>TAB>LAC ≈ CEL>FLO. Linear relationships were established showing that in order to maximize SS delivery to lower airway regions, lactose particles with more elongated shape, more irregular shape, and rougher surface are preferred. Therefore, considerable improvement in DPI performance can be achieved by careful selection of grade of lactose included within DPI formulations. PMID:22197772

  1. The intracellular galactoglycome in Trichoderma reesei during growth on lactose.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, Levente; Coulier, Leon; Fekete, Erzsébet; Overkamp, Karin M; Druzhinina, Irina S; Mikus, Marianna; Seiboth, Bernhard; Novák, Levente; Punt, Peter J; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-06-01

    Lactose (1,4-0-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-glucose) is used as a soluble carbon source for the production of cellulases and hemicellulases for-among other purposes-use in biofuel and biorefinery industries. The mechanism how lactose induces cellulase formation in T. reesei is enigmatic, however. Previous results from our laboratory raised the hypothesis that intermediates from the two galactose catabolic pathway may give rise to the accumulation of intracellular oligogalactosides that could act as inducer. Here we have therefore used high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry to study the intracellular galactoglycome of T. reesei during growth on lactose, in T. reesei mutants impaired in galactose catabolism, and in strains with different cellulase productivities. Lactose, allo-lactose, and lactulose were detected in the highest amounts in all strains, and two trisaccharides (Gal-β-1,6-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru) also accumulated to significant levels. Glucose and galactose, as well as four further oligosaccharides (Gal-β-1,3/1,4/1,6-Gal; Gal-β-1,2-Glc) were only detected in minor amounts. In addition, one unknown disaccharide (Hex-β-1,1-Hex) and four trisaccharides were also detected. The accumulation of the unknown hexose disaccharide was shown to correlate with cellulase formation in the improved mutant strains as well as the galactose pathway mutants, and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and two other unknown hexose trisaccharides correlated with cellulase production only in the pathway mutants, suggesting that these compounds could be involved in cellulase induction by lactose. The nature of these oligosaccharides, however, suggests their formation by transglycosylation rather than by glycosyltransferases. Based on our results, the obligate nature of both galactose catabolic pathways for this induction must have another biochemical basis than providing substrates for inducer formation. PMID:23299458

  2. Orthostatic Intolerance and Motion Sickness After Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Brown, Troy E.; Wood, Scott J.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Bondar, Roberta L.; Stein, Flo; Moradshahi, Peyman; Harm, Deborah L.; Low, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common in astronauts after prolonged space flight. However, the "push-pull effect" in military aviators suggests that brief exposures to transitions between hypo- and hypergravity are sufficient to induce untoward autonomic cardiovascular physiology in susceptible individuals. We therefore investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy test subjects before and after a seated 2-hr parabolic flight. At the same time, we also investigated relationships between parabolic flight-induced vomiting and changes in orthostatic and autonomic cardiovascular function. After parabolic flight, 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate a 30-min upright tilt test, compared to 2 of 16 before flight. Whereas new intolerance in non-Vomiters resembled the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), new intolerance in Vomiters was characterized by comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction. As a group, Vomiters also had evidence for increased postflight fluctuations in efferent vagal-cardiac nerve traffic occurring independently of any superimposed change in respiration. Results suggest that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those occurring after space flight can occur after a brief (i.e., 2-hr) parabolic flight.

  3. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  4. Aldosterone aggravates glucose intolerance induced by high fructose

    PubMed Central

    Sherajee, Shamshad J.; Rafiq, Kazi; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that aldosterone impaired vascular insulin signaling in vivo and in vitro. Fructose-enriched diet induces metabolic syndrome including hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and diabetes in animal. In the current study, we hypothesized that aldosterone aggravated fructose feeding-induced glucose intolerance in vivo. Rats were divided into five groups for six-week treatment; uninephrectomy (Unx, n=8), Unx+aldosterone (aldo, 0.75 μg/h, s.c., n=8), Unx+fructose (fruc, 10% in drinking water, n=8), Unx+aldo+fruc, (aldo+fruc, n=8), and Unx+aldo+fruc+spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (aldo+fruc+spiro, 20 mg/kg/day, p.o., n=8). Aldo+fruc rats manifested the hypertension, and induced glucose intolerance compared to fruc intake rats assessed by oral glucose tolerance test, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study. Spironolactone, significantly improved the aldosterone-accelerated glucose intolerance. Along with improvement in insulin resistance, spironolactone suppressed upregulated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) target gene, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinases-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle in aldo+fruc rats. In conclusion, these data suggested that aldosterone aggravates fructose feeding-induced glucose intolerance through MR activation. PMID:24201309

  5. Tolerance of Intolerance: Values and Virtues at Stake in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlenius, Kennert

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of the tolerance of intolerance in an educational context. It concerns a real case in a Swedish upper secondary school some years ago, when a student was suspended from school owing to his sympathies with Nazi ideas. One hundred and twenty student teachers' responses to this decision were analysed in respect of the…

  6. Rainbow Visibility: How One Catholic University Responded to Intolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Cheryl; Kirkley, Evelyn A.

    2002-01-01

    When intolerance of gays and lesbians at the University of San Diego became a problem, a group of students, staff, and faculty decided to do something about it. The result was a project called Rainbow Visibility that works on many forms to educate the campus community. (Author)

  7. Synthesis, characterisation and microbial utilisation of amorphous polysugars from lactose.

    PubMed

    Daines, Alison M; Smart, Zlatka; Sims, Ian M; Tannock, Gerald W; Hinkley, Simon F R

    2015-03-01

    The melt polymerisations of glucose, galactose, xylose and fucose with citric acid, and mixtures of sugars therein are reported. Characterisation of the citric-acid catalysed reaction products indicated similar degrees of branched polymerisation but differences in the overall molecular weight of the polymers produced. The dairy by-product lactose could not be polymerised in a similar fashion but was shown to be readily hydrolysed using microwave radiation and a polymer generated from the melt condensation of the resultant glucose and galactose monosaccharides. A preliminary assessment of the bifido-bacterial utilisation of the lactose-derived polymerised products demonstrated a significantly different growth profile compared to commercially utilised galactooligosaccharides (GOS). PMID:25498629

  8. 21 CFR 184.1979a - Reduced lactose whey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51, is given in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) through (b)(1)(vii) of this section. Copies may be... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, Box... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reduced lactose whey. 184.1979a Section...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1979a - Reduced lactose whey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51, is given in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) through (b)(1)(vii) of this section. Copies may be... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, Box... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Reduced lactose whey. 184.1979a Section...

  10. Lack of effect of lactose digestion status on baseline fecal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Shrier, Ian; Chong, George; Je, Jung Sung; Park, Sunghoon; Heilpern, Debra; Lalonde, Catherine; Cote, Louis-Francois; Lee, Byong

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genetics of intestinal lactase divide the worlds population into two phenotypes: the ability (a dominant trait) or inability (a recessive trait) to digest lactose. A prebiotic effect of lactose may impact the colonic flora of these phenotypes differently. OBJECTIVE: To detect and evaluate the effects of lactose on subjects divided according to their ability to digest lactose. METHODS: A total of 57 healthy maldigesters (n=30) and digesters (n=27) completed diet questionnaires, genetic and breath hydrogen testing, and quantitative stool analysis for species of bacteria. Log10 transformation of bacterial counts was compared with lactose intake in both groups using multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant relationship between genetic and breath hydrogen tests. Daily lactose intake was marginally lower in lactose maldigesters (median [interquartile range] 12.2 g [31 g] versus 15 g [29.6 g], respectively). There was no relationship between lactose intake and breath hydrogen tests in either group. There were no differences in bacterial counts between the two groups, nor was there a relationship between bacterial counts and lactose intake in either group. CONCLUSION: The differential bacterial effects of lactose were not quantitatively detected in stool samples taken in the present study. PMID:19893771

  11. Influence of amorphous content on compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose.

    PubMed

    Ziffels, S; Steckel, H

    2010-03-15

    Modified lactoses are widely used as filler-binders in direct compression of tablets. Until today, little about the compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose is known. In this study, a new method to prepare anhydrous alpha-lactose from alpha-lactose monohydrate by desiccation with heated ethanol was evaluated and the influence of amorphous content in the lactose powder prior to modification on powder properties, compaction behaviour and storage stability was determined. The modification process led to anhydrous alpha-lactose with decreased bulk and tapped density, increased flow rate and significantly higher specific surface area. Due to the higher specific surface area, the compaction behaviour of the anhydrous alpha-lactose was found to be significantly better than the compaction behaviour of powder blends consisting of alpha-lactose monohydrate and amorphous lactose. An influence of the amorphous content prior to modification could be observed only at higher compaction forces. In general, tablets of modified powders needed longer time to disintegrate directly after compression. However, the storage stability of modified tablets was found to be better compared to the amorphous-crystalline tablets which were influenced by storage conditions, initial crushing strength as well as amorphous content due to the re-crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage. PMID:20005927

  12. Detection of Dissolved Lactose Employing an Optofluidic Micro-System.

    PubMed

    Weber, Emanuel; Keplinger, Franz; Vellekoop, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a novel optofluidic sensor principle is employed for a non-invasive and label-free characterization of lactose containing liquid samples. Especially for medicine and food industry, a simple, fast and accurate determination of the amount of lactose in various products is highly desirable. The presented system exploits the impact of dissolved molecules on the refractive index for sample characterization. On the optofluidic chip, a microfluidic channel filled with the analyte is hit by slightly diverging laser light. The center incident angle of the beam on-chip is set close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. Both the reflected and the transmitted light signals are recorded at the solid-liquid interface. The ratio of those two signals is then used as representative value for the analyte. Using this principle, lactose containing samples were differentiated based on their concentrations at a step size of 10 mmol/L. The use of the signals ratio instead of a single signal approach improves the stability of the system significantly, allowing for higher resolutions to be achieved. Furthermore, the fabrication of the devices in PDMS ensures biocompatibility and provides low absorbance of light in the visible range. PMID:26859402

  13. Detection of Dissolved Lactose Employing an Optofluidic Micro-System

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Emanuel; Keplinger, Franz; Vellekoop, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a novel optofluidic sensor principle is employed for a non-invasive and label-free characterization of lactose containing liquid samples. Especially for medicine and food industry, a simple, fast and accurate determination of the amount of lactose in various products is highly desirable. The presented system exploits the impact of dissolved molecules on the refractive index for sample characterization. On the optofluidic chip, a microfluidic channel filled with the analyte is hit by slightly diverging laser light. The center incident angle of the beam on-chip is set close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. Both the reflected and the transmitted light signals are recorded at the solid-liquid interface. The ratio of those two signals is then used as representative value for the analyte. Using this principle, lactose containing samples were differentiated based on their concentrations at a step size of 10 mmol/L. The use of the signals ratio instead of a single signal approach improves the stability of the system significantly, allowing for higher resolutions to be achieved. Furthermore, the fabrication of the devices in PDMS ensures biocompatibility and provides low absorbance of light in the visible range. PMID:26859402

  14. Microwave-assisted isomerisation of lactose to lactulose and Maillard conjugation of lactulose and lactose with whey proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Nooshkam, Majid; Madadlou, Ashkan

    2016-06-01

    Lactose was isomerised to lactulose by microwave heating and purified by a methanolic procedure to a product with approximately 72% lactulose content. Afterwards, lactose and the lactulose-rich product (PLu) were conjugated with either whey protein isolate (WPI) or its antioxidant hydrolysate (WPH) through microwaving. Lactose had a higher Maillard reactivity than PLu, and WPH was more reactive than WPI. The browning intensity of WPI-sugar systems was however higher than that of WPH-sugar pairs. Atomic force microscopy showed larger (up to ≈103 nm) particles for WPI-PLu conjugates compared to WPH-PLu counterparts (up to ≈39 nm). The Maillard conjugation progressively increased the radical-scavenging activity of WPI/WPH-sugar pairs with increasing conjugation time and improved the foaming properties of WPI and WPH. The WPI/WPH-sugar conjugates showed higher solubility and emulsification index than unreacted counterpart pairs. For native WPI, β-lactoglobulin was not degraded by in vitro gastric digestion, whereas for WPH-PLu conjugates degraded completely. PMID:26830553

  15. Continuous ethanol fermentation of lactose by a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, L.; Dantas, M.M.; Lima, N.; Teixeira, J.A.

    1999-09-20

    Alcohol fermentation of lactose was investigated using a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cetevisiae, expressing the LAC4 (coding the {beta}-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Data on yeast fermentation and growth on a medium containing lactose as the sole carbon source are presented. In the range of studied lactose concentrations, total lactose consumption was observed with a conversion yield of ethanol close to the expected theoretical value. For the continuously operating bioreactor, an ethanol productivity of 11 g L{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} (corresponding to a feed lactose concentration of 50 g L{sup {minus}1} and a dilution rate of 0.55 h{sup {minus}1}) was obtained, which is 7 times larger than the continuous conventional systems. The system stability was confirmed by keeping it in operation for 6 months.

  16. Towards an Ontological Theory of Substance Intolerance and Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A proper ontological treatment of intolerance—including hypersensitivity—to various substances is critical to patient care and research. However, existing methods and standards for documenting these conditions have flaws that inhibit these goals, especially translational research that bridges the two activities. In response, I outline a realist approach to the ontology of substance intolerance, including hypersensitivity conditions. I defend a view of these conditions as a subtype of disease. Specifically, a substance intolerance is a disease whose pathological process(es) are realized upon exposure to a quantity of substance of a particular type, and this quantity would normally not cause the realization of the pathological process(es). To develop this theory, it was necessary to build pieces of a theory of pathological processes. Overall, however, the framework of the Ontology for General Medical Science (which uses Basic Formal Ontology as its uppermost level) was a more-than-adequate foundation on which to build the theory. PMID:20152933

  17. Intolerance of uncertainty and decisions about delayed, probabilistic rewards.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Christian C; Ishida, Kanako; Hajcak, Greg

    2011-09-01

    Worry is the inflated concern about potential future threats and is a hallmark feature of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous theoretical work has suggested that worry may be a consequence of intolerance of uncertainty (IU). The current study seeks to explore the behavioral consequences of IU. Specifically, we examine how IU might be associated with aspects of reward-based decision making. We utilized a simple laboratory gambling task in which participants chose between small, low-probability rewards available immediately at the beginning of each trial and large, high-probability rewards only available after some variable delay. Results demonstrate that higher levels of intolerance of uncertainty were associated with a tendency to select the immediately available, but less valuable and less probable rewards. IU also predicted decision-makers' sensitivity to outcomes. We discuss the cognitive and affective mechanisms that are likely to underlie the observed decision-making behavior and the implications for anxiety disorders. PMID:21658521

  18. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure: Did We Forget the Brain?

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-04-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with their exercise intolerance is more complex. Recent findings indicate that lowered cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation likely represent limiting factors for exercise capacity in patients with HF. After an overview of cardiac and peripheral responses during acute and chronic exercise in healthy individuals, we succinctly review cardiac and noncardiac mechanisms by which HF influences exercise tolerance. We then consider how HF, comorbidity, and HF treatment influence CBF and oxygenation at rest and during exercise. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research to improve our understanding of the role of the brain in exercise intolerance in HF. PMID:26875016

  19. Orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia associated with norepinephrine-transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Flattem, N. L.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Black, B. K.; Biaggioni, I.; Blakely, R. D.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance is a syndrome characterized by lightheadedness, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope and associated with postural tachycardia and plasma norepinephrine concentrations that are disproportionately high in relation to sympathetic outflow. We tested the hypothesis that impaired functioning of the norepinephrine transporter contributes to the pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: In a patient with orthostatic intolerance and her relatives, we measured postural blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamines, and systemic norepinephrine spillover and clearance, and we sequenced the norepinephrine-transporter gene and evaluated its function. RESULTS: The patient had a high mean plasma norepinephrine concentration while standing, as compared with the mean (+/-SD) concentration in normal subjects (923 vs. 439+/-129 pg per milliliter [5.46 vs. 2.59+/-0.76 nmol per liter]), reduced systemic norepinephrine clearance (1.56 vs. 2.42+/-0.71 liters per minute), impairment in the increase in the plasma norepinephrine concentration after the administration of tyramine (12 vs. 56+/-63 pg per milliliter [0.07 vs. 0.33+/-0.37 pmol per liter]), and a disproportionate increase in the concentration of plasma norepinephrine relative to that of dihydroxyphenylglycol. Analysis of the norepinephrine-transporter gene revealed that the proband was heterozygous for a mutation in exon 9 (encoding a change from guanine to cytosine at position 237) that resulted in more than a 98 percent loss of function as compared with that of the wild-type gene. Impairment of synaptic norepinephrine clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by excessive sympathetic activation in response to physiologic stimuli. The mutant allele in the proband's family segregated with the postural heart rate and abnormal plasma catecholamine homeostasis. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic or acquired deficits in norepinephrine inactivation may underlie hyperadrenergic states that lead to orthostatic intolerance.

  20. Orthostatic intolerance and motion sickness after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Brown, T. E.; Wood, S. J.; Benavides, E. W.; Bondar, R. L.; Stein, F.; Moradshahi, P.; Harm, D. L.; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Low, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Because it is not clear that the induction of orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts always requires prolonged exposure to microgravity, we investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy subjects before and after the brief micro- and hypergravity of parabolic flight. Concomitantly, we investigated the effect of parabolic flight-induced vomiting on orthostatic tolerance, R-wave-R-wave interval and arterial pressure power spectra, and carotid-cardiac baroreflex and Valsalva responses. After parabolic flight 1) 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate 30 min of upright tilt (compared to 2 of 16 before flight); 2) 6 of 16 subjects vomited; 3) new intolerance to upright tilt was associated with exaggerated falls in total peripheral resistance, whereas vomiting was associated with increased R-wave-R-wave interval variability and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness; and 4) the proximate mode of new orthostatic failure differed in subjects who did and did not vomit, with vomiters experiencing comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction and nonvomiters experiencing signs and symptoms reminiscent of the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome. Results suggest, first, that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those developing after space flight can develop after a brief (i.e., 2-h) parabolic flight and, second, that recent vomiting can influence the results of tests of autonomic cardiovascular function commonly utilized in returning astronauts.

  1. Drug effects on orthostatic intolerance induced by bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Van Loon, G.; Keil, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Effective and practical preventive procedures for postflight orthostatic intolerance are highly desirable. The current practice of attempts to expand plasma volume by ingestion of salt and fluids before reentry has proven benefits. This study evaluated alternative options using fludrocortisone (F) to expand plasma volume (PV), dextroamphetamine (Dex) to enhance norepinephrine (NE) release, and atropine (A) to reduce the effects of vagal stimulation. Seven subjects with proven post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance returned for a 7-day 6-deg head-down bedrest study. F (0.2 mg) was given at 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM the day before and 8:00 AM the day the subjects got out of bed (2 hours before standing). PV was measured before and 1 hour after the last dose of F. Dex (5 mg) and A (0.8 mg) were then taken orally 1 hour before the stand test. F expanded PV by 16 percent and caused sodium retention. Four of the 7 subjects stood for 1 hour post-bedrest and heart rate, plasma NE and plasma renin responses to standing were greatly enhanced and sustained. Although there was a narrowing of pulse pressure, the ability to overcome orthostatic intolerance with these countermeasures was largely due to vasoconstriction and sustained high heart rate.

  2. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, “ambiguity aversion” and “ambiguity intolerance,” are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, “ambiguity aversion” represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, “ambiguity intolerance” describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  3. Drug effects on orthostatic intolerance induced by bedrest.

    PubMed

    Vernikos, J; Dallman, M F; Van Loon, G; Keil, L C

    1991-10-01

    Effective and practical preventive procedures for postflight orthostatic intolerance are highly desirable. The current practice of attempts to expand plasma volume by ingestion of salt and fluids before reentry has proven benefits. This study evaluated alternative options using fludrocortisone (F) to expand plasma volume (PV), dextroamphetamine (Dex) to enhance norepinephrine (NE) release and atropine (A) to reduce the effects of vagal stimulation. Seven subjects with proven post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance returned for a 7-day 6 degrees head-down bedrest study. F (0.2 mg) was given at 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM the day before and 8:00 AM the day the subjects got out of bed (2 hours before standing). PV was measured before and 1 hour after the last dose of F. D (5 mg) and A (0.8 mg) were then taken orally 1 hour before the stand test. F expanded PV by 16% and caused sodium retention. Four of the 7 subjects stood for 1 hour post-bedrest and HR, plasma NE and PRA responses to standing were greatly enhanced and sustained. Although there was a narrowing of pulse pressure, the ability to overcome orthostatic intolerance with these countermeasures was largely due to vasoconstriction and sustained high heart rate. The existing literature on pharmacologic countermeasures for post-flight and post-bedrest orthostatic hypotension is reviewed, and the results are discussed in that context. PMID:1761730

  4. Characterization and selection of suitable grades of lactose as functional fillers for capsule filling: part 1.

    PubMed

    Moolchandani, Vikas; Augsburger, Larry L; Gupta, Abhay; Khan, Mansoor; Langridge, John; Hoag, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize thermal, physical and mechanical properties of different grades of lactose and better understand the relationships between these properties and capsule filling performance. Eight grades of commercially available lactose were evaluated: Pharmatose 110 M, 125 M, 150 M, 200 M, 350 M (α-lactose monohydrate), AL (anhydrous lactose containing ∼80% β-AL), DCL11 (spray dried α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼15% amorphous lactose) and DCL15 (granulated α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼12% β-AL). In this study, different lactose grades were characterized by thermal, solid state, physical and mechanical properties and later evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) to assess the inter-relationships among some of these properties. The lactose grades were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), moisture sorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution; the flow was characterized by Carr Index (CI), critical orifice diameter (COD) and angle of friction. Plug mechanical strength was estimated from its diametric crushing strength. The first and second principal components (PC) captured 47.6% and 27.4% of variation in the physical and mechanical property data, respectively. The PCA plot grouped together 110 M, AL, DCL11 and DCL15 on the one side of plot which possessed superior properties for capsule formulation and these grades were selected for future formulation development studies (part II of this work). PMID:25212639

  5. Microbial Ecophysiology of Whey Biomethanation: Intermediary Metabolism of Lactose Degradation in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chartrain, M.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediary carbon and electron flow routes for lactose degradation during whey biomethanation were studied in continuous culture. The chemostat was operated under lactose-limited conditions with a 100-h retention time. The carbon balance observed for lactose degradation was 4.65 mmol of CH4, 4.36 mmol of CO2 and 1.15 mmol of cellular carbon per mmol of lactose consumed, with other intermediary metabolites (i.e., acetate, lactate, etc.) accounting for less than 2% of the lactose consumed. The carbon and electron recoveries for this biomethanation were 87 and 90%, respectively. 14C tracer studies demonstrated that lactose biomethanation occurred in three distinct but simultaneous phases. Lactose was metabolized primarily into lactate, ethanol, acetate, formate, and carbon dioxide. During this hydrolytic phase, 82% of the lactose was transformed into lactate. These metabolites were transformed into acetate and H2-CO2 in a second, acetogenic, phase. Finally, the direct methane precursors were transformed during the methanogenic phase, with acetate accounting for 81% of the methane formed. A general scheme is proposed for the exact carbon and electron flow route during lactose biomethanation, which predicts the prevalent microbial populations in this ecosystem. PMID:16346969

  6. Microbial ecophysiology of whey biomethanation: intermediary metabolism of lactose degradation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Chartrain, M; Zeikus, J G

    1986-01-01

    The intermediary carbon and electron flow routes for lactose degradation during whey biomethanation were studied in continuous culture. The chemostat was operated under lactose-limited conditions with a 100-h retention time. The carbon balance observed for lactose degradation was 4.65 mmol of CH(4), 4.36 mmol of CO(2) and 1.15 mmol of cellular carbon per mmol of lactose consumed, with other intermediary metabolites (i.e., acetate, lactate, etc.) accounting for less than 2% of the lactose consumed. The carbon and electron recoveries for this biomethanation were 87 and 90%, respectively. C tracer studies demonstrated that lactose biomethanation occurred in three distinct but simultaneous phases. Lactose was metabolized primarily into lactate, ethanol, acetate, formate, and carbon dioxide. During this hydrolytic phase, 82% of the lactose was transformed into lactate. These metabolites were transformed into acetate and H(2)-CO(2) in a second, acetogenic, phase. Finally, the direct methane precursors were transformed during the methanogenic phase, with acetate accounting for 81% of the methane formed. A general scheme is proposed for the exact carbon and electron flow route during lactose biomethanation, which predicts the prevalent microbial populations in this ecosystem. PMID:16346969

  7. HIV-related Social Intolerance and Risky Sexual Behavior in a High HIV Prevalence Environment

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Sampaio, Mafalda

    2014-01-01

    Although most countries state that fighting social intolerance against persons with HIV is part of their national HIV strategy, the impact of reducing intolerance on risky sexual behavior is largely unknown. In this paper, we estimate the effect of social intolerance against HIV+ persons on risky sexual behavior in rural Malawi using data from roughly 2,000 respondents from the 2004 and 2006 waves of the Malawi Longitudional Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The effect of social intolerance on risky behavior is a priori ambiguous. On the one hand, higher social intolerance or stigma can lead people to disassociate from the stigmatized group and hence promote risky behavior. On the other hand, intolerance can be viewed as a social tax on being HIV+ and thus higher intolerance may reduce risky behavior. We find that a decrease in social intolerance is associated with a decrease in risky behavior, including fewer partners and a lower likelihood of having extra-marital relations. This effect is mainly driven by the impact of social intolerance on men. Overall the results suggests that reducing social intolerance might not only benefit the HIV positive but might also forestall the spread of HIV. PMID:24768779

  8. HIV-related social intolerance and risky sexual behavior in a high HIV prevalence environment.

    PubMed

    Delavande, Adeline; Sampaio, Mafalda; Sood, Neeraj

    2014-06-01

    Although most countries state that fighting social intolerance against persons with HIV is part of their national HIV strategy, the impact of reducing intolerance on risky sexual behavior is largely unknown. In this paper, we estimate the effect of social intolerance against HIV+ persons on risky sexual behavior in rural Malawi using data from roughly 2000 respondents from the 2004 and 2006 waves of the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The effect of social intolerance on risky behavior is a priori ambiguous. On the one hand, higher social intolerance or stigma can lead people to disassociate from the stigmatized group and hence promote risky behavior. On the other hand, intolerance can be viewed as a social tax on being HIV+ and thus higher intolerance may reduce risky behavior. We find that a decrease in social intolerance is associated with a decrease in risky behavior, including fewer partners and a lower likelihood of having extra-marital relations. This effect is mainly driven by the impact of social intolerance on men. Overall the results suggests that reducing social intolerance might not only benefit the HIV positive but might also forestall the spread of HIV. PMID:24768779

  9. Quantitative determination of micronization-induced changes in the solid state of lactose.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, A; Müller, M; Soldati, L; Elviri, L; Bettini, R

    2016-05-30

    Lactose, in particular α-lactose monohydrate, is the most used carrier for inhalation. Its surface and solid-state properties play a key role in determining Dry Powder Inhalers (DPIs) performance. Techniques such as X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), which are commonly used for the characterization of lactose, are not always capable of explaining the solid-state changes induced by processing, such as micronization. In the present work, the evaluation of the effect of the micronization process on the solid-state properties of lactose was carried out by XRPD and DSC and a satisfactory, although not unequivocal, interpretation of the thermal behaviour of lactose was obtained. Thus, a new gravimetric method correlating in a quantitative manner the weight change in specific sections of the Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS) profile and the amount of different forms of α-lactose (hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous) simultaneously present in a given sample was developed and validated. The method is very simple and provides acceptable accuracy in phase quantitation (LOD=1.6, 2.4 and 2.7%, LOQ=5.4, 8.0 and 8.9% for hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous α-lactose, respectively). The application of this method to a sample of micronized lactose led to results in agreement with those obtained by DSC and evidenced that hygroscopic anhydrous α-lactose, rather than amorphous lactose, can be generated in the micronization process. The proposed method may find a more general application for the quantification of polymorphs of compounds different than lactose, provided that the various solid phases afford different weight variations in specific regions of the DVS profile. PMID:27090154

  10. Roller compaction: Effect of morphology and amorphous content of lactose powder on product quality.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Osborne, James D; Althaus, Tim O; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-12-30

    The effect of morphology and amorphous content, of three types of lactose, on the properties of ribbon produced using roller compaction was investigated. The three types of lactose powders were; anhydrous SuperTab21AN, α-lactose monohydrate 200 M, and spray dried lactose SuperTab11SD. The morphology of the primary particles was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the powder amorphous content was quantified using NIR technique. SEM images showed that 21AN and SD are agglomerated type of lactose whereas the 200 M is a non-agglomerated type. During ribbon production, an online thermal imaging technique was used to monitor the surface temperature of the ribbon. It was found that the morphology and the amorphous content of lactose powders have significant effects on the roller compaction behaviour and on ribbon properties. The agglomerated types of lactose produced ribbon with higher surface temperature and tensile strength, larger fragment size, lower porosity and lesser fines percentages than the non-agglomerated type of lactose. The lactose powder with the highest amorphous content showed to result in a better binding ability between the primary particles. This type of lactose produced ribbons with the highest temperature and tensile strength, and the lowest porosity and amount of fines in the product. It also produced ribbon with more smooth surfaces in comparison to the other two types of lactose. It was noticed that there is a relationship between the surface temperature of the ribbon during production and the tensile strength of the ribbon; the higher the temperature of the ribbon during production the higher the tensile strength of the ribbon. PMID:26117279

  11. Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree.

    PubMed

    Kaialy, Waseem; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Engineered lactose particles were prepared by anti-solvent crystallisation technique using lactose solutions with different saturation degrees. In comparison to commercial lactose, engineered lactose particles exhibited less elongated and more irregular shape (large aggregates composed of smaller sub-units), rougher surface texture, higher specific surface area, and different anomer form. Engineered lactose powders demonstrated smaller bulk density, smaller tap density, and higher porosity than commercial lactose powder. Dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing engineered lactose and salbutamol sulphate as a model drug demonstrated improved drug content homogeneity and higher amounts of drug delivered to lower airway regions. Higher fine particle fraction of drug was obtained in the case of lactose powders with higher porosity, higher specific surface area and higher fine particle content (<5 μm). The results indicated that the higher the saturation degree of lactose solution used during crystallisation the smaller the specific surface area, the higher the amorphous lactose content, and the higher the β-lactose content of engineered lactose particles. Also, lactose powders obtained from lactose solution with higher degree of saturation showed higher bulk and tap densities and smaller porosity. Engineered lactose powders crystallized from lower saturation degree (20% and 30% w/v) deposited higher amounts of drug on lower airway regions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is possible to prepare engineered lactose particles with favourable properties (e.g. higher fine particle fraction and better drug content homogeneity) for DPI formulations by using lactose solutions with lower degree of saturation during crystallisation process. PMID:22884837

  12. The formation of lactose plugs for hard shell capsule fills.

    PubMed

    Tattawasart, A; Armstrong, N A

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of lubricant concentration, dosator pressure, and dosator piston height on the properties of lactose plugs. An apparatus designed to simulate Macofar 13/2 capsule filling equipment was used, and the relationship between the variables and the responses was established using a Box-Behnken three-factor, three-level experimental design followed by multiple regression. Plug porosity, both under compression and after ejection, was found to be dependent on dosator pressure. Plug weight and length were dependent on dosator piston height, and uniformity of plug weight was independent of all the factors studied. Plug ejection pressure was dependent on dosator pressure and dosator piston height, even when ejection pressure was corrected for changes in plug length. Lubricant concentration had no significant effect on any plug property, and it must be concluded that 0.5% magnesium stearate provides adequate lubrication for lactose plugs. No interaction between variables was noted, and values of the variables raised to the power 2 had no significant effect, permitting a simplified experimental design to be adopted for future work. PMID:9552462

  13. Synthesis of carbon-13 enriched disaccharides: lactose and sucrose

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Unkefer, P.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Ehler, D.S.

    1986-05-01

    Disaccharides can be prepared enzymatically and by chemical synthesis. Lactose enriched with carbon-13 at C-1 can be synthesized by reacting K/sup 13/CN with a sugar having a one fewer carbon than the desired product. Thus, a mixture of 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)glucose ((1-/sup 13/C)lactose) and 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)mannose can be synthesized from 3-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-arabinose and K/sup 13/CN. (/sup 13/C)Sucrose is conveniently prepared in gram quantities from D-(/sup 13/C)fructose and UDP-glucose in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme sucrose synthetase. This reaction proceeds smoothly at 25/sup 0/ over a period of hours to give an equilibrium mixture which can be separated chromatographically. The glucose portion of sucrose can be labeled using enzymatically-prepared UDP-(/sup 13/C)glucose. Labeled sucrose is important for the preparation of labeled starches to be used for structural and metabolic studies.

