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Sample records for laila chera eriks

  1. Encounters With Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sudhir

    2015-12-01

    This article recollects events from the author's association with Erik Erikson that lasted for a quarter of a century, from a first meeting in India when Erikson was working on his book Gandhi's Truth, to a few months before his death, to sketch a portrait of the man and his influence on Kakar's own career. PMID:26653058

  2. Teaching Elder: Erik H. Erickson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, William R.

    2015-01-01

    A renowned child psychoanalyst, Erik H. Erikson (1902-1994) is perhaps best known for his work on developmental theory ("Childhood and Society," 1950) and his studies of the lives of Martin Luther ("Young Man Luther," 1958) and Gandhi ("Gandhi's Truth", 1969). Twice he found himself intensely engaged in the role of…

  3. Effect of physical parameterization schemes on track and intensity of cyclone LAILA using WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanase, Radhika D.; Salvekar, P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate in detail the sensitivity of cumulus parameterization (CP), planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization, microphysics parameterization (MP) on the numerical simulation of severe cyclone LAILA over Bay of Bengal using Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model. The initial and boundary conditions are supplied from GFS data of 1° × 1° resolution and the model is integrated in three `twoway' interactive nested domains at resolutions of 60 km, 20 km and 6.6 km. Total three sets of experiments are performed. First set of experiments include sensitivity of Cumulus Parameterization (CP) schemes, while second and third set of experiments is carried out to check the sensitivity of different PBL and Microphysics Parameterization (MP) schemes. The fourth set contains initial condition sensitivity experiments. For first three sets of experiments, 0000 UTC 17 May 2010 is used as initial condition. In CP sensitivity experiments, the track and intensity is well simulated by Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) schemes. The track and intensity of LAILA is very sensitive to the representation of large scale environmental flow in CP scheme as well as to the initial vertical wind shear values. The intensity of the cyclone is well simulated by YSU scheme and it depends upon the mixing treatment in and above PBL. Concentration of frozen hydrometeors, such as graupel in WSM6 MP scheme and latent heat released during auto conversion of hydrometeors may be responsible for storm intensity. An additional set of experiments with different initial vortex intensity shows that, small differences in the initial wind fields have profound impact on both track and intensity of the cyclone. The representation of the mid-tropospheric heating in WSM6 is mainly controlled by amount of graupel hydrometeor and thus might be one of the possible causes in modulating the storm's intensity.

  4. Erik Erikson and his problematic identity.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert S

    2014-08-01

    In his psychohistorical biographies of Luther and Gandhi, Erik Erikson proposed that great issues of a particular time and place, as experienced by sensitive and creative individuals who are working to resolve their inner conflicts within these contexts, could find solutions that transcend themselves and yield conceptualizations that transform the world. Although Erikson was able to create a conceptualization of the adolescent task of establishing a coherent identity, one that gave voice to the aspirations and frustrations of the rebellious student movements of the 1960s, he was never able, over his lifetime, to resolve his own identity issues. Was he Dane or German, American or Scandinavian, Jew or Christian or both? His lifelong back-and-forths on this struggle are chronicled. PMID:25135211

  5. Erik Erikson: critical times, critical theory.

    PubMed

    Douvan, E

    1997-01-01

    The work and legacy of Erik Erikson are described in this brief outline of his career, his theories, and his impact on psychoanalysis, psychology, history, and the broader culture. His conception of the adolescent task-weaving internal tastes, talents, and values together with elements of one's life history and the demands of one's culture into a coherent identity-has had profound effects on developmental psychology and the way in which sophisticated youth construct and describe their lives. His extension of development through adulthood and old age established the field of life course development. His emphasis on the impact of history and culture on development was a critical element in the developing field of ego psychology. Many of his major contributions can be fruitfully understood in the context of his personal history and individual qualities. PMID:9256525

  6. Untapped richness in Erik H. Erikson's rootstock.

    PubMed

    Kivnick, Helen Q; Wells, Courtney K

    2014-02-01

    Erik H. Erikson published his groundbreaking theory of 8 stages of lifelong psychosocial development in 1950. His theory expanded psychoanalytic concepts of psychosexual development to include the importance of social dynamics; it transcended then-current thinking that psychological development culminated in early adulthood, acknowledging that systematic human development continues throughout the entire life cycle. The theory made Erikson a pioneer in developmental psychology. His last authored book, Vital Involvement in Old Age, rearticulated and elaborated 3 principles that, in different words, are rooted in his original theory of healthy life cycle development: (1) Dynamic Balance of Opposites; (2) Vital Involvement; and (3) Life in Time. Using a lens informed by knowledge gained over the past 30 years and by reflections of one of the original researchers on that project, the current manuscript seeks to spark new interest in Erikson's late-life contribution. It explains the principles in new detail, links them to relevant research, and suggests ways they could enable Erikson's ideas to further enrich gerontological practice and research. PMID:24136991

  7. 76 FR 28191 - Petition for Rulemaking Submitted by Mr. Erik Erb and 91 Cosigners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... rulemaking (PRM) submitted by Erik Erb, the petitioner, and 91 cosigners, in the planned ``Quality Control/Quality Verification'' (QC/QV) rulemaking (Docket ID: NRC-2009- 0090). The petitioner requested that the..., (75 FR 71368), the NRC published a Notice of Receipt of a PRM filed on August 17, 2010, by Erik...

  8. Clarification and application of Erik Erikson's eighth stage of man.

    PubMed

    Rosel, N

    1988-01-01

    Erik Erikson used the film character of Dr. Borg from Wild Strawberries to flesh out his life cycle conception of ego integrity versus despair in old age. The present application of Erikson is to three women: Augusta Turnley (fiction), Florida Scott-Maxwell, and Arie Carpenter--three distinctly different lifestyles and educational backgrounds. Both the dialectical struggle contained in Erikson's model of old age and the specific concepts of ego integrity, despair and wisdom are made concrete in this theoretical exploration. PMID:3254355

  9. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Poul Erik Andersen is a Professor and Interventional Radiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense and Odense University Hospital, Denmark. His innovative and expertise is primarily in vascular interventions where he has introduced and developed many procedures at Odense University Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology. PMID:22022640

  10. Mother, melancholia, and humor in Erik H. Erikson's earliest writings.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2008-09-01

    Erik H. Erikson wrote three articles when he was in his late-twenties and an up-and-coming member of the psychoanalytic community in Vienna. At the time he wrote these articles, he was in a training psychoanalysis with Anna Freud, teaching at the Heitzing School in Vienna, and learning the Montessori method of teaching. These articles focus on the loss of primary narcissism and the development of the superego (or punitive conscience) in early childhood, especially through the child's conflict with maternal authority. They support the idea that melancholia, with its internalized rage against the mother, is the inevitable outcome of the loss of primary narcissism. I note, however, that the third of these articles makes a case for the restorative role of humor, especially when Freud's view that humor is a function of the superego is taken into account. PMID:19105029

  11. The verbal portrait: Erik H. Erikson's contribution to psychoanalytic discourse.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This article makes the case that Erik H. Erikson developed a form of psychoanalytic discourse-the verbal portrait-which, although not unprecedented, became a focal feature of his work, and the testing ground for the cogency of his major contribution to psychoanalysis (the concept of identity). It suggests that Erikson was inspired to develop the verbal portrait because he came to psychoanalysis from art and was, in fact, a portrait artist. Drawing especially on the work of Richard Brilliant, it presents the view that a portrait is a portrayal of the subject's identity and goes on to show how Erikson's memorial to the cultural anthropologist Ruth Benedict is representative of the verbal portrait. PMID:21744027

  12. [Erik Vio, surgeon from Rijeka at history's crossroad].

    PubMed

    Lazzarich, Marinko

    2016-08-01

    The fact that many famous denizens of Rijeka belong to different nationalities confirms this city's historic multicultural image. The life story of Erik Vio (1910-1966), renowned surgeon of international reputation, reflects the fate of many displaced residents of Rijeka who left to live in exile. After graduating in Rome, Vio worked as a medical doctor in Hong Kong for almost three decades. The question is weather a surgeon from Rijeka chose to live in Hong Kong because it reminded him of his hometown? The author finds the root of this thesis in Vio's novel The Pathways of Freedom (˝Irwege der Freiheit˝, Köln 1978), a particular medical-philosophic diagnosis of the contemporary civilization's spiritual state. Rare fragments dedicated to Rijeka confirm Vio's actual detachment; faced with his own identity, but also with the others' with whom he shared his living space, a surgeon from Rijeka became a true citizen of the world and at the same time a stateless person with no roots of his own. Through the projection of Hong Kong one can detect the novel's identification backbone: writer's provocation of the ideological perspective on socio-cultural relations. By engaging in the interpretation of Vio's The Pathways of Freedom the author seeks to dissect a sociological dimension of descriptions of dual identities in border space. This leads to the issue of understanding and tolerance toward the others. PMID:27598959

  13. Practical Applications of Erik Erikson's Theory to College Reading Instruction and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Miriam T.

    Responses of four people to the book "Future Shock" are analyzed in relation to Erik Erikson's theory of personality. Results were interpreted as support for Erickson's theory and as illustration of how people interpret written language in terms of their own situations and life histories. In general, adults applied more detached and objective…

  14. The Development of a High School Poetry Writing Program from Selected Writings of Erik Erikson, Kenneth Koch, and Theodore Roethke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Albert Luck, Jr.

    In this study, a program for teaching poetry writing in secondary schools is derived from Kenneth Koch's and Theodore Roethke's ideas, and from Erik Erikson's model of adolescent human processes. A review of related literature defines three major approaches to the teaching of poetry writing: models, activities, and models and activities combined.…

  15. I Feel Like an Armadillo: A Look at College Seniors and Recent Graduates Using Erik Erikson's Model of "Identity Versus Role-Diffusion."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaurigue, Rebecca

    Developmental psychologist Erik Erikson observed that achieving a sense of self, an identity, was the important psychosocial task facing adolescents. The conflict lies in discovering and defining that identity despite parental and societal demands, changing values and opportunities, the influence of friends, and lovers, education, and finances.…

  16. The mother relationship and artistic inhibition in the lives of Leonardo da Vinci and Erik H. Erikson.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2008-12-01

    In four earlier articles, I focused on the theme of the relationship of melancholia and the mother, and suggested that the melancholic self may experience humor (Capps, 2007a), play (Capps, 2007b), dreams (Capps, 2008a), and art (Capps, 2008b) as restorative resources. I argued that Erik H. Erikson found these resources to be valuable remedies for his own melancholic condition, which had its origins in the fact that he was illegitimate and was raised solely by his mother until he was three years old, when she remarried. In this article, I focus on two themes in Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a memory of his childhood (1964): Leonardo's relationship with his mother in early childhood and his inhibitions as an artist. I relate these two themes to Erikson's own early childhood and his failure to achieve his goal as an aspiring artist in his early twenties. The article concludes with a discussion of Erikson's frustrated aspirations to become an artist and his emphasis, in his psychoanalytic work, on children's play. PMID:19093682

  17. Threshold of the volcanic forcing that leads the El Niño-like warming in the last millennium: results from the ERIK simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Young-Gyu; Park, Jae-Hun; Park, Rokjin; Song, Chang-Keun

    2016-06-01

    In order to examine the threshold of the volcanic forcing that leads to the El Niño-like warming, we analyze a millennium ERIK simulation (AD 1000-1850) forced by three external forcings including greenhouse gases, solar forcing and volcanic eruptions using the ECHO-G coupled climate model. It is found that there exists a threshold of the volcanic forcing above 15 W/m2 to lead the El Niño-like warming in the climate model. When the volcanic forcing is above this threshold forcing, then the intensity of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is weakened and its position is shifted to the south. This might be associated with the processes of less evaporation in the subtropical cloudless region by a cooling due to the reduction of net surface shortwave radiation. Concurrently, a weakening of ITCZ is associated with a weakening of the trade winds and the subsequent Bjerknes feedback causes El Niño-like warming. Therefore, El Niño-like warming events can occur when volcanic eruption is above threshold forcing, implying that there exists a certain level of radiative forcing change which is capable of changing the state of tropical Pacific sea surface temperature. The last millennium simulation of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project Phase 3 climate models also indicates that there may exist a threshold forcing to lead the El Niño-like warming, which has been also discussed in the present study.

  18. A Conversation with Erik Erikson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Erikson discusses the experience of growing old and how it is changing. He reflects on the life cycle and his theory of human development, and on Gandhi's technique of nonviolence and its relationship to generativity. (SK)

  19. Clarification and Application of Erik Erikson's Eighth Stage of Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosel, Natalie

    1988-01-01

    Applies Erikson's life cycle conception of ego integrity versus despair in old age to three octogenarian women: Augusta Turnley (fiction), Florida Scott-Maxwell, and Arie Carpenter. Both dialectical struggle in Erikson's model of old age and specific components of ego integrity, despair, and wisdom are made concrete in theoretical exploration of…

  20. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration. PMID:3835200

  1. Erik Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development and Vocational Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munley, Patrick H.

    1975-01-01

    Stage resolution attitudes, derived from the first six stage crises outlined by Erikson, were explored as variables influencing problems in vocational choice and vocational maturity. Findings indicated students who made adjusted vocational choices and developed mature career attitudes had also been more successful resolving the first six…

  2. The Psychosocial Development of Children: Implications for Education and Society--Erik Erikson in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batra, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    How do schooling years impact children's lives, in rural and urban settings? Why do some children have lower self-esteem than others? What kinds of conflicts do adolescents experience in their search for identity? Why are some teachers able to understand the importance of ensuring the well-being of children while others do not? Does the emotional…

  3. 'Introduction' to 'Episodic Psychoses', by Erik Strömgren (1940).

    PubMed

    Schioldann, Johan

    2014-12-01

    This anniversary Classic Text, the 'Introduction' from Strömgren's 'Episodic Psychoses', provides a comprehensive, concise and erudite exposition of the history, nosography and nosology of these conditions. Strömgren traces the origin of this term and concepts back to Magnan's degeneration psychoses and associated 'syndromes épisodiques'. Especially inspired by 'the psychogenic psychosis' (1916), the seminal work by his mentor, August Wimmer, he convincingly shows that the episodic psychoses constitute an intermediate link between the degeneration psychoses, now an obsolete term, and the psychogenic psychoses, reactive psychoses and brief reactive psychoses, which in their own right have been a bone of contention in international psychiatry for many decades and an obstacle in achieving consensus in international psychiatric classification. PMID:25395448

  4. 78 FR 75350 - Goldenshores Technologies, LLC and Erik M. Geidl; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Social Security number, date of birth, driver's license number or other state identification number or... networks. Second, the complaint alleges that respondents falsely represent in the Brightest Flashlight EULA... telephone number; (e) a Social Security number; (f) a driver's license or other state-issued...

  5. The passions and perils of interpretation (of dreams and texts): an appreciation of Erik Erikson's Dream specimen paper.

    PubMed

    Coen, S J

    1996-06-01

    The author reconsiders Erikson's 'Dream specimen' paper as a forerunner of subsequent reader-response criticism, constructive writings on the exploration of countertransference and our contemporary debates about the constructions of meaning in the analytic and literary situations. He regards Erikson as deconstructing our interpretive efforts with texts and with patients; we are to move away from an interpretive process in which we pin down meanings towards opening up the ongoing exploration of multiple meanings. By emphasising self-reflexive questioning and joyful play between texts and readers and analysands and analysts, Erikson contributed to opening up the pleasures of both psychoanalysis and literary criticism. Although he wonders whether Erikson may have wished to move his own creativity beyond conflict, the author heartily endorses his encouraging us to enjoy playing with our materials--texts, dreams and analyses. PMID:8818769

  6. Implications in the Theories of Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, George Kelly and Erik Erikson for the Assessment of Instruction in College Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Miriam Thomas

    The interpretation a mature reader gleans from written language is a reflection of his linguistic, cognitive, emotional, and experiential level. In providing adequate instruction, therefore, instructors must be knowledgeable about the developmental sequences characteristic of each of these domains. The theories of L.S. Vygotsky, George Kelly, Jean…

  7. 76 FR 47155 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile-Driving and Renovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulation, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to the Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria (Trinidad Rancheria) to take small numbers of marine mammals, by Level B harassment, incidental to pile- driving and renovation operations for the Trinidad Pier......

  8. NASA's 2013 REEL Science Communications contest: Hurricane Science

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video on NASA satellite and aircraft observations of hurricanes was produced by Will Reiss and Erik Borchers, students at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, North Carolina. Will and Erik...

  9. Datalingvistik, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjaersgaard, Poul Soren, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    Papers from the conference in this volume include the following: "Towards Corpus Annotation Standards--The MATE Workbench" (Laila Dybkjaer and Niels Ole Bernsen); "Danish Text-to-Speech Synthesis Based on Stored Acoustic Segments" (Charles Hoequist); "Toward a Method for the Automated Design of Semantic Representations" (Gregers Koch); "OLAM--et…

  10. Photo of family members of STS-5 commander, Vance D. Brand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Erik Brand and his mother Beverly are seen in a photo of family members of STS-5 commander Vance D. Brand. Erik holds a small model of the space shuttle with its solid rocket boosters and external fuel tank still attached.

  11. 78 FR 29245 - U.S. General Services Administration Federal Property Management Regulations; Administrative Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Administration Federal Property Management Regulations; Administrative Wage Garnishment AGENCY: Office of the.... Erik Dorman, Financial Policy and Analysis Division, at 202-501- 4568 or via email at erik.dorman@gsa... telephone number. The Administrative Wage Garnishment Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts affected...

  12. 75 FR 14154 - Notice of Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... CFR part 180 for residues of the herbicide glyphosate, N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine, in or on corn... glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in or on plant and livestock commodities. These methods include: Gas... glyphosate. Contact: Erik Kraft, (703) 308-9358; e-mail address: kraft.erik@epa.gov . 5. PP 9F7657....

  13. SUICIDE BEHAVIOUR IN THE ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE TAMILS

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, O.S.; Babu, C. Kumar; Geethayan, I. Aruna

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY Suicide behaviour has attracted attention not only from the professionals but also from writers, poets and philosophers of all times and all cultures. In this paper the author describes the suicide behaviour found in the great Tamil classic of the ‘Sangham’ period, PURANANURU, an anthology of the 11 century A. D. The incidents relate to the self immolation of Perun Koppendu on the death of her husband, the fast unto death of the Chera king when insulted by the prison guard and the suicides of important kings and poets after bereavement. PMID:21927385

  14. Aging According to Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Uses Erik Erikson's work to discuss how biographies treat aging. Explores how developmental theorists observe biographical representations of the life cycle and its applicability to aging. (Author/BHK)

  15. Section III: Examining American Values: Value Choices Since Revolutionary Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The statements of Erik Erikson and Urie Bronfenbrenner on American values are followed by a values clarification exercise and an activity based on biographical sketches of five Americans who lived before and after the American Revolution. (KM)

  16. Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept

    SciTech Connect

    MANN, F M

    2003-09-01

    To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES IN RURAL IOWA HOMES WITH ASTHMATIC CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES IN RURAL IOWA HOMES WITH ASTHMATIC CHILDREN
    Erik R. Svendsen*?, Stephen J. Reynolds*?, James A. Merchant*, Ann M. Stromquist*, Peter S. Thorne*. * The University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA ?Current: USEPA,RTP, NC ?Current: Colorado...

  18. Adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina in a geographically diverse collection of Aegilops tauschii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite extensive genetics and breeding research, effective control of leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., an important foliar disease of wheat, has not been achieved. This is mainly due to the widespread use of race-specific seedling resistance genes, which are rapidly overcome by new vi...

  19. Introgression of crown rust resistance from diploid oat Avena strigosa into hexaploid cultivated oat A. sativa by two methods: direct crosses and through an initial 2x+4x synthetic hexaploid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New sources of resistance to oat crown rust, Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae (Eriks.), the major fungal disease of cultivated oat, Avena sativa L. (2n = 6x = 42), are constantly needed due to frequent, rapid shifts in the virulence pattern of the pathogen. Crown rust resistance identified in the dip...

  20. Keys to the Future of American Business. Proceedings of the Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Conference (5th, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 18-19, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, George T., Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Defining the Win and Thereby Lessening the Losses for Successful Entrepreneurs" (Arthur Lipper III); "It Can Be Done" (Anthony Lemme); "A Self-Portrait of Entrepreneurs" (George T. Solomon, Erik K. Winslow); "Software Entrepreneurship: Lessons Learned" (John Coyne); "Developing and Implementing Entrepreneurial…

  1. Registration of 'Otto' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to strawbreaker foot rot (caused by Oculimacula yallundae Crous & W. Gams and O. acuformis Crous & W. Gams) and to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks.) are important traits for winter wheat cultivars produced in the Pacifi Northwest region of the Uni...

  2. Key Qualifications in Work and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Wim J., Ed.; Streumer, Jan N., Ed.

    This book contains the following chapters: "The Demarcation Issue: Introduction" (Wim J. Nijhof, Jan N. Streumer); "Qualifying for the Future" (Wim J. Nijhof); "The Many Meanings of Occupational Competence and Qualification" (Per-Erik Ellstroem); "Qualification and Labour Markets: Institutionalisation and Individualisation" (Ben Hoevels); "The…

  3. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF THE HIGH VOLUME SMALL SURFACE SAMPLER ON WORN CARPETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection Efficiency of the High Volume Small Surface Sampler on Worn Carpets

    Erik R. Svendsen*?, Peter S. Thorne*, Stephen J. Reynolds*?, Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy*, Alba Quinones*, Dale Zimmerman*, and Nervana Metwali*

    *University of Iowa College of Public Health<...

  4. Evaluation and Characterization of Seedling Resistances to Stem Rust Ug99 Races in Wheat-Alien Species Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust, a devastating disease (caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & Henn.) of wheat (Triticum aestivium L.), has been effectively controlled worldwide for the past 50 years by deployment of stem rust resistance (Sr) genes in wheat cultivars. However, a new stem rust ra...

  5. Mapping resistance to the Ug99 race group of the stem rust pathogen in a spring wheat landrace

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat landrace PI 374670 has seedling and field resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici Eriks. & E. Henn (Pgt) race TTKSK. To elucidate the inheritance of resistance, 216 BC1F2 families, 192 double haploid (DH) lines, and 185 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed b...

