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Sample records for laguna salada fault

  1. Late quaternary activity of the Laguna Salada fault in northern Baja California, Mexico

    E-print Network

    Mueller, Karl

    Thomas K. Rockwell ABSTRACT Faulted alluvial fans and bajadas along the central Laguna Salada fault zone in northern Baja California record a recurrent history of oblique-slip Holocene earth- quakes. Alluvial. The recurrence interval determined from displaced alluvial deposits that are dated by soil profile development

  2. Long-term slip rates of the Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault, southern California, by U-series Dating of Pedogenic Carbonate in Progressively Offset Alluvial fan Remnants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, K. E.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Elsinore-Laguna Salada (ELS) fault is one of the principal strands of the San Andreas fault system in southern California, however its seismic potential is often de-emphasized due to previous estimates of a low slip rate. Nevertheless, the fault zone has produced two historic earthquakes over M6, with the 1892 event estimated at >M7; thus further investigation of the long-term slip rate on the ELS fault is warranted. On the western slopes of the Coyote Mountains (CM), southwest Imperial Valley, a series of alluvial fans are progressively offset by the Elsinore fault. These fans can be correlated to their source drainages via distinctive clast assemblages, thereby defining measurable offsets on the fault. Dating of the CM fans (to compute slip rates), however, is challenging. Organic materials appropriate for C-14 dating are rare or absent in the arid, oxidizing environment. Cosmogenic surface exposure techniques are limited by the absence of suitable sample materials and are inapplicable to numerous buried fan remnants that are otherwise excellent strain markers. Pedogenic carbonate datable by U-series, however, occurs in CM soil profiles, ubiquitously developed in fan gravels, and is apparent in deposits as young as ~1 ka. In CM gravels 10's ka and older, carbonate forms continuous, dense, yellow coatings up to 3 mm thick on the undersides of clasts. Powdery white carbonate may completely engulf clasts, but is not dateable. Carefully selected samples of dense, innermost carbonate lamina weighing 10's of milligrams and analyzed by TIMS, are geochemically favorable for precise U-series dating (e.g., U = 1-1.5 ppm, median 238U/232Th ~ 7), and yield reproducible ages for coatings from the same microstratigraphic horizon (e.g., 48.2 ± 2.7 and 49.9 ± 2.2 ka), indicating that U-Th systems have remained closed and that inherited coatings, though present, have been avoided. Accordingly, U-series on pedogenic carbonate provides reliable minimum ages for deposition of host landforms, thereby facilitating determination of maximum bounds on corresponding slip rates. Results to date show that pedogenic carbonate dating in the CM has a useful range of at least 140 ka, thus progressively offset geomorphic surfaces in the CM study area afford the opportunity to examine the pattern of slip on the Elsinore fault over time scales from circa 10 to >100 ka.

  3. Triggered Fault Slip in Southern California Associated with the 2010 Sierra El Mayor-Cucapah, Baja California, Mexico, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, M. J.; Treiman, J. A.; Kendrick, K. J.; Lienkaemper, J. J.; Wei, M.; Weldon, R. J.; Bilham, R. G.; Fielding, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    Surface fracturing (triggered slip) occurred in the central Salton Trough and to the southwest, in the Yuha Desert area—all in association with the 4 April 2010 (M7.2) El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake and its aftershocks. Triggered slip in the central Salton Trough occurred on the ‘frequent movers’: the southern San Andreas, Coyote Creek, Superstition Hills, and Imperial Faults, all of which have slipped in previous moderate to large, local and regional earthquakes in the past five decades. Other faults in the central Salton Trough that also slipped in 2010 include the Wienert Fault (southeastern section of the Superstition Hills Fault), the Kalin Fault (in the Brawley Seismic Zone), and the Brawley Fault Zone; triggered slip had not been reported on these faults in the past. Geologic measures of slip on faults in the central Salton Trough ranged from 1 to 18 mm, and everywhere was located where previous primary (tectonic) or triggered slip has occurred. Triggered slip in the Yuha Desert area occurred along at least two dozen faults, only some of which were known before the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. From east to northwest, slip occurred in seven general areas; 1) in the Northern Centinela Fault Zone (newly named), 2) along unnamed faults south of Pinto Wash, 3) along the Yuha Fault (newly named), 4) along both east and west branches of the Laguna Salada Fault, 5) along the Yuha Well Fault Zone (newly revised name), 6) along the Ocotillo Fault (newly named), and 7) along the southeastern-most section of the Elsinore Fault. Faults that slipped in the Yuha Desert area include northwest-trending right-lateral faults, northeast-trending left-lateral faults, and north-south faults, some of which had dominantly vertical slip. Triggered slip along the Ocotillo and Elsinore Faults occurred only in association with the 14 June 2010 (M5.7) aftershock, which also initiated slip along other faults near the town of Ocotillo. Triggered slip on faults in the Yuha Desert area was most commonly less than 20 mm, but two significant exceptions are slip of about 50-60 mm on the Yuha Fault and of about 80 mm on the Ocotillo Fault. All triggered slips in the Yuha Desert area occurred along pre-existing faults, whether previously recognized or not.

  4. Diversity of halophilic bacteria isolated from Rambla Salada, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luque, Rocío; Béjar, Victoria; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2014-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the diversity of the halophilic bacteria community from Rambla Salada during the years 2006 and 2007. We collected a total of 364 strains, which were then identified by means of phenotypic tests and by the hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA sequences (around 500 bp). The ribosomal data showed that the isolates belonged to Proteobacteria (72.5%), Firmicutes (25.8%), Actinobacteria (1.4%), and Bacteroidetes (0.3%) phyla, with Gammaproteobacteria the predominant class. Halomonas was the most abundant genus (41.2% isolates) followed by Marinobacter (12.9% isolates) and Bacillus (12.6% isolates). In addition, 9 strains showed <97% sequence identity with validly described species and may well represent new taxa. The diversity of the bacterial community analyzed with the DOTUR package determined 139 operational taxonomic units at 3% genetic distance level. Rarefaction curves and diversity indexes demonstrated that our collection of isolates adequately represented all the bacterial community at Rambla Salada that can be grown under the conditions used in this work. We found that the sampling season influenced the composition of the bacterial community, and bacterial diversity was higher in 2007; this fact could be related to lower salinity at this sampling time. PMID:25403824

  5. The Pueblo of Laguna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    Proximity to urban areas, a high employment rate, development of natural resources and high academic achievement are all serving to bring Laguna Pueblo to a period of rapid change on the reservation. While working to realize its potential in the areas of natural resources, commercialism and education, the Pueblo must also confront the problems of…

  6. Diversity of culturable halophilic archaea isolated from Rambla Salada, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luque, R; González-Domenech, C M; Llamas, I; Quesada, E; Béjar, V

    2012-03-01

    We have studied the diversity of culturable halophilic Archaea at Rambla Salada, Murcia (south-eastern Spain). We made 8 samplings at different places in this habitat during the years 2006 and 2007 and isolated a total of 49 strains, which were identified by means of phenotypic tests and the hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene sequences (around 500 bp). The ribosomal data showed that the isolates belonged to 12 genera within the Halobacteriaceae family, with Haloferax and Natrinema being the most abundant. Five strains showed less than 97% sequence identity with validly described species and may well represent new taxa. All the strains grew best with around 25% w/v salts, required high concentrations of NaCl and magnesium and produced red to pink colonies. They were facultative anaerobes with both respiratory and fermentative metabolisms. The diversity of the archaeal community was analysed with the MOTHUR package. We identified 14 OTUs at the 3% genetic distance level and found quite high diversity. Rarefaction curves of richness estimators and diversity indices demonstrated that our collection of isolates represented the archaeal community at Rambla Salada that can be isolated under the conditions used in this work. This is the first report to be published on the culturable archaea at Rambla Salada, an area of considerable ecological interest. PMID:22219037

  7. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source basin and each alluvial fan on both sides of the fault. To accomplish this, we used a portable grid and classified more than 300 clasts at each of more than 90 sites along the fault. We found a very good fit between displaced alluvial fan elements and their inferred source canyons, but a poor match with the alluvium from neighboring canyons, which allows us to resolve the long-term offset. Planned dating of the pedogenic carbonate associated with these buried soils will allow the resolution of the mid- to long-term slip rates over multiple time frames to test the constancy of fault slip rate during the late Quaternary, as well as to test the lateral variations in rate along the fault.

  8. The LAGUNA-LBNO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, Margherita Buizza

    LAGUNA-LBNO is a Design Study funded by the European Commission to develop the design of a large and deep underground neutrino observatory; its physics program involves the study of neutrino oscillations at long baselines, the investigation of the Grand Unification of elementary forces and the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Building on the successful format and on the findings of the previous LAGUNA Design Study, LAGUNA-LBNO is more focused and is specifically considering Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations (LBNO) with neutrino beams from CERN. Two sites, Fréjus (in France at 130 km) and Pyhäsalmi (in Finland at 2300 km), are being considered. Three different detector technologies are being studied: Water Cherenkov, Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Argon. Recently the LAGUNA-LBNO consortium has submitted an Expression of Interest for a very long baseline neutrino experiment, selecting as a first priority the option of a Liquid Argon detector at Pyhäsalmi. Detailed potential studies have been curried out for the determination of the neutrino Mass Hierarchy and the discovery of the CP-violation, using a conventional neutrino beam from the CERN SPS with a power of 750 kW.

  9. Spirit Does a 'Jig' at Laguna Hollow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This front hazard-avoidance image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 45 shows Spirit in its new location after a drive totaling about 20 meters (65.6 feet). The circular depression that Spirit is in, dubbed 'Laguna Hollow,' was most likely formed by a small impact.

    Scientists were interested in reaching Laguna Hollow because of the location's abundance of very fine, dust-like soil. The fine material could be atmospheric dust that has settled into the depression, or a salt-based material that causes crusts in the soils and coating on rocks. Either way, scientists hope to be able to characterize the material and broaden their understanding of this foreign world.

    To help scientists get a better look at the variations in the fine-grained dust at different depths, controllers commanded Spirit to 'jiggle' its wheels in the soil before backing away to a distance that allows the area to be reached with the robotic arm. Spirit will likely spend part of sol 46 analyzing this area with the instruments on its robotic arm.

  10. Faulted Barn

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This barn is faulted through the middle; the moletrack is seen in the foreground with the viewer standing on the fault. From the air one can see metal roof panels of the barn that rotated as the barn was faulted....

  11. Performance of the LAGUNA pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Caird, R.S.; Fowler, C.M.; Greene, A.E.; Kruse, H.W.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Oona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the LAGUNA experimental series of the Los Alamos National Laboratory TRAILMASTER program is to accelerate an annular aluminum plasma z-pinch to greater than one hundred kilojoules of implosion kinetic energy. To accomplish this, an electrical pulse >5.5 MA must be delivered to a 20 nH load in approx.1 ..mu..s. The pulsed power system for these experiments consists of a capacitor bank for initial energy storage, a helical explosive-driven magnetic-flux compression generator for the prime power supply and opening and closing switches for power conditioning. While we have not yet achieved our design goal of 15 MA delivered to the inductive store of the system, all major components have functioned successfully at the 10 MA level. Significant successes and some difficulties experienced in these experiments are described.

  12. Fault management Fault management

    E-print Network

    Giaccone, Paolo

    degradation 1 3% Natural events 1 3% Hard Failures: service interruption Network Management and Qo in the event of a failure causing few or no Network Management and QoS Provisioning - 7Andrea Bianco ­ TNGFault management Pag. 1 Fault management Network Management and QoS Provisioning - 1Andrea Bianco

  13. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H. (1614 NW. 106th St., Vancouver, WA 98665)

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  14. Shallow Landslide Assessment using SINMAP in Laguna, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonus, A. A. B.; Rabonza, M. L.; Alemania, M. K. B.; Alejandrino, I. K.; Ybanez, R. L.; Lagmay, A. M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the tectonic environment and tropical climate in the Philippines, both rain-induced and seismic-induced landslides are common in the country. Numerous hazard mapping activities are regularly conducted by both academic and government institutions using various tools and software. One such software is Stability Index Mapping (SINMAP), a terrain stability mapping tool applied to shallow translational landslide phenomena controlled by shallow groundwater flow convergence. SINMAP modelling combines a slope stability model with a steady-state hydrology model to delineate areas prone to shallow landslides. DOST- Project NOAH, one of the hazard-mapping initiatives of the government, aims to map all landslide hazard in the Philippines using both computer models as well as validating ground data. Laguna, located in the island of Luzon, is one such area where mapping and modelling is conducted. SINMAP modelling of the Laguna area was run with a 5-meter Interferomteric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) derived digital terrain model (DTM). Topographic, soil-strength and physical hydrologic parameters, which include cohesion, angle of friction, bulk density and hydraulic conductivity, were assigned to each pixel of a given DTM grid to compute for the corresponding factor of safety. The landslide hazard map generated using SINMAP shows 2% of the total land area is highly susceptible in Santa Mara, Famy, Siniloan, Pangil, Pakil and Los Ba?os Laguna and 10% is moderately susceptible in the eastern parts of Laguna. The data derived from the model is consistent with both ground validation surveys as well as landslide inventories derived from high resolution satellite imagery from 2003 to 2013. With these combined computer and on-the-ground data, it is useful in identifying no-build zone areas and in monitoring activities of the local government units and other agencies concerned. This provides a reasonable delineation of hazard zones for shallow landslide susceptible areas of Laguna Philippines.

  15. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to examine pilot mental models of the aircraft subsystems and their use in diagnosis tasks. Future research plans include piloted simulation evaluation of the diagnosis decision aiding concepts and crew interface issues. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  16. A geophysical and geological study of Laguna de Ayarza, a Guatemalan caldera lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Paull, C.K.; Newhall, C.G.; Bradbury, J.P.; Ziagos, J.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic and geophysical data from Laguna de Ayarza, a figure-8-shaped doublecaldera lake in the Guatemalan highlands, show no evidence of postcaldera eruptive tectonic activity. The bathymetry of the lake has evolved as a result of sedimentary infilling. The western caldera is steep-sided and contains a large flat-floored central basin 240 m deep. The smaller, older, eastern caldera is mostly filled by coalescing delta fans and is connected with the larger caldera by means of a deep channel. Seismicreflection data indicate that at least 170 m of flat-lying unfaulted sediments partly fill the central basin and that the strata of the pre-eruption edifice have collapsed partly along inward-dipping ring faults and partly by more chaotic collapses. These sediments have accumulated in the last 23,000 years at a minimum average sedimentation rate of 7 m/103 yr. The upper 9 m of these sediments is composed of > 50% turbidites, interbedded with laminated clayey silts containing separate diatom and ash layers. The bottom sediments have >1% organic material, an average of 4% pyrite, and abundant biogenic gas, all of which demonstrate that the bottom sediments are anoxic. Although thin (<0.5 cm) ash horizons are common, only one thick (7-16 cm) primary ash horizon could be identified in piston cores. Alterations in the mineralogy and variations in the diatom assemblage suggest magnesium-rich hydrothermal activity. ?? 1985.

  17. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  18. Study of the Effects of Land Use and Land Cover in Laguna Grande Bioluminescent Bay

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Study of the Effects of Land Use and Land Cover in Laguna Grande Bioluminescent Bay Maribel is the Laguna Grande in Las Croabas Fajardo, Puerto Rico. The bay is considered bioluminescent due to the high on November 18, 2013 the bioluminescent of the bay greatly declined. Many hypotheses were mentioned

  19. Antineutrino flux from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    E-print Network

    Marisol Chavez-Estrada; Alexis A. Aguilar-Arevalo

    2015-09-09

    We present a calculation of the antineutrino flux produced by the reactors at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in M\\'exico, based on the antineutrino spectra produced in the decay chains of the fission fragments of the main isotopes in the reactor core, and their fission rates, that have been calculated using the DRAGON simulation code. We also present an estimate of the number of expected events in a detector made of plastic scintillator with a mass of 1 ton, at 100 m from the reactor cores.

  20. Antineutrino flux from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    E-print Network

    Chavez-Estrada, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    We present a a calculation of the antineutrino flux produced by the reactors at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in M\\'exico, based on the antineutrino spectra produced in the decay chains of the fission fragments of the main isotopes in the reactor core, and their fission rates, that have been calculated using the DRAGON simulation code. We also present an estimate of the number of expected events in a detector made of plastic scintillator with a mass of 1 ton, at 100 m from the reactor cores.

  1. Possibilities For The LAGUNA Projects At The Frejus Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mosca, Luigi

    2010-11-24

    The present laboratory (LSM) at the Frejus site and the project of a first extension of it, mainly aimed at the next generation of dark matter and double beta decay experiments, are briefly reviewed. Then the main characteristics of the LAGUNA cooperation and Design Study network are summarized. Seven underground sites in Europe are considered in LAGUNA and are under study as candidates for the installation of Megaton scale detectors using three different techniques: a liquid Argon TPC (GLACIER), a liquid scintillator detector (LENA) and a Water Cerenkov (MEMPHYS), all mainly aimed at investigation of proton decay and properties of neutrinos from SuperNovae and other astrophysical sources as well as from accelerators (Super-beams and/or Beta-beams from CERN). One of the seven sites is located at Frejus, near the present LSM laboratory, and the results of its feasibility study are presented and discussed. Then the physics potential of a MEMPHYS detector installed in this site are emphasized both for non-accelerator and for neutrino beam based configurations. The MEMPHYNO prototype with its R and D programme is presented. Finally a possible schedule is sketched.

  2. Remote sensing analysis for fault-zones detection in the Central Andean Plateau (Catamarca, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traforti, Anna; Massironi, Matteo; Zampieri, Dario; Carli, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been extensively used to detect the structural framework of investigated areas, which includes lineaments, fault zones and fracture patterns. The identification of these features is fundamental in exploration geology, as it allows the definition of suitable sites for the exploitation of different resources (e.g. ore mineral, hydrocarbon, geothermal energy and groundwater). Remote sensing techniques, typically adopted in fault identification, have been applied to assess the geological and structural framework of the Laguna Blanca area (26°35'S-66°49'W). This area represents a sector of the south-central Andes localized in the Argentina region of Catamarca, along the south-eastern margin of the Puna plateau. The study area is characterized by a Precambrian low-grade metamorphic basement intruded by Ordovician granitoids. These rocks are unconformably covered by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Miocene age, followed by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of Upper Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene age. All these units are cut by two systems of major faults, locally characterized by 15-20 m wide damage zones. The detection of main tectonic lineaments in the study area was firstly carried out by classical procedures: image sharpening of Landsat 7 ETM+ images, directional filters applied to ASTER images, medium resolution Digital Elevation Models analysis (SRTM and ASTER GDEM) and hill shades interpretation. In addition, a new approach in fault zone identification, based on multispectral satellite images classification, has been tested in the Laguna Blanca area and in other sectors of south-central Andes. In this perspective, several prominent fault zones affecting basement and granitoid rocks have been sampled. The collected fault gouge samples have been analyzed with a Field-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer. We acquired bidirectional reflectance spectra, from 0.35?m to 2.5?m with 1nm spectral sampling, of the sampled fault rocks. Subsequently, two different Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classifications were applied to ASTER images: the first one based on fault rock spectral signatures resampled at the ASTER sensor resolution; the second one based on spectral signatures retrieved from specific Region of Interest (ROI), which were directly derived from the ASTER image on the analyzed fault zones. The SAM classification based on the spectral signatures of fault rocks gave outstanding results since it was able to classify the analyzed fault zone, both in terms of length and width. Moreover, in some specific cases, this SAM classification identified not only the sampled fault zone, but also other prominent neighboring faults cutting the same host rock. These results define the SAM supervised classification on ASTER images as a tool to identify prominent fault zones directly on the base of fault-rocks spectra.

  3. Fish for the City: Urban Political Ecologies of Laguna Lake Aquaculture 

    E-print Network

    Saguin, Kristian Karlo Cordova

    2013-10-31

    The dissertation tells the story of the production of socionatures through the development of aquaculture in Laguna Lake. The state introduced lake aquaculture to supplement fisherfolk livelihoods and improve fish production ...

  4. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-24

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R and D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  5. Planning for Water Scarcity: The Vulnerability of the Laguna Region, Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Sanchez Flores, Maria Del Rosario

    2010-10-12

    . Kaiser Dr. John R. Giardino This dissertation examined declining groundwater availability and management strategies for addressing water shortages in the Laguna region located in the states of Coahuila and Durango. Excessive pumping... of groundwater in the Laguna region has resulted in a dramatic decline in the water level of the aquifer and in the region?s water supply. Since agriculture has been highly dependent on groundwater, this may lead dramatic changes in the agricultural sector...

  6. Late Holocene air temperature variability reconstructed from the sediments of Laguna Escondida, Patagonia, Chile (4530S)

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    in Northern Chilean Patagonia, Lago Castor (45°36S, 71°47W) and Laguna Escondida (45°31S, 71°49W). Radiometric dating (210 Pb, 137 Cs, 14 C-AMS) suggests that the cores reach back to c. 900 BC (Laguna Escondida changes and tephra layer deposition. We found eight macroscopic tephras (0.2­5.5 cm thick) dated at 1950

  7. Lithologic controls on mineralization at the Lagunas Norte high-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit, northern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerpa, Luis M.; Bissig, Thomas; Kyser, Kurt; McEwan, Craig; Macassi, Arturo; Rios, Hugo W.

    2013-06-01

    The 13.1-Moz high-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit of Lagunas Norte, Alto Chicama District, northern Peru, is hosted in weakly metamorphosed quartzites of the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Chimú Formation and in overlying Miocene volcanic rocks of dacitic to rhyolitic composition. The Dafne and Josefa diatremes crosscut the quartzites and are interpreted to be sources of the pyroclastic volcanic rocks. Hydrothermal activity was centered on the diatremes and four hydrothermal stages have been defined, three of which introduced Au ± Ag mineralization. The first hydrothermal stage is restricted to the quartzites of the Chimú Formation and is characterized by silice parda, a tan-colored aggregate of quartz-auriferous pyrite-rutile ± digenite infilling fractures and faults, partially replacing silty beds and forming cement of small hydraulic breccia bodies. The ?34S values for pyrite (1.7-2.2 ‰) and digenite (2.1 ‰) indicate a magmatic source for the sulfur. The second hydrothermal stage resulted in the emplacement of diatremes and the related volcanic rocks. The Dafne diatreme features a relatively impermeable core dominated by milled slate from the Chicama Formation, whereas the Josefa diatreme only contains Chimú Formation quartzite clasts. The third hydrothermal stage introduced the bulk of the mineralization and affected the volcanic rocks, the diatremes, and the Chimú Formation. In the volcanic rocks, classic high-sulfidation epithermal alteration zonation exhibiting vuggy quartz surrounded by a quartz-alunite and a quartz-alunite-kaolinite zone is observed. Company data suggest that gold is present in solid solution or micro inclusions in pyrite. In the quartzite, the alteration is subtle and is manifested by the presence of pyrophyllite or kaolinite in the silty beds, the former resulting from relatively high silica activities in the fluid. In the quartzite, gold mineralization is hosted in a fracture network filled with coarse alunite, auriferous pyrite, and enargite. Alteration and mineralization in the breccias were controlled by permeability, which depends on the type and composition of the matrix, cement, and clast abundance. Coarse alunite from the main mineralization stage in textural equilibrium with pyrite and enargite has ?34S values of 24.8-29.4 ‰ and {?^{18 }}{{O}_{{S{{O}_4}}}} values of 6.8-13.9 ‰, consistent with H2S as the dominant sulfur species in the mostly magmatic fluid and constraining the fluid composition to low pH (0-2) and log fO2 of -28 to -30. Alunite-pyrite sulfur isotope thermometry records temperatures of 190-260 °C; the highest temperatures corresponding to samples from near the diatremes. Alunite of the third hydrothermal stage has been dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 17.0 ± 0.22 Ma. The fourth hydrothermal stage introduced only modest amounts of gold and is characterized by the presence of massive alunite-pyrite in fractures, whereas barite, drusy quartz, and native sulfur were deposited in the volcanic rocks. The {?^{18 }}{{O}_{{S{{O}_4}}}} values of stage IV alunite vary between 11.5 and 11.7 ‰ and indicate that the fluid was magmatic, an interpretation also supported by the isotopic composition of barite (?34S = 27.1 to 33.8 ‰ and {?^{18 }}{{O}_{{S{{O}_4}}}} = 8.1 to 12.7 ‰). The ?34Spy-alu isotope thermometry records temperatures of 210 to 280 °C with the highest values concentrated around the Josefa diatreme. The Lagunas Norte deposit was oxidized to a depth of about 80 m below the current surface making exploitation by heap leach methods viable.

  8. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  9. Silicic Magmas Erupted From the Laguna de Bay Caldera, Macolod Corridor, Luzon, Philippines: Geochemistry and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.; Vogel, T. A.; Arpa, M. B.; Patino, L. C.; Cantane, S. G.; Arcilla, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Laguna de Bay Caldera is a depression 200 km2 in diameter that occurs within the Macolod Corridor. The Macalod corridor is a NE-SW zone of rifting through the central part of Luzon that was the site of extensive Pliestocene to Holocene volcanism, including major pyroclastic eruptions from the Laguna de Bay Caldera. This caldera has erupted large volumes of pyroclastic material, with poorly constrained published ages from < 27 ka to > 50 ka. The range in pumice sample composition in these flow units is from 53 to 69 wt. % SiO2. The abundant silicic compositions (>64 wt. % SiO2) are the focus of this investigation. Published chemical data from two nearby and relatively young, subduction related, stratavolcanoes, Taal and Makiling, show that both also contain silicic deposits. A comparison of theses silicic deposits to the silicic samples from Laguna de Bay indicate that the Laguna de Bay pyroclastic deposits contain much higher K2O/Na2O (< 1 for both Taal and Makiling and >6 for Laguna de Bay). Sr concentrations in the silicic samples from Laguna de Bay are high (> 250 ppm), which precludes large amount of plagioclase fractionation. The small Eu anomaly is consistent with this interpretation. The REE element patterns for Laguna de Bay are LREE enriched with flat HREE. No depletion occurs in the middle REE. The lack of depletion in the middle REE is in contrast to a significant concave upward pattern for the Makiling samples, an indication of amphibole in the source (no REE data are available for Taal Volcano). Our preliminary conclusions are that the silicic samples from Laguna comprise distinct compositional groups, which may be interpreted as distinct magma batches. The very high K2O/Na2O values can be used to argue against the origin of these silicic magmas by fractional crystallization or partial melting of basaltic compositions. Melting or assimilation of a more evolved source must be involved. Evolved preexisting continental crust is absent in this area. Therefore we propose that the origin of the silicic magmas from the Laguna de Bay caldera is related to melting of preexisting subduction related, evolved crust.

  10. Factors controlling navigation-channel Shoaling in Laguna Madre, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Nava, R.C.; Arhelger, M.

    2001-01-01

    Shoaling in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway of Laguna Madre, Tex., is caused primarily by recycling of dredged sediments. Sediment recycling, which is controlled by water depth and location with respect to the predominant wind-driven currents, is minimal where dredged material is placed on tidal flats that are either flooded infrequently or where the water is extremely shallow. In contrast, nearly all of the dredged material placed in open water >1.5 m deep is reworked and either transported back into the channel or dispersed into the surrounding lagoon. A sediment flux analysis incorporating geotechnical properties demonstrated that erosion and not postemplacement compaction caused most sediment losses from the placement areas. Comparing sediment properties in the placement areas and natural lagoon indicated that the remaining dredged material is mostly a residual of initial channel construction. Experimental containment designs (shallow subaqueous mound, submerged levee, and emergent levee) constructed in high-maintenance areas to reduce reworking did not retain large volumes of dredged material. The emergent levee provided the greatest retention potential approximately 2 years after construction.

  11. Summary: beyond fault trees to fault graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Prassinos, P.; Smith, C.F.

    1984-09-01

    Fault Graphs are the natural evolutionary step over a traditional fault-tree model. A Fault Graph is a failure-oriented directed graph with logic connectives that allows cycles. We intentionally construct the Fault Graph to trace the piping and instrumentation drawing (P and ID) of the system, but with logical AND and OR conditions added. Then we evaluate the Fault Graph with computer codes based on graph-theoretic methods. Fault Graph computer codes are based on graph concepts, such as path set (a set of nodes traveled on a path from one node to another) and reachability (the complete set of all possible paths between any two nodes). These codes are used to find the cut-sets (any minimal set of component failures that will fail the system) and to evaluate the system reliability.

  12. A case of paleo-creep? Comparison of fault displacements in a trench with the corresponding earthquake record in lake sediments along the Polochic fault, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, Gilles; Anselmetti, Flavio

    2014-05-01

    The Polochic and Motagua strike-slip faults in Guatemala accommodate the displacement (~2 cm/y) across the boundary between the Caribbean and North American plates. Both faults are expected to produce large destructive earthquakes such as the Mw 7.5 earthquake of 1976 on the Motagua fault. Former large earthquakes with magnitudes larger than Mw 7.0 are suggested from the areal extent of destructions to Precolombian Mayan cities and churches, and both the Motagua and Polochic fault have been suspected as the sources of these earthquakes. The available record, however, is surprisingly poor in large earthquakes, suggesting either that the record is sketchy or that such earthquakes are effectively infrequent. We investigated the activity of the Polochic fault by opening trenches along its major strand in Uspantán, Quiché, and Agua Blanca, Alta Verapaz. Recent displacements are evidenced in Agua Blanca, with soils less than 350 years old disrupted by the fault. We combined the study of the trenches with the study of sediment cores in Laguna Chichój, a lake located 4 km north of the Polochic fault. We had previously conducted an analysis of the sensitivity of the Chichój lake sediments to earthquakes in the 20th century. In the 20th centurey the earthquake record is well known, as well the locally felt intensity of these earthquakes. We found that for MMI intensities of VI and higher turbidites and slumps are produced in the lake. We used this calibration to study the earthquake record of the past 12 centuries and identified a cluster of earthquakes with MMI > VI between 830 and 1450 AD. The oldest seismite temporally matches widespread destructions in Mayan cities in 830 AD. Surprisingly, no earthquakes are recorded between 1450 and 1976 AD. Yet, the trench in Agua Blanca records substantial displacement of the Polochic fault over the period. It seems therefore that this ultimate displacement did not produce any substantial earthquake, and may correspond to a period of creeping on the Polochic fault.

  13. Investigation of chikungunya fever outbreak in Laguna, Philippines, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zapanta, Ma Justina; de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background In July 2012, the Philippines National Epidemiology Center received a report of a suspected chikungunya fever outbreak in San Pablo City, Laguna Province, the first chikungunya cases reported from the city since surveillance started in 2007. We conducted an outbreak investigation to identify risk factors associated with chikungunya. Methods A case was defined as any resident of Concepcion Village in San Pablo City who had fever of at least two days duration and either joint pains or rash between 23 June and 6 August 2012. Cases were ascertained by conducting house-to-house canvassing and medical records review. An unmatched case-control study was conducted and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. An environmental investigation was conducted by observing water and sanitation practices, and 100 households were surveyed to determine House and Breteau Indices. Human serum samples were collected for confirmation for chikungunya IgM through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results There were 98 cases identified. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a chikungunya case in the household (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 6.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.0–12.9) and disposing of garbage haphazardly (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.4) were associated with illness. House and Breteau Indices were 27% and 28%, respectively. Fifty-eight of 84 (69%) serum samples were positive for chikungunya IgM. Conclusion It was not surprising that having a chikungunya case in a household was associated with illness in this outbreak. However, haphazard garbage disposal is not an established risk factor for the disease, although this could be linked to increased breeding sites for mosquitoes. PMID:26668759

  14. Fault Mapping in Haiti

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS geologist Carol Prentice surveying features that have been displaced by young movements on the Enriquillo fault in southwest Haiti.  The January 2010 Haiti earthquake was associated with the Enriquillo fault....

  15. Fault model development for fault tolerant VLSI design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, C. R.; Lala, P. K.; Ali, A. M.; Visweswaran, G. S.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-05-01

    Fault models provide systematic and precise representations of physical defects in microcircuits in a form suitable for simulation and test generation. The current difficulty in testing VLSI circuits can be attributed to the tremendous increase in design complexity and the inappropriateness of traditional stuck-at fault models. This report develops fault models for three different types of common defects that are not accurately represented by the stuck-at fault model. The faults examined in this report are: bridging faults, transistor stuck-open faults, and transient faults caused by alpha particle radiation. A generalized fault model could not be developed for the three fault types. However, microcircuit behavior and fault detection strategies are described for the bridging, transistor stuck-open, and transient (alpha particle strike) faults. The results of this study can be applied to the simulation and analysis of faults in fault tolerant VLSI circuits.

  16. Authigenic, detrital and diagenetic minerals in the Laguna Potrok Aike sediment sequence

    E-print Network

    glacial erosion, deflation or desicca- tion (Zolitschka et al., 2006). Therefore, Laguna Potrok Aike has sequence yielded a record spanning the Last Glacial period to the Holocene. This paper presents throughout the glacial section suggesting relatively uniform sediment sources. The transition

  17. Redhead duck behavior on lower Laguna Madre and adjacent ponds of southern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; Custer, T.W.; Zwank, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Behavior of redheads (Aythya americana) during winter was studied on the hypersaline lower Laguna Madre and adjacent freshwater to brackish water ponds of southern Texas. On Laguna Madre, feeding (46%) and sleeping (37%) were the most common behaviors. Redheads fed more during early morning (64%) than during the rest of the day (40%); feeding activity was negatively correlated with temperature. Redheads fed more often by dipping (58%) than by tipping (25%), diving (16%), or gleaning (0.1%). Water depth was least where they fed by dipping (16 cm), greatest where diving (75 cm), and intermediate where tipping (26 cm). Feeding sequences averaged 5.3 s for dipping, 8.1 s for tipping, and 19.2 s for diving. Redheads usually were present on freshwater to brackish water ponds adjacent to Laguna Madre only during daylight hours, and use of those areas declined as winter progressed. Sleeping (75%) was the most frequent behavior at ponds, followed by preening (10%), swimming (10%), and feeding (0.4%). Because redheads fed almost exclusively on shoalgrass while dipping and tipping in shallow water and shoalgrass meadows have declined in the lower Laguna Madre, proper management of the remaining shoalgrass habitat is necessary to ensure that this area remains the major wintering area for redheads.

  18. Lithology, radiocarbon chronology and sedimentological interpretation of the lacustrine record from Laguna Potrok Aike, southern Patagonia

    E-print Network

    global picture of past environmental and climatic changes. However, terrestrial paleoclimatic data). Older records can only be found in extra-Andean Patagonia like at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonia (51580 S, 70230 W). This site emerged as a valuable terrestrial paleoclimate archive for the last 16 cal. ka BP

  19. 75 FR 74073 - Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron and Willacy Counties, TX; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Register July 19, 2004 (69 FR 43010). Laguna Atascosa NWR is located in Cameron and Willacy Counties, Texas.... Management efforts focus on protecting, enhancing, and restoring Refuge habitats and water management for the... Selected Alternative Our draft CCP and our EA (74 FR 66148) addressed several issues. To address these,...

  20. Comparasion of finite difference and finite element hydrodynamic models applied to the Laguna Madre Estuary, Texas 

    E-print Network

    McArthur, Karl Edward

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Surface Water Flow and Transport Model in Two-Dimensions (SV*9FT2D) model was applied to the northern half of the Laguna Madre Estuary. SW=D is a two dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model for well-mixed estuaries...

  1. Fault tolerant data structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aumann, Y.; Bender, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the tolerance of data structures to memory faults. We observe that many pointer-based data structures (e.g. linked lists, trees, etc.) are highly nonresilient to faults. A single fault in a linked list or tree may result in the loss of the entire set of data. In this paper we present a formal framework for studying the fault tolerance properties of pointer-based data structures, and we provide fault tolerant versions of the stack, the linked list, and the dictionary tree.

  2. Late Quaternary faulting in the Cabo San Lucas-La Paz Region, Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Gutiérrez, G. M.; Toke, N.; Brothers, D.; Dimaggio, E.; Maloney, S.; Zielke, O.; Buchanan, B.

    2006-12-01

    While Baja California drifts, active deformation on and just offshore indicates that spreading is not completely localized to the rift axis in the Gulf of California. Using on and offshore data, we characterize normal faulting- related deformation in the Cabo San Lucas-La Paz area. We mapped sections of the north trending faults in a 150 km long left-stepping fault array. Starting in the south, the San Jose del Cabo fault (east dipping) bounds the ~2 km high Sierra La Laguna. It is >70 km long with well defined 1-10 meter fault scarps cutting the youngest late Quaternary geomorphic surfaces. Our preliminary mapping along the north central section exhibits extensive late Quaternary terraces with riser heights of tens of meters above Holocene terraces. The San Jose del Cabo fault trace becomes diffuse and terminates in the area of Los Barriles. Moving northward, the fault system steps to the west, apparently transferring slip to the faults of San Juan de Los Planes and Saltito, which then step left again across the La Paz basin to the NNW trending Carrizal Fault. It has an on shore length of > 60 km. We produced a 25 km detailed strip map along the northern segment. It is embayed by convex east arcs several km long and 100 m deep. In the south, few-m-high scarps cut a pediment of thin Quaternary cover over tertiary volcanic rocks. The escarpment along the fault is hundreds of meters high and scarps 1-10 m high where it goes offshore in the north. Near Bonfil, a quarry cut exposes the fault zone. It comprises a 5-10 m wide bedrock shear zone with sheared tertiary volcanic units. On the footwall, the lower silty and sandy units have moderately well developed pedogenic carbonate, whereas the upper coarse gravel does not. These late Quaternary units appear to be faulted by one to three earthquakes. Finally, we mapped the Saltito fault zone NNE of La Paz. It is a NW trending structure with well developed 5- 10 meter high bedrock scarps defining its NW 5 km and slightly concave east with a 500 m left. Along all the fault zones studied, offset geomorphic surfaces indicate late Pleistocene to Holocene offset. These surfaces can be exploited to determine slip rates and produce a regional chronosequence to test for synchroneity of climatically modulated variations in sediment supply and transport capacity. In addition, a shallow marine geophysics and coring extends our mapping and provides important age control and improved stratigraphic assessment of fault activity.

  3. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  4. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  5. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  6. Robust Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei (Technical Monitor); Collins, Emmanuel G.; Song, Tinglun; Curry, Tramone; Selekwa, Majura

    2003-01-01

    This research used mixed structured singular value theory to develop new estimator (or observer) based approaches to fault detection for dynamic systems. The initial developments were based on minimizing the H-infinity, I-1 and H2 system norms. The resultant fault detection algorithms were each shown to be successful, but the fault detection algorithm based on the I-1 norm was best able to detect abrupt faults. This latter technique was further improved by using fuzzy logic for the fault evaluation. Based on an anomaly observed in this research and apparently ignored in the literature, current research focuses on the determination of a fault using a norm of the change in the residual (the difference between the output of the system and observer) and not simply a norm of the residual itself. This research may lead to a fundamental contribution to research in fault detection and isolation.

  7. Migration chronology and distribution of redheads on the lower Laguna Madre, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Zwank, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    An estimated 80% of redheads (Aythya americana) winter on the Laguna Madre of southern Texas and Mexico. Because there have been profound changes in the Laguna Madre over the past three decades and the area is facing increasing industrial and recreational development, we studied the winter distribution and habitat requirements of redheads during two winters (1987-1988 and 1988-1989) on the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas to provide information that could be used to understand, identify, and protect wintering redhead habitat. Redheads began arriving on the Lower Laguna Madre during early October in 1987 and 1988, and continued to arrive through November. Redhead migration was closely associated with passing weather fronts. Redheads arrived on the day a front arrived and during the following two days; no migrants were observed arriving the day before a weather front arrived. Flock size of arriving redheads was 26.4 ± 0.6 birds and did not differ among days or by time of day (morning midday, or afternoon). Number of flocks arriving per 0.5 h interval (arrival rate) was greater during afternoon (21.7 ± 0.6) than during morning (4.3 ± 1.2) or midday (1.5 ± 0.4) on the day of frontal passage and during the first day after frontal passage. Upon arrival, redhead flocks congregated in the central portion of the Lower Laguna Madre. They continued to use the central portion throughout the winter, but gradually spread to the northern and southern ends of the lagoon. Seventy-one percent of the area used by flocks was vegetated with shoalgrass (Halodule wrightii) although shoalgrass covered only 32% of the lagoon. Flock movements seemed to be related to tide level; redheads moved to remain in water 12-30 cm deep. These data can be used by the environmental community to identify and protect this unique and indispensable habitat for wintering redheads.

  8. Vesicularity variation to pyroclasts from silicic eruptions at Laguna del Maule volcanic complex, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M. N.; Fierstein, J.; Amigo, A.; Miranda, J.

    2014-12-01

    Crystal-poor rhyodacitic to rhyolitic volcanic eruptions at Laguna del Maule volcanic complex, Chile have produced an astonishing range of textural variation to pyroclasts. Here, we focus on eruptive deposits from two Quaternary eruptions from vents on the northwestern side of the Laguna del Maule basin: the rhyolite of Loma de Los Espejos and the rhyodacite of Laguna Sin Puerto. Clasts in the pyroclastic fall and pyroclastic flow deposits from the rhyolite of Loma de Los Espejos range from dense, non-vesicular (obsidian) to highly vesicular, frothy (coarsely vesicular reticulite); where vesicularity varies from <1% to >90%. Bulk compositions range from 75.6-76.7 wt.% SiO2. The highest vesicularity clasts are found in early fall deposits and widely dispersed pyroclastic flow deposits; the frothy carapace to lava flows is similarly highly vesicular. Pyroclastic deposits also contain tube pumice, and macroscopically folded, finely vesicular, breadcrusted, and heterogeneously vesiculated textures. We speculate that preservation of the highest vesicularities requires relatively low decompression rates or open system degassing such that relaxation times were sufficient to allow extensive vesiculation. Such an inference is in apparent contradiction to documentation of Plinian dispersal to the eruption. Clasts in the pyroclastic fall deposit of the rhyodacite (68-72 wt.% SiO2) of Laguna Sin Puerto are finely vesicular, with vesicularity modes at ~50% and ~68% corresponding to gray and white pumice colors, respectively. Some clasts are banded in color (and vesicularity). All clasts were fragmented into highly angular particles, with subplanar to slightly concave exterior surfaces (average Wadell Roundness of clast margins between 0.32 and 0.39), indicating brittle fragmentation. In contrast to Loma de Los Espejos, high bubble number densities to Laguna Sin Puerto rhyodacite imply high decompression rates.

  9. Patterns of fish and macro-invertebrate distribution in the upper Laguna Madre: bag seines 1985-2004 

    E-print Network

    Larimer, Amy Beth

    2009-05-15

    OF FISH AND MACRO-INVERTEBRATE DISTRIBUTION IN THE UPPER LAGUNA MADRE: BAG SEINES 1985-2004 A Thesis by AMY BETH LARIMER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PATTERNS OF FISH AND MACRO-INVERTEBRATE DISTRIBUTION IN THE UPPER LAGUNA MADRE: BAG SEINES 1985-2004 A Thesis by AMY BETH LARIMER...

  10. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  11. Fault simulation and test generation for small delay faults 

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Wangqi

    2007-04-25

    Delay faults are an increasingly important test challenge. Traditional delay fault models are incomplete in that they model only a subset of delay defect behaviors. To solve this problem, a more realistic delay fault model has been developed which...