  14. Investigation of growth rate dispersion in lactose crystallisation by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2014-09-01

    α-Lactose monohydrate crystals have been reported to exhibit growth rate dispersion (GRD). Variation in surface dislocations has been suggested as the cause of GRD, but this has not been further investigated to date. In this study, growth rate dispersion and the change in morphology were investigated in situ and via bottle roller experiments. The surfaces of the (0 1 0) faces of crystals were examined with Atomic Force Microscopy. Smaller, slow growing crystals tend to have smaller (0 1 0) faces with narrow bases and displayed a single double spiral in the centre of the crystal with 2 nm high steps. Additional double spirals in other crystals resulted in faster growth rates. Large, fast growing crystals were observed to have larger (0 1 0) faces with fast growth in both the a and b directions (giving a broader crystal base) with macro steps parallel to the (c direction). The number and location of spirals or existence of macro steps appears to influence the crystal morphology, growth rates and growth rate dispersion in lactose crystals.

  15. Entrainment of lactose inhalation powders: a study using laser diffraction.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Watling CP; Elliott JA; Cameron RE

    2010-07-11

    We have investigated the mechanism of entrainment of lactose inhalation blends released from a dry powder inhaler using a diffraction particle size analyser (Malvern Spraytec). Whether a powder blend entrains as a constant stream of powder (the "erosion" mechanism) or as a few coarse plugs (the "fracture" mechanism) was found by comparing transmission data with particle size information. This technique was then applied to a lactose grade with 0, 5 and 10wt% added fine particles. As the wt% fines increased, the entrainment mechanism was found to change from a mild fracture, consisting of multiple small plugs, to more severe fracture with fewer plugs. The most severe fracture mechanism consisted of either the powder reservoir emptying as a single plug, or of the reservoir emptying after a delay of the order of 0.1s due to the powder sticking to its surroundings. Further to this, three different inhalation grades were compared, and the severity of the fracture was found to be inversely proportional to the flowability of the powder (measured using an annular ring shear tester). By considering the volume of aerosolised fine particles in different blends it was determined that the greater the volume of fines added to a powder, the smaller the fraction of fines that were aerosolised. This was attributed to different behaviour when fines disperse from carrier particles compared with when they disperse from agglomerates of fines. In summary, this paper demonstrates how laser diffraction can provide a more detailed analysis of an inhalation powder than just its size distribution.

  16. CONTRIBUTION OF PLASMA GALACTOSE AND GLUCOSE TO MILK LACTOSE SYNTHESIS DURING GALACTOSE INGESTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously demonstrated that plasma glucose contributed 80% in the fed and 60% in the fasted state to lactose synthesis in humans, while de novo synthesis in the breast contributing to both the glucose and galactose moieties accounted for the remaining 20 and 40%, respectively, of lactose. T...

  17. Recurrent abdominal pain and lactose maldigestion in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    DiPalma, A M; DiPalma, J A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain of childhood affects 10 to 15% of school-aged children and leads to disability and learning difficulties. Lactose maldigestion may be a causative or contributory factor that when identified may lead to improvement. Thus, formal diagnostic testing using breath hydrogen lactose challenge methods is encouraged. This review focuses on this important condition and management options. PMID:9384061

  18. Effect of compression pressure on inhalation grade lactose as carrier for dry powder inhalations

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha Sureshrao; Jamaiwar, Swapnil; Umekar, Milind Janrao; Kotagale, Nandkishor Ramdas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study focused on the potential effects of compression forces experienced during lactose (InhaLac 70, 120, and 230) storage and transport on the flowability and aerosol performance in dry powder inhaler formulation. Materials and Methods: Lactose was subjected to typical compression forces 4, 10, and 20 N/cm2. Powder flowability and particle size distribution analysis of un-compressed and compressed lactose was evaluated by Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, the angle of repose and by laser diffraction method. Aerosol performance of un-compressed and compressed lactose was assessed in dispersion studies using glass twin-stage-liquid-impenger at flow rate 40-80 L/min. Results: At compression forces, the flowability of compressed lactose was observed same or slightly improved. Furthermore, compression of lactose caused a decrease in in vitro aerosol dispersion performance. Conclusion: The present study illustrates that, as carrier size increases, a concurrent decrease in drug aerosolization performance was observed. Thus, the compression of the lactose fines onto the surfaces of the larger lactose particles due to compression pressures was hypothesized to be the cause of these observed performance variations. The simulations of storage and transport in an industrial scale can induce significant variations in formulation performance, and it could be a source of batch-to-batch variations. PMID:27014618

  19. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    PubMed

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose. PMID:26182904

  20. Treatment of 51 pregnancies with danaparoid because of heparin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Kreutzenbeck, Hans-Joachim; Magnani, Harry N

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant patients with acute venous thrombosis or a history of thrombosis may need alternative anticoagulation, when heparin intolerance occurs. Only limited data on the use of the heparinoid danaparoid are available in literature. We reviewed the use of danaparoid in 51 pregnancies of 49 patients identified in literature between 1981 and 2004. All patients had developed heparin intolerance (32 due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, 19 mainly due to heparin-induced skin rashes) and had a current and/or past history of thromboembolic complications. The initial danaparoid dose regimens ranged from 1000 to 7500 U/day administered s.c. or i.v.. The median duration of danaparoid use was 10 weeks. Danaparoid was used until delivery of a healthy infant in 37 pregnancies. In the remaining 14 pregnancies it was stopped earlier, because anticoagulant treatment was no longer required (3/14) or an adverse event led to a treatment discontinuation (11/14). Four maternal bleeding events were recorded during pregnancy, delivery or postpartum, two of them were fatal due to placental problems. Three fetal deaths were recorded, all associated with maternal complications antedating danaparoid use. Danaparoid cross-reactivity was suspected in 4 HIT patients and 5 non-HIT patients with skin reactions and was confirmed serologically in one of the two HIT patients tested. In none of five fetal cord blood- and three maternal breast milksamples anti-Xa activity transfer was observed. In conclusion danaparoid can be used as an alternative antithrombotic agent in pregnant women with high thrombotic risk and intolerance to heparins. PMID:15630492

  1. Down on heights? One in three has visual height intolerance.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Brandt, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The distressing phenomenon of visual height intolerance (vHI) occurs when a visual stimulus causes apprehension of losing control of balance and falling from some height. Epidemiological data of this condition in the general population are lacking. Assignment of prevalence, determinants, and compensation of vHI was performed in a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 3,517 individuals representing the German population. Life-time prevalence of vHI is 28 % (females 32 %). A higher prevalence is associated independently with a family history of vHI, anxiety disorders, migraine, or motion sickness susceptibility. Women aged 50-59 have a higher prevalence than younger women or men of all ages. Initial attacks occur most often (30 %) in the second decade; however, attacks can manifest throughout life. The main symptoms are fearfulness, inner agitation, a queasy-stomach feeling, subjective postural instability with to-and-fro vertigo, and weakness in the knees. Climbing a tower is the first most common precipitating stimulus; the spectrum of such stimuli widens with time in more than 50 % of afflicted individuals. The most frequent reaction to vHI is to avoid the triggering stimuli (>50 %); 11 % of susceptible individuals consult a doctor, most often a general practitioner, neurologist, ENT doctor, or psychiatrist. In brief, visual height intolerance affects one-third of the general population, considerably restricting the majority of these individuals in their daily activities. The data show that the two terms do not indicate a categorical distinction but rather a continuum from slight forms of visual height intolerance to the specific phobia of fear of heights. PMID:23070463

  2. Perceived psychosocial stress and glucose intolerance among pregnant Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, M.L.; Whitcomb, B.W.; Pekow, P.; Braun, B.; Markenson, G.; Dole, N.; Manson, J.E.; Solomon, C.G.; Carbone, E.T.; Chasan-Taber, L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Prior literature suggests a positive association between psychosocial stress and the risk of diabetes in non-pregnant populations, but studies during pregnancy are sparse. We evaluated the relationship between stress and glucose intolerance among 1115 Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) prenatal care patients in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study in Western Massachusetts (2006–2011). Methods Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14) was administered in early (mean = 12.3 weeks gestation; range 4.1–18 weeks) and mid-(mean = 21.3 weeks gestation; range 18.1–26 weeks) pregnancy. Participants were classified as having a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance, based on the degree of abnormality on glucose tolerance testing between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance was 4.1%, 7.2%, and 14.5%, respectively. Absolute levels of early or mid-pregnancy stress were not significantly associated with glucose intolerance. However, participants with an increase in stress from early to mid-pregnancy had a 2.6-fold increased odds of gestational diabetes mellitus (95% confidence intervals: 1.0–6.9) as compared to those with no change or a decrease in stress after adjusting for age and pre-pregnancy body mass index. In addition, every one-point increase in stress scores was associated with a 5.5 mg/dL increase in screening glucose level (β = 5.5; standard deviation = 2.8; P = 0.05), after adjusting for the same variables. Conclusion In this population of predominantly Puerto Rican women, stress patterns during pregnancy may influence the risk of glucose intolerance. PMID:24948416

  3. Effect of lactose concentration on batch production of ethanol from cheese whey using Candida pseudotropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; El-Taweel, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of lactose concentration on growth of Candida pseudotropicalis and ethanol production from cheese whey under batch conditions was investigated. Four initial lactose concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 g/L (5 to 20% wt/vol) were used. High concentration of lactose had an inhibitory effect on the specific growth rate, lactose utilization rate, and ethanol production rate. The maximum cell concentration was influenced by the initial substrate concentration as well as ethanol concentration. Inhibition of ethanol production was more pronounced at higher initial lactose concentrations. The maximum ethanol yield (96.6% of the theoretical yield) was achieved with the 100 g/L initial substrate concentration. The results indicated that pH control during alcohol fermentation of cheese whey is not necessary. 41 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  5. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  6. Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Over 50 Lactose Intolerance Lactose Intolerance (中文) Osteoporosis and Asian American Women (中文) ... Asian Americans may be at increased risk for lactose intolerance, which means they have trouble digesting dairy ...

  7. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... MALABSORPTION, an inability to absorb some foods, or LACTOSE INTOLERANCE or WHEAT INTOLERANCE (CELIAC DISEASE). Avoid the ... beverages that cause your symptoms. People who have lactose intolerance can use lactose enzyme tablets or drops ...

  8. Variability of gluten intolerance in treated childhood coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholl, B; Egan-Mitchell, B; Fottrell, P F

    1979-01-01

    Fifty children consecutively attending a clinic for coeliac disease co-operated in a trial; 10 found to have flat mucosa were excluded. Forty children of mean age 9.8 years, whose duodenal or jejunal mucosa had returned to normal or near normal appearance after a mean of 5.8 years on gluten-free diets, were put back on normal diets. In 37, mucosal occurred in a mean of 16.9 months (four to 74 months). Four of the 37 had serial biopsies, in which mucosal enzymes (particularly lactase) fell and interepithelial lymphocyte counts rose before the mucosal morphology was regarded as definitely 'coeliac'. Three children had normal mucosal appearance after 58 to 73 months on normal diets, one of whom showed temporary mucosal abnormalities, another having occasionally low enzymes, in both suggesting underlying gluten sensitivity. Lactase suppression and raised IEL counts appear to be sensitive indicators of gluten intolerance. In our experience, a diagnosis of coeliac disease based on severe mucosal damage and a satisfactory response to a gluten-free but milk-containing diet implies a very strong likelihood of permanent or prolonged gluten intolerance, but with a striking variability in its expression. Images Figure PMID:428824

  9. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  10. Intolerance of sexy peers: intrasexual competition among women.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Sharma, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Intrasexual competition among males of different species, including humans, is well documented. Among females, far less is known. Recent nonexperimental studies suggest that women are intolerant of attractive females and use indirect aggression to derogate potential rivals. In Study 1, an experimental design was used to test the evolutionary-based hypothesis that women would be intolerant of sexy women and would censure those who seem to make sex too readily available. Results provide strong empirical support for intrasexual competition among women. Using independent raters, blind to condition, we found that almost all women were rated as reacting negatively ("bitchy") to an attractive female confederate when she was dressed in a sexually provocative manner. In contrast, when she was dressed conservatively, the same confederate was barely noticed by the participants. In Study 2, an experimental design was used to assess whether the sexy female confederate from Study 1 was viewed as a sexual rival by women. Results indicated that as hypothesized, women did not want to introduce her to their boyfriend, allow him to spend time alone with her, or be friends with her. Findings from both studies are discussed in terms of evolutionary theory. PMID:21932332

  11. Self-reported intolerance of uncertainty and behavioural decisions.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Shulman, Elizabeth P; Zerff, Marissa; Gonzales, Josh; Mishra, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) appears to be a robust transdiagnostic risk factor related to anxiety and depression. Most transdiagnostic IU research has used the self-report Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-Short Form; however, there is comparatively little research exploring presumed behavioral correlates of IU. The current study was designed to assess relationships between self-reported IU and decisions in uncertainty-based behavioral tasks (specifically, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, the Risky Gains Task, and the Modified Iowa Gambling Task). Participants comprised compensated community members (n = 108; 69% women) and undergraduates (n = 98; 78% women). Community member compensation was not contingent on performance, but undergraduate compensation was partially contingent on performance. Results replicated prior research, with both samples producing small (r = .19) to moderate (r = -.29) correlations (ps < .05) between self-reported IU and outcome variables from each of the behavioral tasks. The relationships were larger in the undergraduate sample, likely due to the compensation incentive. In general, the results suggest that increasing IU is associated with increasingly risk adverse behaviors; however, the relationship appears complex and in need of substantial additional research to understand how clinically-significant IU would impact pathology-related behaviours. PMID:26788617

  12. Healthy diet and lifestyle clustering and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Perry, I J

    2002-11-01

    Glucose intolerance represents a spectrum of abnormalities, including impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. It is a major public health challenge worldwide, with rapidly increasing prevalence rates in both developed and developing countries. This global epidemic of diabetes is largely driven by the globalisation of Western culture and lifestyles. Specifically, there is now evidence from large-scale observational studies, and from intervention studies, of powerful synergistic interactions between diet, obesity, exercise, smoking and alcohol in the development of glucose intolerance. It is estimated that >90% of cases of type 2 diabetes in the population could be prevented with the adoption of a prudent diet (high in cereal fibre and polyunsaturated fatty acids and low in trans-fatty acids and glycaemic load), avoidance of overweight and obesity (BMI<25 kg/m2), engagement in moderate to vigorous physical activity for at least 0.5 h/d, non-smoking and moderate alcohol consumption. These findings are biologically plausible and have major public health implications. They form the basis for a clear, simple and coherent message for health promotion and public policy. However, to make progress on these issues health will need to be placed at the centre of public policy and relevant vested interests tackled, notably in the food, entertainment, tobacco and automobile industries. PMID:12691184

  13. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  14. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  15. [Lactose and its implications in gastroenterology. Nutrition and food sciences].

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W

    1996-11-01

    The development of the practice of dairying allowed humans to become the only species of mammals to consume milk after the time of weaning. Milk contains the sugar, lactose, which requires the enzyme, intestinal lactase, to digest. Adult mammals do not retain ordinarily express this enzyme after early life, but through evolution, some groups of humans-notably those who practice dairying-have evolved to have the persistence of lactase into adulthood. In Meso-America, South America, Asia and most of Africa, the majority of individuals are genetically lactase non-persistent. With milk as an element of the diet, this human polymorphism for lactase produced its implication in gastroenterology, nutrition and food sciences for both those who can digest and those who cannot digest this sugar. Here, we review the issues of terminology, molecular genetics, diagnosis, health consequences, and management of different lactase states at a general and generic level. PMID:9122542

  16. Entrainment of lactose inhalation powders: a study using laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Watling, C P; Elliott, J A; Cameron, R E

    2010-07-11

    We have investigated the mechanism of entrainment of lactose inhalation blends released from a dry powder inhaler using a diffraction particle size analyser (Malvern Spraytec). Whether a powder blend entrains as a constant stream of powder (the "erosion" mechanism) or as a few coarse plugs (the "fracture" mechanism) was found by comparing transmission data with particle size information. This technique was then applied to a lactose grade with 0, 5 and 10wt% added fine particles. As the wt% fines increased, the entrainment mechanism was found to change from a mild fracture, consisting of multiple small plugs, to more severe fracture with fewer plugs. The most severe fracture mechanism consisted of either the powder reservoir emptying as a single plug, or of the reservoir emptying after a delay of the order of 0.1s due to the powder sticking to its surroundings. Further to this, three different inhalation grades were compared, and the severity of the fracture was found to be inversely proportional to the flowability of the powder (measured using an annular ring shear tester). By considering the volume of aerosolised fine particles in different blends it was determined that the greater the volume of fines added to a powder, the smaller the fraction of fines that were aerosolised. This was attributed to different behaviour when fines disperse from carrier particles compared with when they disperse from agglomerates of fines. In summary, this paper demonstrates how laser diffraction can provide a more detailed analysis of an inhalation powder than just its size distribution. PMID:20417708

  17. The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengjie; Jin, Shaoming; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-04-15

    The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment. PMID:25466047

  18. Utilization of Lactose and Galactose by Streptococcus mutans: Transport, Toxicity, and Carbon Catabolite Repression?

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Abundant in milk and other dairy products, lactose is considered to have an important role in oral microbial ecology and can contribute to caries development in both adults and young children. To better understand the metabolism of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of human tooth decay, a genetic analysis of the tagatose-6-phosphate (lac) and Leloir (gal) pathways was performed in strain UA159. Deletion of each gene in the lac operon caused various alterations in expression of a PlacA-cat promoter fusion and defects in growth on either lactose (lacA, lacB, lacF, lacE, and lacG), galactose (lacA, lacB, lacD, and lacG) or both sugars (lacA, lacB, and lacG). Failure to grow in the presence of galactose or lactose by certain lac mutants appeared to arise from the accumulation of intermediates of galactose metabolism, particularly galatose-6-phosphate. The glucose- and lactose-PTS permeases, EIIMan and EIILac, respectively, were shown to be the only effective transporters of galactose in S. mutans. Furthermore, disruption of manL, encoding EIIABMan, led to increased resistance to glucose-mediated CCR when lactose was used to induce the lac operon, but resulted in reduced lac gene expression in cells growing on galactose. Collectively, the results reveal a remarkably high degree of complexity in the regulation of lactose/galactose catabolism. PMID:20190045

  19. Kinetics and regulation of lactose transport and metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis JA6.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M; Silveira, W B; Fietto, L G; Brandão, R L; Castro, I M

    2014-07-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis strains are able to assimilate lactose. They have been used industrially to eliminate this sugar from cheese whey and in other industrial products. In this study, we investigated specific features and the kinetic parameters of the lactose transport system in K. lactis JA6. In lactose grown cells, lactose was transported by a system transport with a half-saturation constant (K s) of 1.49 ± 0.38 mM and a maximum velocity (V max) of 0.96 ± 0.12 mmol. (g dry weight)(-1) h(-1) for lactose. The transport system was constitutive and energy-dependent. Results obtained by different approaches showed that the lactose transport system was regulated by glucose at the transcriptional level and by glucose and other sugars at a post-translational level. In K. lactis JA6, galactose metabolization was under glucose control. These findings indicated that the regulation of lactose-galactose regulon in K. lactis was similar to the regulation of galactose regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:24504708

  20. Novel coprocessed excipients composed of lactose, HPMC, and PVPP for tableting and its application.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongTao; Li, JinZhi; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi; Kou, Xiang; Babu, Sreehari; Panicucci, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    New coprocessed excipients composed of α-lactose monohydrate (a filler), HPMC E3 (a binder), and PVPP (a superdisintegrant) were developed by spray drying in this study to improve the tableting properties of lactose. Factors affecting the properties of the coprocessed excipients were investigated by a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial design. These factors include lactose grade (90 M, 200 M, and 450 M), percentage of HPMC (3.5%, 7.0%, and 10.5%), and percentage of PVPP (0% and 3.5%). The results show that the compactability of the excipients could be significantly improved by increasing either the percentage of HPMC or the primary particle size of lactose. The addition of 3.5% PVPP had little effect on the compactability, but significantly improved the disintegration ability. The developed coprocessed excipients have much lower yield pressures and much higher working efficiency during tableting compared to the main raw material (α-lactose monohydrate). These improvements are mainly attributed to the addition of HPMC and the proximately 30% amorphous lactose formed during process. Both HPMC and amorphous lactose were homogeneously distributed on the surface of the secondary particles, maximizing their effect. Furthermore, the low hygroscopicity and high glass transition temperature of HPMC led to a high yield. The drug loading capacity of the newly coprocessed excipients is also excellent. In summary, the tri-component coprocessed excipients investigated are promising and worthy of further development. PMID:25841572

  1. Studies on Intolerance in American Life. Program in American History and Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    The narrative selected for this unit on intolerance illustrates the perennial and universal methods for scapegoating. The general teaching objectives are to lead the students: 1) to feelings of tolerance toward individuals and groups who are different; 2) to investigate intolerance in terms of some of its causes: fear, deprivation, threatened…

  2. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general…

  3. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that

  4. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  5. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely…

  6. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general

  7. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely

  8. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that…

  9. Discomfort Intolerance: Evaluation of a Potential Risk Factor for Anxiety Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Richey, J. Anthony; Cromer, Kiara R.; Buckner, Julia D.

    2007-01-01

    Discomfort intolerance, defined as an individual difference in the capacity to tolerate unpleasant bodily sensations, is a construct recently posited as a risk factor for panic and anxiety psychopathology. The present report used a biological challenge procedure to evaluate whether discomfort intolerance predicts fearful responding beyond the…

  10. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  11. Effect of pH and lactose concentration on solvent production from whey permeate using Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.M.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-02-20

    A study was performed to optimize the production of solvents from whey permeate in batch fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum P262. Fermentations performed at relatively low pH values resulted in high solvent yields and productivities, but lactose utilization was incomplete. At higher pH values, lactose-utilization was improved but acid production dominated over solvent production. When operating at the higher pH values, an increase in the initial lactose concentration of the whey permeate resulted in lower rates of lactose utilization, and this was accompanied by increased solvent production and decreased acid production. Analysis of data from several experiments revealed a strong inverse relationship between solvent yield and lactose utilization rate. Thus, conditions which minimize the lactose utilization rate such as low culture pH values or high initial lactose concentrations, favor solventogenesis at the expense of acid production. 12 references.

  12. A mechanistic investigation on the utilization of lactose as a protective agent for multi-unit pellet systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Wun Chyi; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2016-03-01

    The effect of lactose particle size on the extent of pellet coat damage was investigated. The extent of pellet coat damage increased linearly with lactose median particle size. It was observed that coated pellets compressed with coarser lactose grades had larger and deeper surface indentations. The surfaces of the pellets compressed with coarser lactose grades were also found to be significantly rougher. Micronized lactose was capable of protecting pellet coats from damage brought about by the presence of coarser lactose particles. The findings suggested a protective effect that micronized lactose conferred to pellet coats was not only through dimensional delimitations but also by higher interparticulate friction and longer particle rearrangement phase. As a result, the pellet volume fraction in the system was reduced. The extent of pellet coat damage was found to escalate when the pellet volume fraction in such system increased beyond a critical value of 0.39. PMID:25519982

  13. Interactions among lactose, β-lactoglobulin and starch in co-lyophilized mixtures as determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Zohreh; Nasirpour, Ali; Scher, Joël; Desobry, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Processing and storage change food powders containing a large quantity of lactose due to lactose crystallization and interactions among components. Model food systems were prepared by co-lyophilization of lactose, β-lactoglobulin (BLG), and gelatinized starch. A mixture design was used to define the percentage of each mixture component to simulate a wide range of food powders. Interactions among lactose, BLG and starch were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) at different relative humidities (RH), before and after 3 months storage. Results showed the presence of hydrogen bonds among these components. Moreover, interactions or formation of hydrogen bonds among lactose, starch and BLG preserved BLG against freezing and freeze-drying shocks. Lactose crystallization could be identified by comparing infrared spectra of amorphous and crystallized lactose at O - H and C - H stretching vibration bands. PMID:26396334

  14. [Old age and illness--destroying the intolerable?].

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K

    1991-05-01

    The spectacular criminal case of a nurse who because of killing seven old patients in an intensive care ward had been sentenced to jail for 11 years is shown as example of radical thinking in the face of intolerability of serious illness and age. The deficit model of age is on the one hand justly criticized and called invalid, on the other hand negative aspects of age may not be concealed in the face of hedonistic principles of the present epoch. There is no doubt about the monstrosity of the case of the guilty nurse but it may be exemplary for a frequent defensive behaviour against the phenomena of age. If this is right this singular case may be characteristic of common thinking on the unbearable presumption of age. Self defense turning into aggressivity because of foreseeing the own fate of hopeless illness in moribund aged would then have to be seen as a socially significant attitude. PMID:1869232

  15. Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Cotugno, Giovanna; Koch, Pierluigi; Dahdah, Lamia

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) symptoms develop at first introduction of fruit during weaning. We report on an infant with suspected HFI who presented with repeated episodes of vomiting and hypotension after ingestion of fruit-containing meals. The first episode occurred at age 4 months. Despite negative genetic testing for HFI, strict avoidance of fruit ingestion resulted in lack of recurrence of symptoms. Oral-fructose-tolerance testing conducted with an apple mousse did not determine hypoglycemia or fructosuria but caused severe hypotension. Allergy evaluations were negative, and the history was diagnostic for fruit-induced food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Because this non-immunoglobulin E-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity manifests as profuse, repetitive vomiting, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration and lethargy, it may be misinterpreted as HFI. We advise pediatricians to consider food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in the differential diagnosis when there is a suspicion of HFI. PMID:25002667

  16. Mechanisms of Orthostatic Intolerance During Real and Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session MP1 includes short reports on: (1) Orthostatic Tests after 42 Days of Simulated Weightlessness; (2) Effects of 12 Days Exposure to Simulated Microgravity on Central Circulatory Hemodynamics in the Rhesus Monkey; (3) Increased Sensitivity and Resetting of Baroflex Control of Exercise Heart Rate After Prolonged Bed-Rest; (4) Complex Cardiovascular Dynamics and Deconditioning During Head-down Bed Rest; (5) The Cardiovascular Effects of 6 Hours of Head-down Tilt Upon Athletes and Non-athletes; (6) Individual Susceptibility to Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Intolerance: Contributions of Gender-related and Microgravity-related Factors; (7) Cassiopee Mission 1996: Comparison of Cardiovascular Alteration after Short and Long-term Spaceflights; (8) Cerebral and Femoral Flow Response to LBNP during 6 Month MIR Spaceflights (93-95); and (9) Cerebrovascular Changes due to Spaceflight and Postflight Presyncope.

  17. Human Gut Microbiota Changes Reveal the Progression of Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuying; Shen, Dongqian; Fang, Zhiwei; Jie, Zhuye; Qiu, Xinmin; Zhang, Chunfang; Chen, Yingli; Ji, Linong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationship of gut microbiota with the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we analyzed 121 subjects who were divided into 3 groups based on their glucose intolerance status: normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 44), prediabetes (Pre-DM; n = 64), or newly diagnosed T2DM (n = 13). Gut microbiota characterizations were determined with 16S rDNA-based high-throughput sequencing. T2DM-related dysbiosis was observed, including the separation of microbial communities and a change of alpha diversity between the different glucose intolerance statuses. To assess the correlation between metabolic parameters and microbiota diversity, clinical characteristics were also measured and a significant association between metabolic parameters (FPG, CRP) and gut microbiota was found. In addition, a total of 28 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found to be related to T2DM status by the Kruskal-Wallis H test, most of which were enriched in the T2DM group. Butyrate-producing bacteria (e.g. Akkermansia muciniphila ATCCBAA-835, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii L2-6) had a higher abundance in the NGT group than in the pre-DM group. At genus level, the abundance of Bacteroides in the T2DM group was only half that of the NGT and Pre-DM groups. Previously reported T2DM-related markers were also compared with the data in this study, and some inconsistencies were noted. We found that Verrucomicrobiae may be a potential marker of T2DM as it had a significantly lower abundance in both the pre-DM and T2DM groups. In conclusion, this research provides further evidence of the structural modulation of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24013136

  18. Vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine in sympathicotonic orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Miller, J W; Streeten, D H

    1990-05-01

    Sympathicotonic orthostatic intolerance (hypotension, tachycardia, or both) is associated with normal or excessive orthostatic increases in plasma norepinephrine concentration and is reversible by the inflation of a military anti-shock trouser suit enveloping the lower limbs and abdomen. These facts suggest that one possible mechanism of the disorder might be a defect in alpha-adrenergic receptor or postreceptor responsiveness of the veins or arterioles. We have investigated in 11 patients and 15 healthy controls the blood pressure and heart rate responses to increasing rates of intravenous norepinephrine infusion (1 to 16 micrograms/min), the dorsal hand vein contractile responses to increasing rates of norepinephrine infusion (1 to 256 ng/min) with a linear variable differential transformer, and the platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor densities and dissociation constants. No statistically significant difference in any of these parameters was found between the normal subjects and nine of the 11 patients with orthostatic intolerance. The venous contractile response to norepinephrine was excessive in one patient and was virtually absent in another. Because supersensitivity of the hand veins to norepinephrine suggests up-regulation of alpha 2-receptors resulting from postganglionic autonomic insufficiency, this finding in one patient with sympathicotonic orthostatic hypotension might have been caused by venous denervation. The venous unresponsiveness to norepinephrine in the other patient presumably resulted from a defect in the venous receptors or smooth muscle function. It is evident that norepinephrine responsiveness and the innervation of the arterioles and hand veins was normal in the other nine patients, in whom the defect must have been mediated by some other mechanism. PMID:2160509

  19. Prevalence of intolerance to food additives among Danish school children.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, G; Madsen, C; Saval, P; Osterballe, O

    1993-08-01

    The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg, Denmark. The children in the study group followed an elimination diet for two weeks before they were challenged with a mixture of food preservatives, colourings and flavours. The challenge was open and the additives were prepared as a fizzy lemonade. If the open challenge was positive, a double-blind placebo controlled challenge with gelatine capsules was performed. The study included 281 children, 10 were excluded, and the remaining 271 children were given the open challenge (98 healthy controls and 173 with atopic symptoms). The open challenge was negative in all 98 healthy control children who had not reported any atopic symptoms. Of the 173 children reporting present or previous atopic disease 17 had a positive open challenge. Of these 17 children 1 experienced gastrointestinal symptoms, 13 reacted with aggravation of atopic eczema, and 3 with urticaria. Twelve of these 17 children went through the double-blind challenge which was positive in 6 cases. Five of these 6 children had positive reactions to synthetic colourings and 1 to citric acid. No serious reactions were seen. Based upon calculations of the results from this study and an earlier multi-center study in children referred to hospital clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%. PMID:8220800

  20. Hepatic lipase deficiency produces glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Blasco, Irene; Herrero-Cervera, Andrea; Vinué, Ángela; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Piqueras, Laura; Sanz, María Jesús; Burks, Deborah Jane; González-Navarro, Herminia

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus constitute a major problem to global health, and their incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which affects up to 90% of obese people and nearly 70% of the overweight, is commonly associated with MetS characteristics such as obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. In the present study, we demonstrate that hepatic lipase (HL)-inactivation in mice fed with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet produced dyslipidemia including hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and increased non-esterified fatty acid levels. These changes were accompanied by glucose intolerance, pancreatic and hepatic inflammation and steatosis. In addition, compared with WT mice, HL(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced circulating MCP1 levels, monocytosis and higher percentage of CD4+Th17+ cells. Consistent with increased inflammation, livers from HL(-/-) mice had augmented activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways compared with the activation levels of the kinases in livers from WT mice. Analysis of HL(-/-) and WT mice fed regular chow diet showed dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance in HL(-/-) mice without any other changes in inflammation or hepatic steatosis. Altogether, these results indicate that dyslipidemia induced by HL-deficiency in combination with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation in mice which are, at least in part, mediated by the activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways. Future studies are warranted to asses the viability of therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of these kinases to reduce hepatic steatosis associated to lipase dysfunction. PMID:26423094

  1. High iron level in early pregnancy increased glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Zein, Salam; Rachidi, Samar; Awada, Sanaa; Osman, Mireille; Al-Hajje, Amal; Shami, Nadine; Sharara, Iman; Cheikh-Ali, Khawla; Salameh, Pascale; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    High iron stores in pregnancy are essential in preventing negative outcomes for both infants and mothers; however the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) might also be increased. We intend to study the relationship between increased iron stores in early pregnancy and the risk of glucose intolerance and GDM. This prospective, observational, single-hospital study involved 104 non-anemic pregnant women, divided into 4 groups based on the quartile values for ferritin at the first trimester of pregnancy. All participants were screened for GDM with 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 24-28 weeks' gestation. We observed that ferritin levels at early pregnancy were significantly correlated to glucose level after OGTT at 1-h and 2-h (rho=0.21, p<0.05; rho=0.43, p<0.001 respectively). Furthermore, in the higher quartile for ferritin (>38.8μg/L) glycemia at 2-h OGTT was significantly higher than in the others quartiles (p=0.002). In multivariate regression analysis, serum ferritin was a significant determinant of glycemia at 2-h OGTT. Although we did not find a significant association in the incidence of GDM in women with higher serum ferritin levels, probably in reason to the limit power of our study, our data demonstrated that the role of iron excess is tightly involved in the pathogenesis of glucose intolerance. We report for the first time that high ferritin values in early pregnancy are predictors of impaired glucose tolerance in non-anemic women. Individual iron supplementation should be evaluated in order to minimize glucose impairment risk in women with high risk of diabetes. PMID:25441227

  2. Defined bacterial culture development for methane generation from lactose. [Streptococcus lactis; Clostridium formicoaceticum; Methanococcus mazei

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Tang, I.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-06-20

    The defined microbial cultures for methane generation from lactose were investigated. A mixed culture consisting of homolactic (Streptococcus lactis), homoacetic (Clostridium formicoaceticum), and acetate-utilizing methanogenic (Methanococcus mazei) bacteria was used to convert lactose and whey permeate to methane at mesophilic temperatures (35-37/sup 0/C) and a pH around 7.0. Lactose was first converted to lactic acid by S. lactis, then to acetic acid by C. formicoaceticum, and finally to methane and CO/sub 2/ by M. mazei. About 5.3 mol methane were obtained from each mole of lactose consumed, and the conversion of acetate to methane was the rate-limiting step for this mixed-culture fermentation.