  6. Genotyping-by-sequencing to re-map QTL for type II Fusarium head blight and leaf rust resistance in a wheat-tall wheatgrass introgression recombinant inbred population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminaerum (Fusarium head blight; FHB) and Puccinia recondita Roberge ex Desmaz. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn (leaf rust; LR) are two major fungal pathogens threatening the wheat crop; consequently identifying resistance genes from various sources is always of importance to wheat breede...

  7. Well Spoken: Teaching Speaking to All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Erik

    2011-01-01

    All teachers at all grade levels in all subjects have speaking assignments for students, but many teachers believe they don't know how to teach speaking, and many even fear public speaking themselves. In his new book, "Well Spoken", veteran teacher and education consultant Erik Palmer shares the art of teaching speaking in any classroom. Teachers…

  8. Sources of resistance to stem rust race Ug99 in spring wheat germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks & E. Henn.) race TTKSK (Ug99) with virulence to the majority of the world’s wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties has spread from Uganda throughout eastern and southern Africa, Yemen, and Iran. The identification and spread of vari...

  9. COCKROACHES, PESTICIDE USE, AND CHILDREN'S PULMONARY FUNCTION IN AN ARID COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cockroaches, pesticide use, and children's pulmonary function in an arid community

    Erik Svendsen1, Mary Ross1, Melissa Gonzales2, Debra Walsh1, Scott Rhoney1, Gina Terrill1, Lucas Neas1
    1US EPA, Chapel Hill, NC; 2University of New Mexico

    The El Paso Children's He...

  10. HOME ENVIRONMENT AND CHILDHOOD ASTHMA IN A RURAL IOWA COUNTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    HOME ENVIRONMENT AND CHILDHOOD ASTHMA IN A RURAL IOWA COUNTY
    Erik R. Svendsen*?, Stephen J. Reynolds*?, James A. Merchant*, Allison L. Naleway*?, Ann M. Stromquist*, Peter S. Thorne*.
    *University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA ?Current: USEPA RTP, NC ?Curre...

  11. RESPIRATORY HEALTH OF RURAL AND FARM WOMEN IN THE KEOKUK COUNTY RURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY HEALTH OF RURAL AND FARM WOMEN IN THE KEOKUK COUNTY RURAL HEALTH STUDY
    Allison L. Naleway*, Nancy L. Sprince?, Erik R. Svendsen?, Ann M. Stromquist?, James A. Merchant?
    *Marshfield Medical Research and Education Foundation, Marshfield, WI; ?University of Iowa Co...

  12. Using RNA-sequencing and in silico subtraction to identify resistance gene analog markers for Lr16 in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is one of the most widespread diseases of wheat worldwide and breeding for resistance is one of the most effective methods of control. Lr16 is a wheat leaf rust resistance gene that provides resistance at both the seedling and adult stages. Simple s...

  13. Resistance to recombinant stem rust race TPPKC in hard red spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn.) resistance gene SrWld1 conditions resistance to all North American stem rust races and is an important gene in hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars. A recombinant wheat stem rust race having ...

  14. Genome Wide Association Analysis of Leaf Rust Response in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust (caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks.) is increasingly impacting durum wheat production with the recent appearance of races with virulence to widely grown cultivars in many durum producing areas worldwide. A highly virulent P. triticina race on durum wheat was recently collected in Kansas....

  15. Four Predictions for Students' Tomorrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Erik

    2016-01-01

    What pieces of their education do adults actually use? Many highly successful people gain success without remembering large amounts of material that schools teach. Erik Palmer suggests that educators to take a closer look at what parts of their education have been critical to your adult success and what they wish they had been taught. In addition,…

  16. Makin' Stories: From New York to Monterey and Now to D.C., Dutch Crew Documents Best "2.0" Practices in U.S. Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Computers in Libraries, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Jaap van de Geer, Erik Boekesteijn, Michael Stephens, and Geert van den Boogaard toured the U.S. last fall and interviewed librarians about how they are revitalizing their libraries. These four Dutch men are representatives of the Delft (the Netherlands) Public Library Concept Center and they came to the U.S. for their "Shanachie Tour." Their trip…

  17. Characterization of stem rust resistance in wheat cultivar 'Gage'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn. (Pgt), re-emerged as a devastating disease of wheat because of virulent race Ug99 (TTKSK). Many bread wheat (T. aestivum L.) cultivars grown in North America are susceptible to Ug99 or its derivative races ...

  18. Using Video Conferencing in Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Bill; Larson, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Duquesne University's department of journalism and multimedia arts supports many of its classes with Mediasite Live, a video conferencing system that captures the output of presentation devices and streams it live to the Web, as well as recording presentations for Web streaming or recording to CD or DVD. Bill Gibbs and Erik Larson examine the…

  19. Adult Development: Implications for Adult Education. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michele

    Various researchers, including Carl Jung, Charlotte Buhler, Erik Erikson, and Robert Havighurst, have formulated sequential models of adult development. More recent investigators, such as Daniel Levinson, Roger Gould, and Gail Sheehy have formulated age-related sequential models of adult development that view the various stages of adulthood in…

  20. Religious Studies: The Shaping of a Field and a Guide to Reference Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippy, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of religious studies as an academic discipline. Examines the work of leading thinkers in the field, including anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Edward Burnett Taylor, sociologist Max Weber, and psychologist Erik Erikson. Identifies some of the many reference works that deal with religious studies. (SG)

  1. Identity Exploration: A "Crisis" Which May Go Unnoticed in Gifted Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Jeannie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Correlation of 82 academically gifted adolescents' personality scores with scores for identity exploration revealed that youth who were actively exploring (according to Erik Erikson's ego identity theory) exhibited the following psychological portrait: inner confusion, agitation, dissatisfaction, unhappiness, periodic spells of depression,…

  2. Generativity-Stagnation: Development of a Status Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Cheryl L.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and empirical developments in Erik Erikson's construct of generativity-stagnation. Presents a five-category model describing styles of resolving the issue using combinations of level of involvement or active concern for the growth of self and others; and level of inclusivity or scope of caregiving concern. Discusses model in…

  3. Viewing Generativity and Social Capital as Underlying Factors of Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sharon; Patel, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Parent involvement in education is a multifaceted support that has many well-documented benefits for students of all ages. Parent involvement is also a common expression of generativity as defined in Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. The activities parents engage in during their children's educational pursuits, as well as their…

  4. Films/Videos: Guidance for Children's Sound and Safe Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Beverly Hardcastle

    1993-01-01

    Three videos for adults chronicle the life works of Erik Erikson and Jean Piaget, two giants in the child development field, and three videos for children candidly and sensitively address common problems experienced by children, such as being afraid to read aloud in class, dealing with bullies, and protecting themselves from attack by strangers.…

  5. David L. Gutmann (1925-2013).

    PubMed

    Rose, Jon; Huyck, Margaret; Grunes, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    David L. Gutmann, a pioneer in geropsychology and professor emeritus at Northwestern University, died on November 3, 2013, at the age of 88. A student of Bernice Neugarten, Bruno Bettelheim, and Erik Erikson, Gutmann discovered changes in adult psychological development related to parenting styles that held across diverse cultures. PMID:25046720

  6. Young Adulthood to Old Age: Looking at Intergenerational Possibilities from a Human Development Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ReVille, Shari

    1989-01-01

    The potential interface between human development theories and intergenerational programing is explored. Erik Erikson's division of adult development into young, middle, and later adulthood, and Butler and Lewis'"characteristics of older people," are considered. Older people can offer help and encouragement to youth while themselves benefiting…

  7. Social Perspective Taking as a Component of Identity Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Robert D.; Deist, Steven H.

    1979-01-01

    This study builds on Erik Erikson's "Identity: Youth and Crisis," and describes in detail what social possibilities the adolescent usually considers when cognitively searching the environment, and describes how the understanding of the possibilities enhances or thwarts identity formation. (Author/KC)

  8. Violent Behaviors among African-American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Darhyl

    1995-01-01

    Explores the development of behaviors by using Erik Erikson's psychosocial developmental theory, with emphasis on adolescents. Examines factors, such as identity versus identity diffusion, that may be contributing to increasing acts of violence by African American adolescents. Other factors are examined that may contribute to increased violence.…

  9. Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson: Developmental Implications for Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Although differences exist between their developmental perspectives, the theories of Erik Erikson, with a psychoanalytic focus, and Piaget and Kohlberg, with a cognitive, structural view, are basically complementary, providing a powerful observation on human growth. Here their theories are used to reexamine the secondary curriculum and the…

  10. An Analysis of Erikson's and Piaget's Theories of Human Growth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Donald W., Jr.

    Similarities and differences between Erik H. Erikson's and Jean Piaget's theories concerning social development and the process of identification are explored in this report. The first part of the report is a synthesis of Erikson's concept of the developmental processes of personal growth and societal development. The second part integrates…

  11. Revisiting Erikson's Views on Women's Generativity, or Erikson Didn't Understand Midlife Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Linda N.

    The past 15 years have brought a re-evaluation of women's adult development in light feminist thinking. However, many outdated assumptions in psychological theory remain comfortably ensconced; to challenge these ideas, some misrepresentations of women's experience are examined. The focus is on Erik Erikson's explanation of the second stage of…

  12. Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munley, Patrick H.

    1977-01-01

    This article outlines some of the contributions of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development in providing a developmental perspective on career behavior. A brief overview of Erikson's theory is presented and possible contributions of the theory towards enhancing understanding of career development are noted. (Author)

  13. Growing through Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barbara J.

    "Growing through Literature" is a curriculum using Joan M. and Erik H. Erikson's theory of the Life Cycle as a structure for selecting and teaching literature to inner-city high school students at Brighton High School in Massachusetts. The program consists of four component parts: Journals, Selected Stories, Discussion, and Autobiography. By…

  14. Gifted Children and Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Tracy L.

    2001-01-01

    After presenting an overview of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development, the theory is applied to the development of gifted children. The psychosocial crisis experienced by children when they are infants, toddlers, preschoolers, elementary-aged, and during adolescence are examined, along with ways parents and teachers can help at each…

  15. Beyond Erikson's Eight Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Erik Erikson has described eight stages of the healthy personality. This essay offers a revised version of the eight stages. Although most individuals develop through the eight stages, each is personally unique because patterns of fluctuation between safety and growth differ from one individual to another. (Author)

  16. Early Learning Theories Made Visible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beloglovsky, Miriam; Daly, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Go beyond reading about early learning theories and see what they look like in action in modern programs and teacher practices. With classroom vignettes and colorful photographs, this book makes the works of Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, Lev Vygotsky, Abraham Maslow, John Dewey, Howard Gardner, and Louise Derman-Sparks visible, accessible, and easier…

  17. "Play" across the Life Cycle: From Initiative to Integrity to Transcendence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In this autobiographical journey through life-span developmental theory, the author reflects on her life as a player, embedding it in the context of Erik Erikson and Joan Erikson's stages of human development. The author builds on these basic ideas--theory, storytelling, play, and development--and defines them as simply as possible.

  18. A Developmental Model Applied to Problems of Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Hilde S.

    2000-01-01

    This "classic" article (1972) in the field of deaf studies includes some interpretive notes for current readers. The article examines the effect of deafness on basic developmental tasks at each of the eight developmental stages of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development and explains the more successful passage through these stages by…

  19. Family Myths, Beliefs, and Customs as a Research/Educational Tool to Explore Identity Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, William E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a qualitative research tool designed to explore personal identity formation as described by Erik Erikson and offers self-reflective and anonymous evaluative comments made by college students after completing this task. Subjects compiled a list of 200 myths, customs, fables, rituals, and beliefs from their family of origin and…

  20. Teaching Cognitive-Moral Development in College (A Generalist Approach).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Francis L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines methods of teaching moral issues to undergraduate students using works of Lawrence Kohlberg, William Perry, Jr., Erik Erikson, and Elisabeth Kubler-Ross in conjunction with literary tests. Encourages comparative and illustrative studies of literature and film. Suggests student participation in cognitive and moral decision making of…

  1. The adolescent with a learning disability: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Cook, L D

    1979-01-01

    The psychosocial difficulties that usually accompany learning disabilities are examined from a framework of developmental theory, particularly that of Erik Erikson. The implications of this perspective for treatment of adolescents with learning problems is discussed, and a specific program described. PMID:525512

  2. Generativity and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The psychological construct of "generativity" was introduced by Erik Erikson in "Childhood and Society" in 1950. This rich and complex notion encompasses the constellation of desires, concerns and commitments that motivate individuals and societies to pass on legacies to future generations. "Flourishing," which means,…

  3. Erikson's Psychosocial Theories Help Explain Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, M. Lee

    1988-01-01

    Middle school educators can design a learning environment for early adolescents based on Erik Erikson's social development theories, which divide human life into eight psychological stages. The identity versus role confusion stage characterizing adolescence will significantly determine the developing person's future. Schools can help learners…

  4. The Several Ages of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Stephen

    1976-01-01

    Examines the various stages of human development (as outlined by Erik Erikson and others) with their psychological stresses of recurring crises of identity and expectation and explores some of the implications for education's best serving human needs. Focuses on early childhood, late adolescence, middle age, and old age. (JT)

  5. The Impact of Chronic Illness on Psychosocial Stages of Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapham, E. Virginia, Ed.; Shevlin, Kathleen M., Ed.

    This book addresses critical issues regarding the impact of chronic illness and disability on human development. It was written for health care professionals who help chronically ill and disabled persons deal with the psychological and social as well as the biological aspects of their illness or disability. An expanded version of Erik Erikson's…

  6. The Assessment of Spirituality in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, David C.

    Dealing with religious issues in the counseling process is a difficulty many therapists encounter. This paper explores a way of understanding religious ideology using Erik Erikson's concept of religious ideology as an organizer of identity. It suggests that, if religion does function as an ideology, then it would be helpful for psychotherapists to…

  7. The Adolescent with a Learning Disability: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Louisa D.

    1979-01-01

    The psychosocial difficulties that usually accompany learning disabilities are examined from a framework of developmental theory, particularly that of Erik Erikson. The implications of this perspective for treatment of adolescents with learning problems is discussed, and the summer residential program at Goddard College described. (Author)

  8. An Empirical Test of Erikson's Theory of Ego Identity Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, James E.; Levine, Charles G.

    1989-01-01

    This study explores interrelationships among the following components of Erik Erikson's theory of ego identity formation: (1) the identity crisis; (2) the institutionalized moratoria; (3) the ego-superego struggle for dominance of the personality; and (4) the value orientation stages. Humanistically oriented adolescents are more likely to have a…

  9. The Application of a Generativity Model for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlman, Katie; Ligon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Generativity is a concept first introduced by Erik Erikson as a part of his psychosocial theory which outlines eight stages of development in the human life. Generativity versus stagnation is the main developmental concern of middle adulthood; however, generativity is also recognized as an important theme in the lives of older adults. Building on…

  10. Danger and Opportunity: Institutional Identity Crises and Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Warren J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the theoretical lenses of Erik Erikson, Burton Clark, and Sonia Nieto, the author highlights the case of Colgate University--a private liberal arts university in central New York State--to consider larger issues of institutional identity by investigating points of crises bringing to the surface opposing forces, which struggle, on one hand,…

  11. Creativity and the Child's Social Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Martha L.; Edwards, Linda C.

    1994-01-01

    Presents three teacher-preschooler scenarios illustrating teacher actions that hinder creativity and social development. Discusses the connection between psychosocial and creative development in light of Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Suggests that teachers need to be flexible, consider children's feelings, foster…

  12. Deep Calling unto Deep: Pre-Oedipal Structures in Children's Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooderham, David

    1994-01-01

    Provides an account of the deep structures of children's literature. Examines theorizing about these texts that deals with earliest affective experiences, including Julia Kristeva and Erik Erikson. Analyzes two texts from these perspectives: "Wind in the Willows" and "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." (HB)

  13. Why Children Need Ongoing Nurturing Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazelton, T. Berry; Greenspan, Stanley I.

    2006-01-01

    Although consistent nurturing relationships with significant adults are taken for granted by most of us as a necessity for babies and young children, this commonly held belief is not often put into practice. Pioneers, such as Erik Erikson, Anna Freud, and Dorothy Burlingham, revealed that to "pass successfully through the stages of early…

  14. Bouncing Back: Erikson, Maslow and Recovery from Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charnofsky, Stan

    Counseling for recovery from divorce may be significantly enhanced if a general model of emotional health/deficiency can be applied. This article introduces an amalgam of Erik Erikson's developmental stages and Abraham Maslow's motivational hierarchy as a means of understanding the rigors of marital dissolution. The paradigm promotes client…

  15. Theories of Childhood: An Introduction to Dewey, Montessori, Erikson, Piaget & Vygotsky, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Carol Garhart

    2013-01-01

    This best-selling resource provides clear, straightforward introductions to the foundational theories of John Dewey, Maria Montessori, Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky. Each chapter highlights a theorist's work and includes insight on how the theory impacts teaching young children today. Discussion questions and suggested readings are…

  16. The Question of Work: Adolescent Literature and the Eriksonian Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgan, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that focusing on paradigms of work--the way it is described, together with the thematic implications it embodies--can be useful in teaching literature to young adults. Examines how examples from literature illustrate Erik H. Erikson's paradigm of the psychosocial stages of development in late childhood and adolescence. (MM)

  17. Themes of Charlotte Zolotow's Books and Her Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Karen Lenz

    A study of Charlotte Zolotow's life and the themes of her children's books provides an illustration of the usefulness and problems in the application of theories of adult development, especially as they apply to women. This report of the study contains (1) discussions of Erik Erikson's and Daniel Levinson's theories of adult development; (2) a…

  18. Learning: Meeting the Challenges of Older Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    Erik Erikson's model (1963, 1982) is most useful to an understanding of development and aging. He describes lifelong growth as related to tasks that must be performed. At each stage of life, times of stability are followed by developmental crises. Upon resolving the crisis, the individual can enjoy the particular beauty and security of that…

  19. Bereavement: Applying Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development to College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floerchinger, Debra S.

    One of the developmental challenges that a college student may have to face is the death of a significant other, friend, spouse, relative, child, or parent. This article reviews the literature on the potential effects of bereavement on a college student with respect to Erik Erikson's stage six of psychosocial development (intimacy versus…

  20. The Relation of Re-Creation to a Theory of Ego Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Louise Annie

    This study explores the relationship of ego-stage development (based on the theories of Erik Erikson and roughly defined as psychological maturity) to experiences which a group of adults identified as leading to re-creation for them. The author believes that re-creation -- defined as a feeling of heightened well-being or a sense of renewal and…

  1. Theories of Moral Development. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin; DeVitis, Joseph L.

    The introductory chapter clarifies key terms and lays the background for different theories of moral development. Chapter 2 surveys competing models from various schools of thought on the initial origins of morality in childhood. The works discussed include those of Freud, Jung and Piaget. Chapter 3 includes: Erik H. Erikson's sociocultural…

  2. Developmental Perspectives on the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Linda W., Ed.

    This bulletin provides an overview of developmental theory and practice in relation to social studies instruction in K-12 curriculum. In the first of eight chapters developmental theories pertaining to teaching and learning social studies are presented. The theories of Erik Erikson, Jane Loevinger, Jean Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Robert Selman…

  3. Understanding Adulthood. A Review and Analysis of the Works of Three Leading Authorities on the Stages and Crises in Adult Development. California Personnel and Guidance Association Monograph Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstein, Martin; Papen-Daniel, Michele

    Adult development theorists believe that the changes that occur during the adult years are predictable and age linked. Their theories explain how change is resolved by the majority of the adult population. Three persons whose research has been influential in the field of adult development during the 1970s are Erik Erikson, Daniel Levinson, and…

  4. Is There Life After Adolescence and If So, Should Political Scientists Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Barbara

    The paper describes developmental theories pertaining to adults and considers the implications of these theories for political scientists. Specifically, the works of four developmental theorists are examined: Erik Erikson's theory of the eight ages of man, Daniel J. Levinson's developmental stages which characterize the life of the early and…

  5. Hanging In and Dropping Out: Voices of At-Risk High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Edwin

    The urban high school dropout phenomenon may result from the inability of at-risk students to integrate competing social identities, or "selves." Using Erik Erikson's theory of adolescent personality development as a framework, this study analyzes information gathered from interviews with 73 New York City high school students by peer interviewers.…

  6. A Report on an Evaluation Study of the Group Dynamics Traffic Safety School, State of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Robert D.; And Others

    The evaluation of the effectiveness of the classes for persons convicted of driving while intoxicated was based largely on analyses of verbal behaviors of participants and instructors, using the psychosocial theories of Erik Erikson. The established goals of the course emphasize that the information must be dealt with in a group situation where…

  7. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  8. The Adult Life Cycle: Exploration and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baile, Susan

    Most of the frameworks that have been constructed to mark off the changes in the cycle of adulthood are characterized by a particular focus such as developmental ages, the role of age and timing, or ego development. The theory of Erik Erikson, based upon his clinical observations, represents these crucial turning points in human development: ages…

  9. The Implications of Psychosocial Theory for Personal Growth in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Philip R.; Newman, Barbara M.

    Psychosocial theory, based on the ideas of Erik Erikson and Robert Havighurst, is proposed as a useful framework for conceptualizing the potential for growth within the family. Erikson's (1950) eight stage theory of psychosocial development and Havighurst's (1959) concept of developmental tasks are used to take account of the stages of development…

  10. A Paediatrician Looks at Traditional Approaches to Emotional Development in Preschool and Primary Years. Foundation for Child and Youth Studies Selected Papers Number 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susi Erika

    This discussion of the emotional development of young children is structured upon Erik Erikson's schemata of psycho-social development. Stage 1, which involves trust versus mistrust, includes references to Erikson's theory and the work of Melanie Klein, Berry Brazelton, Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, John Bowlby, Anthony Stevens, and D. W.…

  11. Affective Education: A Teacher's Manual to Promote Student Self-Actualization and Human Relations Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Thomas R.

    This teacher's manual presents affective education as a program to promote student self-actualization and human relations skills. Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Erik Erikson's life stages of psychosocial development form the conceptual base for this program. The goals and objectives of this manual are concerned with problem-solving…

  12. "They're Listening"; A Report on a Psychosocial Approach to Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Robert D.; And Others

    This monograph reports on a project designed to help teachers use Erik Erikson's concept of ego psychology as a framework to help students with school-related difficulties. It was hypothesized that a full understanding of the growth patterns of students, their orientation to their social (school and family) environment, and the development of…

  13. Sex Differences in the Play Behavior of Three Age Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clance, Pauline Rose; And Others

    Erik Erikson concluded that differences in the play constructions of young children are largely determined by psychosexual differences in the subjects and not by cultural influence. He suggested that additional observation of younger and older subjects could determine whether the differences were true for all ages or whether they were restricted…

  14. Sex Differences in Spatial Play Behavior of Six-Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clance, Pauline Rose; Dawson, Flo B.

