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Sample records for lake hovsgol nw

  1. Paleoclimatic record of the late Quaternary from a gravity core sediment of Lake Hovsgol in northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, D.; Kim, B.

    2007-12-01

    Gravity core sediment (HS 7) from Lake Hovsgol(Mongolia) is divided into three sedimentary units on the basis of sediments texture, water contents, occurrence of fossils and sediment color. Unit 1(27¢¦128§¯) is generally massive and is crudely stratified. Ostracods are well preserved over the all interval of Unit1, but diatoms are not well preserved. At Unit2(9¢¦27§¯), mud content is slightly low and lamination is well developed. It is dark greenish gray in the upper part, and dark greenish gray is alternating with light brownish gray in the lower part. Diatom contents increase towards the top and ostracods fragments disappear at the top of Unit 2. Unit3(0¢¦9§¯) is laminated mud in olive gray color. Diatom contents are high but ostracods are not observed in this unit. According to 14C age dating results, we assumed that Unit1 is Pleistocene sediment, Unit2 is sediment of a transitional stage and Unit 3 is Holocene sediment. Chemical composition of trace elements from ostracods show variations through Unit1, especially showing a distinct change at 95¢¦100§¯ interval. It matches to the distribution of ostracod at this interval. Contents of ostracod decrease at the interval and contents of Cytherissa lacustris decrease, but Limnocythere inopinata increase. It was interpreted that warm air was supplied to Lake Hovsgol after LGM(Last Glacial Maximum), causing ice melting. Consequently the bottom environment of Lake Hovsgol experienced some changes as the lake level increased little bit. At the top of Unit 1 appear a lots of pyrite which are arranged in line, and diatoms occure but ostracods are not observed toward the top of Unit 2, and lamination is developed in Unit 2. It means the bottom environment of Lake Hovsgol changed to anoxic condition. At that time, plenty of water was supplied into the lake, resulting in water stratification and cutting off oxygen supply to the bottom of Lake Hovsgol. It made the lake level rise higher, so that the bottom

  2. Tectonics of the baikal rift deduced from volcanism and sedimentation: a review oriented to the Baikal and Hovsgol lake systems.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexei V; Demonterova, Elena I

    2009-01-01

    As known from inland sedimentary records, boreholes, and geophysical data, the initiation of the Baikal rift basins began as early as the Eocene. Dating of volcanic rocks on the rift shoulders indicates that volcanism started later, in the Early Miocene or probably in the Late Oligocene. Prominent tectonic uplift took place at about 20 Ma, but information (from both sediments and volcanics) on the initial stage of the rifting is scarce and incomplete. A comprehensive record of sedimentation derived from two stacked boreholes drilled at the submerged Akademichesky ridge indicates that the deep freshwater Lake Baikal existed for at least 8.4 Ma, while the exact formation of the lake in its roughly present-day shape and volume is unknown. Four important events of tectonic/environmental changes at about approximately 7, approximately 5, approximately 2.5, and approximately 0.1 Ma are seen in that record. The first event probably corresponds to a stage of rift propagation from the historical center towards the wings of the rift system. Rifting in the Hovsgol area was initiated at about this time. The event of ~5 Ma is a likely candidate for the boundary between slow and fast stages of rifting. It is reflected in a drastic change of sedimentation rate due to isolation of the Akademichesky ridge from the central and northern Lake Baikal basins. The youngest event of 0.1 Ma is reflected by the (87)0Sr/ (86)Sr ratio increase in Lake Baikal waters and probably related to an increasing rate of mountain growth (and hence erosion) resulting from glacial rebounding. The latter is responsible for the reorganization of the outflow pattern with the termination of the paleo-Manzurka outlet and the formation of the Angara outlet. The event of approximately 2.5 Ma is reflected in the decrease of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr and Na/Al ratios in Lake Baikal waters. We suggest that it is associated with a decrease of the dust load due to a reorganization of the atmospheric circulations in Mainland

  3. Changes of clay mineral assemblages in Lake Hovsgol (Mongolia) in the course of their transportation and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, A.; Solotchina, E.; Krivonogov, S.

    2009-04-01

    As known, clay minerals of lake sediments sensitively indicate climatic and environmental changes. Composition of clay mineral assemblages depends on petrography and weathering pattern of parental rocks in lake catchments. Lake Hovsgol, the second large basin in the Baikal Rift Zone, differs from the first one by extremely small drainage area: its ratio to the lake surface is 1.8 (compare with 17 of Lake Baikal). This peculiarity of lake Hovsgol defines the amount of clay minerals deposited in bottom sediments and the value of their transformation in the course of transportation We studied a number of short sediment cores (up to 1.75 m long) obtained from different parts of the lake in the framework of the Hovsgol Drilling Project, 2001-2007. Regularities of modern clay minerals transportation were studied in 80 samples from river mouths and piedmont slopes around the lake. Their mineral composition was determined by X-ray powder diffraction and IR-spectroscopy. For X-ray, we prepared the oriented mounts by transferring the suspension of bulk sample in distilled water onto a glass slide. Slides, dried at room temperature, then were solvated for about 24 hours with ethylene-glycol vapor in an evacuated desiccator. Measurements were conducted on an automated powder diffractometer with CuKα radiation, graphite monochromator. The comparative analysis of clay minerals and their crystallochemical parameters were performed by the original method of modeling X-ray diffraction profiles, based on the calculation of the interference function of the one-dimensional disordered crystals with finite thickness and using a specially developed optimization procedure. Quantitative estimations of the composition of minerals such as quartz, plagioclase, carbonate were made by IR-spectroscopy. Samples were prepared using the KBr pellet method. It was established that the mineral association in bottom sediments includes illite, smectite, chlorite, chlorite-smectite, muscovite, kaolinite

  4. Seasonal changes of methane concentration in boreal lakes of NW Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelina, Svetlana; Desmukh, Chandrashekhar; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Savvichev, Alexander; Shirokova, Liudmila; Guerin, Frederic; Zakharova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Methane (CH4), produced by methanogenic Archaea under strictly anoxic conditions in sediments, is an important atmospheric greenhouse gas, contributing to global warming. Besides, the importance of boreal lakes in global methane evaluation stem from the high coverage of arctic and subarctic land surface by lakes of glacial or thermokarst origin. The first step in the evaluation of methane biogeochemical cycle in high latitudes is the measurement of its concentration in the water column and bottom porewater sediments. In this work, we investigated several typical seasonally stratified lakes in Arkhnagelsk region of the NW Russia. Methane concentrations profiles were measured in the water column and sediment porewaters of two lakes of the Kenozersky National Park (KNP) (Lake Maselgskoe and Lake Vilno) located in the middle of taiga zone southwest from Arkhangelsk, and the lake Svjatoe located in the Geobiopsheric station "Rotkovetz" during the summer (2007, 2009) and winter (2008) stratification period. In addition, the lake Maselgskoe was studied during spring and autumn water overturn. During summer period, methane profiles in the lake Maselgskoe showed three zones with differed CH4 concentration: constant concentration around 0.22 µmol/L in the surface layer (0 to 6-7 m), then gradual decrease to 0.05 μmol/L (8 to 15 m) and significant increase to 80 μmol/L in near-bottom water. During autumn lake water overturn, mean СН4 concentration (0.31 µmol/L) in the water column of the lake Maselgskoe gradually but decreased insignificant from the surface to depth horizons. Stratified lake Svyatoe in 2007 and shallow lake Vilno in 2009 demonstrated similar features of CH4 concentration profile, however near-bottom concentration in lakes was an order of magnitude less than in Maselgskoe. The sediment porewaters of stratified lakes exhibit the concentration of methane ranging from 0.43 to 2.0 mmol/L in summer and from 1 to 2.4 mmol/L in winter in lake Maselgskoe and