  3. Solubility and selective crystallization of lactose from solutions of its hydrolysis products glucose and galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, J.R.; Hegglin, M.; Prenosil, J.E.

    1983-06-01

    A high degree of conversion is desired when lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. This produces, however, a high concentration of galactose, which is inhibitory for the enzyme catalyst (beta-galactosidase). The inhibition can be reduced by limiting the conversion per pass over the enzyme (e.g. to ca. 50%), separating unconverted lactose from the reactor effluent, and recycling it to the reactor inlet. (This allows the overall conversion to be raised to ca. 80-90%). The solubilities of lactose, glucose, and galactose have been determined at various temperatures and for sugar mixtures having different concentrations and degrees of hydrolysis. Various cooling crystallizations have defined convenient and simple processes for the selective separation of lactose from its hydrolysis products.

  4. Effect of viable starter culture bacteria in yogurt on lactose utilization in humans.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, S E; Kim, H S

    1984-01-01

    Breath hydrogen production was used as a measure of lactose malabsorption in human test subjects following the consumption of both heated and unheated cultured yogurt. Less hydrogen was produced when the subjects consumed the unheated cultured yogurt than when they consumed the heated product, indicating that lactose hydrolysis was improved in the small intestine of the individuals consuming the unheated cultured yogurt. Lactase activity in yogurt samples was increased in the presence of bile. Yogurt starter bacteria growing in milk normally do not hydrolyze more lactose than needed for their growth. However, the increased lactase activity in the presence of bile indicates that these bacteria could function as a source of lactase to hydrolyze lactose in the small intestine even though the organisms themselves are not expected to grow in that environment. PMID:6707296

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis between original and evolved recombinant lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; Le Berre, Véronique; Sokol, Serguei; François, Jean; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-12-01

    The engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for lactose utilization has been attempted with the intent of developing high productivity processes for alcoholic fermentation of cheese whey. A recombinant S. cerevisiae flocculent strain that efficiently ferments lactose to ethanol was previously obtained by evolutionary engineering of an original recombinant that displayed poor lactose fermentation performance. We compared the transcriptomes of the original and the evolved recombinant strains growing in lactose, using cDNA microarrays. Microarray data revealed 173 genes whose expression levels differed more than 1.5-fold. About half of these genes were related to RNA-mediated transposition. We also found genes involved in DNA repair and recombination mechanisms, response to stress, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle control, mitosis regulation, glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation. These transcriptomic data are in agreement with some of the previously identified physiological and molecular differences between the recombinants, and point to further hypotheses to explain those differences. PMID:19039778

  6. Fermentation of high concentrations of lactose to ethanol by engineered flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-11-01

    The development of microorganims that efficiently ferment lactose has a high biotechnological interest, particularly for cheese whey bioremediation processes with simultaneous bio-ethanol production. The lactose fermentation performance of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculent strain was evaluated. The yeast consumed rapidly and completely lactose concentrations up to 150 g l(-1) in either well- or micro-aerated batch fermentations. The maximum ethanol titre was 8% (v/v) and the highest ethanol productivity was 1.5-2 g l(-1) h(-1), in micro-aerated fermentations. The results presented here emphasise that this strain is an interesting alternative for the production of ethanol from lactose-based feedstocks. PMID:18575804

  7. [Studies on new co-processed excipient consisting of lactose and gelatinized starch].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-tao; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Xiao; Shen, Lan; Feng, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Co-processed excipients withgelatinized or non-gelatinized starch were prepared by spray drying. Powder and tablet properties of corocessed excipients prepared were compared with those of physical mixtures and spray-dried lactose. Their applicability in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) powder tableting was tested on two TCM extracts, i.e., the gardenia extract and the Herba Sedi extract. It was shown that gelatinizing starch before co-spray drying with lactose could improve the performance and efficiency of starch as a binder, resulting in remarkable improvement in physicomechanical properties of co-processed excipients prepared. Conpared to self-made and commercially available spray-dried lactose, co-processed excipients achieved better compactability and higher drug loading for TCM extracts. In conclusion, the lactose-gelatinized starch co-processed excipient, with excellent physicomechanical properties, is promising to be explored as a new excipient for direct tableting. PMID:25850261

  8. Characterization of a second physiologically relevant lactose permease gene (lacpB) in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Erzsébet; Orosz, Anita; Kulcsár, László; Kavalecz, Napsugár; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, uptake rather than hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step of lactose catabolism. Deletion of the lactose permease A-encoding gene (lacpA) reduces the growth rate on lactose, while its overexpression enables faster growth than wild-type strains are capable of. We have identified a second physiologically relevant lactose transporter, LacpB. Glycerol-grown mycelia from mutants deleted for lacpB appear to take up only minute amounts of lactose during the first 60 h after a medium transfer, while mycelia of double lacpA/lacpB-deletant strains are unable to produce new biomass from lactose. Although transcription of both lacp genes was strongly induced by lactose, their inducer profiles differ markedly. lacpA but not lacpB expression was high in d-galactose cultures. However, lacpB responded strongly also to β-linked glucopyranose dimers cellobiose and sophorose, while these inducers of the cellulolytic system did not provoke any lacpA response. Nevertheless, lacpB transcript was induced to higher levels on cellobiose in strains that lack the lacpA gene than in a wild-type background. Indeed, cellobiose uptake was faster and biomass formation accelerated in lacpA deletants. In contrast, in lacpB knockout strains, growth rate and cellobiose uptake were considerably reduced relative to wild-type, indicating that the cellulose and lactose catabolic systems employ common elements. Nevertheless, our permease mutants still grew on cellobiose, which suggests that its uptake in A. nidulans prominently involves hitherto unknown transport systems. PMID:26935851

  9. Effect of age and lactose on sup 67 Cu utilization in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.; Dowdy, R.; Michelmann, E.; Hill, G.; Zinn, K.; Trrokey, D.; Ellersieck, M. )

    1991-03-15

    Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were fed a control diet or a lactose diet. After four weeks rats were gavaged with approximately 6.24 uCl {sup 67}Cu, placed in metabolism cages, and fed their respective diets for an additional two weeks. Daily whole body, urine and fecal radioactivity measurements were made. Rats were killed on day 42 and livers removed for radioactivity determination. Diet had no effect on whole body retention of {sup 67}Cu in the old rats; approximately 20% of the initial dose was retained by the end of the study. In the young rats, however, lactose appeared to enhance initial {sup 67}Cu retention; by day three young control rats retained only 30% of the initial dose, while the young lactose rats retained about 50%. Retention of {sup 67}Cu at the end of the study was approximately 15% and 20% for young control and young lactose rats, respectively. During the first four days post dosing, cumulative fecal {sup 67}Cu excretion was approximately 83% for young control rats and 69% for young lactose rats indicating enhancement of {sup 67}Cu absorption by lactose in the young rats. For old rats cumulative {sup 67}Cu excretion in feces was about 50% regardless of diet. Cumulative urinary {sup 67}Cu excretion was approximately 6% and 8% for young control and lactose rats, respectively vs about 11% for old rats. {sup 67}Cu retention in liver was greater in old rats regardless of diet. The early increase in {sup 67}Cu absorption after a bolus dose may have therapeutic implications. In light of current concern regarding Cu-carbohydrate interactions, the apparent enhancement Cu retention by lactose in young rats deserves further attention.

  10. Bistability of the naturally induced lactose utilization system of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajic, Jelena; Wall, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In the absence of the preferred sugar glucose, lactose utilization machinery in the bacterium E. coli is activated. The genetic circuit responsible for this response, lac operon, has been observed to exhibit bistability when induced by an artificial inducer, TMG. Here we investigate conditions under which bistability might be observed in response to lactose. The aim of our study is to establish whether the natural system exhibits bistability, as is often assumed despite the lack of experimental support.

  11. Sugar reduction of skim chocolate milk and viability of alternative sweetening through lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, X E; Lopetcharat, K; Qiu, Y; Drake, M A

    2015-03-01

    Milk consumption by Americans has not met the standards of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Chocolate milk can improve milk consumption, especially by children, due to its color and taste. However, the high sugar content of chocolate milk is a cause for concern about its healthfulness, resulting in its removal from some school lunch programs. It is important to reduce the sugar content of chocolate milk and still maintain acceptability among consumers. It is also important to investigate other natural alternatives to sweetening. The objectives of this study were to identify the different sweetness intensity perceptions of sucrose in water and various dairy matrices, to identify the acceptable reduction in sweet taste for chocolate milk for both young adults (19-35 yr) and children (5-13 yr), and to determine if lactose hydrolysis is a viable alternative. Threshold and power function studies were used to determine the benchmark concentration of sucrose in chocolate milk. The acceptability of sugar reduction from the benchmark concentration for both young adults and children and the acceptability of lactose hydrolyzed chocolate milk (4°C for 24 h) with added lactose for young adults were evaluated. Acceptability results demonstrated that sugar reduction in chocolate milk is possible for both young adults and children as long as it does not exceed a 30% reduction (from 205 mM). Lactose hydrolysis of added lactose was used to achieve the sweetness of sucrose in chocolate milk but required >7.5% (wt/vol) added lactose, which contributed undesirable calories, indicating that lactose hydrolysis may be more suitable for other dairy beverages that require less added sugar. The findings of this study demonstrate consumer acceptance of reduced-sugar chocolate milk and a possible way to use lactose hydrolysis in dairy beverages. PMID:25529422

  12. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  13. Effect of lactose on gut microbiota and metabolome of infants with cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Calasso, Maria; Calace, Laura; Siragusa, Sonya; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Vernocchi, Pamela; Brunetti, Luigia; Mancino, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Giuseppe; Guerzoni, Elisabetta; Indrio, Flavia; Laghi, Luca; Miniello, Vito L; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Allergic infants have an unusual gastrointestinal microbiota with low numbers of Bifidobacterium/Lactobacilli and high levels of Clostridium, staphylococci and Escherichia coli. Hydrolyzed formula used to treat these infants is deprived of lactose that instead may influence the gut microbial composition. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of lactose on the composition of the gut microbiota and metabolome of infants with cow's milk allergy. Infants prospectively enrolled received an extensively hydrolyzed formula with no lactose for 2 months followed by an identical lactose-containing formula for an additional 2 months. Healthy, age-gender-matched infants were used as controls. The following determinations were performed before and after the introduction of lactose in the diet: enumeration of cells present in the feces using FISH, counts of viable bacterial cells and gas-chromatography mass spectrometry/solid-phase microextraction analysis. The addition of lactose to the diet significantly increases the counts of Bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria (p < 0.01), decreases that of Bacteroides/clostridia (p < 0.05) reaching counts found in healthy controls; lactose significantly increases the concentration of total short-chain fatty acids (p < 0.05). The addition of lactose to an extensively hydrolyzed formula is able to positively modulate the composition of gut microbiota by increasing the total fecal counts of Lactobacillus/Bifidobacteria and decreasing that of Bacteroides/Clostridia. The positive effect is completed by the increase of median concentration of short chain fatty acids, especially for acetic and butyric acids demonstrated by the metabolomic analysis. PMID:22435727

  14. The LuxS Based Quorum Sensing Governs Lactose Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Duanis-Assaf, Danielle; Steinberg, Doron; Chai, Yunrong; Shemesh, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS) by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2). However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilm. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway. PMID:26779171

  15. Hypersensitivity Reaction After Inhalation of a Lactose-Containing Dry Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Motheral, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Milk protein allergy–induced reactions from lactose-containing dry powder inhalers (DPIs) have not been widely described in the literature. Lactose is a common inactive ingredient in many pharmaceutical products that is used to enhance the stability of active substances in medicinal products, including asthma medications. Contamination of lactose with milk proteins has been identified in reports of inhaled corticosteroid product lot testing. Serious respiratory sequelae may follow after the inhalation of a DPI corticosteroid in a patient with milk protein allergy because DPIs that contain lactose may be contaminated with milk proteins. Lactose-containing DPIs are contraindicated in patients with milk protein allergy. Although manufacturers identify this contraindication in product package inserts, some drug references may not include this information and health care professionals may lack awareness. Clinicians should consider reviewing multiple medication resources for warnings and contraindications of medications to prevent complications. We describe a refractory asthma exacerbation secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction following administration of a lactose-containing DPI corticosteroid and long-acting β2 agonist combination in a child with a milk protein allergy. PMID:25309152

  16. Binding of monoclonal antibody 4B1 to homologs of the lactose permease of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Frillingos, S.; Kaback, H. R.

    1997-01-01

    The conformationally sensitive epitope for monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4B1, which uncouples lactose from H+ translocation in the lactose permease of Escherichia coli, is localized in the periplasmic loop between helices VII and VIII (loop VII/VIII) on one face of a short helical segment (Sun J, et al., 1996, Biochemistry 35;990-998). Comparison of sequences in the region corresponding to loop VII/VIII in members of Cluster 5 of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS), which includes five homologous oligosaccharide/H+ symporters, reveals interesting variations. 4B1 binds to the Citrobacter freundii lactose permease or E. coli raffinose permease with resultant inhibition of transport activity. Because E. coli raffinose permease contains a Pro residue at position 254 rather than Gly, it is unlikely that the mAb recognizes the peptide backbone at this position. Consistently, E. coli lactose permease with Pro in place of Gly254 also binds 4B1. In contrast, 4B1 binding is not observed with either Klebsiella pneumoniae lactose permease or E. coli sucrose permease. When the epitope is transferred from E. coli lactose permease (residues 245-259) to the sucrose permease, the modified protein binds 4B1, but the mAb has no significant effect on sucrose transport. The studies provide further evidence that the 4B1 epitope is restricted to loop VII/VIII, and that 4B1 binding induces a highly specific conformational change that uncouples substrate and H+ translocation. PMID:9232651

  17. Nutritional consequences of low dose milk supplements consumed by lactose-malabsorbing children.

    PubMed

    Brown, K H; Khatun, M; Parry, L; Ahmed, M G

    1980-05-01

    The nutritional consequences of supplementary milk consumption by lactose-malabsorbing children were determined by nutrient balance studies. Twelve subjects received a marginally adequate rice and vegetable base-line diet alone and with simulated milk supplements containing either glucose or lactose during three separate balance periods. The diets were equally well accepted and tolerated. The children gained significantly more weight and had improved apparent nitrogen absorption and retention on the milk supplemented diets (P less than 0.001), and there was no difference between the effects of glucose milk and lactose milk. Fecal wet weights and energy and carbohydrate excretions were modestly increased with the lactose-containing diet, but not significantly so. It is suggested that low dose milk supplements can be well utilized when consumed by lactose malabsorbers in conjunction with other foods. Milk consumption need not be discouraged for populations among whom lactose malabsorption is widely prevalent, but milk should be provided in relatively low doses and the clinical responses to its consumption should be monitored. PMID:6892752

  18. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  19. The LuxS Based Quorum Sensing Governs Lactose Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Duanis-Assaf, Danielle; Steinberg, Doron; Chai, Yunrong; Shemesh, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS) by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2). However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilm. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway. PMID:26779171

  20. Quantifying the release of lactose from polymer matrix tablets with an amperometric biosensor utilizing cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Knöös, Patrik; Schulz, Christopher; Piculell, Lennart; Ludwig, Roland; Gorton, Lo; Wahlgren, Marie

    2014-07-01

    The release of lactose (hydrophilic) from polymer tablets made with hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid) (HMPAA) have been studied and compared to the release of ibuprofen, a hydrophobic active substance. Lactose is one of the most used excipients for tablets, but lactose release has not been widely studied. One reason could be a lack of good analytical tools. A novel biosensor with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) was used to detect the lactose release, which has a polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) layer that increases the response. A sample treatment using polyethylenimine (PEI) was developed to eliminate possible denaturants. The developed methodology provided a good approach to detect and quantify the released lactose. The release was studied with or without the presence of a model amphiphilic substance, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), in the release medium. Ibuprofen showed very different release rates in the different media, which was attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the drug, the HMPAA and the SDS in the release medium. The release of hydrophilic lactose, which did not associate to any of the other components, was rapid and showed only minor differences. The new methodology provides a useful tool to further evaluate tablet formulations by a relatively simple set of experiments. PMID:24726632

  1. Population dynamics of a Lac- strain of Escherichia coli during selection for lactose utilization.

    PubMed

    Foster, P L

    1994-10-01

    During selection for lactose utilization, Lac+ revertants of FC40, a Lac- strain of Escherichia coli, appear at a high rate. Yet, no Lac+ revertants appear in the absence of lactose, or in its presence if the cells have another, unfulfilled requirement for growth. This study investigates more fully the population dynamics of FC40 when incubated in the absence of a carbon source or when undergoing selection for lactose utilization. In the absence of a carbon source, the viable cell numbers do not change over 6 days. When incubated in liquid lactose medium, Lac- cells do not undergo any measurable increase in numbers or in turbidity for at least 2 days. When FC40 is plated on lactose minimum medium in the presence of scavenger cells, the upper limit to the amount of growth of Lac- cells during 5 days is one doubling, and there is no evidence for turnover (i.e., a balance between growth and death). The presence of a minority population that could form microcolonies was not detected. The implications of these results, plus the fact that the appearance of Lac+ revertants during lactose selection is nearly constant with time, are discussed in reference to several models that have been postulated to account for adaptive mutations. PMID:7828809

  2. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases

    PubMed Central

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  3. Analysis of the mechanism and regulation of lactose transport and metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Tangney, Martin; Aass, Hans C; Mitchell, Wilfrid J

    2007-03-01

    Although the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum is currently uneconomic, the ability of the bacterium to metabolize a wide range of carbohydrates offers the potential for revival based on the use of cheap, low-grade substrates. We have investigated the uptake and metabolism of lactose, the major sugar in industrial whey waste, by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Lactose is taken up via a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) comprising both soluble and membrane-associated components, and the resulting phosphorylated derivative is hydrolyzed by a phospho-beta-galactosidase. These activities are induced during growth on lactose but are absent in glucose-grown cells. Analysis of the C. acetobutylicum genome sequence identified a gene system, lacRFEG, encoding a transcriptional regulator of the DeoR family, IIA and IICB components of a lactose PTS, and phospho-beta-galactosidase. During growth in medium containing both glucose and lactose, C. acetobutylicum exhibited a classical diauxic growth, and the lac operon was not expressed until glucose was exhausted from the medium. The presence upstream of lacR of a potential catabolite responsive element (cre) encompassing the transcriptional start site is indicative of the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression characteristic of low-GC gram-positive bacteria. A pathway for the uptake and metabolism of lactose by this industrially important organism is proposed. PMID:17209069

  4. [Beta-galactosidase activity of strains of Kluyveromyces spp. and production of ethanol from lactose].

    PubMed

    de Figueroa, L C; Heluane, H; Rintoul, M; Córdoba, P R

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the behavior of yeast of the genus Kluyveromyces (K. fragilis 507, K. lactis 29 and K. lactis 10), which grow on lactose as sole carbon source, since they possess an enzyme system for the utilization of this sugar. We determined the beta-galactosidase activity of these strains, grown in the logarithmic phase in media containing glucose and lactose. On addition of 0 to 12% v/v ethanol to cells treated with toluene, we did not observe inhibition of the enzyme in strain 10 of Kluyveromyces lactis, which showed the greatest activity (704.4 Units). Since there exist the possibility of industrial utilization of concentrated whey (4 times), we performed fermentation tests of the three strains, at 30 C, in media containing initial lactose concentrations of 16.5 and 24.5%. After 48 h the residual lactose concentration was practically zero, and the ethanol concentrations had reached 7.60 and 10.10% v/v. It might be expected that the rate of fermentation of a disaccharide such as lactose would be related to the rate of hydrolysis of the sugar, so that strains having a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis should show a higher fermentation rate. However, we did not observe such behavior, as strains of Kluyveromyces having enzymatic activities as different as K. lactis 10 (704.4 U) and K. lactis 29 (189.7 U) did not show any great difference in the production of ethanol from lactose. PMID:2129474

  5. Selection of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in Lactose-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Terence D.; Crow, Vaughan L.

    1984-01-01

    Stock cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus are essentially galactose negative (Gal−). Although both galactose 1-phosphate uridyl transferase and uridine-5-diphospho-glucose 4-epimerase are present, suggesting that the genes for the Leloir pathway exist, cells cannot induce high levels of galactokinase. Therefore, galactose is largely excreted when cultures are grown on lactose, and most strains cannot be readily adapted to grow on free galactose. Gal− cultures were grown in a chemostat under lactose limitation in which high concentrations of residual galactose were present. Under this selection pressure, Gal+ organisms eventually took over the culture with all four strains examined. Gal+ cells had induced galactokinase, and three of the four strains grew on free galactose with doubling times of 40 to 50 min. When Gal+ organisms were grown on lactose in batch culture, the galactose moiety was only partially utilized while lactose was still present. As lactose was exhausted, and catabolite repression was lifted, the Leloir pathway enzymes (especially galactokinase) were induced and the residual galactose fermented. Neither phospho-β-galactosidase activity nor the enzymes of the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway were detected in S. thermophilus. In contrast to Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis, fermentation was homolactic with galactose in batch cultures and with lactose limitation in the chemostat. When mixed Gal+-Gal− cultures were repeatedly transferred in milk, the Gal− cells became the dominant cell type. The Gal− phenotype of stock cultures probably reflects their prolonged maintenance in milk. PMID:16346586

  6. Competitive interactions between glucose and lactose with BSA: which sugar is better for children?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiulan; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2016-04-01

    The interactions of the sugars glucose and lactose with the transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using fluorescence, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The results indicated that glucose could be bonded and transported by BSA, mainly involving hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (ΔH = -86.13 kJ mol(-1)). The obtained fluorescence data from the binding of sugar and BSA were processed by the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, and the extracted concentration profiles showed that the equilibrium constant, rglucose:BSA, was about 7. However, the binding of lactose to BSA did not quench the fluorescence significantly, and this indicated that lactose could not be directly transported by BSA. The binding experiments were further performed using the fluorescence titration method in the presence of calcium and BSA. Calcium was added so that the calcium/BSA reactions could be studied in the presence or absence of glucose, lactose or hydrolysis products. The results showed that hydrolyzed lactose seemed to enhance calcium absorption in bovine animals. It would also appear that for children, lactose provides better nutrition; however, glucose is better for adults. PMID:26906109

  7. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%–75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  8. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  9. The influence of physical properties and morphology of crystallised lactose on delivery of salbutamol sulphate from dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Kaialy, Waseem; Martin, Gary P; Larhrib, Hassan; Ticehurst, Martyn D; Kolosionek, Ewa; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the mechanistic evaluation of physicochemical properties of new engineered lactose on aerosolisation performance of salbutamol sulphate (SS) delivered from dry powder inhaler (DPI). Different crystallised lactose particles were obtained from binary mixtures of butanol:acetone. The sieved fractions (63-90 μm) of crystallised lactose were characterised in terms of size, shape, flowability, true density and aerosolisation performance (using multiple twin stage impinger (MSLI), Aerolizer(®) inhaler device, and salbutamol sulphate as a model drug). Compared to commercial lactose, crystallised lactose particles were less elongated, covered with fine lactose particles, and had a rougher surface morphology. The crystallised lactose powders had a considerably lower bulk and tap density and poorer flow when compared to commercial lactose. Engineered carrier with better flow showed improved drug content homogeneity, reduced amounts of drug "deposited" on the inhaler device and throat, and a smaller drug aerodynamic diameter upon inhalation. Aerodynamic diameter of salbutamol sulphate increased as lactose aerodynamic diameter decreased (linear, R(2)=0.9191) and/or as fine particle lactose content increased (linear, R(2)=0.8653). Improved drug aerosolisation performance in the case of crystallised lactose particles was attributed to lower drug-carrier adhesion forces due to a rougher surface and higher fine particle content. In conclusion, this work proved that using binary combinations of solvents in crystallisation medium is vital in modification of the physicochemical and micromeritic properties of carriers to achieve a desirable aerosolisation performance from DPI formulations. Among all lactose samples, lactose particles crystallised from pure butanol generated the highest overall DPI formulations desirability. PMID:21962946

  10. Self-Reported Symptoms of Cold Intolerance in Workers with Injuries of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Cold intolerance is a well-recognized complication of crushing injuries and amputations in the hand. These symptoms are usually thought to resolve within 2 years of injury. The objectives of our study were to determine the prevalence and course over time of self-reported symptoms of cold intolerance in workers with hand injuries. Files from a large worker’s compensation carrier were randomly selected from index years 2, 4, 6, and 10 after a claim was made. Cohorts comprising cases with diagnostic codes corresponding to traumatic hand injuries and codes referring to non-trauma diagnoses in the hand were assembled for each of the years under consideration. A questionnaire was mailed to a total of 7,088 asking questions related to the symptom of cold intolerance. Twenty-five percent of the surveys were returned. Over 90% of trauma patients from all 4 years reported symptoms of cold intolerance. The rate of cold intolerance in the non-trauma group was between 59% and 69%. Individuals reporting cold intolerance indicated worsening over time in 50% of cases and improvement in only 9%. The severity of injury did not appear to be a factor in the development of cold intolerance. Symptoms of cold intolerance are highly prevalent in workers with significant hand injuries. Workers with non-trauma hand conditions also report a substantial prevalence of this symptom. The development of cold intolerance is not related to injury severity. The symptoms remain either static or deteriorate slightly over time. Improvement is experienced by less than 10% of patients. PMID:18780096

  11. Complex dielectric properties of microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous lactose, and α-lactose monohydrate powders using a microwave-based open-reflection resonator sensor.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pei-Fang; Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Angonese, Kristen; Dunn, Don; King, Ray J; Machbitz, Rachel; Christianson, Andrew; Chappell, William J; Taylor, Lynne S; Harris, Michael T

    2011-07-01

    The real (ε') and imaginary (ε″) components of the complex permittivity of anhydrous lactose and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) under different bulk densities, moisture contents (MCs), and times of hydration (for anhydrous lactose) were measured nondestructively using a microwave resonator sensor operating in the range of 700-800 MHz. Measurements of sensor resonant frequency and conductance allow, through calibration, determination of the complex dielectric properties ε' (relative permittivity) and ε″ (relative dielectric loss) of the test material. Characteristic graphs of ε″ versus ε' - 1 curve for each powder were generated as a function of bulk density and MC. Such data can be used to develop empirical models for the simultaneous in situ measurement of the bulk density and MC of the powders. Unlike MCC, anhydrous lactose is converted to its hydrate form in the presence of moisture, which causes a reduction in the amount of physisorbed and "free" water and a subsequent change in the dielectric properties. For powders such as anhydrous lactose that can form a crystal hydrate in the presence of moisture, a combination of techniques such as vibrational spectroscopy together with microwave resonator measurements are appropriate to characterize, in situ, the physical and chemical properties of the powder. PMID:21328582

  12. Novel high-performance metagenome ?-galactosidases for lactose hydrolysis in the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Kuschel, Beatrice; Schwarz, Thilo; Ewert, Jacob; Bhmer, Nico; Niehaus, Frank; Eck, Jrgen; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2015-09-20

    The industrially utilised ?-galactosidases from Kluyveromyces spp. and Aspergillus spp. feature undesirable kinetic properties in praxis, such as an unsatisfactory lactose affinity (KM) and product inhibition (KI) by galactose. In this study, a metagenome library of about 1.3 million clones was investigated with a three-step activity-based screening strategy in order to find new ?-galactosidases with more favourable kinetic properties. Six novel metagenome ?-galactosidases (M1-M6) were found with an improved lactose hydrolysis performance in original milk when directly compared to the commercial ?-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis (GODO-YNL2). The best metagenome candidate, called "M1", was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) in a bioreactor (volume 35 L), resulting in a total ?-galactosidase M1 activity of about 1100 ?katoNPGal,37 C L(-1). Since milk is a sensitive and complex medium, it has to be processed at 5-10 C in the dairy industry. Therefore, the ?-galactosidase M1 was tested at 8 C in milk and possessed a good stability (t1/2=21.8 d), a desirably low apparent KM,lactose,8 C value of 3.80.7 mM and a high apparent KI,galactose,8 C value of 196.655.5 mM. A lactose hydrolysis process (milk, 40 nkatlactose mLmilk,8 C(-1)) was conducted at a scale of 0.5L to compare the performance of M1 with the commercial ?-galactosidase from K. lactis (GODO-YNL2). Lactose was completely (>99.99%) hydrolysed by M1 and to 99.6% (w/v) by K. lactis ?-galactosidase after 25 h process time. Thus, M1 was able to achieve the limit of <100 mg lactose per litre milk, which is recommended for dairy products labelled as "lactose-free". PMID:26122513

  13. Evaluation of granulated lactose as a carrier for DPI formulations 1: effect of granule size.

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Du, Ju; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of large granulated lactose carrier particle systems on aerosol performance of dry powder inhaler formulations. Granulated lactose carriers with average sizes ranging from 200 to 1,000 μm were prepared and subsequently fractionated into separate narrow size powders. The fractionated granulated lactose (GL) samples were characterized in terms of size, specific surface area, surface roughness, morphology, density, flowability, and solid-state. The in vitro aerosolization performance was performed on the different size fractions of GL samples from a commercial inhaler device (Aerolizer®) with a model formulation (2% w/w salbutamol sulfate). The cascade impaction parameters employed were 60 or 90 L/min with standard (aperture size, 0.6 mm) or modified piercing holes (aperture size, 1.2 mm) of the inhaler loaded capsules. It was shown that the largest size fraction formulation (850-1000 μm) had a slight improvement in the fine particle fraction (FPF) compared to immediately preceding size fractions, explained by a smaller adhesive force between drug and carrier. Compared to commercial piercing holes, enlarged piercing holes generated a slight decreasing trend of FPF as the lactose powder sizes increased from 200-250 μm to 600-850 μm, perhaps due to the reduced detachment force by flow forces. The size, surface roughness, density, and flowability of lactose carrier as well as device design all contributed to the aerosol dispersion performance of granulated lactose-based adhesive mixtures. It was concluded that poorer or enhanced redispersion performance is not an inherent property to the significantly large size of granulated lactose carriers as previously contended. PMID:24962007

  14. Pharmacological therapy of feed intolerance in the critically ills

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q

    2014-01-01

    Feed intolerance in the setting of critical illness is associated with higher morbidity and mortality, and thus requires promptly and effective treatment. Prokinetic agents are currently considered as the first-line therapy given issues relating to parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric placement. Currently, the agents of choice are erythromycin and metoclopramide, either alone or in combination, which are highly effective with relatively low incidence of cardiac, hemodynamic or neurological adverse effects. Diarrhea, however, can occur in up to 49% of patients who are treated with the dual prokinetic therapy, which is not associated with Clostridium difficile infection and settled soon after the cessation of the drugs. Hence, the use of prokinetic therapy over a long period or for prophylactic purpose must be avoided, and the indication for ongoing use of the drug(s) must be reviewed frequently. Second line therapy, such as total parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric feeding, must be considered once adverse effects relating the prokinetic therapy develop. PMID:25133043

  15. Mechanisms of microgravity induced orthostatic intolerance: implications for effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of orthostatic hypotension and instability immediately after return from spaceflight has been a significant operational problem to astronauts for more than four decades. Significant reductions in stroke volume and peripheral vascular resistance contribute to ineffective maintenance of systemic arterial blood pressure during standing after spaceflight despite compensatory elevations in heart rate. The primary mechanism underlying reduced stroke volume appears to be a reduction in preload associated with reduced circulating blood volume, although cardiac atrophy might also contribute. Space flight and ground based experiments have demonstrated that an inability to provide adequate peripheral vasoconstriction in astronauts that become presyncopal may be associated with several mechanisms including reduced sympathetic nerve activity, arterial smooth muscle atrophy and/or hyporeactivity, hypersensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors, etc. In addition, an inability to provide adequate tachycardia in presyncopal subjects may be associated with reduced carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Based on the current knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular mechanisms that are altered during exposure to microgravity, a major focus of future research should be directed to the systematic evaluation of potential countermeasures that specifically target and restore the function of these mechanisms. Based on a preliminary systematic evaluation presented in this review, acute physical exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, G-suit inflation, artificial gravity, and specific pharmacological interventions, alone or in combination, have shown promise as successful countermeasures that provide protection against post-flight orthostatic intolerance.