    Using play constructions as a projective technique of investigation, Erik Erikson (1951) concluded from his observation of preadolescents that, during this developmental period, play constructions are largely determined by psychosexual differences. Erikson suggested that only observation of subjects in a younger and older developmental period…

  15. Identification and mapping of adult plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat VA00W-38, Pioneer brand 26R46, and Coker 9553

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2000, many of the previously effective wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedling stripe rust (pathogen Puccinia striiformis Westend. f.sp. tritici Eriks) resistance genes have become ineffective to the new more aggressive races of the pathogen. Because seedling resistance genes work on a gene for...

  16. Linkage maps of wheat stripe rust resistance genes Yr5 and Yr15 for use in marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat stripe rust (also known as yellow rust) caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks. is a serious global disease of wheat. Two important stripe rust resistance genes, Yr5 and Yr15, are being introgressed into wheat in several breeding programs and are the only known all-stage ...

  17. Conserved loci of leaf and stem rust fungi of wheat share synteny interrupted by lineage-specific influx of repeat elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks; Pt) and stem rust (P. graminis f.sp. tritici; Pgt) are significant economic pathogens having similar host ranges and life cycles, but different alternate hosts. The Pt genome, currently estimated at 135 Mb, is significantly larger than Pgt, at ...

  18. Microsatellite markers linked to stem rust resistance allele Sr9a in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.: Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. & E Henn., is one of the most serious diseases of wheat worldwide. Host resistance is more effective and durable when several stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are pyramided into a single genotype, a process that can be ...

  19. Fellowship of "Fate" and Fellowships of "Faith": Religious Education and Citizenship Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebben, Bert

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between religious identity and engagement in citizenship is examined from an educational point of view. The Dutch systematic theologian Erik Borgman refers to the development of European citizenship as a project of "fellowship of fate": we will need to rediscover a common vision on humanity for Europe as fellow human…

  20. Development of COS-SNP and HRM markers for cost efficient and reliable haplotype-based detection of Lr14a in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks. & Henn.) is a major disease affecting durum wheat production. The Lr14a leaf rust resistant gene present in the durum wheat cv. Creso and its derivative Colosseo is one of the best characterized leaf rust resistance sources presently deployed in durum wheat breed...

  1. Registration of ‘Puma’ soft white winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to strawbreaker foot rot (caused by Oculimacula yallundae Crous & W. Gams and O. acuformis Crous & W. Gams), stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks.), and Cephalosporium stripe (caused by Cephalosporium gramineum Nisikado and Ikata) are important traits ...

  2. Reframing Student Outcomes to Develop 21st Century Skills. Knowledge Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Erik

    2011-01-01

    In this brief, Erik Rice identifies three strategic practices schools, districts, and communities can use to help prepare students for college and career success: (1) To collectively articulate and align a set of student outcomes that prioritize 21st century skills; (2) Transform defined outcomes into functioning frameworks for curriculum and…

  3. Association Mapping of Leaf Rust Response in Durum Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.) is a main objective for durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) breeding.Association mapping on germplasm collections is now being used as an additional approach for the discovery and validation of major genes/QTLs. In this study, a collection of 164 el...

  4. Development of a Set of Stem Rust Susceptible D-Genome Disomic Substitutions Based on Rusty durum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn.) is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum (T. turgidum L. ssp. durum). Prior to the development of molecular techniques, studies of genes for stem rust resistance genes in wheat were com...

  5. Registration of ‘Sprinter’ hard red winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High grain protein concentration and stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks.) resistance are important traits for hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars produced in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. The objective of this research wa...

  6. Molecular Mapping of Wheat Leaf Rust Resistance Gene Lr42

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is an important foliar disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr42 from Aegilops tauschii Coss. has been used as a source of rust resistance in breeding programs. To identify molecular markers closely linked to Lr4...

  7. Identification and mapping of adult plant stripe rust resistance in soft red winter wheat cultivar USG 3555

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the extent or diversity of resistance in soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to stripe rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis Westend. f.sp. tritici Eriks., as until recently, breeding programs in the eastern U.S. have not focused on this disease. Pr...

  8. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of wheat introgression lines carrying the stem rust resistance gene Sr39.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn., poses a serious threat to global wheat production because of the emergence of Pgt-TTKSK (Ug99). The TTKSK resistant gene Sr39 was derived from Aegilops speltoides through chromosome translocation. In this study, we ch...

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the wheat-Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wheat GeneChip® was used to profile the changes occurring in two wheat isolines that differed for the presence of the Yr5 gene after inoculation with the stripe rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks. Yr5 represents a single R gene that confers all-stage resistance to ...

  10. Education and Modernization: the European Experience. The "Intensive Course," Erasmus Strand III in Theory and History of Education and Comparative Education (2nd, Gazzada, Italy, March 15-27, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruithof, Bernard, Ed.; Sting, Stephan, Ed.

    The articles presented in this document provide a framework for examining concepts of educational modernization in Europe. The document is organized into three parts. Part 1 "European Perspectives" includes: (1) What Is Implied by a "European curriculum"? Issues of Eurocentrism, Rationality, and Education (Sven Erik Nordenbo); and (2) Modern…

  11. AN UPDATE ON SOME ARSENIC PROGRAMS AT THE US EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Update on Some Arsenic Projects at the United States

    Environmental Protection Agency*

    Charles O. Abernathy1, Michael Beringer2, Rebecca L Calderon3,

    Timothy McMahon4 and Erik Winchester3

    Offices of Science and Technology1, Solid Waste...

  12. Cognitive Process of Development in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boddington, Eulalee N.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we explored the theories of Arnold Gesell, Erik Erickson and Jean Piaget about how human beings development. In this component we will analyze the cognitive processes of how children perceive and develop, in particular children from a cross-cultural background. How learning takes place, and how the influences of culture, and…

  13. Transfer of crown rust resistance from diploid oat Avena strigosa into hexaploid cultivated oat A. sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New sources of resistance to crown rust, Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae (Eriks.), the major fungal disease of cultivated oat, Avena sativa L. (2n = 6x = 42), are constantly needed due to frequent, rapid shifts in the virulence pattern of the pathogen. Crown rust resistance identified in the diploid...

  14. A new 2DS·2RL Robertsonian translocation transfers Sr59 resistance to stem rust into wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging new races of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn, especially the Ug99 race group threaten global wheat, Triticum aestivum L., production. Screening of a collection of wheat-rye, Secale cereale L., chromosome substitution lines developed at the Swed...

  15. Challenging Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    A recent proposal by Erik Verlinde claims that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon due to some yet undetermined microscopic theory. We present a challenge to this reformulation of gravity. Our claim is that a detailed derivation using Verlinde's proposed theory fails to correctly give Newton's laws or Einstein gravity.

  16. Two small secreted proteins from Puccinia triticina induce reduction of ß-glucoronidase transient expression in wheat isolines containing Lr9, Lr24, and Lr26

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the molecular interaction of wheat and leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks). However, genomic tools are now becoming available so that the host-pathogen interaction can be understood. In this work, a cDNA library was made from haustoria isolated from P. triticina race PBJL inf...

  17. Influence of ripening stages on antioxidant properties of papaya fruit (Carica papaya L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addai, Zuhair Radhi; Abdullah, Aminah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.

    2013-11-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L. cv Eksotika) is one of the most commonly consumed tropical fruits by humans, especially Malaysians. The objective of this study was to determine the phenolic compounds and antioxidants activity in different ripening stages of papaya fruit. The fruits were harvested at five different, stages RS1, RS2, RS3, RS4, and RS5 corresponding to 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 weeks after anthesis, respectively. Papayas fruit at five different stage of ripening were obtained from farms at Pusat Flora Cheras, JabatanPertanian and Hulu Langat Semenyih, Selangor, Malaysia. The antioxidants activity were analyzed using the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), ferric reducing antioxidant Power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The analyses were conducted in triplicate and the data were subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS. The results showed significant differences (P< 0.05) were found at different stages of ripening. The total phenol content TPC, TFC, FRAP and DPPH values increased significantly (P<0.05) with the ripening process. The results showed the important role of the ripening stage in increasing the antioxidant content of papaya fruits.

  18. Variation of surface ozone exceedance around Klang Valley, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, Fatimah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Tang, Rosy; Juneng, Liew; Dominick, Doreena; Juahir, Hafizan

    2014-03-01

    The total hourly surface ozone (O3) exceedance from the 100 ppbv hourly O3 standard set by the Department of Environment Malaysia (DOE) was analysed, as elevated O3 concentrations pose health risks to humans and harms vegetation. Air quality data from 2008 to 2010 were obtained from a total of seven stations located around the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Cheras and Shah Alam monitoring stations consistently showed a high frequency of noncompliance to the DOE standards. Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA) was performed on the daily maximum O3 concentration to analyse the spatial variability. Three distinct clusters were obtained from HACA runs on the daily maximum O3 and the results reflected O3 exceedance pattern among the stations. Analysis of the monthly average O3, nitrogen oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations indicated a strong localised influence on the O3 exceedance patterns. It can be concluded that the O3 exceedance pattern in the Klang Valley area is strongly influenced by local pollutant emission and dispersion characteristics.

  19. Prevalence of gender disparities and predictors affecting the occurrence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    PubMed

    Lee, Lai Kuan; Shahar, Suzana; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Mohd Yusoff, Noor Aini; Rajab, Norfadilah; Aziz, Safiyyah Abdul

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) within gender disparities in Malaysian older adults, and to determine the predictors of MCI according to gender disparities. A community-based sample of urban, multiethnic dwelling elderly aged 60 years of age and above from Cheras, Kuala Lumpur was recruited. Prevalence of all-type MCI, amnestic-type MCI (am-MCI) and non-amnestic-type MCI (nam-MCI) was assessed using comprehensive neuropsychological batteries. The association between demography, socioeconomic status, lifestyle practices, and nutritional status and health risk factors with MCI were examined. Predictors of MCI occurrence between gender disparities were determined. The prevalence of all-type MCI, am-MCI and nam-MCI was 21.1%, 15.4% and 5.7%, respectively. Binary logistic regression indicated that hypercholesterolemia is the significant predictor for MCI in men after adjustment for age, ethnicity and total years of education. While, in women, MCI was best predicted by married status, without exercise practice, overweight and obesity. These results suggest that approximately one-fifth of the studied elderly people had MCI. Predictors for MCI are totally different between men and women. It is critical to identify those at higher risk for MCI in order to implement preventative measures to delay or reverse this abnormal condition. PMID:21546098

  20. 77 FR 26744 - Fishing Capacity Reduction Program for the Southeast Alaska Purse Seine Salmon Fishery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... on May 23, 2011 (76 FR 29707), and final program regulations on October 6, 2011 (76 FR 61986), to... voters on March 1, 2012 (77 FR 12568) and the notice of referendum period on March 29, 2012 (77 FR 19004... Menten Erik S01A57726X Michael Mercury S01A55386C Nash Paul S01A57907M Nugent Matthew S01A55689G...

  1. No reason to talk about it: Families confront the nuclear taboo

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, D.S.; Zeitlin, S.

    1987-01-01

    Based on interviews with families from various ethnic and economic backgrounds, the authors look at the effect of the nuclear threat on family life, exploring such issues as how parents deal with their children's fears about the threat of nuclear war and the difficulty adolescents have committing themselves to the adult community in the nuclear age. Using Erik Erikson's stages of development as a framework, they move from early childhood to old age in their analysis of how families confront the nuclear issue.

  2. Encounter with death: The thought of Robert Jay Lifton.

    PubMed

    Lageman, A G

    1987-12-01

    Robert Jay Lifton begins his work in the psychosocial framework that he takes over from Erik Erikson. Lifton's thought is based upon a central paradigm-"death and the continuity of life." Lifton makes important contributions with his five modes of symbolic immortality and with his investigation of the psychological themes in survivors. The origins and limits of Lifton's thought are critically examined. PMID:24302069

  3. Aging according to biography.

    PubMed

    Weiland, S

    1989-04-01

    Aging can no longer be considered an afterthought in biographies. How scholarly biographers treat their subjects is considered in the context of the work of Erik H. Erikson. Readers of biographies can discover in accounts of the subject's last years the same interest in developmental values typical of biographical attention to youth. Developmental theorists can observe in biography representations of the life cycle that add meaning to aging. PMID:2753379

  4. The Life Cycle Completed. Extended Version with New Chapters on the Ninth Stage of Development by Joan M. Erikson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erikson, Erik H.

    This expanded edition of a 1982 book by Erik Erikson summarizes his work on the stages of the human life cycle, including chapters on psychosexuality and the cycle of generations, major stages in psychosocial development, and ego and ethos. An additional chapter on the ninth stage sets forth his philosophy on old age--i.e. the 80s and 90s--and how…

  5. Identity crisis modality: a technique for assessing the structure of the identity crisis.

    PubMed

    Côté, J E

    1986-12-01

    In this paper an interpretation of Erik Erikson's theoretical notions of the severity, prolongation, and aggravation of the identity crisis is presented and operationalized in terms of "identity crisis modality", a concept representing prevailing patterns of identity formation. The reliability and validity of the Identity Crisis Modality Chart (ICMC), an "objective-projective" instrument, is assessed and its various possible and unique uses, ranging from clinical applications to large scale national surveys, are discussed. PMID:3805436

  6. (Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-11-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm/sup 2/. The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm/sup 2/ in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 ..mu..m. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Applying theory of planned behavior to predict exercise maintenance in sarcopenic elderly.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohamad Hasnan; Shahar, Suzana; Teng, Nur Islami Mohd Fahmi; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohd; Omar, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the factors associated with exercise behavior based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) among the sarcopenic elderly people in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur. A total of 65 subjects with mean ages of 67.5±5.2 (men) and 66.1±5.1 (women) years participated in this study. Subjects were divided into two groups: 1) exercise group (n=34; 25 men, nine women); and 2) the control group (n=31; 22 men, nine women). Structural equation modeling, based on TPB components, was applied to determine specific factors that most contribute to and predict actual behavior toward exercise. Based on the TPB's model, attitude (β=0.60) and perceived behavioral control (β=0.24) were the major predictors of intention to exercise among men at the baseline. Among women, the subjective norm (β=0.82) was the major predictor of intention to perform the exercise at the baseline. After 12 weeks, attitude (men's, β=0.68; women's, β=0.24) and subjective norm (men's, β=0.12; women's, β=0.87) were the predictors of the intention to perform the exercise. "Feels healthier with exercise" was the specific factor to improve the intention to perform and to maintain exercise behavior in men (β=0.36) and women (β=0.49). "Not motivated to perform exercise" was the main barrier among men's intention to exercise. The intention to perform the exercise was able to predict actual behavior regarding exercise at the baseline and at 12 weeks of an intervention program. As a conclusion, TPB is a useful model to determine and to predict maintenance of exercise in the sarcopenic elderly. PMID:25258524

  8. Applying theory of planned behavior to predict exercise maintenance in sarcopenic elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohamad Hasnan; Shahar, Suzana; Teng, Nur Islami Mohd Fahmi; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohd; Omar, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the factors associated with exercise behavior based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) among the sarcopenic elderly people in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur. A total of 65 subjects with mean ages of 67.5±5.2 (men) and 66.1±5.1 (women) years participated in this study. Subjects were divided into two groups: 1) exercise group (n=34; 25 men, nine women); and 2) the control group (n=31; 22 men, nine women). Structural equation modeling, based on TPB components, was applied to determine specific factors that most contribute to and predict actual behavior toward exercise. Based on the TPB’s model, attitude (β=0.60) and perceived behavioral control (β=0.24) were the major predictors of intention to exercise among men at the baseline. Among women, the subjective norm (β=0.82) was the major predictor of intention to perform the exercise at the baseline. After 12 weeks, attitude (men’s, β=0.68; women’s, β=0.24) and subjective norm (men’s, β=0.12; women’s, β=0.87) were the predictors of the intention to perform the exercise. “Feels healthier with exercise” was the specific factor to improve the intention to perform and to maintain exercise behavior in men (β=0.36) and women (β=0.49). “Not motivated to perform exercise” was the main barrier among men’s intention to exercise. The intention to perform the exercise was able to predict actual behavior regarding exercise at the baseline and at 12 weeks of an intervention program. As a conclusion, TPB is a useful model to determine and to predict maintenance of exercise in the sarcopenic elderly. PMID:25258524

  9. Remote Correlation of Paleoceanographic Events in the Northern Parts of Bering and Barents Seas during the Termination I and Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. V.; Ovsepyan, E.; Murdmaa, I.; de Vernal, A.; Risebrobakken, B.; Seitkalieva, E.; Radionova, E.; Alekhina, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Barents and Bering seas are closely linked to the High Arctic and to the THC by marine gateways as well as by land-sea and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Our multi-proxy time series demonstrate that these remote seas exhibited dramatic changes during the deglaciation through a succession of global and regional paleoceanographic events including the beginning of Termination I (BT1), Heinrich-1 or Oldest Dryas (OD), Bølling-Allerød (B/A), Younger Dryas (YD) and early Holocene (EH). In the NW Barents Sea, the increased subsurface-to-bottom Atlantic water inflow via the Kvitøya-Erik Eriksen trough (cores S 2519 and S 2528) is inferred at the late OD, late B/A and late YD/EH transition. These events are generally coupled with the strengthened AMOC. A remarkable sea surface warming and sea ice retreat are documented at ~ 13 ka BP. Surface warming and strong Atlantic water inflow were followed by intense iceberg calving in the Erik Eriksen Trough as indicated by the high IRD content of Core S-2519. The rock fragments are unsorted and mainly angular suggesting their ice-rafted (likely iceberg-rafted) origin. Svalbard glaciers apparently derived the material dominated by black schistous mudstones, hard limestones with coral remains, fine-grained sandstones from nearby islands, and icebergs spread it in the Kvitøya-Erik Eriksen Trough during the early deglaciation. The ice rafted coarse terrigenous material supply during the BT1 is also suggested for the NW Bering Sea. In the NW Pacific, NW Bering Sea and Sea of Okhotsk, surface bioproductivity peaked at B/A and EH mainly due to the global warming, enhanced nutrient supply by surface currents from the flooded northeastern shelf, intensified vertical mixing and water exchange through the opened straits. Oxygen-depleted bottom water at intermediate depths characterized several locations including the NW Bering Sea (Core SO201-2-85KL).

  10. The Probable Progenitor of PSN J01364816+1545310 in M74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyk, S. D. Van; Petigura, E. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Zheng, W.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Foley, R. J.; Tucker, B. E.; Kelly, P. L.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    Schuyler D. Van Dyk (IPAC/Caltech), Erik A. Petigura (UC Berkeley), S. Bradley Cenko (NASA/GSFC), WeiKang Zheng, Geoffrey W. Marcy (UC Berkeley), Andrew W. Howard (U. Hawaii/IfA), Ryan J. Foley (Harvard/Smithsonian CfA), Brad E. Tucker (ANU/UC Berkeley), Patrick L. Kelly, and Alexei V. Filippenko (UC Berkeley) report the identification of the probable progenitor of PSN J01364816+1545310 in archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel (WFC) images in bands F435W, F555W, and F814W from 2003 November and 2005 June.

  11. Issues of hope and faith in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Carni, E

    1988-12-01

    Akira Kurosawa's 1952 film about a man with a terminal gastric cancer introduces a discussion of hope and faith in the oncology patient. A psychodynamic relationship between hope and faith is explored, using Lawrence LeShan's research in cancer psychotherapy and Erik Erikson's lifespan developmental theory. LeShan describes a cancer personality characterized by hopeless despair, while Erikson formulates a psychogenetic framework for the development of hope and despair. Hope and faith are linked through the individual's earliest strivings toward basic trust in the world and his or her own self-efficacy. Accordingly, cancer psychotherapy may aim at restoring adult patients' faith in life and inner creative resources. PMID:24302437

  12. Called home: The creation of family life.

    PubMed

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered. PMID:24271052

  13. The subordinate's predicaments.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, E H; Gypen, J

    1979-01-01

    How can subordinates improve relations with their superiors? And how can superiors help their subordinates feel comfortable in what is often a tense relationship? These questions have usually been dealt with only indirectly in management circles. Yet the relationship is so threatening to many subordinates that they react in ways that are damaging to themselves and their ogranizations. Drawing heavily on the work of psychologist Erik Erikson, the authors present dilemmas that commonly confront the subordinate. They point out that being aware of these dilemmas can make them more manageable and then offer advice to superiors to aid subordinates in handling such situations. PMID:10243537

  14. Spiritual journeys in aging: A buddhist view.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, R Y

    1994-09-01

    The spiritual journey of a Buddhist devotee is a continual exploration of the truth of interdependence which Siddhartha Gautama realized to become the Buddha, "the Enlightened One." On the morning of the enlightenment, the Buddha apprehended the truth that all things and all beings are interconnected and mutually dependent in time and space. One measure of the spiritual maturity of the Buddhist devotee is his or her appreciation for the profound responsibilities and gratitude we share for all things. To illustrate the significance of interdependence in our lives, the author turns to the wisdom contained inVital Involvement in Old Age by Erik and Joan Erikson and Helen Q. Kivnick. PMID:24264030

  15. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  16. A Challenge to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan; Munoz, Gerardo

    2012-03-01

    In a recent publication, Erik Verlinde attempts to show that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but rather as an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon arising from an unspecified microscopic theory via equipartition and holography. We present a challenge to his reformulation of gravity. A detailed examination of Verlinde's derivation leads to a number of questions that severely weaken the claim that such a theory correctly reproduces Newton's laws or Einstein gravity. In particular, we find that neither Newtonian gravity nor the Einstein equations are uniquely determined using Verlinde's postulates.