  12. Denali Fault: Alaska Pipeline

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View south along the Trans Alaska Pipeline in the zone where it was engineered for the Denali fault. The fault trace passes beneath the pipeline between the 2nd and 3rd slider supports at the far end of the zone. A large arc in the pipe can be seen in the pipe on the right, due to shortening of the ...

  13. Denali Fault: Susitna Glacier

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Helicopters and satellite phones were integral to the geologic field response. Here, Peter Haeussler is calling a seismologist to pass along the discovery of the Susitna Glacier thrust fault. View is to the north up the Susitna Glacier. The Denali fault trace lies in the background where the two lan...

  14. Denali Fault: Gillette Pass

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View northward of mountain near Gillette Pass showing sackung features. Here the mountaintop moved downward like a keystone, producing an uphill-facing scarp. The main Denali fault trace is on the far side of the mountain and a small splay fault is out of view below the photo....

  15. Denali Fault: Gillette Pass

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View north of Denali fault trace at Gillette Pass. this view shows that the surface rupture reoccupies the previous fault scarp. Also the right-lateral offset of these stream gullies has developed since deglaciation in the last 10,000 years or so....

  16. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  18. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO); Pruett, Jr., James C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  19. Laguna FP project: soft approach and non-coercive strategy generate goodwill.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The success of Laguna's population program is in large part attributable to the good working relationship between the governor of this Philippine's province and the staff of the Provincial Population Office. By 1988, there were 58 hospitals and clinics in Laguna that offered family planning services and a total of 76,549 contraceptive acceptors. The family planning network includes 17 rural health units, 22 hospitals supported by the provincial government, 1 clinic operated by the Family Planning Organization of the Philippines, 2 mobile sterilization teams, and 16 clinics run by private, commercial, and industrial enterprises. Also contributing to the strength of the family planning effort has been the existence of a rural information council comprised of representatives of various government agencies. Barangay service point officers receive a great deal of government support in terms of educational information and supplies. Because of their visibility and noncoercive strategy, the population workers are well received in the community, including in villages under the influence of insurgent political forces. The governor of Laguna has made the population office staff permanent provincial employees, so that they will remain in their positions even if outside funding is taken away. PMID:12342116

  20. Waterbirds (other than Laridae) nesting in the middle section of Laguna Cuyutlán, Colima, México.

    PubMed

    Mellink, Eric; Riojas-López, Mónica E

    2008-03-01

    Laguna de Cuyutlán, in the state of Colima, Mexico, is the only large coastal wetland in a span of roughly 1150 km. Despite this, the study of its birds has been largely neglected. Between 2003 and 2006 we assessed the waterbirds nesting in the middle portion of Laguna Cuyutlán, a large tropical coastal lagoon, through field visits. We documented the nesting of 15 species of non-Laridae waterbirds: Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus), Tricolored Egret (Egretta tricolor), Snowy Egret (Egretta thula), Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea), Great Egret (Ardea alba), Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), Black-crowned Night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), Yellow-crowned Night-heron (Nyctanassa violacea), Green Heron (Butorides virescens), Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), Black-bellied Whistling-duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis), Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris), Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus), and Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus). These add to six species of Laridae known to nest in that area: Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla), Royal Terns (Thalasseus maximus), Gull-billed Terns (Gelochelidon nilotica), Forster's Terns (S. forsteri), Least Terns (Sternula antillarum), and Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and to at least 57 species using it during the non-breeding season. With such bird assemblages, Laguna Cuyutlán is an important site for waterbirds, which should be given conservation status. PMID:18624252

  1. Hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and clams (Rangia cuneata) in Laguna de Pom, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Legorreta, T.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Zapata-Perez, O.

    1994-01-01

    Laguna de Pom is a coastal lagoon within the Laguna de Terminos system in southern Gulf of Mexico. It belongs to the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin, and is located between 18{degrees} 33{prime} and 18{degrees} 38{prime} north latitude and 92{degrees} 01{prime} and 92{degrees} 14{prime} west longitude, in the Coastal Plain physiographic Province of the Gulf. It is ellipsoidal and approximately 10 km long, with a surface area of 5,200 ha and a mean depth of 1.5 m. Water salinity and temperature ranges are 0 to 13 {per_thousand} and 25{degrees} to 31{degrees}C, respectively. Benthic macrofauna is dominated by bivalves such as the clams Rangia cuneata, R. flexuosa, and Polymesoda carolineana. These clams provide the basis of an artisanal fishery, which is the main economic activity in the region. The presence of several oil-processing facilities around the lagoon is very conspicuous, which together with decreasing yields has created social conflicts, with the fishermen blaming the mexican state oil company (PEMEX) for the decrease in the clam population. This work aims to determine if the concentration of hydrocarbons in the clams (R. cuneata) and sediments of Laguna de Pom are responsible for the declining clam fishery. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Transient fault modeling and fault injection simulation 

    E-print Network

    Yuan, Xuejun

    1996-01-01

    An accurate transient fault model is presented in this thesis. A 7-term exponential current upset model is derived from the results of a device-level, 3-dimensional, single-event-upset simulation. A curve-fitting algorithm is used to extract...

  3. Differential Fault Analysis of AES: Toward Reducing Number of Faults

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Differential Fault Analysis of AES: Toward Reducing Number of Faults Chong Hee KIM Information-la-Neuve, Belgium. Abstract Differential Fault Analysis (DFA) finds the key of a block cipher using differ- ential information between correct and faulty ciphertexts obtained by induc- ing faults during the computation

  4. 77 FR 19700 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... the Chocolate Mountains, the territory extends southward to Todos Santos Bay, Laguna Salada and along... from just below Borrego Springs to the north end of the Salton Basin and the Chocolate Mountains....

  5. The Kunlun Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kunlun fault is one of the gigantic strike-slip faults that bound the north side of Tibet. Left-lateral motion along the 1,500-kilometer (932-mile) length of the Kunlun has occurred uniformly for the last 40,000 years at a rate of 1.1 centimeter per year, creating a cumulative offset of more than 400 meters. In this image, two splays of the fault are clearly seen crossing from east to west. The northern fault juxtaposes sedimentary rocks of the mountains against alluvial fans. Its trace is also marked by lines of vegetation, which appear red in the image. The southern, younger fault cuts through the alluvium. A dark linear area in the center of the image is wet ground where groundwater has ponded against the fault. Measurements from the image of displacements of young streams that cross the fault show 15 to 75 meters (16 to 82 yards) of left-lateral offset. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) acquired the visible light and near infrared scene on July 20, 2000. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  6. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  7. A “mesh” of crossing faults: Fault networks of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed geologic mapping of active fault systems in the western Salton Trough and northern Peninsular Ranges of southern California make it possible to expand the inventory of mapped and known faults by compiling and updating existing geologic maps, and analyzing high resolution imagery, LIDAR, InSAR, relocated hypocenters and other geophysical datasets. A fault map is being compiled on Google Earth and will ultimately discriminate between a range of different fault expressions: from well-mapped faults to subtle lineaments and geomorphic anomalies. The fault map shows deformation patterns in both crystalline and basinal deposits and reveals a complex fault mesh with many curious and unexpected relationships. Key findings are: 1) Many fault systems have mutually interpenetrating geometries, are grossly coeval, and allow faults to cross one another. A typical relationship reveals a dextral fault zone that appears to be continuous at the regional scale. In detail, however, there are no continuous NW-striking dextral fault traces and instead the master dextral fault is offset in a left-lateral sense by numerous crossing faults. Left-lateral faults also show small offsets where they interact with right lateral faults. Both fault sets show evidence of Quaternary activity. Examples occur along the Clark, Coyote Creek, Earthquake Valley and Torres Martinez fault zones. 2) Fault zones cross in other ways. There are locations where active faults continue across or beneath significant structural barriers. Major fault zones like the Clark fault of the San Jacinto fault system appears to end at NE-striking sinistral fault zones (like the Extra and Pumpkin faults) that clearly cross from the SW to the NE side of the projection of the dextral traces. Despite these blocking structures, there is good evidence for continuation of the dextral faults on the opposite sides of the crossing fault array. In some instances there is clear evidence (in deep microseismic alignments of hypocenters) that the master dextral faults zones pass beneath shallower crossing fault arrays above them and this mechanism may transfer strain through the blocking zones. 3) The curvature of strands of the Coyote Creek fault and the Elsinore fault are similar along their SE 60 km. The scale, locations and concavity of bends are so similar that their shape appears to be coordinated. The matching contractional and extensional bends suggests that originally straighter dextral fault zones may be deforming in response of coeval sinistral deformation between, beneath, and around them. 4) Deformation is strongly domainal with one style or geometry of structure dominating in one area then another in an adjacent area. Boundaries may be abrupt. 5) There are drastic lateral changes in the width of damage zones adjacent to master faults. Outlines of the deformation related to some dextral fault zones resemble a snake that has ingested a squirming cat or soccer ball. 6) A mesh of interconnected faults seems to transfer slip back and forth between structures. 7) Scarps are not necessarily more abundant on the long master faults than on connector or crossing faults. Much remains to be learned upon completion the fault map.

  8. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the fundamental nature of the control means that 0.1 to 1% roughness should be ubiquitous on faults and can generally be used for simulating ground motion. An important caveat is that the scale-dependence of strength may result in a difference in the yield criterion at large-scales. The commonly observed values of the Hurst exponent below 1 may capture this scale-dependence.

  10. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  11. Fair game : learning from La Salada

    E-print Network

    Hu, Allison (Allison May)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis seeks to expand the potential role of urban design for informal places under the process of formalization. More specifically, it examines the spatial principles that comprise the successful cultural and economic ...

  12. Fault Detection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, John

    2004-09-01

    Plasma processes are used widely in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. Recent trends in this industry have focussed on methods for automated process control. For limiting processes such as plasma etch, an emerging focus is on real time Fault Detection and Classification (FDC). Simply put, the aim is to provide a system that not only detects faults but also identifies the root cause. For example, semiconductor production fabs regularly encounter faults that result in unscheduled tool downtime and reduced yield. Among these are real-time process and tool faults, post maintenance recovery problems and tool mis-matching at start-up and process transfer. The objective of any FDC scheme should be to reduce this product loss and tool downtime by identifying the core problem as rapidly as possible, and replace the usual "trial-and-error" approach to fault identification. There are a couple of key requirements in any control system. Firstly, an estimation of the process state, and secondly, a scheme for providing real-time control. This paper focuses on methods for addressing both problems on plasma etch tools. A non-intrusive high-resolution RF sensor is used to provide in situ process-state and tool-state data. Examples will be presented on how such a sensor can give a repeatable fingerprint of any plasma process. The challenge then becomes the manipulation of this data into usable information. The process control scheme presented is knowledge-based, in that it is trained and does not rely on statistical methods with underlying assumptions of Gaussian data spread. A fingerprint of known fault states is the knowledge set and real-time control is provided by comparison of the sensor fingerprint to the fault fingerprints.

  13. Niebla ceruchis from Laguna Figueroa: dimorphic spore morphology and secondary compounds localized in pycnidia and apothecia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzien, M.; Margulis, L.

    1988-01-01

    During and after the floods of 1979-80 Niebla ceruchis growing epiphytically on Lycium brevipes was one of the dominant aspects of the vegetation in the coastal dunal complex bordering the microbial mats at Laguna Figueroa, Baja California Norte, Mexico. The lichen on denuded branches of Lycium was far more extensively distributed than Lycium lacking lichen. Unusual traits of this Niebla ceruchis strain, namely localization of lichen compounds in the mycobiont reproductive structures (pycnidia and apothecia) and simultaneous presence of bilocular and quadrilocular ascospores, are reported. The abundance of this coastal lichen cover at the microbial mat site has persisted through April 1988.

  14. Fault terminations, Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic, J.B.; McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Two basement-involved faults terminate in folds in the Seminoe Mountains. Mesoscopic and macroscopic structures in sedimentary rocks provide clues to the interrelationship of faults and folds in this region, and on the linkage between faulting and folding in general. The Hurt Creek fault trends 320[degree] and has maximum separation of 1.5 km measured at the basement/cover contact. Separation on the fault decreases upsection to zero within the Jurassic Sundance Formation. Unfaulted rock units form an anticline around the fault tip. The complementary syncline is angular with planar limbs and a narrow hinge zone. The syncline axial trace intersects the fault in the footwall at the basement/cover cut-off. Map patterns are interpreted to show thickening of Mesozoic units adjacent to the syncline hinge. In contrast, extensional structures are common in the faulted anticline within the Permian Goose Egg and Triassic Chugwater Formations. A hanging wall splay fault loses separation into the Goose Egg formation which is thinned by 50% at the fault tip. Mesoscopic normal faults are oriented 320--340[degree] and have an average inclination of 75[degree] SW. Megaboudins of Chugwater are present in the footwall of the Hurt Creek fault, immediately adjacent to the fault trace. The Black Canyon fault transported Precambrian-Pennsylvanian rocks over Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone. This fault is layer-parallel at the top of the Tensleep and loses separation along strike into an unfaulted syncline in the Goose Egg Formation. Shortening in the pre-Permian units is accommodated by slip on the basement-involved Black Canyon fault. Equivalent shortening in Permian-Cretaceous units occurs on a system of thin-skinned'' thrust faults.

  15. Triggered surface slips in southern California associated with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah, Baja California, Mexico, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, Michael J.; Treiman, Jerome A.; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Weldon, Ray J.; Bilham, Roger; Wei, Meng; Fielding, Eric J.; Hernandez, Janis L.; Olson, Brian P.E.; Irvine, Pamela J.; Knepprath, Nichole; Sickler, Robert R.; Tong, Xiaopeng; Siem, Martin E.

    2011-01-01

    Triggered slip in the Yuha Desert area occurred along more than two dozen faults, only some of which were recognized before the April 4, 2010, El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. From east to northwest, slip occurred in seven general areas: (1) in the Northern Centinela Fault Zone (newly named), (2) along unnamed faults south of Pinto Wash, (3) along the Yuha Fault (newly named), (4) along both east and west branches of the Laguna Salada Fault, (5) along the Yuha Well Fault Zone (newly revised name) and related faults between it and the Yuha Fault, (6) along the Ocotillo Fault (newly named) and related faults to the north and south, and (7) along the southeasternmost section of the Elsinore Fault. Faults that slipped in the Yuha Desert area include northwest-trending right-lateral faults, northeast-trending left-lateral faults, and north-south faults, some of which had dominantly vertical offset. Triggered slip along the Ocotillo and Elsinore Faults appears to have occurred only in association with the June 14, 2010 (Mw5.7), aftershock. This aftershock also resulted in slip along other faults near the town of Ocotillo. Triggered offset on faults in the Yuha Desert area was mostly less than 20 mm, with three significant exceptions, including slip of about 50–60 mm on the Yuha Fault, 40 mm on a fault south of Pinto Wash, and about 85 mm on the Ocotillo Fault. All triggered slips in the Yuha Desert area occurred along preexisting faults, whether previously recognized or not.

  16. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  17. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Megerian, Mark G. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  18. Cable fault locator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, C. A.; Honey, S. K.; Petro, J. P.; Phillips, A. C.

    1982-07-01

    Cable fault location and the construction of four field test units are discussed. Swept frequency sounding of mine cables with RF signals was the technique most thoroughly investigated. The swept frequency technique is supplemented with a form of moving target indication to provide a method for locating the position of a technician along a cable and relative to a suspected fault. Separate, more limited investigations involved high voltage time domain reflectometry and acoustical probing of mine cables. Particular areas of research included microprocessor-based control of the swept frequency system, a microprocessor based fast Fourier transform for spectral analysis, and RF synthesizers.

  19. Transition-fault test generation 

    E-print Network

    Cobb, Bradley Douglas

    2013-02-22

    . One way to detect these timing defects is to apply test patterns to the integrated circuit that are generated using the transition-fault model. Unfortunately, industry's current transition-fault test generation schemes produce test sets that are too...

  20. A 20,000-year record of environmental change from Laguna Kollpa Kkota, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, G.O. . Mendenhall Lab.); Abbott, M.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Most records of paleoclimate in the Bolivian Andes date from the last glacial-to-interglacial transition. However, Laguna Kollpa Kkota and other lakes like it, formed more than 20,000 yr BP when glaciers retreated and moraines dammed the drainage of the valleys they are located in. These lakes were protected from subsequent periods of glaciation because the headwalls of these valleys are below the level of the late-Pleistocene glacial equilibrium-line altitude. The chemical, mineral, and microfossil stratigraphies of these glacial lakes provide continuous records of environmental change for the last 20,000 years that can be used to address several problems in paleoclimate specific to tropical-subtropical latitudes. Preliminary results from Laguna Kollpa Kkota indicate that glacial equilibrium-line altitudes were never depressed more than 600 m during the last 20,000 years, suggesting that temperatures were reduced only a few-degrees celsius over this time period. Sedimentation rates and the organic carbon stratigraphy of cores reflect an increase in moisture in the late Pleistocene just prior to the transition to a warmer and drier Holocene. The pollen and diatom concentrations in the sediments are sufficient to permit the high resolution analyses needed to address whether or not there were climatic reversals during the glacial-to-interglacial transition.

  1. Water-quality reconnaissance of Laguna Tortuguero, Vega Baja, Puerto Rico, March 1999-May 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soler-Lopez, Luis; Guzman-Rios, Senen; Conde-Costas, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The Laguna Tortuguero, a slightly saline to freshwater lagoon in north-central Puerto Rico, has a surface area of about 220 hectares and a mean depth of about 1.2 meters. As part of a water-quality reconnaissance, water samples were collected at about monthly and near bi-monthly intervals from March 1999 to May 2000 at four sites: three stations inside the lagoon and one station at the artificial outlet channel dredged in 1940, which connects the lagoon with the Atlantic Ocean. Physical characteristics that were determined from these water samples were pH, temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, dissolved oxygen saturation, and discharge at the outlet canal. Other water-quality constituents also were determined, including nitrogen and phosphorus species, organic carbon, chlorophyll a and b, plankton biomass, hardness, alkalinity as calcium carbonate, and major ions. Additionally, a diel study was conducted at three stations in the lagoon to obtain data on the diurnal variation of temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved oxygen saturation. The data analysis indicates the water quality of Laguna Tortuguero complies with the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board standards and regulations.

  2. Fault compaction and overpressured faults: results from a 3-D model of a ductile fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Miller, S. A.

    2003-10-01

    A model of a ductile fault zone is incorporated into a forward 3-D earthquake model to better constrain fault-zone hydraulics. The conceptual framework of the model fault zone was chosen such that two distinct parts are recognized. The fault core, characterized by a relatively low permeability, is composed of a coseismic fault surface embedded in a visco-elastic volume that can creep and compact. The fault core is surrounded by, and mostly sealed from, a high permeability damaged zone. The model fault properties correspond explicitly to those of the coseismic fault core. Porosity and pore pressure evolve to account for the viscous compaction of the fault core, while stresses evolve in response to the applied tectonic loading and to shear creep of the fault itself. A small diffusive leakage is allowed in and out of the fault zone. Coseismically, porosity is created to account for frictional dilatancy. We show in the case of a 3-D fault model with no in-plane flow and constant fluid compressibility, pore pressures do not drop to hydrostatic levels after a seismic rupture, leading to an overpressured weak fault. Since pore pressure plays a key role in the fault behaviour, we investigate coseismic hydraulic property changes. In the full 3-D model, pore pressures vary instantaneously by the poroelastic effect during the propagation of the rupture. Once the stress state stabilizes, pore pressures are incrementally redistributed in the failed patch. We show that the significant effect of pressure-dependent fluid compressibility in the no in-plane flow case becomes a secondary effect when the other spatial dimensions are considered because in-plane flow with a near-lithostatically pressured neighbourhood equilibrates at a pressure much higher than hydrostatic levels, forming persistent high-pressure fluid compartments. If the observed faults are not all overpressured and weak, other mechanisms, not included in this model, must be at work in nature, which need to be investigated. Significant leakage perpendicular to the fault strike (in the case of a young fault), or cracks hydraulically linking the fault core to the damaged zone (for a mature fault) are probable mechanisms for keeping the faults strong and might play a significant role in modulating fault pore pressures. Therefore, fault-normal hydraulic properties of fault zones should be a future focus of field and numerical experiments.

  3. Magnitude, geomorphologic response and climate links of lake level oscillations at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina)

    E-print Network

    Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina) P. Kliem a,*, J.P. Buylaert b,c , A. Hahn a , C. Mayr d,e , A Holocene Glacial a b s t r a c t Laguna Potrok Aike is a large maar lake located in the semiarid steppe

  4. Winter distributions of North American Plovers in the Laguna Madre regions of Tamaulipas, Mexico and Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mabee, Todd J.; Plissner, Jonathan H.; Haig, Susan M.; Goossen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the distribution and abundance of wintering plovers in the Laguna Madre of Texas and Tamaulipas, surveys were conducted in December 1997 and February 1998, along a 160 km stretch of barrier islands in Mexico and- 40 km of shoreline on South Padre Island, Texas. Altogether, 5,673 individuals, representing six plover species, were recorded during the surveys. Black-bellied Plovers Pluvialis squatarola were the most numerous (3 ,013 individuals) representing 53% of the total number of plovers observed. Numbers of Piping Charadriusm elodu, Snowy C . alexandrinus, Semipalmated C. semipalmatus and Wilson's Plovers C. wilsonia were 739, 1,345, 561, and 13 birds, respectively. Most individuals (97%) of all species except Wilson's Plovers were observed on bayside flats of the barrier islands. Similar numbers of Piping Plovers were recorded at South Padre Island, Texas, and in the Laguna Madre de Tamaulipas. Over 85% of the individuals of each of the other species were found in the more extensively surveyed Mexico portion of Laguna Madre. In Tamaulipas, most plover species were observed more often on algal flats than any other substrate. These results provide evidence of the value of these systems as wintering areas for plover species and indicate the need for more extensive survey efforts to determine temporal and spatial variation in the distribution of these species within the Laguna ecosystem.

  5. Towards a late Quaternary tephrochronological framework for the southernmost part of South America e the Laguna Potrok Aike tephra

    E-print Network

    the composite sediment sequence from Site 2 of the Laguna Potrok Aike ICDP expedition 5022 from southern layers but one are rhyolitic in composition, with SiO2 contents ranging between ca 74.5 and 78 wt with Viedma/Lautaro and the Aguilera volcanoes in the northern part of the AVZ. The early Holocene Tephra, MB1

  6. 15,000-yr pollen record of vegetation change in the high altitude tropical Andes at Laguna Verde Alta, Venezuelai

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    15,000-yr pollen record of vegetation change in the high altitude tropical Andes at Laguna Verde October 2005 Abstract Pollen analysis of sediments from a high-altitude (4215 m), Neotropical (9-N) Andean of factors associated with climate, humans, or both. Pollen influx from upper Andean forests is remarkably

  7. Fault Location and Resolvable Set

    E-print Network

    Tonchev, Vladimir D.

    Fault Location and Resolvable Set Systems Charles J. Colbourn, colbourn@asu.ed with Bingli Fan (Beijing) and Daniel Horsley (Melbourne) Fault Location and Resolvable Set Systems Charles J. Colbourn, and Decision Systems Engineering Arizona State University ACA 2015 #12;Fault Location and Resolvable Set

  8. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  9. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  10. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  11. Fault Tolerant Quantum Filtering and Fault Detection for Quantum Systems

    E-print Network

    Qing Gao; Daoyi Dong; Ian R. Petersen

    2015-04-26

    This paper aims to determine the fault tolerant quantum filter and fault detection equation for a class of open quantum systems coupled to laser fields and subject to stochastic faults. In order to analyze open quantum systems where the system dynamics involve both classical and quantum random variables, a quantum-classical probability space model is developed. Using a reference probability approach, a fault tolerant quantum filter and a fault detection equation are simultaneously derived for this class of open quantum systems. An example of two-level open quantum systems subject to Poisson-type faults is presented to illustrate the proposed method. These results have the potential to lead to a new fault tolerant control theory for quantum systems.

  12. Fault Tolerant Quantum Filtering and Fault Detection for Quantum Systems

    E-print Network

    Qing Gao; Daoyi Dong; Ian R. Petersen

    2015-12-21

    This paper aims to determine the fault tolerant quantum filter and fault detection equation for a class of open quantum systems coupled to a laser field that is subject to stochastic faults. In order to analyze this class of open quantum systems, we propose a quantum-classical Bayesian inference method based on the definition of a so-called quantum-classical conditional expectation. It is shown that the proposed Bayesian inference approach provides a convenient tool to simultaneously derive the fault tolerant quantum filter and the fault detection equation for this class of open quantum systems. An example of two-level open quantum systems subject to Poisson-type faults is presented to illustrate the proposed method. These results have the potential to lead to a new fault tolerant control theory for quantum systems.

  13. Fault Scarp Offsets and Fault Population Analysis on Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, S.; Collins, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini images of Dione show several fault zones cutting through the moon’s icy surface. We have measured the displacement and length of 271 faults, and estimated the strain occurring in 6 different fault zones. These measurements allow us to quantify the total amount of surface strain on Dione as well as constrain what processes might have caused these faults to form. Though we do not have detailed topography across fault scarps on Dione, we can use their projected size on the camera plane to estimate their heights, assuming a reasonable surface slope. Starting with high resolution images of Dione obtained by the Cassini ISS, we marked points at the top to the bottom of each fault scarp to measure the fault’s projected displacement and its orientation along strike. Line and sample information for the measurements were then processed through ISIS to derive latitude/longitude information and pixel dimensions. We then calculate the three dimensional orientation of a vector running from the bottom to the top of the fault scarp, assuming a 45 degree angle with respect to the surface, and project this vector onto the spacecraft camera plane. This projected vector gives us a correction factor to estimate the actual vertical displacement of the fault scarp. This process was repeated many times for each fault, to show variations of displacement along the length of the fault. To compare each fault to its neighbors and see how strain was accommodated across a population of faults, we divided the faults into fault zones, and created new coordinate systems oriented along the central axis of each fault zone. We could then quantify the amount of fault overlap and add the displacement of overlapping faults to estimate the amount of strain accommodated in each zone. Faults in the southern portion of Padua have a strain of 0.031(+/-) 0.0097, central Padua exhibits a strain of .032(+/-) 0.012, and faults in northern Padua have a strain of 0.025(+/-) 0.0080. The western faults of Eurotas have a strain of 0.031(+/-) 0.011, while the eastern faults have a strain of 0.037(+/-) 0.025. Lastly, Clusium has a strain of 0.10 (+/-) 0.029. We also calculated the ratio of maximum fault displacement vs. the length of the faults, and we found this ratio to be 0.019 when drawing a trend line through all the faults that were analyzed. D/L measurements performed on two faults on Europa using stereo topography showed a value of .021 (Nimmo and Schenk 2006), the only other icy satellite where this ratio has been measured. In contrast, faults on Earth has a D/L ratio of about .1 and Mars has a D/L Ratio of about .01 (Schultz et al. 2006).

  14. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy). European Union of Geophysics Congress, Strasbourg, March 1999. Piccardi L., 2000: Active faulting at Delphi (Greece): seismotectonic remarks and a hypothesis for the geological environment of a myth. Geology, 28, 651-654. Piccardi L., 2001: Seismotectonic Origin of the Monster of Loch Ness. Earth System Processes, Joint Meeting of G.S.A. and G.S.L., Edinburgh, June 2001.

  15. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; de Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake in southern-most Patagonia, is located at about 110 m a.s.l. in the Pliocene to late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia, Argentina) at about 52°S and 70°W, some 20 km north of the Strait of Magellan and approximately 90 km west of the city of Rio Gallegos. The lake is almost circular and bowl-shaped with a 100 m deep, flat plain in its central part and an approximate diameter of 3.5 km. Steep slopes separate the central plain from the lake shoulder at about 35 m water depth. At present, strong winds permanently mix the entire water column. The closed lake basin contains a sub saline water body and has only episodic inflows with the most important episodic tributary situated on the western shore. Discharge is restricted to major snowmelt events. Laguna Potrok Aike is presently located at the boundary between the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and the Antarctic Polar Front. The sedimentary regime is thus influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Previous studies demonstrated that closed lakes in southern South America are sensitive to variations in the evaporation/precipitation ratio and have experienced drastic lake level changes in the past causing for example the desiccation of the 75 m deep Lago Cardiel during the Late Glacial. Multiproxy environmental reconstruction of the last 16 ka documents that Laguna Potrok Aike is highly sensitive to climate change. Based on an Ar/Ar age determination, the phreatomagmatic tephra that is assumed to relate to the Potrok Aike maar eruption was formed around 770 ka. Thus Laguna Potrok Aike sediments contain almost 0.8 million years of climate history spanning several past glacial-interglacial cycles making it a unique archive for non-tropical and non-polar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, variations of the hydrological cycle, changes in eolian dust deposition, frequencies and consequences of volcanic activities and other natural forces controlling climatic and environmental responses can be tracked throughout time. Laguna Potrok Aike has thus become a major focus of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program. Drilling operations were carried out within PASADO (Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project) in late 2008 and penetrated ~100 m into the lacustrine sediment. Laguna Potrok Aike is surrounded by a series of subaerial paleo-shorelines of modern to Holocene age that reach up to 21 m above the 2003 AD lake level. An erosional unconformity which can be observed basin-wide along the lake shoulder at about 33 m below the 2003 AD lake level marks the lowest lake level reached during Late Glacial to Holocene times. A high-resolution seismic survey revealed a series of buried, subaquatic paleo-shorelines that hold a record of the complex transgressional history of the past approximately 6800 years, which was temporarily interrupted by two regressional phases from approximately 5800 to 5400 and 4700 to 4000 cal BP. Seismic reflection and refraction data provide insights into the sedimentary infill and the underlying volcanic structure of Laguna Potrok Aike. Reflection data show undisturbed, stratified lacustrine sediments at least in the upper ~100 m of the sedimentary infill. Two stratigraphic boundaries were identified in the seismic profiles (separating subunits I-ab, I-c and I-d) that are likely related to changes in lake level. Subunits I-ab and I-d are quite similar even though velocities are enhanced in subunit I-d. This might point at cementation in subunit I-d. Subunit I-c is restricted to the central parts of the lake and thins out laterally. A velocity-depth model calculated from seismic refraction data reveals a funnel-shaped structure embedded in the sandstone rocks of the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation. This funnel structure is filled by lacustrine sediments of up to 370 m in thickness. These can be separated into two

  16. Holocene faulting on the Mission fault, northwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ostenaa, D.A.; Klinger, R.E.; Levish, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    South of Flathead Lake, fault scarps on late Quaternary surfaces are nearly continuous for 45 km along the western flank of the Mission Range. On late Pleistocene alpine lateral moraines, scarp heights reach a maximum of 17 m. Scarp heights on post glacial Lake Missoula surfaces range from 2.6--7.2 m and maximum scarp angles range from 10[degree]--24[degree]. The stratigraphy exposed in seven trenches across the fault demonstrates that the post glacial Lake Missoula scarps resulted from at least two surface-faulting events. Larger scarp heights on late Pleistocene moraines suggests a possible third event. This yields an estimated recurrence of 4--8 kyr. Analyses of scarp profiles show that the age of the most surface faulting is middle Holocene, consistent with stratigraphic evidence found in the trenches. Rupture length and displacement imply earthquake magnitudes of 7 to 7.5. Previous studies have not identified geologic evidence of late Quaternary surface faulting in the Rocky Mountain Trench or on faults north of the Lewis and Clark line despite abundant historic seismicity in the Flathead Lake area. In addition to the Mission fault, reconnaissance studies have located late Quaternary fault scarps along portions of faults bordering Jocko and Thompson Valleys. These are the first documented late Pleistocene/Holocene faults north of the Lewis and Clark line in Montana and should greatly revise estimates of earthquake hazards in this region.

  17. Methods for quantitatively determining fault slip using fault separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.-S.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; Murillo-Muñetón, G.; Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.

    2007-10-01

    Fault slip and fault separation are generally not equal to each other, however, they are geometrically related. The fault slip ( S) is a vector with a magnitude, a direction, and a sense of the movement. In this paper, a series of approaches are introduced to estimate quantitatively the magnitude and direction of the fault slip using fault separations. For calculation, the known factors are the pitch of slip lineations ( ?), the pitch of a cutoff ( ?), the dip separation ( Smd) or the strike separation ( Smh) for one marker. The two main purposes of this work include: (1) to analyze the relationship between fault slip and fault separation when slickenside lineations of a fault are known; (2) to estimate the slip direction when the parameters Smd or Smh, and ? for two non-parallel markers at a place (e.g., a point) are known. We tested the approaches using an example from a mainly strike-slip fault in East Quantoxhead, United Kingdom, and another example from the Jordan Field, Ector County, Texas. Also, we estimated the relative errors of apparent heave of the normal faults from the Sierra de San Miguelito, central Mexico.

  18. Unrest within a large rhyolitic magma system at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from 2007 through 2013: geodetic measurements and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Cordova, L.; Ali, S. T.; Feigl, K. L.; DeMets, C.; Williams-Jones, G.; Tikoff, B.; Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field is remarkable for its unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulées and domes that erupted between 25 and 2 thousand years ago. Covering more than 100 square kilometers, they erupted from 24 vents encircling a lake basin approximately 20 km in diameter on the range crest of the Andes. Geodetic measurements at the LdM volcanic field show rapid uplift since 2007 over an area more than 20 km in diameter that is centered on the western portion of the young rhyolite domes. By quantifying this active deformation and its evolution with time, we aim to investigate the storage conditions and dynamic processes in the underlying rhyolitic reservoir that drive the ongoing inflation. Analyzing interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, we track the rate of deformation. The rate of vertical uplift is negligible from 2003 to 2004, accelerates from at least 200 mm/yr in 2007 to more than 300 mm/yr in 2012, and then decreases to 200mm/yr in early 2013. To describe the deformation, we use a simple model that approximates the source as a 8 km-by-6 km sill at a depth of 5 km, assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half space with uniform elastic properties. Between 2007 and 2013, the modeled sill increased in volume by at least 190 million cubic meters. Four continuous GPS stations installed in April 2012 around the lake confirm this extraordinarily high rate of vertical uplift and a substantial rate of radial expansion. As of June 2013, the rapid deformation persists in the InSAR and GPS data. To describe the spatial distribution of material properties at depth, we are developing a model using the finite element method. This approach can account for geophysical observations, including magneto-telluric measurements, gravity surveys, and earthquake locations. It can also calculate changes in the local stress field. In particular, a large increase in stress in the magma chamber roof could lead to the initiation and/or reactivation of the ring faults. Potential evidence for fault reactivation is the detection of diffuse soil degassing of CO2 with concentrations reaching 5-7% near the center of deformation. We therefore consider several hypotheses for the processes driving the deformation, including: (1) an intrusion of basalt into the base of a melt-rich layer of rhyolite leading to heating, bubble growth and subsequent increase pressure in the reservoir, and/or (2) inflation of a hydrothermal system above the rhyolite melt layer.

  19. Dynamic faulting on a conjugate fault system detected by near-fault tilt measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Eiichi

    2015-12-01

    There have been reports of conjugate faults that have ruptured during earthquakes. However, it is still unclear whether or not these conjugate faults ruptured coseismically during earthquakes. In this paper, we investigated near-fault ground tilt motions observed at the IWTH25 station during the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake ( M w 6.9). Since near-fault tilt motion is very sensitive to the fault geometry on which the slip occurs during an earthquake, these data make it possible to distinguish between the main fault rupture and a rupture on the conjugate fault. We examined several fault models that have already been proposed and confirmed that only the models with a conjugated fault could explain the tilt data observed at IWTH25. The results support the existence of simultaneous conjugate faulting during the main rupture. This will contribute to the understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics because the conjugate rupture releases the same shear strain as that released on the main fault, and thus it has been considered quite difficult for both ruptures to accelerate simultaneously.

  20. Response of shoal grass, Halodule wrightii, to extreme winter conditions in the Lower Laguna Madre, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, D.W.; Onuf, C.P.; Tunnell, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of a severe freeze on the shoal grass, Halodule wrightii, were documented through analysis of temporal and spatial trends in below-ground biomass. The coincidence of the second lowest temperature (-10.6??C) in 107 years of record, 56 consecutive hours below freezing, high winds and extremely low water levels exposed the Laguna Madre, TX, to the most severe cold stress in over a century. H. wrightii tolerated this extreme freeze event. Annual pre- and post-freeze surveys indicated that below-ground biomass estimated from volume was Unaffected by the freeze event. Nor was there any post-freeze change in biomass among intertidal sites directly exposed to freezing air temperatures relative to subtidal sites which remained submerged during the freezing period.

  1. Water quality mapping of Laguna de Bay and its watershed, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Nakano, T.; Shin, K.; Maruyama, S.; Miyakawa, C.; Yaota, K.; Kada, R.

    2011-12-01

    Laguna de Bay (or Laguna Lake) is the largest lake in the Philippines, with a surface area of 900 km2 and its watershed area of 2920 km2 (Santos-Borja, 2005). It is located on the southwest part of the Luzon Island and its watershed contains 5 provinces, 49 municipalities and 12 cities, including parts of Metropolitan Manila. The water quality in Laguna de Bay has significantly deteriorated due to pollution from soil erosion, effluents from chemical industries, and household discharges. In this study, we performed multiple element analysis of water samples in the lake and its watersheds for chemical mapping, which allows us to evaluate the regional distribution of elements including toxic heavy metals such as Cd, Pb and As. We collected water samples from 24 locations in Laguna de Bay and 160 locations from rivers in the watersheds. The sampling sites of river are mainly downstreams around the lake, which covers from urbanized areas to rural areas. We also collected well water samples from 17 locations, spring water samples from 10 locations, and tap water samples from 21 locations in order to compare their data with the river and lake samples and to assess the quality of household use waters. The samples were collected in dry season of the study area (March 13 - 17 and May 2 - 9, 2011). The analysis was performed at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan. The concentrations of the major components (Cl, NO3, SO4, Ca, Mg, Na, and K) dissolved in the samples were determined with ion chromatograph (Dionex Corporation ICS-3000). We also analyzed major and trace elements (Li, B, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, W, Pb and U) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, Agilent Technologies 7500cx). The element concentrations of rivers are characterized by remarkable regional variations. For example, heavy metals such as Ni, Cd and Pb are markedly high in the western region as compared to the eastern region implying that the chemical variation reflects the urbanization in the western region. On the other hand, As contents is relatively high in the south of the lake and some inflowing rivers in the area. The higher concentration of As is also observed in the spring water samples in the area. Therefore, the source of As in the area is probably natural origin rather than anthropogenic. Although river water samples in western watersheds have high concentrations of heavy metals, the lake water samples in western area of the lake are not remarkably high in heavy metals. This inconsistency implies that the heavy metals flowed into the western lake from heavy metal-enriched rives have precipitated on the bottom of the lake. The polluted sediments may induce the pollution of benthos resulting in increase of the risks of food pollution through the bioaccumulation in the ecosystem.

  2. Late Pleistocene-early Holocene karst features, Laguna Madre, south Texas: A record of climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Prouty, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    A Pleistocene coquina bordering Laguna Madre, south Texas, contains well-developed late Pleistocene-early Holocene karst features (solution pipes and caliche crusts) unknown elsewhere from coastal Texas. The coquina accumulated in a localized zone of converging longshore Gulf currents along a Gulf beach. The crusts yield {sup 14}C dates of 16,660 to 7630 B.P., with dates of individual crust horizons becoming younger upwards. The karst features provide evidence of regional late Pleistocene-early Holocene climate changes. Following the latest Wisconsinan lowstand 18,000 B.P. the regional climate was more humid and promoted karst weathering. Partial dissolution and reprecipitation of the coquina formed initial caliche crust horizons; the crust later thickened through accretion of additional carbonate laminae. With the commencement of the Holocene approximately 11,000 B.P. the regional climate became more arid. This inhibited karstification of the coquina, and caliche crust formation finally ceased about 7000 B.P.

  3. Remote sensing and numerical modeling of suspended sediment in Laguna de Terminos, Campeche, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, John R.; Kjerfve, Bjorn; Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Magill, Karen E.; Medeiros, Carmen

    1989-01-01

    It is necessary to understand the complex physical processes at work in coastal lagoons in order to manage them effectively. Improved methods of data collection and analysis must be found to provide synoptic, timely hydrodynamic information because of the sheer size of some lagoons and the difficulty of acquiring in situ data (particularly in the tropics). This paper summarizes research to model salinity and suspended sediment distributions in Laguna de Terminos, Mexico, using (1) a coupled hydrodynamic and dispersion model and (2) analysis of two Landsat Thematic Mapper images collected on November 25, 1984 and April 24, 1987. Atmospherically corrected chromaticity data derived from Thermatic Mapper data were significantly correlated with modeled total suspended sediment concentrations for the two dates. Comparison between numerically modeled and remotely sensed suspended sediment maps at 1.5 x 1.5 km resolution yielded a covariation map useful for identifying areas of discrepancy between the remotely sensed data and model output.

  4. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  5. Randomness fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting a fault on a power line carrying a line parameter such as a load current. The apparatus monitors and analyzes the load current to obtain an energy value. The energy value is compared to a threshold value stored in a buffer. If the energy value is greater than the threshold value a counter is incremented. If the energy value is greater than a high value threshold or less than a low value threshold then a second counter is incremented. If the difference between two subsequent energy values is greater than a constant then a third counter is incremented. A fault signal is issued if the counter is greater than a counter limit value and either the second counter is greater than a second limit value or the third counter is greater than a third limit value.

  6. Mega displacement waves in glacial lakes: evidence from Laguna Safuna Alta, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Heald, A. P.; Zapata, M.

    2003-04-01

    An anomalously large displacement wave and overtopping event have been investigated at Laguna Safuna Alta, Cordillera Blanca, Peru. On 22nd April 2002, 10M m^3 or more of rock fell from the western valley slope into the southern end of the lake and onto the lower 100 m of the glacier. Evidence from the landslide scar indicates that the mechanism of failure was principally flexural toppling of quartzites, mudstones and sandstones with beds of anthracite. Bathymetric surveys taken before and after the landslide show that about 6.4M m^3 of material entered the lake during the event. The resulting displacement wave was 80--100 m high, overtopping the end moraine, which is 80 m at its lowest point. Oscillating rebound waves had amplitudes up to around 80 m. The initial displacement wave and the largest rebound waves caused erosion of the inner and outer flanks of the moraine, damaged lake security structures, and killed cattle that had been grazing in the area; but the moraine dam remained substantially intact and the resulting flood was largely contained within a lower lake, Laguna Safuna Baja. Active backscarps and tension cracks in the slope adjacent to the rockfall indicate that a further 5M m^3 of rock may fail. Modelling the steady state stability of the now weakened moraine dam provides factors of safety below unity against a large-scale failure of the inner slope of the moraine. The moraine dam cannot be expected to resist a second large displacement wave and mitigation strategies are therefore being developed. The height of the wave produced during this event was an order of magnitude greater than values commonly reported and designed for in glacial lake remediation works.