  5. Rock magnetic properties of sediments from Lake Sanabria and its catchment (NW Spain): paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrasoaña, J. C.; Borruel, V.; Gómez-Paccard, M.; Rico, M.; Valero-Garces, B.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Soto, R.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Sanabria is located in the NW Spanish mountains at 1000 m a.s.l., and constitutes the largest lake of glacial origin in the Iberian Peninsula. Here we present an environmental magnetic study of a Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediment core from Lake Sanabria and from different lithologies that crop out in its catchment, which includes Paleozoic plutonic, metamorphic and vulcanosedimentary rocks, and Quaternary deposits of glacial origin. This study was designed to complement sedimentologic and geochemical studies aimed at unraveling the climatic evolution of the NW Iberian Peninsula during the last deglaciation. Our results indicate that magnetite and pyrrhotite dominate the magnetic assemblage of both the sediments from the lower half of the studied sequence (25.6 - 13 cal kyr BP) deposited in a proglacial environment, and the Paleozoic rocks that make up most of the catchment of the lake. The occurrence of these minerals both in the catchment rocks and in the lake sediments indicates that sedimentation was then driven by the erosion of a glacial flour, which suffered minimal chemical transformation in response to a rapid and short routing to the lake. Sediments from the upper half of the studied sequence, accumulated after 12.4 cal kyr BP in a fluviolacustrine environment, contain magnetite and greigite. This points to a prominent role of post-depositional reductive dissolution, driven by a sharp increase in the accumulation of organic matter into the lake and the creation of anoxic conditions in the sediments, in shaping the magnetic assemblage of Holocene sediments. Pyrrhotite is stable under reducing conditions as opposed to magnetite, which is unstable. We therefore interpret that previous pedogenic processes occurred in the then deglaciated catchment of the lake were responsible for the oxidation of pyrrhotite and authigenic formation of magnetite, which survived subsequent reductive diagenesis given its initial larger concentrations. This interpretation is

  6. The endemic mollusks reveal history of the long-lived Pliocene Lake Slavonia in NW Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandic, Oleg; Kurečić, Tomislav; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the fossil mollusk record of the long-lived Pliocene Lake Slavonia settled in the southern Pannonian Basin. The samples originate from Vukomeričke gorice, a low hill-range situated north of the Kupa River in the area between the towns of Zagreb, Sisak and Karlovac in NW Croatia. Representing the SW margin of the Lake Slavonia the freshwater deposits alternate there with the alluvial series, providing altogether about 400-m-thick, Pliocene continental succession, known in literature by informal name Paludina beds (acc. to a junior synonym of Viviparus). The endemic fauna of the Lake Slavonia became particularly well-known in the late 19th century after Melchior Neumayr demonstrated that the gradual evolutionary change of the mollusk phenotypes toward more complex morphology represents a function of adaptation to environmental change in the paleolake. Even Charles Darwin commented that result as by far the best case which I have ever met with, showing the direct influence of the conditions of life on the organization. The deposition in the Lake Slavonia (~4.5 to ~1.8 Ma) coincides with the Pliocene Climate Optimum (PCO), but captures also the transition into the Pleistocene climate marked by the initial Ice Age pulse at 2.59 Ma. The increase of polar temperatures resulted during PCO in a significant melting of the ice caps leading to a global sea level rise tentatively getting up to 25 m higher than today. Coincidence of the climate and geodynamic settings in southeastern Europe provided conditions supporting extended settlement of lacustrine environments including Lake Slavonia, Lake Kosovo, Lake Transylvania and Lake Dacia, all characterized by explosive adaptive radiations of viviparid snails. In particular, the latter adaptive radiations resulted in the regional phylostratigraphy of Lake Slavonia Viviparus species enabling excellent stratigraphic control for the investigated deposits. Hence, based on this evidence, the

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region in 2008-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontova, E. A.; Tarasova, E. N.; Goreglyad, A. V.; Tkachenko, L. L.; Mamontov, A. A.; Kuzmin, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    Results of the study of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) from the listing of the Stockholm Convention in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region at the base of the "Khankh" stationary, Institute of Geochemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 2008-2013 in the absence of clear sources of these compounds are considered. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the concentration of PCB and OCP in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region in 2008-2013 characterizing the influence of natural (annual temperature variations) and anthropogenic (atmospheric transportation from the territories of neighboring countries) are shown.

  8. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton control on organic and inorganic carbon cycle in stratified and non-stratified lakes of NW Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokova, Liudmila; Vorobjeva, Taissia; Zabelina, Svetlana; Moreva, Olga; Klimov, Sergey; Shorina, Natalja; Chupakov, Artem; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Audry, Stephan; Viers, Jerome

    2010-05-01

    Lakes of boreal zone regulate the fate of dissolved carbon, nutrients and trace metals during their transport from the watershed to the ocean. Study of primary production - mineralization processes in the context of carbon biogeochemical cycle allows determination of the rate and mechanisms of phytoplankton biomass production and its degradation via aquatic heterotrophic bacteria. In particular, comparative study of vertical distribution of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in stratified and non-stratified lakes allows establishing the link between biological and chemical aspects of the carbon cycle which, in turns, determines an environmental stability and recovering potential of the entire ecosystem. In order to better understand the biogeochemical mechanisms that control dissolved organic and inorganic carbon migration in surface boreal waters, we studied in 2007-2009 two strongly stratified lakes (15-20 m deep) and two shallow lakes (2-4 m deep) in the Arkhangelsk region (NW Russia, White Sea basin). We conducted natural experiments of the lake water incubation for measurements of the intensity of production/mineralization processes and we determined vertical concentration of DOC during four basic hydrological seasons (winter and summer stratification, and spring and autumn lake overturn). Our seasonal studies of production/mineralization processes demonstrated high intensity of organic matter formation during summer period and significant retard of these processes during winter stagnation. During spring period, there is a strong increase of bacterial destruction of the allochtonous organic matter that is being delivered to the lake via terrigenous input. During autumn overturn, there is a decrease of the activity of phytoplankton, and the degradation of dead biomass by active bacterial community. Organic matter destruction processes are the most active in Svyatoe lake, whereas in the Beloe lake, the rate of organic matter production is significantly higher than