  17. Laboratory aspects of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Marlyn; Mahdy, Zaleha A; Omar, Jamil; Maan, Noorashikin; Jamil, M A

    2002-09-01

    A total of 1,661 pregnant women aged between 13 and 45 years were screened for bacteriuria by urine culture. Of the 1,661 culture results, 615 (37%) yielded no growth; 728 (43.8%) yielded no significant growth (presence of <10(5) organisms/ml urine of one or more types of bacteria); 286 (17.2%) yielded mixed growth (presence of >10(5) organisms/ml urine of more than one type of bacteria) and only 32 (1.9%) showed significant growth (presence of >10(5) organisms/ml urine of a single bacterium). Urine microscopy was also conducted. Two hundred and twenty-four (13.5%) specimens had >10 white blood cells/ml urine, of which 66 had >100 white blood cells; 13 were from the significant growth group. Three hundred and seventy-four (22.5%) specimens showed the presence of bacteria, 42 (2.5%) had red blood cells, 370 (22.3%) had epithelial cells, 58 (3.5%) had crystals, and 14 (0.8%) had yeasts. The most common bacterium isolated was Escherichia coli (12; 40%); the others included group B Streptococcus (5; 15%), Klebsiella spp (5; 15%), Diphtheroids (2), and Candida albicans (2). Fifty-two percent of tested strains were sensitive to ampicillin; 24 of 28 strains (85.7%) were sensitive to ciprofloxacin; all 7 strains tested were sensitive to nitrofurantoin and all 20 strains tested were sensitive to cotrimoxazole; 14/20 (70%) and 16/17 (94.1%) were sensitive to cephalexin and cefuroxime respectively. This study shows that asymptomatic bacteriuria does occur in pregnant women, albeit at a very low rate in an urban setting like Cheras. Urine microscopy is not specific and only serves as a guide to bacteriuria. The commonest causative organisms are those from the gastrointestinal tract and vagina. The antibiogram showed that cefuroxime and cephalexin are likely to be effective in treating bacteriuria: ampicillin must be reserved for Gram-negative organisms. For Gram-positive organisms, of which Group B Streptococcus is important, ampicillin is still effective in vitro

  18. COMMITTEES: Proceedings of the 13th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW13), San Juan, Puerto Rico, 19-22 January 2009 Proceedings of the 13th Gravitational Waves Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW13), San Juan, Puerto Rico, 19-22 January 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Bruce Allen, AEI, Germany Patrick Brady, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA Deepto Chakrabarty, MIT, USA Eugenio Coccia, INFN, Gran Sasso, Italy James Cordes, Cornell University, USA Mario Díaz (Chair), University of Texas Brownsville, USA Sam Finn, Penn State, USA Neil Gehrels, NASA GSFC, USA Fredrick A Jenet, University of Texas Brownsville, USA Nobuyuki Kanda, Osaka City University, Japan Erik Katsavounides, MIT, USA Dick Manchester, ATNF, Australia Soumya Mohanty, University of Texas Brownsville, USA Benoit Mours, LAPP-Annecy, France Maria Alessandra Papa, AEI, Germany Kate Scholberg, Duke University, USA Susan Scott, The Australian National University Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham, UK Andrea Vicere, INFN - Sezione di Firenze, Italy Stan Whitcomb, LIGO CALTECH, USA Local Organising Committee (LOC) Paulo Freire (Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico) Murray Lewis (Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico) Wanda Wiley (University of Texas Brownsville, USA)

  19. Science & Technology Review November/December 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-10-07

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Innovation Is Key to Prosperity and Security --Commentary by Erik J. Stenehjem; (2) Taking Ultrafast Snapshots of Material Changes--The dynamic transmission electron microscope captures images a million times faster than conventional instruments; (3) Automated Technology for Laser Fusion Systems--The first completely computer-controlled system for aligning laser beams is helping make fusion research possible; (4) Protecting the Nation through Secure Cargo--A new device tracks and monitors cargo containers during transit to improve national security; (5) Atom by Atom, Layer by Layer--Extremely thin sandwiches of materials called nanolaminates exhibit remarkable, highly useful properties; and (6) Predicting the Bizarre Properties of Plutonium--A supercomputing 'grand challenge' team has made highly precise predictions of the behavior of plutonium's most important solid phase.

  20. Emergence in holographic scenarios for gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieks, Dennis; van Dongen, Jeroen; de Haro, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    'Holographic' relations between theories have become an important theme in quantum gravity research. These relations entail that a theory without gravity is equivalent to a gravitational theory with an extra spatial dimension. The idea of holography was first proposed in 1993 by Gerard 't Hooft on the basis of his studies of evaporating black holes. Soon afterwards the holographic 'AdS/CFT' duality was introduced, which since has been intensively studied in the string theory community and beyond. Recently, Erik Verlinde has proposed that even Newton's law of gravitation can be related holographically to the 'thermodynamics of information' on screens. We discuss these scenarios, with special attention to the status of the holographic relation in them and to the question of whether they make gravity and spacetime emergent. We conclude that only Verlinde's scheme straightforwardly instantiates emergence. However, assuming a non-standard interpretation of AdS/CFT may create room for the emergence of spacetime and gravity there as well.

  1. Some Characteristics of a Lipase Preparation from the Uredospores of Puccinia graminis tritici1

    PubMed Central

    Knoche, H. W.; Horner, Teresa L.

    1970-01-01

    The characteristics of a lipase preparation from the uredospores of Puccinia graminis (pers.) f. sp. tritici (Eriks. and Henn.) have been investigated. The majority of the lipolytic activity in disrupted uredospores was found to be associated with a lipid-containing, particulate fraction which sedimented at 5000g. With triolein as a substrate, both 1,3- and 1,2-diglycerides were formed. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, and Hg2+ strongly inhibited the activity. A pH optimum of 6.7 was observed. The sensitivity of the preparation to higher temperatures was indicated by a complete loss of activity when the preparation was preincubated at 25 C or above for 30 minutes. A temperature optimum of 15 C for the enzyme is strikingly similar to the temperature optimum for germination of the uredospores. The possible relationship between the sensitivity of the enzyme and the germination process is discussed. PMID:16657474

  2. KSC-04PD-1810

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, from left, United Space Alliance workers Loyd Turner, Craig Meyer and Erik Visser prepare to conduct a fit check of an External Tank (ET) digital still camera in the right-hand liquid oxygen umbilical well on Space Shuttle Atlantis. NASA is pursuing use of the camera, beginning with the Shuttles Return To Flight, to obtain and downlink high-resolution images of the ET following separation of the ET from the orbiter after launch. The Kodak camera will record 24 images, at one frame per 1.5 seconds, on a flash memory card. After orbital insertion, the crew will transfer the images from the memory card to a laptop computer. The files will then be downloaded through the Ku-band system to the Mission Control Center in Houston for analysis.

  3. KSC-04PD-1811

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, from left, United Space Alliance workers Loyd Turner, Craig Meyer and Erik Visser conduct a fit check of an External Tank (ET) digital still camera in the right-hand liquid oxygen umbilical well on Space Shuttle Atlantis. NASA is pursuing use of the camera, beginning with the Shuttles Return To Flight, to obtain and downlink high-resolution images of the ET following separation of the ET from the orbiter after launch. The Kodak camera will record 24 images, at one frame per 1.5 seconds, on a flash memory card. After orbital insertion, the crew will transfer the images from the memory card to a laptop computer. The files will then be downloaded through the Ku-band system to the Mission Control Center in Houston for analysis.

  4. Applying Erikson’s Wisdom to Self-Management Practices of Older Adults: Findings from Two Field Studies

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Tam E.; Hassevoort, Luke; Ruggiano, Nicole; Shtompel, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    According to Erik Erikson’s theory on the stages of human development, achieving wisdom later in life involves revisiting previous crises and renewing psychosocial accomplishments. However, few studies have used Erikson’s theory as a framework for examining how older adults self-manage physical and mental health changes that commonly occur later in life. This paper presents findings from two qualitative studies that demonstrate how older adults apply wisdom in new domains. Specifically, it was found that older adults (1) reasserted autonomy by initiating creative problem solving; and 2) applied skills gained from productive activities earlier in life to new health-related problems that arise later in life. These findings highlight the importance of engaging older adults to repurpose their life skills, and thus reapply wisdom to new areas of their lives. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:25651571

  5. Psychosocial adjustment of adolescent siblings of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Packman, Wendy; Gong, Kimberly; VanZutphen, Kelly; Shaffer, Tani; Crittenden, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a widely practiced therapy for many life-threatening childhood disorders. The authors investigated the psychosocial effects of HSCT on siblings of pediatric HSCT patients (n = 44; 21 donors, 23 nondonors, ages 6 to 18 years). Donor siblings reported significantly more anxiety and lower self-esteem than did nondonors. Nondonors showed significantly more school problems. Approximately one third of all siblings reported moderate to severe posttraumatic stress. The study drew on the developmental theory of Erik Erikson and the psychosocial model of posttraumatic stress. As part of the study, the authors used the Measures of Psychosocial Development (MPD), a self-report measure based on Eriksonian constructs. The MPD was used to assess the psychosocial adjustment of 12 siblings who were adolescents (> or =13 years) at the time the study was conducted. In this article, findings are presented from the MPD as well as salient findings from the larger study. PMID:15490868

  6. The application of a generativity model for older adults.

    PubMed

    Ehlman, Katie; Ligon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Generativity is a concept first introduced by Erik Erikson as a part of his psychosocial theory which outlines eight stages of development in the human life. Generativity versus stagnation is the main developmental concern of middle adulthood; however, generativity is also recognized as an important theme in the lives of older adults. Building on the work of Erikson, McAdams and de St. Aubin (1992) developed a model explaining the generative process. The aims of this article are: (a) to explore the relationship between generativity and older adults as it appears in research literature; and (b) to examine McAdam's model and use it to explain the role of generativity in older adults who share life stories with gerontology students through an oral history project. PMID:22950351

  7. Identity formation and social relations during late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Craig-Bray, L; Adams, G R; Dobson, W R

    1988-04-01

    Theoretical assumptions outlined by Erik Erikson on psychosocial crisis resolution hypothesizes that the positive resolution of the identity crisis is predictive of more mature intimacy formation. To test this hypothesis, college-aged late adolescents (48 subjects) completed interviews and selfreport instruments measuring identity formation and degree of intimacy along with daily records of social interactions for one week. Analyses indicated a complex association between identity and intimacy formation. Comparisons were made between the exploration and commitment process of identity and the measures of intimacy formation and social interaction measures. Numerous complex sex differences were observed with several interactions between gender, exploration, commitment, and intimacy context. Findings are discussed in terms of broadening future research direction beyond the simple study of the linkage of identity and intimacy. PMID:24277583

  8. Developmental stages of occupational therapy and the feminist movement.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, M B

    1976-10-01

    Developmental stages characterize the growth of both the feminist movement and the field of occupational therapy. The human development stages described by Erik Erikson are used to compare the growth stages of these two groups to the human sequence. It is hypothesized that both female-dominated groups began with an "infancy" period in the early 1900s characterized by the beginnings of identity and confidence in their respective groups. Both continued to develop through stages corresponding to the childhood stages characterized by Erikson and into the adolescent acting out stages as characterized by the demonstrations of the 1960s. Present and future trends are explored in relation to developmental stages, as well as to implications for the field of occupational therapy in education, theory, and practice. PMID:788519

  9. From Cicero to Cohen: developmental theories of aging, from antiquity to the present.

    PubMed

    Agronin, Marc E

    2014-02-01

    Cicero's famous essay "On Old Age," written in ancient Rome, was one of the first detailed depictions of the challenges and opportunities posed by the aging process. Several modern developmental theories of the life cycle have echoed many of the themes of Cicero, including the existence of unfolding life stages with specific tasks and transitions. Freud's psychoanalytic theory of infantile sexuality provided a limited starting point, as well as a theoretical base for Erik Erikson's proposed eight stages of the life cycle. Unlike Freud, however, Erikson and others including Daniel Levinson, George Vaillant, and Carol Gilligan elaborated on forces in adult development that were distinct from early life experiences. Gene Cohen's theory of human potential phases took middle age as a starting point and proposed an extensive structure for late-life development based on emergent strengths including wisdom and creativity. PMID:23665459

  10. A second career in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D E

    1984-03-01

    Career changes in all vocations are relatively common in the forties age group due to a variety of factors which include a crisis period caused by polarities of Generativity versus Stagnation as conceptualized by Erik H. Erikson. Generativity is served not only by procreativity but also by guiding the next generation through teaching. The result can be the strength of Care. Stagnation can result in unhappiness, irrational and destructive behavior, or withdrawal. Concepts of young, old and mortality also come into focus. A successful career change from private practice to academic medicine depends upon a combination of power, opportunity, and character. To be successful, the change should be made for positive reasons and be based upon youthful concepts in the cold reality of the financial and intellectual challenges of a new and competitive career. If properly done, both the personal rewards and the contribution to future medical care can be quite positive. PMID:6706448

  11. On the origins of psychoanalytic psychohistory.

    PubMed

    Pietikainen, Petteri; Ihanus, Juhani

    2003-05-01

    This article examines the origins and early development of psychoanalytically inspired psychohistory from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. It focuses on Erik H. Erikson, Bruce Mazlish, and Robert Jay Lifton and illustrates their contributions to psychoanalytic psychohistory. Erikson, Mazlish, and Lifton were core members of the Wellfleet group, a research project originally funded by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1965 to conceptualize the foundation of psychohistory. The article gives an account of the early history of the Wellfleet group and argues for specific historical reasons to explain why psychoanalytic psychohistory emerged on the East Coast of the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s. A critique of the Wellfleet group in unpublished correspondence of Erich Fromm and David Riesman is also discussed. PMID:12822567

  12. The importance of play in adulthood. An interview with Joan M. Erikson. Interview by Daniel Benveniste.

    PubMed

    Erikson, J M

    1998-01-01

    Joan M. Erikson (1902-1997) was an artist, a writer, a mother, and the wife and collaborator of Erik H. Erikson (1902-1994), one of the most important and influential psychoanalysts in the world. The following is an edited dialogue on one of her favorite topics--The Importance of Play in Adulthood. It features her thoughts on the subject and reminiscences of the ways she played throughout her life. She muses on play in relation to humor, fun, the role of the fool, and more. The article was a project undertaken in the spirit of play and it will hopefully evoke further playful musings in the minds of readers. PMID:9990822

  13. [The first to go--physicians who experimented on themselves].

    PubMed

    Rugstad, Hans Erik

    2005-09-01

    Since ancient times, there have been rules for experiments on humans. Some have claimed that if one thinks an experiment might involve danger, it should first be tried out on oneself. There are, in fact, numerous examples of doctors who have undergone daring experiments on themselves. Among them are Max von Pettenkofer, who drank cholera bacteria, Werner Forssmann who catheterized his own heart, John Paul Stapp, who sat in a rocket sled at almost the speed of sound, and then made an abrupt stop. Doctors from Walter Reed's research team infected themselves with yellow fever, Erik Jacobsen demonstrated the effect of antabuse and alcohol on himself, Barry J. Marshall drank helicobacter pylori bacteria, Klaus Hansen drank heavy water, and Ole Jakob Malm transplanted foreign tissue onto his own skin in order to discern among different tissue types. This article describes these various experiments, why they were done, and their consequences. The perspective of ethics in such experimental research is briefly discussed. PMID:16151505

  14. Views of the mission control center during STS-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A group of payloads operation flight controllers follows early progress of the Spacelab 1 mission. Standing behind the row of consoles are European Space Agency's (ESA) Director General Erik Quistgaard and NASA Headquarters Dr. Michael J. Wiskerchen (44919); After opening of Spacelab in the cargo bay of Columbia, these flight controllers in the payloads operations control center (POCC) at JSC discuss agenda of experiments. Quistgaard, center, ESA's Director General, talks to ESA's Mel Brooks, left, and NASA headquarters Wiskerchen (44920); Flight controllers on duty in the POCC at JSC monitor day 1 activity aboard the Spacelab module. Behind them is a banner representing the West German state of Baden-Wurtenbug from which payload specialist Ulf Merbold hails (44921).

  15. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  16. Applying Erikson's wisdom to self-management practices of older adults: findings from two field studies.

    PubMed

    Perry, Tam E; Ruggiano, Nicole; Shtompel, Natalia; Hassevoort, Luke

    2015-04-01

    According to Erik Erikson's theory on the stages of human development, achieving wisdom later in life involves revisiting previous crises and renewing psychosocial accomplishments. However, few studies have used Erikson's theory as a framework for examining how older adults self-manage physical and mental health changes that commonly occur later in life. This article presents findings from two qualitative studies that demonstrate how older adults apply wisdom in new domains. Specifically, it was found that older adults (1) reasserted autonomy by initiating creative problem solving and (2) applied skills gained from productive activities earlier in life to new health-related problems that arise later in life. These findings highlight the importance of engaging older adults to repurpose their life skills and thus reapply wisdom to new areas of their lives. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:25651571

  17. The dating mind: evolutionary psychology and the emerging science of human courtship.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Nathan; Miklousic, Igor

    2012-01-01

    In the New York Times bestselling book The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists (2006), the world was granted its first exclusive introduction to the steadily growing dating coach and pick-up artist community. Many of its most prominent authorities claim to use insights and information gleaned both through first-hand experience as well as empirical research in evolutionary psychology. One of the industry's most well-respected authorities, the illusionist Erik von Markovik, promotes a three-phase model of human courtship: Attraction, building mutual Comfort and Trust, and Seduction. The following review argues that many of these claims are in fact grounded in solid empirical findings from social, physiological and evolutionary psychology. Two texts which represent much of this literature are critiqued and their implications discussed. PMID:23253794

  18. Identification and mapping of leaf, stem and stripe rust resistance quantitative trait loci and their interactions in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Pandey, M P; Singh, A K; Knox, R E; Ammar, K; Clarke, J M; Clarke, F R; Singh, R P; Pozniak, C J; Depauw, R M; McCallum, B D; Cuthbert, R D; Randhawa, H S; Fetch, T G

    2013-02-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.), stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) cause major production losses in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The objective of this research was to identify and map leaf, stripe and stem rust resistance loci from the French cultivar Sachem and Canadian cultivar Strongfield. A doubled haploid population from Sachem/Strongfield and parents were phenotyped for seedling reaction to leaf rust races BBG/BN and BBG/BP and adult plant response was determined in three field rust nurseries near El Batan, Obregon and Toluca, Mexico. Stripe rust response was recorded in 2009 and 2011 nurseries near Toluca and near Njoro, Kenya in 2010. Response to stem rust was recorded in field nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, in 2010 and 2011. Sachem was resistant to leaf, stripe and stem rust. A major leaf rust quantitative trait locus (QTL) was identified on chromosome 7B at Xgwm146 in Sachem. In the same region on 7B, a stripe rust QTL was identified in Strongfield. Leaf and stripe rust QTL around DArT marker wPt3451 were identified on chromosome 1B. On chromosome 2B, a significant leaf rust QTL was detected conferred by Strongfield, and at the same QTL, a Yr gene derived from Sachem conferred resistance. Significant stem rust resistance QTL were detected on chromosome 4B. Consistent interactions among loci for resistance to each rust type across nurseries were detected, especially for leaf rust QTL on 7B. Sachem and Strongfield offer useful sources of rust resistance genes for durum rust breeding. PMID:23396999

  19. Tropical Airborne LiDAR for Landslide Assessment in Malaysia: a technical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Manap, Mohamad; Azhari Razak, Khamarrul; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ahmad, Azhari; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Mohamad Zin, Mazlan; A'zad Rosle, Qalam

    2015-04-01

    Malaysia has faced a substantial number of landslide events every year. Cameron Highlands, Pahang is one of the badly areas affected by slope failures characterized by extreme climate, rugged topographic and weathered geological structures in a tropical environment. A high frequency of landslide occurrence in the hilly areas is predominantly due to the geological materials, tropical monsoon seasons and uncontrolled agricultural activities. Therefore the Government of Malaysia through the Prime Minister Department has allocated a special budget to conduct national level hazard and risk mapping project through Minerals and Geoscience Department Malaysia, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The primary aim of this project is to provide slope hazard risk information for a better slope management in Malaysia. In addition this project will establish national infrastructure for geospatial information on the geological terrain and slope by emphasizing the disaster risk throughout the country. The areas of interest are located in the three different selected areas i.e. Cameron Highlands (275 square kilometers), Ipoh (200 square kilometers) and Cheras Kajang -- Batang kali (650 square kilometers). These areas are selected based on National Slope Master Plan (2009 -- 2023) that endorsed by Malaysia Government Cabinet. The national hazard and risk mapping project includes six parts of major tasks: (1) desk study and mobilization, (2) airborne LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, (3) field data acquisition and verification, (4) hazard and risk for natural terrain, (5) hazard and risk analysis for man-made slope and (6) Man-made slope mitigation/preventive measures. The project was authorized in September, 2014 and will be ended in March, 2016. In this paper, the main focus is to evaluate the suitability of integrated capability of airborne- and terrestrial LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, and also digital photography for regional landslide assessment. The

  20. Site Suitability Analysis for Dissemination of Salt-tolerant Rice Varieties in Southern Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, D. D.; Singh, A. N.; Singh, U. S.