  16. Genes and exercise intolerance: insights from McArdle disease.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Godfrey, Richard; Santalla, Alfredo; Coll-Cantí, Jaume; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Pinós, Tomàs; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Angel; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    McArdle disease (glycogen storage disease type V) is caused by inherited deficiency of a key enzyme in muscle metabolism, the skeletal muscle-specific isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, "myophosphorylase," which is encoded by the PYGM gene. Here we review the main pathophysiological, genotypic, and phenotypic features of McArdle disease and their interactions. To date, moderate-intensity exercise (together with pre-exercise carbohydrate ingestion) is the only treatment option that has proven useful for these patients. Furthermore, regular physical activity attenuates the clinical severity of McArdle disease. This is quite remarkable for a monogenic disorder that consistently leads to the same metabolic defect at the muscle tissue level, that is, complete inability to use muscle glycogen stores. Further knowledge of this disorder would help patients and enhance understanding of exercise metabolism as well as exercise genomics. Indeed, McArdle disease is a paradigm of human exercise intolerance and PYGM genotyping should be included in the genetic analyses that might be applied in the coming personalized exercise medicine as well as in future research on genetics and exercise-related phenotypes. PMID:26465709

  17. Wheat Allergy and Intolerence; Recent Updates and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Batool, Rizwana; Aziz, Mahwash; Ahmed, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    The current review paper highlights the complicacies associated with communities relying on wheat as their dietary staple. Although, wheat is an important source of nutrients but is also linked with allergenic responses in genetically susceptible subjects. The wheat proteins especially α-amylase inhibitors, ω-5 gliadins, prolamins, nonprolamin, glucoprotein, and profilins are of significance importance. The allergenic responses are further categorized into IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions. Conjugation and degranulation of the IgEs with the allergens results in release of several mediators. In contrary, non-IgE-mediated wheat allergy depends on immune complexes formed by food and food antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. As results, different diseases tend to occur on the completion of these reactions, i.e., celiac disease, baker's asthma, diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria. This instant paper highlighted the concept of food allergy with special reference to wheat. The models are developed that are included in this paper showing the wheat allergen, their possible routes, impact on human health, and indeed possible remedies. The paper would provide the basic information for the researchers, common man, and allied stakeholders to cater the issue in details. However, the issue needs the attention of the researchers as there is a need to clarify the issues of wheat allergy and wheat intolerance. PMID:24915366

  18. The Relationship Between Intolerance of Uncertainty, Sensory Sensitivities, and Anxiety in Autistic and Typically Developing Children.

    PubMed

    Neil, Louise; Olsson, Nora Choque; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Guided by a recent theory that proposes fundamental differences in how autistic individuals deal with uncertainty, we investigated the extent to which the cognitive construct 'intolerance of uncertainty' and anxiety were related to parental reports of sensory sensitivities in 64 autistic and 85 typically developing children aged 6-14 years. Intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety explained approximately half the variance in autistic children's sensory sensitivities, but only around a fifth of the variance in typical children's sensory sensitivities. In children with autism only, intolerance of uncertainty remained a significant predictor of children's sensory sensitivities once the effects of anxiety were adjusted for. Our results suggest intolerance of uncertainty is a relevant construct to sensory sensitivities in children with and without autism. PMID:26864157

  19. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and nonallergic food intolerance: FODMAPs or food chemicals?

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Food intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being recognized, with patients convinced that diet plays a role in symptom induction. Evidence is building to implicate fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in the onset of abdominal pain, bloating, wind and altered bowel habit through their fermentation and osmotic effects. Hypersensitivity to normal levels of luminal distension is known to occur in patients with IBS, with consideration of food chemical intolerance likely to answer many questions about this physiological process. This paper summarizes the evidence and application of the most common approaches to managing food intolerance in IBS: the low-FODMAP diet, the elimination diet for food chemical sensitivity and others including possible noncoeliac gluten intolerance. PMID:22778791

  20. Kinetic approaches to lactose operon induction and bimodality.

    PubMed

    Michel, Denis

    2013-05-21

    The quasi-equilibrium approximation is acceptable when molecular interactions are fast enough compared to circuit dynamics, but is no longer allowed when cellular activities are governed by rare events. A typical example is the lactose operon (lac), one of the most famous paradigms of transcription regulation, for which several theories still coexist to describe its behaviors. The lac system is generally analyzed by using equilibrium constants, contradicting single-event hypotheses long suggested by Novick and Weiner (1957). Enzyme induction as an all-or-none phenomenon. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 43, 553-566) and recently refined in the study of (Choi et al., 2008. A stochastic single-molecule event triggers phenotype switching of a bacterial cell. Science 322, 442-446). In the present report, a lac repressor (LacI)-mediated DNA immunoprecipitation experiment reveals that the natural LacI-lac DNA complex built in vivo is extremely tight and long-lived compared to the time scale of lac expression dynamics, which could functionally disconnect the abortive expression bursts and forbid using the standard modes of lac bistability. As alternatives, purely kinetic mechanisms are examined for their capacity to restrict induction through: (i) widely scattered derepression related to the arrival time variance of a predominantly backward asymmetric random walk and (ii) an induction threshold arising in a single window of derepression without recourse to nonlinear multimeric binding and Hill functions. Considering the complete disengagement of the lac repressor from the lac promoter as the probabilistic consequence of a transient stepwise mechanism, is sufficient to explain the sigmoidal lac responses as functions of time and of inducer concentration. This sigmoidal shape can be misleadingly interpreted as a phenomenon of equilibrium cooperativity classically used to explain bistability, but which has been reported to be weak in this system. PMID:23454080

  1. A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for efficient conversion of lactose in salted and unsalted cheese whey into ethanol.

    PubMed

    Tahoun, M K; el-Nemr, T M; Shata, O H

    2002-10-01

    For utilization of lactose in salted and unsalted cheese whey, intergeneric protoplast fusion between lactose nonfermenting, salt-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC4126 and lactose fermenting Kluyveromyces lactis CBS683 was carried out. The fusion process gave rise to new hybrid yeast strains that revealed higher significant DNA contents than parental strains. The recombinants showed growth on either lactose or sucrose. The ethanol yields by some recombinants were 5.55% from sweet whey and 4.66% from salted whey containing up to 6% sodium chloride compared to 4.15 and 2.86% for parental K. lactis CBS683, respectively. PMID:12428446

  2. [Urticaria and "aspirin intolerance"--part of an interdisciplinary pathogenetic principle? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Illig, L

    1981-03-15

    Like the so-called "aspirin asthma", the aspirin-induced provocation of chronic urticaria is a symptom of the intolerance syndrome. This may also be induced by various other drugs, particularly by indomethacin and food additives. The intolerance syndromes of the "Aspirin type", however, must be assigned to the "anaphylactoid reactions" in man which also include the non-immunologic reactions to radiographic contrast media and colloids in blood substitutes. It has not yet been investigated in how far the mechanisms of these three clinical types of anaphylactoid reactions are similar or identical; however, this appears to be the case at least with aspirin intolerance and anaphylactoid reactions to contrast media. According to our observations in 150 urticaria patients, the non-immunologic aspirin-induced urticaria (and probably also the "aspirin asthma") should furthermore be divided into real provocation within the meaning of a chemical Koebner phenomenon, and "aspirin urticaria" as a symptom of the intolerance syndrome as such. A rel provocation of pre-existent urticaria is much less frequent than superimposed urticaria as a mere symptom of the intolerance syndrome. An exact differentiation is only possible in patients without any clinical symptoms after additive-free diet as well as on the basis of the phenomenon of "figuration". The most important substance as mediator for intolerance urticaria is histamine. In contrast to the usual urticaria, H2-antagonists are an important adjuvant to the traditional H1-antagonists in the symptomatic therapy. PMID:7222893

  3. Relationships among perceived racial stress, intolerance of uncertainty, and worry in a black sample.

    PubMed

    Rucker, LaTanya S; West, Lindsey M; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely to increase worry, perhaps through the mechanism of intolerance of uncertainty, intolerance of uncertainty was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between perceived racial stress and chronic worry. A nonclinical sample of 77 Black undergraduate students at an urban university completed a series of questionnaires assessing the constructs of interest. Both perceived racial stress and intolerance of uncertainty were significantly correlated with chronic worry in this sample. Moreover, intolerance of uncertainty fully mediated the relationship between perceived racial stress and worry for these Black individuals. These findings are discussed in terms of directions for future research and implications for clinical interventions for Black individuals who are both exposed to racial stress and suffer from chronic worry. PMID:20412889

  4. Predictors of Beta-Blocker Intolerance and Mortality in Patients After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Laercio Martins; Ferraz, Alex Lombardi Barbosa; Ferreira, Ana Lúcia dos Anjos; Gut, Ana Lúcia; Cogni, Ana Lúcia; Farah, Elaine; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the predictors of intolerance to beta-blockers treatment and the 6-month mortality in hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods This was a single-center, prospective, and longitudinal study including 370 consecutive ACS patients in Killip class I or II. BBs were prescribed according to international guidelines and withdrawn if intolerance occurred. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee of our university. Statistics: the clinical parameters evaluated at admission, and the related intolerance to BBs and death at 6 months were analyzed using logistic regression (p<0.05)in PATIENTS. Results BB intolerance was observed in 84 patients and was associated with no prior use of statins (OR: 2.16, 95%CI: 1.26–3.69, p= 0.005) and Killip class II (OR: 2.5, 95%CI: 1.30-4.75, p=0.004) in the model adjusted for age, sex, blood pressure, and renal function. There was no association with ST-segment alteration or left anterior descending coronary artery plaque. Intolerance to BB was associated with the greatest risk of death (OR: 4.5, 95%CI: 2.15–9.40, p<0.001). Conclusions After ACS, intolerance to BBs in the first 48 h of admission was associated to non previous use of statin and Killip class II and had a high risk of death within 6 months. PMID:24167581

  5. Synthesis and characterization of lactose-based homopolymers, hydrophilic/hydrophobic copolymers, and hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjing

    The focus of this dissertation is the synthesis and characterization of lactose-based functional polymers. Currently 60% of lactose, a by-product from the cheese industry, is being utilized and the remaining fraction represents a serious disposal problem because of the high biological oxygen demand. Therefore, further development of utilization of lactose is an important issue both for industry and environment. Herein, the syntheses of lactose-based polymers such glycopolymers, hydrophilic/hydrophobic copolymers, and hydrogels are reported. A brief review of lactose formation, physical properties, and production is presented in Chapter 1. Syntheses and applications of lactose derivatives such as lactitol, lactulose, lactaime, lactosylurea, lactosylamine, lactone, and barbituric derivative are documented. Previous work in lactose-based polymers include: (1) hydrogels from cross linking of LPEP, borate complexation of lactose-containing polymer, and copolymerization of lactose monomer with crosslinkers; (2) lactose-based polyurethane rigid foams and adhesives; and (3) lactose-containing glycopolymers are also included. Chapter 2 documents the synthesis of acrylamidolactamine and the free radical copolymerization of this monomer with N-isopropylacrylamide in the presence of BisA to make hydrogels. Swelling behavior of the hydrogels at different temperatures as well as DSC study of these hydrogels are also carried out to characterize the swelling transition and the organization of water in the copolymer hydrogels. In Chapter 3, novel monomer syntheses of N-lactosyl- N'-(4-vinylbenzyl)urea or N '-lactosyl-N,N-methyl(4-vinylbenzyl)urea are described. Polymerization of these new urea monomers using a redox initiator gave water-soluble homopolymers with molecular weights in the range of 1.9 x 103 to 5.3 x 106. Synthesis and polymerization of lactose-O-(p-vinylbenzyl)hydroxime are documented in Chapter 4. The resulting polymers had high molecular weight (106) and narrow polydispersity (Mw/Mn: 1.20--1.35). The Mark-Houwink equation was obtained as [eta] = 2.15 x 10-4Mv0.73. Hydrogels produced in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide swelled as much as 21-fold in deionized water. Copolymerization of styrene with lactose-O-(vinylbenzyl)oxime in dimethylsulfoxide-toluene (1:1, v/v) using 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator are discussed in Chapter 5. The resulting hydrophilic/hydrophobic copolymers were characterized by viscometry, TGA, DSC, GPC, and solubility tests in solvents of varied polarities. Chapter 6 documents the preparation of polystyrene beads with different length of oligo(ethylene glycol) crosslinkers. Swelling in different solvents, solvent accessibility, and reagent diffusion of these beads with different crosslinking density were studied and the results indicated that the PEG-crosslinked polymers showed slightly better solvent accessibility in polar solvents than the analogous DVB-crosslinked networks.

  6. Drying and denaturation characteristics of whey protein isolate in the presence of lactose and trehalose.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Chen, Jie; Aldred, Peter; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-06-15

    The denaturation kinetics of whey protein isolate (WPI), in the presence and absence of lactose and trehalose, was quantified in a convective air-drying environment. Single droplets of WPI, WPI-lactose and WPI-trehalose were dried in conditioned air (2.5% RH, 0.5m/s air velocity) at two temperatures (65°C and 80°C) for 500s. The initial solid concentration of these solutions was 10% (w/v) in all the samples. Approximately 68% of WPI was denatured when it was dried in the absence of sugars. Addition of 20% trehalose prevented the irreversible denaturation of WPI at both temperatures. Thirty percent lactose was required to prevent denaturation of WPI at 65°C and the same amount of lactose protected only 70% of WPI from denaturation at 80°C. The secondary structures of WPI were found to be altered by the drying-induced stresses, even in the presence of 20% trehalose and 30% lactose. PMID:25660851

  7. Integrative food-grade expression system based on the lactose regulon of Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Gosalbes, M J; Esteban, C D; Galán, J L; Pérez-Martínez, G

    2000-11-01

    The lactose operon from Lactobacillus casei is regulated by very tight glucose repression and substrate induction mechanisms, which made it a tempting candidate system for the expression of foreign genes or metabolic engineering. An integrative vector was constructed, allowing stable gene insertion in the chromosomal lactose operon of L. casei. This vector was based on the nonreplicative plasmid pRV300 and contained two DNA fragments corresponding to the 3' end of lacG and the complete lacF gene. Four unique restriction sites were created, as well as a ribosome binding site that would allow the cloning and expression of new genes between these two fragments. Then, integration of the cloned genes into the lactose operon of L. casei could be achieved via homologous recombination in a process that involved two selection steps, which yielded highly stable food-grade mutants. This procedure has been successfully used for the expression of the E. coli gusA gene and the L. lactis ilvBN genes in L. casei. Following the same expression pattern as that for the lactose genes, beta-glucuronidase activity and diacetyl production were repressed by glucose and induced by lactose. This integrative vector represents a useful tool for strain improvement in L. casei that could be applied to engineering fermentation processes or used for expression of genes for clinical and veterinary uses. PMID:11055930

  8. Construction of lactose-assimilating and high-ethanol-producing yeasts by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Farahnak, F.; Seki, T.; Ryu, D.D.Y.; Ogrydziak, D.

    1986-02-01

    The availability of a yeast strain which is capable of fermenting lactose and at the same time is tolerant to high concentrations of ethanol would be useful for the production of ethanol from lactose. Kluyveromyces fragilis is capable of fermenting lactose, but it is not as tolerant as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high concentrations of ethanol. In this study, the authors have used the protoplast fusion technique to construct hybrids between auxotrophic strains of S. cerevisiae having high ethanol tolerance and an auxotrophic strain of lactose-fermenting K. fragilis isolated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. The fusants obtained were prototrophic and capable of assimilating lactose and producing ethanol in excess of 13% (vol/vol). The complementation frequency of fusion was about 0.7%. Formation of fusants was confirmed by the increased amount of chromosomal DNA per cell. Fusants contained 8 x 10/sup -9/ to 16 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell as compared with about 4 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell for the parental strains, suggesting that multiple fusions had taken place.

  9. Permeabilization of Kluyveromyces marxianus with mild detergent for whey lactose hydrolysis and augmentation of mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jay Shankar Singh; Bezawada, Jyothi; Yan, Song; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-03-01

    Cheese whey is a by-product of cheese-manufacturing industries, and the utilization of whey is a challenging problem either to use it or dispose it, because only few microorganisms can metabolize the whey lactose. Enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by β-galactosidase is the approach for biotechnological application. Kluyveromyces marxianus cells were permeabilized with non-toxic, biodegradable, anionic detergent N-lauroyl sarcosine (N-LS) for the enzyme activity. The permeabilization process parameters (N-LS concentration, solvent volume, temperature and incubation time) were optimized. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1,220 IU/g dry weight was obtained using permeabilized cells under optimized conditions. Moreover, viability of the permeabilized cells was also evaluated, which showed that cells were alive; however, viability was reduced by two log cycles. The permeabilized cells were evaluated for whey lactose hydrolysis. The maximum lactose hydrolysis of 91% was observed with 600 mg (dry cell weight/100 mL) in whey powder (5% w/v) solution at 180-min incubation, pH 6.5 and 30 °C. Further, the hydrolyzed whey was evaluated for amelioration of growth of non-lactose-consuming yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae was able to grow in hydrolyzed whey simultaneously with K. marxianus. The study confirmed that N-LS could be used to permeabilize K. marxianus cells to make available the enzyme activity. PMID:24500798

  10. Dispersibility of lactose fines as compared to API in dry powders for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Thalberg, Kyrre; Åslund, Simon; Skogevall, Marcus; Andersson, Patrik

    2016-05-17

    This work investigates the dispersion performance of fine lactose particles as function of processing time, and compares it to the API, using Beclomethasone Dipropionate (BDP) as model API. The total load of fine particles is kept constant in the formulations while the proportions of API and lactose fines are varied. Fine particle assessment demonstrates that the lactose fines have higher dispersibility than the API. For standard formulations, processing time has a limited effect on the Fine Particle Fraction (FPF). For formulations containing magnesium stearate (MgSt), FPF of BDP is heavily influenced by processing time, with an initial increase, followed by a decrease at longer mixing times. An equation modeling the observed behavior is presented. Surprisingly, the dispersibility of the lactose fines present in the same formulation remains unaffected by mixing time. Magnesium analysis demonstrates that MgSt is transferred to the fine particles during the mixing process, thus lubrication both BDP and lactose fines, which leads to an increased FPF. Dry particle sizing of the formulations reveals a loss of fine particles at longer mixing times. Incorporation of fine particles into the carrier surfaces is believed to be behind this, and is hence a mechanism of importance as regards the dispersion performance of dry powders for inhalation. PMID:26965200

  11. Effects of temperature on lactose hydrolysis by immobilized beta-galactosidase in plug-flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, S T; Okos, M R

    1989-02-20

    The hydrolysis of lactose using immobilized beta-galactosidase (from Aspergillus niger) on phenol-formaldehyde resin was studied at temperatures between 8 and 60 degrees C and initial lactose concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20.0%. A model involving enzyme-galactose complex similar to Michaelis-Menten kinetics with competitive product (galactose) inhibition is suitable to describe the lactose hydrolysis reaction. A small degree of lack of fit between the model and the data was found to be due to the formation of oligosaccharides. Thermal deactivation of lactase follows first-order reaction mechanism. The effect of temperature on the reaction and the deactivation rate constants follows the Arrhenius relationship. The Oligosaccharide formation was not significantly affected by the temperature when the initial lactose concentration was 5%. A design equation for the plug-flow immobilized lactase reactor was developed from the reaction and the deactivation kinetics and was used to find the optimal operating temperature. The optimal temperature was found to be dependent on the operating time but not on the lactose concentration or the conversion. The optimal operating temperature is 60 degrees C when operating time is short but is close to 35 degrees C for a long operating time. A preliminary economic analysis indicates that the optimal operating temperature is 43, 38.5, and 33 degrees C when the operating time is 300 days, 1000 days, and infinity, respectively. PMID:18587995

  12. Lactose autoinduction with enzymatic glucose release: characterization of the cultivation system in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sonja; Junne, Stefan; Ukkonen, Kaisa; Glazyrina, Julia; Glauche, Florian; Neubauer, Peter; Vasala, Antti

    2014-02-01

    The lactose autoinduction system for recombinant protein production was combined with enzymatic glucose release as a method to provide a constant feed of glucose instead of using glycerol as a carbon substrate. Bioreactor cultivation confirmed that the slow glucose feed does not prevent the induction by lactose. HPLC studies showed that with successful recombinant protein production only a very low amount of lactose was metabolized during glucose-limited fed-batch conditions by the Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS in well-aerated conditions, which are problematic for glycerol-based autoinduction systems. We propose that slow enzymatic glucose feed does not cause a full activation of the lactose operon. However recombinant PDI-A protein (A-domain of human disulfide isomerase) was steadily produced until the end of the cultivation. The results of the cultivations confirmed our earlier observations with shaken cultures showing that lactose autoinduction cultures based on enzymatic glucose feed have good scalability, and that this system can be applied also to bioreactor cultivations. PMID:24215862

  13. Development and Characterization of Lactose-Positive Pediococcus Species for Milk Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, S. L.; McMahon, D. J.; Oberg, C. J.; Broadbent, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteriophages against Streptococcus thermophilus are a growing problem in the Italian cheese industry. One possible control method involves replacing S. thermophilus in mozzarella starter blends with lactic acid bacteria from a different genus or species. In this study, we evaluated lactose-positive pediococci for this application. Because we could not identify any commercially available pediococci with fast acid-producing ability in milk, we transformed Pediococcus pentosaceus ATCC 25744, P. pentosaceus ATCC 25745, and Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 12697 by electroporation with pPN-1, a 35-kb Lactococcus lactis lactose plasmid. Transformants of P. pentosaceus ATCC 25745 and P. acidilactici ATCC 12697 were then used to examine lactose-positive pediococci for properties related to milk fermentation. Both transformants rapidly produced acid and efficiently retained pPN-1 in lactose broth, and neither bacterium was attacked by bacteriophages in whey collected from commercial cheese facilities. Paired starter combinations of Pediococcus spp. and Lactobacillus helveticus LH100 exhibited synergistic pH reduction in milk, and small-scale cheese trials showed that these cultures could be used to manufacture part-skim mozzarella cheese. Results demonstrate that lactose-positive pediococci have potential as replacement cocci for S. thermophilus in Italian cheese starter blends and may facilitate development of new strain rotation schemes to combat S. thermophilus bacteriophage problems in mozzarella cheese plants. PMID:16535280

  14. Production of galacto-oligosaccharide from lactose by Sterigmatomyces elviae CBS8119.

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, N; Yamashiro, A; Yokozeki, K

    1995-01-01

    Our stock cultures were screened for microorganisms that can produce galacto-oligosaccharide (Gal-OS) from lactose. Of the 574 strains of bacteria and yeasts tested, Sterigmatomyces elviae CBS8119, Rhodotorula minuta IFO879, and Sirobasidium magnum CBS6803 were found to be efficient producers of Gal-OS from lactose and S. elviae CBS8119 was selected as a representative, high-level producing strain. With toluene-treated resting S. elviae CBS8119 cells, 135 mg of Gal-OS per ml was produced from 360-mg/ml lactose. During this reaction, the by-product glucose was found to inhibit Gal-OS production. Therefore, in order to remove the glucose from the reaction mixture, a culture method in which cell growth followed the enzymatic reaction was devised, which increased the yield of Gal-OS considerably because of the consumption of glucose for cell growth. Under such conditions, 232 mg of Gal-OS per ml was produced from 360-mg/ml lactose after incubation at 30 degrees for 60 h. The structure of the major product was identified as O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D- glucopyranose (4'-galactosyl-lactose) by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:8526516

  15. Cerebral vasoconstriction precedes orthostatic intolerance after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Brown, T. E.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of brief but repeated bouts of micro- and hypergravity on cerebrovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) were examined in 13 individuals after (compared to before) parabolic flight. Middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA MFV; transcranial Doppler ultrasound), eye level blood pressure (BP) and end tidal CO(2) (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured while supine and during 80 degrees HUT for 30 min or until presyncope. In the postflight tests subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT) (n = 7) or intolerant (OI) (n = 6). BP was diminished with HUT in the OT group in both tests (p < 0.05) whereas postflight BP was not different from supine in the OI group. Postflight compared to preflight, the reduction in P(ET)CO(2) with HUT (p < 0.05) increased in both groups, although significantly so only in the OI group (p < 0.05). The OI group also had a significant decrease in supine MCA MFV postflight (p < 0.05) that was unaccompanied by a change in supine P(ET)CO(2). The decrease in MCA MFV that occurred during HUT in both groups preflight (p < 0.05) was accentuated only in the OI group postflight, particularly during the final 30 s of HUT (p < 0.05). However, this accentuated decrease in MCA MFV was not correlated to the greater decrease in P(ET)CO(2) during the same period (R = 0.20, p = 0.42). Although cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) also increased in the OI group during the last 30 s of HUT postflight (p < 0.05), the dynamic autoregulatory gain was not simultaneously changed. Therefore, we conclude that in the OI individuals, parabolic flight was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion following a paradoxical augmentation of CVR by a mechanism that was not related to changes in autoregulation nor strictly to changes in P(ET)CO(2).

  16. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects. PMID:25262317

  17. Gluten intolerance: Sex-and age-related features

    PubMed Central

    Llorente-Alonso, MJ; Fernández-Aceñero, MJ; Sebastián, M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gluten intolerance is an immune-mediated enteropathy associated with gluten-containing foods in genetically susceptible patients. The typical form mainly affecting children shows failure to thrive and/or gastrointestinal symptoms. The adult form is less typical, presenting vague gastrointestinal symptoms, iron deficiency (with or without anemia) or nonspecific serum chemistry abnormalities. The present study aims to analyze clinical and biochemical differences of celiac disease (CD) according to sex and age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study reviewed clinical and biochemical features of patients with suspected CD admitted to the Hospital General of Móstoles (Madrid, Spain) between July 2001 and June 2005. Two hundred fifty-two patients were analyzed, in whom intestinal biopsy was performed due to clinical and/or biochemical abnormalities suggestive of CD. One hundred seventy-eight asymptomatic relatives of the affected patients were also included. Overall, 125 patients showed diagnostic features of CD in the intestinal biopsy. RESULTS: The results confirmed higher prevalence of typical forms of CD in children (67% in children compared with only 14.3% in adults). CD seemed to be more frequent in adult women than in men (ratio of women to men 4:1), but it is worth noting that men diagnosed were most often referred with a typical clinical picture, so atypical forms of the disease in men may have been underdiagnosed. CONCLUSIONS: CD shows atypical features in adults, and physicians must include this disorder in the differential diagnosis of adults with iron deficiency or slight hypertransaminasemia. Increased awareness of the disease and extensive availability of accurate serological tests will lead to improved diagnosis of this disorder, both in children and adults. PMID:17111054

  18. Lactose and milk replacer influence on lead absorption and lead toxicity in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Zmudzki, J.; Bratton, G.R.; Womac, C.W.; Rowe, L.D. Jr.; Wagner, B.

    1986-03-01

    The absorption, tissue deposition, retention, and excretion of ingested lead is in large part due to associated dietary factors. Young suckling calves are extremely susceptible to low doses of lead, especially when maintained totally on milk. Unfortunately, the complexity of milk makes it difficult to determine which constituent is actually responsible for increased Pb absorption. Recent studies have shown that lactose, the major carbohydrate of milk, is a dietary factor that increases the absorption of several minerals including Pb in rats. The authors laboratory has recently demonstrated that milk greatly increased the tissue deposition of lead in calves. Lactose, however, has not been considered in the ruminant animal. Moreover, liquid milk seems to increase the absorption of lead more significantly than powdered milk. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of lactose and powdered milk on lead uptake and tissue distribution in calves.

  19. Synthesis of novel bioactive lactose-derived oligosaccharides by microbial glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Municio, Marina; Herrero, Miguel; Olano, Agustín; Moreno, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are increasingly demanded within the Food Science domain because of the interesting healthy properties that these compounds may induce to the organism, thanks to their beneficial intestinal microbiota growth promotion ability. In this regard, the development of new efficient, convenient and affordable methods to obtain this class of compounds might expand even further their use as functional ingredients. This review presents an overview on the most recent interesting approaches to synthesize lactose-derived oligosaccharides with potential prebiotic activity paying special focus on the microbial glycoside hydrolases that can be effectively employed to obtain these prebiotic compounds. The most notable advantages of using lactose-derived carbohydrates such as lactosucrose, galactooligosaccharides from lactulose, lactulosucrose and 2-α-glucosyl-lactose are also described and commented. PMID:24690139

  20. Lactose biosensor based on lactase and galactose oxidase immobilized in polyvinyl formal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Kumar, Ashok; Chaudhary, Reeti; Suman; Pundir, Suman; Pundir, C S; Sehgal, Neeta

    2007-01-01

    A lactose biosensor was developed by immobilizing lactase and galactose oxidase in a polyvinyl formal membrane and was attached to the oxygen electrode of a dissolved oxygen analyzer for estimation of lactose in milk and food products. The enzyme immobilized polyvinyl formal membrane was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The biosensor showed the linearity for 1-7 g dl(-1) of lactose and can be reused for up to 20 measurements. The effects of pH, temperature and the stability of the immobilized lactase and galactose oxidase in PVF membrane were also studied. The enzyme membrane was found stable up to 35 degrees C and had a shelf-life of more than three months at 4 degrees C. PMID:17701488

  1. Mild protein hydrolysation of lactose-free milk further reduces milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, Anu; Kautiainen, Hanna; Tikkanen, Marja-Leena; Sibakov, Timo; Tossavainen, Olli; Myllyluoma, Eveliina

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms associated with milk are common. Besides lactose, milk proteins may cause symptoms in sensitive individuals. We have developed a method for mild enzymatic hydrolysation of milk proteins and studied the effects of hydrolysed milk on gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a self-diagnosed sensitive stomach. In a double blind, randomised placebo-controlled study, 97 subjects consumed protein-hydrolysed lactose-free milk or commercially available lactose-free milk for 10 d. Frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms during the study period was reported and a symptom score was calculated. Rumbling and flatulence decreased significantly in the hydrolysed milk group (P < 0·05). Also, the total symptom score was lower in subjects who consumed hydrolysed milk (P < 0·05). No difference between groups was seen in abdominal pain (P = 0·47) or bloating (P = 0·076). The results suggest that mild enzymatic protein hydrolysation may decrease gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a sensitive stomach. PMID:27034058

  2. Lactose/whey utilization and ethanol production by transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Porro, D; Martegani, E; Ranzi, B M; Alberghina, L

    1992-04-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with a multicopy expression vector bearing both the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene under the control of the upstream activating sequence of the GAL1-10 genes and the GAL4 activator gene release part of beta-galactosidase in the growth medium. This release is due to cell lysis of the older mother cells; the enzyme maintains its activity in buffered growth media. Fermentation studies with transformed yeast strains showed that the release of beta-galactosidase allowed an efficient growth on buffered media containing lactose as carbon source as well as on whey-based media. The transformed strains utilized up to 95% of the lactose and a high growth yield was obtained in rich media. High productions of ethanol were also observed in stationary phase after growth in lactose minimal media. PMID:18601014

  3. Production of lactosucrose from sucrose and lactose by a levansucrase from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Han, Woo-Cheul; Byun, Sun-Ho; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Sohn, Eun Hwa; Lim, Jung Dae; Um, Byung Hun; Kim, Chul Ho; Kang, Soon Ah; Jang, Ki-Hyo

    2009-10-01

    Lactosucrose (4(G)-beta-D-galactosylsucrose) is an oligosaccharide consisting of galactose, glucose, and fructose. In this study, we prepared lactosucrose from lactose and sucrose using a levansucrase derived from Zymomonas mobilis. Optimum conditions for lactosucrose formation were 23 degrees C, pH 7.0, 18.0% (w/v) lactose monohydrate, and 18% (w/v) sucrose as substrates, and 1 unit of enzyme/ml of reaction mixture. Under these conditions, the lactosucrose conversion efficiency was 28.5%. The product was purified and confirmed to be O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl- (1-->2)-beta-D-fructofuranoside, or lactosucrose. A mixed-enzyme system containing a levansucrase and a glucose oxidase was applied in order to increase the efficiency of lactose and sucrose conversion to lactosucrose, which rose to 43.2% as s result. PMID:19884774

  4. Antifouling properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nugraha, Roni; Finlay, John A; Hill, Sophie; Fyrner, Timmy; Yandi, Wetra; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Ederth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), using four different proteins, zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza and cells of the diatom Navicula incerta, were investigated. The SAM-forming alkylthiols, which contained 1, 2 or 3 lactose units, showed significant variation in AF properties, with no differences in wettability. Non-specific adsorption of albumin and pepsin was low on all surfaces. Adsorption of lysozyme and fibrinogen decreased with increasing number of lactose units in the SAM, in agreement with the generally observed phenomenon that thicker hydrated layers provide higher barriers to protein adsorption. Settlement of spores of U. linza followed an opposite trend, being greater on the bulkier, more hydrated SAMs. These SAMs are more ordered for the larger saccharide units, and it is therefore hypothesized that the degree of order, and differences in crystallinity or stiffness between the surfaces, is an important parameter regulating spore settlement on these surfaces. PMID:25629533