  9. Waterborne and on-land electrical surveys to suggest the geological evolution of a glacial lake in NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Comina, Cesare; Gianotti, Franco; Sambuelli, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Geophysical surveys on and around the Candia Lake, located NE of Turin (NW Italy), in the internal depression of the Ivrea Morainic Amphitheater (IMA) right frontal sector, are reported in this paper. The surveys were intended to obtain a geophysical characterization of the lakebed, to investigate the interconnection paths between surface water and groundwater and to be used as a first general survey for suggesting the geological processes which lead to the actual morphology. An extensive waterborne continuous vertical electrical sounding (CVES) survey consisting of 15 profiles, with a total length of about 19 km of acquisition, was carried out on the lake surface. The processing of the acquired profiles with a laterally constrained inversion (LCI) approach lead to the reconstruction of the lakebed sediment distribution, down to 10 m depth. Self potential (SP) data recorded on the lake surface have also been analyzed. Moreover, to verify the areal distribution of the deposits, three electrical resistivity tomographies (ERTs) were carried out on land near the northern and southern shores of the lake. The combination of the geophysical survey results with hydrogeological information and geological observations and interpretations allowed the characterization of the submerged deposits, the probable identification of the main areas of groundwater recharge and the preliminary reconstruction of the lake genesis.

  10. Reconstructing Climate Change Since The Late Glacial At Amsterdamøya, NW Svalbard (80°N), Based On Lake Sediments From Lake Hakluytvatnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerde, Marthe; Bakke, Jostein; D'Andrea, William J.; Balascio, Nicholas L.; Hormes, Anne; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2015-04-01

    Records of past climatic changes are sparse and poorly resolved in the Arctic due to obvious reasons such as lack of dateable organic material and logistical challenges. Here, we present a new time series from the island of Amsterdamøya, NW Svalbard (80°N), based on lake sediments from Lake Hakluytvatnet. Located at the northernmost branch of the North Atlantic Current, this high-Arctic site is ideally placed to infer changes in past atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns recorded as changes in precipitation and temperature. Our novel data set provides a climatic reconstruction based on multi-proxy analyses on lake sediments from a non-glacial lake. We have combined one long piston core with a shorter gravity core to capture the entire sediment infill from the bottom of the basin to the most recently accumulated sediments on top. A robust chronology has been established for the cores through 28 AMS radiocarbon (14C) ages in combination with one lead (210Pb) profile of the most recent sediments, and this gives an unprecedented age control for a lake at this latitude as well as a precise sediment accumulation rate. The Hakluytvatnet cores are analysed for physical sediment properties as well as newer scanning instruments (e.g. XRF scanning, Scanning Electron Microscope, SEM, analyses) in order to produce a high-resolution reconstruction of the climate development for the study site. A separate alkenone study will produce a high-resolution temperature curve for the area. Soil samples from the surrounding catchment have also been subject to geochemical analyses in order to distinguish between the relative influences of different sediment sources on sediment accumulation in the lake. Geomorphological mapping has been carried out to combine interpretation of the catchment development with the lake sediment record interpretation. Numerical analyses (e.g. Principal Component Analysis, PCA) are applied on the results from the lake sediment and catchment samples in

  11. Holocene lake level fluctuations of a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China: a comparison of chironomid, ostracod, pollen and geochemistry data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischke, S.; Herzschuh, U.

    2003-04-01

    A core of 14 m length was drilled in a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China. The lake Luanhaizi has a drainage area of about 30 km2 and is situated at an altitude of 3200 m which represents the altitude of the present regional upper timberline. Due to the small size of the open-basin lake (surface area about 1 km2) and the sharply outlined catchment area the lake is regarded as a very sensitively and rapidly responding ecosystem. Analyses of ostracod shells, head capsules of larval chironomids and pollen and spores were conducted and the organic and carbonate content (LOI), element concentrations and magnetic susceptibility of core samples determined. Ostracod taxa mainly comprise Candona candida, C. neglecta, C. rawsoni, Cyclocypris ovum, Cypridopsis vidua, Fabaeformiscandona caudata, F. danielopoli, F. hyalina, Herpetocypris chevreuxi, Heterocypris salina, Ilyocypris cf. bradyi, I. echinata, I. lacustris and Limnocythere inopinata. They may be used to distinguish periods of low lake levels corresponding to a dense cover of aquatic plants at the lake bottom from stages of higher lake levels and a corresponding decrease in macrophytes at the core site. Chironomid taxa belonging to Chironomus, Cladopelma, Glyptotendipes, Micropsectra, Paratanytarsus, Polypedilum, Psectrocladius and Tanytarsus further provide information on variations in benthic oxygen availability and lake level fluctuations. Several units of the core show high abundances of pollen and spores of higher aquatic and wetland plants and fungi (Cyperaceae, Hippuris, Myriophyllum and Glomus) indicating low lake levels. In contrast, algae such as Botryococcus, Pediastrum and Tetraedron were regarded to reflect higher water levels. Typha angustifolia-type, Typha latifolia, Alisma and Potamogeton were recorded in low abundances as well. The organic content of core samples averages 6 % displaying four alternating stages of distinct minima and maxima. Lowest values of about 1 % occur at the core

  12. DC resistivity and seismic refraction survey across the SE margin of Lake Ngami, NW Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemang, Elisha; Molwalefhe, Loago

    2009-09-01

    Seismic refraction survey and DC resistivity measurements were made across the margin of the Lake Ngami. The structure and stratigraphy at the lake were determined. High resolution aeromagnetic data showed a prominent anomaly coinciding with the Kunyere Fault. Estimated depths to magnetic sources are increasing towards the lake. Two velocity layers were mapped. The top layer (500 m/s) is thin outside the lake and thicker inside the lake. The underlying layer (3125 m/s) has undeterminable thickness. Resistivity sounding results inside the lake showed that the low velocity layer has four sub-units: dry hard clays; diatomaceous earth; soft clays interlayered with silts; and wet whitish clays interlayered with silts. Normal faults were mapped along the profile with a total displacement up to 50 m. The results of the study indicate that the formation of the Lake Ngami basin was structurally controlled and probably initiated by the tectonics of the Okavango Rift Zone.