    2014-11-01

    Bangladesh is a country of 14.4 million ha geographical area and has a population density of more than 1100 persons per sq. km. Rice is the staple food crop, growing on about 72 % of the total cultivated land and continues to be the most important crop for food security of the country. A project "Sustainable Rice Seed Production and Delivery Systems for Southern Bangladesh" has been executed by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in twenty southern districts of Bangladesh. These districts grow rice in about 2.9 million ha out of the country's total rice area of 11.3 million ha. The project aims at contributing to the Government of Bangladesh's efforts in improving national and household food security through enhanced and sustained productivity by using salinity-, submergence- and drought- tolerant and high yielding rice varieties. Out of the 20 project districts, 12 coastal districts are affected by the problem of soil salinity. The salt-affected area in Bangladesh has increased from about 0.83 million ha in 1973 to 1.02 million ha in 2000, and 1.05 million ha in 2009 due to the influence of cyclonic storms like "Sidr", "Laila" and others, leading to salt water intrusion in croplands. Three salinity-tolerant rice varieties have recently been bred by IRRI and field tested and released by the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI) and Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA). These varieties are BRRI dhan- 47 and Bina dhan-8 and - 10. However, they can tolerate soil salinity level up to EC 8-10 dSm-1, whereas the EC of soils in several areas are much higher. Therefore, a large scale dissemination of these varieties can be done only when a site suitability analysis of the area is carried out. The present study was taken up with the objective of preparing the site suitability of the salt-tolerant varieties for the salinity-affected districts of southern Bangladesh. Soil salinity map prepared by Soil Resources Development Institute of

  1. TU-E-BRD-01: President’s Symposium: The Necessity of Innovation in Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bayouth, J; Siewerdsen, J; Wahl, E

    2014-06-15

    This abstract will not blow you away, but speed-painting presenter Erik Wahl will certainly make a truly unique AAPM symposium that you will not want to miss. Along with clinical director John Bayouth and scientific leader Jeff Siewerdsen, this session will highlight innovation. To avoid being button pushers and irrelevant investigators of yesterday’s science, we must innovate. This is particularly challenging in the changing landscape of declining research funding and healthcare reimbursement. But all hope is not lost, Medical Physics is a field born out of innovation. As scientists we quickly translated the man-made and natural phenomena of radiation into a tool that could diagnose broken bones, locate foreign objects imbedded within the body, and treat a spectrum of diseases. As hyperbolae surrounding the curative powers of radiation overcame society, physicists continued their systematic pursuit of a fundamental understanding of radiation and applied their knowledge to enable the diagnostic and therapeutic power of this new tool. Health economics and the decline in research funding have put the Medical Physicist in a precarious position: how do we optimally participate in medical research and advanced patient care in the face of many competing needs? Today's diagnostic imaging and therapeutic approaches are tremendously sophisticated. Researchers and commercial vendors are producing technologies at a remarkable rate; to enable their safe and effective implementation Medical Physicists must work from a fundamental understanding of these technologies. This requires all of us, clinically practicing Medical Physicists, Researchers and Educators alike, to combine our training in scientific methods with innovation. Innovation is the key to our past, a necessity for our contemporary challenges, and critical for the future of Medical Physics. The keynote speakers for the 2014 AAPM Presidential Symposium session will address the way we approach these vitally important

  2. EDITORIAL: Nonlinear optical manipulation, patterning and control in nano- and micro-scale systems Nonlinear optical manipulation, patterning and control in nano- and micro-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, Cornelia; Simoni, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    collaborating in this network. The editors are grateful for the active participation of all colleagues in this network, in the network meeting, and in making this special issue a success. We also extend our thanks to a great Journal of Optics A staff that have supported the editing of this special issue, especially the Publishing Editor, Julia Dickinson. Among the active colleagues in our network was also Associate Professor Erik Fällman, Umea University, Sweden. It was with great sadness that we learnt of the death of our colleague and friend in June 2008. We dedicate this special issue to his memory, and the active and always engaged contribution he made both to our conference and to the field of optical micromanipulation and optical control. Erik will be particularly remembered for his applications of optical force measurements on bacterial pili adhesion, which has stimulated a worldwide experimental and theoretical interest in this field.

  3. S-TI-S Josephson junction networks: a platform for exploring and exploiting topological states and Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harlingen, Dale J.

    We are studying the transport properties of hybrid superconductor-topological insulator nanoscale devices fabricated by depositing superconductor electrodes onto the surface of topological insulators. In top-gated lateral Nb-Bi2Se3-Nb junctions, we have measured the Josephson supercurrent and conductance as a function of geometry, temperature, and gate voltage in order to determine the nature of the electronic transport. The supercurrent exhibits a sharp drop as a function of gate voltage that may be explained by the relocation of the topological surface state from above to below trivial conducting surface states formed by band-banding near the surface. We find that the magnetic field modulation of the supercurrent in Josephson junctions and dc SQUIDs exhibits anomalous features consistent with a 4 π-periodic sin(φ/2)-component in the junction current-phase relation that may arise from the nucleation of Majorana bound states in the junction. We are exploring circuits for imaging, manipulating, and braiding these exotic excitations and schemes for reading out their parity. In collaboration with Aaron Finck, Erik Huemiller, Cihan Kurter, Vladimir Orlyanchik, Martin Stehno, and Can Zhang.

  4. Lost Mountain: a year in the vanishing wilderness; radical strip mining and the devastation of Appalachia

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, E.

    2007-02-15

    The mountains of Appalachia are home to one of the great forests of the world - they predate the Ice Age and scientists refer to them as the 'rainforests' of North America for their remarkable density and species diversity. These mountains also hold the mother lode of American coal, and the coal mining industry has long been the economic backbone for families in a region hard-pressed for other job opportunities. But recently, a new type of mining has been introduced -'radical strip mining', aka 'mountaintop removal'- in which a team employing no more than ten men and some heavy machinery literally blast off the top of a mountain, dump it in the valley below, and scoop out the coal. Erik Reece chronicles the year he spent witnessing the systematic decimation of a single mountain, aptly named 'Lost Mountain'. A native Kentuckian and the son of a coal worker, Reece makes it clear that strip mining is neither a local concern nor a radical contention, but a mainstream crisis that encompasses every hot-button issue - from corporate hubris and government neglect, to class conflict and poisoned groundwater, to irrevocable species extinction and landscape destruction. Published excerpts of Lost Mountain are already driving headlines and legislative action in Kentucky.

  5. Sex role strain among kibbutz adolescents and adults: A developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Snarey, J; Friedman, K; Blasi, J

    1986-06-01

    In spite of a commitment to equality, the kibbutz is a male-dominated society with highly differentiated sex roles. Has this gap between ideals and reality created sex role strain for kibbutz-born adolescents and adults? Previous kibbutz studies have suggested that sex role strain may be the most intense among adult kibbutz women. Based on Erik Erikson's developmental model, however, we hypothesized that adolescent females would experience significantly greater sex role strain than other kibbutz members, including adult women. Adolescent and adult males and females were tested using Loevinger's ego development test. The sex role items of the test were used to construct a new measure of sex role strain. The global index included the following submeasures: avoidance of sex role issues; expression of intellectual, emotional, or behavioral sex role conflict; and evaluative attitudes toward male roles and female roles. Significant cohort or sex differences were found on the global index and on all submeasures of sex role strain. The findings indicate that sex role strain is greatest among adolescent females, followed by adolescent males. Adult kibbutz women, however, are significantly more likely to focus their dissatisfaction in the area of actual role behavior rather than in terms of how they intellectually conceptualize kibbutz sex roles, as is the case for adolescents and adult males. PMID:24301699

  6. Mapping of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.

    PubMed

    McCartney, C A; Stonehouse, R G; Rossnagel, B G; Eckstein, P E; Scoles, G J; Zatorski, T; Beattie, A D; Chong, J

    2011-02-01

    Crown rust is an important disease of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks. Crown rust is efficiently and effectively managed through the development of resistant oat varieties. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current P. coronata population in North America. The primary objective of this study was to develop DNA markers linked to Pc91 for purposes of marker-assisted selection in oat breeding programs. The Pc91 locus was mapped using a population of F7-derived recombinant inbred lines developed from the cross 'CDC Sol-Fi'/'HiFi' made at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. The population was evaluated for reaction to P. coronata in field nurseries in 2008 and 2009. Pc91 mapped to a linkage group consisting of 44 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. DArTs were successfully converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Five robust SCARs were developed from three non-redundant DArTs that co-segregated with Pc91. SCAR markers were developed for different assay systems, such that SCARs are available for agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism detection. The SCAR markers accurately postulated the Pc91 status of 23 North American oat breeding lines. PMID:20862449

  7. Gamma-ray spectra of individual components of decay series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Henry

    2001-04-01

    In order to obtain high quality spectra to update the ``Heath Catalog" of spectra with Ge detectors, we (I and a group of Univ. of Michigan undergraduates*) have investigated the neutron activation and decay products related to natural thorium and natural uranium. We have used the UM Ford Nuclear Reactor for irradiations and the UM Phoenix Memorial Lab for the remaining work. Spectra have been obtained with a variety of detectors, some suitable for low energies (>5 keV) and others efficient (70%) for high energies. Sources have been obtained in a variety of forms, each of which has been characterized in comparison with a thin, point source. We will report on A=233 (Th, Pa, and U, and the Np-237 parent of Pa-233), A=234 (Th and the Pa isomers), and A=239 (U, Np, and the Am-243 parent of Np-239). *The 2000-01 undergrad research group consists of Jason Banker, Adam Berro, Adam Cole, Amelia Deschamps, Erik Epp, Ralph Pierre, and Emma Wong.

  8. Genetic analysis of seedling resistance to crown rust in five diploid oat (Avena strigosa) accessions.

    PubMed

    Cabral, A L; Park, R F

    2016-02-01

    Crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks., is a serious menace in oats, for which resistance is an effective means of control. Wild diploid oat accessions are a source of novel resistances that first need to be characterised prior to introgression into locally adapted oat cultivars. A genetic analysis of resistance to crown rust was carried out in three diverse diploid oat accessions (CIav6956, CIav9020, PI292226) and two cultivars (Saia and Glabrota) of A. strigosa. A single major gene conditioning resistance to Australian crown rust pathotype (Pt) 0000-2 was identified in each of the three accessions. Allelism tests suggested that these genes are either the same, allelic, or tightly linked with less than 1 % recombination. Similarly, a single gene was identified in Glabrota, and possibly two genes in Saia; both cultivars previously reported to carry two and three crown rust resistance genes, respectively. The identified seedling resistance genes could be deployed in combination with other resistance gene(s) to enhance durability of resistance to crown rust in hexaploid oat. Current diploid and hexaploid linkage maps and molecular anchor markers (simple sequence repeat [SSR] and diversity array technology [DArT] markers) should facilitate their mapping and introgression into hexaploid oat. PMID:26143064

  9. An Annotated Bibliography of HVDC Transmission and FACTS Devices, 1996-1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberger, Wayne H.; Varma, Rajiv K.; Flanagan, John D.

    1998-06-01

    This edition of the Annotated Bibliography of HVDC Transmission and FACTS Devices continues work begun in 1962 by the late Erik Bromberg, Bonneville Power Administration Librarian. His original bibliography covered the period 1932--1962. Subsequent editions were compiled by Bromberg, Val S. Lava, and Wayne Litzenberger, all of Bonneville Power Administration. Beginning with the 1991--1993 edition, the scope of the bibliography was expanded to include flexible ac transmission (FACTS) devices. This 1996--1997 edition also contains information for 1998. Preparation of the present edition took place primarily in May-June of 1998. All pertinent references have been included that were available to the editors at the time of preparation. Papers for the 1998 IEEE Winter and Summer Power Meetings and 1998 T and D Conference have been included. This edition contains the organizational affiliation of the first-named author as an aid to accessing the reference. Unfortunately, space limitations prevented the inclusion of the affiliations of all authors. Some minor editorial changes have been made to abstracts to ensure consistency in style and syntax.

  10. A.E. Nordenski and the auroral oval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygrén, Tuomo; Silén, Johan

    In 1857, Adold Erik Nordenskiöld (1832-1901), a Finnish geographer and mineralogist, was forced to withdraw from his position at the University of Helsinki because of a conflict with the czarist officials in Finland. He then moved to Sweden, where he became one of the most celebrated explorers of his time. Most famous of his polar expeditions was the discovery of the Northeast Passage. Nordenskiöld made his voyage in the wooden steamship Vega in 1878-79.Vega started its voyage on June 22, 1878, and was directed in a course around Scandinavia and along the Siberian coast toward Bering Strait. Nordenskiöld's plan was to reach the Pacific Ocean during the summer months, but this was hindered by unfavorable ice conditions. At the end of September the sea was blocked by ice fields, and the Vega had to pass the winter on the northern coast of the Chukchi Peninsula (67°4‧49″N, 173°23‧2″W)—exasperatingly close to the open waters of Bering Strait. The ship could not set sail any sooner than the following July when the sea was free again. After visiting Japan, China, and Ceylon, the Vega passed through the Suez Canal and finally, on April 24, 1880, arrived at Stockholm.

  11. Erikson's concept of ego identity reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, R S

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores and attempts to explain the paradox that Erik Erikson--after Freud, undoubtedly the psychoanalyst best known, most deeply esteemed, and most widely influential in the sociohistorical surround of world culture--has at the same time never been properly integrated into the psychoanalytic mainstream, but has instead been marginalized, consigned to a persisting psychoanalytic limbo. Two successive contexts within the historical unfolding of psychoanalysis in America, the milieu in which Erikson worked, would seem to account for this neglect. First, Erikson's monumental contributions to our understanding of the psychosocial developmental process, of the epigenesis of the ego, of the phase-specific developmental tasks across the eight postulated stages of the life cycle, and of the intergenerational cogwheeling of the life cycles were made during the 1950s and 1960s and could not easily be integrated into the ego psychology metapsychological paradigm then monolithically regnant within American psychoanalysis. And, second, as a major paradigm shift took place in America, beginning in the 1970s, toward a more relational, interpersonal, and intersubjective framework, Erikson's contributions, couched as they were in the structural language of the ego psychology of his time, were overlooked and went unremarked as seminal precursors of the newly emerging emphases. The clear relationship of Erikson's concepts of (ego) identity to emerging conceptions of self in relation to objects was simply not noticed, and his work continues to this day to be neglected and unintegrated within psychoanalysis. PMID:9565906

  12. Call of the wild: the negative tendency in the nature religions of American youth.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The author argues that the paucity of options for sanctioned rebellion in contemporary American society drive an ever-increasing number of idealistic youth in search of isolation in nature, where they construct what the author here calls "nature religions." These worldviews focus on purification of falsehood, ritualized through enduring extreme physical pain, social isolation, and extreme weather conditions in hopes of experiencing reality more authentically. The author argues that unemployment, limited vocational options, and the homogenization of American society are among the major catalysts for this ever-expanding breed of seekers, each of whom struggles with a negative tendency (a theoretical term created by Erik Erikson). Furthermore, the author argues that the emphasis in the nature religions on connection to nature is constructed to compensate for the lack of community and sense of human connectedness in contemporary American society. A representative case study from Jon Krakauer's (Into the wild; Doubleday, New York, 1996) Into the Wild is presented to illuminate and justify the argument made by the author for more institutionally housed options for sanctioned, licit rebellion to manage the negative tendency. PMID:23700246

  13. Symbolic loss in American adolescents: mourning in teenage cinema.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2014-04-01

    I argue that the changing economic conditions in the contemporary world have caused a shift in religious and cultural values among American youth. This shift in cultural and religious values and practices is interpreted in this essay as an experience of symbolic loss, or a loss of socially shared historic ideals and symbols (Homans in Childhood and selfhood: essays on tradition, religion, and modernity in the psychology of Erik H. Erikson. Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp 189-228, 2008). I argue that the symbolic loss among American youth can most clearly be seen in the contemporary horror film genre in America. I assess the popularity of this genre, its value structure and the psychosocial consequences of the symbolic losses experienced by American youth as witnessed in this film genre. I suggest two ways in which adolescents and adults can work to re-create cultural and religious meanings that both foster courage and serenity in the face of the profound despair that accompanies the rage and paranoia in the contemporary horror film genre. PMID:22843337

  14. Connecting Life Span Development with the Sociology of the Life Course: A New Direction

    PubMed Central

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The life course has become a topic of growing interest within the social sciences. Attempts to link this sub-discipline with life span developmental psychology have been called for but with little sign of success. In this paper, we seek to address three interlinked issues concerning the potential for a more productive interchange between life course sociology and life span psychology. The first is to try to account for the failure of these two sub-disciplines to achieve any deepening engagement with each other, despite the long-expressed desirability of that goal; the second is to draw attention to the scope for enriching the sociology of the life course through Erik Erikson’s model of life span development; and the last is the potential for linking Eriksonian theory with current debates within mainstream sociology about the processes involved in ‘individualisation’ and ‘self-reflexivity’ as an alternative entry point to bring together these two fields of work. PMID:27041774

  15. A four-fold humanity: Margaret Mead and psychological types.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in 1933, while working in New Guinea, Margaret Mead developed her so-called squares hypothesis. Mead never published its terms, though she made a brief comment on it in her autobiography, Blackberry Winter (1972), and the arguments found in Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies (1935) and the research leading to Balinese Character (Bateson & Mead, 1942) bore its imprint. Beginning with William McDougall's distinction between temperament (innate predispositions) and character (learned organization of habit), Mead articulated a morphological approach to the interplay between biology and culture that yielded four primary and four intermediary personality types. Under specified but not inevitable circumstances, the conscious choices of a given people could render one or another of these types characteristic or predominantly stable within their population, giving each of the other types a definite relation to the dominant type and thereby the cultural ethos of its society. Persons of each type followed a developmental path specific to their type different both from that of other types and in its manifestations given the various relations of the individual's type to the dominant type. Mead's hypothesis was, therefore, a vision of the unity and diversity of a single human species as well as an approach to the differing psychological positioning of individuals in cultures. In examining Mead's hypothesis, this essay also takes up Mead's debts to several leading psychologists (McDougall, C. G. Jung, and Erik Erikson), and (provisionally) how her vision differed from that of Ruth Benedict. PMID:15048668

  16. Links of Adolescents Identity Development and Relationship with Peers: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ragelienė, Tija

    2016-01-01

    Objective: According to Erik Erikson, the main task of adolescents is to solve the crisis of identity versus role confusion. Research has shown that a stable and strong sense of identity is associated with better mental health of adolescents. Good relationships with peers are also linked with better emotional and psychological well-being of adolescents. However, there is a lack of reviews of studies in the scientific literature examining the relationship between the adolescents’ identity development and relationships with peers. The aims of this article were to analyze links between adolescent identity development and relationships with peers identified from a literature review, summarize the results, and discuss the theoretical factors that may predict these relationships. Method: A systematic literature review. Results: Analysis of findings from the systematic literature review revealed that a good relationship with peers is positively related to adolescent identity development, but empirical research in this area is extremely limited. Conclusions: The links between adolescents’ identity development and their relationship with peers are not completely clear. The possible intermediate factors that could determine the relationship between adolescent identity development and their relationships with peers are discussed. Further empirical researches is needed in this area. PMID:27274745

  17. KSC-03PD-0810

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sponsor representatives of the 2003 Southeastern Regional FIRST Robotic Competition take a moment to compare notes between events. From left are Wayne Weinberg, director of development for the University of Central Florida College of Engineering and Computer Science; Erik Halleus, chair of the FIRST Regional Advisory Committee and a vice president at Siemens Enterprise Networks; and Roy D. Bridges, Jr., director of the NASA/Kennedy Space Center. The competition is being held at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, March 20-23. Forty student teams from around the country are participating in the event that pits team-built gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The teams are sponsored by NASA/Kennedy Space Center, The Boeing Company/Brevard Community College, and Lockheed Martin Space Operations/Mission Systems for the nonprofit organization For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, known as FIRST. The vision of FIRST is to inspire in the youth of our nation an appreciation of science and technology and an understanding that mastering these disciplines can enrich the lives of all mankind.

  18. Early climate change consensus at the National Academy: the origins and making of "Changing Climate".

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Nicolas; Tschinkel, Walter R; Tschinkel, Victoria J

    2010-01-01

    The 1983 National Academy of Sciences report entitled "Changing Climate," authored by a committee of physical and social scientists chaired by William Nierenberg, was an early comprehensive review of the effects of human-caused increases in the levels of atmospheric CO2. Study of the events surrounding the committee's creation, deliberations, and subsequent report demonstrates that the conclusions of the report were the consensus of the entire committee and in line with the scientific consensus of the time. This result contraverts a 2008 paper in which Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. Conway, and Matthew Shindell asserted that the report contradicted a growing consensus about climate change, and that Nierenberg for political reasons deliberately altered the summary and conclusions of the report in a way that played down the concerns of the other physical scientists on the committee. Examining the production of the report and contextualizing it in contemporaneous scientific and political discussion, we instead show how it was a multi-year effort with work divided among the various members of the committee according to their expertise. The synthesis and conclusions were expressly a joint statement of the committee and were consistent with other assessments of that time expressing deep concern over the potential issues while stopping short of recommending major policy changes due to the uncertainties, and to a lack of good alternatives. PMID:20848755

  19. von Willebrand’s disease: a report from a meeting in the Åland islands

    PubMed Central

    BERNTORP, E.; PEAKE, I.; BUDDE, U.; LAFFAN, M.; MONTGOMERY, R.; WINDYGA, J.; GOODEVE, A.; PETRINI, P.; DEPKA, M.VON; MIESBACH, W.; LILLICRAP, D.; FEDERICI, A. B.; LASSILA, R.; WHITE, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary von Willebrand’s disease (VWD) is probably the most common bleeding disorder, with some studies indicating that up to 1% of the population may have the condition. Over recent years interest in VWD has fallen compared to that of haemophilia, partly the result of focus on blood-borne diseases such as HIV and hepatitis. Now the time has come to revisit VWD, and in view of this some 60 international physicians with clinical and scientific interest in VWD met over 4 days in 2010 in the Åland islands to discuss state-of-the-art issues in the disease. The Åland islands are where Erik von Willebrand had first observed a bleeding disorder in a number of members of a family from Föglö, and 2010 was also the 140th anniversary of his birth. This report summarizes the main papers presented at the symposium; topics ranged from genetics and biochemistry through to classification of VWD, pharmacokinetics and laboratory assays used in the diagnosis of the disease, inhibitors, treatment guidelines in different age groups including the elderly who often have comorbid conditions that present challenges, and prophylaxis. Other topics included managing surgeries in patients with VWD and the role of FVIII in VWF replacement, a controversial subject. PMID:22906074

  20. Along paths converging to Bengt Saltin’s early contributions in exercise physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, P

    2015-01-01

    A fascinating chain of events led in 1941 to the formation of the Department of Physiology at the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute (GCI) in Stockholm, Sweden. Erik Hohwü Christensen, from the scientifically advanced Lindhard School in Copenhagen became its first professor. A central research question for him concerned determining the limiting factors for maximal physical performance in man. This was the academic setting where the sports interested medical student Bengt Saltin was introduced to exercise physiology. In the summer of 1959, he became involved in a study on intermittent vs continuous running. A doctoral project, with Per-Olof Åstrand as his tutor, resulted in 1964 as the thesis “Aerobic work capacity and circulation at exercise in man. With special reference to the effect of prolonged exercise and/or heat exposure”. In the decade that followed, Saltin continued along that path. However, he also added a vital research line involving pioneering studies on skeletal muscles in the exercising man, a series of novel studies on the physiological demands in various sports, and studies of the effects of physical training within the general population. PMID:26589112

  1. Along paths converging to Bengt Saltin's early contributions in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Schantz, P

    2015-12-01

    A fascinating chain of events led in 1941 to the formation of the Department of Physiology at the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute (GCI) in Stockholm, Sweden. Erik Hohwü Christensen, from the scientifically advanced Lindhard School in Copenhagen became its first professor. A central research question for him concerned determining the limiting factors for maximal physical performance in man. This was the academic setting where the sports interested medical student Bengt Saltin was introduced to exercise physiology. In the summer of 1959, he became involved in a study on intermittent vs continuous running. A doctoral project, with Per-Olof Åstrand as his tutor, resulted in 1964 as the thesis "Aerobic work capacity and circulation at exercise in man. With special reference to the effect of prolonged exercise and/or heat exposure". In the decade that followed, Saltin continued along that path. However, he also added a vital research line involving pioneering studies on skeletal muscles in the exercising man, a series of novel studies on the physiological demands in various sports, and studies of the effects of physical training within the general population. PMID:26589112

  2. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-12-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ħ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that as the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ħ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  3. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ℏ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that since the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ℏ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  4. History of Disaster Medicine.