  5. Natural history of soy allergy and/or intolerance in children, and clinical use of soy-protein formulas.

    PubMed

    Cantani, A; Lucenti, P

    1997-05-01

    Atopic diseases of infants and children are common, debilitating, chronic and sometimes even life-threatening. Several well-conducted studies in high risk babies have demonstrated a significant reduction in the prevalence and severity of atopic diseases with dietary and environmental manipulations. The currently available cow's milk (CM) substitutes for infants are soy protein (SP) formulas (SPFs), hydrolyzed formulas (HF), and home-made meat-based formulas. Soybeans have been cultivated in Eastern countries for many centuries and were first used to feed US babies with CM allergy (CMA) in 1929. Since then, SPFs containing purified SP, a mixture of vegetable oils, and purified carbohydrate have been developed. From a nutritional point of view, SPFs are adequate, support normal growth, protein status, bone mineralization, are well accepted, and economical. SPFs are used for different conditions including CMA, lactose and galactose intolerance and in the management of severe gastroenteritis, and some studies show that feeding SPFs for the first six months of life significantly reduces the prevalence of atopic diseases in high risk babies. Although gastrointestinal symptoms and atopic dermatitis (AD) may occur in some SPF-fed children, anaphylaxis following the ingestion of soybean is extremely rare in children. However, in the past few years the antigenicity/allergenicity of SPFs has been over-emphasized in the medical literature. In this paper on the natural history of soy antigenicity/allergenicity we discuss all the pros and cons of SPFs, their composition and nutritional value, the basic immune definitions, chemistry and characterization of SPs. We then discuss the antigenicity and allergenicity of SPFs in animals, recent data on the use of SPFs and the incidence of soy allergy in children, clinical reactions to SPFs, and the clinical relevance of skin testing and IgE antibodies to soy, challenge test procedure, clinical indication of SPFs, and their relevance in the prevention of atopy. We have meta-analyzed 17 different studies and conclude that history-based SPF allergy incidence totals 27%, in skin prick tests (SPT) RAST-oral food challenge (OFC)/double-blind food challenge (DBFC)-based epidemiological studies attains 3%, and in challenge test studies 4%. We suggest that double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) studies in larger cohorts of babies may establish a more reliable prevalence of SPF allergy in different disorders associated with CMA. PMID:9617775

  6. Lactose Variability of Escherichia coli in Thermally Stressed Reactor Effluent Waters

    PubMed Central

    Kasweck, K. L.; Fliermans, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    Lactose-utilizing and nalidixic acid-resistant populations of Escherichia coli, having an optimum growth temperature of 37°C, were placed in modified diffusion chambers. The chambers were submerged in the epilimnion and hypolimnion of a 1,100-hectare lake (Par Pond) which receives cooling water from a nuclear production reactor. Control chambers were placed in a deep-water reservoir and a Flowing-Streams Laboratory, both of which had comparable temperatures to Par Pond. The populations of E. coli were sampled regularly for up to 3 weeks. Viability of the bacteria was determined by dilution plating to nutrient agar followed by replicate plating onto selective medium to determine lactose utilization and nalidixic acid sensitivity. Initial populations of E. coli were lactose positive but changed to lactose negative in Par Pond when the reactor was operating (i.e., cooling water from the heat exchangers was being discharged to the lake). This alteration occurred most rapidly in the chambers closest to the cooling-water discharge point. Such changes did not occur in a deep-water reservoir, in Par Pond when the reactor was not operating, or in the Flowing-Streams Laboratory. The nalidixic acid-resistant characteristic remained stable regardless of the chambers' placement or reactor operations. Although the reasons for such alterations are unclear, it appears that lactose-negative populations of E. coli are selected for in these reactor effluent waters. The loss of the lactose characteristic prevents the recognition and identification of E. coli in this cooling lake (when the reactor is operating) and may prevent the assessment of water quality based on coliform recognition. PMID:365111

  7. Triboelectrification of spray-dried lactose prepared from different feedstock concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, O E; Carter, P A; Rowley, G; Merrifield, D R

    2000-01-01

    Powder systems may acquire electrostatic charge during various pharmaceutical processing operations and may give rise to difficulties in handling and powder flow, mainly due to adhesion/cohesion effects. We have investigated the electrostatic charging of spray-dried lactose prepared from different feedstock concentrations using a laboratory spray-dryer. Triboelectrification of the spray-dried lactose samples was effected through contact with the stainless steel surface of either a mixing vessel or a cyclone separator. Results from both techniques showed differences in charge accumulation and particle-steel adhesion between the spray-dried lactose samples. As the feedstock concentration used to produce the spray-dried lactose was increased in the range 10-50% w/v, the mean charge on the lactose decreased from -20.8 to -1.3 nC g(-1) and -54.9 to -4.1 nC g(-1) for the mixing vessel and cyclone separator, respectively, with a corresponding decrease in adhesion. In addition, as the feedstock concentration was increased from 10 to 50% w/v, decreases were obtained in surface area values (1.06 to 0.56 m2 g(-1)), pore diameter (198.7 to 83.5 microm) and pore volume (1.09 to 0.75 cm3 g(-1)), and together with differences in crystal form correlated with the charge and adhesion results. The results suggested that the feedstock concentration could have a considerable influence on the charging and adhesional properties of spray-dried lactose. This may have relevance during pharmaceutical processing and manufacturing operations. PMID:10716598

  8. Orthostatic intolerance in 6 degrees head-down tilt and lower body negative pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Akira; Ito, Masao; Mano, Takaichi; Nakayama, Kiyoshi

    6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest experiment for 6 days was conducted at Nihon University Itabashi Hospital for 10 male athletes. In order to observe the orthostatic intolerance due to six days head-down tilt bed rest, 70 degrees head up tilt tests were performed before and after the head-down tilt. Two types of orthostatic intolerance were distinguished by the time course of their cardiovascular responses. One was vagotonia type and the other was brain anemia type. The latter type was commonly seen among astronauts after space flight due to the lack of plasma volume. As this volume change is considered to be initiated by some fluid loss from the lower extremities, analysis was made to clarify the relation between the leg volume change and the types of orthostatic intolerance. Nakayama proposed a Heart Rate Controllability Index, which is calculated from the initiate leg volume change and heart rate increase in head up tilt, for an indicator of the orthostatic intolerability. The index was applied to the subjects of six days head-down tilt above mentioned. For the subjects who showed a sign of presyncopy, the index values were higher or lower than that of the rest subjects who showed no sign of presyncopy. In order to evaluate the validity of the index, another experiment was conducted to induce an orthostatic intolerance by a different way of loading. The same types of orthostatic intolerance were observed and the index value hit high in the brain anemia type of orthostatic intolerance, while the vagotonia type showed relatively lower values than the normal group.

  9. Novel determination of protein, fat, and lactose of milk by liquid scintillation counter

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.C.; Shand, J.H.; West, I.G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for routine determination of protein, fat, and lactose contents of milk is based on the ability of a scintillation counter to measure coloration or opalescence through attenuation of photons emitted from sealed miniature carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 radioactive standards. A series of simplified and accurate analytical procedures enable full advantage to be taken of the automatic facilities on the modern liquid scintillation counter. The methods provide several advantages over existing procedures. Accuracy of quantification was high as assessed by comparing the results with those derived by recommended Kjeldahl, Gerber, and colorimetric procedures for protein, fat, and lactose determinations, respectively.

  10. Crystallization of amorphous lactose at high humidity studied by terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alexander I.; Yang, Bin; Goldup, Stephen M.; Watkinson, Michael; Donnan, Robert S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the first use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to study the hydration and crystallization of an amorphous molecular solid at high humidity. Lactose in its amorphous and monohydrate forms exhibits different terahertz spectra due to the lack of long range order in the amorphous material. This difference allowed the transformation of amorphous lactose to its monohydrate form at high humidity to be studied in real time. Spectral fitting of frequency-domain data allowed kinetic data to be obtained and the crystallization was found to obey Avrami kinetics. Bulk changes during the crystallization could also be observed in the time-domain.

  11. [Jaffe color test-based microtechnique for determination of milk lactose].

    PubMed

    Khramov, V A; Kolome?tseva, A S; Papichev, N V

    2008-01-01

    The picric acid reaction (Jaffe test) that is widely used in clinical biochemical practice to determine creatinine has proven to be suitable for the assay of lactose in milk samples. The reaction conditions (picric acid concentration, sample heating time, etc.) were examined to optimize this method. The specificity of this color test was also studied. Other reducing sugars, as well as glucose-6-phosphate and glycerol yielded a picric acid reaction. The level of lactose in the test milk samples (n = 14) ranged from 0.120 to 0.148 mmol/l. PMID:18590158

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of crystallized-particle size in lactose-powder by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Hatakeyama, Sakura; Imai, Yoh; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Transmission-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to evaluate crystallized lactose particle of size below 30 μm, which is far too small compared to the wavelength of incident terahertz (THz)-wave. The THz-absorption spectrum of lactose is successfully deconvoluted by Lorentzian to two spectra with peaks at 17.1 cm-1 (0.53 THz) and 45.6 cm-1 (1.37 THz) derived from α-lactose monohydrate, and a spectrum at 39.7 cm-1 (1.19 THz) from anhydrous β-lactose after removal of the broad-band spectrum by polynomial cubic function. Lactose is mainly crystallized into α-lactose monohydrate from the supersaturated solution at room temperature with a small amount of anhydrous β-lactose below 4%. The absorption feature is dependent on the crystallized particle size and the integrated intensity ratio of the two absorptions due to α-lactose monohydrate is correlated in linear for the size.

  13. Diagnostic and Public Health Dilemma of Lactose-Fermenting Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium in Cattle in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Patrick L.; Shin, Sang J.; Lein, Donald H.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of lactose-fermenting Salmonella strains in clinical case materials presented to microbiology laboratories presents problems in detection and identification. Failure to detect these strains also presents a public health problem. The laboratory methods used in detecting lactose-fermenting Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from six outbreaks of salmonellosis in veal calves are described. Each outbreak was caused by a multiply-resistant and lactose-fermenting strain of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. The use of Levine eosin-methylene blue agar in combination with screening of suspect colonies for C8 esterase enzyme and inoculation of colonies into sulfide-indole-motility medium for hydrogen sulfide production was particularly effective for their detection. A hypothesis for the creation of lactose-fermenting salmonellae in the environment is presented. It is proposed that the environment and husbandry practices of veal-raising barns provide a unique niche in which lactose-fermenting salmonellae may arise. PMID:10699026

  14. Bistable Behavior of the Lac Operon in E. Coli When Induced with a Mixture of Lactose and TMG

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Orlando; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigate multistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli when it is induced by a mixture of lactose and the non-metabolizable thiomethyl galactoside (TMG). In accordance with previously published experimental results and computer simulations, our simulations predict that: (1) when the system is induced by TMG, the system shows a discernible bistable behavior while, (2) when the system is induced by lactose, bistability does not disappear but excessively high concentrations of lactose would be required to observe it. Finally, our simulation results predict that when a mixture of lactose and TMG is used, the bistability region in the extracellular glucose concentration vs. extracellular lactose concentration parameter space changes in such a way that the model predictions regarding bistability could be tested experimentally. These experiments could help to solve a recent controversy regarding the existence of bistability in the lac operon under natural conditions. PMID:21423364

  15. Characterisation and deposition studies of recrystallised lactose from binary mixtures of ethanol/butanol for improved drug delivery from dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Kaialy, Waseem; Martin, Gary P; Ticehurst, Martyn D; Royall, Paul; Mohammad, Mohammad A; Murphy, John; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2011-03-01

    Dry powder inhaler formulations comprising commercial lactose-drug blends can show restricted detachment of drug from lactose during aerosolisation, which can lead to poor fine particle fractions (FPFs) which are suboptimal. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the crystallisation of lactose from different ethanol/butanol co-solvent mixtures could be employed as a method of altering the FPF of salbutamol sulphate from powder blends. Lactose particles were prepared by an anti-solvent recrystallisation process using various ratios of the two solvents. Crystallised lactose or commercial lactose was mixed with salbutamol sulphate and in vitro deposition studies were performed using a multistage liquid impinger. Solid-state characterisation results showed that commercial lactose was primarily composed of the α-anomer whilst the crystallised lactose samples comprised a α/β mixture containing a lower number of moles of water per mole of lactose compared to the commercial lactose. The crystallised lactose particles were also less elongated and more irregular in shape with rougher surfaces. Formulation blends containing crystallised lactose showed better aerosolisation performance and dose uniformity when compared to commercial lactose. The highest FPF of salbutamol sulphate (38.0 ± 2.5%) was obtained for the lactose samples that were crystallised from a mixture of ethanol/butanol (20:60) compared to a FPF of 19.7 ± 1.9% obtained for commercial lactose. Engineered lactose carriers with modified anomer content and physicochemical properties, when compared to the commercial grade, produced formulations which generated a high FPF. PMID:21057906

  16. Sources and severity of self-reported food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Steenhagen, Elles; de Roos, Nicole M; Bouwman, Carolien A; van Laarhoven, Cees J H M; van Staveren, Wija A

    2006-09-01

    Data on food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis are scarce. The aim of this study was to identify foods causing intolerance and to determine the nature and severity of reported symptoms. Patients from the Dutch Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Association were mailed a survey on food intolerance; 105 (31% men) of 137 patients took part. They all reported intolerance to one or more foods. Common symptoms (scored from 0=absent to 10=severe), included diarrhea (mean score=5.8), fatigue (mean score=5.5), and thirst (mean score=4.6). Spicy foods, cabbage, and citrus fruits (or juice) were most likely to decrease stool consistency, increase stool frequency, or cause perianal irritation. Onions, cabbage, or leeks were reported by 28% of the patients to cause flatulence. The urge to defecate was stronger after a cooked meal (45% within (1/2) hour) than after sandwiches (15% within (1/2) hour). Foods reported to increase stool consistency were potato products, bread, and bananas. This study demonstrates that food intolerance is a common, albeit mild, problem after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Food and nutrition professionals should encourage patients to base their food choices on individual tolerance as long as no (patho-) physiological-based evidence to the contrary is available. PMID:16963353

  17. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-03-16

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10-15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  18. FOOD INTOLERANCES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING FOBI-CAPELLA TECHNIQUE WITHOUT GASTRIC RING

    PubMed Central

    MOREIRA, Marcella de Arruda; ESPÍNOLA, Patrícia Ramos Maciel; de AZEVEDO, Camila Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is considered the only effective method to treat refractory obesity, and especially for those in which clinical treatment was not successful. However, the appearance of food intolerances and clinical manifestations are quite common. Aim To identify food intolerances and associated them to symptoms in patients undergoing Fobi-Capella technique without gastric ring. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of adult patients who had more than one year after surgery. Demographic, anthropometric, weight and preoperative height data were investigated. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization. It was considered food intolerance the presence of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloating after eating a particular food. Results The sample consisted of 61 patients who attended the nutritional consultation of which 26 (42.6%) had food intolerance, mostly related to red meat (n=12; 34.3%) during the first six months of operation; there was a significant difference between the periods between 0 and 6 months, and 7 to 12 (p=0.02). Among the symptoms reported by patients, nausea was the most recurrent until the 6th month, but without significant differences between the two periods (p=0.06). Conclusions The Fobi-Capella procedure without gastric ring promoted high frequency of intolerance to meat in general, especially for the red, chicken and fish, on this sequence; nausea was the most frequent symptom. These data suggest the need for adequate nutritional monitoring throughout the postoperative period. PMID:25861067

  19. Efficient ethanol production from glucose, lactose, and xylose by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alterthum, F; Ingram, L O

    1989-08-01

    Lactose and all of the major sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose) present in cellulose and hemicellulose were converted to ethanol by recombinant Escherichia coli containing plasmid-borne genes encoding the enzymes for the ethanol pathway from Zymomonas mobilis. Environmental tolerances, plasmid stability, expression of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase, substrate range, and ethanol production (from glucose, lactose, and xylose) were compared among eight American Type Culture Collection strains. E. coli ATCC 9637(pLO1297), ATCC 11303(pLO1297), and ATCC 15224(pLO1297) were selected for further development on the basis of environmental hardiness and ethanol production. Volumetric ethanol productivities per hour in batch culture were 1.4 g/liter for glucose (12%), 1.3 g/liter for lactose (12%), and 0.64 g/liter for xylose (8%). Ethanol productivities per hour ranged from 2.1 g/g of cell dry weight with 12% glucose to 1.3 g/g of cell dry weight with 8% xylose. The ethanol yield per gram of xylose was higher for recombinant E. coli than commonly reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae with glucose. Glucose (12%), lactose (12%), and xylose (8%) were converted to (by volume) 7.2% ethanol, 6.5% ethanol, and 5.2% ethanol, respectively. PMID:2675762

  20. Efficient ethanol production from glucose, lactose, and xylose by recombinant Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alterthum, F. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-08-01

    Lactose and all of the major sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose) present in cellulose and hemicellulose were converted to ethanol by recombinant Escherichia coli containing plasmid-borne genes encoding the enzymes for the ethanol pathway from Zymomonas mobilis. Environmental tolerances, plasmid stability, expression of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase, substrate range, and ethanol production (from glucose, lactose, and xylose) were compared among eight American Type Culture Collection strains. E. coli ATCC 9637(pLOI297), ATCC 11303(pLOI297), and ATCC 15224(pLOI297) were selected for further development on the basis of environmental hardiness and ethanol production. Volumetric ethanol productivities per hour in batch culture were 1.4 g/liter for glucose (12%), 1.3 g/liter for lactose (12%), and 0.64 g/liter for xylose (8%). Ethanol productivities per hour ranged from 2.1 g/g of cell dry weight with 12% glucose to 1.3 g/g of cell dry weight with 8% xylose. The ethanol yield per gram of xylose was higher for recombinant E. coli than commonly reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae with glucose. Glucose (12%), lactose (12%), and xylose (8%) were converted to (by volume) 7.2% ethanol, 6.5% ethanol, and 5.2% ethanol, respectively.

  1. Influence of solvents on the habit modification of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimaladevi, P.; Srinivasan, K.

    2013-02-01

    Restricted evaporation of solvent method was adopted for the growth of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals from different solvents. The crystal habits of grown crystals were analysed. The form of crystallization was confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction analysis. Thermal behaviour of the grown crystals was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry.

  2. Measurement of Enzyme Kinetics by Use of a Blood Glucometer: Hydrolysis of Sucrose and Lactose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinzerling, Peter; Schrader, Frank; Schanze, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    An alternative analytical method for measuring the kinetic parameters of the enzymes invertase and lactase is described. Invertase hydrolyzes sucrose to glucose and fructose and lactase hydrolyzes lactose to glucose and galactose. In most enzyme kinetics studies, photometric methods or test strips are used to quantify the derivates of the

  3. Effect of Lactose as a Prebiotic on Turkey Body Weight Under Commercial Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of a commercially available lactic acid bacteria (LAB) probiotic alone and supplemented with lactose as prebiotic, was evaluated for effects on turkey body weight during the brooding and grow out phases under commercial conditions in two experiments. Turkey poults were given the probioti...

  4. Measurement of Enzyme Kinetics by Use of a Blood Glucometer: Hydrolysis of Sucrose and Lactose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinzerling, Peter; Schrader, Frank; Schanze, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    An alternative analytical method for measuring the kinetic parameters of the enzymes invertase and lactase is described. Invertase hydrolyzes sucrose to glucose and fructose and lactase hydrolyzes lactose to glucose and galactose. In most enzyme kinetics studies, photometric methods or test strips are used to quantify the derivates of the…

  5. Lactose absorption in patients with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency with and without favism.

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, T; Colombo, C; Ogana, A; Mannazzu, M C; Meloni, G F

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has recently been suggested that primary lactase deficiency might have been selected for by malaria, as has been previously shown to occur for thalasaemia and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. AIMS: To test this hypothesis, the prevalence of primary lactase deficiency in G6PD deficient subjects and in controls from the area of Sassari (Northern Sardinia) was determined, which in the past was characterised by an intermediate malarial endemicity. SUBJECTS: 70 adult subjects with G6PD deficiency, 34 of whom had a past history of favism, and 50 age matched control subjects. METHODS: The capacity to absorb lactose was assessed by measuring breath hydrogen production after oral administration of lactose (50 g) by a gas chromatographic method. RESULTS: Twenty per cent of G6PD deficient subjects with a positive history of favism and 22% of G6PD deficient subjects without a positive history of favism were lactose absorbers compared with 14% lactose absorbers in the control group. The differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that the prevalence of primary lactase deficiency in the area of Sassari is relatively high, but comparable to that seen in the adult population from another area of southern Italy (Naples) where malaria was less endemic. PMID:8991858

  6. Hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate for subsequent fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Coté, A; Brown, W A; Cameron, D; van Walsum, G P

    2004-06-01

    Fermentation of lactose in whey permeate directly into ethanol has had only limited commercial success, as the yields and alcohol tolerances of the organisms capable of directly fermenting lactose are low. This study proposes an alternative strategy: treat the permeate with acid to liberate monomeric sugars that are readily fermented into ethanol. We identified optimum hydrolysis conditions that yield mostly monomeric sugars and limit formation of fermentation inhibitors such as hydroxymethyl furfural by caramelization reactions. Both lactose solutions and commercial whey permeates were hydrolyzed using inorganic acids and carbonic acid. In all cases, more glucose was consumed by secondary reactions than galactose. Galactose was recovered in approximately stoichiometric proportions. Whey permeate has substantial buffering capacity-even at high partial pressures (>5500 kPa[g]), carbon dioxide had little effect on the pH in whey permeate solutions. The elevated temperatures required for hydrolysis with CO2-generated inhibitory compounds through caramelization reactions. For these reasons, carbon dioxide was not a feasible acidulant. With mineral acids reversion reactions dominated, resulting in a stable amount of glucose released. However, the Maillard browning reactions also appeared to be involved. By applying Hammet's acidity function, kinetic data from all experiments were described by a single line. With concentrated inorganic acids, low reaction temperatures allowed lactose hydrolysis with minimal by-product formation and generated a hexose-rich solution amenable to fermentation. PMID:15453474

  7. Incorporation of acetaminophen as an active pharmaceutical ingredient into porous lactose.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amirali; Saffari, Morteza; Dehghani, Fariba; Langrish, Timothy

    2016-02-29

    A new formulation method for solid dosage forms with drug loadings from 0.65±0.03% to 39±1% (w/w) of acetaminophen (APAP) as a model drug has been presented. The proposed method involves the production of highly-porous lactose with a BET surface area of 20±1m(2)/g as an excipient using a templating method and the incorporation of drug into the porous structure by adsorption from a solution of the drug in ethanol. Drug deposition inside the carrier particles, rather than being physically distributed between them, eliminated the potential drug/carrier segregation, which resulted in excellent blend uniformities with relative standard deviations of less than 3.5% for all drug formulations. The results of DSC and XRD tests have shown deposition of nanocrystals of APAP inside the nanopores of lactose due the nanoconfinement phenomenon. FTIR spectroscopy has revealed no interaction between the adsorbed drug and the surface of lactose. The final loaded lactose particles had large BET surface areas and high porosities, which significantly increased the crushing strengths of the produced tablets. In vitro release studies in phosphate buffer (pH 5.8) have shown an acceptable delivery performance of 85% APAP release within 7minutes for loaded powders filled in gelatin capsules. PMID:26768724

  8. Blood pressure and plasma renin activity as predictors of orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.; Keil, L.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 3 h standing, followed by a period of head-up tilt (HUT) on physiological response (orthostatic tolerance, blood pressure and heart rate), as well as on plasma vasopressin (PVP) and renin activity (PRA) were studied in 13 dehydrated (to 2.4 pct loss of body weight) subjects. Seven subjects showed signs of orthostatic intolerance (INT), manifested by sweating, pallor, nausea and dizziness. Prior to these symptoms, the INT subjects exhibited lower systolic (SP) and pulse (PP) pressures, and an elevated PRA, compared to the tolerant (TOL) subjects. HUT has aggravated increases of RPA in the INT subjects and caused an increase, higher than in TOL subjects, in PVP, while rehydration has greatly attenuated the PVP response to the HUT and decreased the PRA response. It is concluded that dehydration, together with measurements of SP, PP and PRA, may serve as a means of predicting orthostatic intolerance and may provide a physiological model for studying the causes of intolerance.

  9. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  10. Effects of exercise and metformin on the prevention of glucose intolerance: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Molena-Fernandes, C; Bersani-Amado, C A; Ferraro, Z M; Hintze, L J; Nardo, N; Cuman, R K N

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training (4 days) and metformin exposure on acute glucose intolerance after dexamethasone treatment in rats. Forty-two adult male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided randomly into four groups: sedentary control (SCT), sedentary dexamethasone-treated (SDX), training dexamethasone-treated (DPE), and dexamethasone and metformin treated group (DMT). Glucose tolerance tests and in situ liver perfusion were undertaken on fasting rats to obtain glucose profiles. The DPE group displayed a significant decrease in glucose values compared with the SDX group. Average glucose levels in the DPE group did not differ from those of the DMT group, so we suggest that exercise training corrects dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and improves glucose profiles in a similar manner to that observed with metformin. These data suggest that exercise may prevent the development of glucose intolerance induced by dexamethasone in rats to a similar magnitude to that observed after metformin treatment. PMID:26421869

  11. Genetic difference in HLA-DR phenotypes between coeliac disease and transitory gluten intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Meuli, R; Pichler, W J; Gaze, H; Lentze, M J

    1995-01-01

    Genetic differences in HLA phenotypes were studied in coeliac disease to investigate why some patients do not react with mucosal damage after gluten challenge. Forty five children with coeliac disease and 16 with transitory gluten intolerance were typed; 76 subjects served as controls. HLA phenotypes in children with coeliac disease had significantly higher proportions of DR3/X and DR5/7 than controls (48.8% v 11.8% and 26.7% v 5.3%). Children with transitory gluten intolerance had lower DR3/X (43.8%) than children with coeliac disease and there were no DR5/7 phenotypes. Further analysis of similarly well defined cases might show whether genetic differences in the DR3/X and DR5/7 phenotypes can serve as a marker for the permanence of gluten intolerance. PMID:7717732

  12. Use of Mycophenolate Mofetil in Patients with Severe Localized Scleroderma Resistant or Intolerant to Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jorre S; Marsman, Diane; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Knaapen, Hanneke K A; Radstake, Timothy R D; de Jong, Elke M G J; Seyger, Marieke M B

    2016-04-12

    To assess the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with localized scleroderma (LoS) resistant or intolerant to previous treatment with methotrexate (MTX). A case series of patients with LoS treated with MMF. Outcome was assessed through clinical examination. Adverse events were documented. Seven patients with LoS were treated with MMF. Median age at MMF initiation was 15 years (range 7-74 years). Three patients received MMF due to MTX ineffectiveness and 4 due to MTX intolerance. Disease remission was achieved in 4 patients and maintained in one patient. One patient showed a favourable response, but had to discontinue treatment due to elevated liver enzymes. The remaining patient experienced disease progression. MMF was shown to improve the clinical condition of patients with refractory LoS and may be a relatively safe alternative in patients who are intolerant to MTX. PMID:26582717

  13. Odor and Noise Intolerance in Persons with Self-Reported Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Steven; Neely, Gregory; Olsson, David; Sandström, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Lack of confirmation of symptoms attributed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and triggered by EMF exposure has highlighted the role of individual factors. Prior observations indicate intolerance to other types of environmental exposures among persons with electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). This study assessed differences in odor and noise intolerance between persons with EHS and healthy controls by use of subscales and global measures of the Chemical Sensitivity Scale (CSS) and the Noise Sensitivity Scale (NSS). The EHS group scored significantly higher than the controls on all CSS and NSS scales. Correlation coefficients between CSS and NSS scores ranged from 0.60 to 0.65 across measures. The findings suggest an association between EHS and odor and noise intolerance, encouraging further investigation of individual factors for understanding EMF-related symptoms. PMID:25166918

  14. Effects of exercise and metformin on the prevention of glucose intolerance: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Molena-Fernandes, C.; Bersani-Amado, C. A.; Ferraro, Z. M.; Hintze, L. J.; Nardo, N.; Cuman, R. K. N.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training (4 days) and metformin exposure on acute glucose intolerance after dexamethasone treatment in rats. Forty-two adult male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided randomly into four groups: sedentary control (SCT), sedentary dexamethasone-treated (SDX), training dexamethasone-treated (DPE), and dexamethasone and metformin treated group (DMT). Glucose tolerance tests and in situ liver perfusion were undertaken on fasting rats to obtain glucose profiles. The DPE group displayed a significant decrease in glucose values compared with the SDX group. Average glucose levels in the DPE group did not differ from those of the DMT group, so we suggest that exercise training corrects dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and improves glucose profiles in a similar manner to that observed with metformin. These data suggest that exercise may prevent the development of glucose intolerance induced by dexamethasone in rats to a similar magnitude to that observed after metformin treatment. PMID:26421869

  15. Orthostatic intolerance and the postural tachycardia syndrome: genetic and environment pathophysiologies. Neurolab Autonomic Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A. C.; Diedrich, A.; Carson, R.; Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a common problem for inbound space travelers. There is usually tachycardia on standing but blood pressure may be normal, low or, rarely, elevated. This condition is analogous to the orthostatic intolerance that occurs on Earth in individuals with orthostatic tachycardia, palpitations, mitral valve prolapse, and light-headedness. Our studies during the Neurolab mission indicated that sympathetic nerve traffic is raised in microgravity and that plasma norepinephrine is higher than baseline supine levels but lower than baseline upright levels. A subgroup of patients with familial orthostatic intolerance differ from inbound space travelers in that they have an alanine-to-to-proline mutation at amino acid position 457 in their norepinephrine transporter gene. This leads to poor clearance of norepinephrine from synapses, with consequent raised heart rate. Clinical features of these syndromes are presented.

  16. Assessment of the inhibition of ricin toxicity by lactose in milk.

    PubMed

    Lumor, Stephen E; Deen, Bronwyn D; Ronningen, Ian; Smith, Kenneth; Fredrickson, Neal R; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Labuza, Theodore P

    2013-12-01

    The effect of lactose at the concentration typically found in milk (134 mM) on the ability of ricin to inhibit protein synthesis in HeLa cells was studied. Ricin (0.001 to 300 μg/ml) that was either not treated or treated with 134 mM lactose was added to test tubes containing 1 ml of HeLa cells (approximately 3 × 10(5) cells in a low-leucine medium). After 2 h of incubation at 37°C, 0.5 μCi of L-[U-(14)C]-leucine was added to each tube and incubated for another 60 min. The cells were harvested by centrifugation and lysed, and cellular proteins were separated. The amount of radioactivity incorporated into the proteins was determined by liquid scintillation. The biological activity of ricin, i. e., the amount of radioactivity in a sample relative to that of the control (cells not treated with ricin), was calculated for each treatment. The inhibitory effect of 134 mM lactose on the biological activity of ricin was only significant at concentrations of ricin below 1 μg/ml. At higher ricin concentrations, the effect of 134 mM lactose decreased as the concentration of ricin increased, resulting in an increase in the inhibition of proteins synthesis. Our results also indicated that bovine milk, when used in place of 134 mM lactose, was more effective for reducing the activity of ricin at concentrations below 1 μg/ml but was ineffective against ricin concentrations greater than 1 μg/ml. These results suggest that milk may not protect against ricin intoxication at the concentration (0.89 μg/ml) equivalent to the lowest limit of its 50 % lethal dose for a 20-kg child consuming 225 ml (8 oz) of milk. PMID:24290678

  17. An integrated amperometric biosensor for the determination of lactose in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Conzuelo, F; Gamella, M; Campuzano, S; Ruiz, M A; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2010-06-23

    An integrated amperometric biosensor for the determination of lactose is reported. The bioelectrode design is based on the use of a 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified gold electrode on which the enzymes beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal), glucose oxidase (GOD), peroxidase (HRP) and the mediator tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) are coimmobilized by a dialysis membrane. beta-Gal catalyzes the hydrolysis of lactose, and the produced glucose is catalytically oxidized to gluconic acid and H(2)O(2), which is reduced in the presence of HRP. This enzyme reaction is mediated by TTF, and the reduction of TTF(+) at 0.00 V (vs Ag/AgCl) gives rise to an amperometric signal proportional to the lactose concentration. The biosensor exhibits a good repeatability of the measurement carried out with the same biosensor, a good reproducibility of the responses obtained with different biosensors and a useful lifetime of 28 days. A linear calibration plot was obtained for lactose over the 1.5 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-4) M concentration range, with a limit of detection of 4.6 x 10(-7) M. The effect of potential interferents (sucrose, lactulose, fructose, arabinose, maltose, galactose, glucose and uric and ascorbic acids) on the biosensor response was evaluated. Furthermore, the bioelectrode exhibits a suitable performance in flow-injection systems in connection with amperometric detection. The developed biosensor was applied to the determination of lactose in milk and other foodstuffs (chocolate, butter, margarine, yogurt, cheese and mayonnaise), and the results obtained were validated by comparison with those provided by using a commercial enzyme test kit. PMID:20509693

  18. Simulation of roller compaction with subsequent tableting and characterization of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hein, Stephanie; Picker-Freyer, Katharina M; Langridge, John

    2008-01-01

    Tablets are by far the most common solid oral dosage forms, and many drugs need to be granulated before they can be tableted. Increasingly roller compaction is being used as a dry granulation technique; however it is a very time and material intensive method. Thus some mini roller compactors and simulations of the roller compaction process have been developed as a means of studying the technique at small scale. An important factor in the selection of materials for roller compaction is their ability to be recompressed into tablets after the initial roller compaction and milling steps. In this paper the roller compaction process was simulated on the basis of some models by Gereg and Cappola (2002) and Zinchuk et al. (2004). An eccentric tableting machine was used to make compacts from alpha-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous beta-lactose, spray-dried lactose and microcrystalline cellulose at different maximum relative densities (rho rel,max 0.6-0.9). These compacts were milled immediately to granules with a rotary granulator. The properties of the granules were analyzed and compared to the properties of the original powders. These granules and powders were then tableted at different maximum relative densities (rho rel,max 0.75-0.95) and their properties including elastic recovery, crushing force and 3D-model were analyzed. The properties of the tablets made from the granules were compared to the properties of the tablets made from the powders to determine which excipients are most suitable for the roller compaction process. The study showed that anhydrous beta-lactose is the preferred form of lactose for use in roller compaction since compaction did not affect tablet crushing force to a large extent. With the simulation of roller compaction process one is able to find qualified materials for use in roller compaction without the necessity of a great deal of material and time. PMID:18728996

  19. Anemia amelioration by lactose infusion during trypanosomosis could be associated with erythrocytes membrane de-galactosylation.