  13. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  14. New paleoreconstruction of transgressive stages in the northern part of Lake Ladoga, NW Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Anton; Sapelko, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Lake Ladoga is one of the largest lakes in the world and the largest in Europe. The watershed of lake Ladoga covers the North-Western part of European Russia and the Eastern Finland. Lake basin is on the border between the Baltic shield and the East European Platform. The most consistent paleoreconstructions of Lake Ladoga history are based on bottom sediments of smaller lakes, which used to be a part of Ladoga in the past. The stages of Ladoga evolution are directly connected with the history of the Baltic Ice Lake (BIL) and of the Ancylus Lake. Water level of these lakes was significant higher than nowadays level. Lake Ladoga in its present limits used to be an Eastern gulf of BIL and Ancylus Lake. The preceding paleoreconstructions of Ladoga water level oscillations were undertaken by G. de Geer, J. Ailio, E. Hyyppä, K. Markov, D. Kvasov, D. Malakhovskiy, M. Ekman, G. Lak, N. Davydova, M. Saarnisto, D. Subetto and others. The new data on multivariate analysis of bottom sediments of lakes which used to belong to Ladoga, collected in the last few years, allows to create several maps of Ladoga transgressive stages in Late Glacial period and post-glacial time. A series of maps showing the extent of Ladoga transgression was created based on lake sediments multivariate analysis and a GIS-modeling using the digital elevation data with an accuracy of several meters and an open-source software (QGIS and SAGA). Due to post-glacial rebound of the lake watershed territory, GIS-modeling should comprise the extent of the glacioisostatic uplift, so the chart of a present-day uplift velocity for Fennoscandia of Ekman and Mäkinen was used. The new digital elevation models were calculated for several moments in the past, corresponding to the most probable dates of smaller lakes isolation from Lake Ladoga. Then, the basin of Ladoga was "filled" with water into GIS program to the levels sufficient for the smaller lakes to join and to split-off. The modern coastlines of Ladoga and

  15. Lake level changes in Hala Lake(NW China) based on ostracodassemblages during the LGM and Post-LGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Wuennemann, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Hala Lake, located in the Qilian Mountains, Qinghai Province, China, at 4078 m a.s.l. may archive in its sediments hydrological and climate changes during the Late Quaternary time, as it is close to the area impacted by the East-Asian Summer monsoon and westerly-driven air masses. Based on the sediment core H7, which was taken in the center of the lake at 65m water depth,ostracod assemblages and stable isotopes from ostracode shells were investigated in details. Three main species were found, which are common species in high altitude saline lakes of the Tibetan Plateau: Leucocythere sp.,Limnocythereinopinata and Eucypris sp.They started to occur in deeper part of H7,indicating an early onset of favorable living conditions during the LGM and post-LGM periods. Besides, algae occurred between 25 and 32m water depth. According to the unevenly distributed amount of ostracods and oxygen isotope data, our results indicate important lake level changes during the global LGM and Lateglacial. The lake experienced lowest levels of 25-50 m below the present water line. Ostracods disappeared with the onset of the early Holocene.A stepwise refilling started already at ca. 16 kyr BP and reached -25 m level during the Bølling/Allerød warm phase at ca. 13.5 kyr BP.Latest at ca.7.6 kyr BP, the lake reached a stable highstand similar to the present level until ca.6 kyr BPas . The subsequent lake development remains unclear due to strong mismatches of the data but may indicate a general trend to deteriorating conditions and lake level lowstands at ca. 5.0-4.2, 2.0 and at around 0.5 kyr BP.; Ostracods Distribution in H2 ; Ostracods plate in Hala lake

  16. Depth evolution of the Meirama pit lake, A Coruña, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Jordi; Juncosa-Rivera, Ricardo; Cereijo-Arango, José Luis; García-Morrondo, David; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    The Meirama pit lake is a water mass in the process of controlled flooding that, by the end of December 2015, can be described as a steadily stratified meromictic system. The deepest portion of the lake (monimolimnion) is isolated regarding the annual mixing dynamics (December/January) of the upper water body (mixolimnion), for which the depth of mixing is restricted to a water column of 35-40 m thick. Due to the contrasting flooding history (access of groundwater at the beginning and mixed access of stream/groundwater (being dominant the stream water) the deepest portion of the lake is separated from the upper, non-mixed layer by a marked chemocline. Strictly speaking, the monimolimnion of a meromictic lake extends to the waters located beneath the mixed lake layer. In the case of the Meirama Lake the monimolimnion is internally stratified and made of two major water bodies. From hereafter the deep and upper monimolimnion will be identified as bottom and middle sections of the lake while the mixolimnion is referred to as the surface layer. The general characteristics and evolution of the Meirama Lake have been reported elsewhere. In this work we focus on a summary description of the chemical evolution of the monimolimnion of the lake based on data gathered between 2009 and 2015 from the still on-going monitoring survey. The chemical evolution of the monimolimnion of the lake differs significantly from that of the mixolimnion. In general, surface water is sensible to seasonal fluctuations due to weather conditions, rainfall and biogeochemical processes. The middle and bottom sections are not sensible, in general, to this effects and their evolution obeys to a number of internal processes. In the case of temperature we observe a nearly constant gradient increase (0.001 °C/day) in the middle and deep lake waters up to the beginning of 2012, where it remains constant. The rise in temperature is likely due to the heat provided by groundwater seepage whose temperature

  17. Late Holocene High Discharge and Erosion Events Inferred from Sediment Proxies and Catchment Geomorphology, Lake Vuoksjávrátje, NW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsson, A.; Jansson, K. N.; Kylander, M. E.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Bertrand, S.

    2014-12-01

    Alpine lakes in NW Sweden are highly sensitive to variations in catchment erosion and in precipitation. Previous studies aimed at reconstructing past summer temperatures have suggested that this sensitivity may influence chironomid species composition enough to cause bias in quantitative temperature reconstructions. In this study we have analysed lake sediments covering the last 5100 years from Lake Vuoksjávrátje in NW Sweden and catchment geomorphology with the aim to separate between different erosional regimes in the lake and its catchment and to identify sediment sources and processes behind sediment deposition in the lake basin. Methods include XRF core scanning, grain size analysis, chironomid analysis, TOC and C/N analysis and detailed mapping of geomorphology. From the integrated results we identify time intervals with increased catchment erosion, inferred to result from intense precipitation. Based on the combined proxy data it was concluded that a major flood event took place at the Vindelfjällen site c. 2800 cal BP, unique for the 5100-year long record. The chironomid species composition shows stronger influence from wetland surface erosion at c. 2800 cal BP and during the last c. 1000 years. By combining multi-proxy lake sediment analysis with study of catchment geomorphology it is possible to improve the understanding of Late Holocene hydro-climatic change and how it may influence Arctic alpine lakes.

  18. Climate and human impacts on the vegetation in NW Turkey: palynological insights from Lake Iznik since the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Andrea; Niestrath, Phoebe; Roeser, Patricia A.; Litt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    , the vegetation was also influenced by anthropogenic activities. During an early settlement phase near Lake Iznik, beginning ca. 8 ka cal BP (Roodenberg & Schier 2001), only minor changes in the pollen assemblage are registered. Still, evidence for human activity consolidates since the Early Bronze Age: cultivated trees, crops, and secondary human indicator species appeared, and forests got cleared. Subsequent fluctuations between extensive agricultural use and regeneration of the natural vegetation can be clearly correlated to the regional archaeological history. References: Roeser, P.A. (2014): Paleolimnology of Lake Iznik (NW Turkey) during the past ~ 31 ka cal BP. PhD thesis, University of Bonn, Germany. Roodenberg, J.J. & Schier, W. (2001): Radiocarbon determinations. In: Roodenberg, J.J. & Thissen, L.C. (eds.): The Ilıpınar Excavations II. PIHANS 93, Leiden: 257-278. Zohary, M. (1973): Geobotanical foundations of the Middle East. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart.