  7. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  8. This paper compares two fault injection techniques: scan chain implemented fault injection (SCIFI), i.e. fault

    E-print Network

    Karlsson, Johan

    Abstract This paper compares two fault injection techniques: scan chain implemented fault injection (SCIFI), i.e. fault injection in a physical system using built in test logic, and fault injection in a VHDL software simulation model of a system. The fault injections were used to evaluate the error

  9. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  10. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees... LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 410.561a) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making...

  11. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  12. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  13. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees... LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 410.561a) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making...

  14. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  15. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  16. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment, that... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507...

  17. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gerald M.

    1982-09-01

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress and slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nosteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  18. Anisotropic origin of transform faults.

    PubMed

    Freund, R; Merzer, A M

    1976-04-01

    Transform faults appear in the process of stretching during freezing of the surface films on liquid wax. These films are composed of a warp yarn of wax fibers with optical anisotropy. This fabric is absent in materials that fail to produce transform faults. The mechanical anisotropy of these wax films (with high tensile strength and low shear strength in the direction of spreading) is responsible for the initiation of the transform faults. It is suggested that the anisotropy of the ocean upper mantle recorded seismically may likewise be responsible for the creation of the ridge-ridge transform faults in the oceans. PMID:17792444

  19. Geological setting and paleomagnetism of the Eocene red beds of Laguna Brava Formation (Quebrada Santo Domingo, northwestern Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizán, H.; Geuna, S.; Melchor, R.; Bellosi, E. S.; Lagorio, S. L.; Vásquez, C.; Japas, M. S.; Ré, G.; Do Campo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The red bed succession cropping out in the Quebrada Santo Domingo in northwestern Argentina had been for long considered as Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic in age based on weak radiometric and paleontological evidence. Preliminary paleomagnetic data confirmed the age and opened questions about the nature of fossil footprints with avian features discovered in the section. Recently the stratigraphic scheme was reviewed with the identification of previously unrecognized discontinuities, and a radiometric dating obtained in a tuff, indicated an Eocene age for the Laguna Brava Formation and the fossil bird footprints, much younger than the previously assigned. We present a detailed paleomagnetic study interpreted within a regional tectonic and stratigraphic framework, looking for an explanation for the misinterpretation of the preliminary paleomagnetic data. The characteristic remanent magnetizations pass a tilt test and a reversal test. The main magnetic carrier is interpreted to be low Ti titanomagnetites and to a lesser extent hematite. The characteristic remanent magnetization would be essentially detrital. The obtained paleomagnetic pole (PP) for the Laguna Brava Formation has the following geographic coordinates and statistical parameters: N = 29, Lon. = 184.5° E, Lat. = 75.0° S, A95 = 5.6° and K = 23.7. When this PP is compared with another one with similar age obtained in an undeformed area, a declination anomaly is recognized. This anomaly can be interpreted as Laguna Brava Formation belonging to a structural block that rotated about 16° clockwise along a vertical axis after about 34 Ma. This block rotation is consistent with the regional tectonic framework, and would have caused the fortuitous coincidence of the PP with Early Jurassic poles. According to the interpreted magnetostratigraphic correlation, the Laguna Brava Formation would have been deposited during the Late Eocene with a mean sedimentation rate of about 1.4 cm per thousand years, probably in relation to the onset of the Andean deformation.

  20. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

  1. Shallow faults mapped with seismic reflections: Lost River Fault, Idaho

    E-print Network

    Mubarik, Ali; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-09-01

    A high-resolution seismic-reflection survey, conducted at the intersection of Arentson Gulch road and the western splay of the Lost River fault scarp in central Idaho, defines a bedrock surface about 80 m deep which is segmented by several faults...

  2. DRAM Fault Analysis and Test DRAM Fault Analysis and Test

    E-print Network

    of the personal computer (PC). These memories are elaborately tested by their manufacturers to ensure a high-up stage where products are shipped to the customer, and ending with the test adaptation stage, basedDRAM Fault Analysis and Test Generation #12;#12;DRAM Fault Analysis and Test Generation

  3. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL...Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of...Office of Personnel Management may have been at fault in initiating an...

  4. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL...Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of...Office of Personnel Management may have been at fault in initiating an...

  5. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 35.25 deg. North lat., 118.05 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking southwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  6. Fault current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  7. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.

  8. Postglacial eruptive history of Laguna del Maule volcanic field in Chile, from fallout stratigraphy in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierstein, J.; Sruoga, P.; Amigo, A.; Elissondo, M.; Rosas, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field, which surrounds the 54-km2 lake of that name, covers ~500 km2 of rugged glaciated terrain with Quaternary lavas and tuffs that extend for 40 km westward from the Argentine frontier and 30 km N-S from the Rio Campanario to Laguna Fea in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile. Geologic mapping (Hildreth et al., 2010) shows that at least 130 separate vents are part of the LdM field, from which >350 km3 of products have erupted since 1.5 Ma. These include a ring of 36 postglacial rhyolite and rhyodacite coulees and domes that erupted from 24 separate vents and encircle the lake, suggesting a continued large magma reservoir. Because the units are young, glassy, and do not overlap, only a few ages had been determined and the sequence of most of the postglacial eruptions had not previously been established. However, most of these postglacial silicic eruptions were accompanied by explosive eruptions of pumice and ash. Recent investigations downwind in Argentina are combining stratigraphy, grain-size analysis, chemistry, and radiocarbon dating to correlate the tephra with eruptive units mapped in Chile, assess fallout distribution, and establish a time-stratigraphic framework for the postglacial eruptions at Laguna del Maule. Two austral summer field seasons with a tri-country collaboration among the geological surveys of the U.S., Chile, and Argentina, have now established that a wide area east of the volcanic field was blanketed by at least 3 large explosive eruptions from LdM sources, and by at least 3 more modest, but still significant, eruptions. In addition, an ignimbrite from the LdM Barrancas vent complex on the border in the SE corner of the lake traveled at least 15 km from source and now makes up a pyroclastic mesa that is at least 40 m thick. This ignimbrite (72-75% SiO2) preceded a series of fall deposits that are correlated with eruption of several lava flows that built the Barrancas complex. Recent 14C dates suggest that most of the preserved LdM fallout eruptions were between 7 ka and 2 ka. However, the oldest and perhaps largest fall unit yet recognized is correlated with the Los Espejos rhyolite lava flow that dammed the lake and yields a 40Ar/39Ar age of 23 ka. Pumice clasts as large as 8.5 cm and lithics to 4 cm were measured 32 km ENE of source. It is the only high-silica rhyolite (75.5-76% SiO2) fall layer yet found, correlates chemically with the Los Espejos rhyolite lava flow, and includes distinctive olivine-bearing lithics that are correlated with mafic lavas which underlie the Espejos vent. Extremely frothy pumice found near the vent is also consistent with the bubble-wall shards and reticulite pumice distinctive of the correlative fall deposit. Another large rhyolite fall deposit (74.5% SiO2), 4 m thick 22 km E of source, has pumice clasts to 9.5 cm and includes ubiquitous coherent clasts of fine, dense soil that suggests it erupted through wet ground; 14C dates (uncalibrated) yield ages ~7 ka. Stratigraphic details suggest that pulses of fallout were accompanied by small pyroclastic flows. Ongoing field and lab work continues to build the LdM postglacial eruptive story. The numerous postglacial explosive eruptions from the LdM field are of significant concern because of ongoing 33 cm/year uplift along the western lakeshore, as measured by InSAR and verified by GPS.

  9. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5?s; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  11. Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report

    E-print Network

    Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Engineering Research Center Optimized Fault Location Concurrent Technologies Corporation Final Project Report

  12. The Maars of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field: the Example of 'laguna Pizatal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Hernandez-Cardona, A.; Alvarez del Castillo, E.; Godinez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (TVF), also known as Los Tuxtlas massif, is a structure of volcanic rocks rising conspicuously in the south-central part of the coastal plains of eastern Mexico. The TVF seems related to the upper cretaceous magmatism of the NW part of the Gulf's margin (e.g. San Carlos and Sierra de Tamaulipas alkaline complexes) rather than to the nearby Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this field began in late Miocene and has continued in historical times, The TVF is composed of 4 large volcanoes (San Martin Tuxtla, San Martin Pajapan, Santa Marta, Cerro El Vigia), at least 365 volcanic cones and 43 maars. In this poster we present the distribution of the maars, their size and depths. These maars span from a few hundred km to almost 1 km in average diameter, and a few meters to several tens of meters in depth; most of them filled with lakes. As an example on the nature of these structures we present our results of the ongoing study of 'Laguna Pizatal or Pisatal' (18° 33'N, 95° 16.4'W, 428 masl) located some 3 km from the village of Reforma, on the western side of San Martin Tuxtla volcano. Laguna Pisatal is a maar some 500 meters in radius and a depth about 40 meters from the surrounding ground level. It is covered by a lake 200 m2 in extent fed by a spring discharging on its western side. We examined a succession of 15 layers on the margins of the maar, these layers are blast deposits of different sizes interbedded by surge deposits. Most of the contacts between layers are irregular; which suggests scouring during deposition of the upper beds. This in turn suggests that the layers were deposited in a rapid series of explosions, which mixed juvenile material with fragments of the preexisting bedrock. We were unable to find the extent of these deposits since the surrounding areas are nowadays sugar cane plantations and the lake has overspilled in several occassions.

  13. Diatom diversity and paleoenvironmental changes in Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonia: the ~ 50 kyr PASADO sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recasens, C.; Ariztegui, D.; Maidana, N. I.

    2012-12-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a maar lake located in the southernmost Argentinean Patagonia, in the province of Santa Cruz. Being one of the few permanent lakes in the area, it provides an exceptional and continuous sedimentary record. The sediment cores from Laguna Potrok Aike, obtained in the framework of the ICDP-sponsored project PASADO (Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Program), were sampled for diatom analysis in order to reconstruct a continuous history of hydrological and climatic changes since the Late Pleistocene. Diatoms are widely used to characterize and often quantify the impact of past environmental changes in aquatic systems. We use variations in diatom concentration and in their dominant assemblages, combined with other proxies, to track these changes. Diatom assemblages were analyzed on the composite core 5022-2CP with a multi-centennial time resolution. The total composite profile length of 106.09 mcd (meters composite depth) was reduced to 45.80 m cd-ec (event-corrected composite profile) of pelagic deposits once gaps, reworked sections, and tephra deposits were removed. This continuous deposit spans the last ca. 51.2 cal. ka BP. Previous diatomological analysis from the core catcher samples of core 5022-1D, allowed us to determine the dominant diatom assemblages in this lake and select the sections where higher temporal resolution was needed. Over 200 species, varieties and forms were identified in the sediment record, including numerous endemic species and others which can be new to science. Among these, a new species has been described: Cymbella gravida sp. nov. Recasens and Maidana. The quantitative analysis of the sediment record reveals diatom abundances reaching 460 million valves per gram of dry sediment, with substantial fluctuations through time. Variations in the abundance and species distribution point toward lake level variations, changes in nutrient input or even periods of ice-cover in the lake. The top meters of the record reveal a shift in the phytoplakton composition, corresponding to the previously documented salinization of the water and the lake level drop, indicators of warming temperatures and lower moisture availability during the early and middle Holocene. The new results presented here on diatom diversity and distribution in the Glacial to Late Glacial sections of the record bring much needed information on the previously poorly known paleolimnology of this lake for that time period.

  14. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-print Network

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  15. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  16. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  17. Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation for Local Leakage Faults

    E-print Network

    Panos Aliferis; Barbara M. Terhal

    2006-05-26

    We provide a rigorous analysis of fault-tolerant quantum computation in the presence of local leakage faults. We show that one can systematically deal with leakage by using appropriate leakage-reduction units such as quantum teleportation. The leakage noise is described by a Hamiltonian and the noise is treated coherently, similar to general non-Markovian noise analyzed in Refs. quant-ph/0402104 and quant-ph/0504218. We describe ways to limit the use of leakage-reduction units while keeping the quantum circuits fault-tolerant and we also discuss how leakage reduction by teleportation is naturally achieved in measurement-based computation.

  18. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  19. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  20. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  2. The ambient acoustic environment in Laguna San Ignacio, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Seger, Kerri D; Thode, Aaron M; Swartz, Steven L; Urbán R, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Each winter gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) breed and calve in Laguna San Ignacio, Mexico, where a robust, yet regulated, whale-watching industry exists. Baseline acoustic environments in LSI's three zones were monitored between 2008 and 2013, in anticipation of a new road being paved that will potentially increase tourist activity to this relatively isolated location. These zones differ in levels of both gray whale usage and tourist activity. Ambient sound level distributions were computed in terms of percentiles of power spectral densities. While these distributions are consistent across years within each zone, inter-zone differences are substantial. The acoustic environment in the upper zone is dominated by snapping shrimp that display a crepuscular cycle. Snapping shrimp also affect the middle zone, but tourist boat transits contribute to noise distributions during daylight hours. The lower zone has three source contributors to its acoustic environment: snapping shrimp, boats, and croaker fish. As suggested from earlier studies, a 300?Hz noise minimum exists in both the middle and lower zones of the lagoon, but not in the upper zone. PMID:26627811

  3. Laguna Negra Virus Infection Causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Turkish Hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti).

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, K; Scott, D; Safronetz, D; Brining, D L; Ebihara, H; Feldmann, H; LaCasse, R A

    2016-01-01

    Laguna Negra virus (LNV) is a New World hantavirus associated with severe and often fatal cardiopulmonary disease in humans, known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Five hamster species were evaluated for clinical and serologic responses following inoculation with 4 hantaviruses. Of the 5 hamster species, only Turkish hamsters infected with LNV demonstrated signs consistent with HPS and a fatality rate of 43%. Clinical manifestations in infected animals that succumbed to disease included severe and rapid onset of dyspnea, weight loss, leukopenia, and reduced thrombocyte numbers as compared to uninfected controls. Histopathologic examination revealed lung lesions that resemble the hallmarks of HPS in humans, including interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary edema, as well as generalized infection of endothelial cells and macrophages in major organ tissues. Histologic lesions corresponded to the presence of viral antigen in affected tissues. To date, there have been no small animal models available to study LNV infection and pathogenesis. The Turkish hamster model of LNV infection may be important in the study of LNV-induced HPS pathogenesis and development of disease treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:25722219

  4. Radiocarbon dating of the Peruvian Chachapoya/Inca site at the Laguna de los Condores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Eva Maria; Guillen, Sonia; Kutschera, Walter; Seidler, Horst; Steier, Peter

    2007-06-01

    In 1997 a new archaeological site was discovered in the Peruvian tropical rain forest. The site is located in an area which has been occupied by the Chachapoya, a pre-Incan people, from about 800AD on. The site comprises a large funerary place with several mausoleums built in the cliffs next to the Laguna de los Condores. More than 200 human mummies and funerary bone-bundles together with numerous grave artefacts have been found there. Although the site has been ascribed to the Chachapoya, the mummification method used is very similar to the one applied by the Inca. As part of an ongoing multidisciplinary project to explore the history of this site and of the Chachapoya people, twenty-seven (27) 14C-AMS age determinations were performed. Samples, bones and textile wrappings as well as samples from a funerary bone bundle plus associated grave artefacts were dated. The 14C data show that the site originates from the Chachapoya pre-Inca period and that in addition, it was used as a funerary place during the subsequent Inca occupation era. The radiocarbon results indicate that the Chachapoya may have changed their burial tradition due to the colonization by the Inca.

  5. Impact of Water Resorts Development along Laguna de Bay on Groundwater Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jago-on, K. A. B.; Reyes, Y. K.; Siringan, F. P.; Lloren, R. B.; Balangue, M. I. R. D.; Pena, M. A. Z.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid urbanization and land use changes in areas along Laguna de Bay, one of the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia, have resulted in increased economic activities and demand for groundwater resources from households, commerce and industries. One significant activity that can affect groundwater is the development of the water resorts industry, which includes hot springs spas. This study aims to determine the impact of the proliferation of these water resorts in Calamba and Los Banos, urban areas located at the southern coast of the lake on the groundwater as a resource. Calamba, being the "Hot Spring Capital of the Philippines", presently has more than 300 resorts, while Los Banos has at least 38 resorts. Results from an initial survey of resorts show that the swimming pools are drained/ changed on an average of 2-3 times a week or even daily during peak periods of tourist arrivals. This indicates a large demand on the groundwater. Monitoring of actual groundwater extraction is a challenge however, as most of these resorts operate without water use permits. The unrestrained exploitation of groundwater has resulted to drying up of older wells and decrease in hot spring water temperature. It is necessary to strengthen implementation of laws and policies, and enhance partnerships among government, private sector groups, civil society and communities to promote groundwater sustainability.

  6. Stratigraphy and Characterization of Volcanic Deposits on the Northwestern Flanks of Mt. Makiling, Laguna, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ybanez, R. L.; Bonus, A. A. B.; Judan, J. M.; Racoma, B. A.; Morante, K. A. M.; Balangue, M. I. R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Mt. Makiling is an inactive stratovolcano located in the province of Laguna. Semi-detailed geologic field mapping on the northwestern low-level flanks and apron of the volcano was conducted. Exposures reveal a volcanic terrain hosting a wide variety of volcanic rocks: lava flows, pyroclastic surges, pyroclastic flows, and tuff deposits. Stratigraphic logging of the volcanic deposits showed differences in occurrence of the deposit types as well as their characteristics. The pyroclastic flow deposits are found at the base of the column overlain by pyroclastic surges which were more common in the area. Capping the pyroclastic surges is a thin layer of tuffaceous units. Isolated deposits of lava flows of andesitic composition were mapped in the western flank of Mt. Makiling. These varying volcanic deposits are derived from different eruptive activities of Mt. Makiling, with at least three separate eruptive episodes indicated by the exposed deposits. Two separate explosive eruptions are marked by two different pyroclastic deposits, while an effusive episode, marked by andesitic lava flows, can also be identified. The pyroclastic surge deposit is uncharacteristically thick, around a hundred meters or more exposed, providing further questions as to the magnitude of past eruptions or the mechanism of pyroclastic material deposition around the volcano. Mt. Makiling, thus, has historically undergone different eruption types, but still releases generally the same material composition across varying deposits: intermediate or andesitic composition. This is consistent with the trend of Philippine volcanoes, and with the Macolod corridor which hosts this volcanic system.

  7. Estimating floodplain sedimentation in the Laguna de Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a conceptual and analytical framework for predicting the spatial distribution of floodplain sedimentation for the Laguna de Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA. We assess the role of the floodplain as a sink for fine-grained sediment and investigate concerns regarding the potential loss of flood storage capacity due to historic sedimentation. We characterized the spatial distribution of sedimentation during a post-flood survey and developed a spatially distributed sediment deposition potential map that highlights zones of floodplain sedimentation. The sediment deposition potential map, built using raster files that describe the spatial distribution of relevant hydrologic and landscape variables, was calibrated using 2 years of measured overbank sedimentation data and verified using longer-term rates determined using dendrochronology. The calibrated floodplain deposition potential relation was used to estimate an average annual floodplain sedimentation rate (3.6 mm/year) for the ~11 km2 floodplain. This study documents the development of a conceptual model of overbank sedimentation, describes a methodology to estimate the potential for various parts of a floodplain complex to accumulate sediment over time, and provides estimates of short and long-term overbank sedimentation rates that can be used for ecosystem management and prioritization of restoration activities.

  8. Constraining Fault-Zone Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Ball, L. B.; Caine, J. S.; Revil, A.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are known to behave as hydrologic barriers, conduits, or combined barrier-conduits to fluid flow. On the basis of hydrological and geophysical data, this study presents a possible fault-zone permeability model for a buried reverse fault that juxtaposes Precambrian crystalline rocks against Tertiary sedimentary strata, the Elkhorn fault zone in South Park, Colorado. Permeameter tests and thin section analyses were performed on several samples taken from a 300-foot interval of core from the sedimentary footwall and yielded permeability values on the order of 10E-16 m^2. In-situ slug tests and single-well pumping tests conducted in both the footwall and hanging wall yielded larger permeability values, varying between 10E-14 to 10E-11 m^2, indicating a substantial change in permeability in the vicinity of the fault. Geophysical interpretations from electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential measurements suggest that these permeability estimates may be representative of a lithologically and hydrologically distinct fault zone. Permeability estimates, resistivity structure, and interpreted changes in groundwater flow direction near the fault are consistent with combined conduit-barrier behavior at the meter to tens-of-meters scale.

  9. Differential Fault Analysis on Block Cipher Piccolo

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Differential Fault Analysis on Block Cipher Piccolo Kitae Jeong Center for Information Security propose differential fault analysis on Piccolo. Based on a random byte fault model, our attack can recover the secret key of Piccolo-80 by using an exhaustive search of 224 and six random byte fault injections

  10. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  11. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  12. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  13. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  14. Seismic Fault Rheology and Earthquake Dynamics

    E-print Network

    5 Seismic Fault Rheology and Earthquake Dynamics JAMES R. RICE1 and MASSIMO COCCO2 1Department Workshop on The Dynamics of Fault Zones, spe- cifically on the subtopic "Rheology of Fault Rocks and Their Surroundings," we addressed critical research issues for understanding the seismic response of fault zones

  15. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  16. Improved Differential Fault Analysis on ARIA using Small Number of Faults

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Improved Differential Fault Analysis on ARIA using Small Number of Faults Yuseop Lee a , Kitae In [15], Li et al. firstly proposed a differential fault analysis on ARIA-128. This attack requires, only 7 faults are required. In this paper, we propose improved differential fault analysis on ARIA

  17. Differential Fault Analysis on SMS4 Using a Single Fault , Bing Sun1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Differential Fault Analysis on SMS4 Using a Single Fault Ruilin Li1 , Bing Sun1 , Chao Li1 Fault Analysis (DFA) attack is a powerful cryptanalytic technique that could be used to retrieve paper, we propose a new DFA attack on SMS4 using a single fault. We show that if a random byte fault

  18. Differential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using a Single Fault

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Differential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using a Single Fault Michael we present a differential fault attack that can be applied to the AES using a single fault. We demonstrate that when a single random byte fault is induced at the input of the eighth round, the AES key can

  19. Acceleration of Di#erential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using Single Fault

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Acceleration of Di#erential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using Single Fault of the existing fault attack [2] on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) using single faulty cipher. The paper: Di#erential Fault Analysis, Fault Attack, Advanced Encryption Stan­ dard. 1 Introduction In [1

  20. Acceleration of Differential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using Single Fault

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Acceleration of Differential Fault Analysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard using Single Fault of the existing fault attack [2] on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) using single faulty cipher. The paper: Differential Fault Analysis, Fault Attack, Advanced Encryption Stan- dard. 1 Introduction In [1] the author

  1. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 13 Fault Simulation II

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 13 Fault Simulation II Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/17 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 5.2 Next lecture: 5.3 ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/17 #12;Outline Deductive Fault

  2. Fault-free performance validation of fault-tolerant multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Feather, Frank E.; Grizzaffi, Ann Marie; Segall, Zary Z.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1987-01-01

    A validation methodology for testing the performance of fault-tolerant computer systems was developed and applied to the Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) at NASA-Langley's AIRLAB facility. This methodology was claimed to be general enough to apply to any ultrareliable computer system. The goal of this research was to extend the validation methodology and to demonstrate the robustness of the validation methodology by its more extensive application to NASA's Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor System (FTMP) and to the Software Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) Computer System. Furthermore, the performance of these two multiprocessors was compared by conducting similar experiments. An analysis of the results shows high level language instruction execution times for both SIFT and FTMP were consistent and predictable, with SIFT having greater throughput. At the operating system level, FTMP consumes 60% of the throughput for its real-time dispatcher and 5% on fault-handling tasks. In contrast, SIFT consumes 16% of its throughput for the dispatcher, but consumes 66% in fault-handling software overhead.

  3. Lithologic controls on mineralization at the Lagunas Norte high-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit, northern Peru

    E-print Network

    -colored aggregate of quartz-auriferous pyrite­rutile ± digenite infilling fractures and faults, partially replacing silty beds and forming cement of small hydraulic breccia bodies. The 34 S values for pyrite (1 or micro inclusions in pyrite. In the quartzite, the alteration is subtle and is manifested by the presence

  4. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  5. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  6. Physical Fault Tolerance of Nanoelectronics

    E-print Network

    Szkopek, Thomas

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of ...

  7. Cation stacking faults in magnesium germanate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, P. J.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1981-12-01

    Widely extended, cation stacking faults in experimentally deformed Mg2GeO4 spinel have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The faults lie on {110} planes. The displacement vector is of the form 1/4left< {1bar 10} rightrangle and is normal to the fault plane. The partial dislocations which bound the stacking fault have colinear Burgers vectors of the form 1/4left< {1bar 10} rightrangle which are normal to the fault plane.

  8. Seismic fault zone trapped noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Campillo, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Roux, P.

    2014-07-01

    Systematic velocity contrasts across and within fault zones can lead to head and trapped waves that provide direct information on structural units that are important for many aspects of earthquake and fault mechanics. Here we construct trapped waves from the scattered seismic wavefield recorded by a fault zone array. The frequency-dependent interaction between the ambient wavefield and the fault zone environment is studied using properties of the noise correlation field. A critical frequency fc ? 0.5 Hz defines a threshold above which the in-fault scattered wavefield has increased isotropy and coherency compared to the ambient noise. The increased randomization of in-fault propagation directions produces a wavefield that is trapped in a waveguide/cavity-like structure associated with the low-velocity damage zone. Dense spatial sampling allows the resolution of a near-field focal spot, which emerges from the superposition of a collapsing, time reversed wavefront. The shape of the focal spot depends on local medium properties, and a focal spot-based fault normal distribution of wave speeds indicates a ˜50% velocity reduction consistent with estimates from a far-field travel time inversion. The arrival time pattern of a synthetic correlation field can be tuned to match properties of an observed pattern, providing a noise-based imaging tool that can complement analyses of trapped ballistic waves. The results can have wide applicability for investigating the internal properties of fault damage zones, because mechanisms controlling the emergence of trapped noise have less limitations compared to trapped ballistic waves.

  9. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  10. Fault Tree Analysis: A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Fault tree analysis is a top-down approach to the identification of process hazards. It is as one of the best methods for systematically identifying an graphically displaying the many ways some things can go wrong. This bibliography references 266 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts. fault tree analysis, risk an probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms. An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

  11. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Carminati, E; Petricca, P; Riguzzi, F

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  12. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2000-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

  13. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  14. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  15. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  16. Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault 

    E-print Network

    Neal, Leslie Ann

    2002-01-01

    Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure...

  17. The Development of a Restless Rhyolite Magma Chamber at Laguna del Maule, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Fierstein, J.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field is a site of rapid crustal deformation at rates in excess of 200 mm/yr since 2007. The uplift is centered in the 16 km diameter LdM lake basin, which is ringed by 21 rhyolite domes and coulees erupted since the last glacial retreat. The lack of previously common andesite and dacite eruptions since 19 ka and coherent major and trace element variation throughout post-glacial time suggests the presence of a large silicic magma body beneath the LdM basin. Assimilation-fractional crystallization modeling predicts the rhyolites evolved at 5 km depth by 73% fractionation of a basaltic parent and modest assimilation of granodiorite accounting for up to 20% of the highest silica rhyolite. AFC processes dominate the evolution from basalt, however the differentiation of the silicic magma is complicated by liquid extraction from crystal mush, remelting of cumulate by intruding basalt, and trace element diffusion. Two-oxide thermometry indicates a relatively hot, oxidized system with eruptive temperatures ranging from 760 - 850° C and fO2 at QFM+2. Pilot ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of zircon rims suggests the shallow LdM magma system was assembled over a period of 100-200 kyr. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and field relationships reveal the post-glacial silicic volcanism occurred in two phases. Phase 1 began approximately coincident with deglaciation at 25 ka with the eruption of the rhyolite East of Presa Laguna del Maule. Over the next 6 ky, 6 small rhyodacite domes, a larger rhyodacite flow, and 4 andesite flows erupted in the NW basin and two silicic domes 12 km to the SE. Phase 1 culminates with the eruption of the Espejos rhyolite near the N shore of the lake at 19 ka. The locus of volcanism then migrates SE and phase 2 begins at ~10 ka with the eruption of the Cari Launa rhyolite and the early flows of the Barrancas complex. This period is more voluminous, erupting 4.8 km3 compared to 1.7 km3 during phase 1. Phase 2 produced lower silica rhyolite (72-74%) than the majority erupted during phase 1 (75-76%) but a smaller range of compositions overall as andesite and rhyodacite eruptions become rare and peripheral. The two phases are also distinguished by a small, but consistent, shift in REE contents. Phase 1 is marked by lower REE contents, but higher Ce/Sm ratios. The chemical trends are temporally, rather than spatially, correlated reflecting the evolution of an integrated magma body rather than local vagaries in magmatic process. Early eruptions in both phases 1 and 2 are characterized by elevated two-oxide temperatures, the presence of trace pyrrhotite, and Ta contents 2-3 times greater than subsequent eruptions, an enrichment of similar magnitude to that observed in the early Bishop Tuff. The intrusion of basalt to the base of the magma chamber could provide a source of heat and volatiles catalyzing the crystallization of Fe-sulfide and roofward diffusion of Ta. Such events have been followed by periods of heightened volcanic activity and produced an increasing rate of silicic magma generation. If the current unrest is indicative of basaltic intrusion, it could foreshadow continuing silicic volcanism at LdM, potentially leading to a catastrophic caldera forming eruption.

  18. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  19. Dynamics of a large, restless, rhyolitic magma system at Laguna del Maule, southern Andes, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Brad S.; Andersen, Nathan L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; DeMets, Charles; Tikoff, Basil; Thurber, Clifford H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Cardonna, Carlos; Córdova, Loreto; Gil, Fernando; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Williams-Jones, Glyn; Miller, Craig W.; Fierstein, Judith; Hildreth, Edward; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of large-volume rhyolitic magma systems are common in the geologic record and pose a major potential threat to society. Unlike other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and tsunamis, a large rhyolitic volcano may provide warning signs long before a caldera-forming eruption occurs. Yet, these signs—and what they imply about magma-crust dynamics—are not well known. This is because we have learned how these systems form, grow, and erupt mainly from the study of ash flow tuffs deposited tens to hundreds of thousands of years ago or more, or from the geophysical imaging of the unerupted portions of the reservoirs beneath the associated calderas. The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile, includes an unusually large and recent concentration of silicic eruptions. Since 2007, the crust there has been inflating at an astonishing rate of at least 25 cm/yr. This unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of a large rhyolitic system while magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation are actively under way is stimulating a new international collaboration. Findings thus far lead to the hypothesis that the silicic vents have tapped an extensive layer of crystal-poor, rhyolitic melt that began to form atop a magmatic mush zone that was established by ca. 20 ka with a renewed phase of rhyolite eruptions during the Holocene. Modeling of surface deformation, magnetotelluric data, and gravity changes suggest that magma is currently intruding at a depth of ~5 km. The next phase of this investigation seeks to enlarge the sets of geophysical and geochemical data and to use these observations in numerical models of system dynamics.

  20. Continued Rapid Uplift at Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (Chile) from 2007 through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Feigl, K. L.; Cordova, L.; DeMets, C.; Lundgren, P.

    2014-12-01

    The current rate of uplift at Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is among the highest ever observed geodetically for a volcano that is not actively erupting. Using data from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded at five continuously operating stations, we measure the deformation field with dense sampling in time (1/day) and space (1/hectare). These data track the temporal evolution of the current unrest episode from its inception (sometime between 2004 and 2007) to vertical velocities faster than 200 mm/yr that continue through (at least) July 2014. Building on our previous work, we evaluate the temporal evolution by analyzing data from InSAR (ALOS, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X) and GPS [http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1093/gji/ggt438]. In addition, we consider InSAR data from (ERS, ENVISAT, COSMO-Skymed, and UAVSAR), as well as constraints from magneto-telluric (MT), seismic, and gravity surveys. The goal is to test the hypothesis that a recent magma intrusion is feeding a large, existing magma reservoir. What will happen next? To address this question, we analyze the temporal evolution of deformation at other large silicic systems such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters, during well-studied episodes of unrest. We consider several parameterizations, including piecewise linear, parabolic, and Gaussian functions of time. By choosing the best-fitting model, we expect to constrain the time scales of such episodes and elucidate the processes driving them.

  1. Holocene History of the Chocó Rain Forest from Laguna Piusbi, Southern Pacific Lowlands of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Negret, Alvaro José

    1998-11-01

    A high-resolution pollen record from a 5-m-long sediment core from the closed-lake basin Laguna Piusbi in the southern Colombian Pacific lowlands of Chocó, dated by 11 AMS 14C dates that range from ca. 7670 to 220 14C yr B.P., represents the first Holocene record from the Chocó rain forest area. The interval between 7600 and 6100 14C yr B.P. (500-265 cm), composed of sandy clays that accumulated during the initial phase of lake formation, is almost barren of pollen. Fungal spores and the presence of herbs and disturbance taxa suggest the basin was at least temporarily inundated and the vegetation was open. The closed lake basin might have formed during an earthquake, probably about 4400 14C yr B.P. From the interval of about 6000 14C yr B.P. onwards, 200 different pollen and spore types were identified in the core, illustrating a diverse floristic composition of the local rain forest. Main taxa are Moraceae/Urticaceae, Cecropia,Melastomataceae/Combretaceae, Acalypha, Alchornea,Fabaceae, Mimosa, Piper, Protium, Sloanea, Euterpe/Geonoma, Socratea,and Wettinia.Little change took place during that time interval. Compared to the pollen records from the rain forests of the Colombian Amazon basin and adjacent savannas, the Chocó rain forest ecosystem has been very stable during the late Holocene. Paleoindians probably lived there at least since 3460 14C yr B.P. Evidence of agricultural activity, shown by cultivation of Zea maissurrounding the lake, spans the last 1710 yr. Past and present very moist climate and little human influence are important factors in maintaining the stable ecosystem and high biodiversity of the Chocó rain forest.

  2. Hydrocarbon concentrations in the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, in Laguna de Terminos, Campeche, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gold-Bouchot, G.; Norena-Barroso, E.; Zapata-Perez, O.

    1995-02-01

    Laguna de Terminos is a 2,500 km{sup 2} coastal lagoon in the southern Gulf of Mexico, located between 18{degrees} 20` and 19{degrees} 00` N, and 91{degrees} 00` and 92{degrees} 20` W (Figure 1). It is a shallow lagoon, with a mean depth of 3.5 m and connected to the Gulf of Mexico through two permanent inlets, Puerto Real to the east and Carmen to the west. Several rivers, most of them from the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin (the largest in Mexico and second largest in the Gulf of Mexico), drain into the lagoon with a mean annual discharge of 6 X 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/year. This lagoon has been studied systematically, and is probably one of the best known in Mexico. An excellent overview of this lagoon can be found in Yanez-Arancibia and Day. The continental shelf north of Terminos, the Campeche Bank, is the main oil-producing zone in Mexico with a production of about 2 X 10{sup 6} barrels/day. It is also the main shrimp producer in the southern Gulf, with a mean annual catch of 18,000 tonnes/year, which represents 38 to 50% of the national catch in the Gulf of Mexico. The economic importance of this region, along with its extremely high biodiversity, both in terms of species and habitats, has prompted the Mexican government to study the creation of a wildlife refuge around Terminos. Thus, it is very important to know the current levels of pollutants in this area, as a contribution to the management plan of the proposed protected area. This paper looks at hydrocarbon concentrations in oyster tissue. 14 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Active faulting and earthquake hazard: The case study of the Chihshang Fault, Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jian-Cheng

    Active faulting and earthquake hazard: The case study of the Chihshang Fault, Taiwan Jacques forthcoming locking stages, which would increase earthquake hazard. # 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights

  4. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  5. The basaltic to trachydacitic upper Diliman Tuff in Manila: Petrogenesis and comparison with deposits from Taal and Laguna Calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpa, Maria Carmencita B.; Patino, Lina C.; Vogel, Thomas A.

    2008-11-01

    The basaltic to trachydacitic (50-65 wt.% SiO 2) upper Diliman Tuff is the youngest deposit of a sequence of tuffaceous deposits in Metro Manila. The deposit is located north of Taal Caldera and northwest of Laguna Caldera, which are both within the Southwest Luzon Volcanic Field. Chemical variations in the pumice fragments within the upper Diliman Tuff include medium-K basalt to basaltic andesite, high-K basaltic andesite to andesite and trachyandesite to trachydacite. Magma mixing/mingling is ubiquitous and is shown by banding textures in some pumice fragments, considerable range in groundmass glass composition (54 to 65 wt.% SiO 2) in a single pumice fragment, and zoning in plagioclase phenocrysts. Simple binary mixing modeling and polytopic vector analysis were used to further evaluate magma mixing. Trace-element variations are inconsistent with the medium-K and high-K magmas being related by crystal fractionation. The medium-K basalts represent hotter intrusions, which induced small degrees of partial melting in older crystallized medium-K basaltic material within the crust to produce the high-K magmas. All melts likely differentiated in the crust but the emplaced and new basaltic intrusions originated from the mantle wedge and were generated by subduction zone processes. The volcanic source vent for the upper Diliman Tuff has not been identified. In comparisons with the deposits from adjacent Taal and Laguna Calderas it is chemically distinct with respect to both major- and trace-element concentrations.

  6. Distribution and community structure of ichthyoplankton in Laguna Madre seagrass meadows: Potential impact of seagrass species change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolan, J.M.; Holt, S.A.; Onuf, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Seasonal ichthyoplankton surveys were made in the lower Laguna Madre, Texas, to compare the relative utilization of various nursery habitats (shoal grass, Halodule wrightii; manatee grass, Syringodium filiforme;, and unvegetated sand bottom) for both estuarine and offshore-spawned larvae. The species composition and abundance of fish larvae were determined for each habitat type at six locations in the bay. Pushnet ichthyoplankton sampling resulted in 296 total collections, yielding 107,463 fishes representing 55 species in 24 families. A broad spectrum of both the biotic and physical habitat parameters were examined to link the dispersion and distribution of both pre-settlement and post-settlement larvae to the utilization of shallow seagrass habitats. Sample sites were grouped by cluster analysis (Ward's minimum variance method) according to the similarity of their fish assemblages and subsequently examined with a multiple discriminant function analysis to identify important environmental variables. Abiotic environmental factors were most influential in defining groups for samples dominated by early larvae, whereas measures of seagrass complexity defined groups dominated by older larvae and juveniles. Juvenile-stage individuals showed clear habitat preference, with the more shallow Halodule wrightii being the habitat of choice, whereas early larvae of most species were widely distributed over all habitats. As a result of the recent shift of dominance from Halodule wrightii to Syringodium filiforme, overall reductions in the quality of nursery habitat for fishes in the lower Laguna Madre are projected.

  7. Vegetation history in southern Patagonia: first palynological results of the ICDP lake drilling project at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäbitz, Frank; Michael, Wille

    2010-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike located in southern Argentina is one of the very few locations that are suited to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental and climatic history of southern Patagonia. In the framework of the multinational ICDP deep drilling project PASADO several long sediment cores to a composite depth of more than 100 m were obtained. Here we present first results of pollen analyses from sediment material of the core catcher. Absolute time control is not yet available. Pollen spectra with a spatial resolution of three meters show that Laguna Potrok Aike was always surrounded by Patagonian Steppe vegetation. However, the species composition underwent some marked proportional changes through time. The uppermost pollen spectra show a high contribution of Andean forest and charcoal particles as it can be expected for Holocene times and the ending last glacial. The middle part shows no forest and relatively high amounts of pollen from steppe plants indicating cold and dry full glacial conditions. The lowermost samples are characterized by a significantly different species composition as steppe plants like Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Ericaceae and Ephedra became more frequent. In combination with higher charcoal amounts and an algal species composition comparable to Holocene times we suggest that conditions during the formation of sediments at the base of the record were more humid and/or warmer causing a higher fuel availability for charcoal production compared to full glacial times.

  8. Estimated natural streamflow in the Rio San Jose upstream from the pueblos of Acoma and Laguna, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    The development of surface and ground water, which began about 1870 in the upper Rio San Jose drainage basin, has decreased the flow of the Rio San Jose on the Pueblo of Acoma and the Pueblo of Laguna. The purpose of this study was to estimate the natural streamflow in the Rio San Jose that would have entered the pueblos if no upstream water development had taken place. Estimates of natural flow were based upon streamflow and precipitation records, historical accounts of streamflow, records of irrigated acreage, and empirically-derived estimates of the effects on streamflow of Bluewater Lake, groundwater withdrawals, and irrigation diversions. Natural streamflow in the Rio San Jose at the western boundary of the Pueblo of Acoma is estimated to be between 13,000 and 15,000 acre-feet per year, based on 55 years of recorded and reconstructed streamflow data from water years 1913 to 1972. Natural streamflow at the western boundary of the Pueblo of Laguna is estimated to be between 17 ,000 and 19,000 acre-feet per year for the same period. The error in these estimates of natural streamflow is difficult to assess accurately, but it probably is less than 25 percent. (USGS)

  9. Intelligent fault-tolerant controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chien Y.

    1987-01-01

    A system with fault tolerant controls is one that can detect, isolate, and estimate failures and perform necessary control reconfiguration based on this new information. Artificial intelligence (AI) is concerned with semantic processing, and it has evolved to include the topics of expert systems and machine learning. This research represents an attempt to apply AI to fault tolerant controls, hence, the name intelligent fault tolerant control (IFTC). A generic solution to the problem is sought, providing a system based on logic in addition to analytical tools, and offering machine learning capabilities. The advantages are that redundant system specific algorithms are no longer needed, that reasonableness is used to quickly choose the correct control strategy, and that the system can adapt to new situations by learning about its effects on system dynamics.

  10. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  11. Fault testing quantum switching circuits

    E-print Network

    Jacob Biamonte; Marek Perkowski

    2010-01-19

    Test pattern generation is an electronic design automation tool that attempts to find an input (or test) sequence that, when applied to a digital circuit, enables one to distinguish between the correct circuit behavior and the faulty behavior caused by particular faults. The effectiveness of this classical method is measured by the fault coverage achieved for the fault model and the number of generated vectors, which should be directly proportional to test application time. This work address the quantum process validation problem by considering the quantum mechanical adaptation of test pattern generation methods used to test classical circuits. We found that quantum mechanics allows one to execute multiple test vectors concurrently, making each gate realized in the process act on a complete set of characteristic states in space/time complexity that breaks classical testability lower bounds.

  12. An Evaluation of Seagrass Community Structure and Its Role in Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Forgaging Dynamics in the Lower Laguna Madre 

    E-print Network

    Weatherall, Tracy F.

    2010-07-14

    Satellite tracking data of juvenile and subadult green turtles captured and released by Texas A&M University at Galveston?s Sea Turtle and Fisheries Ecology Research Lab (STFERL) from the lower Laguna Madre indicate green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas...

  13. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  14. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems 

    E-print Network

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19

    Fault location in distribution systems is a critical component of outage management and service restoration, which directly impacts feeder reliability and quality of the electricity supply. Improving fault location methods supports the Department...

  15. Development of a bridge fault extractor tool 

    E-print Network

    Bhat, Nandan D.

    2005-02-17

    Bridge fault extractors are tools that analyze chip layouts and produce a realistic list of bridging faults within that chip. FedEx, previously developed at Texas A&M University, extracts all two-node intralayer bridges ...