    PubMed

    Balogun, E O; Balogun, J B; Yusuf, S; Inuwa, H M; Ndams, I S; Sheridan, P; Inaoka, D K; Shiba, T; Harada, S; Kita, K; Esievo, K A N; Nok, A J

    2014-01-31

    African trypanosomosis is a potentially fatal disease that is caused by extracellular parasitic protists known as African trypanosomes. These parasites inhabit the blood stream of their mammalian hosts and produce a number of pathological features, amongst which is anemia. Etiology of the anemia has been partly attributed to an autoimmunity-like mediated erythrophagocytosis of de-sialylated red blood cells (dsRBCs) by macrophages. Lactose infusion to infected animals has proven effective at delaying progression of the anemia. However, the mechanism of this anemia prevention is yet to be well characterized. Here, the hypothesis of a likely induced further modification of the dsRBCs was investigated. RBC membrane galactose (RBC m-GAL) and packed cell volume (PCV) were measured during the course of experimental trypanosomosis in mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense (stb 212). Intriguingly, while the membrane galactose on the RBCs of infected and lactose-treated mice (group D) decreased as a function of parasitemia, that of the lactose-untreated infected group (group C) remained relatively constant, as was recorded for the uninfected lactose-treated control (group B) animals. At the peak of infection, the respective cumulative percent decrease in PCV and membrane galactose were 30 and 185 for group D, and 84 and 13 for group C. From this observed inverse relationship between RBCs membrane galactose and PCV, it is logical to rationalize that the delay of anemia progression during trypanosomosis produced by lactose might have resulted from an induction of galactose depletion from dsRBCs, thereby preventing their recognition by the macrophages. PMID:24238624

  20. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can I get enough calcium? If you're lactose intolerant, it can be hard to get enough calcium. Lactose is the sugar that is found in dairy products like milk. Lactose intolerance means your body has a hard time ...

  1. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cookies or graham crackers. If You're Lactose Intolerant Teens who are lactose intolerant don't have enough of the intestinal enzyme lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, ...

  2. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be avoiding dairy products because of lactose intolerance. Or you might have other reasons. But ... the major reasons people avoid dairy products is lactose intolerance. Lactose is a natural sugar found in ...

  3. Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenile osteoporosis. Osteoporosis in children and adolescents. ^ top Lactose intolerance. Inability to digest lactose, the natural sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Individuals with lactose intolerance who avoid dairy products may be at increased ...

  4. Effects of Topical Fucosyl-Lactose, a Milk Oligosaccharide, on Dry Eye Model: An Example of Nutraceutical Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Bucolo, Claudio; Musumeci, Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Romano, Giovanni Luca; Leggio, Gian Marco; Gagliano, Caterina; Reibaldi, Michele; Avitabile, Teresio; Uva, Maurizio G.; Musumeci, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colostrum has been proposed to treat severe dryness and problematic eye lesions showing a beneficial effect. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 2-fucosyl-lactose, a natural sugar present in the human colostrum, in an experimental dry eye. Methods: Dry eye was induced in adult male New Zealand albino rabbits by topical administration of 1% atropine. Tear volume (Schirmer’s test), tear film breakup time (TBUT), corneal staining and tear osmolarity were assessed. Fucosyl-lactose eye drops was instilled at different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and, 1%). Results: After 24 h from first atropine administration, tear volume and TBUT values were significantly improved in groups treated with 2-fucosyl-lactose in a dose-dependent manner. Tear volume increased from 5.25 to 10.75 mm and TBUT values from 8.75 to 34.5 s with 0.01% or 1% 2-fucosyl-lactose treatment, respectively. No changes were observed in terms of corneal staining among the all groups treated with 2-fucosyl-lactose. Atropine instillation caused an increase of tear osmolarity (428 mOsm/L), which was reversed by topical treatment with 2-fucosyl-lactose at all doses. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 2-fucosyl-lactose, a human milk oligosaccharide, has protective effect on tear film stability. PMID:26635610

  5. Additional Value of CH4 Measurement in a Combined 13C/H2 Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined 13C/H2 lactose breath test that measures breath 13CO2 as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H2 and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 13C/H2 lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH4 in addition to H2 and 13CO2. Based on the 13C/H2 breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH4 further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H2-excretion were found to excrete CH4. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH4-concentrations has an added value to the 13C/H2 breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  6. Membrane fractionation processes for removing 90% to 95% of the lactose and sodium from skim milk and for preparing lactose and sodium-reduced skim milk.

    PubMed

    Morr, C V; Brandon, S C

    2008-11-01

    Pilot-scale microfiltration (MF), microfiltration-diafiltration (MDF), ultrafiltration (UF), ultrafiltration-diafiltration (UDF), and nanofilration (NF) membrane fractionation processes were designed and evaluated for removing 90% to 95% of the lactose and sodium from skim milk. The study was designed to evaluate several membrane fractionation schemes as a function of: (1) membrane types with and without diafiltration; (2) fractionation process temperatures ranging from 17 to 45 degrees C; (3) sources of commercial drinking water used as diafiltrant; and (4) final mass concentration ratios (MCR) ranging from about 2 to 5. MF and MDF membranes provided highest flux values, but were unsatisfactory because they failed to retain all of the whey proteins. UDF fractionation processes removed more than 90% to 95% of the lactose and sodium from skim milk. NF permeate prepared from UDF cumulative permeate contained sodium and other mineral concentrations that would make them unsuitable for use as a diafiltrant for UDF applications. A method was devised for preparing simulated milk permeate (SMP) formulated with calcium, magnesium, and potassium hydroxides, and phosphoric and citric acids for use as UDF diafiltrant or for preparing lactose and sodium reduced skim milk (L-RSM). MF retentates with MCR values of 4.7 to 5.0 exhibited extremely poor frozen storage stabilities of less than 1 wk at -20 degrees C, whereas MCR 1.77 to 2.95 MDF and UDF retentates and skim milk control exhibited frozen storage stabilities of more than 16 wk. L-RSM exhibited a whiter appearance and a lower viscosity than skim milk, lacked natural milk flavor, and exhibited a metallic off-flavor. PMID:19021794

  7. Long-term Patency of Primary Arterial Repair and the Modified Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Lannau, Bernd; Bliley, Jacqueline; James, Isaac B.; Wang, Sheri; Sivak, Wesley; Kim, Kang; Fowler, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to assess the long-term arterial patency of repaired arteries in the upper extremity and any morbidity resulting from the subsequent occlusion of these vessels. Concurrently, a new questionnaire, the modified Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity (mod CISS) questionnaire, was developed to allow for better assessment of cold intolerance. Methods: Thirteen patients who had undergone repair of the radial (4 patients), ulnar (6 patients), brachial (1 patient), digital (1), and an undefined lower arm artery (1) were examined using questionnaires, physical examination, and high-resolution ultrasound. Results: Outcome measures that were statistically significantly worse in the group of patients who presented with nerve injuries included cold intolerance symptoms, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score, Michigan Hand Questionnaire, and grip strength (middle setting on dynamometer). The results from the mod CISS correlated with high statistical significance with the results of the CISS score for the injured hand. Of note, wrist extension was significantly better with patent arteries. Conclusions: Sixty-seven percent of arterial repairs remained patent at 6 years (mean) follow-up. The presence of nerve injury has a higher impact on the outcome metrics assessed in this study than arterial patency. Our modification of the CISS score enhances its utility as a survey of cold intolerance. PMID:26893976

  8. Do Metacognitions and Intolerance of Uncertainty Predict Worry in Everyday Life? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Thielsch, Carolin; Andor, Tanja; Ehring, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) suggest that excessive worry is due to positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and/or intolerance of uncertainty. Empirical support mainly derives from cross-sectional studies with limited conclusiveness, using self-report measures and thereby possibly causing recall biases. The aim of the present study therefore was to examine the power of these cognitive variables to predict levels of worry in everyday life using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). Metacognitions and intolerance of uncertainty were assessed using well-established self-report questionnaires in 41 nonclinical participants who subsequently completed ratings on worry intensity and burden on a portable device for 1week at seven times a day once every 2hours. Results showed significant associations of negative metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty, but not positive metacognitive beliefs, with worry in everyday life. In multilevel regression analyses, a substantial proportion of variance of everyday worry could be accounted for by negative metacognitions over and above trait worry and daily hassles. Intolerance of uncertainty likewise emerged as a valid predictor when tested in isolation, but did not explain additional variance once negative metacognitions were controlled. The findings support current cognitive models of excessive worry and highlight the role of negative metacognitions. By using EMA to assess levels of worry in everyday life, they extend earlier findings focusing exclusively on retrospective questionnaire measures. PMID:26163716

  9. Autogenic-feedback training: A potential treatment for post-flight orthostatic intolerance in aerospace crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Miller, Neil E.; Pickering, Thomas G.; Shapiro, David

    1993-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance was identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority was given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder which are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine (15-30 training sessions). At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures that the subjects made, ranged between 20 and 5O mmHg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings suggest that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Further, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  10. Does Homeschooling or Private Schooling Promote Political Intolerance? Evidence from a Christian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Political tolerance is the willingness to extend civil liberties to people who hold views with which one disagrees. Some have claimed that private schooling and homeschooling are institutions that propagate political intolerance by fostering separatism and an unwillingness to consider alternative viewpoints. I empirically test this claim by…

  11. Genetic disruption of SOD1 gene causes glucose intolerance and impairs β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Salmon, Adam B; Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Li, Mengyao; Balas, Bogdan; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Giaccari, Andrea; Reddick, Robert L; Reyna, Sara M; Weir, Gordon; Defronzo, Ralph A; Van Remmen, Holly; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, it is not clear whether oxidative damage is a cause or a consequence of the metabolic abnormalities present in diabetic subjects. The goal of this study was to determine whether inducing oxidative damage through genetic ablation of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) leads to abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. We studied SOD1-null mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Glucose tolerance was evaluated with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was quantitated with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. β-Cell function was determined with the hyperglycemic clamp and morphometric analysis of pancreatic islets. Genetic ablation of SOD1 caused glucose intolerance, which was associated with reduced in vivo β-cell insulin secretion and decreased β-cell volume. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not significantly altered in SOD1-null mice. High-fat diet caused glucose intolerance in WT mice but did not further worsen the glucose intolerance observed in standard chow-fed SOD1-null mice. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress per se does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and demonstrate that oxidative stress caused by SOD1 ablation leads to glucose intolerance secondary to β-cell dysfunction. PMID:24009256

  12. Autogenic-feedback training: a potential treatment for orthostatic intolerance in aerospace crews.

    PubMed

    Cowings, P S; Toscano, W B; Miller, N E; Pickering, T G; Shapiro, D; Stevenson, J; Maloney, S; Knapp, J

    1994-06-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance has been identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder that are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research has demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily, and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The current pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, autogenic-feedback training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine training (15-30-minute) sessions. At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures, that the subjects made ranged between 20 and 50 mm Hg under both supine and 45 degrees head-up tilt conditions. These findings indicate that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance. PMID:8083391

  13. Autogenic-Feedback Training: A Potential Treatment for Orthostatic Intolerance in Aerospace Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Miller, N. E.; Pickering, T. G.; Shapiro, D.; Stevenson, J.; Maloney, S.; Knapp, J.

    1994-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance has been identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder that are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research has demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily, and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The current pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, autogenic-feedback training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine training (15-30-minute) sessions. At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures, that the subjects made ranged between 20 and 50 mm Hg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings indicate that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  15. Student Engagement for College Students with the Hidden Disability of Orthostatic Intolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabin, Beverly Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This study described the factors that contribute to engagement patterns of college students with the hidden health-related disability of orthostatic intolerance. Specifically, it used a qualitative methodology and collective-case study design to explore the categories of campus physical, institutional, academic and social engagement from a student…

  16. Culture Change from Tobacco Accommodation to Intolerance: Time to Connect the Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingood, William C., Jr.; Allegrante, John P.; Green, Lawrence W.

    2016-01-01

    Broad changes in normative health behavior are critical to overcoming many of the contemporary challenges to public health. Reduction in tobacco use during the last third of the 20th century--one of the greatest improvements in public health--illustrates such change. The culture change from accommodation to intolerance of smoking is irrefutable.…

  17. Sarcopenic obesity and the pathogenesis of exercise intolerance in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Bharathi; Haykowsky, Mark J; Eggebeen, Joel; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2015-06-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the most common form of heart failure (HF) in older adults. The primary chronic symptom in patients with HFpEF, even when well compensated, is severe exercise intolerance. Cardiac and peripheral functions contribute equally to exercise intolerance in HFpEF, though the latter has been the focus of fewer studies. Of note, multiple studies with exercise training have shown that exercise intolerance can improve significantly in the absence of improvements in exercise cardiac output, indicating a role of peripheral, noncardiac adaptations. In addition, clinical drug trials performed to date in HFpEF, all of which have focused on influencing cardiovascular function, have not been positive on primary clinical outcomes and most have not improved exercise capacity. Mounting evidence indicates that sarcopenic obesity, characterized by the coexistence of excess fat mass and decreased muscle mass, could contribute to the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in older HFpEF patients and may provide avenues for novel treatments. PMID:25750186

  18. Approaches to determine the enthalpy of crystallisation, and amorphous content, of lactose from isothermal calorimetric data.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Sarah E; Buckton, Graham; Gaisford, Simon; Ramos, Rita

    2004-10-13

    Amorphous lactose will crystallise rapidly if its glass transition temperature is reduced below its storage temperature. This is readily achieved by storing samples at ambient temperature and a relative humidity (RH) of greater than 50%. If the sample is monitored in an isothermal microcalorimeter as it crystallises, the heat changes associated with the event can be measured; indeed this is one of the methods used to quantify the amorphous content of powders and formulations. However, variations in the calculation methods used to determine these heat changes have led to discrepancies in the values reported in the literature and frequently make comparison of data from different sources difficult. Data analysis and peak integration software allow the selection and integration of specific areas of complex traces with great reproducibility; this has led to the observation that previously ignored artefacts are in fact of sufficient magnitude to affect calculated enthalpies. In this work a number of integration methodologies have been applied to the analysis of amorphous spray-dried lactose, crystallised under 53 or 75% RH at 25 degrees C. The data allowed the selection of a standard methodology from which reproducible heat changes could be determined. The method was subsequently applied to the analysis of partially amorphous lactose samples (containing 1-100% (w/w) amorphous content) allowing the quantification limit of the technique to be established. It was found that the best approach for obtaining reproducible results was (i) to crystallise under an RH of 53%, because this slowed the crystallisation response allowing better experimental measurement and (ii) to integrate all the events occurring in the ampoule, rather than trying to select only that region corresponding to crystallisation, since it became clear that the processes occurring in the cell overlapped and could not be deconvoluted. The technique was able to detect amorphous contents as low as 1% (w/w), using this integration strategy, although it was observed that the calibration plot constructed showed a negative deviation from linearity. It is suggested that such non-ideal behaviour results from the formation of varying ratios of alpha-lactose monohydrate, anhydrous alpha-lactose and anhydrous beta-lactose. PMID:15454300

  19. Distribution of Vibrio vulnificus and Other Lactose-Fermenting Vibrios in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, James D.; Warner, Robert A.; Cleland, David R.

    1983-01-01

    During the summer of 1981, 3,887 sucrose-negative vibrios were isolated from seawater, sediment, plankton, and animal samples taken from 80 sites from Miami, Fla., to Portland, Maine. Of these, 4.2% were able to ferment lactose. The lactose-positive strains isolated from the various samples correlated positively with pH and turbidity of the water, vibrios in the sediment and oysters, and total bacterial counts in oysters. Negative correlations were obtained for water salinity. Numerical taxonomy was performed on 95 of the lactose-fermenting environmental isolates and 23 reference strains. Five clusters resulted, with the major cluster containing 33 of the environmental isolates and all of the Vibrio vulnificus reference strains. The 33 isolates, which produced an acid reaction in lactose broth within hours of initial inoculation, represented 20% of all lactose-fermenting vibrios studied. These isolates were nearly identical phenotypically to clinical strains of V. vulnificus studied by the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., and by our laboratory, and their identification was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization studies. V. vulnificus was isolated from all sample types and from Miami to Cape Cod, Mass., and comparison of the environmental parameters of the eight subsites yielding this species with those of all 80 subsites revealed no significant differences. The majority of the isolates were obtained from animals, with clams providing most (84%) of these. On injection into mice, 82% of the V. vulnificus isolates resulted in death. Members of the remaining four clusters contained strains which differed from V. vulnificus in such phenotypic traits as luminescence and in urease or H2S production. None of the other reference cultures, including nine other Vibrio species, were contained in the remaining clusters, and these isolates could not be identified. Most of these were also lethal for mice. Phenotypic differences, potential pathogenicity, and geographic distribution of the five clusters were examined. It is concluded that V. vulnificus is a ubiquitous organism, both geographically and in a variety of environmental sources, although it occurs in relatively low numbers. The public health significance of this organism and of the other unidentified lactose-fermenting Vibrio species is discussed. PMID:6847190

  20. Intermittent hypoxia-induced glucose intolerance is abolished by ?-adrenergic blockade or adrenal medullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Devera, Ronald; Yao, Qiaoling; Mesarwi, Omar; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep and is associated with dysregulation of glucose metabolism. We developed a novel model of clinically realistic IH in mice to test the hypothesis that IH causes hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance via activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Mice were exposed to acute hypoxia of graded severity (21, 14, 10, and 7% O2) or to IH of graded frequency [oxygen desaturation index (ODI) of 0, 15, 30, or 60, SpO2 nadir 80%] for 30 min to measure levels of glucose fatty acids, glycerol, insulin, and lactate. Glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests were then performed under each hypoxia condition. Next, we examined these outcomes in mice that were administered phentolamine (?-adrenergic blockade) or propranolol (?-adrenergic blockade) or that underwent adrenal medullectomy before IH exposure. In all experiments, mice were maintained in a thermoneutral environment. Sustained and IH induced hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in a dose-dependent fashion. Only severe hypoxia (7% O2) increased lactate, and only frequent IH (ODI 60) increased plasma fatty acids. Phentolamine or adrenal medullectomy both prevented IH-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. IH inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and phentolamine prevented the inhibition. Propranolol had no effect on glucose metabolism but abolished IH-induced lipolysis. IH-induced insulin resistance was not affected by any intervention. Acutely hypoxia causes hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in a dose-dependent manner. During IH, circulating catecholamines act upon ?-adrenoreceptors to cause hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. PMID:25315697

  1. Genealogical analysis as a new approach for the investigation of drug intolerance heritability.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marc; Bouhali, Tarek; Gaudet, Daniel; Brisson, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Genealogical analysis has proven a useful method to understand the origins and frequencies of hereditary diseases in many populations. However, this type of analysis has not yet been used for the investigation of drug intolerance among patients suffering from inherited disorders. This study aims to do so, using data from familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients receiving high doses of statins. The objective is to measure and compare various genealogical parameters that could shed light on the origins and heritability of muscular intolerance to statins using FH as a model. Analysis was performed on 224 genealogies from 112 FH subjects carrying either the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) prom_e1 deletion>15?kb (n=28) or c.259T>G (p.Trp87Gly) (n=84) mutations and 112 non-FH controls. Number of ancestors, geographical origins and genetic contribution of founders, inbreeding and kinship coefficients were calculated using the S-Plus-based GENLIB software package. For both mutations, repeated occurrences of the same ancestors are more frequent among the carriers' genealogies than among the controls', but no difference was observed between tolerant and intolerant subjects. Founders who may have introduced both mutations in the population appear with approximately the same frequencies in all genealogies. Kinship coefficients are higher among carriers, with no difference according to statins tolerance. Inbreeding coefficients are slightly lower among >15-kb deletion carriers than among c.259?T>G carriers, but the differences between tolerants and intolerants are not significant. These findings suggest that although muscular intolerance to statins shows a family aggregation, it is not transmitted through the same Mendelian pattern as LDLR mutations. PMID:24281370

  2. Frequency and prognostic value of resistance/intolerance to hydroxycarbamide in 890 patients with polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Kerguelen, Ana; Hernández-Boluda, Juan C; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; Bárez, Abelardo; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Cuevas, Beatriz; Mata, M Isabel; García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Aragües, Pilar; Montesdeoca, Sara; Burgaleta, Carmen; Caballero, Gonzalo; Hernández-Rivas, J Angel; Durán, M Antonia; Gómez-Casares, M Teresa; Besses, Carles

    2016-03-01

    The clinical significance of resistance/intolerance to hydroxycarbamide (HC) was assessed in a series of 890 patients with polycythaemia vera (PV). Resistance/intolerance to HC was recorded in 137 patients (15·4%), consisting of: need for phlebotomies (3·3%), uncontrolled myeloproliferation (1·6%), failure to reduce massive splenomegaly (0·8%), development of cytopenia at the lowest dose of HC to achieve a response (1·7%) and extra-haematological toxicity (9%). With a median follow-up of 4·6 years, 99 patients died, resulting in a median survival of 19 years. Fulfilling any of the resistance/intolerance criteria had no impact on survival but when the different criteria were individually assessed, an increased risk of death was observed in patients developing cytopenia [Hazard ratio (HR): 3·5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·5-8·3, P = 0·003]. Resistance/intolerance had no impact in the rate of thrombosis or bleeding. Risk of myelofibrotic transformation was significantly higher in those patients developing cytopenia (HR: 5·1, 95% CI: 1·9-13·7, P = 0·001) and massive splenomegaly (HR: 9·1, 95% CI: 2·3-35·9, P = 0·002). Cytopenia at the lowest dose required to achieve a response was also an independent risk factor for transformation to acute leukaemia (HR: 20·3, 95% CI: 5·4-76·5, P < 0·001). In conclusion, the unified definition of resistance/intolerance to HC delineates a heterogeneous group of PV patients, with those developing cytopenia being associated with an adverse outcome. PMID:26898196

  3. Are food intolerances and allergies increasing in immigrant children coming from developing countries ?

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Francesco; Accomando, Salvatore; Fragapane, Maria L; Montaperto, Daniela

    2006-08-01

    There are not available data concerning the occurrence, the clinical features and the environmental risk factors for food intolerances and allergies in immigrant children. The aim of the study was to evaluate rates, distribution, clinical features and environmental risk factors for food intolerances and allergies in immigrant children. Hospital records of 4,130 patients with celiac disease (CD), cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) and food allergies (FA) diagnosed in 24 Italian Centres from 1999 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed, comparing immigrant patients with Italian ones. 78/4,130 (1.9%) patients were immigrant: 36/1,917 (1.9%) had CD, 24/1,370 (1.75%) CMPI and 18/843 (2.1%) FA. They were evenly distributed across Italy and their native areas were: East Europe (23/78), Northern Africa (23/78), Southern Asia (14/78), Saharan and Sub-Saharan Africa (9/78), Southern America (4/78), Far East (3/7), Middle East (2/78). Despite differences in their origin, the clinical features of immigrant children were similar to the ones of Italian patients and among each ethnic group. The majority of them were born in Italy (57/78) or have been residing in Italy since several years (19/78). All of them had lost dietary habits of the native countries and had acquired those of the Italian childhood population. Food intolerances and allergies are present also in children coming from developing countries, and paediatricians will need to have a full awareness of them because the number of immigrant children in Italy is quickly increasing. The clinical features of food intolerances and allergies appear the same in each ethnic group, despite differences in races. Sharing of dietary habits with the Italian childhood population seems to be an important environmental risk factor. PMID:16846455

  4. Failure of lactose-restricted diets to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients undergoing whole pelvis irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.

    1986-05-01

    Sixty-four patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy into one of three dietary groups: the control group maintained a regular diet except that they drank at least 480 cc of milk daily; the lactose-restricted group was placed on a lactose-restricted diet; and the lactase group drank at least 480 cc of milk with lactase enzyme added to hydrolyze 90% of the lactose. The patients kept records of their stool frequency and the number of diphenoxylate tablets required to control their diarrhea during a 5 week course of standard whole pelvis irradiation. The data does not support the concept that one of the mechanisms of radiation-induced diarrhea associated with pelvic irradiation is a reduction the ability of the intestine to hydrolyze ingested lactose due to the effect of the radiation on the small intestine. There was not a significant difference in stool frequency or diphenoxylate usage among the dietary groups.

  5. Working with Enzymes - Where Is Lactose Digested? An Enzyme Assay for Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Sandi R.; Tolleson, Tonya D.; Williams, R. Jill; Underhill, Russell D.; Deal, S. Todd

    1998-06-01

    At Georgia Southern University, we offer a sophomore-level introductory biochemistry course that is aimed at nutrition and chemistry education majors. The laboratory portion of this course has long lacked an experimental introduction to enzymes. We have developed a simple enzyme assay utilizing lactase enzyme from crushed LactAid tablets and a 5% lactose solution ("synthetic milk"). In the experiment, the students assay the activity of the enzyme on the "synthetic milk" at pHs of approximately 1, 6, and 8 with the stated goal of determining where lactose functions in the digestive tract. The activity of the lactase may be followed chromatographically or spectrophotometrically. The experiment, which is actually a simple pH assay, is easily implemented in allied health chemistry laboratory courses and readily lends itself to adaptation for more complex kinetic assays in upper-level biochemistry laboratory courses. The experimental details, including a list of required supplies and hints for implementation, are provided.

  6. Influence of lactose on the diffusion of calcium ions at physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Luis M P; Ribeiro, Vânia C M; Ribeiro, Ana C F; Melia Rodrigo, M; Esteso, Miguel A

    2014-11-15

    Mutual diffusion coefficients for calcium chloride (0.100 mol dm(-3)) in aqueous solutions containing lactose at various concentrations (from 0.005 to 0.200 mol dm(-3)) have been measured at 37°C (physiological temperature), by using a conductimetric cell coupled to an automatic system to follow the diffusion. This cell uses an open-ended capillary method based on the measurement of the electrical resistance of a solution placed inside the capillaries at recorded times. The analysis of the CaCl2 diffusion coefficient values obtained suggests the presence of some CaCl2/lactose aggregates in the media, which are influenced by the temperature. PMID:24912727

  7. Crystal growth mechanisms of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    The growth rates of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystals were measured at 30, 40 and 50 °C in the relative supersaturation range 0.55-2.33 in aqueous solutions. The mechanisms of growth were investigated. Spiral growth was found to be the mechanism of growth up to a critical relative supersaturation ( s-1) crit=1.9 at 30 °C. Above the critical relative supersaturation, the crystal growth mechanisms were predicted to change. All growth models fit equally well to the growth rates. No two-dimensional nucleation was observed above critical supersaturation by AFM. On the other hand increased step height and roughness on the edges of steps were observed. It was concluded that the growth mechanism of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystal is spiral growth. A parabolic relationship was obtained below critical supersaturation followed by a linear relationship with relative supersaturation.

  8. Nucleation of Alpha lactose monohydrate induced using flow through a venturi orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, J. S.; Paterson, A. H. J.; Bronlund, J. E.; Jones, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    Nucleation is a determinant of the final crystal size distribution produced during a crystallization process. Other studies in the literature have shown that mixing influences alpha lactose monohydrate nucleation. To investigate this in more detail, three different sized Venturi orifices were used to provide a point of passive mixing for supersaturated lactose solutions. This system allowed the study of different factors associated with characterising the mixing process, including cavitation, power input, Reynolds number and vortex formation. A strong relationship was found between the number of vortices created in the system and the nucleation rate. It is speculated that the vortices decrease the distance required for diffusion of molecules in the system, increasing the rate at which they can come together to form a stable nuclei.

  9. Synthesis of PEGylated lactose analogs for inhibition studies on T.cruzi trans-sialidase.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, M Eugenia; Ratier, Laura; Agusti, Rosala; Frasch, Alberto C C; de Lederkremer, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, expresses a unique enzyme, the trans-sialidase (TcTS) involved in the transfer of sialic acid from host glycoconjugates to mucins of the parasite. The enzyme is shed to the medium and may affect the immune system of the host. We have previously described that lactose derivatives effectively inhibited the transfer of sialic acid to N-acetyllactosamine. Lactitol also prevented the apoptosis caused by the TcTS, although it is rapidly eliminated from the circulatory system. In this paper we report covalent conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with lactose, lactobionolactone and benzyl beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->6)-2-amino-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (1) with the hope to improve the bioavailability, though retaining their inhibitory properties. Different conjugation methods have been used and the behavior of the PEGylated products in the TcTS reaction was studied. PMID:20645127

  10. Quinolone resistance and ornithine decarboxylation activity in lactose-negative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gomig, Franciane; Galvão, Carolina Weigert; de Freitas, Denis Leandro; Labas, Larissa; Etto, Rafael Mazer; Esmerino, Luiz Antonio; de Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Appel, Marcia Helena; Zanata, Silvio Marques; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Nader, Helena Bonciani; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are widely used to treat uropathogenic Escherichia coli infections. Bacterial resistance to these antimicrobials primarily involves mutations in gyrA and parC genes. To date, no studies have examined the potential relationship between biochemical characteristics and quinolone resistance in uropathogenic E. coli strains. The present work analyzed the quinolone sensitivity and biochemical activities of fifty-eight lactose-negative uropathogenic E. coli strains. A high percentage of the isolates (48.3%) was found to be resistant to at least one of the tested quinolones, and DNA sequencing revealed quinolone resistant determining region gyrA and parC mutations in the multi-resistant isolates. Statistical analyses suggested that the lack of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is correlated with quinolone resistance. Despite the low number of isolates examined, this is the first study correlating these characteristics in lactose-negative E. coli isolates. PMID:26413057

  11. Transgalactosylation of lactose for synthesis of galacto-oligosaccharides using Kluyveromyces marxianus NCIM 3551.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anita; Mishra, Saroj; Chand, Subhash

    2015-06-25

    Among a number of yeast strains screened for whole cell transgalactosylating activity, Kluyveromyces marxianus NCIM 3551 was found to be most suitable biocatalyst for production of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). Cell permeabilization lead to an efficient bioconversion by β-galactosidase resulting in synthesis of GOS. A maximum GOS yield of 36% (w/w) of total sugars was achieved and the products consisted of tri- and tetra-galacto-oligosaccharides. A lactose conversion rate of 80% and productivity of 24g/L/h was obtained under the optimum conditions at lactose concentration of 20% (w/v), temperature 40°C, pH 6.5 and enzyme units after 3h of reaction time. Tetrasaccharides were the main component of the reaction mixture. The products were quantitated by HPLC and structurally characterized by mass spectrometry. PMID:25976627

  12. Continuous lactose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum--assessment of acidogenesis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Fabio; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of the growth kinetics of acidogenic cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 is reported in the paper. Tests were carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor under controlled conditions adopting a complex medium supplemented with lactose as carbon source to mimic cheese whey. The effects of acids (acetic and butyric), solvents (acetone, ethanol and butanol) and pH on the growth rate of acidogenic cells were assessed. The conversion process was characterized under steady-state conditions in terms of concentration of lactose, cells, acids, total organic carbon and pH. The growth kinetics was expressed by means of a multiple product inhibition and interacting model including a novel formulation to account for the role of pH. The model has the potential to predict microorganism growth rate under a broad interval of operating conditions, even those typical of solvents production. PMID:20889336

  13. Properties of the Sodium Naproxen-Lactose-Tetrahydrate Co-Crystal upon Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Sovago, Ioana; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Danwen; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Bond, Andrew D; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    Co-crystals and co-amorphous systems are two strategies to improve the physical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and, thus, have recently gained considerable interest both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the behavior of the recently identified sodium naproxen-lactose-tetrahydrate co-crystal and the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose was investigated. The structure of the co-crystal is described using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structural analysis revealed a monoclinic lattice, space group P21, with the asymmetric unit containing one molecule of lactose, one of naproxen, sodium, and four water molecules. Upon heating, it was observed that the co-crystal transforms into a co-amorphous system due to the loss of its crystalline bound water. Dehydration and co-amorphization were studied using synchrotron X-ray radiation and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Subsequently, different processing techniques (ball milling, spray drying, and dehydration) were used to prepare the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) revealed the amorphous nature of the mixtures after preparation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that the blends were single-phase co-amorphous systems as indicated by a single glass transition temperature. The samples were subsequently tested for physical stability under dry (silica gel at 25 and 40 °C) and humid conditions (25 °C/75% RH). The co-amorphous samples stored at 25 °C/75% RH quickly recrystallized into the co-crystalline state. On the other hand, the samples stored under dry conditions remained physically stable after five months of storage, except the ball milled sample stored at 40 °C which showed signs of recrystallization. Under these dry conditions, however, the ball-milled co-amorphous blend crystallized into the individual crystalline components. PMID:27104502

  14. Windowing of THz time-domain spectroscopy signals: A study based on lactose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Cabo, José; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Fraile-Peláez, Francisco Javier; Rubiños-López, Óscar; López-Santos, José María; Martín-Ramos, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy has established itself as a reference method for determining material parameters in the terahertz spectral range. This procedure requires the processing of the measured time-domain signals in order to estimate the spectral data. In this work, we present a thorough study of the properties of the signal windowing, a step previous to the parameter extraction algorithm, that permits to improve the accuracy of the results. Lactose has been used as sample material in the study.