  19. A late Pleistocene long pollen record from Lake Urmia, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamali, Morteza; de Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis; Shah-hosseini, Madjid; Andrieu-Ponel, Valérie; Ponel, Philippe; Amini, Abdolhossein; Akhani, Hossein; Leroy, Suzanne A. G.; Stevens, Lora; Lahijani, Hamid; Brewer, Simon

    2008-05-01

    A palynological study based on two 100-m long cores from Lake Urmia in northwestern Iran provides a vegetation record spanning 200 ka, the longest pollen record for the continental interior of the Near East. During both penultimate and last glaciations, a steppe of Artemisia and Poaceae dominated the upland vegetation with a high proportion of Chenopodiaceae in both upland and lowland saline ecosystems. While Juniperus and deciduous Quercus trees were extremely rare and restricted to some refugia, Hippophaë rhamnoides constituted an important phanerophyte, particularly during the late last glacial period. A pronounced expansion in Ephedra shrub-steppe occurred at the end of the penultimate late-glacial period but was followed by extreme aridity that favoured an Artemisia steppe. Very high lake levels, registered by both pollen and sedimentary markers, occurred during the middle of the last glaciation and late part of the penultimate glaciation. The late-glacial to early Holocene transition is represented by a succession of Hippophaë, Ephedra, Betula, Pistacia and finally Juniperus and Quercus. The last interglacial period (Eemian), slightly warmer and moister than the Holocene, was followed by two interstadial phases similar in pattern to those recorded in the marine isotope record and southern European pollen sequences.

  20. Late Holocene Climate and Environmental Changes: Disentangling Natural and Anthropogenic Signals in Lake Lilandsvatnet (NW Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anjou, R. M.; Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; Finkelstein, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-proxy reconstruction of late Holocene regional climate and environmental history has been produced from the sediments of Lilandsvatnet, a small sub-arctic lake on Vestvågøy, in the Lofoten Islands, Norway. Chronology for the core was developed from two AMS radiocarbon measurements, and five cryptotephra horizons, indicating that the record extends from 125-2500 yrs BP. These five cryptotephra horizons have been identified as; Askja-1875, Hekla-1158, Hekla-1104, OWB-105, and the SN-1 eruption. The tephra horizons support the radiocarbon age model, providing a robust chronology that will allow higher resolution reconstructions from the 2.5 kyr record. Quantitative paleotemperature reconstructions are based on the Uk37 index, relating molecular variations in the C37 alkenones produced by lacustrine haptophytes, to spring lake surface temperatures. A record of compound specific δD values from terrestrial (n-C27-n-C31) and aquatic (n-C17, n-C21, n-C23 and n-C25) lipid n-alkanes will be generated, and the difference between the two sources of n-alkane δD values (ΔDT-A) will serve as a proxy for changes in the effective moisture of the region. Bulk geochemical properties (%TOC, %TN, C/N, δ13C, δ15N) and records of lipid geochemistry (n-alkanes, n-alkenones, n-alkanols, and n-alkanoic acids) serve as proxies for environmental changes in; catchment vegetation/soil stability, organic material sources, primary productivity, and overall ecosystem response to natural climate variability and anthropogenic forcing. This record is also being used to address the timing and impact of human settlement on Vestvågøy. Lilandsvatnet is located adjacent to the location of the major Viking chieftain farm, which existed throughout the Iron Age settlement period. A record of biomarker compounds associated with agricultural land-use practices (pyrogenic PAHs), and human/higher-mammal feces (coprostanol (5β-cholestan-3 β-ol), epicoprostanol (5β-cholestan-3

  1. Seismic activity and water level fluctuations in the artificial lakes of Aliakmonas river (NW Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Drakatos, George

    2015-04-01

    The Public Power Corporation (PPC) of Greece has established four dammed reservoirs, downstream of each other on Aliakmonas River in North Western Greece (namely the artificial lakes of Ilarionas, Polyphyto, Sfikia and Asomata). In addition to the monitoring of the reservoir water levels the PPC has also installed a dense seismological network in the wider area. In this investigation the correlation between the local seismic activity and the water level fluctuations at the Ilarionas and Polyphyto reservoirs is studied. On October 25th, 1984, during the Asomata reservoir initial filling, a Ms=5.4 earthquake occurred in the region which was characterized by weak seismicity, until the strong earthquake of Ms=6.5 that occurred on May 13th, 1995, at a distance of 18 km from the southern edge of the Polyphyto reservoir. More recently, on July 2nd and 3rd, 2013, two moderate earthquakes (Ml=4.7 and Ml=4.6) occurred, almost a year after the filling of the Ilarionas reservoir in 2012. In addition to these events, fourteen earthquakes with magnitudes equal or greater to Ml=4 have also been detected in the wider area of the Aliakmonas reservoir.

  2. Structural and stratigraphic features and ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar backscatter characteristics of ice growing on shallow lakes in NW Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Morris, K.; Weeks, W. F.; Wakabayashi, H.

    1994-11-01

    Changes in ERS 1 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter intensity (σ°) from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes at three locations in NW Alaska are described. Ice core analysis shows that at all lakes on the coast at Barrow the ice, whether floating or frozen to the bottom, includes an inclusion-free layer overlying a layer of ice with tubular bubbles oriented parallel to the direction of growth. The clear ice may also be overlain by a discontinuous layer of bubbly snow ice. Backscatter is low (-16 to -22 dB) at the time of initial ice formation, probably due to the specular nature of the upper and lower ice surfaces causing the radar pulse to be reflected away from the radar. As the ice thickens during the autumn, backscatter rises steadily. Once the ice freezes to the lake bottom, regardless of the presence of forward scattering tubular bubbles, low backscatter values of-17 to -18 dB are caused by absorption of the radar signal in the lake bed. For ice that remains afloat all winter the ice-water interface and the tubular bubbles combine, presumably via an incoherent double-bounce mechanism, to cause maximum backscatter values of the order of -6 to -7 dB. The σ° saturates at -6 to -7 dB before maximum ice thickness and tubular bubble content are attained. A simple ice growth model suggests that the layer of ice with tubular bubbles need be only a few centimeters thick midway through the growth season to cause maximum backscatter from floating ice. During the spring thaw a previously unreported backscatter reversal is observed on the floating and grounded portions of the coastal lakes but not on the lakes farther inland. This reversal may be related to the ice surface topography and wetness plus the effects of a longer, cooler melt period by the coast. Time series of backscatter variations from shallow tundra lakes are a record of (1) the development of tubular bubbles in the ice and, by association, changes in the gas content of the underlying