  16. Parametric Modeling and Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva; Ju, Jianhong

    2000-01-01

    Fault tolerant control is considered for a nonlinear aircraft model expressed as a linear parameter-varying system. By proper parameterization of foreseeable faults, the linear parameter-varying system can include fault effects as additional varying parameters. A recently developed technique in fault effect parameter estimation allows us to assume that estimates of the fault effect parameters are available on-line. Reconfigurability is calculated for this model with respect to the loss of control effectiveness to assess the potentiality of the model to tolerate such losses prior to control design. The control design is carried out by applying a polytopic method to the aircraft model. An error bound on fault effect parameter estimation is provided, within which the Lyapunov stability of the closed-loop system is robust. Our simulation results show that as long as the fault parameter estimates are sufficiently accurate, the polytopic controller can provide satisfactory fault-tolerance.

  17. Underground distribution cable incipient fault diagnosis system 

    E-print Network

    Jaafari Mousavi, Mir Rasoul

    2007-04-25

    This dissertation presents a methodology for an efficient, non-destructive, and online incipient fault diagnosis system (IFDS) to detect underground cable incipient faults before they become catastrophic. The system provides vital information...

  18. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we think that we can divide Nishiyama fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment like Kikugawa fault.About both active faults, the length of the active fault, segment division, the activity characteristics of each segment are examining now.

  19. Dynamic evolution of a fault system through interactions between fault segments

    E-print Network

    Yamashita, Teruo

    Dynamic evolution of a fault system through interactions between fault segments Ryosuke Ando 2004; published 18 May 2004. [1] We simulate the dynamic evolution process of fault system geometry geometry Citation: Ando, R., T. Tada, and T. Yamashita (2004), Dynamic evolution of a fault system through

  20. Curved Fault Dynamic Rupture Study: Wasatch Fault Salt Lake City Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Archuleta, R. J.; Smith, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are not planar; the curvature of the fault provides us useful information on the earthquake mechanics and faulting (Scholz, 1990). Fault geometry has a profound impact on both static aspect (stress distribution in the fault zone) and dynamic aspect (facilitation and impedance of the fault rupture process) of some fundamental earthquake problems. In most earthquake simulations, planar/piece-wise planar faults are used for numerical simplicity. For real earthquake scenarios, especially ground motion prediction, the eligibility of using simplified planar fault geometry needs to be validated, otherwise the simplification might bias the final conclusion. We analyze the rupture process and ground motion statistics in earthquake simulations for Wasatch Fault -Salt Lake City segment- with different fault configurations. We use a finite element method (Ma & Liu, 2006) to simulate the dynamics of a propagating rupture. We consider various initial stress distribution schemes on the fault (uniform, depth-dependent, random). We want to understand 1) how does the fault geometry itself influence the physical rupture process? and 2) what effect does the curvature have on redistributing the initial stresses on the fault? We will monitor the Coulomb stress change near the fault (Liu et al, 2010). This may provide some indication of the interaction between discontinuous fault segments and dynamic triggering as well as the distribution of aftershocks/foreshocks in relation to the fault geometry.

  1. Differential Fault Analysis of AES using a Single Multiple-Byte Fault

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Differential Fault Analysis of AES using a Single Multiple-Byte Fault Subidh Ali1 , Debdeep. In this paper we present an improved fault attack on the Advanced En- cryption Standard (AES). This paper presents an improvement on a recently pub- lished differential fault analysis of AES that requires one

  2. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 09 Fault Modeling I

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 09 Fault Modeling I Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/24 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 4.1, 4.2 Next lecture: 4.2 ­ 4.4 ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/24 #12;Homework 2 Due: 5

  3. Multi-Sensor Fault Recovery in the Presence of Known and Unknown Fault Types

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Multi-Sensor Fault Recovery in the Presence of Known and Unknown Fault Types Steven Reece in the presence of modelled and unmodelled faults. The al- gorithm comprises two stages. The first stage attempts to re- move modelled faults from each individual sensor estimate. The second stage de

  4. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 11 Fault Modeling III

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 11 Fault Modeling III Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/19 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 4.5, 4.6 Next lecture: 5.1, 5.2 ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/19 #12;Outline The Single

  5. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 12 Fault Simulation I

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 12 Fault Simulation I Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/17 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 5.1, 5.2 Next lecture: 5.2, 5.3 ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/17 #12;Outline Applications

  6. Di#erential Fault Analysis of AES using a Single MultipleByte Fault

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Di#erential Fault Analysis of AES using a Single Multiple­Byte Fault Subidh Ali 1 , Debdeep@cs.bris.ac.uk Abstract. In this paper we present an improved fault attack on the Advanced En­ cryption Standard (AES). This paper presents an improvement on a recently pub­ lished di#erential fault analysis of AES that requires

  7. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 10 Fault Modeling II

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 10 Fault Modeling II Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/17 #12;Literature Survey Choose one research article for details. ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/17 #12;Literature Survey Choose one

  8. ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 14 Fault Simulation III

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jia

    ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Lecture 14 Fault Simulation III Professor Jia Wang ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 1/27 #12;Reading Assignment This lecture: 5.3 Next lecture: 6.1, 6.2.1 ECE 586 ­ Fault Detection in Digital Circuits Spring 2015 2/27 #12;Outline Concurrent

  9. Efficient Fault Tolerance: an Approach to Deal with Transient Faults in Multiprocessor Architectures

    E-print Network

    Firenze, Università degli Studi di

    Efficient Fault Tolerance: an Approach to Deal with Transient Faults in Multiprocessor be integrated with a fault treatment approach aiming at op- timising resource utilisation. In this paper we propose a diagnosis approach that, accounting for transient faults, tries to remove units very cautiously

  10. Microfracture analysis of fault growth and wear processes, Punchbowl Fault, San Andreas system, California

    E-print Network

    Chester, Frederick M.

    Microfracture analysis of fault growth and wear processes, Punchbowl Fault, San Andreas system hypotheses for the origin of damage along large-displacement faults by the processes of fault growth and wear surface. Low-angle microfractures nearest the ultracataclasite layer also may record wear associated

  11. Fault Models for Quantum Mechanical Switching Networks

    E-print Network

    Jacob Biamonte; Jeff S. Allen; Marek A. Perkowski

    2010-01-19

    The difference between faults and errors is that, unlike faults, errors can be corrected using control codes. In classical test and verification one develops a test set separating a correct circuit from a circuit containing any considered fault. Classical faults are modelled at the logical level by fault models that act on classical states. The stuck fault model, thought of as a lead connected to a power rail or to a ground, is most typically considered. A classical test set complete for the stuck fault model propagates both binary basis states, 0 and 1, through all nodes in a network and is known to detect many physical faults. A classical test set complete for the stuck fault model allows all circuit nodes to be completely tested and verifies the function of many gates. It is natural to ask if one may adapt any of the known classical methods to test quantum circuits. Of course, classical fault models do not capture all the logical failures found in quantum circuits. The first obstacle faced when using methods from classical test is developing a set of realistic quantum-logical fault models. Developing fault models to abstract the test problem away from the device level motivated our study. Several results are established. First, we describe typical modes of failure present in the physical design of quantum circuits. From this we develop fault models for quantum binary circuits that enable testing at the logical level. The application of these fault models is shown by adapting the classical test set generation technique known as constructing a fault table to generate quantum test sets. A test set developed using this method is shown to detect each of the considered faults.

  12. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Technical Report FALCON: Rapid Statistical Fault

    E-print Network

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Technical Report FALCON: Rapid Statistical Fault Coverage Estimation for Complex Designs Shahrzad 78712-1234 Telephone: 512-471-8000 Fax: 512-471-8967 http://www.cerc.utexas.edu #12;FALCON: Rapid}@cerc.utexas.edu Abstract--FALCON (FAst fauLt COverage estimatioN) is a scalable method for fault grading which uses local

  14. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  15. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

  16. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  17. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  18. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  19. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  20. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

  1. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  2. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

  3. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  4. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  5. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  6. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

  7. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

  8. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

  9. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  10. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  11. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

  12. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

  13. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

  14. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL...Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an...the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or another agency may have been at fault in initiating an...

  15. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL...Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an...the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or another agency may have been at fault in initiating an...

  16. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  18. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  19. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  20. The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen

    E-print Network

    Ives, Zachary G.

    The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen Petr Kuznetsov Abstract One of the most important challenges in distributed computing is ensuring that services are correct and available despite faults. Recently it has been argued that fault detection can be factored out from computation, and that a generic

  1. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  4. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  5. The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen1

    E-print Network

    Ives, Zachary G.

    The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen1 and Petr Kuznetsov2 1 Max Planck Institute challenges in distributed com- puting is ensuring that services are correct and available despite faults. Recently it has been argued that fault detection can be factored out from computation, and that a generic

  6. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  7. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  8. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  9. FAULT PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF COMPACT DISK PLAYERS

    E-print Network

    Wickerhauser, M. Victor

    FAULT PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF COMPACT DISK PLAYERS Peter Fogh Odgaard Mladen Victor Wickerhauser playing certain discs with surface faults like scratches and fingerprints. The problem is to be found in an other publications of the first author. This scheme is based on an assumption that the surface faults do

  10. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  11. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  12. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  13. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  14. Lake Tahoe Faults, Shaded Relief Map

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Shaded relief map of western part of the Lake Tahoe basin, California. Faults lines are dashed where approximately located, dotted where concealed, bar and ball on downthrown side. Heavier line weight shows principal range-front fault strands of the Tahoe-Sierra frontal fault zone (TSFFZ). Opaque wh...

  15. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  16. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  18. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  19. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  20. Salton Sea Satellite Image Showing Fault Slip

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Landsat satellite image (LE70390372003084EDC00) showing location of surface slip triggered along faults in the greater Salton Trough area. Red bars show the generalized location of 2010 surface slip along faults in the central Salton Trough and many additional faults in the southwestern section of t...

  1. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  2. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  3. Availability of ground water in parts of the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinwiddie, George A.; Motts, Ward Sundt

    1964-01-01

    The need for additional water has increased in recent years on the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations in west-central New Mexico because the population and per capita use of water have increased; the tribes also desire water for light industry, for more modern schools, and to increase their irrigation program. Many wells have been drilled in the area, but most have been disappointing because of small yields and poor chemical quality of the water. The topography in the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations is controlled primarily by the regional and local dip of alternating beds of sandstone and shale and by the igneous complex of Mount Taylor. The entrenched alluvial valley along the Rio San Jose, which traverses the area, ranges in width from about 0.4 mile to about 2 miles. The climate is characterized by scant rainfall, which occurs mainly in summer, low relative humidity, and large daily fluctuations of temperature. Most of the surface water enters the area through the Rio San Jose. The average annual streamflow past the gaging station Rio San Jose near Grants, N. Mex. is about 4,000 acre-feet. Tributaries to the Rio San Jose within the area probably contribute about 1,000 acre-feet per year. At the present time, most of the surface water is used for irrigation. Ground water is obtained from consolidated sedimentary rocks that range in age from Triassic to Cretaceous, and from unconsolidated alluvium of Quaternary age. The principal aquifers are the Dakota Sandstone, the Tres Hermanos Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, and the alluvium. The Dakota Sandstone yields 5 to 50 gpm (gallons per minute) of water to domestic and stock wells. The Tres Hermanos sandstone Member generally yields 5 to 20 gpm of water to domestic and stock wells. Locally, beds of sandstone in the Chinle and Morrison Formations, the Entrada Sandstone, and the Bluff Sandstone also yield small supplies of water to domestic and stock wells. The alluvium yields from 2 gpm to as much as 150 gpm of water to domestic and stock wells. Thirteen test wells were drilled in a search for usable supplies of ground water for pueblo and irrigation supply and to determine the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the water-bearing material. The performance of six of the test wells suggests that the sites are favorable for pueblo or irrigation supply wells. The yield of the other seven wells was too small or the quality of the water was too poor for development of pueblo or irrigation supply to be feasible. However, the water from one of the seven wells was good in chemical quality, and the yield was large enough to supply a few homes with water. The tests suggest that the water in the alluvium of the Rio San Jose valley is closely related to the streamflow and that it might be possible to withdraw from the alluvium in summer and replenish it in winter. The surface flow in summer might be decreased by extensive pumpage of ground water, but on the other hand, more of the winter flow could be retained in the area by storage in the ground-water reservoir. Wells could be drilled along the axis of the valley, and the water could be pumped into systems for distribution to irrigated farms. The chemical quality of ground water in the area varies widely from one stratigraphic unit to another and laterally within each unit and commonly the water contains undesirably large amounts of sulfate. However, potable water has been obtained locally from all the aquifers. The water of best quality seemingly is in the Tres Hermanos Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale and in the alluvium north of the Rio San Jose. The largest quantity of water that is suitable for irrigation is in the valley fill along the Rio San Jose. Intensive pumping of ground water from aquifers containing water of good quality may draw water of inferior chemical quality into the wells.

  4. Deep pulverization along active faults ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Pulverization is a intensive damage observed along some active faults. Rarely found in the field, it has been associated with dynamic damage produced by large earthquakes. Pulverization has been so far only described at the ground surface, consistent with the high frequency tensile loading expected for earthquake occurring along bimaterial faults. However, we discuss here a series of hints suggesting that pulverization is expected also several hundred of meters deep. In the deep well drilled within Nojima fault after the 1995 Kobe earthquake, thin sections reveal non localized damage, with microfractured pervading a sample, but with little shear disturbing the initial microstructure. In the SAFOD borehole drilled near Parkfield, Wiersberg and Erzinger (2008) made gas monitoring while drilling found large amount of H2 gas in the sandstone west to the fault. They attribute this high H2 concentration to mechanochemical origin, in accordance with some example of diffuse microfracturing found in thin sections from cores of SAFOD phase 3 and from geophysical data from logs. High strain rate experiments in both dry (Yuan et al, 2011) and wet samples (Forquin et al, 2010) show that even under confining pressures of several tens of megapascals, diffuse damage similar to pulverization is possible. This could explain the occurrence of pulverization at depth.

  5. Geometric Analyses of Rotational Faults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwert, Donald Peters; Peck, Wesley David

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of analysis of rotational faults in undergraduate structural geology laboratories to provide students with applications of both orthographic and stereographic techniques. A demonstration problem is described, and an orthographic/stereographic solution and a reproducible black model demonstration pattern are provided. (TW)

  6. Fault current limiters using superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, W. T.; Power, A.

    Fault current limiters on power systems are to reduce damage by heating and electromechanical forces, to alleviate duty on switchgear used to clear the fault, and to mitigate disturbance to unfaulted parts of the system. A basic scheme involves a super-resistor which is a superconductor being driven to high resistance when fault current flows either when current is high during a cycle of a.c. or, if the temperature of the superconductive material rises, for the full cycle. Current may be commuted from superconductor to an impedance in parallel, thus reducing the energy dispersed at low temperature and saving refrigeration. In a super-shorted transformer the ambient temperature primary carries the power system current; the superconductive secondary goes to a resistive condition when excessive currents flow in the primary. A super-transformer has the advantage of not needing current leads from high temperature to low temperature; it behaves as a parallel super-resistor and inductor. The supertransductor with a superconductive d.c. bias winding is large and has small effect on the rate of fall of current at current zero; it does little to alleviate duty on switchgear but does reduce heating and electromechanical forces. It is fully active after a fault has been cleared. Other schemes depend on rapid recooling of the superconductor to achieve this.

  7. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  8. Denali Fault: Black Rapids Glacier

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View eastward along Black Rapids Glacier. The Denali fault follows the trace of the glacier. These very large rockslides went a mile across the glacier on the right side. Investigations of the headwall of the middle landslide indicate a volume at least as large as that which fell, has dropped a mete...

  9. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  10. Abstract--Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equiva-

    E-print Network

    Al-Asaad, Hussain

    1 Abstract--Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equiva- lence/dominance relationships among faults. Exact glo- bal fault collapsing can be easily applied fault collapsing method for library modules that uses both binary deci- sion diagrams and fault

  11. Novel neural networks-based fault tolerant control scheme with fault alarm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive active fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown actuator fault is investigated. The actuator fault is assumed to have no traditional affine appearance of the system state variables and control input. The useful property of the basis function of the radial basis function neural network (NN), which will be used in the design of the fault tolerant controller, is explored. Based on the analysis of the design of normal and passive fault tolerant controllers, by using the implicit function theorem, a novel NN-based active fault-tolerant control scheme with fault alarm is proposed. Comparing with results in the literature, the fault-tolerant control scheme can minimize the time delay between fault occurrence and accommodation that is called the time delay due to fault diagnosis, and reduce the adverse effect on system performance. In addition, the FTC scheme has the advantages of a passive fault-tolerant control scheme as well as the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme's properties. Furthermore, the fault-tolerant control scheme requires no additional fault detection and isolation model which is necessary in the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed techniques. PMID:25014982

  12. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  13. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  14. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Multiversion or N-version programming was proposed as a method of providing fault tolerance in software. The approach requires the separate, independent preparation of multiple versions of a piece of software for some application. Specific topics addressed are: failure probabilities in N-version systems, consistent comparison in N-version systems, descriptions of the faults found in the Knight and Leveson experiment, analytic models of comparison testing, characteristics of the input regions that trigger faults, fault tolerance through data diversity, and the relationship between failures caused by automatically seeded faults.

  15. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  16. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  17. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  18. Landsat TM processing in the investigation of active fault zones, South Lajas Valley Fault Zone and Cerro Goden Fault Zone as an example

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Landsat TM processing in the investigation of active fault zones, South Lajas Valley Fault Zone and Cerro Goden Fault Zone as an example ANTONIO E. CAMERON-GONZÁLEZ1 1 Department of Geology, University and geophysical data, to delineate the lateral extent of two fault zones, the South Lajas Valley Fault Zone (SLVFZ

  19. Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

    2013-07-01

    Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

  20. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  1. Experiments in fault tolerant software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, David F.; Vouk, Mladen A.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty functionally equivalent programs were built and tested in a multiversion software experiment. Following unit testing, all programs were subjected to an extensive system test. In the process sixty-one distinct faults were identified among the versions. Less than 12 percent of the faults exhibited varying degrees of positive correlation. The common-cause (or similar) faults spanned as many as 14 components. However, a majority of these faults were trivial, and easily detected by proper unit and/or system testing. Only two of the seven similar faults were difficult faults, and both were caused by specification ambiguities. One of these faults exhibited variable identical-and-wrong response span, i.e. response span which varied with the testing conditions and input data. Techniques that could have been used to avoid the faults are discussed. For example, it was determined that back-to-back testing of 2-tuples could have been used to eliminate about 90 percent of the faults. In addition, four of the seven similar faults could have been detected by using back-to-back testing of 5-tuples. It is believed that most, if not all, similar faults could have been avoided had the specifications been written using more formal notation, the unit testing phase was subject to more stringent standards and controls, and better tools for measuring the quality and adequacy of the test data (e.g. coverage) were used.

  2. Model-Based Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Aditya; Viassolo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Model Based Fault Tolerant Control (MBFTC) task was conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program. The goal of MBFTC is to develop and demonstrate real-time strategies to diagnose and accommodate anomalous aircraft engine events such as sensor faults, actuator faults, or turbine gas-path component damage that can lead to in-flight shutdowns, aborted take offs, asymmetric thrust/loss of thrust control, or engine surge/stall events. A suite of model-based fault detection algorithms were developed and evaluated. Based on the performance and maturity of the developed algorithms two approaches were selected for further analysis: (i) multiple-hypothesis testing, and (ii) neural networks; both used residuals from an Extended Kalman Filter to detect the occurrence of the selected faults. A simple fusion algorithm was implemented to combine the results from each algorithm to obtain an overall estimate of the identified fault type and magnitude. The identification of the fault type and magnitude enabled the use of an online fault accommodation strategy to correct for the adverse impact of these faults on engine operability thereby enabling continued engine operation in the presence of these faults. The performance of the fault detection and accommodation algorithm was extensively tested in a simulation environment.

  3. Parallel fault-tolerant robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. L.; Bennett, J. K.; Walker, I. D.

    1992-01-01

    A shared memory multiprocessor architecture is used to develop a parallel fault-tolerant robot controller. Several versions of the robot controller are developed and compared. A robot simulation is also developed for control observation. Comparison of a serial version of the controller and a parallel version without fault tolerance showed the speedup possible with the coarse-grained parallelism currently employed. The performance degradation due to the addition of processor fault tolerance was demonstrated by comparison of these controllers with their fault-tolerant versions. Comparison of the more fault-tolerant controller with the lower-level fault-tolerant controller showed how varying the amount of redundant data affects performance. The results demonstrate the trade-off between speed performance and processor fault tolerance.

  4. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  5. Characterizing the eolian sediment component in the lacustrine record of Laguna Potrok Aike (southeastern Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, C.; Gebhardt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Southern South America with its extended dry areas was one of the major sources for dust in the higher latitudes of the southern hemisphere during the last Glacial, as was deduced from fingerprinting of dust particles found in Antarctic ice cores. The amount of dust that was mobilized is mostly related to strength and latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds (SWW). How exactly SWW shifted between glacial and interglacial times and what consequences such shifts had for ocean and atmospheric circulation changes during the last deglaciation is currently under debate. Laguna Potrok Aike (PTA) as a lake situated in the middle of the source area of dust offers the opportunity to arrive at a better understanding of past SWW changes and their associated consequences for dust transport. For this task, a sediment record of the past ~51 ka is available from a deep drilling campaign (PASADO). From this 106 m long profile, 76 samples representing the different lithologies of the sediment sequence were selected to characterize an eolian sediment component. Prior to sampling of the respective core intervals, magnetic susceptibility was measured and the element composition was determined by XRF-scanning on fresh, undisturbed sediment. After sampling and freeze drying, physical, chemical and mineralogical sediment properties were determined before and after separation of each sample into six grainsize classes for each fraction separately. SEM techniques were used to verify the eolian origin of grains. The aim of this approach is to isolate an exploitable fingerprint of the eolian sediment component in terms of their grain size, physical properties, geochemistry and mineralogy. Thereby, the challenging aspect is that such a fingerprint should be based on high-resolution down-core scanning techniques, so time-consuming techniques such as grain-size measurements by laser detection can be avoided. A first evaluation of the dataset indicates that magnetic susceptibility, which is often used as a tracer for the eolian sediment component in marine sediments, probably does not yield a robust signal of eolian input in this continental setting because it is variably contained in the silt as well as in the fine sand fraction. XRF-scanning of powdered samples of the different grain-size fractions shows that some elements are characteristically enriched in the clay, silt or medium sand fractions which might allow a geochemical fingerprinting of these. For instance, an identification of higher amounts of clay in a sample may be possible based on it's enrichment in heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb) and/or Fe. Higher amounts of silt may be recognized by Zr and/or Y enrichment. Hence, unmixing of the signal stored in the sedimentary record of PTA with tools of multivariate statistics is a necesseary step to characterize the eolian fraction. The 51 ka BP sediment record of PTA might then be used for a reconstruction of dust availability in the high latitude source areas of the southern hemisphere.

  6. Tracing the Geomorphic Signature of Lateral Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Active strike-slip faults are among the most dangerous geologic features on Earth. Unfortunately, it is challenging to estimate their slip rates, seismic hazard, and evolution over a range of timescales. An under-exploited tool in strike-slip fault characterization is quantitative analysis of the geomorphic response to lateral fault motion to extract tectonic information directly from the landscape. Past geomorphic work of this kind has focused almost exclusively on vertical motion, despite the ubiquity of horizontal motion in crustal deformation and mountain building. We seek to address this problem by investigating the landscape response to strike-slip faulting in two ways: 1) examining the geomorphology of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), a suite of parallel strike-slip faults within the actively deforming South Island of New Zealand, and 2) conducting controlled experiments in strike-slip landscape evolution using the CHILD landscape evolution model. The MFS offers an excellent natural experiment site because fault initiation ages and cumulative displacements decrease from north to south, whereas slip rates increase over four fold across a region underlain by a single bedrock unit (Torlesse Greywacke). Comparison of planform and longitudinal profiles of rivers draining the MFS reveals strong disequilibrium within tributaries that drain to active fault strands, and suggests that river capture related to fault activity may be a regular process in strike-slip fault zones. Simple model experiments support this view. Model calculations that include horizontal motion as well as vertical uplift demonstrate river lengthening and shortening due to stream capture in response to shutter ridges sliding in front of stream outlets. These results suggest that systematic variability in fluvial knickpoint location, drainage area, and incision rates along different faults or fault segments may be expected in catchments upstream of strike-slip faults and could act as useful indicators of fault activity.

  7. Lateglacial and Holocene climatic changes in south-eastern Patagonia inferred from carbonate isotope records of Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlerich, M.; Mayr, C.; Gussone, N.; Hahn, A.; Hölzl, S.; Lücke, A.; Ohlendorf, C.; Rummel, S.; Teichert, B. M. A.; Zolitschka, B.

    2015-04-01

    First results of strontium, calcium, carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of bulk carbonates from a 106 m long sediment record of Laguna Potrok Aike, located in southern Patagonia are presented. Morphological and isotopic investigations of ?m-sized carbonate crystals in the sediment reveal an endogenic origin for the entire Holocene. During this time period the calcium carbonate record of Laguna Potrok Aike turned out to be most likely ikaite-derived. As ikaite precipitation in nature has only been observed in a narrow temperature window between 0 and 7 °C, the respective carbonate oxygen isotope ratios serve as a proxy of hydrological variations rather than of palaeotemperatures. We suggest that oxygen isotope ratios are sensitive to changes of the lake water balance induced by intensity variations of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies and discuss the role of this wind belt as a driver for climate change in southern South America. In combination with other proxy records the evolution of westerly wind intensities is reconstructed. Our data suggest that weak SHW prevailed during the Lateglacial and the early Holocene, interrupted by an interval with strengthened Westerlies between 13.4 and 11.3 ka cal BP. Wind strength increased at 9.2 ka cal BP and significantly intensified until 7.0 ka cal BP. Subsequently, the wind intensity diminished and stabilised to conditions similar to present day after a period of reduced evaporation during the "Little Ice Age". Strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr ratio) were identified as a potential lake-level indicator and point to a lowering from overflow conditions during the Glacial (?17 ka cal BP) to lowest lake levels around 8 ka cal BP. Thereafter the strontium isotope curve resembles the lake-level curve which is stepwise rising until the "Little Ice Age". The variability of the Ca isotope composition of the sediment reflects changes in the Ca budget of the lake, indicating higher degrees of Ca utilisation during the period with lowest lake level.

  8. Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses in Laguna Madre, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, P.

    2004-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine how long alterations in habitat characteristics and use by fishery and forage organisms were detectable at dredged material placement sites in Laguna Madre, Texas. Water, sediment, seagrass, benthos, and nekton characteristics were measured and compared among newly deposited sediments and nearby and distant seagrasses each fall and spring over three years. Over this period, 75% of the estimated total surface area of the original deposits was either re-vegetated by seagrass or dispersed by winds and currents. Differences in water and sediment characteristics among habitat types were mostly detected early in the study. There were signs of steady seagrass re-colonization in the latter half of the study period, and mean seagrass coverage of deposits had reached 48% approximately three years after dredging. Clovergrass Halophila engelmannii was the initial colonist, but shoalgrass Halodule wrightii predominated after about one year. Densities of annelids and non-decapod crustaceans were generally significantly greater in close and distant seagrass habitats than in dredged material habitat, whereas densities of molluscs were not significantly related to habitat type. Nekton (fish and decapod) densities were almost always significantly greater in the two seagrass habitats than in dredged material deposits. Benthos and nekton communities in dredged material deposits were distinct from those in seagrass habitats. Recovery from dredged material placement was nearly complete for water column and sediment components after 1.5 to 3 years, but recovery of seagrasses, benthos, and nekton was predicted to take 4 to 8 years. The current 2 to 5 years dredging cycle virtually insures no time for ecosystem recovery before being disturbed again. The only way to ensure permanent protection of the high primary and secondary productivity of seagrass beds in Laguna Madre from acute and chronic effects of maintenance dredging, while ensuring navigation capability, is to remove dredged materials from the shallow waters of the ecosystem.

  9. Sr Isotopes and Migration of Prairie Mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) from Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Crespo, V.; Schaaf, P. E.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asserting mobility of ancient humans is a major issue for anthropologists. For more than 25 years, Sr isotopes have been used as a resourceful tracer tool in this context. A comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios found in tooth enamel and in bone is performed to determine if the human skeletal remains belonged to a local or a migrant. Sr in bone approximately reflects the isotopic composition of the geological region where the person lived before death; whereas the Sr isotopic system in tooth enamel is thought to remain as a closed system and thus conserves the isotope ratio acquired during childhood. Sr isotope ratios are obtained through the geologic substrate and its overlying soil, from where an individual got hold of food and water; these ratios are in turn incorporated into the dentition and skeleton during tissue formation. In previous studies from Teotihuacan, Mexico we have shown that a three-step leaching procedure on tooth enamel samples is important to assure that only the biogenic Sr isotope contribution is analyzed. The same Sr isotopic tools can function concerning ancient animal migration patterns. To determine or to discard the mobility of prairie mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) found at Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, México the leaching procedure was applied on six molar samples from several fossil remains. The initial hypothesis was to use 87Sr/86Sr values to verify if the mammoth population was a mixture of individuals from various herds and further by comparing their Sr isotopic composition with that of plants and soils, to confirm their geographic origin. The dissimilar Sr results point to two distinct mammoth groups. The mammoth population from Laguna de Cruces was then not a family unit because it was composed by individuals originated from different localities. Only one individual was identified as local. Others could have walked as much as 100 km to find food and water sources.

  10. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  11. Fault growth and interactions in a multiphase rift fault network: Horda Platform, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Oliver B.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Whipp, Paul S.

    2015-11-01

    Physical models predict that multiphase rifts that experience a change in extension direction between stretching phases will typically develop non-colinear normal fault sets. Furthermore, multiphase rifts will display a greater frequency and range of styles of fault interactions than single-phase rifts. Although these physical models have yielded useful information on the evolution of fault networks in map view, the true 3D geometry of the faults and associated interactions are poorly understood. Here, we use an integrated 3D seismic reflection and borehole dataset to examine a range of fault interactions that occur in a natural multiphase fault network in the northern Horda Platform, northern North Sea. In particular we aim to: i) determine the range of styles of fault interaction that occur between non-colinear faults; ii) examine the typical geometries and throw patterns associated with each of these different styles; and iii) highlight the differences between single-phase and multiphase rift fault networks. Our study focuses on a ca. 350 km2 region around the >60 km long, N-S-striking Tusse Fault, a normal fault system that was active in the Permian-Triassic and again in the Late Jurassic-to-Early Cretaceous. The Tusse Fault is one of a series of large (>1500 m throw) N-S-striking faults forming part of the northern Horda Platform fault network, which includes numerous smaller (2-10 km long), lower throw (<100 m), predominantly NW-SE-striking faults that were only active during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. We examine how the 2nd-stage NW-SE-striking faults grew, interacted and linked with the N-S-striking Tusse Fault, documenting a range of interaction styles including mechanical and kinematic isolation, abutment, retardation and reactivated relays. Our results demonstrate that: i) isolated, and abutting interactions are the most common fault interaction styles in the northern Horda Platform; ii) pre-existing faults can act as sites of nucleation for 2nd-stage faults or may form mechanical barriers to propagation; iii) the throw distribution on reactivated 1st-stage faults will be modified in a predictable manner if they are intersected or influenced by 2nd-stage faults; iv) sites of fault linkage and relay-breaching associated with the first phase of extension can act as preferential nucleation sites for 2nd-stage faults; and v) the development of fault intersections is a dynamic process, involving the gradual transition from one style to another.

  12. Weakness of the San Andreas Fault revealed by samples from the active fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Marone, C.; Saffer, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the strength and slip behaviour of tectonic faults is a central problem in earthquake physics and seismic-hazard assessment. Many major faults, including the San Andreas Fault, are weak compared with the surrounding rock, but the cause of this weakness is debated. Previous measurements of the frictional strength of San Andreas Fault rocks are too high to explain the observed weakness. However, these measurements relied on samples taken at a distance from the active fault or from weathered surface samples. Recent drilling into the San Andreas Fault has provided material from the actively slipping fault at seismogenic depths. Here we present systematic measurements of the frictional properties and composition of the San Andreas Fault at 2.7km depth, including the wall rock and active fault. We find that the fault is weak relative to the surrounding rock and that the fault rock exhibits stable sliding friction behaviour. The fault zone contains the weak mineral smectite and exhibits no frictional healing--bonds in the material do not heal after rupture. Taken together, the low inherent strength and lack of healing of the fault-zone material could explain why the San Andreas Fault slips by aseismic creep and small earthquakes in central California, rather than by large, destructive earthquakes.

  13. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (?) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ?1 ?m powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 ?m clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub-micron particles of unstable materials are unlikely to survive in the crust over geologic time, so a direct comparison of fresh experimental wear material and ancient fault rock needs to account for the alteration and crystallization of primary materials. The surface of the Corona fault is coated by a translucent shiny layer consisting of ~100 nm interlocking groundmass of dislocation-free quartz, 10 nm ellipsoidal particles, and interstitial patches of amorphous silica. We interpret this layer as the equivalent of the experimentally produced amorphous material after crystallizing to more stable forms over geological time.

  14. Frictional constraints on crustal faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Cocco, M.

    1996-01-01

    We consider how variations in fault frictional properties affect the phenomenology of earthquake faulting. In particular, we propose that lateral variations in fault friction produce the marked heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes. We model these variations using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening behavior into two fields: the strong seismic field is very velocity weakening and the weak seismic field is slightly velocity weakening. Similarly, we differentiate velocity-strengthening behavior into two fields: the compliant field is slightly velocity strengthening and the viscous field is very velocity strengthening. The strong seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two "intermediate" fields, weak seismic and compliant, have frictional velocity dependences that are close to velocity neutral: these fields modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the weak seismic and compliant regions slip aseismically, while the strong seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak seismic areas exhibit most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks but can also creep seismically. This "mixed" frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution of the critical slip distance. The model also provides a mechanism for rupture arrest: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into unloaded complaint or weak seismic areas, producing broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur on both the weak seismic and compliant areas around a fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the seismicity and the coseismic slip for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes. The interevent seismicity and aftershocks appear to occur on fault areas outside the regions of significant slip: these regions are interpreted as either weak seismic or compliant, depending on whether or not they manifest interevent seismicity.

  15. Cataclastic faults along the SEMP fault system (Eastern Alps, Austria) — A contribution to fault zone evolution, internal structure and paleo-stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausegger, Stefan; Kurz, Walter

    2013-11-01

    In this study three different sites along the ENE-trending, sinistral Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone were investigated with respect to brittle fault zone evolution and fault re-activation. All sites crop out in Triassic carbonates (Ladinian Wetterstein limestone/-dolomite). Simultaneously (re-) activated faults were investigated with focus on fault-slip data and structural inventory of each individual fault zone. Configuration of (internal) structural elements, fault core thickness, strike direction and slip sense in addition to particle analysis of fault core cataclasites add up to three different fault types (Fault Types I, II and III). Fault Type I is classified by a complex internal fault core structure with thicknesses up to several 10s of meters and generally evolve in a strike direction of maximum shear stress (?max). Type II faults, characterized by cataclastic fault cores with thicknesses up to 1 m, as well as Type III faults (thin solitary cataclastic layers) evolve sub-parallel to the main fault direction and in orientation according to R, R' or X shear fractures with variable (?n/?) ratio. Progressive development from Type III to Type II and Type I faults is consistent with increasing displacement and increasing fault core width. Fault type classification and related paleostress analysis provide evidence from field observation compared to theoretical and analog models of Mohr-Coulomb fracture evolution.

  16. A Log-Scaling Fault Tolerant Agreement Algorithm for a Fault Tolerant MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Hursey, Joshua J; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Graham, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The lack of fault tolerance is becoming a limiting factor for application scalability in HPC systems. The MPI does not provide standardized fault tolerance interfaces and semantics. The MPI Forum's Fault Tolerance Working Group is proposing a collective fault tolerant agreement algorithm for the next MPI standard. Such algorithms play a central role in many fault tolerant applications. This paper combines a log-scaling two-phase commit agreement algorithm with a reduction operation to provide the necessary functionality for the new collective without any additional messages. Error handling mechanisms are described that preserve the fault tolerance properties while maintaining overall scalability.

  17. Fault Injection Techniques and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1997-01-01

    Dependability evaluation involves the study of failures and errors. The destructive nature of a crash and long error latency make it difficult to identify the causes of failures in the operational environment. It is particularly hard to recreate a failure scenario for a large, complex system. To identify and understand potential failures, we use an experiment-based approach for studying the dependability of a system. Such an approach is applied not only during the conception and design phases, but also during the prototype and operational phases. To take an experiment-based approach, we must first understand a system's architecture, structure, and behavior. Specifically, we need to know its tolerance for faults and failures, including its built-in detection and recovery mechanisms, and we need specific instruments and tools to inject faults, create failures or errors, and monitor their effects.

  18. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.70 deg. North lat., 118.57 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  19. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, Andy; Nelson, Austin; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chebahtah, Justin; Wang, Trudie; McCarty, Michael

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  20. A Quaternary Fault Database for Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, S.; Ehlers, T. A.; Bendick, R.; Stübner, K.; Strube, T.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for Central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for Central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault segments and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 122 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in Central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  1. Early weakening processes inside thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Oliot, E.; Lahfid, A.; Collettini, C.

    2015-07-01

    Observations from deep boreholes at several locations worldwide, laboratory measurements of frictional strength on quartzo-feldspathic materials, and earthquake focal mechanisms indicate that crustal faults are strong (apparent friction ? ? 0.6). However, friction experiments on phyllosilicate-rich rocks and some geophysical data have demonstrated that some major faults are considerably weaker. This weakness is commonly considered to be characteristic of mature faults in which rocks are altered by prolonged deformation and fluid-rock interaction (i.e., San Andreas, Zuccale, and Nankai Faults). In contrast, in this study we document fault weakening occurring along a marly shear zone in its infancy (<30 m displacement). Geochemical mass balance calculation and microstructural data show that a massive calcite departure (up to 50 vol %) from the fault rocks facilitated the concentration and reorganization of weak phyllosilicate minerals along the shear surfaces. Friction experiments carried out on intact foliated samples of host marls and fault rocks demonstrated that this structural reorganization lead to a significant fault weakening and that the incipient structure has strength and slip behavior comparable to that of the major weak faults previously documented. These results indicate that some faults, especially those nucleating in lithologies rich of both clays and high-solubility minerals (such as calcite), might experience rapid mineralogical and structural alteration and become weak even in the early stages of their activity.

  2. Fault Mechanics and Earthquake Physics: Insights From Laboratory Studies Of Fault Rocks Recovered In Scientific Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Collettini, C.

    2012-12-01

    Laboratory experiments on fault rocks recovered in scientific drilling projects have emerged as a powerful tool for understanding tectonic faults and the spectrum of fault slip behaviors. Recent laboratory work has made significant strides in understanding frictional strength, slip stability, poromechanical properties, and their relationships in active fault zones. These studies are beginning to reconcile field measurements with theory and lab measurements, including heat flow, stress orientation data, and lab measurements on fault gouge. In particular, it is now clear that mature tectonic faults can be much weaker than previously thought due to the effects of in situ shear fabric, fault rock mineralogy, and clay nano-coatings on micro- and meso-scale shear localization surfaces within fault gouge. We summarize results from laboratory experiments on samples recovered in scientific drilling projects, outcrop fault samples, and synthetic fault gouge, focusing primarily on friction measurements conducted under slip velocities that correspond to nucleation of dynamic earthquake rupture. Our data show that fault zone friction is strongly influenced by shear fabric in some cases, which suggests that rotary and triaxial experimental geometries are not well suited for studies of in-situ fault zone friction, at least in some cases. At this stage, the role of fault zone fabric at dynamic slip velocities, such as accessed only in rotary shear experiments, is unclear and needs to be explored. A number of current studies are evaluating connections between fault strength and poromechanical properties, with particular focus on fault zone permeability and anisotropy. Results of these laboratory studies will have important implications for understanding emerging, in-situ measurements of fault zone shear heating and on explanations for fault strength.

  3. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (? 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ? 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  4. Fault segmentation and structural evolution of the frontal Longmen San fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Xu, X.; Yuan, R.; Li, K.; Sun, X.; Chen, W.

    2011-12-01

    Field investigations show that the Wenchuan earthquake on the 12th of May 2008 ruptured two NW-dipping imbricate reverse faults along the Longmen Shan fault zone at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The length of the Beichuan-Yingxiu Fault reaches nearly 240 km. Southeast of this fault, a smaller displacement occurred along the Guanxian-Jiangyou Fault, which has a length of about 70 km. A 7 km long NW-striking left-lateral reverse fault, the Xiaoyudong Fault, was clearly observed between these two main surface ruptures. This co-seismic surface rupture pattern, involving multiple structures, is one of the most complicated patterns of recent great earthquakes. The surface rupture length is the longest among the co-seismic surface rupture zones for reverse faulting events ever reported. Our detail field investigations reveal that the surface rupture of the Wenchuan earthquake cascaded through several pre-existing fault segments. The displacement amount, the rupture pattern and the stress orientation calculated from the fault slickenside striations between the different segments are all different. Some secondary faults can also be observed between the segments. These faults are partially active and control the development of river terraces and the shape of streams. We suggest that the multi-segment rupturing model is a better approximation than a single-segment model for estimating the maximum magnitude of the Longmen Shan fault zone.

  5. Networking of Near Fault Observatories in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín; Bernard, Pascal; Chiraluce, Lauro; Fäh, Donat; Festa, Gaetano; Zulficar, Can

    2014-05-01

    Networking of six European near-fault observatories (NFO) was established In the FP7 infrastructure project NERA (Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation). This networking has included sharing of expertise and know-how among the observatories, distribution of analysis tools and access to data. The focus of the NFOs is on research into the active processes of their respective fault zones through acquisition and analysis of multidisciplinary data. These studies include the role of fluids in fault initiation, site effects, derived processes such as earthquake generated tsunamis and landslides, mapping the internal structure of fault systems and development of automatic early warning systems. The six fault zones are in different tectonic regimes: The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) in Iceland, the Marmara Sea in Turkey and the Corinth Rift in Greece are at plate boundaries, with strike-slip faulting characterizing the SISZ and the Marmara Sea, while normal faulting dominates in the Corinth Rift. The Alto Tiberina and Irpinia faults, dominated by low- and medium-angle normal faulting, respectively are in the Apennine mountain range in Italy and the Valais Region, characterized by both strike-slip and normal faulting is located in the Swiss Alps. The fault structures range from well-developed long faults, such as in the Marmara Sea, to more complex networks of smaller, book-shelf faults such as in the SISZ. Earthquake hazard in the fault zones ranges from significant to substantial. The Marmara Sea and Corinth rift are under ocean causing additional tsunami hazard and steep slopes and sediment-filled valleys in the Valais give rise to hazards from landslides and liquefaction. Induced seismicity has repeatedly occurred in connection with geothermal drilling and water injection in the SISZ and active volcanoes flanking the SISZ also give rise to volcanic hazard due to volcano-tectonic interaction. Organization among the NERA NFO's has led to their gaining working-group status in EPOS as the WG on Near Fault Observatories, representing multidisciplinary research of faults and fault zones.