  15. Lactose-hydrolyzed milk is more prone to chemical changes during storage than conventional ultra-high-temperature (UHT) milk.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Therese; Clausen, Morten R; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Eggers, Nina; Nyegaard, Steffen; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Sundgren, Anja; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose to glucose and galactose gives rise to reactions that change the chemistry and quality of ambient-stored lactose-hydrolyzed ultra-high-temperature (UHT) milk. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare chemical changes in lactose-hydrolyzed and conventional UHT milk during a 9 month ambient storage period. Several complementary analyses of volatiles, free amino acids, acetate, furosine, and level of free amino terminals were concluded. The analyses revealed an increased level of free amino acids and an increased formation rate of specific compounds such as furosine and 2-methylbutanal in lactose-hydrolyzed UHT milk compared to conventional UHT milk during storage. These observations indicate more favorable conditions for Maillard and subsequent reactions in lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to conventional UHT milk stored at ambient temperature. Furthermore, it is postulated that proteolytic activity from the lactase-enzyme preparation may be responsible for the observed higher levels of free amino acids in lactose-hydrolyzed UHT milk. PMID:25019952

  16. Impact of lactose starvation on the physiology of Lactobacillus casei GCRL163 in the presence or absence of tween 80.

    PubMed

    Al-Naseri, Ali; Bowman, John P; Wilson, Richard; Nilsson, Rolf E; Britz, Margaret L

    2013-11-01

    The global proteomic response of the nonstarter lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus casei strain GCRL163 under carbohydrate depletion was investigated to understand aspects of its survival following cessation of fermentation. The proteome of L. casei GCRL163 was analyzed quantitatively after growth in modified MRS (with and without Tween 80) with different levels of lactose (0% lactose, starvation; 0.2% lactose, growth limiting; 1% lactose, non-growth-limited control) using gel-free proteomics. Results revealed that carbohydrate starvation lead to suppression of lactose and galactose catabolic pathways as well as pathways for nucleotide and protein synthesis. Enzymes of the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, amino acid synthesis, and pyruvate and citrate metabolism become more abundant as well as other carbohydrate catabolic pathways, suggesting increased optimization of intermediary metabolism and scavenging. Tween 80 did not affect growth yield; however, proteins related to fatty acid biosynthesis were repressed in the presence of Tween 80. The data suggest that L. casei adeptly switches to a scavenging mode, using both citrate and Tween 80, and efficiently adjusts energetic requirements when carbohydrate starved and thus can sustain survival for weeks to months. Explaining the adaptation of L. casei during lactose starvation will assist efforts to maintain viability of L. casei and extend its utility as a beneficial dietary adjunct and fermentation processing aid. PMID:24066708

  17. Quantifying amorphous content of lactose using parallel beam X-ray powder diffraction and whole pattern fitting.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Bates, S; Morris, K R

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the applicability of parallel beam X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and a new method for whole pattern fitting to the quantification of the residual amount of amorphous content in a pharmaceutical solid using lactose as a model system. Lactose monohydrate, prepared by slurry conversion of anhydrous lactose, was mixed with different amounts of amorphous lactose produced by lyophilization. X-ray powder diffractograms of each mixture were recorded and analyzed by whole pattern fitting using Percentage Crystallinity Determination Software from Kratos Analytical Inc. The polycapillary X-ray optic, which provides a parallel beam of X-radiation, has advantages over Bragg-Brentano Optics with respect to sample height artifacts. Significant shifts in peak position with changes in sample height of lactose monohydrate were observed using Bragg-Brentano Optics while no change was detected for the polycapillary X-ray optic. A technique to normalize all diffractograms to have the same total integrated intensity was necessary to eliminate tube fluctuation effects. After normalization, the amorphous content of lactose in the range of 1-10% was reproducibly predicted (small standard deviation between samplings) using whole pattern fitting. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.37% amorphous content. The results indicated that parallel beam XRPD and whole pattern fitting can provide accurate analysis of relatively small amounts of amorphous content in pharmaceuticals compared to typical XRPD analysis. PMID:11451643

  18. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  19. Evaluation of melt rheology of lactose-filled polyethylene glycol composites by means of capillary rheometery.

    PubMed

    Bahramian, Bahareh; Motlagh, Ghodratollah H; Majidi S, Shabnam; Kaffashi, Babak; Nojoumi, Seyed A; Haririan, Ismaeil

    2013-02-01

    In this study melt rheological behavior of lactose-filled polyethylene glycol (PEG) composites as a low melting polymeric carrier for controlled release drugs was investigated using a capillary rheometer. The effect of lactose concentration and process variables such as temperature and ram speed on the flow behavior of PEG has been studied. The composites were found to be shear thinning in behavior when extruded, and the results were well described by power-law model in each case. Stronger shear thinning behavior was observed by raising the filler concentration and decreasing the temperature, while the flow index has been decreased. In all compositions a significant increase in shear viscosity was found by an increase in the filler content. In fact, shear viscosity increased linearly by weight fraction of filler, but there was a dramatic increase after the filler content raised above 20 wt% of lactose which might be the result of the strong interaction among filler particles. Furthermore, decreasing the process temperature resulted in an increase in shear viscosity, and the temperature dependence of shear viscosity decreased as the shear rate increased. The extensional viscosity of composites was calculated in each case. The results showed that the ratio of the extensional viscosity to shear viscosity was in the range of 500-1200. PMID:22141378

  20. Exploring the effects of high shear blending on lactose and drug using fluidised bed elutriation.

    PubMed

    Willetts, J P; Robbins, P T; Roche, T C; Bowley, M; Bridson, R H

    2012-09-15

    Powder formulations comprising inhalation grade lactose and a mimic drug (cholesterol) were prepared using a high shear blending process for which the total energy input could be quantified. The formulations were fluidised in a classic fluidised bed system, to determine whether blending-induced changes could be determined through either bulk fluidisation behaviour or the characteristics of elutriated fractions from the powder beds. The evolution of the fluidisation regime within the powder beds (Δ pressure vs. superficial gas velocity) and total mass of elutriated material were not sensitive measures to differentiate between blended and unblended samples. However, blended and unblended material could be distinguished by the size distributions of the elutriated fractions. The study also showed that there were no further changes in the size distribution of the elutriated fractions once a chemically homogenous mixture of lactose and drug had been produced. However, further blending beyond this 'point of homogeneity' continued to change the lactose particle size distribution of the bulk powder; this may have implications for blend end point determination for these types of formulation. PMID:22683647

  1. [Preparation of budesonide sustained-release dry powder for inhalation and influence of lactose content].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng-lin; Wang, Xiu-hua; Ni, Rui; Zhang, Lan; Muenster, Uwe; Mao, Shi-rui

    2015-09-01

    Using high pressure homogenization method combined with spray-drying, budesonide-loaded chitosan microparticles were prepared and the in vitro release profile was investigated. The microparticles were then blended with lactose using a vortex mixer, influence of mixing speed, mixing time on drug recovery rate and content homogeneity were investigated. Meanwhile, influence of lactose content on drug recovery rate, content homogeneity, powder flowability and in vitro deposition were studied. It turned out that budesonide was released from the microparicles in a sustained manner, with fine particle fraction as high as 46.0%, but the powder flowability was poor. After blending with 10 times of lactose, the drug recovery rate was 96.5%, with relative standard deviation of drug content 2.5%, and fine particle fraction of the formulation increased to 59.6% with good flowability. It's demonstrated that using a vortex mixer, budesonide sustained-release dry powder for inhalation with good recovery and content homogeneity could be prepared, the formulation had good flowability and was suitable for pulmonary inhaling. PMID:26757557

  2. Regulation of product formation during glucose or lactose limitation in nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, A M; Crow, V L; Thomas, T D

    1984-01-01

    Nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis in a pH-stat were dosed with sugar to allow fermentation at the maximum rate or were fed a continuous supply of sugar at rates less than the maximum. Under anaerobic conditions, rapid fermentation of either glucose or lactose was essentially homolactic. However, with strain ML3, limiting the fermentation rate diverted approximately half of the pyruvate to formate, acetate, and ethanol. At limiting glucose fermentation rates, cells contained lower concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase activator (fructose 1,6-diphosphate) and pyruvate formate-lyase inhibitors (triose phosphates). As a result, pyruvate formate-lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase play a greater role in pyruvate metabolism. In contrast to strain ML3, strain ML8 did not give the same diversion of products under anaerobic conditions, and cells retained higher concentrations of the above effector compounds. Lactose metabolism under aerobic conditions resulted in pyruvate excretion by both S. lactis ML3 and ML8. At 7% of the maximum utilization rate, pyruvate accounted for 69 and 35% of the lactose metabolized by ML3 and ML8, respectively. Acetate was also a major product, especially with ML8. The data suggest that NADH oxidase is involved in coenzyme recycling in the presence of oxygen and that pyruvate formate-lyase is inactivated, but the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex still functions. PMID:6435521

  3. Binding of spin-labeled galactosides to the lactose permease of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Klai, T; Hideg, K; Altenbach, C; Hubbell, W L; Kaback, H R

    2000-09-19

    A series of nitroxide spin-labeled alpha- or beta-galactopyranosides and a nitroxide spin-labeled beta-glucopyranoside have been synthesized and examined for binding to the lactose permease of Escherichia coli. Out of the twelve nitroxide spin-labeled galactopyranosides synthesized, 1-oxyl-2, 5, 5-trimethyl-2-[3-nitro-4-N-(hexyl-1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranosid-1 -yl )]aminophenyl pyrrolidine (NN) exhibits the highest affinity for the permease based on the following observations: (a) the analogue inhibits lactose transport with a K(I) about 7 microM; (b) NN blocks labeling of single-Cys148 permease with 2-(4'-maleimidylanilino) naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) with an apparent affinity of about 12 microM; (c) electron paramagnetic resonance demonstrates binding of the spin-labeled sugar by purified wild-type permease in a manner that is reversed by nonspin-labeled ligand. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) is about 23 microM and binding stoichiometry is approximately unity. In contrast, the nitroxide spin-labeled glucopyranoside does not inhibit active lactose transport or labeling of single-Cys148 permease with MIANS. It is concluded that NN binds specifically to lac permease with an affinity in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, affinity of the permease for the spin-labeled galactopyranosides is directly related to the length, hydrophobicity, and geometry of the linker between the galactoside and the nitroxide spin-label. PMID:10985783

  4. Biosynthesis of milk fat, protein, and lactose: roles of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Johan S; Lohakare, Jayant; Bionaz, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The demand for high-quality milk is increasing worldwide. The efficiency of milk synthesis can be improved by taking advantage of the accumulated knowledge of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the synthesis of fat, protein, and lactose in the mammary gland. Research in this area is relatively new, but data accumulated in the last 10 years provide a relatively clear picture. Milk fat synthesis appears to be regulated, at least in bovines, by an interactive network between SREBP1, PPARγ, and LXRα, with a potential role for other transcription factors, such as Spot14, ChREBP, and Sp1. Milk protein synthesis is highly regulated by insulin, amino acids, and amino acid transporters via transcriptional and posttranscriptional routes, with the insulin-mTOR pathway playing a central role. The transcriptional regulation of lactose synthesis is still poorly understood, but it is clear that glucose transporters play an important role. They can also cooperatively interact with amino acid transporters and the mTOR pathway. Recent data indicate the possibility of nutrigenomic interventions to increase milk fat synthesis by feeding long-chain fatty acids and milk protein synthesis by feeding amino acids. We propose a transcriptional network model to account for all available findings. This model encompasses a complex network of proteins that control milk synthesis with a cross talk between milk fat, protein, and lactose regulation, with mTOR functioning as a central hub. PMID:26812986

  5. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900–4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. Participants We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40–87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900–3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000–3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300–4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Main outcome measure Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. Results The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500–4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs <3500 m, respectively). After adjusting for lifestyle change, hypoxaemia and polycythaemia were closely associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose intolerance, with polycythaemia as a sign of poor hypoxic adaptation, accelerated by lifestyle change and ageing. PMID:26908520

  6. In silico analysis of exercise intolerance in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lengert, Nicor; Drossel, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    Post-exertional malaise is commonly observed in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanism is not yet well understood. A reduced capacity for mitochondrial ATP synthesis is associated with the pathogenesis of CFS and is suspected to be a major contribution to exercise intolerance in CFS patients. To demonstrate the connection between a reduced mitochondrial capacity and exercise intolerance, we present a model which simulates metabolite dynamics in skeletal muscles during exercise and recovery. CFS simulations exhibit critically low levels of ATP, where an increased rate of cell death would be expected. To stabilize the energy supply at low ATP concentrations the total adenine nucleotide pool is reduced substantially causing a prolonged recovery time even without consideration of other factors, such as immunological dysregulations and oxidative stress. Repeated exercises worsen this situation considerably. Furthermore, CFS simulations exhibited an increased acidosis and lactate accumulation consistent with experimental observations. PMID:25899994

  7. Cutting-edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, N; Tozzoli, R; Villalta, D; Fabris, M; Tonutti, E

    2012-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a gluten-dependent immune-mediated disease with a prevalence in the general population estimated between 0.3% and 1.2%. Large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that only 10-20% of cases of CD are identified on the basis of clinical findings and that laboratory tests are crucial to identify subjects with subtle or atypical symptoms. The correct choice and clinical use of these diagnostic tools may enable accurate diagnosis and early recognition of silent CD cases. In this review, we have considered some relevant aspects related to the laboratory diagnosis of CD and, more extensively, of gluten intolerance, such as the best combination of tests for early and accurate diagnosis, the diagnostic role of new tests for detecting antibodies against neoepitopes produced by the transglutaminase-gliadin complex, the forms of non-celiac gluten intolerance (gluten sensitivity), and the use and significance of measuring cytokines in CD. PMID:21181303

  8. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. PMID:25550428

  9. Developing scales measuring disorder-specific intolerance of uncertainty (DSIU): a new perspective on transdiagnostic.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Michel A; Carleton, R Nicholas; McEvoy, Peter M; Zvolensky, Michael J; Brandt, Charles P; Boelen, Paul A; Mahoney, Alison E J; Deacon, Brett J; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2015-04-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a construct of growing prominence in literature on anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder. Existing measures of IU do not define the uncertainty that respondents perceive as distressing. To address this limitation, we developed eight scales measuring disorder-specific intolerance of uncertainty (DSIU) relating to various anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder. We used exploratory factor analysis and item characteristic curves in two large undergraduate samples (Ns=627 and 628) to derive eight three-item DSIU scales (24 items total) that exhibited excellent psychometric properties. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor structures of the scales and the transdiagnostic nature of IU. Each scale predicted unique variance in its respective symptom measure beyond a traditional measure of IU. DSIU represents a theoretically proximal and causal intermediary between known vulnerability factors and disorder symptomatology. The DSIU scales can be used to advance theories of psychopathology and inform case conceptualization and treatment planning. PMID:25728016

  10. The diagnosis and management of cow milk protein intolerance in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Whitney Merrill; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2005-01-01

    Cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) affects 3% of infants under the age of 12 months and is often misdiagnosed as GERD or colic, risking dangerous exposure to antigens. Most infants out grow CMPI by 12 months; however, those with IgE-mediated reactions usually continue to be intolerant to cow's milk proteins and also develop other allergens including environmental allergens that cause asthmatic symptoms. Clinical manifestations of CMPI include diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, feeding refusal, eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, allergic rhinitis, coughing, wheezing, failure to thrive, and anaphylaxis. The research and literature showed that CMPI is easily missed in the primary care setting and needs to be considered as a cause of infant distress and clinical symptoms. This article focuses on correctly diagnosing CMPI and managing it in the primary care setting. PMID:16411542

  11. Cassia cinnamon for the attenuation of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance resulting from sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations reveal a concomitant increase in sleep loss and metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, over the past several decades. An increasing body of scientific evidence indicates that acute sleep loss induces insulin resistance and glucose intolerance profiles similar to those of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Experimentally, cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) supplementation facilitates glucose disposal in healthy humans, which may be achieved by enhancing (1) insulin sensitivity via increased phosphorylation of signaling proteins and (2) insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4-mediated glucose uptake into muscle cells. Because peripheral insulin resistance is primarily a consequence of reduced muscle insulin sensitivity, C. cassia and C. cassia extracts may attenuate insulin resistance and glucose intolerance observed following sleep loss. PMID:19627193

  12. Auxological evaluation of children with cow's milk protein intolerance treated an elimination diet.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Jastrzebska, J; Białokoz, I; Zagórecka, E

    1995-01-01

    A somatic development assesment, including the nutritive condition at the moment of diagnosis and after at least a year's dietary treatment was carried out in a group of 55 children with primary cow's milk protein intolerance. The influence of the applied elimination diet and/or anti-allergic supporting treatment on the clinical picture was evaluated as well as calcium--phosphorus--magnesium balance parameters. PMID:8775309

  13. Hypovolemia in syncope and orthostatic intolerance role of the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Ertl, A. C.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic intolerance is the cause of significant disability in otherwise normal patients. Orthostatic tachycardia is usually the dominant hemodynamic abnormality, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety and, in some cases, syncope. It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension. There is a predilection for younger rather than older adults and for women more than men. Its cause is unknown; partial sympathetic denervation or hypovolemia has been proposed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma renin activity, perhaps from defects in sympathetic innervation of the kidney, could underlie a hypovolemia, giving rise to these clinical symptoms. Sixteen patients (14 female, 2 male) ranging in age from 16 to 44 years were studied. Patients were enrolled in the study if they had orthostatic intolerance, together with a raised upright plasma norepinephrine (> or = 600 pg/mL). Patients underwent a battery of autonomic tests and biochemical determinations. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between the blood volume and plasma renin activity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001). The tachycardic response to upright posture correlated with the severity of the hypovolemia. There was also a correlation between the plasma renin activity measured in these patients and their concomitant plasma aldosterone level. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovolemia occurs commonly in orthostatic intolerance. It is accompanied by an inappropriately low level of plasma renin activity. The degree of abnormality of blood volume correlates closely with the degree of abnormality in plasma renin activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that reduced plasma renin activity may be an important pathophysiologic component of the syndrome of orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Muscle Histidine-Containing Dipeptides Are Elevated by Glucose Intolerance in Both Rodents and Men

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, Sanne; Everaert, Inge; Deldicque, Louise; Vallova, Silvia; de Courten, Barbora; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Derave, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes. Design and Methods Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats), 60% high-fat feeding (male rats), cafeteria feeding (male rats), 70% high-fat feeding (female mice). Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients) and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured. Results Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding) induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1), +30% (p<0.05) and +39% (p<0.05), respectively). The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05) and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07), compared to healthy lean subjects. Conclusion Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional). In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional). Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:25803044

  15. Comparative analysis of the Trichoderma reesei transcriptome during growth on the cellulase inducing substrates wheat straw and lactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renewable lignocellulosic biomass is an advantageous resource for the production of second generation biofuels and other biorefinery products. In Middle Europe, wheat straw is one of the most abundant low-cost sources of lignocellulosic biomass. For its efficient use, an efficient mix of cellulases and hemicellulases is required. In this paper, we investigated how cellulase production by T. reesei on wheat straw compares to that on lactose, the only soluble and also cheap inducing carbon source for enzyme production. Results We have examined and compared the transcriptome of T. reesei growing on wheat straw and lactose as carbon sources under otherwise similar conditions. Gene expression on wheat straw exceeded that on lactose, and 1619 genes were found to be only induced on wheat straw but not on lactose. They comprised 30% of the CAZome, but were also enriched in genes associated with phospholipid metabolism, DNA synthesis and repair, iron homeostatis and autophagy. Two thirds of the CAZome was expressed both on wheat straw as well as on lactose, but 60% of it at least >2-fold higher on the former. Major wheat straw specific genes comprised xylanases, chitinases and mannosidases. Interestingly, the latter two CAZyme families were significantly higher expressed in a strain in which xyr1 encoding the major regulator of cellulase and hemicellulase biosynthesis is non-functional. Conclusions Our data reveal several major differences in the transcriptome between wheat straw and lactose which may be related to the higher enzyme formation on the former and their further investigation could lead to the development of methods for increasing enzyme production on lactose. PMID:24016404

  16. Intolerance for Smoking Abstinence Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties and Relationship to Tobacco Dependence and Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Alan D.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; MacKinnon, Selene V.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Eaton, Cheryl A.; Kaplan, Gary B.; Monti, Peter M.; Tidey, Jennifer W.; Swift, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    While smokers’ ability to tolerate emotional or physical distress has been associated with length of smoking cessation, there is no measure of ability to tolerate smoking abstinence discomfort specifically, which may be more heuristic than a measure of tolerance of general emotional stress or physical discomfort. Methods Questionnaires completed by 300 smokers assessed inability to tolerate smoking abstinence discomfort (IDQ-S), general physical discomfort (IDQ-P), and general emotional discomfort (IDQ-E), so that shared variance among these measures could be assessed. Results The IDQ-S has three reliable components: Withdrawal Intolerance, Lack of Cognitive Coping, and Pain Intolerance. The 14-item IDQ-P and 9-item IDQ-E each consist of one reliable component. Intercorrelations suggest only modest shared variance. Support for construct and discriminant validity was seen. Two scales of the IDQ-S showed excellent convergent validity, correlating with smoking use, dependence, motivation, and length of past smoking cessation, while IDQ-P and IDQ-E correlated with few indices of use or dependence and not with smoking cessation. Conclusions The final 17-item IDQ-S with two scales is reliable and valid, and more heuristic than measures of general physical or emotional discomfort intolerance as a correlate of motivation and past success with smoking cessation. PMID:20381260

  17. Contributions of MSNA and stroke volume to orthostatic intolerance following bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether the altered orthostatic tolerance following 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) was related to inadequate sympathetic outflow or to excessive reductions in cardiac output during a 10- to 15-min head-up tilt (HUT) test. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP, Finapres), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography), and stroke volume blood velocity (SVV, Doppler ultrasound) were assessed during supine 30 degrees (5 min) and 60 degrees (5-10 min) HUT positions in 15 individuals who successfully completed the pre-HDBR test without evidence of orthostatic intolerance. Subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT, n = 9) or intolerant (OI, n = 6) following the post-HDBR test. MSNA, BP, and SVV during supine and HUT postures were not altered in the OT group. Hypotension during 60 degrees HUT in the post-bed rest test for the OI group (P < 0.05) was associated with a blunted increase in MSNA (P < 0.05). SVV was reduced following HDBR in the OI group (main effect of HDBR, P < 0.02). The data support the hypothesis that bed rest-induced orthostatic intolerance is related to an inadequate increase in sympathetic discharge that cannot compensate for a greater postural reduction in stroke volume.

  18. Knowledge about aging and worry in older adults: Testing the mediating role of intolerance of uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Nuevo, Roberto; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Montorio, Ignacio; Ruiz, Miguel A.; Cabrera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to explore the relationship between knowledge about aging and severity of worry in older adults, and to test the potential mediational role of intolerance of uncertainty. Method The sample was composed of 120 community-dwelling older adults, with a mean of age of 71.0 years (SD = 6.3). Mediational analyses and structural equation modeling were used to analyze and compare different models. Results Greater knowledge about aging was negatively related to both intolerance of uncertainty and worry, and its effect on worry was partially mediated by intolerance of uncertainty. The mediational model obtained an excellent fit to the data (i.e. Goodness of fit index (GFI) = 0.995) and clearly had a better fit than alternative models. Conclusion These results suggest that a good knowledge of the aging process could help decrease aversive uncertainty and thus reduce the level of worry among older adults. Thus, educational programs to increase knowledge about aging could serve as one preventive strategy for anxiety in old age. PMID:19197699

  19. Does the use of glycerin laxatives decrease feeding intolerance in preterm infants?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vibhuti; Chirinian, Nevart; Lee, Shoo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycerin laxatives are often prescribed in the neonatal population for meconium evacuation and to promote enteral feeding. However, the literature regarding their effectiveness has not been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of glycerin enema or suppository in preventing feeding intolerance in preterm infants at ≤32 weeks’ gestational age or weighing ≤1500 g at birth. METHODS: The Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched to identify studies that evaluated glycerin enemas/suppositories for feeding intolerance. Using the Evidence Evaluation Worksheet adapted from the American Heart Association’s International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, eligible studies were scored for quality, level of evidence and direction of support. RESULTS: Two clinical studies that evaluated meconium evacuation and feeding intolerance were included. One study showed no difference in the time to complete meconium evacuation or establishment of full enteral feeds, while the other showed that the times to first meconium passage and full enteral feeding were significantly shorter, and the rate of sepsis was lower in the glycerin enema group. CONCLUSION: The evidence regarding the effectiveness of glycerin laxatives for improving feeding tolerance is inconclusive in infants at ≤32 weeks’ gestational age or weighing ≤1500 g at birth. PMID:23115504

  20. Effects of standing on cerebrovascular resistance in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Atkinson, D.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Furlan, R.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance often have debilitating symptoms on standing that are suggestive of cerebral hypoperfusion despite the absence of orthostatic hypotension. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We evaluated the effects of graded head-up tilt on cerebral blood flow as determined by transcranial Doppler measurements in 10 patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (nine women, one man, 22 to 47 years) and nine age- and sex-matched control subjects. RESULTS: In patients, mean (+/- SD) arterial pressure at 0 degrees head-up tilt was 90 +/- 11 mm Hg and was well maintained at all tilt angles (90 +/- 11 mm Hg at 75 degrees). In controls, mean arterial pressure was 85 +/- 7 mm Hg at 0 degrees and 82 +/- 11 mm Hg at 75 degrees head-up tilt. There was a substantial decrease in peak velocity with increasing tilt angle in patients (28% +/- 10%) but not in controls (10% +/- 10% at 75 degrees, P <0.001). Similarly, mean velocity decreased 26% +/- 13% in patients and 12% +/- 11% in controls (P = 0.01). With increasing head-up tilt, patients had a significantly greater increase in regional cerebrovascular resistance than controls. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, peak and mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity decreased in response to head-up tilt despite well sustained arterial blood pressure. These observations indicate that in this group of patients, regulation of cerebrovascular tone may be impaired and might therefore be a target for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Nitric oxide in microgravity-induced orthostatic intolerance: relevance to spinal cord injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, N. D.; Purdy, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in cardiovascular deconditioning which is marked by orthostatic intolerance in the returning astronauts and recovering bed-ridden patients. Recent studies conducted in our laboratories at University of California, Irvine have revealed marked elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production in the kidney, heart, brain, and systemic arteries coupled with significant reduction of NO production in the cerebral arteries of microgravity-adapted animals. We have further demonstrated that the observed alteration of NO metabolism is primarily responsible for the associated cardiovascular deconditioning. Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently complicated by orthostatic intolerance that is due to the combined effects of the disruption of efferent sympathetic pathway and cardiovascular deconditioning occasioned by prolonged confinement to bed. In this presentation, I will review the nature of altered NO metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of microgravity-induced cardiovascular deconditioning. The possible relevance of the new findings to orthostatic intolerance in patients with acute SCI and its potential therapeutic implications will be discussed.

  2. Phenytoin as an effective treatment for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia due to QT prolongation in a patient with multiple drug intolerances.

    PubMed

    Yager, Neil; Wang, Katherine; Keshwani, Najiba; Torosoff, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia caused by QT prolongation. Owing to known intolerances to a majority of antiarrhythmic medications, one remaining option was to initiate phenytoin. Phenytoin's narrow therapeutic window, multiple drug interactions and side effect profile make it an infrequently used antiarrhythmic. It is, however, a potent antiarrhythmic agent, which may be useful in treatment of ventricular tachycardia, especially in patients with multiple drug intolerances. PMID:26071440

  3. Feeding Problems in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Yes These symptoms may be a sign of LACTOSE INTOLERANCE, the inability to digest lactose. Lactose is a sugar found in milk and other ... allergy or more severe intolerance to cow's milk (LACTOSE INTOLERANCE) or wheat (CELIAC DISEASE). See your baby's ...

  4. High Intensity Exercise Countermeasures does not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Space Shuttle astronauts became presyncopal during operational stand and 80deg head-up tilt tests, and the prevalence of orthostatic intolerance increases after longer missions. Greater than 60% of the US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions experienced presyncope during post-flight tilt tests, perhaps related to limitations of the exercise hardware that prevented high intensity exercise training until later ISS missions. The objective of this study was to determine whether an intense resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure program designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 d of bed rest (BR), a space flight analog, would protect against post-BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: non-exercise controls (n=11) or one of two exercise groups (ExA, n=8; ExB, n=7). Both ExA and ExB groups performed the same resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasures during BR, but one exercise group received testosterone supplementation while the other received a placebo during BR in a double-blinded fashion. On 3 d/wk, subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise (=75% max heart rate). On the other 3 d/wk, subjects performed only highintensity, interval-style aerobic exercise. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80? head-up tilt test performed 2 d (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using carbon monoxide rebreathing on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). The code for the exercise groups has not been broken, and results are reported here without group identification. RESULTS Only one subject became presyncopal during tilt testing on BR-2, but 7 of 11 (63%) controls, 3 of 8 (38%) ExA, and 4 of 7 (57%) ExB subjects were presyncopal on BR70. Survival analysis of post-BR tilt tests revealed no differences (p=0.77) between groups. Plasma volume (absolute or relative to body mass index) decreased (p<0.001) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS These preliminary results corroborate previous reports that the performance of a vigorous exercise countermeasure protocol during BR, even with testosterone supplementation, does not protect against orthostatic intolerance or plasma volume loss. Preventing post-BR orthostatic intolerance may require additional countermeasures, such as orthostatic stress during BR or end-of-BR fluid infusion.

  5. Direct pelletization in a rotary processor controlled by torque measurements. III. Investigation of microcrystalline cellulose and lactose grade.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of different grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and lactose in a direct pelletization process in a rotary processor. For this purpose, a mixed 2- and 3-level factorial study was performed to determine the influence of the particle size of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) (approximately 60 and 105 microm) and lactose (approximately 30, 40, and 55 microm), as well as MCC type (Avicel and Emcocel) on the pelletization process and the physical properties of the prepared pellets. A 1:4 mixture of MCC and lactose was applied, and granulation liquid was added until a 0.45 Nm increase in the torque of the friction plate was reached. All combinations of the 3 factors resulted in spherical pellets of a high physical strength. The particle size of MCC was found to have no marked effect on the amount of water required for agglomerate growth or on the size of the resulting pellets. An increasing particle size of lactose gave rise to more spherical pellets of a more narrow size distribution as well as higher yields. The MCC type was found to affect both the release of the model drug from the prepared pellets and the size distribution. Generally, the determined influence of the investigated factors was small, and direct pelletization in a rotary processor was found to be a robust process, insensitive to variations in the particle size and type of MCC and the particle size of lactose. PMID:16354010

  6. Recovery of Whey Proteins and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lactose Derived from Casein Whey Using a Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bipasha; Bhattacharjee, Sangita; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib

    2013-09-01

    In this study, ultrafiltration (UF) of pretreated casein whey was carried out in a cross-flow module fitted with 5 kDa molecular weight cut-off polyethersulfone membrane to recover whey proteins in the retentate and lactose in the permeate. Effects of processing conditions, like transmembrane pressure and pH on permeate flux and rejection were investigated and reported. The polarised layer resistance was found to increase with time during UF even in this high shear device. The lactose concentration in the permeate was measured using dinitro salicylic acid method. Enzymatic kinetic study for lactose hydrolysis was carried out at three different temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 °C using β-galactosidase enzyme. The glucose formed during lactose hydrolysis was analyzed using glucose oxidase-peroxidase method. Kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose solution was found to follow Michaelis-Menten model and the model parameters were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot. The hydrolysis rate was found to be maximum (with Vmax = 5.5091 mmol/L/min) at 30 °C.