  3. Structural and stratigraphic features and ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar backscatter characteristics of ice growing on shallow lakes in NW Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Morris, K.; Weeks, W. F.; Wakabayashi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter intensity (sigma(exp 0)) from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes at three locations in NW Alaska are described. Ice core analysis shows that all lakes on the coast at Barrow the ice, whether floating or frozen to the bottom, includes an inclusion-free layer overlying a layer of ice with tubular bubbles oriented parallel to the direction of growth. The clear ice may also be overlain by a discontinuous layer of bubbly snow ice. Backscatter is low (-16 to -22 dB) at the time of initial ice formation, probably due to the specular nature of the upper and lower ice surfaces causing the radar pulse to be reflected away from the radar. As the ice thickens during the autumn, backscatter rises steadily. Once the ice freezes to the lake bottom, regardless of the presence of foward scattering tubular bubbles, low backscatter values of -17 to -18 dB are caused by absorption of the radar signal in the lake bed. For ice that remains afloat all winter the ice-water interface and the tubular bubbles combine, presumably via an incoherent double-bounce mechanism, to cause maximum backscatter values of the order of -6 to -7 dB. The sigma(exp 0) saturates at -6 to -7 dB before maximum ice thickness and tubular bubble content are attained. A simple ice growth model suggests that the layer of ice with tubular bubbles need be only a few centimeters thick midway through the growth season to cause maximum backscatter from floating ice. During the spring thaw a previously unreported backscatter reversal is observed on the floating and grounded portions of the coastal lakes but not on the lakes farther inland. This reversal may be related to the ice surface topography and wetness plus the effects of a longer, cooler melt period by the coast. Time series of backscatter variations from shallow tundra lakes are a record of (1) the development of tubular bubbles in the ice and, by association

  4. Chemical pollution in inland shallow lakes in the Mediterranean region (NW Spain): PAHs, insecticides and herbicides in water and sediments.

    PubMed

    Hijosa-Valsero, María; Bécares, Eloy; Fernández-Aláez, Camino; Fernández-Aláez, Margarita; Mayo, Rebeca; Jiménez, Juan José

    2016-02-15

    The possible effect of land uses and human-related geographic patterns (presence of roads and urban settlements) on chemical pollution was evaluated in the waters and sediments of fifty-three Mediterranean shallow lakes. The presence of fifty-nine pollutants (belonging to PAHs, insecticides and herbicides groups) was analysed in these lakes by GC-MS. The studied lakes had similar pollutant concentrations to other lakes worldwide. The distribution of the compounds between water and sediment compartments was strongly influenced by log K(ow) values (an average of 3.61 for compounds found in water and of 4.69 for compounds found in sediments). A multivariate analysis suggested that the concentration of PAHs in water could be related to agricultural activities and not related to local road traffic. When assessing nutrient levels in the lakes, it was observed that eutrophicated lakes [>300 μg L(-1) total phosphorus (TP)] appeared in areas affected by urban or industrial use (at least 2% urban use in a 1-km radius around the lake), whilst lakes with lower TP concentrations were placed in forest areas (60% of forest use in a 1-km radius); in addition, the aqueous concentrations of Σ(PAH) were lower in lakes with higher TP concentrations (>150 μg L(-1) TP), which could be related to the adsorption capacity of PAHs onto suspended matter which is present in mesotrophic and eutrophic lakes, thus being removed from the aqueous phase. PMID:26688052

  5. The disappearing of the largest lake in the Middle East: Geochemical clues for human impact on Urmia salt lake NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, O.; Haeri-Ardakani, O.; Pourmand, A.

    2012-12-01

    The water level in Lake Urmia, the third largest saline lake on earth and the largest continental lake in the Middle East, has dropped by more than 9 m over the last two decades, with no signs of improvement in recent years. Urmia is a hypersaline shallow lake (average salinity ~200 ‰) located in a closed continental drainage basin in northwestern Iran, and is surrounded by a variety of rock formations, ranging in age from Precambrian metamorphic complexes to Holocene mud deposits. Lake sediments are composed of two major components; chemical-biochemical and clastic fractions. Based on grain size analysis of samples from 24 push-cores, silt-size particles dominate the lake's sediments with clay-bearing materials mostly present near the center of the lake. Sand-size particles are dominant in the northwest, where felsic to intermediate plutonic and metamorphic rocks are located in the proximity of the lake. The water of the Urmia Lake can be classified as Na-K-Cl-Mg-SO4 brine. Based on chemical analysis of conservative lithogenic elements (e.g., Ti, Si, Al, Ca) as well as redox-sensitive elements (e.g., Fe, K, Rb, Sr) in the clastic fraction of the lake's sediment, elemental distributions are reflective of regional geology. The main sources of ions to the lake are evaporite formations with minor contribution from igneous rocks. Ion concentrations in the northern part of the lake are nearly constant throughout the year while south-southeastern parts of the lake show variable annual ion concentration due to major fresh water inflows. Chemical analysis of the surface sediment samples for heavy metals (Ni, Cr, V and Hg) indicate moderate to high degrees of contamination in the affected areas, where Hg is the most abundant heavy metal. The highest concentrations of Hg (Normalized Enrichment Factor =6) are observed in the middle part of the lake, where intensive dredging and construction activities have taken place. In contrast, the lowest concentrations of Hg in

  6. Cold active hydrolytic enzymes production by psychrotrophic Bacilli isolated from three sub-glacial lakes of NW Indian Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of culturable, cold-active enzymes producing Bacilli was investigated from three sub-glacial lakes of north western Indian Himalayas. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) using three restriction enzymes Alu I, Msp I, and Hae III led to the clustering of 136 Bacilli into 26, 23, and 22 clusters at 75% similarity index from Chandratal Lake, Dashair Lake, and Pangong Lake, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing led to the identification of 35 Bacilli that could be grouped in seven families viz.: Bacillaceae (48%), Staphylococcaceae (14%), Bacillales incertae sedis (13%), Planococcaceae (12%), Paenibacillaceae (9%), Sporolactobacillaceae (3%), and Carnobacteriaceae (1%), which included twelve different genera Bacillus, Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus, and Virgibacillus. Based on their optimal temperature for growth, 35 Bacilli were grouped as psychrophilic (11 strains), psychrotrophic (17 strains), or psychrotolerant (7 strains), respectively. The representative isolates from each cluster were screened for cold-active enzyme activities. Amylase, β-glucosidase, pectinase, and protease activities at 4 °C were detected in more than 80% of the strains while approximately 40, 31, 23, 14, 11, and 9% of strains possessed cellulase, xylanase, β-galactosidase, laccase, chitinase, and lipase activity, respectively. Among 35 Bacilli, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus marisflavi, Exiguobacterium indicum, Paenibacillus terrae, Pontibacillus sp., Sporosarcina globispora, and Sporosarcina psychrophila were efficient producers of different cold-active enzymes. These cold-adapted Bacilli could play an important role in industrial and agricultural processes. PMID:26933936

  7. Paleohydrological and paleoclimatic oscillations during MIS3 revealed by multi-proxies from Balikun Lake, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chengbang; Zhao, Yongtao

    2016-04-01

    Multi-disciplinary analyses (sedimental, geochemical) of a sedimental core (BLK11A) recovered from the centre of the Balikun Lake, eastern Tienshan Mts., provide evidence of paleohydrology and its climatic indications in the arid western China during MIS3. The results suggested fairly high-frequency MIS3 interstadial oscillations and alternate change patterns among nearly fresh water and brackish water and hypersaline water during the ~30 ka. We also found that: 1) the evolutional process of the lake responds indicatively and quickly to the climate change on sub-orbital and millennial timescales, the onset of MIS3 interstadial is featured by abrupt increases in both bioproductivity and chemical weathering; 2) the appearance of the halite lithofacies indicates gradually cooling and drying trends during the middle to late MIS3, this deteriorated environment shrunk the lake area and weakened the vegetation cover as well as watershed chemical weathering; 3) Our new interpretations differ from the assumption that highest lake level and wettest conditions occurred during the late MIS3 from Tibetan Plateau and Inner Mongolia, while suggest that the climate in the Balikun region, even most of arid western China areas would have undergone a progressive aridification. The evolution of the paleohydrology and climate change of Balikun Basin may have a strong correlation with the high latitude summer insolation and the climate in North Atlantic.