  6. Identifiability of Additive Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Upchurch, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    A class of fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type actuator and sensor faults is explored in detail from the point of view of fault identifiability. The methods use state augmentation along with banks of Kalman-Bucy filters for fault detection, fault pattern determination, and fault value estimation. A complete characterization of conditions for identifiability of bias-type actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is presented. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have unknown biases. The fault identifiability conditions are demonstrated via numerical examples. The analytical and numerical results indicate that caution must be exercised to ensure fault identifiability for different fault patterns when using such methods.

  7. Distributed bearing fault diagnosis based on vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, Boštjan; Boškoski, Pavle; Juri?i?, ?ani

    2016-01-01

    Distributed bearing faults appear under various circumstances, for example due to electroerosion or the progression of localized faults. Bearings with distributed faults tend to generate more complex vibration patterns than those with localized faults. Despite the frequent occurrence of such faults, their diagnosis has attracted limited attention. This paper examines a method for the diagnosis of distributed bearing faults employing vibration analysis. The vibrational patterns generated are modeled by incorporating the geometrical imperfections of the bearing components. Comparing envelope spectra of vibration signals shows that one can distinguish between localized and distributed faults. Furthermore, a diagnostic procedure for the detection of distributed faults is proposed. This is evaluated on several bearings with naturally born distributed faults, which are compared with fault-free bearings and bearings with localized faults. It is shown experimentally that features extracted from vibrations in fault-free, localized and distributed fault conditions form clearly separable clusters, thus enabling diagnosis.

  8. LIDAR Measurements of Fault Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagy, A.; Axen, G. J.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2005-12-01

    Fault zones contain several discrete slip surfaces that accommodate most of the displacement across the zone. The geometrical properties of a given slip surface and the geometrical relation between surfaces can control the friction and deformation properties. We present the first measurements of fault surfaces using ground-based LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). The Laser-based system can measure precise distances over an area hundreds of squares meters large with individual points spaced as close as 3mm apart. We can then extract thousands of fault-surface profiles in any direction along the scanned surface. Our measurements of 8 large-scale, natural fault exposures in the Western US suggest the following preliminary results: (1) Not surprisingly, at any measurable wavelength, individual coherent striated slip surfaces are smooth relative to nearby erosional surfaces. For wavelengths of 1 m (which is the scale of slip on large earthquakes), we find that the average asperity height of slip surfaces is 1.8 cm, while that of erosional surfaces is 10 cm. (2) Like previous studies, we find that the wavelength ? is related to the asperity height h by h=C?#? over a range of wavelengths of 2 cm to a few meters. However, our more precise measurements show that the constants are different than in previous estimates. We find that C ranges between 0.01-0.0025, and ? ranges between 0.4-0.7. Surfaces with low values of C also have low values of ?. (3) An extrapolation of the self-affine relationship with the measured parameters implies that the heights and lengths of asperities have similar dimensions at scales of microns up to tens of microns. The geometry implies that below these scales sliding breaks asperities, while at larger scales the surfaces are riding up on each other during sliding. This scale of 10s of microns is consistent with previous laboratory measurements of Dc. (4) In some cases the fault ``surface'' is an ensemble of striated surfaces at non-uniform orientation and a single exposure may have non-stationary spectral properties with variations in both ? and C (although not Dc) over the 1-10 meter scale. Other surfaces have consistent spectra for nearly 100 m.

  9. Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

  10. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.78 deg. North lat., 118.75 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  11. Parallel fault-tolerant robot control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Deirdre L.; Bennett, John K.; Walker, Ian D.

    1992-11-01

    Most robot controllers today employ a single processor architecture. As robot control requirements become more complex, these serial controllers have difficulty providing the desired response time. Additionally, with robots being used in environments that are hazardous or inaccessible to humans, fault-tolerant robotic systems are particularly desirable. A uniprocessor control architecture cannot offer tolerance of processor faults. Use of multiple processors for robot control offers two advantages over single processor systems. Parallel control provides a faster response, which in turn allows a finer granularity of control. Processor fault tolerance is also made possible by the existence of multiple processors. There is a trade-off between performance and the level of fault tolerance provided. This paper describes a shared memory multiprocessor robot controller that is capable of providing high performance and processor fault tolerance. We evaluate the performance of this controller, and demonstrate how performance and processor fault tolerance can be balanced in a cost- effective manner.

  12. Diagnosis of single faults in quantum circuits

    E-print Network

    Debajyoti Bera; Subhamoy Maitra; Sparsa Roychowdhury; Susanta Chakraborty

    2015-12-16

    Detecting and isolating faults is crucial for synthesis of quantum circuits. Under the single fault assumption that is now routinely accepted in circuit fault analysis, we show that the behaviour of faulty quantum circuits can be fully characterized by the single faulty gate and the corresponding fault model. This allows us to efficiently determine test input states as well as measurement strategy that can be used to detect every single-gate fault using very few test cases and with minimal probability of error; in fact we demonstrate that most commonly used quantum gates can be isolated without any error under the single missing gate fault (SMGF) model. We crucially exploit the quantum nature of circuits to show vast improvement upon the existing works of automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) for quantum circuits.

  13. Fault-tolerant dynamic task graph scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt, Mehmet C.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Kunal; Agrawal, Gagan

    2014-11-16

    In this paper, we present an approach to fault tolerant execution of dynamic task graphs scheduled using work stealing. In particular, we focus on selective and localized recovery of tasks in the presence of soft faults. We elicit from the user the basic task graph structure in terms of successor and predecessor relationships. The work stealing-based algorithm to schedule such a task graph is augmented to enable recovery when the data and meta-data associated with a task get corrupted. We use this redundancy, and the knowledge of the task graph structure, to selectively recover from faults with low space and time overheads. We show that the fault tolerant design retains the essential properties of the underlying work stealing-based task scheduling algorithm, and that the fault tolerant execution is asymptotically optimal when task re-execution is taken into account. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the low cost of recovery under various fault scenarios.

  14. Performance Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine

    2005-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. In this paper, an FTC analysis framework is provided to calculate the upper bound of an induced-L(sub 2) norm of an FTC system with existence of false identification and detection time delay. The upper bound is written as a function of a fault detection time and exponential decay rates and has been used to determine which FTC law produces less performance degradation (tracking error) due to false identification. The analysis framework is applied for an FTC system of a HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle. Index Terms fault tolerant control system, linear parameter varying system, HiMAT vehicle.

  15. Holocene fault scarps near Tacoma, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, B.L.; Brocher, T.M.; Weaver, C.S.; Bucknam, R.C.; Blakely, R.J.; Kelsey, H.M.; Nelson, A.R.; Haugerud, R.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne laser mapping confirms that Holocene active faults traverse the Puget Sound metropolitan area, northwestern continental United States. The mapping, which detects forest-floor relief of as little as 15 cm, reveals scarps along geophysical lineaments that separate areas of Holocene uplift and subsidence. Along one such line of scarps, we found that a fault warped the ground surface between A.D. 770 and 1160. This reverse fault, which projects through Tacoma, Washington, bounds the southern and western sides of the Seattle uplift. The northern flank of the Seattle uplift is bounded by a reverse fault beneath Seattle that broke in A.D. 900-930. Observations of tectonic scarps along the Tacoma fault demonstrate that active faulting with associated surface rupture and ground motions pose a significant hazard in the Puget Sound region.

  16. COMPLETE FAULT ANALYSIS FOR LONG TRANSMISSION LINE USING

    E-print Network

    COMPLETE FAULT ANALYSIS FOR LONG TRANSMISSION LINE USING SYNCHRONIZED SAMPLING Nan Zhang Mladen 77843-3128, U.S.A. Abstract: A complete fault analysis scheme for long transmission line represented for normal situation and external faults, and is close to fault current during the internal faults

  17. Syntactic Fault Patterns in OO Programs Roger T. Alexander

    E-print Network

    Bieman, James M.

    Syntactic Fault Patterns in OO Programs Roger T. Alexander Colorado State University Dept faults are widely studied, there are many aspects of faults that we still do not understand, par is to cause failures and thereby detect faults, a full understanding of the char- acteristics of faults

  18. Fault prophet : a fault injection tool for large scale computer systems

    E-print Network

    Tchwella, Tal

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I designed and implemented a fault injection tool, to study the impact of soft errors for large scale systems. Fault injection is used as a mechanism to simulate soft errors, measure the output variability ...

  19. The Automatic Synthesis of Fault Tolerant and Fault Secure VLSI Systems 

    E-print Network

    Nixon, Ian Michael

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the design of fault tolerant and fault secure (FTFS) systems within the framework of silicon compilation. Automatic design modification is used to introduce FTFS characteristics into a design. A ...

  20. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults 

    E-print Network

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01

    With increasing operating speed and shrinking technology, timing defects in integrated circuits are becoming increasingly important. The well established stuck-at-fault model is not sufficient because it is a static fault model and does not account...

  1. The effects of lithology and initial fault angle in physical models of fault-propagation folds 

    E-print Network

    McLain, Christopher Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Experimentally deformed physical rock models are used to examine the effects of changing mechanical stratigraphy and initial fault angle on the development of fault-propagation folds over a flat-ramp-flat thrust geometry. This study also...

  2. A fault location approach for fuzzy fault section estimation on radial distribution feeders 

    E-print Network

    Andoh, Kwame Sarpong

    2000-01-01

    Locating the faulted section of a distribution system is a difficult task because of lack of accurate system models and the presence of uncertainty in the data used for estimating the fault section. Many of the methods used to account...

  3. Chemistry of Hot Spring Pool Waters in Calamba and Los Banos and Potential Effect on the Water Quality of Laguna De Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balangue, M. I. R. D.; Pena, M. A. Z.; Siringan, F. P.; Jago-on, K. A. B.; Lloren, R. B.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Spanish Period (1600s), natural hot spring waters have been harnessed for balneological purposes in the municipalities of Calamba and Los Banos, Laguna, south of Metro Manila. There are at more than a hundred hot spring resorts in Brgy. Pansol, Calamba and Tadlac, Los Banos. These two areas are found at the northern flanks of Mt. Makiling facing Laguna de Bay. This study aims to provide some insights on the physical and chemical characteristics of hot spring resorts and the possible impact on the lake water quality resulting from the disposal of used water. Initial ocular survey of the resorts showed that temperature of the pool water ranges from ambient (>300C) to as high as 500C with an average pool size of 80m3. Water samples were collected from a natural hot spring and pumped well in Los Banos and another pumped well in Pansol to determine the chemistry. The field pH ranges from 6.65 to 6.87 (Pansol springs). Cation analysis revealed that the thermal waters belonged to the Na-K-Cl-HCO3 type with some trace amount of heavy metals. Methods for waste water disposal are either by direct discharge down the drain of the pool or by discharge in the public road canal. Both methods will dump the waste water directly into Laguna de Bay. Taking in consideration the large volume of waste water used especially during the peak season, the effect on the lake water quality would be significant. It is therefore imperative for the environmental authorities in Laguna to regulate and monitor the chemistry of discharges from the pool to protect both the lake water as well as groundwater quality.

  4. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio; Chong, Guillermo; Lambán, Luis Javier; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans; Jódar, Jorge; Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry; Sarmiento, Alvaro; Gamboa, Carolina; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water-rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the ?(18)O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano. PMID:26410705

  5. The fault-tolerant multiprocessor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. B., III (editor); Lala, J. H. (editor); Goldberg, J. (editor); Kautz, W. H. (editor); Melliar-Smith, P. M. (editor); Green, M. W. (editor); Levitt, K. N. (editor); Schwartz, R. L. (editor); Weinstock, C. B. (editor); Palumbo, D. L. (editor)

    1986-01-01

    The development and evaluation of fault-tolerant computer architectures and software-implemented fault tolerance (SIFT) for use in advanced NASA vehicles and potentially in flight-control systems are described in a collection of previously published reports prepared for NASA. Topics addressed include the principles of fault-tolerant multiprocessor (FTMP) operation; processor and slave regional designs; FTMP executive, facilities, acceptance-test/diagnostic, applications, and support software; FTM reliability and availability models; SIFT hardware design; and SIFT validation and verification.

  6. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  7. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  8. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  9. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  10. 31 CFR 29.522 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault. 29.522 Section 29.522 Money... Overpayments § 29.522 Fault. (a) General rule. A debtor is considered to be at fault if he or she, or any other... requirement. (3) The following factors may affect the decision as to whether the debtor is or is not at...

  11. Stuck-at-fault test set compaction 

    E-print Network

    Vanfickell, Jason Michael

    2013-02-22

    . 1 ormula for computation ot'thc pattern metric Figurc 3. Htgh-level SupcrDA prograin tlon chart. 1 igurc 4. Pattern Score and Fault Detections before compaction . . . . . . 13 Figure 5. Pattern Score and Dctections after compaction. . Figure 6... within that model are assumed the only points of failure that the test patterns should need to be able to detect. Beside the advantage of technology abstraction, alternative fault models also greatly reduce the number of faults under consideration...

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  13. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of back-to-back, or comparison, testing for regression test or porting is examined. The efficiency and the cost of the strategy is compared with manual and table-driven single version testing. Some of the key parameters that influence the efficiency and the cost of the approach are the failure identification effort during single version program testing, the extent of implemented changes, the nature of the regression test data (e.g., random), and the nature of the inter-version failure correlation and fault-masking. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed, together with some suggestions concerning its practical use.

  14. Fault Tolerant Filtering and Fault Detection for Quantum Systems Driven By Fields in Single Photon States

    E-print Network

    Qing Gao; Daoyi Dong; Ian R. Petersen; Herschel Rabitz

    2015-08-11

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the quantum filtering and fault detection equations for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. A quantum-classical probability space model is used as a convenient tool to simultaneously estimate the system observables and the fault process, that are characterized by a quantum filter and a fault detection equation, respectively.

  15. On Identifiability of Bias-Type Actuator-Sensor Faults in Multiple-Model-Based Fault Detection and Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores a class of multiple-model-based fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type faults in actuators and sensors. These methods employ banks of Kalman-Bucy filters to detect the faults, determine the fault pattern, and estimate the fault values, wherein each Kalman-Bucy filter is tuned to a different failure pattern. Necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for identifiability of actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have biases.

  16. Fault-tolerant policies for optical grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Weiqiang; Hu, Weisheng

    2008-11-01

    Optical Grid has been thought as a promising technology to support large-scale data-intensive distributed applications. For such a system with so many heterogeneous resources involved, faults seem to be inevitable. A fault in Optical Grid may lead to the failure of the application. Therefore, fault-tolerant policies are necessary to improve the performance of Optical Grid and satisfy the SLA requirements of the applications. In this paper, we propose several fault-tolerant policies for Optical Grid. The performances of different polices are compared by simulation.

  17. Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

    2012-01-01

    Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

  18. Paleostresses associated with faults of large offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, Steven; Pershing, Jonathan

    In order to test empirically the limitations of paleostress analysis, we used Etchecopar's computer program to compute the orientations and relative magnitudes of paleostress principal values in two southern Appalachian (U.S.A) thrust zones from minor fault and slickenside attitudes. In both thrust zones, faults are closely spaced, many faults have offsets whose magnitudes exceed the distance to adjacent faults of comparable size, and deformation was strongly non-coaxial. While even in the less-deformed thrust zone bulk strains due to fault movement have axial ratios as high as 10:1, nearly 75% of the fault-slickenside pairs in each thrust zone conform with paleostress tensors that indicate: (1) sequential transport-parallel compression, transport-parallel extension and extension oblique to transport; and (2) low resolved shear stresses on the thrusts. Finite strains measured in one thrust zone share a principal plane with the first two tensors, and the inclinations of the paleostress and finite strain principal directions in that plane are consistent with thrust-parallel shearing. Relative magnitudes of paleostress and strain principal values do not correlate well. Moreover, the locations and inferred origins of fault-slickenside pairs inconsistent with paleostress tensors suggest that stresses in rocks between faults were not, as is assumed in paleostress analyses, uniform; this complexity may also occur in faulted rocks where bulk strains are small. Paleostress tensors from rocks with large bulk strains may be viable, but they must be interpreted cautiously.

  19. Toward Reducing Fault Fix Time: Understanding Developer Behavior for the Design of Automated Fault Detection Tools, the Full Report

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    Toward Reducing Fault Fix Time: Understanding Developer Behavior for the Design of Automated Fault}@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract The longer a fault remains in the code from the time it was injected, the more time it will take to fix the fault. Increasingly, automated fault detection (AFD) tools are providing developers

  20. Use of Fault Dropping for Multiple Fault Analysis Youns KARKOURI, El Mostapha ABOULHAMID, Eduard CERNY and Alain VERREAULT

    E-print Network

    Aboulhamid, El Mostapha

    - 1 - Use of Fault Dropping for Multiple Fault Analysis Younès KARKOURI, El Mostapha ABOULHAMID Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. "A" Montréal, (Québec), H3C-3J7, Canada. ABSTRACT A new approach to fault analysis is presented. We consider multiple stuck-at-0/1 faults at the gate level. First, a fault

  1. Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equivalence/dominance

    E-print Network

    Al-Asaad, Hussain

    1 Abstract Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equivalence/dominance relationships among faults. Exact fault collapsing can be easily applied locally such as execution time and/or memory. In this paper, we present EGFC, an exact global fault collapsing tool

  2. Transform fault earthquakes in the North Atlantic - Source mechanisms and depth of faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1988-01-01

    The centroid depths and source mechanisms of 12 large earthquakes on transform faults of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge were determined from an inversion of long-period body waveforms. The earthquakes occurred on the Gibbs, Oceanographer, Hayes, Kane, 15 deg 20 min, and Vema transforms. The depth extent of faulting during each earthquake was estimated from the centroid depth and the fault width. The source mechanisms for all events in this study display the strike slip motion expected for transform fault earthquakes; slip vector azimuths agree to 2 to 3 deg of the local strike of the zone of active faulting. The only anomalies in mechanism were for two earthquakes near the western end of the Vema transform which occurred on significantly nonvertical fault planes. Secondary faulting, occurring either precursory to or near the end of the main episode of strike-slip rupture, was observed for 5 of the 12 earthquakes. For three events the secondary faulting was characterized by reverse motion on fault planes striking oblique to the trend of the transform. In all three cases, the site of secondary reverse faulting is near a compression jog in the current trace of the active transform fault zone. No evidence was found to support the conclusions of Engeln, Wiens, and Stein that oceanic transform faults in general are either hotter than expected from current thermal models or weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  3. Transform fault earthquakes in the North Atlantic: Source mechanisms and depth of faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The centroid depths and source mechanisms of 12 large earthquakes on transform faults of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge were determined from an inversion of long-period body waveforms. The earthquakes occurred on the Gibbs, Oceanographer, Hayes, Kane, 15 deg 20 min, and Vema transforms. The depth extent of faulting during each earthquake was estimated from the centroid depth and the fault width. The source mechanisms for all events in this study display the strike slip motion expected for transform fault earthquakes; slip vector azimuths agree to 2 to 3 deg of the local strike of the zone of active faulting. The only anomalies in mechanism were for two earthquakes near the western end of the Vema transform which occurred on significantly nonvertical fault planes. Secondary faulting, occurring either precursory to or near the end of the main episode of strike-slip rupture, was observed for 5 of the 12 earthquakes. For three events the secondary faulting was characterized by reverse motion on fault planes striking oblique to the trend of the transform. In all three cases, the site of secondary reverse faulting is near a compression jog in the current trace of the active transform fault zone. No evidence was found to support the conclusions of Engeln, Wiens, and Stein that oceanic transform faults in general are either hotter than expected from current thermal models or weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  4. Detecting seismogenic stress evolution and constraining fault zone rheology in the San Andreas Fault following

    E-print Network

    Niu, Fenglin

    earthquake- related coseismic damage of rock and subsequent healing nearby fault zones [e.g., Li et al., 1998 Fault following the 2004 Parkfield earthquake Taka'aki Taira,1 Paul G. Silver,1 Fenglin Niu,2 and Robert attributed to the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, making use of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth

  5. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault

    E-print Network

    Savage, Heather M.

    Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 faults is governed by the same process. Based on our own field work combined with data from

  6. A novel KFCM based fault diagnosis method for unknown faults in satellite reaction wheels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Sarosh, Ali; Dong, Yun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    Reaction wheels are one of the most critical components of the satellite attitude control system, therefore correct diagnosis of their faults is quintessential for efficient operation of these spacecraft. The known faults in any of the subsystems are often diagnosed by supervised learning algorithms, however, this method fails to work correctly when a new or unknown fault occurs. In such cases an unsupervised learning algorithm becomes essential for obtaining the correct diagnosis. Kernel Fuzzy C-Means (KFCM) is one of the unsupervised algorithms, although it has its own limitations; however in this paper a novel method has been proposed for conditioning of KFCM method (C-KFCM) so that it can be effectively used for fault diagnosis of both known and unknown faults as in satellite reaction wheels. The C-KFCM approach involves determination of exact class centers from the data of known faults, in this way discrete number of fault classes are determined at the start. Similarity parameters are derived and determined for each of the fault data point. Thereafter depending on the similarity threshold each data point is issued with a class label. The high similarity points fall into one of the 'known-fault' classes while the low similarity points are labeled as 'unknown-faults'. Simulation results show that as compared to the supervised algorithm such as neural network, the C-KFCM method can effectively cluster historical fault data (as in reaction wheels) and diagnose the faults to an accuracy of more than 91%. PMID:22035775

  7. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  8. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  9. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1993-01-01

    Strategies and tools for the testing, risk assessment and risk control of dependable software-based systems were developed. Part of this project consists of studies to enable the transfer of technology to industry, for example the risk management techniques for safety-concious systems. Theoretical investigations of Boolean and Relational Operator (BRO) testing strategy were conducted for condition-based testing. The Basic Graph Generation and Analysis tool (BGG) was extended to fully incorporate several variants of the BRO metric. Single- and multi-phase risk, coverage and time-based models are being developed to provide additional theoretical and empirical basis for estimation of the reliability and availability of large, highly dependable software. A model for software process and risk management was developed. The use of cause-effect graphing for software specification and validation was investigated. Lastly, advanced software fault-tolerance models were studied to provide alternatives and improvements in situations where simple software fault-tolerance strategies break down.

  10. Conjoined Processor: A Fault Tolerant High Performance Microprocessor

    E-print Network

    Conjoined Processor: A Fault Tolerant High Performance Microprocessor Viswanathan Subramanian, Naga, intermittent faults and detects silicon defects. The fast recovery process requires no checkpointing and takes of the proposed architecture. Index Terms--Microprocessors, Fault tolerance, Redundancy, Adaptive Systems I

  11. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation 

    E-print Network

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational circuits. The results...

  12. Earthquake behavior and structure of oceanic transform faults

    E-print Network

    Roland, Emily Carlson

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic transform faults that accommodate strain at mid-ocean ridge offsets represent a unique environment for studying fault mechanics. Here, I use seismic observations and models to explore how fault structure affects ...

  13. Low-cost motor drive embedded fault diagnosis systems 

    E-print Network

    Akin, Bilal

    2009-05-15

    cost incipient fault detection of inverter-fed driven motors. Basically, low order inverter harmonics contributions to fault diagnosis, a motor drive embedded condition monitoring method, analysis of motor fault signatures in noisy line current, and a...

  14. Fault Management Techniques in Human Spaceflight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hagan, Brian; Crocker, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses human spaceflight fault management operations. Fault detection and response capabilities available in current US human spaceflight programs Space Shuttle and International Space Station are described while emphasizing system design impacts on operational techniques and constraints. Preflight and inflight processes along with products used to anticipate, mitigate and respond to failures are introduced. Examples of operational products used to support failure responses are presented. Possible improvements in the state of the art, as well as prioritization and success criteria for their implementation are proposed. This paper describes how the architecture of a command and control system impacts operations in areas such as the required fault response times, automated vs. manual fault responses, use of workarounds, etc. The architecture includes the use of redundancy at the system and software function level, software capabilities, use of intelligent or autonomous systems, number and severity of software defects, etc. This in turn drives which Caution and Warning (C&W) events should be annunciated, C&W event classification, operator display designs, crew training, flight control team training, and procedure development. Other factors impacting operations are the complexity of a system, skills needed to understand and operate a system, and the use of commonality vs. optimized solutions for software and responses. Fault detection, annunciation, safing responses, and recovery capabilities are explored using real examples to uncover underlying philosophies and constraints. These factors directly impact operations in that the crew and flight control team need to understand what happened, why it happened, what the system is doing, and what, if any, corrective actions they need to perform. If a fault results in multiple C&W events, or if several faults occur simultaneously, the root cause(s) of the fault(s), as well as their vehicle-wide impacts, must be determined in order to maintain situational awareness. This allows both automated and manual recovery operations to focus on the real cause of the fault(s). An appropriate balance must be struck between correcting the root cause failure and addressing the impacts of that fault on other vehicle components. Lastly, this paper presents a strategy for using lessons learned to improve the software, displays, and procedures in addition to determining what is a candidate for automation. Enabling technologies and techniques are identified to promote system evolution from one that requires manual fault responses to one that uses automation and autonomy where they are most effective. These considerations include the value in correcting software defects in a timely manner, automation of repetitive tasks, making time critical responses autonomous, etc. The paper recommends the appropriate use of intelligent systems to determine the root causes of faults and correctly identify separate unrelated faults.

  15. Paleoseismicity of two historically quiescent faults in Australia: Implications for fault behavior in stable continental regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; De Martini, P. M.; Machette, M.M.; Okumura, K.; Prescott, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Paleoseismic studies of two historically aseismic Quaternary faults in Australia confirm that cratonic faults in stable continental regions (SCR) typically have a long-term behavior characterized by episodes of activity separated by quiescent intervals of at least 10,000 and commonly 100,000 years or more. Studies of the approximately 30-km-long Roopena fault in South Australia and the approximately 30-km-long Hyden fault in Western Australia document multiple Quaternary surface-faulting events that are unevenly spaced in time. The episodic clustering of events on cratonic SCR faults may be related to temporal fluctuations of fault-zone fluid pore pressures in a volume of strained crust. The long-term slip rate on cratonic SCR faults is extremely low, so the geomorphic expression of many cratonic SCR faults is subtle, and scarps may be difficult to detect because they are poorly preserved. Both the Roopena and Hyden faults are in areas of limited or no significant seismicity; these and other faults that we have studied indicate that many potentially hazardous SCR faults cannot be recognized solely on the basis of instrumental data or historical earthquakes. Although cratonic SCR faults may appear to be nonhazardous because they have been historically aseismic, those that are favorably oriented for movement in the current stress field can and have produced unexpected damaging earthquakes. Paleoseismic studies of modern and prehistoric SCR faulting events provide the basis for understanding of the long-term behavior of these faults and ultimately contribute to better seismic-hazard assessments.

  16. Linking microbial assemblages to paleoenvironmental conditions from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum times in Laguna Potrok Aike sediments, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a closed basin located in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitudes (52°S) where paleoenvironmental conditions were recorded as temporal sedimentary sequences resulting from variations in the regional hydrological regime and geology of the catchment. The interpretation of the limnogeological multiproxy record developed during the ICDP-PASADO project allowed the identification of contrasting time windows associated with the fluctuations of Southern Westerly Winds. In the framework of this project, a 100-m-long core was also dedicated to a detailed geomicrobiological study which aimed at a thorough investigation of the lacustrine subsurface biosphere. Indeed, aquatic sediments do not only record past climatic conditions, but also provide a wide range of ecological niches for microbes. In this context, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and survival remained still unexplored for the deep lacustrine realm. Therefore, we investigated living microbes throughout the sedimentary sequence using in situ ATP assays and DAPI cell count. These results, compiled with pore water analysis, SEM microscopy of authigenic concretions and methane and fatty acid biogeochemistry, provided evidence for a sustained microbial activity in deep sediments and pinpointed the substantial role of microbial processes in modifying initial organic and mineral fractions. Finally, because the genetic material associated with microorganisms can be preserved in sediments over millennia, we extracted environmental DNA from Laguna Potrok Aike sediments and established 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal clone libraries to better define the use of DNA-based techniques in reconstructing past environments. We focused on two sedimentary horizons both displaying in situ microbial activity, respectively corresponding to the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum periods. Sequences recovered from the productive Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to subsaline conditions producing methane with a high potential of organic matter degradation. In contrast, sediments rich in volcanic detritus from the Last Glacial Maximum showed a substantial presence of lithotrophic microorganisms and sulphate-reducing bacteria mediating authigenic minerals. Together, these features suggested that microbial communities developed in response to climatic control of lake and catchment productivity at the time of sediment deposition. Prevailing climatic conditions exerted a hierarchical control on the microbial composition of lake sediments by regulating the influx of organic and inorganic material to the lake basin, which in turn determined water column chemistry, production and sedimentation of particulate material, resulting in the different niches sheltering these microbial assemblages. Moreover, it demonstrated that environmental DNA can constitute sedimentary archives of phylogenetic diversity and diagenetic processes over tens of millennia.

  17. Analysis of the ecosystem structure of Laguna Alvarado, western Gulf of Mexico, by means of a mass balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Escalona, V. H.; Arreguín-Sánchez, F.; Zetina-Rejón, M.

    2007-03-01

    Alvarado is one of the most productive estuary-lagoon systems in the Mexican Gulf of Mexico. It has great economic and ecological importance due to high fisheries productivity and because it serves as a nursery, feeding, and reproduction area for numerous populations of fishes and crustaceans. Because of this, extensive studies have focused on biology, ecology, fisheries (e.g. shrimp, oysters) and other biological components of the system during the last few decades. This study presents a mass-balanced trophic model for Laguna Alvarado to determine it's structure and functional form, and to compare it with similar coastal systems of the Gulf of Mexico and Mexican Pacific coast. The model, based on the software Ecopath with Ecosim, consists of eighteen fish groups, seven invertebrate groups, and one group each of sharks and rays, marine mammals, phytoplankton, sea grasses and detritus. The acceptability of the model is indicated by the pedigree index (0.5) which range from 0 to 1 based on the quality of input data. The highest trophic level was 3.6 for marine mammals and snappers. Total system throughput reached 2680 t km -2 year -1, of which total consumption made up 47%, respiratory flows made up 37% and flows to detritus made up 16%. The total system production was higher than consumption, and net primary production higher than respiration. The mean transfer efficiency was 13.8%. The mean trophic level of the catch was 2.3 and the primary production required to sustain the catch was estimated in 31 t km -2 yr -1. Ecosystem overhead was 2.4 times the ascendancy. Results suggest a balance between primary production and consumption. In contrast with other Mexican coastal lagoons, Laguna Alvarado differs strongly in relation to the primary source of energy; here the primary producers (seagrasses) are more important than detritus pathways. This fact can be interpreted a response to mangrove deforest, overfishing, etc. Future work might include the compilation of fishing and biomass time trends to develop historical verification and fitting of temporal simulations.

  18. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  19. Your Mission: (1) Identify 20 active faults in California (2) Identify the direction of fault motion and the slip rate for each fault

    E-print Network

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Your Mission: (1) Identify 20 active faults in California (2) Identify the direction of fault motion and the slip rate for each fault (3) Investigate recent earthquakes near your hometown (4) Use Microsoft Excel to plot a small set of earthquake data Your Supplies: California Faults map handout

  20. Off-fault Damage Associated with a Localized Bend in the North Branch San Gabriel Fault, California 

    E-print Network

    Becker, Andrew 1987-

    2012-08-15

    Structures within very large displacement, mature fault zones, such as the North Branch San Gabriel Fault (NBSGF), are the product of a complex combination of processes. Off-fault damage within a damage zone and first-order geometric asperities...

  1. Investigation of active faulting at the Emigrant Peak fault in Nevada using shallow seismic reflection and ground penetrating radar

    E-print Network

    Christie, Michael Wayne

    2007-12-18

    and 4-40 m respectively. Both the SSR and GPR data revealed structural geometries dominated by NW-dipping normal faulting and corresponding antithetic faults with identifiable offsets. Near the main fault strand, alluvial fan strata dip consistently...

  2. Improving Distribution System Reliability Through Risk-base Doptimization of Fault Management and Improved Computer-based Fault Location 

    E-print Network

    Dong, Yimai

    2013-11-07

    regulation on power quality. Optimization in fault management tasks has the potential of improving system reliability by reducing the duration and scale of outages caused by faults through fast fault isolation and service restoration. The research reported...

  3. Evaluation of faulting characteristics and ground acceleration associated with recent movement along the Meers Fault, Southwestern Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Burrell, Richard Dennis

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a 27 km section of the Meers Fault was reactivated during Holocene time. Although these studies have proven the occurrence of recent fault activity, many basic characteristics of the faulting remain unresolved...

  4. Fault structure, frictional properties and mixed-mode fault slip behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Niemeijer, André; Viti, Cecilia; Smith, Steven A. F.; Marone, Chris

    2011-11-01

    Recent high-resolution GPS and seismological data reveal that tectonic faults exhibit complex, multi-mode slip behavior including earthquakes, creep events, slow and silent earthquakes, low-frequency events and earthquake afterslip. The physical processes responsible for this range of behavior and the mechanisms that dictate fault slip rate or rupture propagation velocity are poorly understood. One avenue for improving knowledge of these mechanisms involves coupling direct observations of ancient faults exhumed at the Earth's surface with laboratory experiments on the frictional properties of the fault rocks. Here, we show that fault zone structure has an important influence on mixed-mode fault slip behavior. Our field studies depict a complex fault zone structure where foliated horizons surround meter- to decameter-sized lenses of competent material. The foliated rocks are composed of weak mineral phases, possess low frictional strength, and exhibit inherently stable, velocity-strengthening frictional behavior. In contrast, the competent lenses are made of strong minerals, possess high frictional strength, and exhibit potentially unstable, velocity-weakening frictional behavior. Tectonic loading of this heterogeneous fault zone may initially result in fault creep along the weak and frictionally stable foliated horizons. With continued deformation, fault creep will concentrate stress within and around the strong and potentially unstable competent lenses, which may lead to earthquake nucleation. Our studies provide field and mechanical constraints for complex, mixed-mode fault slip behavior ranging from repeating earthquakes to transient slip, episodic slow-slip and creep events.

  5. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  6. Partial fault dictionary: A new approach for computer-aided fault localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, A.; Papathanasiou, A.

    1995-12-31

    The approach described in this paper has been developed to address the computation time and problem size of localization methodologies in VLSI circuits in order to speed up the overall time consumption for fault localization. The reduction of the problem to solve is combined with the idea of the fault dictionary. In a pre-processing phase, a possibly faulty area is derived using the netlist and the actual test results as input data. The result is a set of cones originating from each faulty primary output. In the next step, the best cone is extracted for the fault dictionary methodology according to a heuristic formula. The circuit nodes, which are included in the intersection of the cones, are combined to a fault list. This fault list together with the best cone can be used by the fault simulator to generate a small and manageable fault dictionary related to one faulty output. In connection with additional algorithms for the reduction of stimuli and netlist a partial fault dictionary can be set up. This dictionary is valid only for the given faulty device together with the given and reduced stimuli, but offers important benefits: Practical results show a reduction of simulation time and size of the fault dictionary by factors around 100 or even more, depending on the actual circuit and assumed fault. The list of fault candidates is significantly reduced, and the required number of steps during the process of localization is reduced, too.

  7. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  8. Fault Tolerant Homopolar Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ming-Hsiu; Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Provenza, Andrew; Beach, Raymond; Kascak, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions (MS) satisfy the long life and low loss conditions demanded by satellite and ISS based flywheels used for Energy Storage and Attitude Control (ACESE) service. This paper summarizes the development of a novel MS that improves reliability via fault tolerant operation. Specifically, flux coupling between poles of a homopolar magnetic bearing is shown to deliver desired forces even after termination of coil currents to a subset of failed poles . Linear, coordinate decoupled force-voltage relations are also maintained before and after failure by bias linearization. Current distribution matrices (CDM) which adjust the currents and fluxes following a pole set failure are determined for many faulted pole combinations. The CDM s and the system responses are obtained utilizing 1D magnetic circuit models with fringe and leakage factors derived from detailed, 3D, finite element field models. Reliability results are presented vs. detection/correction delay time and individual power amplifier reliability for 4, 6, and 7 pole configurations. Reliability is shown for two success criteria, i.e. (a) no catcher bearing contact following pole failures and (b) re-levitation off of the catcher bearings following pole failures. An advantage of the method presented over other redundant operation approaches is a significantly reduced requirement for backup hardware such as additional actuators or power amplifiers.

  9. Fault classification in gearboxes using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, B.; Esat, I.; Badi, M.N.M.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of condition monitoring, and fault diagnostics are to detect faults occurring in machinery, in order to reduce operational and maintenance costs, and provide a significant improvement in plant economy. The condition of a model drive-line was investigated. This model drive-line consists of various interconnected rotating parts, including a gearbox, two bearing blocks, and an electric motor, all connected via flexible coupling and loaded by a disc brake. The drive-line was run in its normal condition, and then single and multiple faults were intentionally introduced to the gearbox, and bearing block. The faults investigated on the drive-line were typical bearing and gear faults, which may develop during normal and continuous operation of this kind of machinery. This paper presents the investigation carried out in order to study both bearing and gear faults introduced together to the drive-line. It is shown that, by using multilayer artificial neural networks on the condition monitoring data, single and multiple faults were successfully classified. The real time domain signals obtained from the drive-line were pre-processed by Wavelet transforms for the network to perform fault classification.

  10. Intermittent/transient faults in digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.; Glazer, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Containment set techniques are applied to 8085 microprocessor controllers so as to transform a typical control system into a slightly modified version, shown to be crashproof: after the departure of the intermittent/transient fault, return to one proper control algorithm is assured, assuming no permanent faults occur.

  11. PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big?

    E-print Network

    Stein, Seth

    PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big? Seth Stein Because deep Earth processes are inacces. Recent results for the mys- terious deep earthquakes that occur to depths greater than 600 km is that large deep earthquakes (1-3) seem to have occurred on faults larger than ex- pected from the competing

  12. Is the Lishan fault of Taiwan active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo-Chen, Hao; Wu, Francis; Chang, Wu-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hirata, Naoshi

    2015-10-01

    The Lishan fault has been characterized alternately as a major discontinuity in stratigraphy, structures and metamorphism, a ductile shear zone, a tectonic suture or non-existent. In addition to being a geological boundary, it also marks transitions in subsurface structures. Thus, the seismicity to the west of the fault permeates through the upper and mid-crust while beneath the Central Range it is noticeably less and largely concentrated in the upper 12 km. A prominent west-dipping conductive zone extends upward to meet the Lishan fault. Also, the eastward increase of crust thickness from ~ 30 km in the Taiwan Strait quickens under the Lishan fault to form a root of over 50 km under the Central Range. In the past, the small magnitude seismicity along the Lishan fault has been noticed but is too diffuse for definitive association with the fault. Recent processing of aftershock records of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake using Central Weather Bureau data and, especially, data from three post-Chi-Chi deployments of seismic stations across central Taiwan yielded hypocenters that appear to link directly to the Lishan structure. The presence of a near 4-km-long vertical seismic zone directly under the surface trace of the Lishan fault indicates that it is an active structure from the surface down to about 35 km, and the variety of focal mechanisms indicates that the fault motion can be complex and depth-dependent.

  13. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  14. Diagnostics Tools Identify Faults Prior to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Through the SBIR program, Rochester, New York-based Impact Technologies LLC collaborated with Ames Research Center to commercialize the Center s Hybrid Diagnostic Engine, or HyDE, software. The fault detecting program is now incorporated into a software suite that identifies potential faults early in the design phase of systems ranging from printers to vehicles and robots, saving time and money.

  15. Airborne Mitigation Of Constellation Wide Faults

    E-print Network

    Boneh, Dan

    Airborne Mitigation Of Constellation Wide Faults Todd Walter and Juan Blanch Stanford University, is the possibility of multiple simultaneous faults being present on one of the constellations. This threat can be mitigated by forming position solutions that exclude each constellation in turn. Unfortunately

  16. A Game Theoretic Fault Detection Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Walter H.; Speyer, Jason L.

    1995-01-01

    The fault detection process is modelled as a disturbance attenuation problem. The solution to this problem is found via differential game theory, leading to an H(sub infinity) filter which bounds the transmission of all exogenous signals save the fault to be detected. For a general class of linear systems which includes some time-varying systems, it is shown that this transmission bound can be taken to zero by simultaneously bringing the sensor noise weighting to zero. Thus, in the limit, a complete transmission block can he achieved, making the game filter into a fault detection filter. When we specialize this result to time-invariant system, it is found that the detection filter attained in the limit is identical to the well known Beard-Jones Fault Detection Filter. That is, all fault inputs other than the one to be detected (the "nuisance faults") are restricted to an invariant subspace which is unobservable to a projection on the output. For time-invariant systems, it is also shown that in the limit, the order of the state-space and the game filter can be reduced by factoring out the invariant subspace. The result is a lower dimensional filter which can observe only the fault to be detected. A reduced-order filter can also he generated for time-varying systems, though the computational overhead may be intensive. An example given at the end of the paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the filter as a tool for fault detection and identification.

  17. Late Cenozoic intraplate faulting in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, Abbas; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2014-12-01

    The intensity and tectonic origin of late Cenozoic intraplate deformation in eastern Australia is relatively poorly understood. Here we show that Cenozoic volcanic rocks in southeast Queensland have been deformed by numerous faults. Using gridded aeromagnetic data and field observations, structural investigations were conducted on these faults. Results show that faults have mainly undergone strike-slip movement with a reverse component, displacing Cenozoic volcanic rocks ranging in ages from ˜31 to ˜21 Ma. These ages imply that faulting must have occurred after the late Oligocene. Late Cenozoic deformation has mostly occurred due to the reactivation of major faults, which were active during episodes of basin formation in the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and later during the opening of the Tasman and Coral Seas from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene. The wrench reactivation of major faults in the late Cenozoic also gave rise to the occurrence of brittle subsidiary reverse strike-slip faults that affected Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Intraplate transpressional deformation possibly resulted from far-field stresses transmitted from the collisional zones at the northeast and southeast boundaries of the Australian plate during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and from the late Miocene to the Pliocene. These events have resulted in the hitherto unrecognized reactivation of faults in eastern Australia.

  18. Fault detection with principal component pursuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yijun; Yang, Chunjie; Sun, Youxian; An, Ruqiao; Wang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Data-driven approaches are widely applied for fault detection in industrial process. Recently, a new method for fault detection called principal component pursuit(PCP) is introduced. PCP is not only robust to outliers, but also can accomplish the objectives of model building, fault detection, fault isolation and process reconstruction simultaneously. PCP divides the data matrix into two parts: a fault-free low rank matrix and a sparse matrix with sensor noise and process fault. The statistics presented in this paper fully utilize the information in data matrix. Since the low rank matrix in PCP is similar to principal components matrix in PCA, a T2 statistic is proposed for fault detection in low rank matrix. And this statistic can illustrate that PCP is more sensitive to small variations in variables than PCA. In addition, in sparse matrix, a new monitored statistic performing the online fault detection with PCP-based method is introduced. This statistic uses the mean and the correlation coefficient of variables. Monte Carlo simulation and Tennessee Eastman (TE) benchmark process are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of monitored statistics.