    PubMed

    Suner, Selim

    2015-10-01

    Erik Noji, mentioned, tongue in cheek, Noah as the first disaster manager during a lecture in 2005. The canonical description of "The Genesis Flood" does describe Noah as a master planner and executer of an evacuation of biblical proportions. After gaining knowledge of a potential catastrophic disaster he planned and executed an evacuation to mitigate the effects of the "Genesis Flood" by building the Ark and organizing a mass exodus. He had to plan for food, water, shelter, medical care, waste disposal and other needs of all the evacuees. Throughout history, management of large disasters was conducted by the military. Indeed, the military still plays a large role in disaster response in many countries, particularly if the response is overseas and prolonged. The histories of emergency preparedness, disaster management and disaster medicine have coevolved and are inextricably intertwined. While disaster management in one form or another existed as long as people started living together in communities, the development of disaster medicine took off with the emergence of modern medicine. Similar to disaster management, disaster medicine also has roots in military organizations. PMID:27437524

  5. Implications of land-atmosphere coupling on the present and projected climate over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez, S.; Montavez, J. P.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Garcia-Valero, J. A.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J.; Jimenez, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    north-south heterogeneities of the IP climate are better captured. Regarding the underlying mechanisms causing these results, the leading is related to the more realistic sensible and latent superficial heat fluxes simulated. Last, the implications of such detected features when projecting the future warming over the IP have been evaluated. In order to do that, two pairs of identical simulations except for the soil model employed have been performed: a control period (1961-1990) driven by the ERIK1 experiment performed with ECHO-G global climate model, and a future projection (2070-2099) driven by the prolongation of the ERIK1 towards the future under the SRES A2 scenario. Results show a larger projected 2-meter temperature increase for the summer season, almost 2 degrees for some areas, when the complex LSM (Noah) is used. This increase is larger for the maximum temperatures than for the minimum ones showing different spatial patterns. Moreover, not only a displacement of the temperature distribution function is found, but also a change of its shape. Due to its climatic heterogeneity, the IP results a feasible scenario for this kind of studies. It has been shown that seasons and areas not subjected to hydrological stress phenomena are not notably affected by the use of the more complex (and so, more computationally expensive) soil parametrization. Nevertheless, results indicate more realistic simulations for the South of the IP and for the summer season, where the simplest-scheme simulation fails in both mean values and temporal variability. These current results open a new uncertainty source for temperature projections coming from the uncertainties related to the simulated precipitation.

  6. Mapping the entangled ontology of science teachers' lived experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugbjerg, Peer S.; de Freitas, Elizabeth; Valero, Paola

    2015-09-01

    primary science teachers—Erik, Jane and Tina—, we look for how their self-reported lived experiences become entangled with their content knowledge and their classroom practice. We examine this entanglement in the data collected from the three teachers. In the three teachers stories the proposed dimensions of experience shift in prominence. We focus on Erik's reflections on his teaching experience as well as his bodily gestures in teaching biological concepts and explanations to the pupils in a classical classroom setting. We discuss how Jane embodies and enacts her own childhood relations to nature and natural phenomena, recent in-service training, teaching experience and continued enthusiastic relation to nature and natural phenomenon. We also discuss how Tina exhibits a continued entanglement of past ethical experience and present embodiment of dedication to do good for others. By carefully attending to the entanglement of the three dimensions—continuity, relation and setting—, we hope to offer insight into the complex ways in which the body factors into science teaching practices.

  7. EDITORIAL: The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páll Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Uhrenfeldt, Christian

    2012-03-01

    AndersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Pia BomholtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hafliði P GíslasonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Haraldur Páll GunnlaugssonAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark John HansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Britta JohansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Volodymyr KhranovskyyLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Arne Nylandsted LarsenAarhus University, Denmark Helge MalmbekkUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik Stensrud MarsteinInstitute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway Antonio MartiUniversidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain Torben MølholtUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Sveinn ÓlafssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Thomas PedersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Thomas Garm PedersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Dirch Hjorth PetersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Vincent QuemenerUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Henry RadamsonKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Bahman RaeissiUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Jonatan SlotteAalto University, Aalto, Finland Xin SongUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Einar Örn SveinbjörnssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Mikael SyväjärviLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Chi Kwong TangUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik V ThomsenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Christian UhrenfeldtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hans Ulrik UlriksenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Muhammad UsmanKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Lasse VinesUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Ulrich WahlUnidade de Física e Aceleradores, Sacavém, Portugal Helge WemanNTNU, Trondheim, Norway Gerd WeyerAarhus University, Denmark

  8. Earth-Sized Planets Around Nearby Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Despite having lost two of its reaction wheels, the Kepler mission has proven itself still capable of making discoveries. Now in a mission extension called K2, in which radiation pressure from the Sun stabilizes the spacecraft, Kepler has continued to detect planets in distant solar systems. And one of its latest discoveries is an especially intriguing pair of Earth-sized planets transiting a small, cool star only ~200 light-years away Transiting Discoveries: Earth-sized planets that orbit close to their host stars are thought to be remarkably common. Theyre predicted to exist around more than a quarter of Sun-like stars, and to be nearly ubiquitous around the smaller, cooler M dwarfs. Unfortunately, systems with M-dwarf hosts are hard to find, since theyre often very faint; a large survey is needed to spot the few M dwarfs near enough to be easily detectable. Luckily, Kepler has risen to the occasion Calibrated photometry for the K2-21 system, with the planet transits marked by red and teal ticks. Best-fit light curves for the transits are shown in the lower panels. Click for a closer look [Petigura et al. 2015] In a recent paper, a team of scientists led by Erik Petigura (Hubble Fellow at the California Institute of Technology) reports the discovery of two new transiting, Earth-sized planets around nearby M dwarf K2-21. The team followed up with spectroscopy of the host star, which allowed them to estimate that the two planets, K2-21b and K2-21c, have radii roughly 1.6 and 1.9 times the radius of Earth. These sizes mean that they straddle the boundary between high-density, rocky planets and low-density planets with thick gaseous envelopes.Unique PlanetsOne unanswered question about close-in, small planets common around dwarfs is whether they form in situ, or form far from their host and migrate inward. K2-21b and c have orbital periods of approximately 9.3 and 15.5 days, which means they are very nearly in a 5:3 resonance. This may be evidence that they formed

  9. The climate of the Iberian Peninsula during the last five centuries from a regional climate model perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Garcia-Valero, J. A.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Zorita, E.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.

    2009-09-01

    During the last years the use of paleoclimate simulations with models of different complexity has become an usual tool in paleoclimate studies. Progress in understanding climate variability leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant for both the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. Most of paleoclimate integrations available in the literature covering the last millennium have been performed with relative rough resolution which does not allow to analyze regional climate features that can be of interest in the context of proxies evidence. In this work we present a new high resolution (30 km) regional climate simulation over the Iberian Peninsula of the last five. The regional simulations were performed with a climate version of the MM5 model coupled to the Noah LSM. The driving conditions used follow the Erik1 experiment, performed with the ECHO-G global circulation model. The results indicate that the seasonal modes of variation for near surface air temperature and precipitation obtained within the regional paleoclimate experiment are consistent with the obtained using the observational databases and equivalent to regional climate integrations driven by reanalysis data. On the other hand, the main modes of variation show strong signals in historical periods such as the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. Finally, some preliminary comparisons between the global and the regional model against reconstructions are also reported in this contribution.

  10. A high resolution regional paleoclimate experiment over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Garcia-Valero, J. A.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    During the last years the use of paleoclimate simulations with models of different complexity has become an usual tool in paleoclimate studies. Progress in understanding climate variability leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant for both the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. Most of paleoclimate integrations available in the literature covering the last millennium have been performed with relative rough resolution which does not allow to analyze regional climate features that can be of interest in the context of proxies evidence. In this work we present a new high resolution (30 km) regional climate simulation over the Iberian Peninsula of the last five centuries and two extensions to the future for the A2 and B2 SRES scenarios. The regional simulations were performed with a climate version of the MM5 model coupled to the Noah LSM. The driving conditions used follow the Erik1 experiment, performed with the ECHO-G global circulation model. The results indicate that the seasonal modes of variation for near surface air temperature and precipitation obtained within the regional paleoclimate experiment are consistent with the obtained using the observational databases and equivalent to regional climate integrations driven by reanalysis data. On the other hand, the main modes of variation show strong signals in historical periods such as the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. Finally, some preliminary comparisons between the global and the regional model against tree ring temperature reconstructions are also reported in this contribution.

  11. Interdisciplinarity, Debate And Movie Clips As Highly Motivating Factors In Live Shows - Five Years Of Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengler, E.; Sirera, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    A live show on any subject that includes experiments and continuous interaction with the audience is a well known approach for EPO activities that many are carrying out all over. We present such an initiative with some added ingredients such as interdisciplinarity, the use of movie clips, and especially the debate between the two presenters, a debate that is all the more attractive to the public if it not fully staged but closely represents their actual points of view. José Montesinos, from the "Orotava" Canarian Foundation for the History of Science, is and plays the role of the more mature math professor who has grown weary of the overrated value given in science to mathematics and its consequences. This poses a constant challenge to his colleague, Erik Stengler, from the Science Museum of Tenerife, the young down-to-earth hands-on scientist, who defends the usual view that science and technology are to be judged by their achievements, which have brought about the advancement of modern society. With this approach and as a collaboration between our institutions, we have produced and toured highly successful activities on: Einstein and Relativity (from 2005 to 2008, "Einstein Goes To School," including a theatre play); circularity, the number π, forces of inertia and the Newtonian revolution (in 2008/2009, "The Tension Between Circularity and The Straight Line"); and the foundations of modern astronomy (in 2009/2010 "Kepler and Galileo, Messengers of the Stars"). Audiences were very varied - students, adult students, general public, prison inmates, teachers - and all appreciated the presentations as fun, thought-provoking and highly motivating, and valued especially the interdisciplinary character of the activity. Movie clips have shown to be especially useful to recover the attention of the young when they lose the thread due to the short attention spans they presently have.

  12. MO-D-BRD-01: Memorial to Bengt Bjarngard - Memorial Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Das, I

    2014-06-15

    We lost a legendary medical physicist, Dr. Bengt Erik Bjarngard, to angiosarcoma an aggressive type of cancer. He devoted his life to providing improved methods of radiation treatment for this devastating disease over the last 36 years. Bengt was born in a rural village of Bjarnum in southern Sweden, located near forest and is known for its furniture making. He migrated to USA at the age of 35 and was recruited by Dr. Samuel Hellman to lead a group of physicists that became the “mecca of medical physics” known as the Joint Center of Radiation Therapy (JCRT) at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Bengt mentored some of the best physicists in the country, and many of our modern treatments go back to the early days of research at the JCRT. These accomplishments, dating from 1969–1989, include: dose optimization using computer control; soft wedges; stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS); total-body irradiation (TBI); CT-planning; and radiation dosimetry. Bengt worked at Brown University in Rhode Island and at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where he provided major contributions in radiation dosimetry, specifically with the head scatter model. He advocated superior calculation algorithm through the Helax treatment planning system that was on par from most commercial systems. Bengt served as AAPM president in 1979 and was a recipient of the Coolidge Award in 1998. He had a lifelong love of nature, retiring in 2000 from the University of Pennsylvania to take care of his 200 acres of homestead forest in Maine. His legacy continues through his contributions to radiation dosimetry. This session, on small field dosimetry, is a small tribute to his memory. Further details can be found in his obituary in Med Phy, 41(4), 040801, 2014.

  13. Development and characterization of a compensating wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Robertsonian translocation with Sr44 resistance to stem rust (Ug99).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxuan; Danilova, Tatiana V; Rouse, Matthew N; Bowden, Robert L; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S; Pumphrey, Michael O

    2013-05-01

    The emergence of the highly virulent Ug99 race complex of the stem rust fungus (Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn.) threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production worldwide. One of the effective genes against the Ug99 race complex is Sr44, which was derived from Thinopyrum intermedium (Host) Barkworth and D.R. Dewey and mapped to the short arm of 7J (designated 7J#1S) present in the noncompensating T7DS-7J#1L∙7J#1S translocation. Noncompensating wheat-alien translocations are known to cause genomic duplications and deficiencies leading to poor agronomic performance, precluding their direct use in wheat improvement. The present study was initiated to produce compensating wheat-Th. intermedium Robertsonian translocations with Sr44 resistance. One compensating RobT was identified consisting of the wheat 7DL arm translocated to the Th. intermedium 7J#1S arm resulting in T7DL∙7J#1S. The T7DL∙7J#1S stock was designated as TA5657. The 7DL∙7J#1S stock carries Sr44 and has resistance to the Ug99 race complex. This compensating RobT with Sr44 resistance may be useful in wheat improvement. In addition, we identified an unnamed stem rust resistance gene located on the 7J#1L arm that confers resistance not only to Ug99, but also to race TRTTF, which is virulent to Sr44. However, the action of the second gene can be modified by the presence of suppressors in the recipient wheat cultivars. PMID:23358862

  14. Resistance to recombinant stem rust race TPPKC in hard red spring wheat.

    PubMed

    Klindworth, D L; Miller, J D; Williams, N D; Xu, S S

    2011-08-01

    The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn.) resistance gene SrWld1 conditions resistance to all North American stem rust races and is an important gene in hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars. A sexually recombined race having virulence to SrWld1 was isolated in the 1980s. Our objective was to determine the genetics of resistance to the race. The recombinant race was tested with the set of stem rust differentials and with a set of 36 HRS and 6 durum cultivars. Chromosomal location studies in cultivars Len, Coteau, and Stoa were completed using aneuploid analysis, molecular markers, and allelism tests. Stem rust differential tests coded the race as TPPKC, indicating it differed from TPMKC by having added virulence on Sr30 as well as SrWld1. Genes effective against TPPKC were Sr6, Sr9a, Sr9b, Sr13, Sr24, Sr31, and Sr38. Genetic studies of resistance to TPPKC indicated that Len, Coteau, and Stoa likely carried Sr9b, that Coteau and Stoa carried Sr6, and Stoa carried Sr24. Tests of HRS and durum cultivars indicated that five HRS and one durum cultivar were susceptible to TPPKC. Susceptible HRS cultivars were postulated to have SrWld1 as their major stem rust resistance gene. Divide, the susceptible durum cultivar, was postulated to lack Sr13. We concluded that although TPPKC does not constitute a threat similar to TTKSK and its variants, some cultivars would be lost from production if TPPKC became established in the field. PMID:21573955

  15. Identification of New Resistance Loci to African Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Tetraploid Wheats Based on Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Laidò, Giovanni; Panio, Giosuè; Marone, Daniela; Russo, Maria A; Ficco, Donatella B M; Giovanniello, Valentina; Cattivelli, Luigi; Steffenson, Brian; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn. (Pgt), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Races of the pathogen in the "Ug99 lineage" are of international concern due to their virulence for widely used stem rust resistance genes and their spread throughout Africa. Disease resistant cultivars provide one of the best means for controlling stem rust. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to African stem rust race TTKSK at the seedling stage, we evaluated an association mapping (AM) panel consisting of 230 tetraploid wheat accessions under greenhouse conditions. A high level of phenotypic variation was observed in response to race TTKSK in the AM panel, allowing for genome-wide association mapping of resistance QTL in wild, landrace, and cultivated tetraploid wheats. Thirty-five resistance QTL were identified on all chromosomes, and seventeen are of particular interest as identified by multiple associations. Many of the identified resistance loci were coincident with previously identified rust resistance genes; however, nine on chromosomes 1AL, 2AL, 4AL, 5BL, and 7BS may be novel. To validate AM results, a biparental population of 146 recombinant inbred lines was also considered, which derived from a cross between the resistant cultivar "Cirillo" and susceptible "Neodur." The stem rust resistance of Cirillo was conferred by a single gene on the distal region of chromosome arm 6AL in an interval map coincident with the resistance gene Sr13, and confirmed one of the resistance loci identified by AM. A search for candidate resistance genes was carried out in the regions where QTL were identified, and many of them corresponded to NBS-LRR genes and protein kinases with LRR domains. The results obtained in the present study are of great interest as a high level of genetic variability for resistance to race TTKSK was described in a germplasm panel comprising most of the tetraploid wheat sub-species. PMID

  16. Geophysics of Small Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, Erik I.

    1998-01-01

    As a SETI Institute PI from 1996-1998, Erik Asphaug studied impact and tidal physics and other geophysical processes associated with small (low-gravity) planetary bodies. This work included: a numerical impact simulation linking basaltic achondrite meteorites to asteroid 4 Vesta (Asphaug 1997), which laid the groundwork for an ongoing study of Martian meteorite ejection; cratering and catastrophic evolution of small bodies (with implications for their internal structure; Asphaug et al. 1996); genesis of grooved and degraded terrains in response to impact; maturation of regolith (Asphaug et al. 1997a); and the variation of crater outcome with impact angle, speed, and target structure. Research of impacts into porous, layered and prefractured targets (Asphaug et al. 1997b, 1998a) showed how shape, rheology and structure dramatically affects sizes and velocities of ejecta, and the survivability and impact-modification of comets and asteroids (Asphaug et al. 1998a). As an affiliate of the Galileo SSI Team, the PI studied problems related to cratering, tectonics, and regolith evolution, including an estimate of the impactor flux around Jupiter and the effect of impact on local and regional tectonics (Asphaug et al. 1998b). Other research included tidal breakup modeling (Asphaug and Benz 1996; Schenk et al. 1996), which is leading to a general understanding of the role of tides in planetesimal evolution. As a Guest Computational Investigator for NASA's BPCC/ESS supercomputer testbed, helped graft SPH3D onto an existing tree code tuned for the massively parallel Cray T3E (Olson and Asphaug, in preparation), obtaining a factor xIO00 speedup in code execution time (on 512 cpus). Runs which once took months are now completed in hours.

  17. g_contacts: Fast contact search in bio-molecular ensemble data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Christian; Grubmuller, Helmut

    2013-12-01

    Short-range interatomic interactions govern many bio-molecular processes. Therefore, identifying close interaction partners in ensemble data is an essential task in structural biology and computational biophysics. A contact search can be cast as a typical range search problem for which efficient algorithms have been developed. However, none of those has yet been adapted to the context of macromolecular ensembles, particularly in a molecular dynamics (MD) framework. Here a set-decomposition algorithm is implemented which detects all contacting atoms or residues in maximum O(Nlog(N)) run-time, in contrast to the O(N2) complexity of a brute-force approach. Catalogue identifier: AEQA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8945 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 981604 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C99. Computer: PC. Operating system: Linux. RAM: ≈Size of input frame Classification: 3, 4.14. External routines: Gromacs 4.6[1] Nature of problem: Finding atoms or residues that are closer to one another than a given cut-off. Solution method: Excluding distant atoms from distance calculations by decomposing the given set of atoms into disjoint subsets. Running time:≤O(Nlog(N)) References: [1] S. Pronk, S. Pall, R. Schulz, P. Larsson, P. Bjelkmar, R. Apostolov, M. R. Shirts, J.C. Smith, P. M. Kasson, D. van der Spoel, B. Hess and Erik Lindahl, Gromacs 4.5: a high-throughput and highly parallel open source molecular simulation toolkit, Bioinformatics 29 (7) (2013).