  8. Impacts of climate and humans on the vegetation in NW Turkey: palynological insights from Lake Iznik since the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, A.; Niestrath, P.; Roeser, P.; Litt, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Marmara region in northwestern Turkey provides a unique opportunity for studying the vegetation history in response to climate changes and anthropogenic impacts because of its location between different climate and vegetation zones and its long settlement history. Geochemical and mineralogical investigations of the largest lake in the region, Lake Iznik, already registered climate related changes of the lake level and the lake mixing. However, a palynological investigation encompassing the Late Pleistocene to Middle Holocene was still missing. Here, we present the first pollen record of the last ca. 31 ka cal BP (calibrated kilo years before 1950) inferred from Lake Iznik sediments as an independent proxy for paleoecological reconstructions. Our study reveals that the vegetation in the Iznik area changed generally between steppe during glacial/stadial conditions, forest-steppe during interstadial conditions, and oak dominated mesic forest during interglacial conditions. Moreover, a pronounced succession of pioneer trees, cold temperate, warm temperate, and Mediterranean trees appeared since the Lateglacial. Rapid climate changes, which are reflected by vegetation changes, can be correlated with Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events such as DO-4, DO-3, and DO-1, the Younger Dryas, and probably also the 8.2 event. Since the mid-Holocene, the vegetation was influenced by anthropogenic activities. During early settlement phases, the distinction between climate-induced and human-induced changes of the vegetation is challenging. Still, evidence for human activities consolidates since the Early Bronze Age (ca. 4.8 ka cal BP): cultivated trees, crops, and secondary human indicator taxa appeared, and forests got cleared. Subsequent fluctuations between extensive agricultural use and regeneration of the natural vegetation become apparent.

  9. Towards a quantitative climate reconstruction linking meteorological, limnological and sedimentological datasets: the Lake Sanabria (NW Spain) case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico-Herrero, María. Teresa; Giralt, Santiago; Valero-Garcés, Blas L.; Vega, José Carlos

    2010-05-01

    It is well-known that lacustrine sediment records constitute one of the best environmental sensors to reconstruct climate variability. Nevertheless, our knowledge of how the climate signal (precipitation, temperature, wind stress) is transferred from the atmosphere to the lake water masses (through the limnological variables such as pH, nutrient inputs or water chemistry) and to the sediments is very poor. Besides there are few reliable and temporal long limnological and/or meteorological datasets. This lack also prevents the conversion of these qualitative climate reconstructions into quantitative ones. Lake Sanabria (Zamora) is located in the northwestern of the Iberian Peninsula (42°07'30' N, 06°43'00' W), at 1.000 m a.s.l. It is the largest glacial lake (368 ha, 51 m of water depth at the deepest point and 96 Hm3 of water volume) in the Iberian Peninsula. The main water and sediments input and output is the Tera River. Monthly limnological (secchi disk, water temperature profiles, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen), nutrients (nitrates, silicon, total phosphorous, reactive phosphorous, total chlorophyll and a-chlorophyll), hydrological (Tera river discharge) and meteorological (precipitation and air temperature from the Ribadelago meteorological station) datasets covering the period 1992 - 2005 were employed to explore the relationships between the atmosphere and the Lake Sanabria hydrological balance, and the limnological variables. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) core scanner data of two gravity cores (SAN04-3A and SAN07-1M) allowed us to characterize with high resolution the evolution of the chemical composition of the uppermost sedimentary infill. SAN07-1M was dated using gamma-spectrometry (210Pb) and a key bed corresponding to the dam failure of the Vega de Tera Reservoir located upstream occurred in 1959 AD. The relationships between the sedimentological and limnological datasets allowed us to characterize the transference of the climate signal from the

  10. Warm Brine Lakes in Craters of Active Mud Volcanoes, Menes Caldera off NW Egypt: Evidence for Deep-Rooted Thermogenic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, S.; Mascle, J.; Foucher, J. P.; Woodside, J. M.; Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during several oceanographic expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling mud volcano morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids (Dupré et al. 2014). The active Cheops and Chephren mud volcanoes are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops mud volcano, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  11. Warm brine lakes in craters of active mud volcanoes, Menes caldera off NW Egypt: evidence for deep-rooted thermogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Mascle, Jean; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Harmegnies, François; Woodside, John; Pierre, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    The Menes caldera is a fault-controlled depression (~8 km in diameter) at ~3,000 m water depth in the western province of the Nile deep-sea fan off NW Egypt, comprising seven mud volcanoes (MVs) of which two are active. Based on multichannel and chirp seismic data, temperature profiles, and high-resolution bathymetric data collected during the 2000 Fanil, 2004 Mimes and 2007 Medeco2 expeditions, the present study investigates factors controlling MV morphology, the geometry of feeder channels, and the origin of emitted fluids. The active Cheops and Chephren MVs are 1,500 m wide with subcircular craters at their summits, about 250 m in diameter, generally a few tens of metres deep, and filled with methane-rich muddy brines with temperatures reaching 42 °C and 57 °C respectively. Deployments of CTDs and corers with attached temperature sensors tracked these warm temperatures down to almost 0.5 km depth below the brine lake surface at the Cheops MV, in a feeder channel probably only a few tens of metres wide. Thermogenic processes involve the dissolution of Messinian evaporites by warm fluids likely sourced even deeper, i.e. 1.7 and 2.6 km below the seabed at the Cheops and Chephren MVs respectively, and which ascend along listric faults. Seepage activity appears broadly persistent since the initiation of mud volcanism in the Early Pliocene, possibly accompanied by lateral migration of feeder channels.