  19. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  20. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker Lane and that oblique components of displacement are of opposite sense along the Walker Lane (extension) and San Andreas (contraction), respectively. Despite the gross differences in fault pattern, the Walker Lane and San Andreas also share similarities in deformation style, including clockwise rotations of crustal blocks leading to development of structural basins and the partitioning of oblique components of slip onto subparallel strike-slip and dip-slip faults.

  1. Neotectonics of the Sumatran fault, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, Kerry; Natawidjaja, Danny

    2000-12-01

    The 1900-km-long, trench-parallel Sumatran fault accommodates a significant amount of the right-lateral component of oblique convergence between the Eurasian and Indian/Australian plates from 10°N to 7°S. Our detailed map of the fault, compiled from topographic maps and stereographic aerial photographs, shows that unlike many other great strike-slip faults, the Sumatran fault is highly segmented. Cross-strike width of step overs between the 19 major subaerial segments is commonly many kilometers. The influence of these step overs on historical seismic source dimensions suggests that the dimensions of future events will also be influenced by fault geometry. Geomorphic offsets along the fault range as high as ˜20 km and may represent the total offset across the fault. If this is so, other structures must have accommodated much of the dextral component of oblique convergence during the past few million years. Our analysis of stretching of the forearc region, near the southern tip of Sumatra, constrains the combined dextral slip on the Sumatran and Mentawai faults to be no more than 100 km in the past few million years. The shape and location of the Sumatran fault and the active volcanic arc are highly correlated with the shape and character of the underlying subducting oceanic lithosphere. Nonetheless, active volcanic centers of the Sumatran volcanic arc have not influenced noticeably the geometry of the active Sumatran fault. On the basis of its geologic history and pattern of deformation, we divide the Sumatran plate margin into northern, central and southern domains. We support previous proposals that the geometry and character of the subducting Investigator fracture zone are affecting the shape and evolution of the Sumatran fault system within the central domain. The southern domain is the most regular. The Sumatran fault there comprises six right-stepping segments. This pattern indicates that the overall trend of the fault deviates 4° clockwise from the slip vector between the two blocks it separates. The regularity of this section and its association with the portion of the subduction zone that generated the giant (Mw9) earthquake of 1833 suggest that a geometrically simple subducting slab results in both simple strike-slip faulting and unusually large subduction earthquakes.

  2. Active Fault Topography and Fault Outcrops in the Central Part of the Nukumi fault, the 1891 Nobi Earthquake Fault System, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Ueta, K.; Inoue, D.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, N.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to evaluate the magnitude of earthquake caused by multiple active faults, taking into account the simultaneous effects. The simultaneity of adjacent active faults are often decided on the basis of geometric distances except for known these paleoseismic records. We have been studied the step area between the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault, which appeared as consecutive ruptures in the 1891 Nobi earthquake, since 2009. The purpose of this study is to establish innovation in valuation technique of the simultaneity of adjacent active faults in addition to the paleoseismic record and the geometric distance. Geomorphological, geological and reconnaissance microearthquake surveys are concluded. The present work is intended to clarify the distribution of tectonic geomorphology along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault by high-resolution interpretations of airborne LiDAR DEM and aerial photograph, and the field survey of outcrops and location survey. The study area of this work is the southeastern Nukumi fault and the northwestern Neodani fault. We interpret DEM using shaded relief map and stereoscopic bird's-eye view made from 2m mesh DEM data which is obtained by airborne laser scanner of Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Aerial photographic survey is for confirmation of DEM interpretation using 1/16,000 scale photo. As a result of topographic survey, we found consecutive tectonic topography which is left lateral displacement of ridge and valley lines and reverse scarplets along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault . From Ogotani 2km southeastern of Nukumi pass which is located at the southeastern end of surface rupture along the Nukumi fault by previous study to Neooppa 9km southeastern of Nukumi pass, we can interpret left lateral topographies and small uphill-facing fault scarps on the terrace surface by detail DEM investigation. These topographies are unrecognized by aerial photographic survey because of heavy vegetation. We have found several new outcrops in this area where the surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake have not been known. These outcrops have active fault which cut the layer of terrace deposit and slope deposit to the bottom of present soil layer in common. At the locality of Ogotani outcrop, the humic layer which age is from14th century to 15th century by 14C age dating is deformed by the active fault. The vertical displacement of the humic layer is 0.8-0.9m and the terrace deposit layer below the humic layer is ca. 1.3m. For this reason and the existence of fain grain deposit including AT tephra (28ka) in the footwall of the fault, this fault movement occurred more than once since the last glacial age. We conclude that the surface rupture of Nukumi fault in the 1891 Nobi earthquake is continuous to 9km southeast of Nukumi pass. In other words, these findings indicate that there is 10km parallel overlap zone between the surface rupture of the southeastern end of Nukumi fault and the northwestern end of Neodani fault.

  3. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  4. Quantifying fault recovery in multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Harary, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Various aspects of reliable computing are formalized and quantified with emphasis on efficient fault recovery. The mathematical model which proves to be most appropriate is provided by the theory of graphs. New measures for fault recovery are developed and the value of elements of the fault recovery vector are observed to depend not only on the computation graph H and the architecture graph G, but also on the specific location of a fault. In the examples, a hypercube is chosen as a representative of parallel computer architecture, and a pipeline as a typical configuration for program execution. Dependability qualities of such a system is defined with or without a fault. These qualities are determined by the resiliency triple defined by three parameters: multiplicity, robustness, and configurability. Parameters for measuring the recovery effectiveness are also introduced in terms of distance, time, and the number of new, used, and moved nodes and edges.

  5. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  6. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  7. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data is a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In our domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. We explain where this subsystem fits into our envisioned fault detection system as well its experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  8. Structural evolution and fault interaction of the frontal Longmen Shan fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Xu, X.; Yuan, R.; Li, K.; Sun, X.

    2013-12-01

    Field investigations show that the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) on the 12th of May 2008 ruptured two NW-dipping imbricate reverse faults along the Longmen Shan fault zone at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The length of the Beichuan-Yingxiu Fault reaches nearly 240 km. Southeast of this fault, a smaller displacement occurred along the Guanxian-Jiangyou Fault, which has a length of about 70 km. A 7 km long NW-striking left-lateral reverse fault, the Xiaoyudong Fault, was clearly observed between these two main surface ruptures. This co-seismic surface rupture pattern, involving multiple structures, is one of the most complicated patterns of recent great earthquakes. The surface rupture length is the longest among the co-seismic surface rupture zones for reverse faulting events ever reported. The Lushan Ms 7.0 earthquake on the 20th of April 2013 is another destructive earthquake which struck the Longmen Shan area five years after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The epicentre of the Lushan earthquake is located in a southern segment of the Longmen Shan fault zone and is about 85 km away from the initial nucleation point or epicentre of the Wenchuan earthquake. Our detail field investigations reveal that the surface rupture of the Wenchuan earthquake cascaded through several pre-existing fault segments. But no apparent surface rupture has been found along the faults or their adjacent areas of the Lushan epicentre. Combining the rupture distribution, the rupture pattern, the displacement amount, the aftershock distribution, and the stress orientation calculated from the fault slickenside striations, we proposed a multi-segment rupturing model to explain the structural evolution and fault interaction of the Longmen Shan fault zone.

  9. Evolution of unrest at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from InSAR and GPS measurements, 2003 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mével, Hélène Le; Feigl, Kurt L.; Córdova, Loreto; DeMets, Charles; Lundgren, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in the southern volcanic zone of the Chilean Andes exhibits a large volume of rhyolitic material erupted during postglacial times (20-2 ka). Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation. Analysis of new GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveals uplift rates greater than 190 mm/yr between January 2013 and November 2014. The geodetic data are modeled as an inflating sill at depth. The results are used to calculate the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2010. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation. Modeling historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates.

  10. Secondary forest succession and tree planting at the Laguna Cartagena and Cabo Rojo wildlife refuges in southwestern Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Peter L; Schwagerl, Joseph J

    2008-12-01

    Secondary forest succession and tree planting are contributing to the recovery of the Cabo Rojo refuge (Headquarters and Salinas tracts) and Laguna Cartagena refuge (Lagoon and Tinaja tracts) of the Fish and Wildlife Service in southwestern Puerto Rico. About 80 species, mainly natives, have been planted on 44 ha during the past 25 y in an effort to reduce the threat of grass fires and to restore wildlife habitat. A 2007 survey of 9-y-old tree plantings on the Lagoon tract showed satisfactory growth rates for 16 native species. Multiple stems from individual trees at ground level were common. A sampling of secondary forest on the entire 109 ha Tinaja tract disclosed 141 native tree species, or 25% of Puerto Rico's native tree flora, along with 20 exotics. Five tree species made up about 58% of the total basal area, and seven species were island endemics. Between 1998 and 2003, tree numbers and basal area, as well as tree heights and diameter at breast height values (diameter at 1.4 m above the ground), increased on the lower 30 ha of the Tinaja tract. In this area, much of it subject to fires and grazing through 1996, exotic trees made up 25% of the species. Dry forest throughout the tropics is an endangered habitat, and its recovery (i.e., in biomass, structure, and species composition) at Tinaja may exceed 500 y. Future forests, however, will likely contain some exotics. PMID:19205183

  11. late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen record from Laguna de las Trancas, northern coastal Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, David P.; Byrne, Roger; Luther, Edgar

    1981-01-01

    A 2.1-m core from Laguna de las Trancas, a marsh atop a landslide in northern Santa Cruz County, California, has yielded a pollen record for the period between about 30,000 B. P. and roughly 5000 B. P. Three pollen zones are recognized. The earliest is characterized by high frequencies of pine pollen and is correlated with a mid-Wisconsinan interstade of the mid-continent. The middle zone contains high frequencies of both pine and fir (Abies, probably A. grandis) pollen and is correlated with the last full glacial interval (upper Wisconsinan). The upper zone is dominated by redwood (Sequoia) pollen and represents latest Pleistocene to middle Holocene. The past few thousand years are not represented in the core. The pollen evidence indicates that during the full glacial period the mean annual temperature at the site was about 2°C to 3°C lower than it is today. We attribute this small difference to the stabilizing effect of marine upwelling on the temperature regime in the immediate vicinity of the coast. Precipitation may have been about 20 percent higher as a result of longer winter wet seasons.

  12. Methodology for Designing Fault-Protection Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin; Levison, Jeffrey; Kan, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    A document describes a methodology for designing fault-protection (FP) software for autonomous spacecraft. The methodology embodies and extends established engineering practices in the technical discipline of Fault Detection, Diagnosis, Mitigation, and Recovery; and has been successfully implemented in the Deep Impact Spacecraft, a NASA Discovery mission. Based on established concepts of Fault Monitors and Responses, this FP methodology extends the notion of Opinion, Symptom, Alarm (aka Fault), and Response with numerous new notions, sub-notions, software constructs, and logic and timing gates. For example, Monitor generates a RawOpinion, which graduates into Opinion, categorized into no-opinion, acceptable, or unacceptable opinion. RaiseSymptom, ForceSymptom, and ClearSymptom govern the establishment and then mapping to an Alarm (aka Fault). Local Response is distinguished from FP System Response. A 1-to-n and n-to- 1 mapping is established among Monitors, Symptoms, and Responses. Responses are categorized by device versus by function. Responses operate in tiers, where the early tiers attempt to resolve the Fault in a localized step-by-step fashion, relegating more system-level response to later tier(s). Recovery actions are gated by epoch recovery timing, enabling strategy, urgency, MaxRetry gate, hardware availability, hazardous versus ordinary fault, and many other priority gates. This methodology is systematic, logical, and uses multiple linked tables, parameter files, and recovery command sequences. The credibility of the FP design is proven via a fault-tree analysis "top-down" approach, and a functional fault-mode-effects-and-analysis via "bottoms-up" approach. Via this process, the mitigation and recovery strategy(s) per Fault Containment Region scope (width versus depth) the FP architecture.

  13. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick fine-grained ultracataclastic layer occurs on the fault and was sampled for the present study. The fault rocks build up by limestones are diamagnetic and characterized by a very weak, negative magnetic susceptibility (in the order of -0.1*E-5 [SI]), resulting in quite imprecise AMS measurements. The polymict fault rocks formed within the talus deposits on the other hand provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The degree of AMS (P) is quite low in all these samples, but nevertheless the magnetic K-max axes correspond approximately to the pol of the fault plan, indicating probably an inverse magnetic fabric. The lineation observed in the field is not reflected by the magnetic fabric; K-int and K-min mostly show a girdle distribution retracing the orientation of the fault plane. These are preliminary results of an ongoing study. More sites will be analysed and additional measurements (e.g. low temperature measurements, high-field AMS, lithological and textural analyses) have to be performed. However, already these preliminary results indicate, that AMS can be used to identify rock fabric in different kinds of brittle fault rocks.

  14. 77 FR 19702 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ...Bound to the east by the Sand Hills in Imperial County and includes the southern end of the Salton Basin and all of the Chocolate Mountains, the territory extends southward to Todos Santos Bay, Laguna Salada and along the New River in northern Baja...

  15. Is There any Relationship Between Active Tabriz Fault Zone and Bozkush Fault Zones, NW Iran?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ISIK, V.; Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic plate motions and consequent earthquakes can be actively observed along the northwestern Iran. The Tabriz fault zone (TFZ), also called the North Tabriz fault, active right-lateral strike-slip fault zone with slip rates estimated as ~8 mm/yr, has been vigorously deforming much of northwestern Iran for over the past several million years. Historical earthquakes on the TFZ consist of large magnitude, complimentary rupture length and changed the landscape of regions surrounding the fault zone. The TFZ in the city of Bostanabad is more segmented with several strands and joined by a series of WNW-ESE trending faults, called the Bozkush fault zones. The Bozkush fault zones (BFZ's) (south and north), bounding arch-shaped Bozkush mountains, generates not only hundreds of small earthquakes each year but also has provided significant earthquakes that have been historically documented. The rock units deformed within the BFZ's include Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks with intercalation limestone, Oligo-Miocene clastic rocks with intercalation gypsiferous marl and Plio-Quaternary volcano-sedimentary rocks, travertine and alluvium. The North and South Bozkush fault zones are characterized by development of structures typically associated with transpression. These include right-lateral strike-slip faults, thrust faults and foldings. Our field studies indicate that these zones include step to sub-vertical fault surfaces trending NW and NE with slickenlines. Slickensides preserve brittle kinematic indicators (e.g., Riedel shear patterns, slickenside marks) suggesting both dextral displacements and top-to-the-NE/NW and-SE/SW sense of shearing. Besides, mesoscopic and microscopic ductile kinematic indicators (e.g., asymmetric porphyroclasts, C/S fabrics) within Miocene gypsum marl show dextral displacements. Fault rocks along most of these faults consist of incohesive fault breccia and gauge. Adjacent to the fault contact evidence of bedding in Oligo-Miocene and Plio-Quaternary units is obliterated and the strata are folded into NW folds. The geometry of the BFZ's and partitioning of deformation within them indicate positive flower structures, which are commonly noted in zones of transpression. Our preliminary results suggest that the Bozkush fault zones have evidence for late Quaternary activity and similar to the coeval right-lateral strike-slip faulting with a thrust component taking place along the Tabriz fault zone at the present time.

  16. Fault interactions and growth in an outcrop-scale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Andy; Walsh, John; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Schoepfer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Fault geometries and strike-slip displacements in a moderately dipping (~50°) multi-layer sequence have been analysed to constrain the evolution of an outcrop-scale fault system in coastal New Zealand. Displacements and geometries of small faults (lengths 1-200 m and maximum displacements 0.007-3 m) were sampled from a horizontal shore platform up to 120 m wide and 1.5 km long with near 100% exposure. Displacement profiles have variable shapes that mainly reflect fault interactions, with individual faults being both hard- and soft-linked. Variable displacement profiles produce an average profile for all faults that is near-triangular, with displacement gradients (and displacement-length ratios) increasing by an order of magnitude from smallest to largest faults. Within fault zones these gradients are accompanied by secondary faults, which are typically of greatest density close to fault intersections, in relay zones and at fault tips. Horsetail and synthetic splays confined to the regions around fault tips are incompatible with gradual fault propagation for the duration of growth. Instead, fault displacements and tip geometries are consistent with growth initially dominated by fault propagation followed by displacement accumulation and approximately stationary fault tips. Retardation of propagation is thought to arise due to fault interactions and associated reduction of tip stresses, with the early change from propagation- to displacement-dominated growth stages produced by fault-system saturation (i.e., all faults are interacting). Initial rapid fault propagation succeeded by displacement-dominated growth accounts for different fault types over a range of scales suggesting that this fault growth model has wide application.

  17. Characterization of the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, California, by fault zone trapped waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Gang; Vernon, Frank L.

    2001-01-01

    We installed three 350-m-long seismic arrays, each array consisting of 12 three-component stations, across the Coyote Creek fault (CCF), Clark Valley fault (CVF), and Buck Ridge fault (BRF) of the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ) near Anza, California, to record fault zone trapped waves from microearthquakes. We observed trapped waves with relatively large amplitudes and long duration at stations close to the fault traces for earthquakes occurring within the fault zone. The coda-normalized amplitude spectra of trapped waves showed peaks at 4-7 Hz, which decreased sharply with the distance from the fault trace. Observations and three-dimensional finite difference simulations of trapped waves revealed low-velocity and low-Q waveguides on these active faults with the width of 75-100 m in which shear velocities are reduced by 25-30% from wall rock velocities and Q values are 40-90 at depths between the surface and 18 km. The locations of earthquakes for which we observed trapped waves delineate the most seismically active fault strands of the SJFZ in a region with complicated slip planes near Anza. The low-velocity waveguides inferred from trapped waves extend 15 to 20 km in the length on these active faults and are segmented by the fault discontinuities. The waveguide on the BRF dips south westward to connect the waveguide on the CVF, which dips northeastward. This waveguide extends at the seismogenic depth through Anza slip gap to another low-velocity waveguide on the Casa Loma fault (CLF), which has been delineated in our previous study of the SJFZ using trapped waves [Li et al., 1997]. The waveguide on the CCF in Coyote Mountain is nearly vertical and disconnected from the CLF at the south edge of Anza gap. We interpret the low-velocity waveguides on these active strands to partly result from recent prehistoric significant earthquakes on them and evaluate the future earthquake in the Anza region

  18. Characterizing Fault Zone Permeability Through Integrated Geophysical and Hydrological Data, Elkhorn Fault, Park County, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, L. B.; Ge, S.; Caine, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Fault zones are ubiquitous in ground-water aquifers and can play a significant role in fluid transport at local to regional scales. Fault-zone permeability structure controls whether the fault behaves as a barrier, conduit, or combined barrier-conduit for fluid flow. Much work has been done to measure local- to well-scale permeability of faults. However, hydrogeologic heterogeneity prevents local-scale measurements from accurately characterizing the regional hydrogeologic impact of fault zones. Near-surface geophysical techniques provide an estimate the distribution and continuity of subsurface fault zone properties, allowing for the identification of structural heterogeneities that may cause heterogeneities in permeability. This research focuses on the integration of geophysical and hydrological techniques to characterize the regional hydrogeologic effects of the Elkhorn Fault in Park County, Colorado. The Elkhorn fault is a Laramide-aged thrust fault with a sedimentary foot wall and fractured Proterozoic, crystalline hanging wall. Magnetic, gravity, and resistivity data are used to constrain the location and geometry of the fault as well as to aid in the interpretation of the structural and hydrogeologic complexity of the fault and its associated damage zone. The combined geophysical interpretation provides a framework for the development of a physical domain in which pumping test and time-series hydrologic data can be used to evaluate permeability. This interpretation also serves as a guideline for the placement of wells, facilitating direct hydrological testing of the in-situ permeability of different components of the fault zone. By utilizing geophysical techniques, hydrological data may be more effectively collected and interpreted, leading to the development of ground-water-flow models that more accurately depict the regional hydrogeologic effect of the Elkhorn fault.

  19. Fault heterogeneity and earthquake scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Alison; Steacy, Sandy

    2007-08-01

    There is an on-going debate in the seismological community as to whether stress drop is independent of earthquake size and this has important implications for earthquake physics. Here we investigate this question in a simple 2D cellular automaton that includes heterogeneity. We find that when the range of heterogeneity is low, the scaling approaches that of constant stress drop. However, clear deviations from the constant stress drop model are observed when the range of heterogeneity is large. Further, fractal distributions of strength show more significant departures from constant scaling than do random ones. Additionally, sub-sampling the data over limited magnitude ranges can give the appearance of constant stress drop even when the entire data set does not support this. Our results suggest that deviations from constant earthquake scaling are real and reflect the heterogeneity of natural fault zones, but may not provide much information about the physics of earthquakes.

  20. Reconfigurable fault tolerant avionics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Asami, K.; Cho, Mengu

    This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable avionics system based on modern Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)-based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to be used in future generations of nano satellites. A major concern in satellite systems and especially nano satellites is to build robust systems with low-power consumption profiles. The system is designed to be flexible by providing the capability of reconfiguring itself based on its orbital position. As Single Event Upsets (SEU) do not have the same severity and intensity in all orbital locations, having the maximum at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the polar cusps, the system does not have to be fully protected all the time in its orbit. An acceptable level of protection against high-energy cosmic rays and charged particles roaming in space is provided within the majority of the orbit through software fault tolerance. Check pointing and roll back, besides control flow assertions, is used for that level of protection. In the minority part of the orbit where severe SEUs are expected to exist, a reconfiguration for the system FPGA is initiated where the processor systems are triplicated and protection through Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) with feedback is provided. This technique of reconfiguring the system as per the level of the threat expected from SEU-induced faults helps in reducing the average dynamic power consumption of the system to one-third of its maximum. This technique can be viewed as a smart protection through system reconfiguration. The system is built on the commercial version of the (XC5VLX50) Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA on bulk silicon with 324 IO. Simulations of orbit SEU rates were carried out using the SPENVIS web-based software package.

  1. Robot Position Sensor Fault Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.

    1997-01-01

    Robot systems in critical applications, such as those in space and nuclear environments, must be able to operate during component failure to complete important tasks. One failure mode that has received little attention is the failure of joint position sensors. Current fault tolerant designs require the addition of directly redundant position sensors which can affect joint design. A new method is proposed that utilizes analytical redundancy to allow for continued operation during joint position sensor failure. Joint torque sensors are used with a virtual passive torque controller to make the robot joint stable without position feedback and improve position tracking performance in the presence of unknown link dynamics and end-effector loading. Two Cartesian accelerometer based methods are proposed to determine the position of the joint. The joint specific position determination method utilizes two triaxial accelerometers attached to the link driven by the joint with the failed position sensor. The joint specific method is not computationally complex and the position error is bounded. The system wide position determination method utilizes accelerometers distributed on different robot links and the end-effector to determine the position of sets of multiple joints. The system wide method requires fewer accelerometers than the joint specific method to make all joint position sensors fault tolerant but is more computationally complex and has lower convergence properties. Experiments were conducted on a laboratory manipulator. Both position determination methods were shown to track the actual position satisfactorily. A controller using the position determination methods and the virtual passive torque controller was able to servo the joints to a desired position during position sensor failure.

  2. Data Fault Detection in Medical Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Qian; Gao, Zhipeng; Qiu, Xuesong; Meng, Luoming

    2015-01-01

    Medical body sensors can be implanted or attached to the human body to monitor the physiological parameters of patients all the time. Inaccurate data due to sensor faults or incorrect placement on the body will seriously influence clinicians’ diagnosis, therefore detecting sensor data faults has been widely researched in recent years. Most of the typical approaches to sensor fault detection in the medical area ignore the fact that the physiological indexes of patients aren’t changing synchronously at the same time, and fault values mixed with abnormal physiological data due to illness make it difficult to determine true faults. Based on these facts, we propose a Data Fault Detection mechanism in Medical sensor networks (DFD-M). Its mechanism includes: (1) use of a dynamic-local outlier factor (D-LOF) algorithm to identify outlying sensed data vectors; (2) use of a linear regression model based on trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to predict which readings in the outlying data vector are suspected to be faulty; (3) the proposal of a novel judgment criterion of fault state according to the prediction values. The simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and superiority of DFD-M. PMID:25774708

  3. Formal Validation of Fault Management Design Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Corrina; Karban, Robert; Andolfato, Luigi; Day, John

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes an approach used to develop SysML modeling patterns to express the behavior of fault protection, test the model's logic by performing fault injection simulations, and verify the fault protection system's logical design via model checking. A representative example, using a subset of the fault protection design for the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) system, was modeled with SysML State Machines and JavaScript as Action Language. The SysML model captures interactions between relevant system components and system behavior abstractions (mode managers, error monitors, fault protection engine, and devices/switches). Development of a method to implement verifiable and lightweight executable fault protection models enables future missions to have access to larger fault test domains and verifiable design patterns. A tool-chain to transform the SysML model to jpf-Statechart compliant Java code and then verify the generated code via model checking was established. Conclusions and lessons learned from this work are also described, as well as potential avenues for further research and development.

  4. Data fault detection in medical sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Qian; Gao, Zhipeng; Qiu, Xuesong; Meng, Luoming

    2015-01-01

    Medical body sensors can be implanted or attached to the human body to monitor the physiological parameters of patients all the time. Inaccurate data due to sensor faults or incorrect placement on the body will seriously influence clinicians' diagnosis, therefore detecting sensor data faults has been widely researched in recent years. Most of the typical approaches to sensor fault detection in the medical area ignore the fact that the physiological indexes of patients aren't changing synchronously at the same time, and fault values mixed with abnormal physiological data due to illness make it difficult to determine true faults. Based on these facts, we propose a Data Fault Detection mechanism in Medical sensor networks (DFD-M). Its mechanism includes: (1) use of a dynamic-local outlier factor (D-LOF) algorithm to identify outlying sensed data vectors; (2) use of a linear regression model based on trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to predict which readings in the outlying data vector are suspected to be faulty; (3) the proposal of a novel judgment criterion of fault state according to the prediction values. The simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and superiority of DFD-M. PMID:25774708

  5. Generic along-strike segmentation of Afar normal faults, East Africa: Implications on fault growth and stress heterogeneity on seismogenic fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Caulet, C.; Barros, L.; Perrin, C.; Cappa, F.; Gaudemer, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural faults are segmented along their length can provide useful insights into fault growth processes, stress distribution on fault planes, and earthquake dynamics. We use cumulative displacement profiles to analyze the two largest scales of segmentation of ˜900 normal faults in Afar, East Africa. We build upon a prior study by Manighetti et al. (2009) and develop a new signal processing method aimed at recovering the number, position, displacement, and length of both the major (i.e., longest) and the subordinate, secondary segments within the faults. Regardless of their length, age, geographic location, total displacement, and slip rate, 90% of the faults contain two to five major segments, whereas more than 70% of these major segments are divided into two to four secondary segments. In each hierarchical rank of fault segmentation, most segments have a similar proportional length, whereas the number of segments slightly decreases with fault structural maturity. The along-strike segmentation of the Afar faults is thus generic at its two largest scales. We summarize published fault segment data on 42 normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults worldwide, and find a similar number (two to five) of major and secondary segments across the population. We suggest a fault growth scenario that might account for the generic large-scale segmentation of faults. The observation of a generic segmentation suggests that seismogenic fault planes are punctuated with a deterministic number of large stress concentrations, which are likely to control the initiation, arrest and hence extent and magnitude of earthquake ruptures.

  6. Negative Selection Algorithm for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated a real-valued Negative Selection Algorithm (NSA) for fault detection in man-in-the-loop aircraft operation. The detection algorithm uses body-axes angular rate sensory data exhibiting the normal flight behavior patterns, to generate probabilistically a set of fault detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults and damages) in the behavior pattern of the aircraft flight. We performed experiments with datasets (collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions) using the NASA Ames man-in-the-loop high-fidelity C-17 flight simulator. The paper provides results of experiments with different datasets representing various failure conditions.

  7. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  8. Cooperative application/OS DRAM fault recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Heroux, Michael Allen; Hoemmen, Mark; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01

    Exascale systems will present considerable fault-tolerance challenges to applications and system software. These systems are expected to suffer several hard and soft errors per day. Unfortunately, many fault-tolerance methods in use, such as rollback recovery, are unsuitable for many expected errors, for example DRAM failures. As a result, applications will need to address these resilience challenges to more effectively utilize future systems. In this paper, we describe work on a cross-layer application/OS framework to handle uncorrected memory errors. We illustrate the use of this framework through its integration with a new fault-tolerant iterative solver within the Trilinos library, and present initial convergence results.

  9. Tunable architecture for aircraft fault detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, Subhabrata (Inventor); Papageorgiou, George (Inventor); Glavaski-Radovanovic, Sonja (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for detecting faults in an aircraft is disclosed. The method involves predicting at least one state of the aircraft and tuning at least one threshold value to tightly upper bound the size of a mismatch between the at least one predicted state and a corresponding actual state of the non-faulted aircraft. If the mismatch between the at least one predicted state and the corresponding actual state is greater than or equal to the at least one threshold value, the method indicates that at least one fault has been detected.

  10. Fault-Tolerant Exact State Transmission

    E-print Network

    Zhao-Ming Wang; Lian-Ao Wu; Michele Modugno; Wang Yao; Bin Shao

    2012-05-02

    We show that a category of one-dimensional XY-type models may enable high-fidelity quantum state transmissions, regardless of details of coupling configurations. This observation leads to a fault- tolerant design of a state transmission setup. The setup is fault-tolerant, with specified thresholds, against engineering failures of coupling configurations, fabrication imperfections or defects, and even time-dependent noises. We propose the implementation of the fault-tolerant scheme using hard-core bosons in one-dimensional optical lattices.

  11. Geofluid Dynamics of Faulted Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Jung, B.; Boles, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Faults are known to affect basin-scale groundwater flow, and exert a profound control on petroleum migration/accumulation, the PVT-history of hydrothermal fluids, and the natural (submarine) seepage from offshore reservoirs. For example, in the Santa Barbara basin, measured gas flow data from a natural submarine seep area in the Santa Barbara Channel helps constrain fault permeability k ~ 30 millidarcys for the large-scale upward migration of methane-bearing formation fluids along one of the major fault zones. At another offshore site near Platform Holly, pressure-transducer time-series data from a 1.5 km deep exploration well in the South Ellwood Field demonstrate a strong ocean tidal component, due to vertical fault connectivity to the seafloor. Analytical solutions to the poroelastic flow equation can be used to extract both fault permeability and compressibility parameters, based on tidal-signal amplitude attenuation and phase shift at depth. These data have proven useful in constraining coupled hydrogeologic 2-D models for reactive flow and geomechanical deformation. In a similar vein, our studies of faults in the Los Angeles basin, suggest an important role for the natural retention of fluids along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Based on the estimates of fault permeability derived above, we have also constructed new two-dimensional numerical simulations to characterize large-scale multiphase flow in complex heterogeneous and anisotropic geologic profiles, such as the Los Angeles basin. The numerical model was developed in our lab at Tufts from scratch, and based on an IMPES-type algorithm for a finite element/volume mesh. This numerical approach allowed us model large differentials in fluid saturation and relative permeability, caused by complex geological heterogeneities associated with sedimentation and faulting. Our two-phase flow models also replicated the formation-scale patterns of petroleum accumulation associated with the basin margin, where deep faults resulted in stacked petroleum reservoirs along the Newport-Inglewood Fault, as deep geofluids migrated out of the basin to the Palo Verde Peninsula. Recent isotope data collected by our group also verify fault connectivity at the deep crustal scale.

  12. Geometry and earthquake potential of the shoreline fault, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline fault is a vertical strike?slip fault running along the coastline near San Luis Obispo, California. Much is unknown about the Shoreline fault, including its slip rate and the details of its geometry. Here, I study the geometry of the Shoreline fault at seismogenic depth, as well as the adjacent section of the offshore Hosgri fault, using seismicity relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms. The Optimal Anisotropic Dynamic Clustering (OADC) algorithm (Ouillon et al., 2008) is used to objectively identify the simplest planar fault geometry that fits all of the earthquakes to within their location uncertainty. The OADC results show that the Shoreline fault is a single continuous structure that connects to the Hosgri fault. Discontinuities smaller than about 1 km may be undetected, but would be too small to be barriers to earthquake rupture. The Hosgri fault dips steeply to the east, while the Shoreline fault is essentially vertical, so the Hosgri fault dips towards and under the Shoreline fault as the two faults approach their intersection. The focal mechanisms generally agree with pure right?lateral strike?slip on the OADC planes, but suggest a non?planar Hosgri fault or another structure underlying the northern Shoreline fault. The Shoreline fault most likely transfers strike?slip motion between the Hosgri fault and other faults of the Pacific–North America plate boundary system to the east. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the entire known length of the Shoreline fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.4–6.8. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the Shoreline fault and the section of the Hosgri fault north of the Hosgri–Shoreline junction would have a moment magnitude of 7.2–7.5.

  13. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen in experiments where silica gel was produced, in other words, strong faults that experienced significant slip weakening.

  14. Network Connectivity for Permanent, Transient, Independent, and Correlated Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.; Sicher, Courtney; henry, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a method for the quantitative analysis of network connectivity in the presence of both permanent and transient faults. Even though transient noise is considered a common occurrence in networks, a survey of the literature reveals an emphasis on permanent faults. Transient faults introduce a time element into the analysis of network reliability. With permanent faults it is sufficient to consider the faults that have accumulated by the end of the operating period. With transient faults the arrival and recovery time must be included. The number and location of faults in the system is a dynamic variable. Transient faults also introduce system recovery into the analysis. The goal is the quantitative assessment of network connectivity in the presence of both permanent and transient faults. The approach is to construct a global model that includes all classes of faults: permanent, transient, independent, and correlated. A theorem is derived about this model that give distributions for (1) the number of fault occurrences, (2) the type of fault occurrence, (3) the time of the fault occurrences, and (4) the location of the fault occurrence. These results are applied to compare and contrast the connectivity of different network architectures in the presence of permanent, transient, independent, and correlated faults. The examples below use a Monte Carlo simulation, but the theorem mentioned above could be used to guide fault-injections in a laboratory.

  15. Algebraic Fault Analysis of Katan November 21, 2014

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Algebraic Fault Analysis of Katan November 21, 2014 Frank-M. Quedenfeld1 1 Ruhr University Bochum for fault attacks and statistical and algebraic techniques to improve fault analysis in general. Our these techniques to introduce two new fault attacks on the hardware oriented block cipher Katan32 from the Katan

  16. Fault Attack against Miller's algorithm Nadia EL MRABET

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Fault Attack against Miller's algorithm Nadia EL MRABET LIASD, University Paris 8, 2, rue de la a fault attack. We prove that Miller's algorithm is vulnerable to a fault attack which is valid in all of the article [15]. Key words: Miller's algorithm, Identity Based Cryptography, Fault Attack, Coordinates System

  17. Trends in reliability modeling technology for fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    Reliability modeling for fault tolerant avionic computing systems was developed. The modeling of large systems involving issues of state size and complexity, fault coverage, and practical computation was discussed. A novel technique which provides the tool for studying the reliability of systems with nonconstant failure rates is presented. The fault latency which may provide a method of obtaining vital latent fault data is measured.

  18. Fault detection for discrete-time switched systems with sensor stuck faults and servo inputs.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guang-Xin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the fault detection problem of switched systems with servo inputs and sensor stuck faults. The attention is focused on designing a switching law and its associated fault detection filters (FDFs). The proposed switching law uses only the current states of FDFs, which guarantees the residuals are sensitive to the servo inputs with known frequency ranges in faulty cases and robust against them in fault-free case. Thus, the arbitrarily small sensor stuck faults, including outage faults can be detected in finite-frequency domain. The levels of sensitivity and robustness are measured in terms of the finite-frequency H- index and l2-gain. Finally, the switching law and FDFs are obtained by the solution of a convex optimization problem. PMID:26055929

  19. Fault detection in finite frequency domain for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault detection (FD) problem in finite frequency domain for continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults. Some finite-frequency performance indices are initially introduced to measure the fault/reference input sensitivity and disturbance robustness. Based on these performance indices, an effective FD scheme is then presented such that the generated residual is designed to be sensitive to both fault and reference input for faulty cases, while robust against the reference input for fault-free case. As the additional reference input sensitivity for faulty cases is considered, it is shown that the proposed method improves the existing FD techniques and achieves a better FD performance. The theory is supported by simulation results related to the detection of sensor faults in a tunnel-diode circuit. PMID:24184791

  20. Rapid recovery from transient faults in the fault-tolerant processor with fault-tolerant shared memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Richard E.; Butler, Bryan P.

    1990-01-01

    The Draper fault-tolerant processor with fault-tolerant shared memory (FTP/FTSM), which is designed to allow application tasks to continue execution during the memory alignment process, is described. Processor performance is not affected by memory alignment. In addition, the FTP/FTSM incorporates a hardware scrubber device to perform the memory alignment quickly during unused memory access cycles. The FTP/FTSM architecture is described, followed by an estimate of the time required for channel reintegration.

  1. GIS coverages of the Castle Mountain Fault, south central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Labay, Keith A.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is one of several major east-northeast-striking faults in southern Alaska, and it is the only fault with had historic seismicity and Holocene surface faulting. This report is a digital compilation of three maps along the Castle Mountain fault in south central Alaska. This compilation consists only of GIS coverages of the location of the fault, line attributes indicating the certainty of the fault location, and information about scarp height, where measured. The files are presented in ARC/INFO export file format and include metadata.

  2. Parameter Transient Behavior Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor); Shin, Jong-Yeob

    2003-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. This paper illustrates analysis of a FTC system based on estimated fault parameter transient behavior which may include false fault detections during a short time interval. Using Lyapunov function analysis, the upper bound of an induced-L2 norm of the FTC system performance is calculated as a function of a fault detection time and the exponential decay rate of the Lyapunov function.

  3. A complete hydro-climate model chain to investigate the influence of sea surface temperature on recent hydroclimatic variability in subtropical South America (Laguna Mar Chiquita, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troin, Magali; Vrac, Mathieu; Khodri, Myriam; Caya, Daniel; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Piovano, Eduardo; Sylvestre, Florence

    2015-06-01

    During the 1970s, Laguna Mar Chiquita (Argentina) experienced a dramatic hydroclimatic anomaly, with a substantial rise in its level. Precipitations are the dominant driving factor in lake level fluctuations. The present study investigates the potential role of remote forcing through global sea surface temperature (SST) fields in modulating recent hydroclimatic variability in Southeastern South America and especially over the Laguna Mar Chiquita region. Daily precipitation and temperature are extracted from a multi-member LMDz atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) ensemble of simulations forced by HadISST1 observed time-varying global SST and sea-ice boundary conditions from 1950 to 2005. The various members of the ensemble are only different in their atmospheric initial conditions. Statistical downscaling (SD) is used to adjust precipitation and temperature from LMDz ensemble mean at the station scale over the basin. A coupled basin-lake hydrological model (cpHM) is then using the LMDz-downscaled (LMDz-SD) climate variables as input to simulate the lake behavior. The results indicate that the long-term lake level trend is fairly well depicted by the LMDz-SD-cpHM simulations. The 1970s level rise and high-level conditions are generally well captured in timing and in magnitude when SST-forced AGCM-SD variables are used to drive the cpHM. As the LMDz simulations are forced solely with the observed sea surface conditions, the global SST seems to have an influence on the lake level variations of Laguna Mar Chiquita. As well, this study shows that the AGCM-SD-cpHM model chain is a useful approach for evaluating long-term lake level fluctuations in response to the projected climate changes.

  4. Faulting in outer continental shelf of southern Bering Sea.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Vallier, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of more than 10 000 line-km of high-resolution seismic data indicates the distribution, types, and trends of faults present on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea. Faults are classified into three types as to whether they 1) offset the sea floor (surface fault), 2) show less than 5m of displacement (minor fault), of 3) show more than 5m of displacement (major fault). The distribution of surface faults follows the outline of St George basin and suggests that the basin is presently subsiding. Minor faults are concentrated throughout St George and Amak basins but are not common elsewhere in the region. Major faults appear to be associated with the boundary faults of St George and, to a lesser extent, Amak basins. The faulting is probably a result of earthquake-induced energies that reactivate zones of weakness inherited from the collapse of the margin during the late Mesozoic-early Tertiary. -Authors

  5. Hydrologic, water-quality, and biological assessment of Laguna de las Salinas, Ponce, Puerto Rico, January 2003-September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soler-López, Luis R.; Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús

    2005-01-01

    The Laguna de Las Salinas is a shallow, 35-hectare, hypersaline lagoon (depth less than 1 meter) in the municipio of Ponce, located on the southern coastal plain of Puerto Rico. Hydrologic, water-quality, and biological data in the lagoon were collected between January 2003 and September 2004 to establish baseline conditions. During the study period, rainfall was about 1,130 millimeters, with much of the rain recorded during three distinct intense events. The lagoon is connected to the sea by a shallow, narrow channel. Subtle tidal changes, combined with low rainfall and high evaporation rates, kept the lagoon at salinities above that of the sea throughout most of the study. Water-quality properties measured on-site (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and Secchi disk transparency) exhibited temporal rather than spatial variations and distribution. Although all physical parameters were in compliance with current regulatory standards for Puerto Rico, hyperthermic and hypoxic conditions were recorded during isolated occasions. Nutrient concentrations were relatively low and in compliance with current regulatory standards (less than 5.0 and 1.0 milligrams per liter for total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively). The average total nitrogen concentration was 1.9 milligrams per liter and the average total phosphorus concentration was 0.4 milligram per liter. Total organic carbon concentrations ranged from 12.0 to 19.0 milligrams per liter. Chlorophyll a was the predominant form of photosynthetic pigment in the water. The average chlorophyll a concentration was 13.4 micrograms per liter. Chlorophyll b was detected (detection limits 0.10 microgram per liter) only twice during the study. About 90 percent of the primary productivity in the Laguna de Las Salinas was generated by periphyton such as algal mats and macrophytes such as seagrasses. Of the average net productivity of 13.6 grams of oxygen per cubic meter per day derived from the diel study, the periphyton and macrophyes produced 12.3 grams per cubic meter per day; about 1.3 grams (about 10 percent) were produced by the phytoplankton (plant and algae component of plankton). The total respiration rate was 59.2 grams of oxygen per cubic meter per day. The respiration rate ascribed to the plankton (all organisms floating through the water column) averaged about 6.2 grams of oxygen per cubic meter per day (about 10 percent), whereas the respiration rate by all other organisms averaged 53.0 grams of oxygen per cubic meter per day (about 90 percent). Plankton gross productivity was 7.5 grams per cubic meter per day; the gross productivity of the entire community averaged 72.8 grams per cubic meter per day. Fecal coliform bacteria counts were generally less than 200 colonies per 100 milliliters; the highest concentration was 600 colonies per 100 milliliters.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of a 20 kHz resonant power system - Fault identification and fault recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasynczuk, O.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed simulation of a dc inductor resonant driver and receiver is used to demonstrate the transient characteristics of a 20 kHz resonant power system during fault and overload conditions. The simulated system consists of a dc inductor resonant inverter (driver), a 50-meter transmission cable, and a dc inductor resonant receiver load. Of particular interest are the driver and receiver performance during fault and overload conditions and on the recovery characteristics following removal of the fault. The information gained from these studies sets the stage for further work in fault identification and autonomous power system control.