  7. Fermentation of lactose to bio-ethanol by yeasts as part of integrated solutions for the valorisation of cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2010-01-01

    Cheese whey, the main dairy by-product, is increasingly recognized as a source of many bioactive valuable compounds. Nevertheless, the most abundant component in whey is lactose (ca. 5% w/v), which represents a significant environmental problem. Due to the large lactose surplus generated, its conversion to bio-ethanol has long been considered as a possible solution for whey bioremediation. In this review, fermentation of lactose to ethanol is discussed, focusing on wild lactose-fermenting yeasts, particularly Kluyveromyces marxianus, and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The early efforts in the screening and characterization of the fermentation properties of wild lactose-consuming yeasts are reviewed. Furthermore, emphasis is given on the latter advances in engineering S. cerevisiae strains for efficient whey-to-ethanol bioprocesses. Examples of industrial implementation are briefly discussed, illustrating the viability of whey-to-ethanol systems. Current developments on strain engineering together with the growing market for biofuels will likely boost the industrial interest in such processes. PMID:20153415

  8. The surface roughness of lactose particles can be modulated by wet-smoothing using a high-shear mixer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Franca; Cocconi, Daniela; Bettini, Ruggero; Giordano, Ferdinando; Santi, Patrizia; Tobyn, Michael; Price, Robert; Young, Paul; Caramella, Carla; Colombo, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The surface morphology of a-lactose monohydrate particles was modified by a new wet-smoothing process performed in a high-shear mixer using solvents. Successive steps of wetting and drying of lactose powders during rolling in the mixer's cylindrical bowl were performed. Smoothed particles were tested for size distribution, flow, and packing. The wet-smoothing process flattened the surface and rounded the edges of lactose particles. In comparison with original lactose, an improvement of powder packing and flow properties was evidenced. When the process was performed in the presence of a ternary agent such as magnesium stearate, the smoothing was improved. The evolution of rugosity during the smoothing process was assessed through a fractal descriptor of SEM picture. Atomic force microscopy and surface area measurements quantified the surface rugosity. A very significant reduction of the rugosity, more remarkable in the presence of magnesium stearate, was measured. This new process of powder wet-smoothing allows the preparation of lactose particles with different degrees of smoothed surface for the control of flow and packing properties and particle-particle interactions. PMID:15760057

  9. Production, purification, and characterization of a potential thermostable galactosidase for milk lactose hydrolysis from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Chen, H; Xia, Y; Zhao, J; Tian, F; Zhang, H

    2008-05-01

    Beta-galactosidase, commonly named lactase, is one of the most important enzymes used in dairy processing; it catalyzes the hydrolysis of lactose to its constituent monosaccharides glucose and galactose. Here, a thermostable beta-galactosidase gene bgaB from Bacillus stearothermophilus was cloned and expressed in B. subtilis WB600. The recombinant enzyme was purified by a combination of heat treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography techniques. The purified beta-galactosidase appeared as a single protein band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE gel with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa. Its isoelectric point, determined by polyacryl-amide gel isoelectric focusing, was close to 5.1. The optimum temperature and pH for this beta-galactosidase activity were 70 degrees C and pH 7.0, respectively. Kinetics of thermal inactivation and half-life times for this thermostable enzyme at 65 and 70 degrees C were 50 and 9 h, respectively, and the K(m) and V(max) values were 2.96 mM and 6.62 micromol/min per mg. Metal cations and EDTA could not activate this thermostable enzyme, and some divalent metal ions, namely, Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Sn(2+), inhibited its activity. Thiol reagents had no effect on the enzyme activity, and sulfhydryl group blocking reagents inactivated the enzyme. This enzyme possessed a high level of transgalactosylation activity in hydrolysis of lactose in milk. The results suggest that this recombinant thermostable enzyme may be suitable for both the hydrolysis of lactose and the production of galactooligosaccharides in milk processing. PMID:18420605

  10. Dietary protein and lactose increase translation initiation factor activation and tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jason W; Escobar, Jeffery; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Davis, Teresa A

    2006-02-01

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in muscle and liver of pigs parenterally infused with amino acids and insulin. To examine the effects of enteral protein and carbohydrate on protein synthesis, pigs (n = 42, 1.7 kg body wt) were fed isocaloric milk diets containing three levels of protein (5, 15, and 25 g x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1)) and two levels of lactose (low = 11 and high = 23 g x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1)) from 1 to 6 days of age. On day 7, pigs were gavage fed after 4-h food deprivation, and tissue protein synthesis rates and biomarkers of mRNA translation were assessed. Piglet growth and protein synthesis rates in muscle and liver increased with dietary protein and plateaued at 15 g x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1) (P < 0.001). Growth tended to be greater in high-lactose-fed pigs (P = 0.07). Plasma insulin was lowest in pigs fed 5 g x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1) protein (P < 0.0001). Plasma branched-chain amino acids increased as protein intake increased (P < 0.0001). Muscle (P < 0.001) and liver (P < or = 0.001) ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 and eIF4E-binding protein phosphorylation increased with protein intake and plateaued at 15 g x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1). The results indicate that growth and protein synthesis rates in neonatal pigs are influenced by dietary protein and lactose intake and might be mediated by plasma amino acids and insulin levels. However, feeding protein well above the piglet's requirement does not further stimulate the activation of translation initiation or protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver. PMID:16144813

  11. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  12. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. )

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  13. Transfer of (15)N from oral lactose-ureide to lysine in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan A; Gibson, Neil R; Bundy, Rafe; Hounslow, Angela; Millward, D Joe; Wootton, Stephen A

    2004-09-01

    The metabolic fate of salvaged urea-nitrogen was explored in normal adults who had consumed a diet that provided 36 g protein/day for 7 days. We hypothesised that the colonic microflora utilise nitrogen derived from urea salvage to synthesise lysine in functionally significant amounts for the host. Oral lactose-[(15)N(15)N]ureide is resistant to digestion but is fermented by the colonic microflora to release (15)NH3, which can be used for amino acid synthesis. Prime and intermittent oral doses of lactose-[(15)N(15)N]ureide were ingested for 18 h, urine was collected every 3 h and stools were collected for a further 2 days. Amino acids were isolated from urine and from faecal bacterial protein and the enrichment measured. Compared with baseline values, there was significant enrichment (atoms per cent excess) in faecal bacterial glycine (0.0526), alanine (0.117), lysine (0.0875) and histidine (0.0487), and in urinary glycine (0.016), alanine (0.0144) and lysine (0.0098), but not hisitidine. These data show that the gastrointestinal bacteria can utilise urea-nitrogen in the formation of essential and non-essential amino acids that are available to the host. We estimate that on this low protein diet the amount of lysine from bacterial synthesis and available to the host may be 30 mg/kg/day. These data have important implications for our current perceptions for the dietary requirements for essential amino acids. PMID:15762310

  14. Properties and purification of an active biotinylated lactose permease from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Consler, T G; Persson, B L; Jung, H; Zen, K H; Jung, K; Privé, G G; Verner, G E; Kaback, H R

    1993-08-01

    A simplified approach for purification of functional lactose permease from Escherichia coli is described that is based on the construction of chimeras between the permease and a 100-amino acid residue polypeptide containing the biotin acceptor domain from the oxaloacetate decarboxylase of Klebsiella pneumoniae [Cronan, J. E., Jr. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 10327-10333]. Chimeras were constructed with a factor Xa protease site and the biotin acceptor domain in the middle cytoplasmic loop (loop 6) or at the C terminus of the permease. Each construct catalyzes active lactose transport in cells and right-side-out membrane vesicles. Moreover, the constructs are biotinylated in vivo, and in both chimeras, the factor Xa protease site is accessible from the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane. Both biotinylated permeases bind selectively to immobilized monomeric avidin and are eluted with free biotin in a high state of purity, and the loop 6 chimera catalyzes active transport after reconstitution into proteoliposomes. The methodology described should be applicable to other membrane proteins. PMID:8346199

  15. Dietary supplementation with lactose or artificial sweetener enhances swine gut Lactobacillus population abundance.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Nau, Alexandra; Bravo, David; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-06-01

    The commensal bacteria Lactobacillus are widely used as probiotic organisms conferring a heath benefit on the host. They have been implicated in promoting gut health via the stimulation of host immunity and anti-inflammatory responses, as well as protecting the intestinalmucosa against pathogen invasion. Lactobacilli grow by fermenting sugars and starches and produce lactic acid as their primary metabolic product. For efficient utilisation of varied carbohydrates, lactobacilli have evolved diverse sugar transport and metabolic systems, which are specifically induced by their own substrates. Many bacteria are also capable of sensing and responding to changes in their environment. These sensory responses are often independent of transport or metabolism and are mediated through membrane-spanning receptor proteins. We employed DNA-based pyrosequencing technology to investigate the changes in the intestinal microbiota of piglets weaned to a diet supplemented with either a natural sugar, lactose or an artificial sweetener (SUCRAM®, consisting of saccharin and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC); Pancosma SA). The addition of either lactose or saccharin/NHDC to the piglets' feed dramatically increased the caecal population abundance of Lactobacillus, with concomitant increases in intraluminal lactic acid concentrations. This is the first report of the prebiotic-like effects of saccharin/NHDC, an artificial sweetener, being able to influence the commensal gut microbiota. The identification of the underlying mechanism(s) will assist in designing nutritional strategies for enhancing gut immunity and maintaining gut health. PMID:24382146

  16. Lactose-Functionalized Gold Nanorods for Sensitive and Rapid Serological Diagnosis of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuetao; Tong, Liping; Li, Yong; Pan, Haobo; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Min; Li, Weihao; Chen, Yixin; Li, Qing; Li, Zhongjun; Wang, Huaiyu; Yu, Xue-Feng; Chu, Paul K

    2016-03-01

    Timely and accurate diagnosis of cancer is crucial to cancer treatment. However, serological diagnosis of cancer still faces great challenge because the conventional methodology based on the enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) is costly, time-consuming, and complicated, involving multiple steps. Herein, lactose-functionalized gold nanorods (Lac-GNRs) are fabricated as efficient biosensors to detect cancerous conditions based on the unique surface plasmon resonance properties of GNRs and high specificity of lactose to the galectin-1 cancer biomarker. A trace concentration of galectin-1 as small as 10(-13) M can be detected by Lac-GNRs. The comparative study among BSA, galectin-3, and galectin-1 demonstrates the good specificity of Lac-GNRs to galectin-1 either in aqueous solutions or in the complex and heterogeneous serum specimens. Clinical tests show that the Lac-GNRs biosensors can readily distinguish the serums of cancer patients from those of healthy persons simply by using a microplate reader or even direct visual observation. The Lac-GNRs biosensing platform is highly efficient and easy to use and have great potential in rapid screening of cancer patients. PMID:26883478

  17. Influence of size and surface roughness of large lactose carrier particles in dry powder inhaler formulations.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Martin J; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2010-12-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of both carrier particle size and surface roughness on the aerosol performance of dry powder formulations. Two morphologically distinct grades of lactose, anhydrous (AN) and granulated (GR), were fractionated into 11 discreet sizes up to 300μm, and separately employed as carriers in 2% (w/w) budesonide blends. In vitro deposition studies were performed at 60Lmin(-1) with an Aerolizer(®) DPI. It was found that large carriers can improve dispersion performance, although the effect is more pronounced with greater surface roughness. AN carriers exhibited minimal surface roughness and generally behaved as predicted from the literature, with the smaller carriers outperforming their larger counterparts. In contrast, GR carriers had a high degree of surface roughness, and the dispersion performance of larger carriers exceeded that of the smaller size fractions. Comparing the two lactose grades, AN carriers deposited a greater fraction of the total dose up to the 90-125μm size range, when they were surpassed in performance by the GR carriers. These results suggest that the mechanism of drug detachment varies with the physical properties of the carrier particle population, where surface roughness can alter the predominant detachment mechanism to favor larger carrier particle diameters. PMID:20816928

  18. Monoclonal antibody against a lactose epitope of glycosphingolipids binds to melanoma tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, K; Ekberg, T; Zeuthen, J; Teneberg, S; Karlsson, K A; Rosén, A

    1993-10-01

    Mice were immunized with a neoglycoprotein consisting of a chemically modified carbohydrate moiety (reductively aminated 3'-sialyllactose) linked to human serum albumin. By this procedure an antibody response to the normally non-immunogenic carbohydrate structure was obtained. Hybridomas were established, and monoclonal antibodies were selected in ELISA based on their binding to the saccharide hapten, or to a lactosylceramide-mimicking neoglycolipid, lactose-bis-sulfone. One of the selected antibodies, 2H4, was of particular interest, since it also bound to glycolipids present on melanoma cells. FACS analysis of a panel of 14 melanoma cell lines showed that the 2H4 antibody bound to the majority of these. In frozen, non-fixed sections or paraffin sections of biopsies the monoclonal antibody 2H4 stained melanoma cells, but not tumour infiltrating lymphocytes or normal skin. Detailed immunochemical analysis of 2H4, using thin layer chromatography revealed that it recognized an internal lactose epitope in several glycosphingolipids. PMID:7507746

  19. Development of a digital video-microscopy technique to study lactose crystallisation kinetics in situ.

    PubMed

    Arellano, María Paz; Aguilera, José Miguel; Bouchon, Pedro

    2004-11-15

    Polarised light microscopy was employed non-invasively to monitor lactose crystallisation from non-seeded supersaturated solutions in real time. Images were continuously recorded, processed and characterised by image analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained by refractometry. Three crystallisation temperatures (10, 20 and 30 degrees C) and three different levels of initial relative supersaturation (C/C(s)=1.95; 2.34; 3.15) were investigated. Induction times using the imaging technique proved to be substantially lower than those determined using refractive index. Lactose crystals were isolated digitally to determine geometrical parameters of interest, such as perimeter, diameter, area, roundness and Feret mean, and to derive crystal growth rates. Mean growth rates obtained for single crystals were fitted to a combined mass transfer model (R(2)=0.9766). The model allowed the effects of temperature and supersaturation on crystallisation rate to be clearly identified. It also suggested that, in this set of experiments, surface integration seemed to be the rate controlling step. It is believed that a similar experimental set-up could be implemented in a real food system to characterise a particular process where crystallisation control is of interest and where traditional techniques are difficult to implement. PMID:15519331

  20. Genes associated to lactose metabolism illustrate the high diversity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Christelle F; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Rahman, Abdur; Rondags, Emmanuel; Remenant, Benoît; Zagorec, Monique; Leisner, Jorgen J; Borges, Frédéric; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    The dairy population of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is characterized by a high diversity suggesting a high diversity of the genetic traits linked to the dairy process. As lactose is the main carbon source in milk, the genetics of lactose metabolism was investigated in this LAB. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that the species C. maltaromaticum exhibits genes related to the Leloir and the tagatose-6-phosphate (Tagatose-6P) pathways. More precisely, strains can bear genes related to one or both pathways and several strains apparently do not contain homologs related to these pathways. Analysis at the population scale revealed that the Tagatose-6P and the Leloir encoding genes are disseminated in multiple phylogenetic lineages of C. maltaromaticum: genes of the Tagatose-6P pathway are present in the lineages I, II and III, and genes of the Leloir pathway are present in the lineages I, III and IV. These data suggest that these genes evolved thanks to horizontal transfer, genetic duplication and translocation. We hypothesize that the lac and gal genes evolved in C. maltaromaticum according to a complex scenario that mirrors the high population diversity. PMID:27217362

  1. Glucose Homeostatic Law: Insulin Clearance Predicts the Progression of Glucose Intolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Shinsuke; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Iwaki, Toshinao; Fukuzawa, Hiroki; Komori, Yasunori; Fujii, Masashi; Toyoshima, Yu; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Wataru; Kuroda, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic control of blood glucose is regulated by a complex feedback loop between glucose and insulin, of which failure leads to diabetes mellitus. However, physiological and pathological nature of the feedback loop is not fully understood. We made a mathematical model of the feedback loop between glucose and insulin using time course of blood glucose and insulin during consecutive hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 113 subjects with variety of glucose tolerance including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We analyzed the correlation of the parameters in the model with the progression of glucose intolerance and the conserved relationship between parameters. The model parameters of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion significantly declined from NGT to IGT, and from IGT to T2DM, respectively, consistent with previous clinical observations. Importantly, insulin clearance, an insulin degradation rate, significantly declined from NGT, IGT to T2DM along the progression of glucose intolerance in the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was positively correlated with a product of insulin sensitivity and secretion assessed by the clamp analysis or determined with the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was correlated negatively with postprandial glucose at 2h after oral glucose tolerance test. We also inferred a square-law between the rate constant of insulin clearance and a product of rate constants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in the model, which is also conserved among NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. Insulin clearance shows a conserved relationship with the capacity of glucose disposal among the NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. The decrease of insulin clearance predicts the progression of glucose intolerance. PMID:26623647

  2. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness Retreats For Health Professionals Excerpt from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians ... after surgery (Bruno, 1996) . Back to index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians ...

  3. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and are unable to keep warm.

  4. Autoantibodies to pancreatic hsp60 precede the development of glucose intolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Johansen, H K; Carmi, P; Høiby, N; Cohen, I R

    2001-09-01

    Persons expressing the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from a high risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. The development of diabetes in CF has been attributed, in the past, to the destruction of pancreatic islets and their resident beta-cells secondary to the destruction of the surrounding tissue by mechanical clogging of the pancreatic exocrine ducts. However, the discovery that autoimmunity to the 60-kDa heat shock protein (hsp60) may cause type I diabetes in NOD mice raises the possibility that hsp60 autoimmunity may be involved in CF diabetes too; could the hyperimmunization to bacterial hsp60 characteristic of CF spread to self-hsp60 and hence to autoimmune diabetes? We now report that rising levels of IgG autoantibodies to hsp60 do indeed precede the appearance of glucose intolerance and diabetes in CF patients. We produced a recombinant human pancreatic hsp60 protein and investigated the IgG antibody response to hsp60 in prediabetic and non-diabetic patients with CF. To detect hsp60 autoantibodies in the presence of high levels of antibodies to bacterial hsp60, we absorbed test sera with the 60-kDa GroEL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and used an immunostaining technique. Using this technique, 32 prediabetic CF patients were evaluated over a five-year period, three years, on the average, before the onset of glucose intolerance. We found that a significant increase in hsp60 autoantibody preceded impaired glucose tolerance (P=0.042, n=17), diabetes (P=0.011, n=15) and glucose intolerance (P=0.005, n=32). As has been observed in NOD mice and in type I diabetic patients, the hsp60 autoantibodies decline at the outbreak of glucose intolerance in the CF patients. The association of CF diabetes with the rise and fall of hsp60 autoimmunity suggests that the pathogenesis of the diabetes may not be merely mechanical, but arise in the wake of bacterial hyperimmunisation. PMID:11591125

  5. Mechanisms to dyspnoea and dynamic hyperinflation related exercise intolerance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Varga, Janos

    2015-06-01

    Expiratory flow limitation can develop in parallel with the progression of COPD, and as a consequence, dynamic hyperinflation and lung mechanical abnormalities can develop. Dynamic hyperinflation can cause increased breathlessness and reduction in exercise tolerance. Achievement of critical inspiratory reserve volume is one of the main factors in exercise intolerance. Obesity has specific lung mechanical effects. There is also a difference concerning gender and dyspnoea. Increased nerve activity is characteristic in hyperinflation. Bronchodilator therapy, lung volume reduction surgery, endurance training at submaximal intensity, and heliox or oxygen breathing can decrease the degree of dynamic hyperinflation. PMID:26100306

  6. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  7. Genetic mutation underlying orthostatic intolerance and diagnostic and therapeutic methods relating thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, David (Inventor); Blakely, Randy D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Isolated polynucleotide molecules and peptides encoded by these molecules are used in the analysis of human norepinephrine (NE) transporter variants, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, relating to a human NE transporter polymorphism. By analyzing genomic DNA or amplified genomic DNA, or amplified cDNA derived from mRNA, it is possible to type a human NE transporter with regard to the human NE transporter polymorphism, for example, in the context of diagnosing and treating NE transport impairments, and disorders associated with NE transport impairments, such as orthostatic intolerance.

  8. Structural characterisation of human galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain in complex with glycerol, lactose, 3'-sulfo-lactose, and 2'-fucosyllactose.

    PubMed

    Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J; Blanchard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin with two distinct carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD). Galectin-4 is expressed mainly in the alimentary tract and is proposed to function as a lipid raft and adherens junction stabilizer by its glycan cross-linking capacity. Galectin-4 plays divergent roles in cancer and inflammatory conditions, either promoting or inhibiting each disease progression, depending on the specific pathological condition. The study of galectin-4's ligand-binding profile may help decipher its roles under specific conditions. Here we present the X-ray structures of human galectin-4 N-terminal CRD (galectin-4N) bound to different saccharide ligands. Galectin-4's overall fold and its core interactions to lactose are similar to other galectin CRDs. Galectin-4N recognises the sulfate cap of 3'-sulfated glycans by a weak interaction through Arg45 and two water-mediated hydrogen bonds via Trp84 and Asn49. When galectin-4N interacts with the H-antigen mimic, 2'-fucosyllactose, an interaction is formed between the ring oxygen of fucose and Arg45. The extended binding site of galectin-4N may not be well suited to the A/B-antigen determinants, α-GalNAc/α-Gal, specifically due to clashes with residue Phe47. Overall, galectin-4N favours sulfated glycans whilst galectin-4C prefers blood group determinants. However, the two CRDs of galectin-4 can, to a less extent, recognise each other's ligands. PMID:26828567

  9. Transient lactose malabsorption in patients affected by symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Giorgetti, Gian Marco; Elisei, Walter

    2006-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) may be secondary to several small bowel diseases, and small intestinal overgrowth (SIBO) may be one of them. We looked for a correlation between symptomatic diverticular disease of the colon and LM and assessed whether this correlation may be related to SIBO. Ninety consecutive patients (pts; 39 males, 51 females; mean age, 67.2 years; range, 32-91 years) affected by symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon were evaluated to assess orocecal transit time (OCTT), SIBO, and LM by lactulose and lactose H2 breath test (H2-BT) at entry and after 8 weeks of treatment. OCTT was delayed in 67 of 90 pts (74.44%). Fifty-three of 90 pts (58.88%) showed SIBO, and OCTT was normal in 23 of 90 pts (25.56%). LM was diagnosed in 59 of 90 pts (65.55%): 49 of 59 (71.74%) were simultaneously affected by SIBO and delayed OCTT (and thus 49 of 53 pts [92.45%] with delayed OCTT and SIBO were affected by LM); 3 of 59 pts (5.09%) showed only delayed OCTT; 7 of 59 pts (11.86%) did not show either SIBO or delayed OCTT. The association of LM and SIBO was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Seventy-nine of 86 pts (91.86%) showed normal OCTT, while OCTT remained prolonged but shorter in the remaining 7 pts (8.14%). SIBO was eradicated in all pts completing the study, while a new lactulose H2-BT showed persistence of SIBO in one pt with recurrence of symptomatic diverticular disease. Forty-seven of 59 pts (79.66%) had a normal lactose H2-BT (P < 0.002), while 12 of 59 pts (20.34%) showed persistence of LM. LM disappeared in 46 of 49 pts (93.88%) concurrently with normalization of OCTT and eradication of SIBO (P < 0.002); it also disappeared in 1 of 3 pts (33.33%) previously affected by delayed OCTT (without SIBO) and LM concurrently with normalization of OCTT. On the contrary, it persisted in all pts with normal OCTT and absence of SIBO. Moreover, it persisted also in the pt with recurrence of symptomatic diverticular disease and persistence of SIBO. In conclusion, most pts affected by symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon showed LM, and in more than 70% of cases it disappeared after successful treatment of the colonic disease. PMID:16614952

  10. The effect of LacI autoregulation on the performance of the lactose utilization system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Semsey, Szabolcs; Jauffred, Liselotte; Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Erdossy, János; Stéger, Viktor; Hansen, Sabine; Krishna, Sandeep

    2013-07-01

    The lactose operon of Escherichia coli is a paradigm system for quantitative understanding of gene regulation in prokaryotes. Yet, none of the many mathematical models built so far to study the dynamics of this system considered the fact that the Lac repressor regulates its own transcription by forming a transcriptional roadblock at the O3 operator site. Here we study the effect of autoregulation on intracellular LacI levels and also show that cAMP-CRP binding does not affect the efficiency of autoregulation. We built a mathematical model to study the role of LacI autoregulation in the lactose utilization system. Previously, it has been argued that negative autoregulation can significantly reduce noise as well as increase the speed of response. We show that the particular molecular mechanism, a transcriptional roadblock, used to achieve self-repression in the lac system does neither. Instead, LacI autoregulation balances two opposing states, one that allows quicker response to smaller pulses of external lactose, and the other that minimizes production costs in the absence of lactose. PMID:23658223

  11. Use of continuous lactose fermentation for ethanol production by Kluveromyces marxianus for verification and extension of a biochemically structured model.

    PubMed

    Sansonetti, S; Hobley, T J; Curcio, S; Villadsen, J; Sin, G

    2013-02-01

    A biochemically structured model has been developed to describe the continuous fermentation of lactose to ethanol by Kluveromyces marxianus and allowed metabolic coefficients to be determined. Anaerobic lactose-limited chemostat fermentations at different dilution rates (0.02-0.35h(-1)) were performed. Species specific rates of consumption/formation, as well as yield coefficients were determined. Ethanol yield (0.655 C-mol ethanol(∗)C-mol lactose(-1)) was as high as 98% of theoretical. The modeling procedure allowed calculation of maintenance coefficients for lactose consumption and ethanol production of m(s)=0.6029 and m(e)=0.4218 (C-mol) and (C-molh)(-1), respectively. True yield coefficients for biomass, ethanol and glycerol production were calculated to be Y(true)(sx)=0.114, Y(true)(ex)=0.192 and Y(sg)=2.250 (C-mol) and (C-mol)(-1), respectively. Model calculated maintenance and true yield coefficients agreed very closely with those determined by regressions of the experimental data. The model developed provides a solid basis for the rational design of optimised fermentation of cheese whey. PMID:23334030

  12. An efficient synthesis of novel carbocyclic nucleosides with use of ring-closing metathesis from D-lactose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Hee; Shim, Myung Jung; Ro, Bong Oh; Ko, Ok Hyun

    2002-09-20

    This paper describes an efficient synthetic route for various types of novel carbocyclic nucleosides. The required stereochemistry of the targeted nucleosides was successfully obtained with use of Grubbs cyclization and Trost allylic alkylation from the carbohydrate chiral template "D-lactose". PMID:12227822

  13. Study of whey fermentation by kefir immobilized on low cost supports using 14C-labelled lactose.

    PubMed

    Soupioni, Magdalini; Golfinopoulos, Aristidis; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2013-10-01

    Brewer's Spent Grains (BSG) and Malt Spent Rootlets (MSR) were used as supports for kefir cells immobilization and the role of lactose uptake rate by kefir in the positive activity of produced biocatalysts during whey fermentation was investigated. Lactose uptake rate by the immobilized cells was recorded using (14)C-labelled lactose and the effect of various conditions (pH, temperature and kind of support) on it and consequently on fermentation time and ethanol production was examined. The results showed that lactose uptake rate was correlated to fermentation rate and increased as temperature was increased up to 30°C at pH 5.5. The same results have been recently noticed by using biocatalysts with Delignified Cellulosic Materials (DCM) and Gluten Pellets (GP), but fermentation time of about 7h by kefir immobilized on DCM and BSG resulted to two fold lower than that on GP and MSR. The highest alcohol concentration was observed by MSR. PMID:23385156

  14. The high fermentative metabolism of Kluyveromyces marxianus UFV-3 relies on the increased expression of key lactose metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Raphael H S; Silveira, Wendel B; Fietto, Luciano G; Passos, Flávia M L

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain insights about the factors that determine the lactose fermentative metabolism of Kluyveromyces marxianus UFV-3. K. marxianus UFV-3 and Kluyveromyces lactis JA6 were cultured in a minimal medium containing different lactose concentrations (ranging from 0.25 to 64 mmol l(-1)) under aerobic and hypoxic conditions to evaluate their growth kinetics, gene expression and enzymatic activity. The increase in lactose concentration and the decrease in oxygen level favoured ethanol yield for both yeasts but in K. marxianus UFV-3 the effect was more pronounced. Under hypoxic conditions, the activities of β-galactosidase and pyruvate decarboxylase from K. marxianus UFV-3 were significantly higher than those in K. lactis JA6. The expression of the LAC4 (β-galactosidase), RAG6 (pyruvate decarboxylase), GAL7 (galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) and GAL10 (epimerase) genes in K. marxianus UFV-3 was higher under hypoxic conditions than under aerobic conditions. The high expression of genes of the Leloir pathway, LAC4 and RAG6, associated with the high activity of β-galactosidase and pyruvate decarboxylase contribute to the high fermentative flux in K. marxianus UFV-3. These data on the fermentative metabolism of K. marxianus UFV-3 will be useful for optimising the conversion of cheese whey lactose to ethanol. PMID:22068918

  15. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Friedl, A; Maddox, I S

    2014-12-01

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 g L(-1) lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system, a productivity of 0.43 g L(-1) h(-1) was obtained which is 307 % of that achieved in a non-product removal batch reactor (0.14 g L(-1) h(-1)) where approximately 60 g L(-1) whey permeate lactose was fermented. The productivity obtained in this system is much higher than that achieved in other product removal systems (perstraction 0.21 g L(-1) h(-1) and gas stripping 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1)). This membrane was also used to concentrate butanol from approximately 2.50 g L(-1) in the reactor to 755 g L(-1). Using this membrane, ABE selectivities and fluxes of 24.4-44.3 and 0.57-4.05 g m(-2) h(-1) were obtained, respectively. Pervaporation restricts removal of water from the reaction mixture thus requiring significantly less energy for product recovery when compared to gas stripping. PMID:25326775

  16. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  17. Deciphering the dynamics of changing proteins of tolerant and intolerant wheat seedlings subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Om Prakash; Mishra, Vagish; Singh, N K; Tiwari, Ratan; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, R K; Sharma, Indu

    2015-01-01

    Indulgence of heat defense mechanism is crucial to allay undesirable effects by developing significant heat tolerant plants. Translation of heat stress related genes into proteins is a key tolerance strategy tailored by plants. In order to understand the possible mechanisms of heat tolerance in wheat at proteomic level, two wheat genotypes (WH 730-heat tolerant; Raj 4014-heat intolerant) along with their 10 extreme recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were exposed to heat stress (35 °C for 6 h) to identify important stress related proteins. 2-DE coupled with MALDI TOF/TOF of wheat seedlings revealed 14 differentially regulated protein spots. Compared to Raj 4014, 3 proteins viz. Rubisco activase A, Con A and PEP carboxylase 1 were differentially regulated only in WH 730 implying their practical role in heat tolerance. Above and beyond, increased expression of cytochrome b6f complex and catalase in tolerant RIL population signifies their role in accelerated electron flow during heat stress to cope up with the stress. Our results suggests that, compared to intolerant parent and RILs, tolerant parent and RILs might be actively modulating protein involved in photosynthesis, signal transduction and defense which signifies the activation of adaptation mechanism under heat stress. PMID:25218843

  18. Dynamic tracheal collapse as a cause of exercise intolerance in a thoroughbred.

    PubMed

    Tetens, J; Hubert, J D; Eddy, A L; Moore, R M

    2000-03-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred filly was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of exercise intolerance. Resting videoendoscopic evaluation (i.e., while the horse was standing) of the nasopharynx and trachea revealed right arytenoid paresis and a tracheal defect that was 100 cm distal to the external nares. Surgery, consisting of a right prosthetic laryngoplasty, was performed. However, postoperative videoendoscopic evaluation revealed minimal abduction of the affected arytenoid cartilage. Dynamic videoendoscopic evaluation (i.e., while the horse was exercising) revealed the right arytenoid to be fixed in a submaximal position with no evidence of collapse into the airway. When the endoscope was positioned in the midcervical tracheal region, marked tracheal collapse was identified during exercise. Tracheal collapse can critically limit athletic function. Treatment of tracheal collapse depends on causative factors, the length of the trachea involved, and accessibility of the affected tracheal segment. The use of dynamic tracheal videoendoscopy should be considered in athletic horses with exercise intolerance in which the cause cannot be determined from resting or dynamic videoendoscopic evaluations of the nasopharynx. PMID:10707689

  19. Impact of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Intolerance of Uncertainty in Patients with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kuk; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Borah; Choi, Tai Kiu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a transdiagnostic construct in various anxiety and depressive disorders. However, the relationship between IU and panic symptom severity is not yet fully understood. We examined the relationship between IU, panic, and depressive symptoms during mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in patients with panic disorder. Methods We screened 83 patients with panic disorder and subsequently enrolled 69 of them in the present study. Patients participating in MBCT for panic disorder were evaluated at baseline and at 8 weeks using the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results There was a significant decrease in scores on the IUS (p<0.001), PDSS (p<0.001), and BDI (p<0.001) following MBCT for panic disorder. Pre-treatment IUS scores significantly correlated with pre-treatment PDSS (p=0.003) and BDI (p=0.003) scores. We also found a significant association between the reduction in IU and PDSS after controlling for the reduction in the BDI score (p<0.001). Conclusion IU may play a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder. MBCT is effective in lowering IU in patients with panic disorder. PMID:27081380

  20. Defective insulin secretion by chronic glucagon receptor activation in glucose intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, Linda; Omar, Bilal; Valeur, Anders; Fosgerau, Keld; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Stimulation of insulin secretion by short-term glucagon receptor (GCGR) activation is well characterized; however, the effect of long-term GCGR activation on β-cell function is not known, but of interest, since hyperglucagonemia occurs early during development of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we examined whether chronic GCGR activation affects insulin secretion in glucose intolerant mice. To induce chronic GCGR activation, high-fat diet fed mice were continuously (2 weeks) infused with the stable glucagon analog ZP-GA-1 and challenged with oral glucose and intravenous glucose±glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). Islets were isolated to evaluate the insulin secretory response to glucose±GLP1 and their pancreas were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. Two weeks of ZP-GA-1 infusion reduced insulin secretion both after oral and intravenous glucose challenges in vivo and in isolated islets. These inhibitory effects were corrected for by GLP1. Also, we observed increased β-cell area and islet size. We conclude that induction of chronic ZP-GA-1 levels in glucose intolerant mice markedly reduces insulin secretion, and thus, we suggest that chronic activation of the GCGR may contribute to the failure of β-cell function during development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26698567