  18. Towards a psychoanalytic understanding of Fascism and anti-Semitism: perceptions from the 1940s.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David James

    2004-01-01

    After selecting five representative European psychoanalytic thinkers, all of whom emigrated to the United States, this essay surveys their earliest perceptions and interpretations of the historical and psychological roots of Fascism, with particular emphasis on anti-Semitism. My samples almost all derive from the period before, during, and immediately after World War II. In examining the writings of Otto Fenichel, Ernst Simmel, Erik Homburger Erikson, Rudolf Loewenstein and Bruno Bettelheim, it discusses the various environmental and psychological dimensions of their understandings of racial prejudice. The paper argues that each thinker attempted to integrate historical, sociological, cultural and clinical factors into their psychodynamic formulations about the individual and group mind of the Fascist anti-Semite. This generation of psychoanalysts explained Fascist anti-Semitism by exploring the mechanisms of projection, the process of massive splitting mechanisms of the group mind, fantasies of delinquent adolescent aggrandizement in Hitler, sado-masochistic and perverse oedipal dynamics, and a macabre identification with the torturers on the part of Jewish inmates in the concentration camps, that obliterated the individual's sense of autonomy and capacity to respond morally. The paper points out the pronounced ambivalence of this generation of Jewish analysts and intellectuals toward their own Jewish backgrounds and sense of themselves as Jews. It also argues that this generation muted its left-wing and socialist political tendencies once they arrived in America, taking a turn against politics. It suggests that some of the features of this Jewish ambivalence can be seen in the exploration of a so-called "Jewish psychology," itself a disguised form of racism, a derivative of projection, which may have had rather negative and authoritarian consequences for the psychoanalytic movement in America. PMID:21847853

  19. Mollie Stevens Smart (1916-2012).

    PubMed

    Smart, Laura S; Prochaska, James O

    2013-09-01

    Presents an obituary for Mollie Stevens Smart (1916-2012). Mollie attended the University of Toronto, from which she graduated with honors in psychology at age 20 in 1936. She studied and worked at the Merrill-Palmer Institute in Detroit, earning a master's degree in child development from the University of Michigan in 1941. She earned her doctorate in educational psychology at the University of Delhi in 1969. An author, teacher, and mentor, Mollie won Fulbright research grants to India and New Zealand and lectured in the United States, India, New Zealand, Canada, and China. She wrote 26 books, most co-authored with her husband, Russell (Rus) C. Smart. Beginning in the 1940s, when Freudian theory had a strong grip on the popular view of child development, the books placed the developing child in the context of family and community systems. The Smarts' best-selling college textbook Children: Development and Relationships (1967, 1973, 1977, 1982) was based on the theories of Erik Erikson and Jean Piaget. Mollie was a member of the American Psychological Association throughout her professional career and held memberships also in the Society for Research in Child Development, the National Council on Family Relations, the Groves Conference on Marriage and Family, and the Fulbright Association. After moving to Ridgefield, Washington, in 2003 with her daughter Ellen following Rus's death in 1996, she applied her great knowledge to advise a community-based organization that serves the needs of new babies born into destitute families. Mollie died at home in Ridgefield on October 22, 2012, at age 96. PMID:24016121

  20. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  1. The Triassic of the Kocaeli Peninsula (NW Turkey) with emphasis on Anisian conodonts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat Kilic, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In the present structural concept, the Kocaeli Peninsula, as a part of the Istanbul Zone, was in Triassic times part of an Eurasian fragment on the northern edge of the northernmost Tethys branch. The Triassic sequence, exposed in the Kocaeli Peninsula (NW Turkey), represents well dated transgressive and regressive marine deposits. This "Kocaeli Triassic", being regarded as an important Triassic sequence has attracted the attention of a large number of scientists. The Kocaeli Triassic encompasses six formations: The red coloured Scythian Kapaklı Formation is barren and shows regressive features, resembling the underlying Permian facies; The Erikli Formation is the first marine deposition of Scythian age. The Late Scythian Demirciler Formation consists of micritic and dolomitic limestone. The unit shows bioturbation in the clayey limestone-limestone sequence. Covering a karstic surface, the Anisian Ballıkaya Formation consists of dolomite, dolomitic limestone and limestone, follow by the Tepeköy Formation that shows 4 different lithologies. At base, Anisian grey nodular and red nodular limestones equals the nodular limestones of the Kazmalı Formation laterally; The Late Anisian-Ladinian Ammonitico Rosso facies. The upper part consists of Carnian shale with Halobia and grey-green marls. Restricted to the Çerkeşli region, the Çerkeşli Formation consists of a pebbly limestones, as a lateral equivalent of the Tepeköy Formation. The Anisian platform conodonts include new taxa that are described. We also focus on several new ramiforms, adding to the multi-elemental and taxonomic diversities. The revised Anisian conodont biostratigraphy is presented. Key Words: Triassic, Anisian, Conodont, Kocaeli

  2. The NetVISA automatic association tool. Next generation software testing and performance under realistic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Arora, Nimar; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tomuta, Elena; Kebede, Fekadu; Feitio, Paulino

    2016-04-01

    The CTBTO's International Data Centre is in the process of developing the next generation software to perform the automatic association step. The NetVISA software uses a Bayesian approach with a forward physical model using probabilistic representations of the propagation, station capabilities, background seismicity, noise detection statistics, and coda phase statistics. The software has been in development for a few years and is now reaching the stage where it is being tested in a realistic operational context. An interactive module has been developed where the NetVISA automatic events that are in addition to the Global Association (GA) results are presented to the analysts. We report on a series of tests where the results are examined and evaluated by seasoned analysts. Consistent with the statistics previously reported (Arora et al., 2013), the first test shows that the software is able to enhance analysis work by providing additional event hypothesis for consideration by analysts. A test on a three-day data set was performed and showed that the system found 42 additional real events out of 116 examined, including 6 that pass the criterion for the Reviewed Event Bulletin of the IDC. The software was functional in a realistic, real-time mode, during the occurrence of the fourth nuclear test claimed by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on January 6th, 2016. Confirming a previous statistical observation, the software found more associated stations (51, including 35 primary stations) than GA (36, including 26 primary stations) for this event. Nimar S. Arora, Stuart Russell, Erik Sudderth. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA) April 2013, vol. 103 no. 2A pp709-729.

  3. Where are you sucking from? Using Stable Isotopes to understand Host Specificity in two Hemiparasitic plants above the tree line in Northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias Sevde, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    By Alejandro Macias, Erik Hobbie, Ruth Varner, Kaitlyn Steele Hemiparasites are known to suck nutrients from nearby plants but their host specificity is not well understood. Hemiparasites are ecosystem engineers, limiting surrounding plant's growth, and decreasing local biodiversity. To better understand this phenomenon, the host specificities of two hemiparasitic angiosperms, Bartsia alpina , and Pedicularis lapponica were studied above the tree line along an elevational gradient in Sweden. B. alpina specialized in wetter environments, as indicated by their higher δ13C signature, and their growth among Salixsp.Betula nana, Bistorta vivipara, Viola biflora, Geranium sp., and Trollious europaeus. P. lapponica was common in drier, less species rich environments, known as heaths, where B. nana, Empetrum negrum, Phyllodoce coeruela, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea are the most common species. P. lapponica had higher foliage δ13C due to its better water-use efficiency in a dry environment. Field survey data and δN15 values of both the foliage of the parasitic plants and their potential hosts were used to determine host specificity. Since the δN15 value of the hemiparasitic plant and its host are similar due to parasitism, it was determined that P. lapponica had a preference for plants with an ericoid mycorrhizal association, such as Vaccinium sp, and E. negrum, but not for the common P. coeruela. This does not support the idea found in the literature that P. lapponica has a preference for grasses. B. alpina was less host specific, associating with non-mycorrhizal, ericoid, and ectomycorhizal plants, such as Carex sp, Vaccinium sp., and S. lapponum. The ectomycorrhizal species, Salix sp., and B. nana, were both potential hosts for B. alpina and P. lapponica due to their presence among them. However, the isotopic data revealed that B. alpina had a preference for Salix sp., and P. lapponica had a preference for B. nana.

  4. Evidence for full-glacial flow and retreat of the Late Weichselian Ice Sheet from the waters around Kong Karls Land, eastern Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Kelly A.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Noormets, Riko; Evans, Jeffrey; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.

    2010-12-01

    Marine-geophysical and geological data from the seafloor surrounding Kong Karls Land in eastern Svalbard are used to reconstruct Late Weichselian full-glacial flow dynamics and retreat history of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet (BSIS). Grounded ice extended over the entire area during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and produced streamlined sedimentary landforms in the broad bathymetric troughs that flank the Kong Karls Land archipelago. The landforms were produced in subglacial till as a result of subglacial processes at the base of the ice sheet. Drumlins and hill-hole pairs confirm that regional ice-flow was towards the east-northeast through the troughs. Based on the absence of ice-margin recessional features, deglaciation in Olga Strait, Erik Eriksen Strait and the unnamed deep northeast of Kong Karls Land appears to have been rapid in the deeper, outer parts of the troughs. In contrast, in the shallower parts of the troughs, ice recession was slower and minor readvances/still-stands of the ice margin resulted in the formation of recessional moraines. During deglaciation, temporary calving bays formed in the deeper parts of the troughs and calved icebergs were evacuated away from the ice margin through the troughs. Grounding-zone features formed in Olga Strait indicate that retreat here was gradual and punctuated by longer still-stands. The transition from a grounded ice sheet to ice-proximal settings is marked locally by a laminated mud sequence deposited from meltwater plumes from a nearby ice margin. The presence of meltwater-derived facies suggests that melting may have also been a significant ice loss mechanism during retreat. In a broader context, this study is one of the first investigations of the seafloor east of Svalbard, providing evidence that ice drained towards the east-northeast during full-glacial conditions. Ice from this part of the BSIS was an important contributor to the palaeo-ice stream in the large Franz Victoria Trough during the LGM.

  5. GROMACS 4.5: a high-throughput and highly parallel open source molecular simulation toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, Sander; Páll, Szilárd; Schulz, Roland; Larsson, Per; Bjelkmar, Pär; Apostolov, Rossen; Shirts, Michael R.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Kasson, Peter M.; van der Spoel, David; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Contact: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23407358

  6. Eight-hundred years of summer temperature variations in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado Liñán, Isabel; Zorita, Eduardo; González-Rouco, Jesús Fidel; Heinrich, Ingo; Campello, Filipe; Muntán, Elena; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Gutiérrez, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    July-to-October temperature variations are reconstructed for the last 800 years based on tree-ring widths from the Cazorla Range. Annual tree-ring width at this site has been found to be negatively correlated with temperature of the previous summer. This relationship is genuine, metabolically plausible, and cannot be explained as an indirect correlation mediated by hydroclimate. The resulting reconstruction (NCZ Tjaso ) represents the southernmost annually resolved temperature record based on tree-rings in Europe and provides detailed information on the regional climate evolution during the Late Holocene in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula. The tree-ring based temperature reconstruction of Cazorla Range reveals predominantly warm summer temperatures during the transition between the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA) from the 13th to the mid of the sixteenth century. The LIA spanned a slightly longer time (1500-1930 CE) than in other European summer temperature reconstructions from the Alps and Pyrenees. The twentieth century, though warmer than the preceding centuries, does not show unprecedented warmth in the last 800 years. Three ensembles of climate simulations conducted with two global atmosphere-ocean general circulation climate models (GCMs), considering different external forcings, were used for comparison: ECHO-G (Erik) and MPI-ESM (E1 and E2). Additionally, individual simulations were available from GCM included in the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, as well as single-forcing simulations performed with MPI-ESM. The comparison of the reconstructed and simulated temperatures revealed a close agreement of NCZ Tjaso with the simulations performed with total solar irradiance forcing with wider amplitude. Furthermore, the correlations with single-forcing simulations suggest volcanism as the main factor controlling preindustrial summer temperature variations in the Cazorla Range over the last five centuries. The

  7. Observations of transits of K2 exoplanet discoveries EPIC 203371098b&c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael; Gorjian, Varoujan; Beichmani, Charles; Akeson, Rachel; Ciardi, Dave; Christiansen, Jessie; Crossfield, Ian; Petigura, Erik; Krick, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    We request DDT time to observe transits of two super-Neptune planets orbiting a bright G star, EPIC 203371098. Erik Petigura has brought to our attention a particularly interesting K2 discovery that consists of two sub-Saturn-sized planets (5.9 RE and 7.8 RE) orbiting EPIC-203371098, a bright G star (K = 9.2). The orbital periods of the planets are 20.9 d and 42.4 d, respectively. The planets have sizes between that of Neptune and Saturn; sizes not represented among the Solar System planets. Due to the brightness of the host star, this system is an ideal laboratory to study this new class of planets. Over the past two months, our team has conducted radial velocity (RV) follow up of EPIC-203371098 with Keck/HIRES. Our preliminary measurements suggest these planets have low densities, ~0.6 g/cc and ~0.4 g/cc, respectively. Low planet masses translate into larger atmospheric scale heights, which sets the amplitude of the features in planet transmission spectra. The apparent commensurability of their orbits suggest that this is a resonant system where transit timing variations may be particularly large. Our Spitzer observations, compared with the previous K2 first epoch observations, can provide initial evidence for TTVs and set the stage for future campaigns from Spitzer and other telescopes which will independently determine the planetary masses; they will also pin down the ephemerides of these interesting planets - including the hard to capture orbital eccentricity - for possible JWST study.It is important to carry out these observations in the upcoming apparition of this star in the October-December time frame because multiple observations are required for accurate studies of TTVs, and to prevent secular errors in timing from building up to a point where the system is hard to recover. The size of these planets and the brightness of the star shows us that we will achieve S/N>20 per transit on each planet.We will propose to observe one transit of each planet

  8. A novel Robertsonian translocation event leads to transfer of a stem rust resistance gene (Sr52) effective against race Ug99 from Dasypyrum villosum into bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Qi, L L; Pumphrey, M O; Friebe, Bernd; Zhang, P; Qian, C; Bowden, R L; Rouse, M N; Jin, Y; Gill, B S

    2011-06-01

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn.) (the causal agent of wheat stem rust) race Ug99 (also designated TTKSK) and its derivatives have defeated several important stem rust resistance genes widely used in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production, rendering much of the worldwide wheat acreage susceptible. In order to identify new resistance sources, a large collection of wheat relatives and genetic stocks maintained at the Wheat Genetic and Genomic Resources Center was screened. The results revealed that most accessions of the diploid relative Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy were highly resistant. The screening of a set of wheat-D. villosum chromosome addition lines revealed that the wheat-D. villosum disomic addition line DA6V#3 was moderately resistant to race Ug99. The objective of the present study was to produce and characterize compensating wheat-D. villosum whole arm Robertsonian translocations (RobTs) involving chromosomes 6D of wheat and 6V#3 of D. villosum through the mechanism of centric breakage-fusion. Seven 6V#3-specific EST-STS markers were developed for screening F(2) progeny derived from plants double-monosomic for chromosomes 6D and 6V#3. Surprisingly, although 6D was the target chromosome, all recovered RobTs involved chromosome 6A implying a novel mechanism for the origin of RobTs. Homozygous translocations (T6AS·6V#3L and T6AL·6V#3S) with good plant vigor and full fertility were selected from F(3) families. A stem rust resistance gene was mapped to the long arm 6V#3L in T6AS·6V#3L and was designated as Sr52. Sr52 is temperature-sensitive and is most effective at 16°C, partially effective at 24°C, and ineffective at 28°C. The T6AS·6V#3L stock is a new source of resistance to Ug99, is cytogenetically stable, and may be useful in wheat improvement. PMID:21437597

  9. Soil development as limiting factor for shrub expansion in southwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviezel, Chatrina; Hunziker, Matthias; Zoller, Oliver; Wüthrich, Christoph; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2014-05-01

    . Swingedouw, A. Landais, M. S. Seidenkrantz, E. Gauthier, V. Bichet, C. Massa, B. Perren, V. Jomelli, and G. Adalgeirsdottir. 2012. "Greenland Climate Change: From the Past to the Future." Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcc.186/full. Normand, Signe, Christophe Randin, Ralf Ohlemüller, Christian Bay, Toke T. Høye, Erik D. Kjær, Christian Körner, et al. 2013. "A Greener Greenland? Climatic Potential and Long-Term Constraints on Future Expansions of Trees and Shrubs." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 368 (1624) (August 19): 20120479. doi:10.1098/rstb.2012.0479.

  10. Genetics and mapping of seedling resistance to Ug99 stem rust in Canadian wheat cultivars 'Peace' and 'AC Cadillac'.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Colin W; Fetch, Tom G; Zegeye, Taye; Thomas, Julian B; Somers, Daryl J; Humphreys, D Gavin; McCallum, Brent D; Cloutier, Sylvie; Singh, Davinder; Knott, Doug R

    2011-01-01

    Stem rust (caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn.) has re-emerged as a threat to wheat production with the evolution of new pathogen races, namely TTKSK (Ug99) and its variants, in Africa. Deployment of resistant wheat cultivars has provided long-term control of stem rust. Identification of new resistance genes will contribute to future cultivars with broad resistance to stem rust. The related Canadian cultivars Peace and AC Cadillac show resistance to Ug99 at the seedling stage and in the field. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the inheritance and genetically map resistance to Ug99 in these two cultivars. Two populations were produced, an F(2:3) population from LMPG/AC Cadillac and a doubled haploid (DH) population from RL6071/Peace. Both populations showed segregation at the seedling stage for a single stem rust resistance (Sr) gene, temporarily named SrCad. SrCad was mapped to chromosome 6DS in both populations with microsatellite markers and a marker (FSD_RSA) that is tightly linked to the common bunt resistance gene Bt10. FSD_RSA was the closest marker to SrCad (≈ 1.6 cM). Evaluation of the RL6071/Peace DH population and a second DH population, AC Karma/87E03-S2B1, in Kenya showed that the combination of SrCad and leaf rust resistance gene Lr34 provided a high level of resistance to Ug99-type races in the field, whereas in the absence of Lr34 SrCad conferred moderate resistance. A survey confirmed that SrCad is the basis for all of the seedling resistance to Ug99 in Canadian wheat cultivars. While further study is needed to determine the relationship between SrCad and other Sr genes on chromosome 6DS, SrCad represents a valuable genetic resource for producing stem rust resistant wheat cultivars. PMID:20725713

  11. Keith Attenborough, Kai Ming Li and Kirill Horoshenkov, Predicting Outdoor Sound , Taylor & Francis, UK (2006) ISBN 9780419235101 xiii+441pp., price £75.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Kenneth E.

    2008-08-01

    In the preface to "Predicting Outdoor Sound," the authors say they regard their book as complementary to the book, "Computational Acoustics," by Erik M. Salomons. Further, they say that workers in outdoor sound would be wise to own both books. With these statements in mind, it seems prudent to briefly compare the two books. Put simply, "Computational Acoustics" is mainly about using full-wave, numerical models to predict long-range sound propagation in a realistic atmosphere over irregular, but otherwise simple, terrain. In contrast, "Predicting Outdoor Sound" is mainly about how to predict sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere over surfaces that range from simple flat impedance planes to very complex structures such as realistic barriers and buildings. There are other important differences as well. While "Computational Acoustics" is largely theoretical, "Predicting Outdoor Sound" has a wealth of experimental measurements and empirical prediction schemes. Specifically, Chapters 1-6 contain in-depth discussions of propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere over a flat, finite impedance surface. A multitude of ground impedance measurements and models are discussed in these chapters. Chapter 7 discusses the effect of source motion. Chapter 8 considers sound propagation over a flat surface with a horizontally varying impedance. Chapters 9 and 10 discuss, respectively, the performance of outdoor noise barriers and the effects of vegetation, trees and turbulence. Chapter 11 considers approximate analytic models for sound propagation that include the effects of a finite impedance surface, refraction, and turbulence. In Chapter 12, a number of currently popular, semi-empirical noise prediction schemes are discussed. Chapter 13, the final chapter, discusses sound and noise in an urban environment, with consideration of such issues as street canyons and building facades. Although the book probably would not serve well as a stand-alone text, the authors have nevertheless

  12. A complementary perspective to primary socialization theory.

    PubMed

    Nurco, D N; Lerner, M

    1999-06-01

    Primary socialization theory as formulated by Oetting and his associates emphasizes the transmission of societal norms during childhood and adolescence within society's three major socializing agencies: family, school, and small, intimate peer groups. The norms thus transmitted may be prosocial or deviant, with prosocial norms more likely to be transmitted through strong bonds to healthy families or schools. Personality traits and other personal characteristics influence negative outcomes, such as deviance or drug use, only to the extent that they interfere with socialization to family or school. Our own research does not address primary socialization theory directly in that we have not focused on the transmission of norms per se as central. Nevertheless, we have studied social factors, personality factors, and various psychopathologies as etiological for deviance and substance use. By and large our research has supported the hypotheses of primary socialization theory, even extending them in specific areas, such as the importance of family influences as etiological. Our work has also emphasized the significance of rebelliousness and impulse control in this regard. Like all large-scale theories which necessarily abstract from the totality and diversity of human behavior, primary socialization theory leaves some gaps requiring further elucidation. Among these is its ethnocentric and temporocentric perspective, but even within this perspective it understates the difficulties for adolescents in making a successful transition to adult social roles (Kingley Davis) and in establishing a unique identity independent of parents (Erik H. Erikson). Also, it generally ignores the salience of the youth culture as rebellious against the older generation, a particularly important characteristic of modern society. And finally, it should cover the process of "maturing out" of deviance, which perhaps results in a reaffirmation of the legitimacy of norms transmitted earlier, and it

  13. [Gender dysphoria in pervasive developmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Tateno, Masaru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Saito, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) are characterized by two essential symptoms: impairment in social interaction, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities. PDD include autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). These three disorders are sometimes termed autism spectrum disorders. A recent epidemiological survey demonstrated that the rate of PDD may be almost 1% and that many PDD cases might not be diagnosed properly in childhood. Erik Erikson described eight stages of psychosocial development through which a normally developing human should pass from infancy to adulthood. In the theory, an adolescent shows 'Identity vs. Role Confusion'. It has been reported that individuals with PDD often have identity crises which sometimes include gender dysphoria. This phenomenon might be related to the so-called identity diffusion in youth. When they reach their young youth, it has been said that subjects with PDD realize their uniqueness and differences compared to others, and, as a result, they may develop confusion of identity which could be exhibited as gender identity disorder. A recent study demonstrated that, amongst 204 children and adolescents who visited a GID clinic in the Netherlands, 7.8% were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders after a careful diagnostic procedure by a multi-disciplinary team. Taken together, PDD and GID seem closely related to each other. In this paper, we present four PDD cases with gender dysphoria and related symptoms: 1) a girl with PDD who repeatedly asserted gender identity disorder (GID) symptoms in response to social isolation at school, 2) a junior high school boy with PDD and transvestism, 3) a boy diagnosed with Asperger's disorder who developed a disturbance of sexual orientation, and 4) a boy with Asperger's disorder and comorbid childhood GID. Many of the clinical symptoms related to gender dysphoria might be explained by the

  14. Identification of New Resistance Loci to African Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Tetraploid Wheats Based on Linkage and Genome-Wide Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Laidò, Giovanni; Panio, Giosuè; Marone, Daniela; Russo, Maria A.; Ficco, Donatella B. M.; Giovanniello, Valentina; Cattivelli, Luigi; Steffenson, Brian; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn. (Pgt), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Races of the pathogen in the “Ug99 lineage” are of international concern due to their virulence for widely used stem rust resistance genes and their spread throughout Africa. Disease resistant cultivars provide one of the best means for controlling stem rust. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to African stem rust race TTKSK at the seedling stage, we evaluated an association mapping (AM) panel consisting of 230 tetraploid wheat accessions under greenhouse conditions. A high level of phenotypic variation was observed in response to race TTKSK in the AM panel, allowing for genome-wide association mapping of resistance QTL in wild, landrace, and cultivated tetraploid wheats. Thirty-five resistance QTL were identified on all chromosomes, and seventeen are of particular interest as identified by multiple associations. Many of the identified resistance loci were coincident with previously identified rust resistance genes; however, nine on chromosomes 1AL, 2AL, 4AL, 5BL, and 7BS may be novel. To validate AM results, a biparental population of 146 recombinant inbred lines was also considered, which derived from a cross between the resistant cultivar “Cirillo” and susceptible “Neodur.” The stem rust resistance of Cirillo was conferred by a single gene on the distal region of chromosome arm 6AL in an interval map coincident with the resistance gene Sr13, and confirmed one of the resistance loci identified by AM. A search for candidate resistance genes was carried out in the regions where QTL were identified, and many of them corresponded to NBS-LRR genes and protein kinases with LRR domains. The results obtained in the present study are of great interest as a high level of genetic variability for resistance to race TTKSK was described in a germplasm panel comprising most of the tetraploid wheat sub

  15. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, W. J.

    2014-05-01

    Wim J. de Lange, Geert F. Prinsen, Jacco H. Hoogewoud, Ab A Veldhuizen, Joachim Hunink, Erik F.W. Ruijgh, Timo Kroon Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectral types of stars in Coalsack region (Vanas 1939)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanas, E.