  7. Late Quaternary faulted landforms characteristics on the Tumen-Jiazhu village segment of Luoyunshan piedmont fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Xie, X.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Luoyunshan piedmont fault is located west of Linfen basin, controlling the western border of the basin. Based on the fault 1:50000 geological mapping, river and gully terraces and piedmont faulted landforms survey, this paper mainly introduces late Quaternary faulted landforms characteristics on the Tumen-Jiazhu village segment of Luoyunshan piedmont fault. Luoyunshan piedmont alluvial-pluvial fans are divided into three stages, named alluvial-pluvial fans D1, D2 and D3. The gullies on the upthrown plate of Luoyunshan piedmont fault has five terraces: T1~T5. Alluvial-pluvial fans D1 and terraces T1 and T2 formed in the early and middle Holocene. Alluvial-pluvial fans D2 and terraces T3 formed in the middle-late stage of late Pleistocene. Alluvial-pluvial fans D3 and terraces T4 and T5 formed in the middle-late stage of middle Pleistocene. Faulted landforms characteristics on different parts of the middle segment of the Luo Yunshan piedmont fault are different. The dislocation of alluvial-pluvial fans D1 is about 2.9m and 3m respectively in the Xifanggou area and the piedmont of southwest of Yukou village, Jindian town. The dislocation of alluvial-pluvial fans D2 is about 2.5m, 4m, 6m and 7.7m respectively in the southwest of Puzi village, Tumen town, piedmont of west of Yangjiazhuang village, west of Jingcun village and piedmont of southwest of Langquangou, Xiangling town. The faulted landforms on the Tumen-Jiazhu village segment of Luoyunshan piedmont fault are obvious. The latest activity times of the fault is Holocene. The latest activity times of Tumen segment and Longci segment of the fault are early Holocene and middle-late Holocene respectively. Since the Middle-Late Pleistocene an activity rate of the middle segment of Luoyunshan piedmont fault is 0.18~0.54mm/yr, and activity showed an increasing trend from north to south. Since Early-Middle Holocene it is 0.4~0.9mm/yr, and fault activities mainly concentrated on the segment from Xifanggou to Yukou village. An increasing trend of the activity rate of the middle segment of Luoyunshan piedmont fault from the Middle-Late Pleistocene to Holocene, it is in good agreement with an increasing trend of the uplift rate of the terraces on the upthrown plate of the fault from the Middle-Late Pleistocene to Holocene and the sedimentation rate of Linfen basin which also has an increasing trend from the Late Pleistocene to Holocene.

  8. Investigation of fault interaction and growth in Mygdonia basin (Greece) fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkarlaouni, Charikleia; Kilias, Adamantios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Karakostas, Vasileios

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays there is a scientific debate upon the strong correlation that exists between the earthquake clusters and the active seismogenic fault systems since they both constitute populations that participate in processes that include different states of initiation, interaction and coalescence. Since faults grow by the increase in their displacement and their length, the degree of fault interaction between two neighbour segments is expressed by scaling laws describing the fault dimensions, such as the displacement and the length. The distribution of the displacement along the fault trace, follows a bell-shaped pattern according to Dugdale model and is often a key to quantify the degree of interaction between two different fault segments since it gives an insight to the stage of growth and linkage between faults. In our case the fault attributes of Mygdonia basin that is located in the northern part of the Greek mainland are investigated under the prism of the scaling properties of its major active faults. Important seismogenic fault segments such as Lagina - Agios Vasilios, Gerakarou - Stivos and Sohos fault that define the boundaries of the basin and have generated important earthquakes in the past are investigated. Displacement - length profiles were constrained for the major fault segments, using digital elevation models (DEMs) since intense tectonics is etched upon the topography of the area such as to provide valuable seismotectonic information. In our case scarp heights are used for the approximation of fault displacement. Structural information, concerning displacement measurements on active fault scarps, and slip lineaments onto fault expressions are collected in-situ from field surveys. The information based on the field observations, justify the results coming out from the D.E.M. analysis. The final results are compared to conclusions derived from the investigation of different fault systems and the influence on the hazard assessment is discussed. This work is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF)-Research Funding Program: Heracleitus II. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  9. The Zuccale Fault, Elba Island, Italy: A new perspective from fault architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, G.; Mazzarini, F.; Cruden, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Zuccale Fault, central-eastern Elba Island, has been regarded since the 1990s as a low-angle normal fault that records Neogene crustal extension in the inner (Tyrrhenian side) portion of the northern Apennines. The flat-lying attitude of the fault zone and the strong excision of thick nappes were the main reasons for this interpretation. Previous structural and petrographic studies have focused primarily on the fault rocks themselves without map-scale investigation of the structural setting and deformation structures in the hanging wall and footwall blocks. Furthermore, despite the complex history proposed for the Zuccale Fault, the timing of deformation has not yet been constrained by radiometric age data. We present the findings of recent geological studies on eastern Elba Island that provide significant new insight on the nature and tectonic significance of the Zuccale Fault. We document in detail the architecture of breccias and cataclasites that comprise the Zuccale Fault. Our new observations are consistent with a purely brittle deformation zone that crosscuts older early-middle and late Miocene regional and local tectonic structures. The activity on the fault postdates emplacement of the late Miocene Porto Azzurro pluton, and it displaces a previously formed nappe stack ~6 km eastward without any footwall exhumation or hanging wall block rotation. These new data raise questions about the development of misoriented faults in the upper crust.

  10. The San Andreas Fault System Paul Withers Wallace RE, The San Andreas Fault System, California, USGS Professional Paper 1515,

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    The San Andreas Fault System ­ Paul Withers Wallace RE, The San Andreas Fault System, California://www.johnmartin.com/earthquakes/eqsafs/INDEX.HTM) Schultz SS and Wallace RE, The San Andreas Fault, USGS General Interest Publication, 1989 (http. Europa is covered with faults and evidence of plate motion. Large, light, rigid caps of lithosphere float

  11. Faults and Folds on the Colorado Plateau Fault = planar fracture along which displacement of the two blocks has occurred

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    it is found to be a reactivated Precambrian fault. It is reasonable to suggest that this is true in the CP of movements on reactivated, Precambrian, high-angle fault zones. 2 - The systematic distribution by ancient, deep-seated faults. 3 ­ The reactivation of Precambrian fault and fracture zones to produce

  12. Porosity variations in and around normal fault zones: implications for fault seal and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, David; Neilson, Joyce; Farrell, Natalie; Timms, Nick; Wilson, Moyra

    2015-04-01

    Porosity forms the building blocks for permeability, exerts a significant influence on the acoustic response of rocks to elastic waves, and fundamentally influences rock strength. And yet, published studies of porosity around fault zones or in faulted rock are relatively rare, and are hugely dominated by those of fault zone permeability. We present new data from detailed studies of porosity variations around normal faults in sandstone and limestone. We have developed an integrated approach to porosity characterisation in faulted rock exploiting different techniques to understand variations in the data. From systematic samples taken across exposed normal faults in limestone (Malta) and sandstone (Scotland), we combine digital image analysis on thin sections (optical and electron microscopy), core plug analysis (He porosimetry) and mercury injection capillary pressures (MICP). Our sampling includes representative material from undeformed protoliths and fault rocks from the footwall and hanging wall. Fault-related porosity can produce anisotropic permeability with a 'fast' direction parallel to the slip vector in a sandstone-hosted normal fault. Undeformed sandstones in the same unit exhibit maximum permeability in a sub-horizontal direction parallel to lamination in dune-bedded sandstones. Fault-related deformation produces anisotropic pores and pore networks with long axes aligned sub-vertically and this controls the permeability anisotropy, even under confining pressures up to 100 MPa. Fault-related porosity also has interesting consequences for the elastic properties and velocity structure of normal fault zones. Relationships between texture, pore type and acoustic velocity have been well documented in undeformed limestone. We have extended this work to include the effects of faulting on carbonate textures, pore types and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp, Vs) using a suite of normal fault zones in Malta, with displacements ranging from 0.5 to 90 m. Our results show a clear lithofacies control on the Vp-porosity and the Vs-Vp relationships for faulted limestones. Using porosity patterns quantified in naturally deformed rocks we have modelled their effect on the mechanical stability of fluid-saturated fault zones in the subsurface. Poroelasticity theory predicts that variations in fluid pressure could influence fault stability. Anisotropic patterns of porosity in and around fault zones can - depending on their orientation and intensity - lead to an increase in fault stability in response to a rise in fluid pressure, and a decrease in fault stability for a drop in fluid pressure. These predictions are the exact opposite of the accepted role of effective stress in fault stability. Our work has provided new data on the spatial and statistical variation of porosity in fault zones. Traditionally considered as an isotropic and scalar value, porosity and pore networks are better considered as anisotropic and as scale-dependent statistical distributions. The geological processes controlling the evolution of porosity are complex. Quantifying patterns of porosity variation is an essential first step in a wider quest to better understand deformation processes in and around normal fault zones. Understanding porosity patterns will help us to make more useful predictive tools for all agencies involved in the study and management of fluids in the subsurface.

  13. Reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions during the past 50 ka from the biogeochemical record of Laguna Potrok Aike, southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Rosén, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and biogenic silica (BSi) assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) are used to reconstruct the environmental history during the past 50kyrs in high resolution from Laguna Potrok Aike. During the Holocene warmer conditions lead to an increased productivity reflected in higher TOC and BSi contents. Calcite precipitation initiated around 9 ka cal. BP probably due to supersaturation induced by lake level lowering. It is assumed that prior to this time period sediments are carbonate-free because high lake-level conditions prevailed. During the Glacial, increased runoff linked to permafrost, precipitation related to stronger cyclonic activity and reduced evaporation have caused higher lake levels. Moreover, during cold glacial conditions lake productivity was low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin as indicated by generally low TOC and C/N values. During interstadials, such as the Antarctic A-events and the Younger Dryas, TOC contents appear to rise. The glacial C/N ratios and their correlation with TOC concentrations indicate that aquatic moss blooms probably induce these increases in TOC. Aquatic mosses grow if surface water temperatures rise due to warmer climatic conditions and/or development of a lake water stratification. The latter may occur if wind speeds are low and melt water inflow caused higher density gradients. Prevailing permafrost thawing during warmer periods could lead to considerable rises of lake levels, which would contribute to the preservation of organic material. This may explain why higher C/N and TOC values occur at the end of Antarctic A-events. For the uppermost 25 m, the BSi profile shows a high correlation with the TOC profile. In deeper horizons, however, there are indications that the BSi/TOC ratio increased. This part of the record is dominated by mass movement events, which may have supplied nutrients and thus triggered diatom blooms.

  14. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  15. Seismology: Do faults shimmy before they shake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, Michael R.

    2008-05-01

    Not only do plate boundary faults generate earthquakes, they also produce slow slip and non-volcanic tremor. New observations on these phenomena provide fresh insights into the conditions that dictate earthquake behaviour.

  16. Fault-tolerant communication channel structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon (Inventor); Chau, Savio N. (Inventor); Tai, Ann T. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Systems and techniques for implementing fault-tolerant communication channels and features in communication systems. Selected commercial-off-the-shelf devices can be integrated in such systems to reduce the cost.

  17. Study of fault-tolerant software technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slivinski, T.; Broglio, C.; Wild, C.; Goldberg, J.; Levitt, K.; Hitt, E.; Webb, J.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is an overview of the current state of the art of fault-tolerant software and an analysis of quantitative techniques and models developed to assess its impact. It examines research efforts as well as experience gained from commercial application of these techniques. The paper also addresses the computer architecture and design implications on hardware, operating systems and programming languages (including Ada) of using fault-tolerant software in real-time aerospace applications. It concludes that fault-tolerant software has progressed beyond the pure research state. The paper also finds that, although not perfectly matched, newer architectural and language capabilities provide many of the notations and functions needed to effectively and efficiently implement software fault-tolerance.

  18. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION...TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault...his age, intelligence, education, and physical and mental...

  19. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation

    E-print Network

    Ognyan Oreshkov; Todd A. Brun; Daniel A. Lidar

    2013-12-01

    We review an approach to fault-tolerant holonomic quantum computation on stabilizer codes. We explain its workings as based on adiabatic dragging of the subsystem containing the logical information around suitable loops along which the information remains protected.

  20. Delineation of fault zones using imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Gulen, L.; Prange, M.; Matarese, J.; Pettengill, G. H.; Ford, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The assessment of earthquake hazards and mineral and oil potential of a given region requires a detailed knowledge of geological structure, including the configuration of faults. Delineation of faults is traditionally based on three types of data: (1) seismicity data, which shows the location and magnitude of earthquake activity; (2) field mapping, which in remote areas is typically incomplete and of insufficient accuracy; and (3) remote sensing, including LANDSAT images and high altitude photography. Recently, high resolution radar images of tectonically active regions have been obtained by SEASAT and Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A and SIR-B) systems. These radar images are sensitive to terrain slope variations and emphasize the topographic signatures of fault zones. Techniques were developed for using the radar data in conjunction with the traditional types of data to delineate major faults in well-known test sites, and to extend interpretation techniques to remote areas.

  1. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. ??1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Fault detection in programmable logic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somenzi, F.; Gai, S.

    1986-05-01

    When designing fault-tolerant systems including programmable logic arrays (PLAs), the various aspects of these circuits concerning fault diagnosis have to be taken into account. The peculiarity of these aspects, ranging from fault models to test generation algorithms and to self-checking structures, is due to the regularity of PLAs. The fault model generally accepted for PLAs is the crosspoint defect; it is employed by dedicated test generation algorithms, based on the fact that PLAs implement a two-level combinational function. The problem of accessing inputs and outputs of the PLA can be alleviated by augmenting the PLA itself so as to simplify the test vectors to be applied, making them function independent in the limit. A further step consists in the addition of the circuitry required to generate test vectors and to evaluate the answer, thus obtaining a built-in self-test (BIST) architecture. Finally, high reliability can be achieved with PLAs featuring concurrent error detection.

  3. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in divergent and convergent transfer zones. Flat base plate setups have been used to build different configurations that would lead to approaching, normal offset and overlapping faults geometries. The results have been analyzed with respect to fault orientation, density, connectivity and 3D geometry from photographs taken from the three free surfaces and laser scans of the top surface of the clay cake respectively. The second chapter looks into the 3D structural analysis of the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico with the help of a 3D seismic dataset and associated well tops and velocity data donated by ExxonMobil Corporation. This study involves seismic interpretation techniques, velocity modeling, cross section restoration of a series of seismic lines and 3D subsurface modeling using depth converted seismic horizons, well tops and balanced cross sections. The third chapter deals with the clay experiments of listric normal fault systems and tries to understand the controls on geometries of fault systems with and without a ductile substrate. Sloping flat base plate setups have been used and silicone fluid underlain below the clay cake has been considered as an analog for salt. The experimental configurations have been varied with respect to three factors viz. the direction of slope with respect to extension, the termination of silicone polymer with respect to the basal discontinuities and overlap of the base plates. The analyses for the experiments have again been performed from photographs and 3D laser scans of the clay surface.

  4. Palaeostress reconstruction using polygonal faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Joe Cartwright 3DLab, School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary Sciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3YE, Wales, UK (cartwrightja@cf.ac.uk) Polygonal faults are non-tectonic normal faults that form during shallow burial of clay-rich sedimentary sequences. They mainly occur in passive continental margin settings, where they are organised into layer-bound tiers spanning areas often in excess of a million km2. They are arranged in complex arrays with a polygonal planform geometry, with a typical spacing of 500-1000m, and have maximum throws of up to 100m or so. There is no general agreement on their genesis, and models range from density inversion to diagenesis. Polygonal faults have been observed in sediments that have never been buried deeper than a few tens of metres, so their shallow origin is certain. Their polygonal planform argues powerfully for their non-tectonic origin, and their presence in passively buried horizontal sequences testifies to a bulk volumetric strain in units deformed by these faults that is truly three-dimensional, and clearly at odds with classical views of sediment compaction as a 1d consolidation strain. Here I present examples of polygonal faults that have propagated under the influence of a local or regional tectonic stress. The addition of a tectonic stress leads to an anisotropic horizontal state of stress, and the polygonal faults respond to this by propagating preferentially in a single direction: the local direction of the intermediate principal compressive stress. Sharp boundaries are observed between classical polygonal planform arrays (where horizontal stress is isotropic), and strongly aligned arrays. Excellent examples of this segregation into two types of array are observed surrounding salt diapirs, conduits for mud volcanoes, and most interestingly adjacent to tectonic faults. In all these cases it is possible to recognise the zone of influence of the local structure (fault or intrusion) on the local state of stress, and hence polygonal faults can be used to map isotropic versus anisotropic regions of horizontal stress. Unlike many other forms of palaeostress analysis, this approach of using polygonal faulting as a local guide, has the advantage of being in situ and directly through seismic observation of the subsurface. Polygonal faults thus have the potential to serve as natural piezometers for past deformation, and to allow quantification of the degree of stress anisotropy induced by propagation of tectonic structures and intrusive bodies.

  5. GN and C Fault Protection Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This is a companion presentation for a paper by the same name for the same conference. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on the fundamentals of fault tolerant design for GN&C. The common heritage of ideas behind both faulted and normal operation is explored, as is the increasingly indistinct line between these realms in complex missions. Techniques in common practice are then evaluated in this light to suggest a better direction for future efforts.

  6. Fault current limiter using a superconducting coil

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.; Paice, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    A novel circuit, consisting of solid-state diodes and a biased superconducting coil, for limiting the fault currents in three phase ac systems is presented. A modification of the basic circuit results in a solid-state ac breaker with current limiting features. The operating characteristics of the fault current limiter and the ac breaker are analyzed. An optimization procedure for sizing the superconducting coil is derived.

  7. A Primer on Architectural Level Fault Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the fundamental concepts of fault tolerant computing. Key topics covered are voting, fault detection, clock synchronization, Byzantine Agreement, diagnosis, and reliability analysis. Low level mechanisms such as Hamming codes or low level communications protocols are not covered. The paper is tutorial in nature and does not cover any topic in detail. The focus is on rationale and approach rather than detailed exposition.

  8. Geometric incompatibility in a fault system.

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielov, A; Keilis-Borok, V; Jackson, D D

    1996-01-01

    Interdependence between geometry of a fault system, its kinematics, and seismicity is investigated. Quantitative measure is introduced for inconsistency between a fixed configuration of faults and the slip rates on each fault. This measure, named geometric incompatibility (G), depicts summarily the instability near the fault junctions: their divergence or convergence ("unlocking" or "locking up") and accumulation of stress and deformations. Accordingly, the changes in G are connected with dynamics of seismicity. Apart from geometric incompatibility, we consider deviation K from well-known Saint Venant condition of kinematic compatibility. This deviation depicts summarily unaccounted stress and strain accumulation in the region and/or internal inconsistencies in a reconstruction of block- and fault system (its geometry and movements). The estimates of G and K provide a useful tool for bringing together the data on different types of movement in a fault system. An analog of Stokes formula is found that allows determination of the total values of G and K in a region from the data on its boundary. The phenomenon of geometric incompatibility implies that nucleation of strong earthquakes is to large extent controlled by processes near fault junctions. The junctions that have been locked up may act as transient asperities, and unlocked junctions may act as transient weakest links. Tentative estimates of K and G are made for each end of the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault system in Southern California. Recent strong earthquakes Landers (1992, M = 7.3) and Northridge (1994, M = 6.7) both reduced K but had opposite impact on G: Landers unlocked the area, whereas Northridge locked it up again. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11607673

  9. A survey of fault diagnosis technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Joel

    1989-01-01

    Existing techniques and methodologies for fault diagnosis are surveyed. The techniques run the gamut from theoretical artificial intelligence work to conventional software engineering applications. They are shown to define a spectrum of implementation alternatives where tradeoffs determine their position on the spectrum. Various tradeoffs include execution time limitations and memory requirements of the algorithms as well as their effectiveness in addressing the fault diagnosis problem.

  10. Interrelationship of nondestructive testing to fault determination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J.; Rosenthal, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    Several nondestructive test techniques have been developed for electroexplosive devices. The bridgewire will respond, when pulsed with a safe level current, by generating a characteristic heating curve. The response is indicative of the electrothermal behavior of the bridgewire-explosive interface. Bridgewires which deviate from the characteristic heating curve have been dissected and examined to determine the cause for the abnormality. Deliberate faults have been fabricated into squibs. The relationship of the specific abnormality and the fault associated with it is discussed.

  11. Fault strength in Marmara region inferred from the geometry of the principle stress axes and fault orientations: A case study for the Prince's Islands fault segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, Ali; Coskun, Zeynep; Mert, Aydin; Kalafat, Dogan

    2015-04-01

    The general consensus based on historical earthquake data point out that the last major moment release on the Prince's islands fault was in 1766 which in turn signals an increased seismic risk for Istanbul Metropolitan area considering the fact that most of the 20 mm/yr GPS derived slip rate for the region is accommodated mostly by that fault segment. The orientation of the Prince's islands fault segment overlaps with the NW-SE direction of the maximum principle stress axis derived from the focal mechanism solutions of the large and moderate sized earthquakes occurred in the Marmara region. As such, the NW-SE trending fault segment translates the motion between the two E-W trending branches of the North Anatolian fault zone; one extending from the Gulf of Izmit towards Ç?narc?k basin and the other extending between offshore Bak?rköy and Silivri. The basic relation between the orientation of the maximum and minimum principal stress axes, the shear and normal stresses, and the orientation of a fault provides clue on the strength of a fault, i.e., its frictional coefficient. Here, the angle between the fault normal and maximum compressive stress axis is a key parameter where fault normal and fault parallel maximum compressive stress might be a necessary and sufficient condition for a creeping event. That relation also implies that when the trend of the sigma-1 axis is close to the strike of the fault the shear stress acting on the fault plane approaches zero. On the other hand, the ratio between the shear and normal stresses acting on a fault plane is proportional to the coefficient of frictional coefficient of the fault. Accordingly, the geometry between the Prince's islands fault segment and a maximum principal stress axis matches a weak fault model. In the frame of the presentation we analyze seismological data acquired in Marmara region and interpret the results in conjuction with the above mentioned weak fault model.

  12. An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weldon, Ray J., II; Fletcher, D.K.; Weldon, E.M.; Scharer, K.M.; McCrory, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is the online version of a CD-ROM publication. We have updated the eastern portion of our previous active fault map of Oregon (Pezzopane, Nakata, and Weldon, 1992) as a contribution to the larger USGS effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The 1992 fault map has seen wide distribution and has been reproduced in essentially all subsequent compilations of active faults of Oregon. The new map provides a substantial update of known active or suspected active faults east of the Cascades. Improvements in the new map include (1) many newly recognized active faults, (2) a linked ArcInfo map and reference database, (3) more precise locations for previously recognized faults on shaded relief quadrangles generated from USGS 30-m digital elevations models (DEM), (4) more uniform coverage resulting in more consistent grouping of the ages of active faults, and (5) a new category of 'possibly' active faults that share characteristics with known active faults, but have not been studied adequately to assess their activity. The distribution of active faults has not changed substantially from the original Pezzopane, Nakata and Weldon map. Most faults occur in the south-central Basin and Range tectonic province that is located in the backarc portion of the Cascadia subduction margin. These faults occur in zones consisting of numerous short faults with similar rates, ages, and styles of movement. Many active faults strongly correlate with the most active volcanic centers of Oregon, including Newberry Craters and Crater Lake.

  13. Protecting Against Faults in JPL Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A paper discusses techniques for protecting against faults in spacecraft designed and operated by NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The paper addresses, more specifically, fault-protection requirements and techniques common to most JPL spacecraft (in contradistinction to unique, mission specific techniques), standard practices in the implementation of these techniques, and fault-protection software architectures. Common requirements include those to protect onboard command, data-processing, and control computers; protect against loss of Earth/spacecraft radio communication; maintain safe temperatures; and recover from power overloads. The paper describes fault-protection techniques as part of a fault-management strategy that also includes functional redundancy, redundant hardware, and autonomous monitoring of (1) the operational and health statuses of spacecraft components, (2) temperatures inside and outside the spacecraft, and (3) allocation of power. The strategy also provides for preprogrammed automated responses to anomalous conditions. In addition, the software running in almost every JPL spacecraft incorporates a general-purpose "Safe Mode" response algorithm that configures the spacecraft in a lower-power state that is safe and predictable, thereby facilitating diagnosis of more complex faults by a team of human experts on Earth.

  14. Software fault tolerance in computer operating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Lee, Inhwan

    1994-01-01

    This chapter provides data and analysis of the dependability and fault tolerance for three operating systems: the Tandem/GUARDIAN fault-tolerant system, the VAX/VMS distributed system, and the IBM/MVS system. Based on measurements from these systems, basic software error characteristics are investigated. Fault tolerance in operating systems resulting from the use of process pairs and recovery routines is evaluated. Two levels of models are developed to analyze error and recovery processes inside an operating system and interactions among multiple instances of an operating system running in a distributed environment. The measurements show that the use of process pairs in Tandem systems, which was originally intended for tolerating hardware faults, allows the system to tolerate about 70% of defects in system software that result in processor failures. The loose coupling between processors which results in the backup execution (the processor state and the sequence of events occurring) being different from the original execution is a major reason for the measured software fault tolerance. The IBM/MVS system fault tolerance almost doubles when recovery routines are provided, in comparison to the case in which no recovery routines are available. However, even when recovery routines are provided, there is almost a 50% chance of system failure when critical system jobs are involved.

  15. The organization of seismicity on fault networks.

    PubMed Central

    Knopoff, L

    1996-01-01

    Although models of homogeneous faults develop seismicity that has a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, this is only a transient state that is followed by events that are strongly influenced by the nature of the boundaries. Models with geometrical inhomogeneities of fracture thresholds can limit the sizes of earthquakes but now favor the characteristic earthquake model for large earthquakes. The character of the seismicity is extremely sensitive to distributions of inhomogeneities, suggesting that statistical rules for large earthquakes in one region may not be applicable to large earthquakes in another region. Model simulations on simple networks of faults with inhomogeneities of threshold develop episodes of lacunarity on all members of the network. There is no validity to the popular assumption that the average rate of slip on individual faults is a constant. Intermediate term precursory activity such as local quiescence and increases in intermediate-magnitude activity at long range are simulated well by the assumption that strong weakening of faults by injection of fluids and weakening of asperities on inhomogeneous models of fault networks is the dominant process; the heat flow paradox, the orientation of the stress field, and the low average stress drop in some earthquakes are understood in terms of the asperity model of inhomogeneous faulting. PMID:11607672

  16. The Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Fereira, H.; Pinheiro, A.; Falcao Flor, A. P.; Nemser, E.; Villanova, S. P.; Fonseca, J. D.

    2010-05-01

    The LTV fault and its associated historical seismic activity have been the focus of several scientific studies in Portugal. There are at least three historical earthquakes associated with the LTV fault, in 1344, 1531, and 1909. Magnitude estimates for these earthquakes range from 6.5 to 7.0. They caused widespread damage throughout the Lower Tagus Valley region with intensities ranging from VIII to X from Lisbon to Entroncamento. During the great 1755 earthquake, the LTV fault was likewise proposed to have ruptured coseismically. The Azambuja fault or the Vila Franca de Xira fault are suggested origins of the 1909 earthquake. Trenching activities together with borehole data analyses, geophysical investigations, and seismic hazard assessments were undertaken in the LTV in the recent years. Complex trench features along the excavated sections were argued to be either fault- or erosion-related phenomena. Borehole data and seismic profiles indicate subsurface structures within the Lower Tagus Valley and adjacent areas. Furthermore, recent attempts to improve seismic hazard assessment indicate that the highest values in Portugal for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years correspond with the greater Lisbon area, with the LTV fault as the most probable source. Considering the above, efforts are being made to acquire more information about the location of the LTV seismic source taking into account the presence of extensive erosion and/or deposition processes within the valley, densely populated urban areas, heavily forested regions, and flooded sections such as the Tagus estuary. Results from recent mapping along the LTV reveal surface faulting that left-laterally displaced numerous geomorphic landforms within the Lower Tagus River valley. The mapped trace shows clear evidence of left-lateral displacement and deformation within the valley transecting the river, its tributaries, and innumerable young terraces. The trace has been mapped by analyzing topographic maps, aerial photographs, and river systems together with other remotely-sensed data. Active fault-related features that were identified include fault scarps, pressure ridges, pull-apart basin, saddles, and linear valleys. Limited ocular investigation has also been undertaken to verify modifications that post-date the aerial photos, quantify both elevation differences across the fault, and possibly evaluate the cumulative lateral displacements. Thus, the newly-identified traces of an active fault in the LTV corresponds with a left-lateral fault along the Lower Tagus floodplains striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNE-SSW) in the region. This trace clearly indicates continued tectonic movement along the LTV fault during the Holocene. Taking into account the newly-mapped location and length of the active trace, trenching work is being planned to determine recurrence intervals along the LTV fault while further mapping of its possible extension and other related active structures are underway. Moreover, new estimates of slip rate along this structure will result from this study and can be used for an improved seismic hazard assessment for the region.

  17. Fault structure and mechanics of the Hayward Fault, California, from double-difference earthquake locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, Felix; Ellsworth, William L.

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between small-magnitude seismicity and large-scale crustal faulting along the Hayward Fault, California, is investigated using a double-difference (DD) earthquake location algorithm. We used the DD method to determine high-resolution hypocenter locations of the seismicity that occurred between 1967 and 1998. The DD technique incorporates catalog travel time data and relative P and S wave arrival time measurements from waveform cross correlation to solve for the hypocentral separation between events. The relocated seismicity reveals a narrow, near-vertical fault zone at most locations. This zone follows the Hayward Fault along its northern half and then diverges from it to the east near San Leandro, forming the Mission trend. The relocated seismicity is consistent with the idea that slip from the Calaveras Fault is transferred over the Mission trend onto the northern Hayward Fault. The Mission trend is not clearly associated with any mapped active fault as it continues to the south and joins the Calaveras Fault at Calaveras Reservoir. In some locations, discrete structures adjacent to the main trace are seen, features that were previously hidden in the uncertainty of the network locations. The fine structure of the seismicity suggests that the fault surface on the northern Hayward Fault is curved or that the events occur on several substructures. Near San Leandro, where the more westerly striking trend of the Mission seismicity intersects with the surface trace of the (aseismic) southern Hayward Fault, the seismicity remains diffuse after relocation, with strong variation in focal mechanisms between adjacent events indicating a highly fractured zone of deformation. The seismicity is highly organized in space, especially on the northern Hayward Fault, where it forms horizontal, slip-parallel streaks of hypocenters of only a few tens of meters width, bounded by areas almost absent of seismic activity. During the interval from 1984 to 1998, when digital waveforms are available, we find that fewer than 6.5% of the earthquakes can be classified as repeating earthquakes, events that rupture the same fault patch more than one time. These most commonly are located in the shallow creeping part of the fault, or within the streaks at greater depth. The slow repeat rate of 2-3 times within the 15-year observation period for events with magnitudes around M = 1.5 is indicative of a low slip rate or a high stress drop. The absence of microearthquakes over large, contiguous areas of the northern Hayward Fault plane in the depth interval from ~5 to 10 km and the concentrations of seismicity at these depths suggest that the aseismic regions are either locked or retarded and are storing strain energy for release in future large-magnitude earthquakes.

  18. Fault structure and mechanics of the Hayward Fault, California from double-difference earthquake locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldhauser, F.; Ellsworth, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between small-magnitude seismicity and large-scale crustal faulting along the Hayward Fault, California, is investigated using a double-difference (DD) earthquake location algorithm. We used the DD method to determine high-resolution hypocenter locations of the seismicity that occurred between 1967 and 1998. The DD technique incorporates catalog travel time data and relative P and S wave arrival time measurements from waveform cross correlation to solve for the hypocentral separation between events. The relocated seismicity reveals a narrow, near-vertical fault zone at most locations. This zone follows the Hayward Fault along its northern half and then diverges from it to the east near San Leandro, forming the Mission trend. The relocated seismicity is consistent with the idea that slip from the Calaveras Fault is transferred over the Mission trend onto the northern Hayward Fault. The Mission trend is not clearly associated with any mapped active fault as it continues to the south and joins the Calaveras Fault at Calaveras Reservoir. In some locations, discrete structures adjacent to the main trace are seen, features that were previously hidden in the uncertainty of the network locations. The fine structure of the seismicity suggest that the fault surface on the northern Hayward Fault is curved or that the events occur on several substructures. Near San Leandro, where the more westerly striking trend of the Mission seismicity intersects with the surface trace of the (aseismic) southern Hayward Fault, the seismicity remains diffuse after relocation, with strong variation in focal mechanisms between adjacent events indicating a highly fractured zone of deformation. The seismicity is highly organized in space, especially on the northern Hayward Fault, where it forms horizontal, slip-parallel streaks of hypocenters of only a few tens of meters width, bounded by areas almost absent of seismic activity. During the interval from 1984 to 1998, when digital waveforms are available, we find that fewer than 6.5% of the earthquakes can be classified as repeating earthquakes, events that rupture the same fault patch more than one time. These most commonly are located in the shallow creeping part of the fault, or within the streaks at greater depth. The slow repeat rate of 2-3 times within the 15-year observation period for events with magnitudes around M = 1.5 is indicative of a low slip rate or a high stress drop. The absence of microearthquakes over large, contiguous areas of the northern Hayward Fault plane in the depth interval from ???5 to 10 km and the concentrations of seismicity at these depths suggest that the aseismic regions are either locked or retarded and are storing strain energy for release in future large-magnitude earthquakes.

  19. Aftershocks illuninate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  20. Model-based fault detection and isolation for intermittently active faults with application to motion-based thruster fault detection and isolation for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is a method for detecting and isolating fault modes in a system having a model describing its behavior and regularly sampled measurements. The models are used to calculate past and present deviations from measurements that would result with no faults present, as well as with one or more potential fault modes present. Algorithms that calculate and store these deviations, along with memory of when said faults, if present, would have an effect on the said actual measurements, are used to detect when a fault is present. Related algorithms are used to exonerate false fault modes and finally to isolate the true fault mode. This invention is presented with application to detection and isolation of thruster faults for a thruster-controlled spacecraft. As a supporting aspect of the invention, a novel, effective, and efficient filtering method for estimating the derivative of a noisy signal is presented.

  1. Quantifying Vertical Exhumation in Intracontinental Strike-Slip Faults: the Garlock fault zone, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, L.; Blythe, A. E.; Fendick, A.

    2012-12-01

    New apatite fission-track ages show varying rates of vertical exhumation at the eastern terminus of the Garlock fault zone. The Garlock fault zone is a 260 km long east-northeast striking strike-slip fault with as much as 64 km of sinistral offset. The Garlock fault zone terminates in the east in the Avawatz Mountains, at the intersection with the dextral Southern Death Valley fault zone. Although motion along the Garlock fault west of the Avawatz Mountains is considered purely strike-slip, uplift and exhumation of bedrock in the Avawatz Mountains south of the Garlock fault, as recently as 5 Ma, indicates that transpression plays an important role at this location and is perhaps related to a restricting bend as the fault wraps around and terminates southeastward along the Avawatz Mountains. In this study we complement extant thermochronometric ages from within the Avawatz core with new low temperature fission-track ages from samples collected within the adjacent Garlock and Southern Death Valley fault zones. These thermochronometric data indicate that vertical exhumation rates vary within the fault zone. Two Miocene ages (10.2 (+5.0/-3.4) Ma, 9.0 (+2.2/-1.8) Ma) indicate at least ~3.3 km of vertical exhumation at ~0.35 mm/yr, assuming a 30°C/km geothermal gradient, along a 2 km transect parallel and adjacent to the Mule Spring fault. An older Eocene age (42.9 (+8.7/-7.3) Ma) indicates ~3.3 km of vertical exhumation at ~0.08 mm/yr. These results are consistent with published exhumation rates of 0.35 mm/yr between ~7 and ~4 Ma and 0.13 mm/yr between ~15 and ~9 Ma, as determined by apatite fission-track and U-Th/He thermochronometry in the hanging-wall of the Mule Spring fault. Similar exhumation rates on both sides of the Mule Spring fault support three separate models: 1) Thrusting is no longer active along the Mule Spring fault, 2) Faulting is dominantly strike-slip at the sample locations, or 3) Miocene-present uplift and exhumation is below detection levels using apatite fission-track thermochronometry. In model #1 slip on the Mule Spring fault may have propagated towards the range front, and may be responsible for the fault-propagation-folding currently observed along the northern branch of the Southern Death Valley fault zone. Model #2 may serve to determine where faulting has historically included a component of thrust faulting to the east of sample locations. Model #3 would further determine total offset along the Mule Spring fault from Miocene-present. Anticipated fission-track and U-Th/He data will help distinguish between these alternative models.

  2. Weak Faults, Yet Strong Middle Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Behr, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    A global compilation of stress magnitude from mylonites developed along major fault zones suggests that maximum differential stresses between 140 and 200 MPa are reached at temperatures between 300 and 350°C on normal, thrust, and strike-slip faults. These differential stresses are consistent with brittle rock strengths estimated based on Coulomb fracture (e.g., Byerlee's law), and with in-situ measurements of crustal stress measured in boreholes. This confirms previous suggestions that many parts of the continental crust are stressed close to failure down to the brittle-ductile transition. Many major active faults in all tectonic regimes are considered to be relatively weak, however, based on various lines of evidence, including their unfavorable orientation with respect to regional stresses, the absence of heat flow anomalies, the mechanical properties of fault gouge, and evidence for high fluid pressures along subduction zone megathrusts. Peak differential stresses estimated by a variety of techniques lie mostly in the range 1 - 20 MPa. The sharp contrast between differential stresses estimated on the seismogenic parts of major faults and those estimated from ductile rocks immediately below the brittle-ductile transition has the following implications: 1. The lower limit of seismicity in major fault zones is not controlled by the intersection of brittle fracture laws such as Byerlee's law with ductile creep laws. Rather, it represents an abrupt downward termination, probably controlled by temperature, of the weakening processes that govern fault behavior in the upper crust. 2. The seismogenic parts of major fault zones contribute little to lithospheric strength, and are unlikely to have much influence on either the slip rate or the location of the faults. Conversely, the high strength segments of ductile shear zones immediately below the brittle-ductile transition constitute a major load-bearing element within the lithosphere. Displacement rates are governed by the width and rheology of these high-stress ductile shear zones, and the processes by which they form are likely to influence fault initiation and hence location.

  3. Fault tree analysis for maintenance needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halme, Jari; Aikala, Antti

    2012-05-01

    One of the key issues in maintenance is to allocate focus and resources to those components and subsystems which are the most unreliable and prone to failures. In industrial systems, fault tree analysis technique can be used to study the reliability of the complex systems and their substructures. In this paper a fault tree application for analyzing online the current reliability and failure probability for maintenance purposes is presented. The analysis is utilizing data connected to the fault tree root causes and events. An indication of an anomaly case, service action, cumulative loading, etc., or just time passed or service hour counter level can trigger a new calculation of current probabilities of the fault tree events and subsystem interactions. In proposed approach real time, dynamic information from several available data sources and different measurement are interconnected to each fault tree event and root cause. There is also formulated an active, constantly updated link between the fault tree events and maintenance databases for the maintenance decision support, and to keep the analysis up to date. Typically top event probability is evaluated based on updated root cause probabilities and lower level events. At the industrial plant level an identification of a failure in a component event defined within a constructed and operatively existing fault tree explicitly means that the event's failure probability is one. By utilizing this indication, the most probable failure branches through the fault tree sub events to root causes can be identified and printed as a valid check list for maintenance purposes to focus service actions first to those fault tree branches most probable causing the failure. Respectively, during the checks, service actions, etc., components, especially those within the critical branches, detected as healthy can be a updated as having zero failure probability. This information can be used to further update the fault tree and produce online a new service order list. The added value of the proposed method with respect to developed software platform functions lies in its applicability to rationalize maintenance actions and in a case of a failure allocate resources where they are assumable mostly needed.

  4. Owens Valley fault kinematics: Right-lateral slip transfer via north-northeast trending normal faults at the northern end of the Owens Valley fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N. H.

    2003-12-01

    The occurrence of several northeast trending normal faults along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada escarpment are evidence of right-lateral slip transfer across northern Owens Valley from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault zone. Interaction between the Sierran frontal normal fault and these two fault zones has created a transtensional tectonic environment, which allows for right-lateral slip transfer via a population of northwest dipping normal faults within the Late Quaternary-Holocene alluvial valley fill of northern Owens Valley. A component of normal movement within the valley floor has been documented along fifteen faults. This includes the Tungsten Hills fault, two faults near Klondike Lake, and twelve or so, some possibly linked, small NNE trending scarps southeast of the town of Bishop. One fault segment, located just past the tip of the 1872 earthquake rupture, reveals a minimum of 3.2 meters of normal throw along much of its length. This fault shows evidence for at least three large ruptures, each exhibiting at least one meter of vertical slip. In addition, a large population of normal faults with similar orientations is mapped within the immediate vicinity of this scarp segment. These faults accommodate a substantial amount of normal movement allowing for eastward right lateral slip transfer. With the exception of the Tungsten Hills fault, they are primarily concentrated along a segment of the Sierran Escarpment known as the Coyote Warp. The pre-existing normal fault geometry along this segment acts to block the northward propagation of right-lateral movement, which is consequently forced across the valley floor to the White Mountain fault zone.

  5. Fault-Zone Maturity Defines Maximum Earthquake Magnitude: The case of the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco; Bulut, Fatih; Stierle, Eva; Martinez-Garzon, Patricia; Benzion, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the maximum likely magnitude of future earthquakes on transform faults near large metropolitan areas has fundamental consequences for the expected hazard. Here we show that the maximum earthquakes on different sections of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) scale with the duration of fault zone activity, cumulative offset and length of individual fault segments. The findings are based on a compiled catalogue of historical earthquakes in the region, using the extensive literary sources that exist due to the long civilization record. We find that the largest earthquakes (M~8) are exclusively observed along the well-developed part of the fault zone in the east. In contrast, the western part is still in a juvenile or transitional stage with historical earthquakes not exceeding M=7.4. This limits the current seismic hazard to NW Turkey and its largest regional population and economical center Istanbul. Our findings for the NAFZ are consistent with data from the two other major transform faults, the San Andreas fault in California and the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East. The results indicate that maximum earthquake magnitudes generally scale with fault-zone evolution.

  6. Dynamic shear rupture interactions with fault bends and off-axis secondary faulting

    E-print Network

    Dmowska, Renata

    ? What secondary fault locations and orientations, in a damaged region bordering a major fault in the damage zone likewise increases markedly as the limiting speed is approached. Such may make the fracture, or on the compressional side too. Natural examples are consistent with the concepts developed. INDEX TERMS: 7209

  7. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  8. A note on the effect of fault gouge thickness on fault stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.; Summers, R.

    1976-01-01

    At low confining pressure, sliding on saw cuts in granite is stable but at high pressure it is unstable. The pressure at which the transition takes place increases if the thickness of the crushed material between the sliding surfaces is increased. This experimental result suggests that on natural faults the stability of sliding may be affected by the width of the fault zone. ?? 1976.

  9. Realization of User Level Fault Tolerant Policy Management through a Holistic Approach for Fault Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byung H; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Agarwal, Pratul K; Bernholdt, David E; Geist, Al; Tippens, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications, which are designed to utilize high performance parallel com- puters, occupy hundreds of thousands of computational cores running for days or even weeks. Since many scien- tists compete for resources, most supercomputing centers practice strict scheduling policies and perform meticulous accounting on their usage. Thus computing resources and time assigned to a user is considered invaluable. However, most applications are not well prepared for un- foreseeable faults, still relying on primitive fault tolerance techniques. Considering that ever-plunging mean time to interrupt (MTTI) is making scientific applications more vulnerable to faults, it is increasingly important to provide users not only an improved fault tolerant environment, but also a framework to support their own fault tolerance policies so that their allocation times can be best utilized. This paper addresses a user level fault tolerance policy management based on a holistic approach to digest and correlate fault related information. It introduces simple semantics with which users express their policies on faults, and illustrates how event correlation techniques can be applied to manage and determine the most preferable user policies. The paper also discusses an implementation of the framework using open source software, and demonstrates, as an example, how a molecular dynamics simulation application running on the institutional cluster at Oak Ridge National Laboratory benefits from it.

  10. It Wasn't My Fault: Understanding OS Fault Propagation Via Delta Execution

    E-print Network

    Cavallaro, Lorenzo

    It Wasn't My Fault: Understanding OS Fault Propagation Via Delta Execution Cristiano Giuffrida]. To successfully re- cover from an otherwise-fatal crash, it is necessary to deter- mine a safe execution point execution state to a safe state and selectively re- play execution. Unfortunately, a faulty execution

  11. Lake records of Northern Hemisphere South American summer monsoon variability from the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia: Initial results from Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, J.; Rudloff, O.; Bird, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    The lack of terrestrial paleoclimate records from the Northern Hemisphere Andes with decadal resolution has meant that our understanding of abrupt South American summer monsoon (SASM) variability during the Holocene is almost exclusively based on data from Southern Hemisphere sites. In order to develop a more integrated and complete picture of the SASM as a system and its response during rapid climate changes, high-resolution paleoclimate records are needed from the Northern Hemisphere Andes. We present initial results from analysis of lake sediment cores that were collected from Lago de Tota (N 5.554, W 72.916) and Laguna de Ubaque (N 4.500, W 73.935) in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. These sediment cores were collected in July 2013 as part on an ongoing paleoclimate research initiative in Colombia. Located in the Boyacá Provence, Lago de Tota is the largest high-altitude lake (3010 masl) in the Northern Hemisphere Andes and the second largest Andean lake in South America. As such, hydrologic changes recorded in the lake's sediment record reflect regional climate responses. Lago de Ubaque (2070 masl) is a small east facing moraine-dammed lake near the capital of Bogotá that contains finely laminated clastic sediments. The initial sedimentological and chronological results demonstrate that Lago de Tota and Laguna de Ubaque have excellent potential for resolving Northern Hemisphere SASM variability at decadal time scales or better. Such records will provide important counterparts to high-resolution paleoclimate records from the Southern Hemisphere Andes.

  12. Earthquake epicenters and fault intersections in central and southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (principal investigator); Silverstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identifed the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery provided evidence for the existence of short transverse fault segments lodged between faults of the San Andreas system in the Coast Ranges, California. They indicate that an early episode of transverse shear has affected the Coast Ranges prior to the establishment of the present San Andreas fault. The fault has been offset by transverse faults of the Transverse Ranges. It appears feasible to identify from ERTS-1 imagery geomorphic criteria of recent fault movements. Plots of historic earthquakes in the Coast Ranges and western Transverse Ranges show clusters in areas where structures are complicated by interaction of tow active fault systems. A fault lineament apparently not previously mapped was identified in the Uinta Mountains, Utah. Part of the lineament show evidence of recent faulting which corresponds to a moderate earthquake cluster.

  13. How geometrical constraints contribute to the weakness of mature faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing evidence that the San Andreas fault has low shear strength1 has fuelled considerable discussion regarding the role of fluid pressure in controlling fault strength. Byerlee2,3 and Rice4 have shown how fluid pressure gradients within a fault zone can produce a fault with low strength while avoiding hydraulic fracture of the surrounding rock due to excessive fluid pressure. It may not be widely realised, however, that the same analysis2-4 shows that even in the absence of fluids, the presence of a relatively soft 'gouge' layer surrounded by harder country rock can also reduce the effective shear strength of the fault. As shown most recently by Byerlee and Savage5, as the shear stress across a fault increases, the stress state within the fault zone evolves to a limiting condition in which the maximum shear stress within the fault zone is parallel to the fault, which then slips with a lower apparent coefficient of friction than the same material unconstrained by the fault. Here we confirm the importance of fault geometry in determining the apparent weakness of fault zones, by showing that the apparent friction on a sawcut granite surface can be predicted from the friction measured in intact rock, given only the geometrical constraints introduced by the fault surfaces. This link between the sliding friction of faults and the internal friction of intact rock suggests a new approach to understanding the microphysical processes that underlie friction in brittle materials.

  14. Thermal Fluid and Fault Interactions at the Intersection of Two Faults, Agua Caliente, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R. E.; Evans, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Agua Caliente Springs lies at a unique intersection between the NNW-trending Elsinore fault and the 40° northeast-dipping, likely inactive West Salton detachment fault; it provides an opportunity to study damage zone geometry, fault behavior in crystalline rocks, a left-stepover zone between the Julian and Coyote segments, microseismicity, and the influence of thermal fluids on rock deformation. The Elsinore fault bounds the northwestern flank of the Tierra Blanca Mountains with strike-slip and normal motion; the detachment fault wraps around the northernmost portion of the mountains. Damage along the Elsinore ranges in thickness from a narrow slip plane to > 100 m along the eastern flank of the Tierra Blanca Mountains. Subsidiary faults trend northeast and southeast, and slip orientations vary from normal to strike-slip horizontal motion. Thermal fluids (~30°C) emerge at the intersection of the West Salton detachment and Elsinore faults actively alter the 94 Ma La Posta tonalite pluton, already fractured and crushed during fault slip, to a fine-grained white to orange powder through mineral re-equilibration. Grain sizes decrease with closer proximity to the faults. Fault cores contain thin dark green zones of chlorite ± epidote, and fault surfaces are coated with a thin layer of the same. Origin of the mineralization may be from reworked biotite crystals. We present water chemistry data from the hot springs at Agua Caliente in conjunction with geochemical and petrographic analysis of the surrounding rock. Water analyses include cation and anion measurements, bicarbonate, stable isotopes, tritium, and a multi-month recording of spring conductivity, water level, and temperature fluctuations. Cation geothermometry shows the fluids are enriched in Na, Ca, Mg, K, and Si from broken down quartz, plagioclase, and orthoclase. Water level and temperature data are compared to seismicity during the logging interval; temperatures so far have diurnal fluctuations indicating air temperature plays a larger role than anticipated for the subsurface fluids. Conductivity also displays daily cycles. We propose a larger scale map of the intersection of the two faults and the continuation of the Elsinore farther south showing the current extent and probable growth of the damage and alteration as more slip occurs. Spring flow increases post seismic events, and we believe by monitoring fluid chemistry and comparing seismicity along the faults we will see precursors to and effects from fault motion.

  15. Complex Paleotopography and Faulting near the Elsinore Fault, Coyote Mountains, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, M. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Coyote Mountains of southern California are bounded on the southwest by the Elsinore Fault, an active dextral fault within the San Andreas Fault zone. According to Axen and Fletcher (1998) and Dorsey and others (2011), rocks exposed in these mountains comprise a portion of the hanging wall of the east-vergent Salton Detachment Fault, which was active from the late Miocene-early Pliocene to Ca. 1.1-1.3 Ma. Detachment faulting was accompanied by subsidence, resulting in deposition of a thick sequence of marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks. Regional detachment faulting and subsidence ceased with the inception of the Elsinore Fault, which has induced uplift of the Coyote Mountains. Detailed geologic mapping in the central Coyote Mountains supports the above interpretation and adds some intriguing details. New discoveries include a buttress unconformity at the base of the Miocene/Pliocene section that locally cuts across strata at an angle so high that it could be misinterpreted as a fault. We thus conclude that the syn-extension strata were deposited on a surface with very rugged topography. We also discovered that locally-derived nonmarine gravel deposits exposed near the crest of the range, previously interpreted as part of the Miocene Split Mountain Group by Winker and Kidwell (1996), unconformably overlie units of the marine Miocene/Pliocene Imperial Group and must therefore be Pliocene or younger. The presence of such young gravel deposits on the crest of the range provides evidence for its rapid uplift. Additional new discoveries flesh out details of the structural history of the range. We mapped just two normal faults, both of which were relatively minor, thus supporting Axen and Fletcher's assertion that the hanging wall block of the Salton Detachment Fault had not undergone significant internal deformation during extension. We found abundant complex synthetic and antithetic strike-slip faults throughout the area, some of which offset Quaternary alluvial deposits. We interpret these faults as Riedel shears of the Elsinore Fault that distribute dextral strain over an area at least 2 km wide. Finally, our mapping of the Elsinore Fault itself reveals two releasing bends that are superimposed on the overall transpressive regime in the area. Axen, G.J. and Fletcher, J.M., 1998, Hall Volume, GSA, p. 365-392. Dorsey, R.J., Housen, B.A., Janecke, S.U., Fanning, C. M., Spears, A.L.F., 2011, GSA Bulletin, v. 123, p. 771-793. Winker, C.D. and Kidwell, S.M., 1996, Field Conference Guide, Pacific Section AAPG/SEPM, Book 80, p. 295-336.

  16. Microroughness Variation with Inferred Changes in Fault-Normal Stress Along a Pseudotachylyte-Bearing Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, P. G.; Shervais, K.; Di Toro, G.; Griffith, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental simulations of earthquake-like conditions reveal a significant decrease in effective steady-state friction during dynamic slip. Unlike static friction, the effective dynamic friction coefficient has a clear dependence on the applied normal stress, typical of lubrication. In the case of melt generation it has been hypothesized that the steady state represents a balance between melt generation, melt extrusion, and fault surface microtopography. We have undertaken an investigation of a pseudotachylyte-bearing fault zone to determine if similar relationships between fault-normal stress and fault zone geometry result from natural earthquake slip. The study area is a single fault strand with ~60 cm of slip within the Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italy. At the outcrop scale, this strand is distinctly wavy with contractional and extensional bends as well as relatively straight (neutral) sections. In order to quantify the pseudotachylyte geometry and microroughness of fault surfaces we collected cm-scale cores from locations along the fault that we infer to have experienced different fault-normal stress during slip. The internal geometry of the cores was imaged with ~0.03 mm resolution using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). The pseudotachylyte-bearing fault zone was then segmented from the CT volume by combining manual interpretation with gradient-based edge detection. Finally, the microroughness of the fault zone surfaces (contact between pseudotachylyte and wall rock) was quantified using Fourier spectral analysis. Both the geometry and microroughness of the fault zone vary with inferred fault-normal stress. Regions of low stress have thicker pseudotachylyte (up to 5.080 mm) and are rougher at short wavelengths (0.01 mm). Regions of high stress are thinner (as low as 0.256 mm) and are smoother at short wavelengths. At wavelengths near the grain-scale (1 mm) spectral power is poorly correlated with stress, indicating that the scaling of roughness (beta value) also varies with fault normal stress. We interpret these patterns of roughness as evidence of competing processes of roughening and smoothing associated with melting during earthquake slip.

  17. Fault-controlled geomorphology and paleoseismology of Fethiye fault and gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzipetros, Alexandros; Pavlides, Spyros; Ya?murlu, Fuzuli; Özgür, Nevzat; Kamaci, Züheyr; ?entürk, Murat

    2010-05-01

    Fethiye gulf is located at the south-westernmost part of the large left-lateral Fethiye-Burdur fault zone. It is modified and controlled by sets of NE - SW trending normal and oblique left-lateral faults. The gulf forms coastlines that are often aligned nearly perpendicular to one another. Coastlines are mainly NE - SW trending and they are inundated by small bays, mainly in NNW-SSE direction. Those directions are comparable to the main mainland fault lines, as measured on outcrops in the area. The brittle features of the area overprint the pre-existing tectonic fabric of low-angle thrusts and pure strike-slip faults. Recent activity of the faults seems to be possible, since there is indication for hangingwall submergence at the "Cleopatra's bath" site, where an early-Byzantine building complex has been submerged by at least 2 m. The mainland active fault zone is located S-SE of Fethiye town and it forms an N-NW dipping fault scarp that is characterized by multiple en échelon segments. The quantitative tectonic geomorphology of this fault has been studied by using morphotectonic indices (scarp sinuosity, valley width/depth ratio, etc.), which show that the fault has a rather low level of activity. Nevertheless, the fault zone near Fethiye presents other morphotectonic features, such as riverbed catchment, slight left-lateral bend of streams at the foot of the scarp, etc. The fault zone seems to fan out towards the west and the deformation is less evident. Although the fault segments near Fethiye are classified as low-activity ones, they are associated with the large 1957 earthquake (Ms 7.1). This earthquake produced extensive damage and casualties. It was physically manifested by surface ruptures, rockfalls, etc. A palaeoseismological survey has been carried out in the area. Trenches in two different segments show that the 1957 surface rupture is traceable along the fault, while at least two previous events seem to have affected the area and produced surface faulting. Dating and correlation results show that these two earthquakes happened at AD 619-642 (well constrained) and at BC 700-200 (not well constrained).

  18. Immunity-Based Aircraft Fault Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the study reported in this paper, we have developed and applied an Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for aircraft fault detection, as an extension to a previous work on intelligent flight control (IFC). Though the prior studies had established the benefits of IFC, one area of weakness that needed to be strengthened was the control dead band induced by commanding a failed surface. Since the IFC approach uses fault accommodation with no detection, the dead band, although it reduces over time due to learning, is present and causes degradation in handling qualities. If the failure can be identified, this dead band can be further A ed to ensure rapid fault accommodation and better handling qualities. The paper describes the application of an immunity-based approach that can detect a broad spectrum of known and unforeseen failures. The approach incorporates the knowledge of the normal operational behavior of the aircraft from sensory data, and probabilistically generates a set of pattern detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults) in the behavior pattern indicating unsafe in-flight operation. We developed a tool called MILD (Multi-level Immune Learning Detection) based on a real-valued negative selection algorithm that can generate a small number of specialized detectors (as signatures of known failure conditions) and a larger set of generalized detectors for unknown (or possible) fault conditions. Once the fault is detected and identified, an adaptive control system would use this detection information to stabilize the aircraft by utilizing available resources (control surfaces). We experimented with data sets collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions using a piloted motion-base simulation facility. The reported results are from a collection of test cases that reflect the performance of the proposed immunity-based fault detection algorithm.

  19. Fault detection, isolation and reconfiguration in FTMP Methods and experimental results. [fault tolerant multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) is a highly reliable computer designed to meet a goal of 10 to the -10th failures per hour and built with the objective of flying an active-control transport aircraft. Fault detection, identification, and recovery software is described, and experimental results obtained by injecting faults in the pin level in the FTMP are presented. Over 21,000 faults were injected in the CPU, memory, bus interface circuits, and error detection, masking, and error reporting circuits of one LRU of the multiprocessor. Detection, isolation, and reconfiguration times were recorded for each fault, and the results were found to agree well with earlier assumptions made in reliability modeling.

  20. Electromagnetic images of a strike-slip fault: The Tintina fault-Northern Canadian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Ferguson, Ian J.

    2002-04-01

    Wideband magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired along three profiles crossing the strike-slip Tintina Fault in northwestern Canada. The MT responses obtained exhibit remarkable similarity from all three profiles, implying similar two-dimensional (2-D) electromagnetic behavior of the fault zone over a strike length of at least 350 km. Analyses of the MT responses for dimensionality corroborate the validity of assuming regional 2-D structures in interpretation. Several high conductivity anomalies at different depth scales are present in the models obtained, and we suggest that both the shallow structures and the deep crustal scale anomalies are caused by electronic conduction mechanisms in interconnected mineralized zones. Intriguingly, the middle and lower crust beneath the surface expression of the Tintina Fault is highly resistive, in contrast to some other large-scale strike-slip faults. This implies that fault zone processes that result in interconnected conducting phases are not generic in nature but are controlled by local conditions.

  1. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

  2. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  3. Robust Fault Detection and Isolation for Stochastic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jemin; Gregory, Irene M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the formulation of a robust fault detection and isolation scheme that can precisely detect and isolate simultaneous actuator and sensor faults for uncertain linear stochastic systems. The given robust fault detection scheme based on the discontinuous robust observer approach would be able to distinguish between model uncertainties and actuator failures and therefore eliminate the problem of false alarms. Since the proposed approach involves precise reconstruction of sensor faults, it can also be used for sensor fault identification and the reconstruction of true outputs from faulty sensor outputs. Simulation results presented here validate the effectiveness of the robust fault detection and isolation system.

  4. Simultaneous Sensor and Process Fault Diagnostics for Propellant Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, J.; Kwan, C.; Figueroa, F.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to extract fault features from sensor faults and process faults by using advanced fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms. A tank system that has some common characteristics to a NASA testbed at Stennis Space Center was used to verify our proposed algorithms. First, a generic tank system was modeled. Second, a mathematical model suitable for FDI has been derived for the tank system. Third, a new and general FDI procedure has been designed to distinguish process faults and sensor faults. Extensive simulations clearly demonstrated the advantages of the new design.

  5. Faults and Earthquakes (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    I have been studying fault rocks and fault mechanics for 40 years, trying to understand mechanisms of earthquakes. A basic strategy has been to study fault rocks for understanding deformation and transport processes in fault zones at depths, to reproduce the same processes in laboratory experiments and determine mechanical and transport properties of faults, and to conduct earthquake modeling based on measured properties and compare with natural earthquakes. I will try to give an overview of the progress of fault studies in the last 25 years, emphasizing the importance of such integrated studies. The following four topics will be covered from my own perspectives of fault and earthquake studies. High-velocity frictional properties of faults in relation to earthquake rupture dynamics will be the main focus, but the lecture will cover lithosphere rheology, initiation processes of earthquake-induced landslides, and a basin evolution and pore-pressure development as relevant topics. [1] Friction to flow law A simple friction to flow law merges strength profiles of lithosphere and velocity-dependency models of faults that have been used widely in the last three decades to characterize the thickness and internal structures of the lithosphere and to model earthquake cycles and earthquake rupture propagations, respectively. The law allows analyzing earthquake generations including frictional, transitional and flow properties at shallow to deep faults across a lithosphere. Analyses shows how strength profile evolve during earthquake cycles. The law can be extended to describe brittle to high-temperature flow properties across a lithosphere, and realistic analysis of earthquake generation and interseismic deformation, including postseismic deformation, will be possible. [2] High-velocity weakening of fault and a source of diverse seismic activities Extensive studies in the last two decades demonstrated that faults undergo dramatic weakening at seismic slip rates, through mechanisms such as flash heating/bulk heating of gouge, frictional melting, and thermochemical pressurization. It is likely that earthquake nucleation is controlled by rate and state frictional properties at slow slip rates, whereas high-velocity weakening can affect the growth processes of large earthquakes. Combinations of those slow and high-velocity properties can produce very diverse seismic and aseismic fault motions. I will also discuss technical problems in building friction apparatuses to extend the high-velocity friction studies to wet environments and to higher normal stresses and temperatures. [3] Catastrophic landslides triggered by earthquakes Tsaoling landslide in Taiwan is the largest and well-documented landslide among many landslides triggered by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. The landslide occurred along a very flat bedding surface, and a Newmark analysis using high-velocity frictional properties quantitatively reproduced the initiation and runaway processes of the landslide, elucidating the importance of slip weakening of landslide surface. The method has many applications to earthquake-triggered landslides. [4] Basin evolution and pore pressure development Pore-pressure distribution in the earth is poorly known at present. Analysis of basin evolution, using measured permeability and storage capacity of all formations of a basin, revealed the sedimentation and fluid flow processes in the last 30 Ma that lead to the development of abnormal pore pressure below about 4 km in depths. Modeling based on measured transport properties will be useful to solve many problems such as fluid flow in the earth, effect of water on earthquake generation, waste isolation, and CCS.

  6. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of deformation on the LA and SFS segments: an early period characterized by fault-propagation or structural wedge kinematics that terminates in the early Pleistocene, followed by a period of quiescence. The faults were subsequently reactivated in the middle Pleistocene and propagated upward to detachments, with the deformation characterized by fold-bend folding kinematics. Slip on the LA segment decreases to the West, suggesting lateral growth in that direction. Our work highlights the need to assess along-strike variability in slip rate when assessing the seismic hazard of a compressional fault, as marginal sites may significantly underestimate fault activity. Ponti, D. J. et al. A 3-Dimensional Model of Water-Bearing Sequences in the Dominguez Gap Region, Long Beach, California. US Geological Survey Open-File Report 1013 (2007).

  7. NASA Spacecraft Fault Management Workshop Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn; McDougal, John; Barley, Bryan; Fesq, Lorraine; Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fault Management is a critical aspect of deep-space missions. For the purposes of this paper, fault management is defined as the ability of a system to detect, isolate, and mitigate events that impact, or have the potential to impact, nominal mission operations. The fault management capabilities are commonly distributed across flight and ground subsystems, impacting hardware, software, and mission operations designs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that 4 out of the 5 missions studied had significant overruns due to underestimating the complexity and support requirements for fault management. As a result of this and other recent experiences, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Planetary Science Division (PSD) commissioned a workshop to bring together invited participants across government, industry, academia to assess the state of the art in fault management practice and research, identify current and potential issues, and make recommendations for addressing these issues. The workshop was held in New Orleans in April of 2008. The workshop concluded that fault management is not being limited by technology, but rather by a lack of emphasis and discipline in both the engineering and programmatic dimensions. Some of the areas cited in the findings include different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; unclear ownership of end-to-end fault management engineering; inadequate understanding of the impact of mission-level requirements on fault management complexity; and practices, processes, and tools that have not kept pace with the increasing complexity of mission requirements and spacecraft systems. This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations from that workshop, as well as opportunities identified for future investment in tools, processes, and products to facilitate the development of space flight fault management capabilities.

  8. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be associated to an alignment or different structures oblique directed to the principal fault trace which sometimes shows inverted moves suggest that the MAFS is a system with ''en echelon'' geometry which respond to transtensive tectonic activity. Recent research based in cinematic indicators from some of the most important faults of the MAFS concludes with evidence of the existence of a transtensive deformation in the center section of the TMVB, which can be explained through the oblique convergence model of plates Northamerica, Rivera and Cocos added to the division of the subduction angle at the North of the Mesoamerican trench.

  9. Reconnaissance study of late quaternary faulting along cerro GoDen fault zone, western Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.S.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Grindlay, N.R.; Abrams, L.J.; Lao-Davila, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cerro GoDen fault zone is associated with a curvilinear, continuous, and prominent topographic lineament in western Puerto Rico. The fault varies in strike from northwest to west. In its westernmost section, the fault is ???500 m south of an abrupt, curvilinear mountain front separating the 270- to 361-m-high La CaDena De San Francisco range from the Rio A??asco alluvial valley. The Quaternary fault of the A??asco Valley is in alignment with the bedrock fault mapped by D. McIntyre (1971) in the Central La Plata quadrangle sheet east of A??asco Valley. Previous workers have postulated that the Cerro GoDen fault zone continues southeast from the A??asco Valley and merges with the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone of south-central Puerto Rico. West of the A??asco Valley, the fault continues offshore into the Mona Passage (Caribbean Sea) where it is characterized by offsets of seafloor sediments estimated to be of late Quaternary age. Using both 1:18,500 scale air photographs taken in 1936 and 1:40,000 scale photographs taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1986, we iDentified geomorphic features suggestive of Quaternary fault movement in the A??asco Valley, including aligned and Deflected drainages, apparently offset terrace risers, and mountain-facing scarps. Many of these features suggest right-lateral displacement. Mapping of Paleogene bedrock units in the uplifted La CaDena range adjacent to the Cerro GoDen fault zone reveals the main tectonic events that have culminated in late Quaternary normal-oblique displacement across the Cerro GoDen fault. Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the La CaDena range exhibit large folds with wavelengths of several kms. The orientation of folds and analysis of fault striations within the folds indicate that the folds formed by northeast-southwest shorTening in present-day geographic coordinates. The age of Deformation is well constrained as late Eocene-early Oligocene by an angular unconformity separating folDed, Deep-marine middle Eocene rocks from transgressive, shallow-marine rocks of middle-upper Oligocene age. Rocks of middle Oligocene-early Pliocene age above unconformity are gently folDed about the roughly east-west-trending Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands arch, which is well expressed in the geomorphology of western Puerto Rico. Arching appears ongoing because onshore and offshore late Quaternary oblique-slip faults closely parallel the complexly Deformed crest of the arch and appear to be related to exTensional strains focused in the crest of the arch. We estimate ???4 km of vertical throw on the Cerro GoDen fault based on the position of the carbonate cap north of the fault in the La CaDena De San Francisco and its position south of the fault inferred from seismic reflection data in Mayaguez Bay. Based on these observations, our interpretation of the kinematics and history of the Cerro GoDen fault zone incluDes two major phases of motion: (1) Eocene northeast-southwest shorTening possibly accompanied by left-lateral shearing as Determined by previous workers on the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone; and (2) post-early Pliocene regional arching of Puerto Rico accompanied by normal offset and right-lateral shear along faults flanking the crest of the arch. The second phase of Deformation accompanied east-west opening of the Mona rift and is inferred to continue to the present day. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  10. Pseudotachylyte-bearing faults and shear zones along the Norumbega fault system in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Price, N. A.; Swanson, M.; Pollock, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Norumbega fault system represents the eroded roots of a >400 km long fault system that records a Middle Paleozoic through Mesozoic history of superimposed deformational processes. The Paleozoic history is dominated by right lateral shearing that evolved from a wide zone of regional scale dextral transpression to more highly focused and in many cases seismogenic slip along relatively narrow faults and shear zones. The Mesozoic history, largely deduced through geochronological studies, likely involved localized reactivation in association with the transition between Late Paleozoic dextral transpression and Early Mesozoic extension in the northern Appalachians. Pseudotachylyte, found in a variety of structural settings, has been identified on numerous fault strands along the southern 250 km of the fault system in Maine and provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate evolving seismogenic processes, at a variety of depths, along a regional scale fault system. The oldest pseudotachylyte (Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous) formed at frictional-to-viscous transitional depths during dextral deformation and is most commonly characterized by multiple generations of foliation-parallel frictional melt veins that were subsequently deformed through viscous shearing and transformed into thin ultramylonite layers. While this variety of pseudotachylyte has only been positively identified along three ~25 km long fault segments within the central portion of the Norumbega (e.g., Sandhill Corner), we speculate it may be more widespread in the fault system owing to difficulties in recognition in the field and a lack of detailed imaging and laboratory studies of mylonite-hosted pseudotachylyte-bearing rocks in the fault system. Younger (Permian-Early Triassic) undeformed pseudotachylyte-bearing faults have been found discontinuously along much of the Norumbega and presumably these occurrences reflect countless high velocity coseismic slip events at shallower depths. Spectacularly complex pseudotachylyte arrays consisting of literally hundreds of fault veins (up to 2 cm thick) and associated injection veins and reservoir structures characterize several of the well studied fault zones (e.g., Fort Foster). The geometries of these fault zones are generally consistent with strike-slip displacements either in association with synthetic faults or in rare cases left lateral antithetic structures (e.g., Harbor Island). While host rock mineralogies and bulk rock compositions vary amongst these fault zones, the degree of pre-existing layering and the orientation of this layering with respect to the superimposed brittle faults seems to be the dominant control on the nature and complexity of these undeformed pseudotachylyte vein arrays. The Norumbega fault system in Maine preserves numerous highly complex pseudotachylyte-bearing fault zones that formed at a range of depths over a period of nearly 100 million years. Mutually overprinting pseudotachylyte-mylonite zones provide insight into processes occurring at frictional-to-viscous transitional depths beneath active fault zones while the zones of undeformed pseudotachylyte afford insight into more shallow depth brittle processes.

  11. A Millennial Length High-Resolution Pollen, Charcoal, Diatom and Stable Isotope Record from Laguna San Carlos, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Jacques, J. M.; Escobar, J.; Velez, M.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Curtis, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We report here on preliminary results from Laguna San Carlos, (8o 37' 32.44''N, 80o 03' 04.24'' W) a small, shallow (8.3 m) volcanic lake from west-central Panama, a relatively unstudied Pacific coast region that is an important location for paleo-ENSO studies. The circular lake is a closed basin lake with a gradually sloping shoreline located within a caldera. The 300 cm core was taken in 2 m of water during March 2010. The core bottom was resting upon basement granitic rock with feldspar phenocrystals. The chronology is based upon five radiocarbon dates from terrestrial plant and wood remains. Pollen and charcoal were sampled at 10 cm resolution, diatoms at 5 cm and stable isotopes at 1 cm. The pollen profile shows four distinct terrestrial vegetation units. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), from AD 880-1485, the vegetation was sparse with high amounts of grass, Asteraceae and charcoal suggestive of grasslands with high rates of natural disturbance, including fire. With the onset of the Little Ice Age (LIA), during AD 1485-1570, the vegetation transitioned into an open dry forest characterized by Myrica and Anacardium with high seasonality in precipitation. At AD 1570, the climate became wetter as shown by the pollen typical of a moist tropical forest. This lasted until AD 1720 when a period of greater human disturbance began (as shown by increased sedimentation rates), with primary forest taxa cohabiting with grasses and secondary taxa. The first maize pollen appeared at ~AD 1700. The diatom record is dominated by a single eutrophic species, Fragilaria crotonensis; however from AD 880-1150 minor taxa such as Aulacoseira spp., indicative of increased turbulence appeared, supporting the pollen record of open canopy vegetation at this time. The sedimentary carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) shows that the majority of the organic remains in the lake have always come from the surrounding basin. MTM spectral analysis of percent Fragilaria crotonensis, percent carbon, percent nitrogen, C/N, 13C and 15N shows common re-occurring peaks at 85 years, 50 years, 37 years and 30 years.

  12. Active faults in the Kashmir Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A.

    2012-04-01

    The risk of earthquake is ever increasing in mountains along with rapid growth of population and urbanization. Over half a million people died in the last decade due to earthquakes. The devastations of Sumatra and Thai coasts in 2004, of Kashmir and New Orleans in 2005, of SW Java in 2006, of Sumatra again in 2007, W Sichuan and Myanmar in 2008, of Haiti in 2010, Japan, New Zealand and Turkey in 2011, brought enormous damage. The primary step in this regard could be to establish an earthquake risk model. The Kashmir valley is a NW-SE trending oval-shaped inter-mountain basin. A number of low magnitude earthquakes have recently been reported from the border and few inside the Kashmir valley. A number of active reverse faults were identified in this valley using remote sensing images and active geomorphic features. NE dipping reverse faults uplifted the young alluvial fan at the SW side. An active tectonic environment has been created by these reverse faults; sediment filled streams at NE, and uplifted quaternary deposits at SW. These resulted in an overall tilting of the entire Kashmir valley towards NE. Dating of displaced deposits is required to estimate the total convergence along these faults. Broadly, these faults are because of the convergence of Indian plate beneath the Eurasian plate.

  13. Tectonic analysis of fault slip data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelier, Jacques

    1984-07-01

    Using data that include the direction and the sense of motion on individual fault surfaces determined by slickenside lineations, it is possible to reconstruct reduced stress tensors that correspond to the orientation of stress axes and to the ratio ? = (?2-?3)/(?1-?3) between principal stress values (?1??2??3, compression being positive). No assumption is made concerning the orientation of fault planes relative to stress axes, so that reactived faults are taken into account as well as newly created ones. Qualitative and quantitative methods for analysis of fault slip data were developed during the last 10 years. The practical limitation of the methods and the necessity for critical field observations are emphasized. These methods can be applied to focal mechanisms of earthquakes. A more complex analysis of heterogeneous data sets, involving an iterative separation of different stress systems, is also discussed. This analysis enables one to distinguish successive faulting events. Careful qualitative study in the field is in all cases essential.

  14. Experimental fault characterization of a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Chang-Huong

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a variety of faults on a neural network is quantified via simulation. The neural network consists of a single-layered clustering network and a three-layered classification network. The percentage of vectors mistagged by the clustering network, the percentage of vectors misclassified by the classification network, the time taken for the network to stabilize, and the output values are all measured. The results show that both transient and permanent faults have a significant impact on the performance of the measured network. The corresponding mistag and misclassification percentages are typically within 5 to 10 percent of each other. The average mistag percentage and the average misclassification percentage are both about 25 percent. After relearning, the percentage of misclassifications is reduced to 9 percent. In addition, transient faults are found to cause the network to be increasingly unstable as the duration of a transient is increased. The impact of link faults is relatively insignificant in comparison with node faults (1 versus 19 percent misclassified after relearning). There is a linear increase in the mistag and misclassification percentages with decreasing hardware redundancy. In addition, the mistag and misclassification percentages linearly decrease with increasing network size.

  15. Control of fault geometry and permeability contrast on fault-related hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christine; Rüpke, Lars; Hasenclever, Jörg; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Petersen, Sven

    2015-04-01

    High-temperature black smoker systems along slow-spreading ridges such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) are frequently related to tectonic fault zones and therefore are commonly found off axis. While preferential flow of hot fluids along highly permeable, fractured rocks seems intuitive, such efficient flow leads to the entrainment of cold ambient seawater resulting in a drastic decrease in vent temperatures. This temperature drop is difficult to reconcile with high-temperature black smoker activity observed at outcropping fault zones. In our recent study we aim to resolve this apparent contradiction by combining newly acquired seismological data (Grevemeyer et al., 2013) from the high-temperature, off-axis Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field (LHF1) along the MAR with 2D hydrothermal flow modeling. The seismic data shows intense off-axis seismicity with focal mechanisms suggesting a fault zone dipping from LHF1 toward the ridge axis. In order to explain fault-related high-temperature hydrothermal discharge as observed at LHF1, our simulations predict that fault zones need to be just permeable and wide enough to capture and redirect hydrothermal plumes rising from depth but, because they are not isolated conduits, must not be too wide or permeable in order to prevent cooling through mixing with ambient colder fluids. The two controlling parameters fault width and permeability contrast between fault and surrounding rock can be expressed as a single term, the relative transmissibility of the fault zone, which is defined by the product of the two. Low relative fault transmissibility leads to plumes that cross the fault and vent above the heat source rather than at the fault termination at the seafloor. High relative fault transmissibility leads to significantly lower vent exit temperatures than those observed at black smoker systems. Our findings further illustrate the intrinsic relationship between permeability, mass flux and upflow temperature: the higher the permeability, the higher the mass flux and the lower the vent temperature. The common occurrence of fault-linked high-temperature vent fields strongly points at a not-yet-quantified self-adjusting permeability that depends on pore space-clogging reactions between hydrothermal and ambient cold fluids. Furthermore, the temperature drop associated with any high permeability zone in heterogeneous crust may well explain the sparse high-temperature vent fields along the MAR and why the heterogeneous crust of the Atlantic, with its strong permeability contrasts, is predominantly cooled by lower-temperature fluid flow.

  16. Apparent stress, fault maturity and seismic hazard for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of apparent stress for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones is derived by examining the apparent stress (?? a = ??Es/Mo, where E s is radiated energy and Mo is seismic moment) of all globally distributed shallow (depth, ?? 1 MPa) are also generally intraslab, but occur where the lithosphere has just begun subduction beneath the overriding plate. They usually occur in cold slabs near trenches where the direction of plate motion across the trench is oblique to the trench axis, or where there are local contortions or geometrical complexities of the plate boundary. Lower ??a (< 1 MPa) is associated with events occurring at the outer rise (OR) complex (between the OR and the trench axis), as well as with intracrustal events occurring just landward of the trench. The average apparent stress of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes is considerably higher than the average apparent stress of interplate-thrust-fault earthquakes. In turn, the average ?? a of strike-slip earthquakes in intraoceanic environments is considerably higher than that of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes. The variation of average ??a with focal mechanism and tectonic regime suggests that the level of ?? a is related to fault maturity. Lower stress drops are needed to rupture mature faults such as those found at plate interfaces that have been smoothed by large cumulative displacements (from hundreds to thousands of kilometres). In contrast, immature faults, such as those on which intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes generally occur, are found in cold and intact lithosphere in which total fault displacement has been much less (from hundreds of metres to a few kilometres). Also, faults on which high ??a oceanic strike-slip earthquakes occur are predominantly intraplate or at evolving ends of transforms. At subduction zones, earthquakes occurring on immature faults are likely to be more hazardous as they tend to generate higher amounts of radiated energy per unit of moment than earthquakes occurring on mature faults. We have identified earthquake pairs in which an interplate-thrust and an intraslab-normal earthquake occurred remarkably close in space and time. The intraslab-normal member of each pair radiated anomalously high amounts of energy compared to its thrust-fault counterpart. These intraslab earthquakes probably ruptured intact slab mantle and are dramatic examples in which Mc (an energy magnitude) is shown to be a far better estimate of the potential for earthquake damage than Mw. This discovery may help explain why loss of life as a result of intraslab earthquakes was greater in the 20th century in Latin America than the fatalities associated with interplate-thrust events that represented much higher total moment release. ?? 2004 RAS.

  17. Active faulting and folding along the Jumilla Fault Zone, northeastern Betics, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Balen, R. T.; Forzoni, A.; Van Dam, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Jumilla Fault Zone (JFZ) is an ENE-WSW topographic lineament in the external part of the eastern Betic Cordillera. It represents an active fault. Three small basins are aligned along the JFZ, the La Celia-, Alqueria- and Jumilla basins. The tectonic geomorphology of the La Celia- and Alqueria basins consists of folds, a set of normal fault scarps, strike-slip lineaments, fault-springs, tectonically-modified drainage lines and elevated gypsum/anhydrite diapirs. Two of the scarps are normal faults generated by the extensional collapse of one of the folds. The other scarps are secondary normal faults generated by transtensional left-lateral motions along the JFZ. Normal fault scarps that developed on conglomerates are considerably steeper (~ 30°) than those affecting softer marly materials (< 10°) as a consequence of their different erodibilities. Two natural springs reveal the sealing nature of the normal faults, which has resulted in a segmented groundwater system. These springs are the sources of the two largest ramblas (gullies) in the area. The onset of fault activity is constrained by the late Tortonian-Messinian age of the sedimentary rocks in the basins. Interbedded lavaflows and lamproitic dykes in the lacustrine sediments have been dated at 7.6-7.2 Ma. However, the morphology of fault scarps and relief of the diapirs suggest a younger age of the deformation. Results from modelling of fault scarp evolution indicate Middle Pleistocene and younger ages of faulting and scarp formation. Furthermore, in at least one of the fault scarps, Quaternary alluvial-pediment deposits are involved in the deformation. The drainage pattern anomalies and moderate earthquake activity (Mb 4.2) in the JFZ also indicate slow ongoing tectonic activity. In addition, the ENE prolongation of the JFZ (outside the study area) shows geodetic displacement rates of approximately 2 mm/year. We thus conclude that the JFZ is still active, despite the general lack of post-Messinian deposits in the studied basins. The discrepancy between the age of the tectonic landforms and the late Neogene age of the basin infill can be explained by an endo- to exhorheic change in the drainage system, due to the capture of the ancient basin lake system by tributaries of the nearby Segura river. The cessation of sedimentation in the basins resulted in the preservation of tectonic landforms.

  18. Holocene faulting in the western Basin and Range, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, W.A. . Div. of Mines and Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Principal late Quaternary faults in the Basin and Range Geomorphic Province of eastern and northeastern California were evaluated for evidence of Holocene surface fault rupture as part of DMG's Fault Evaluation and Zoning Project. Those faults considered to have been active in Holocene time were zoned for special studies in order to mitigate surface fault rupture hazard as authorized by the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. Thirty-seven faults or fault zones were evaluated from the southern Sierra Nevada east to Death Valley and north to Surprise Valley. About 70% of these faults have evidence of Holocene displacement. Slip-rates for 20 faults have been determined by others or were estimated during this study. It is difficult to categorize slip-rates in this region because fault zones often are characterized by a complex history of both right-lateral strike-slip (rlss) and normal dip-slip displacement include the Death Valley, Deep Springs, Genoa, Hilton Creek, Honey Lake, Owens Valley, and Panamint Valley faults. All but 2 of these faults (Deep Springs and Genoa) have correspondingly high slip-rates [>=] 2mm/yr. The Death Valley, Honey Lake, Owens Valley, and Panamint Valley faults are characterized primarily by rlss displacement; the other 3 faults have predominantly normal displacement. Most of the faults considered to have primarily vertical displacement are characterized by maximum vertical slip-rates less than 1mm/yr. Range-front faults with maximum vertical slip-rates [>=]1mm/yr include the Genoa, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, Round Valley, Surprise Valley, and White Mountains faults.

  19. Transpressive duplex and flower structure: Dent Fault System, NW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Nigel H.; Rickards, Barrie

    2003-12-01

    Revised mapping along the Dent Fault (northwest England) has improved the resolution of folds and faults formed during Variscan (late Carboniferous) sinistral transpression. A NNE-trending east-down monocline, comprising the Fell End Syncline and Taythes Anticline, was forced in Carboniferous cover above a reactivated precursor to the Dent Fault within the Lower Palaeozoic basement. The Taythes Anticline is periclinal due to interference with earlier Acadian folds. The steep limb of the monocline was eventually cut by the west-dipping Dent Fault. The hangingwall of the Dent Fault was dissected by sub-vertical or east dipping faults, together forming a positive flower structure in cross-section and a contractional duplex in plan view. The footwall to the Dent Fault preserves evidence of mostly dip-slip displacements, whereas strike-slip was preferentially partitioned into the hangingwall faults. This pattern of displacement partitioning may be typical of transpressive structures in general. The faults of the Taythes duplex formed in a restraining overlap zone between the Dent Fault and the Rawthey Fault to the west. The orientations of the duplex faults were a response to kinematic boundary conditions rather than to the regional stress field directly. Kinematic constraints provided by the Dent and neighbouring Variscan faults yield a NNW-SSE regional shortening direction in this part of the Variscan foreland.

  20. The effect of thermal pressurization on dynamic fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yumi; Hok, Sébastien; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Madariaga, Raúl

    2014-02-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of thermal pressurization (TP) on fault branch behaviour during dynamic rupture propagation, a situation likely to occur during large earthquakes at subduction interfaces. We consider a 2-D mode II (in-plane) rupture in an infinite medium that propagates spontaneously along a planar main fault and encounters an intersection with a pre-existing branching fault. The fault system is subjected to uniform external stresses. We adopt the values used by Kame et al. We use the 2-D boundary integral equation method and the slip-weakening friction law with a Coulomb failure criterion, allowing the effective normal stress to vary as pore pressure changes due to TP. We reveal that TP can alter rupture propagation paths when the dip angle of the main fault is small. The rupture propagation paths depend on the branching angle when TP is not in effect on either of the faults, as described by Kame et al. However, the dynamic rupture processes are controlled more by TP than by the branching angle. When TP is in effect on the main fault only, the rupture propagates along the main fault. It propagates along the branch when TP is in effect on both faults. Finally, we considered the case where there is a free surface above the branch fault system. In this case, the rupture can propagate along both faults because of interaction between the free surface and the branch fault, in addition to TP on the main fault.