    2010-11-01

    This table shows coordinates and identifications for 1930 stars in northern Cygnus ('Northern Coalsack' region) classified by Erik Vanas in an early spectral survey. In the source paper, the stars were identified by BD number (part I of the catalogue) and by approximate coordinates for fainter non-BD stars (part II of the catalogue). The spectral types were determined from scans of objective-prism plates (~260Å/mm). Accurate coordinates of the BD stars were derived mainly from the Tycho-2 catalogue. The non-BD stars had to be identified one-by-one from DSS images via SkyView, usually unambiguous, and coordinates found in VizieR. For the non-BD stars, the acronym [V39] was used. For pairs or crowded stars, 2MASS positions are sometimes used. Where the type applies to a near-equal double star, the coordinates are for the mid-point between the two stars (rounded to 1" precision), and the magnitude is for the combined light. The original Vanas photo-blue magnitudes are somewhat uncertain, probably including a color term. Instead standard V magnitudes from Tycho-2 or from the TASS MkIV survey (Cat. II/271) are supplied. The Vanas spectral types are formally on the 'Uppsala' system, which includes the strength of the CN band to distinguish dwarfs and giants among types later than G5. These are shown in modern MK notation. The scheme also includes a pseudo-luminosity class for hot stars based largely on the width of the Balmer lines. Since the He lines were not involved in the classification, the system loses resolution (or 'granularity') for types earlier than A0. There is also the danger at this dispersion of mistaking a late-B supergiant for an early-B dwarf. From consideration of his descriptions of the spectra, and also comparison with types from modern sources for the same stars, these 'Greek-lettered' types were transformed in modern notation as: * types 'A0μ' given as A0V * types 'A0σ' and 'A0σ+' given as B8 * types 'B{tau}-' given as B, and are mainly B3 to B

  17. Rethinking Uncertainty: What Does the Public Need to Know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.

    2012-12-01

    The late Steven Schneider is often quoted as addressing the double-bind of science communication: that to be a good scientist one has to be cautious and acknowledge uncertainty, but to reach the media and the public one has to be bold, incautious, and even a bit dramatic. Here, I focus on a related but different double-bind: the double bind of responding to doubt. In our recent book, Merchants of Doubt, Erik M. Conway and I showed how doubt-mongers exploited scientific uncertainty as a political strategy to confuse the public and delay action on a range of environmental issues from the harms of tobacco to the reality of anthropogenic climate change. This strategy is effective because it appeals to lay people, journalists,' and even fellow scientists' sense of fair play—that it is right to hear "both sides" of an issue. Scientists are then caught in a double-bind: refusing to respond seems smug and elitist, but responding scientifically seems to confirm that there is in fact a scientific debate. Doubt-mongering is also hard to counter because our knowledge is, in fact, uncertain, so when we communicate in conventional scientific ways, acknowledging the uncertainties and limits in our understanding, we may end up reinforcing the uncertainty framework. The difficulty is exacerbated by the natural tendency of scientists to focus on novel and original results, rather than matters that are well established, lest we be accused of lacking originality or of taking credit for other's work. The net result is the impression among lay people that our knowledge is very likely to change and therefore a weak basis for making public policy decision. History of science, however, suggests a different picture: we know that a good deal of scientific knowledge has proved temporally robust and has provided a firm basis for effective public policy. Action on earlier environmental issues such as DDT and acid rain, guided by scientific knowledge, has worked to limit environmental damage

  18. Teachers at Sea with the ARMADA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Two science teachers accompanied an international scientific party of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program on a 6-week expedition to the high Arctic Ocean this summer. Kathy Couchon, a middle school science teacher from Narragansett, RI, was sponsored by the NSF-funded ARMADA Project (www.armadaproject.org), directed by the Office of Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island. Erik Zetterberg, a high school teacher from Sweden, was sponsored by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. The purpose of the expedition was to collect rock and sediment cores in order to reconstruct environmental and climatic conditions in the polar region over the past 60 million years. The $12.5M expedition involved over 200 people from more than 10 countries, three icebreakers, and two helicopters. Cores collected on one vessel were transferred to a laboratory on another, where 20 scientists analyzed microfossils as well as sedimentology, chemistry, and lithology. The teachers participated early in all aspects of the expedition, including coring operations, helicopter flights for ice reconnaissance, laboratory work, and science meetings. Formal education, such as learning how to prepare sediment samples for micropaleontological analysis, was complemented by informal education during one-on-one conversations with scientists over meals, or in social gatherings. The teachers posted reports regularly on websites (e.g., http://tea.rice.edu tea_cuchonfrontpage.html) and participated in a teleconference via Iridium satellite phone. When asked to compare preconceived notions with actual experience, the teachers noted the following: (1) there are many things that scientists don't know (and they are often the first to admit this); (2) the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery does not diminish with age and experience; (3) teamwork among the scientists was greater than expected, and competition among individuals was not observed; and (4) much in the natural world is unknown

  19. How to introduce climate change into extreme precipitation predetermination? First attempts to tamper with the MEWP method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, Maxime; Brigode, Pierre; Bernardara, Pietro; Gailhard, Joël; Garçon, Rémy; Paquet, Emmanuel; Ribstein, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    insights into the next steps that will allow a more sophisticated representation of climate change in the MEWP distribution. References: Garavaglia, F., J. Gailhard, E. Paquet, M. Lang, R. Garçon, and P. Bernardara. 2010. "Introducing a Rainfall Compound Distribution Model Based on Weather Patterns Sub-sampling." Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 14 (6): 951-964. doi:10.5194/hess-14-951-2010. Lenderink, Geert, and Erik van Meijgaard. 2008. "Increase in Hourly Precipitation Extremes Beyond Expectations from Temperature Changes." Nature Geoscience 1 (8) (July 20): 511-514. doi:10.1038/ngeo262. Pall, P., MR Allen, and DA Stone. 2007. "Testing the Clausius-Clapeyron Constraint on Changes in Extreme Precipitation Under CO 2 Warming." Climate Dynamics 28 (4): 351-363.

  20. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    initial contact with the journal. Leopoldo Soto President, Chilean Physical Society Head of Plasma Department, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission Editors: Leopoldo Soto, José Moreno, Ricardo Ávila, Karla Cubillos Scientific Committee Physicists from various research institutions, specialty areas, and regions of the country were invited by the Board of SOCHIFI to join the Symposium Scientific Committee, which was formed by: Julio Yánez, Universidad de Antofagasta Sergio del Campo, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Patricio Vargas, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María Rodrigo Soto, Universidad de Chile Ulrich Volkmann, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Víctor Muñoz, Universidad de Chile Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Luis Huerta, Universidad de Talca Patricio Salgado, Universidad de Concepción Luis Roa, Universidad de Concepción Asticio Vargas, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco Cristian Martínez, Centro de Estudios Científicos, Valdivia Organizing Commitee Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Erik Herrera, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear José Moreno, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Andrea Rozas, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Gonzalo Gutiérrez, Universidad de Chile Executive Board, Chilean Physical Society April 2006 - April 2008 Leopoldo Soto, President Joel Saavedra, Secretary Rodrigo Aros: Treasurer Rodolfo Figueroa: Director Luis Huerta: Director Conference photograph

  1. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Alex Ince-Cushman, John deGrassie, Lars-Goran Eriksson, Yoshiteru Sakamoto, Andrea Scarabosio and Yuri Podpaly, as well as the other coauthors. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to Earl Marmar, Martin Greenwald and Miklos Porkolab at MIT for continued support of this work, as well as to the entire C-Mod team. This award was made possible due to the insight of Mitsuru Kikuchi and the support of the IAEA through Werner Burkhart, and I am truly grateful to both of them. Many thanks as well to the outstanding staff at Nuclear Fusion. It is a distinct honor to be included in the group of previous winners: Tim Luce, Clemente Angioni, Todd Evans and Steve Sabbagh. It is also a great honor to be considered alongside the 2010 nominees: Phil Snyder, Sibylle Guenter, Maiko Yoshida, Hajime Urano, Fulvio Zonca, Erik Garcia, Costanza Maggi, Hartmut Zohm, Thierry Loarer and Bruce Lipschultz. Finally, I would like to thank the readers of Nuclear Fusion for the many citations. John Rice 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award winner Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA

  2. High Energy Density Physics and Applications with a State-of-the-Art Compact X-Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat N

    2013-08-14

    particularly address the key issues associated with x-pinches, which include radiation transport, energetic particle transport, supersonic jet formation, using state-of-the-art compact pulsed power drivers. All the primary objectives of the proposed work were met. These objectives include: • Understanding of the fundamental physics of hot and dense plasma formation, implosion to less than 1 µm size due to the radiation enhanced collapse and energetic electron heating, • Study of the jet formation mechanism, which is of interest due to the astrophysical jets and deposition of energy by energetic electrons in jets, • Characterization of an x-pinch as a point x-ray source for the phase contrast radiography of beryllium cryogenic targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments. The work carried out included a strong educational component involving both undergraduate and graduate students. Several undergraduate students from University of California San Diego participated in this project. A post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Simon Bott and two graduate students, David Haas and Erik Shipton contributed to every aspect of this project. The success of the project can be judged from the fact that fifteen peer-reviewed papers were published in high quality journals. In addition several presentations were made to a number of scientific meetings.

  3. Efficiency of preventive actions for landslides and flooding - evaluation of Scandinavian practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Andersson-sköld, Y. B.; Nyberg, L.; Johansson, M.; Persson, E.

    2011-12-01

    Author: Ramona Bergman, Yvonne Andersson-Sköld, Lars Nyberg, Magnus Johansson, Erik Persson Preventive actions can be, and are frequently, taken to reduce accidents and their consequences in different ways. The MSB funded research programme "Effects of Society's Security actions" (ESS, 2009-2013) aims to study the relationship between such actions and their effects. The program is divided into three subgroups: Frequent accidents Natural hazards (such as flooding, erosion and landslide) Chemical and landfill accidents The results presented here covers natural hazards with focus on land slides and flooding. The results are based on Swedish/Scandinavian contexts. Natural events such as erosion, flooding and land slides are common, but the number of accidents (events causing severe negative impact) is rare. Therefore, in such analysis there is limited data and other information available which can be used for example in statistical analysis of actions and their effects. Instead, the analysis must be based on other information. Therefore, the analysis may have to include aspects that only can be assessed by scenario and "what-if" analyses. In this project the main method has been interviews with officials in Swedish municipalities and national agencies in Sweden and Norway. The two levels are chosen since policies are taken on national (or international) level, while the key actions and actors are on the municipal level. The interviews cover experiences and potential scenarios. In all municipalities, one politician and officials working with planning and rescue service have been interviewed. The study covers hazard and risk mapping, follow up of such maps, physical planning and lessons learned from previous events and activities. The final outcome of the research will be a review of what is found to be well functioning, identification of weak points and recommendations for the management of landslides, erosion and flooding. The present results indicate that hazard

  4. Social class and self-reported health status among men and women: what is the role of work organisation, household material standards and household labour?

    PubMed

    Borrell, Carme; Muntaner, Carles; Benach, Joan; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2004-05-01

    Social class understood as social relations of ownership and control over productive assets taps into parts of the social variation in health that are not captured by conventional measures of social stratification. The objectives of this study are to analyse the association between self-reported health status and social class and to examine the role of work organisation, material standards and household labour as potential mediating factors in explaining this association. We used the Barcelona Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional survey of 10,000 residents of the city's non-institutionalised population in 2000. This was a stratified sample, strata being the 10 districts of the city. The present study was conducted on the working population, aged 16-64 years (2345 men and 1874 women). Social class position was measured with Erik Olin Wright's indicators according to ownership and control over productive assets. The dependent variable was self-reported health status. The independent variables were social class, age, psychosocial and physical working conditions, job insecurity, type of labour contract, number of hours worked per week, possession of appliances at home, as well as household labour (number of hours per week, doing the housework alone and having children, elderly or disabled at home). Several hierarchical logistic regression models were performed by adding different blocks of independent variables. Among men the prevalence of poor reported health was higher among small employers and petit bourgeois, supervisors, semi-skilled (adjusted odds ratio-aOR: 4.92; 95% CI: 1.88-12.88) and unskilled workers (aOR: 7.69; 95%CI: 3.01-19.64). Work organisation and household material standards were associated with poor health status with the exception of number of hours worked per week. Work organisation variables were the main explanatory variables of social class inequalities in health, although material standards also contributed. Among women, only unskilled

  5. The potential and sustainability of agricultural land use in a changing ecosystem in southern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Matthias; Caviezel, Chatrina; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2015-04-01

    . Fredskild B (1988) Agriculture in a marginal area - South Greenland from the Norse landnam (985 A.D.) to the resent (1985 A.D.). In: Birks HH, Birks HJB, Kaland PE et al. (eds) The Cultural Landscape - Past, Present and Future, Cambridge University Press, pp. 381-393. Greenland Agriculture Advisory Board (2009). Available at: http://www.nunalerineq.gl/english/landbrug/index-landbrug.htm Masson-Delmotte, V., D. Swingedouw, A. Landais, M. S. Seidenkrantz, E. Gauthier, V. Bichet, C. Massa, B. Perren, V. Jomelli, and G. Adalgeirsdottir. 2012. "Greenland Climate Change: From the Past to the Future." Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcc.186/full. Normand, Signe, Christophe Randin, Ralf Ohlemüller, Christian Bay, Toke T. Høye, Erik D. Kjær, Christian Körner, et al. 2013. "A Greener Greenland? Climatic Potential and Long-Term Constraints on Future Expansions of Trees and Shrubs." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 368 (1624) (August 19): 20120479. doi:10.1098/rstb.2012.0479. Perren, B., B, Massa, C., Bichet, V., Gauthier, E., Mathieu, O., Petit, C., Richard, H. 2012. A paleoecological perspective on 1450 years of human impacts from a lake in southern Greenland. The Holocene, 22 (9), pp. 1025-1034.

  6. Surface nanobubbles and micropancakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, James R. T.

    2013-05-01

    , Ziaul Haque Ansari and Jianguo Mi The effect of PeakForce tapping mode AFM imaging on the apparent shape of surface nanobubblesWiktoria Walczyk, Peter M Schön and Holger Schönherr Coarse-grained modelling of surface nanobubblesPatrick Grosfils Understanding the stability of surface nanobubblesShuo Wang, Minghuan Liu and Yaming Dong Hydrogen nanobubble at normal hydrogen electrodeS Nakabayashi, R Shinozaki, Y Senda and H Y Yoshikawa Particle tracking around surface nanobubblesErik Dietrich, Harold J W Zandvliet, Detlef Lohse and James R T Seddon Imaging surface nanobubbles at graphite--water interfaces with different atomic force microscopy modesChih-Wen Yang, Yi-Hsien Lu and Ing-Shouh Hwang

  7. PREFACE: Seventh International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zande, Wim J.

    2009-09-01

    possible by generous sponsors, whom we thank wholeheartedly: The Radboud University Nijmegen, The Institute for Molecules and Materials of the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (Stichting FOM), The Foundation PHYSICA (Stichting Physica), and The Netherlands Royal Academy of Sciences (KNAW). The organisational support by Erna Gouwens van Oss before and during the conference was essential for its success. The help of Thanja Lambrechts and Vitali Zhaunerchyk during the preparation of the proceedings is greatly appreciated. The delay in the publication of these proceedings is entirely caused by the editor. The authors of the contributions are thanked for the quality of their contributions, Wim J van der Zande, Editor Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands Email: w.vanderzande@science.ru.nl Conference photograph Participants of the 7th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications, taken in front of d'Amelander Kaap, the conference venue in Ameland, one of the Wadden Islands in the North of the Netherlands. 1. Dror Shafir21. Annemieke Petrignani41. Oumanou Motopan 2. Ioan Scheider22. Johanna Roos42. Max Berg 3. Nigel Adams23. Erna Gouwens van Oss43. Henrik Buhr 4. Hajime Tanuma24. Natalie de Ruette44. Ilya Fabrikant 5. Jonathan Tennyson25. Francois Wameu Tamo45. Claude Krantz 6. Vitali Zhaunerchyk26. Rainer Johnsen46. Michael Stenrup 7. Robert Continetti27. Viatcheslav Kokoouline47. Xavier Urbain 8. Stefan Rosén28. Hidekazu Takagi48. Evelyne Roueff 9. Erik Vigren29. Hans-Jakob Wörner49. Dirk Schwalm 10. Magdalena Kaminska30. Oskar Asvany50. Valery Ngassam 11. Chris Greene31. Lutz Lammich51. Julien Lecointre 12. Steffen Novotny32. Brandon Jordon-Thaden52. Ann Orel 13. Amy Schumak33. Wolf Diettrich Geppert53. Ihor Korolov 14. Gerard van Rooij34. Alexander Faure54. Romain Guerot 15. Wim van der Zande35. Mathias

  8. Pollen-inferred quantitative reconstructions of Holocene land-cover in NW Europe for the evaluation of past climate-vegetation feedbacks - The Swedish LANDCLIM project and the NordForsk LANDCLIM network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Marie-Jose; Sugita, Shinya; Rundgren, Mats; Smith, Benjamin; Mazier, Florence; Trondman, Anna-Kari; Fyfe, Ralph; Kokfelt, Ulla; Nielsen, Anne-Birgitte; Strandberg, Gustav

    2010-05-01

    of ca. 1o x 1o. The REVEALS estimates of the past cover of PFTs will be 1) compared with the outputs of the LPJ-GUESS (10 PFTs), a widely-used dynamic vegetation model and 2) used as an alternative to the LPJ-GUESS-simulated vegetation (3 PFTs) to run for the past the regional climate model RCA3 developed at the Rossby Centre, Norrköping, Sweden. The study will evaluate and further refine these models (RCA3 and LPJ-GUESS) using a data-model comparison approach that incorporates new syntheses of palaeoclimatic data as well. It will lead to new assessments of the possible effect of various factors on climate, such as deforestations and afforestations, and changes in vegetation composition and spatial patterns of land cover/land use. Refined climate models and empirical land-cover reconstructions will shed new light on controversial hypotheses of past climate change and human impacts, such as the "Ruddiman hypothesis". First maps of REVEALS estimates of plant functional types (PFTs) are now available for Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Estonia, Poland, Germany, The Czech Republic, Switzerland and Britain (see Mazier et al. C1.21 and Trondman et al. C1.22). Correlation tests show that the REVEALS estimates are robust in terms of ranking of the PFTs' abundance (see Mazier et al, C1.21). The LANDCLIM project and network are a contribution to the IGBP-PAGES-Focus 4 PHAROS programme on human impact on environmental changes in the past. The following LANDCLIM members are acknowledged for providing pollen records, for help with pollen databases, and for providing results to the project: Mihkel Kangur and Tiiu Koff (Univ. Tallinn, Tallinn); Erik Kjellström (SMHI, Norrköping), Anna Broström, Lena Barnekow and Thomas Persson (GeoBiosphere Science Centre, Lund University); Anneli Poska (Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University); Thomas Giesecke (Albrecht-von-Haller-Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen), Anne Bjune and John Birks (Dept. of

  9. Spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for urban soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Kopel, Daniella; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    % followed by concrete dust, plastic crumbs, other man made materials, clay and other minerals. The major part of the mineralogical composition was dominated by Montmorillonite and Kaolinite as is it expected to be in the Mount Carmel soils. Pyroxene and Olivine are also typical to the mineralogy of the Mount Carmel were there are several known magmatic eruption areas of Scoria and Basalt. There is a high frequency of Actinolite (Ca2(Mg,Fe)5(Si8O22)(OH)2), Amphibole family (2.5%) that is typical to metamorphic rocks that are not to be found in the Mount Carmel region. Some of the mineral found in the analysis is of marine origin like Syngenite (K2Ca(SO4)2(H2O)) and Blodite (Na2Mg(SO4)24(H2O)) as the area was created under the Mediterranean Sea and is still influence by it. None of the endmembers were detected only once, the lowest frequency was 4 times for Cyanide-Cadmium (Cd(CN)2) and Andalusite (Al2SiO5). The results of the soils pH, measured electrometrically and the particle size distribution, measured by Laser diffraction, indicate there is no big different between the samples particle size distribution and the pH values of the samples but they are not significantly different from the expected, except for the OM percentage which is significantly higher in most samples. The suggested method was very effective for tracing the man-made substances, we could find concrete and asphalt, plastic and synthetic polymers after they were assimilated, broken down and decomposed into soil particles. By the top-down unmixing method we did not limit the substances we characterize and so we could detect unexpected materials and contaminants. Gómez-Baggethun, Erik and David N. Barton. 2013. "Classifying and Valuing Ecosystem Services for Urban Planning." Ecological Economics 86: 235-245. Pavao-Zuckerman, M. A. 2008. "The Nature of Urban Soils and their Role in Ecological Restoration in Cities." Restoration Ecology 16 (4): 642-649. Li, Lijun, Peter E. Holm, Helle Marcussen, and Hans

  10. PREFACE: 16th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétur Gíslason, Hafliði; Guðmundsson, Viðar

    1994-01-01

    including both basic and applied physics was also organized. Most of the oral sessions included an invited lecture. The invited speakers were all of high international class, five of them working in the Nordic countries, Sami Franssila, Finland, Jostein Grepstad, Norway, Jam Hvam, Denmark, Erik Janzén and Lars Samuelson, Sweden. The other five represented a wider geographical spread, Klaus von Klitzing and Detlef Heitmann, Germany, Gordon Davies, United Kingdom, Markus Büttiker and Chris Palmstrøm, U.S.A. Attendees from China, Japan, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Lithuania also participated in the conference. In addition to the invited lectures some 100 oral papers and 25 posters were contributed. Another novelty of the conference is the fact that the proceedings of the conference are being published in a refereed journal. These proceedings contain all the invited and contributed papers the authors of which complied with the deadline of submission of the manuscripts. The editors paid special attention to prompt publication of the proceedings in order to promote the actuality of the results presented at the conference. Therefore, the deadline was strict, all of the papers were refereed during the conference. Changes suggested by the referees were either made at Laugarvatn or within three weeks from the conference. We are grateful to the international crowd of session chairmen who assumed the task of refereeing the papers, either themselves or with the help of colleagues. Without their impressive qualifications this procedure would not have been as reliable as the quality of the papers deserved. We also want to thank the editorial staff of Physica Scripta for their help and cooperation. It is our hope that the 16th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting succeeded in keeping the tradition of a popular conference series at the same time as mowing slightly the emphasis which may strengthen future meetings. Time will tell. In the meantime, we thank all the participants for their