  12. Gravity anomaly at a Pleistocene lake bed in NW Alaska interpreted by analogy with Greenland's Lake Taserssauq and its floating ice tongue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    A possible example of a very deep glacial excavation is provided by a distinctive gravity low located at the front of a valley glacier that once flowed into glacial Lake Aniuk (formerly Lake Noatak) in the western Brooks Range. Geologic and geophysical data suggest that sediments or ice filling a glacially excavated valley are the most probable cause of the 30-50 mGal anomaly. Reasonable choices of geometric models and density contrasts indicate that the former excavation is now filled with a buried-ice thickness of 700 m or sediment thicknesses greater than 1 km. No direct evidence of efficient excavation was observed in Greenland, but efficient glacial erosion behind a floating polar ice tongue could explain the excavation that caused the Alaskan gravity anomaly. -from Author

  13. An INTIMATE Example: Into and out of the Younger Dryas at Lake Hämelsee, NW-Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Renée; Engels, Stefan; Hoek, Wim Z.; Lane, Christine S.; Sachse, Dirk; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2014-05-01

    Lake Hämelsee is a classical site with an excellent high-resolution record of Pleniglacial to Holocene climate and environment, contained in 18m of lacustrine sediments. At the centre of the lake, the Late Glacial interval consists of 2.7m of sapropelic and silty muds, that are mostly laminated (Merkt and Müller, QI 1999). In the framework of a summer school - 'An INTIMATE Example' - the lake was cored again, with the purpose of applying the latest techniques in palaeoclimatology and -ecology. Twenty international students and Early Stage Researchers (ESR's) from a wide range of backgrounds participated in lectures and field work and gained hands-on-experience with several proxies and techniques. Ongoing research by participants of the training school is focused on the timing and nature of the Allerød - Younger Dryas (YD) and YD - Preboreal transitions. Five short-term international exchange visits have provided opportunities for participants to learn and apply new techniques to the Hämelsee record, supervised by members of the INTIMATE network. A new age model will be constructed for the Late Glacial core section based on a combination of 14C-dates on macro-remains, varve chronology and tephrochronology. Tephrostratigraphic correlations will allow direct correlation of the record to both marine and ice core records from the North Atlantic region, as well as other European archives. Palaeoclimatic and -ecological research will include pollen-, chironomid-, LOI-, XRF-, lipid biomarker, stable isotope and GDGT-analysis. Temperature reconstructions will be made based on several of these proxies, providing a unique opportunity to compare independent reconstructions using material from a single record. Not only did the training school and subsequent research provide an excellent opportunity for ESR's to learn and work with international experts in the field - the collected data will also provide a high-resolution multi-proxy record of palaeoclimatology, -ecology and

  14. Geophysical, isotopic, and hydrogeochemical tools to identify potential impacts on coastal groundwater resources from Urmia hypersaline Lake, NW Iran.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Vahab; Nakhaei, Mohammad; Lak, Razyeh; Kholghi, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of major ions, trace elements, water-stable isotopes, and geophysical soundings were made to examine the interaction between Urmia Aquifer (UA) and Urmia Lake (UL), northwest Iran. The poor correlation between sampling depth and Cl(-) concentrations indicated that the position of freshwater-saltwater interface is not uniformly distributed in the study area, and this was attributed to aquifer heterogeneities. The targeted coastal wells showed B/Cl and Br/Cl molar ratios in the range of 0.0022-2.43 and 0.00032-0.28, respectively. The base-exchange index (BEI) and saturation index (SI) calculations showed that the salinization process followed by cation-exchange reactions mainly controls changes in the chemical composition of groundwater. All groundwater samples are depleted with respect to δ(18)O (-11.71 to -9.4 ‰) and δD (-66.26 to -48.41 ‰). The δ(18)O and δD isotope ratios for surface and groundwater had a similar range and showed high deuterium excess (d-excess) (21.11 to 31.16 ‰). The high d-excess in water samples is because of incoming vapors from the UL mixed with an evaporated moisture flux from the Urmia mainland and incoming vapors from the west (i.e., Mediterranean Sea). Some saline samples with low B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios had depleted δ(18)O and δD. In this case, due to freshwater flushing, the drilled wells in the coastal playas and salty sediments could have more depleted isotopes, more Cl(-), and consequently smaller B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios. Moreover, the results of hydrochemical facies evolution (HFE) diagram showed that because of the existence fine-grained sediments saturated with high density saltwater in the coastal areas that act as a natural barrier, increasing the groundwater exploitation leads to movement of freshwaters from recharge zones in the western mountains not saltwater from UL. The highly permeable sediments at the junction of the rivers to the lake are characterized by low hydraulic gradient and high

  15. Varved sediments of Lake Oeschinen, NW Alps: filling the gap in the flood frequency-precipitation relationship for the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Benjamin; Szidat, Sönke; Grosjean, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The global climate is warming, which is leading to changes in the hydrological cycle. What are the impacts of these climatic changes on the occurrence and magnitude of extreme flood events? Are these changes simultaneous or independent? These are key questions for future flood-risk predictions. In Europe, regional climate models do not show robust results for the future occurrence of precipitation extremes, which is mainly due to the difficulty in resolving precipitation events and the limited temporal coverage of instrumental data. To overcome this issue, considerable effort has been put forward by the paleoclimate community to produce millennial-long flood proxy records from natural archives. This has led to a more comprehensive understanding of flood events in relation to climate variability. However, while there is an increased consensus in the long-term flood-temperature relationship, still very little is known about the role of precipitation changes on flood frequency and magnitude. This is largely due to the lack of long-term and high-quality precipitation records. Here we present a millennial-long precipitation reconstruction together with a flood-frequency record obtained from the same natural paleoclimate archive. This allows, for the first time, the direct comparison between the two climate variables in the Alps. We used the varved (annually laminated) sediments of proglacial Lake Oeschinen (1580 m a.s.l., NW European Alps) to reconstruct warm season (MJJA) precipitation and summer flood frequency back to AD 884. Our results support recent findings from an increasing number of studies in the Swiss, German, French and Austrian Alps showing that floods were consistently more frequent during cool periods over the last Millennium. While the relationship between flood frequency and inferred moist climate has remained speculative, our precipitation reconstruction allows for a direct comparison and shows that flood frequency also increased during wetter

  16. High-levels of microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake.

    PubMed

    Free, Christopher M; Jensen, Olaf P; Mason, Sherri A; Eriksen, Marcus; Williamson, Nicholas J; Boldgiv, Bazartseren

    2014-08-15

    Despite the large and growing literature on microplastics in the ocean, little information exists on microplastics in freshwater systems. This study is the first to evaluate the abundance, distribution, and composition of pelagic microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake. We quantified pelagic microplastics and shoreline anthropogenic debris in Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia. With an average microplastic density of 20,264 particles km(-2), Lake Hovsgol is more heavily polluted with microplastics than the more developed Lakes Huron and Superior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Fragments and films were the most abundant microplastic types; no plastic microbeads and few pellets were observed. Household plastics dominated the shoreline debris and were comprised largely of plastic bottles, fishing gear, and bags. Microplastic density decreased with distance from the southwestern shore, the most populated and accessible section of the park, and was distributed by the prevailing winds. These results demonstrate that without proper waste management, low-density populations can heavily pollute freshwater systems with consumer plastics. PMID:24973278

  17. Simulating the decadal- to millennial-scale dynamics of morphology and sequestered carbon mobilization of two thermokarst lakes in NW Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, M. A.; Plug, L. J.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2012-06-01

    Thermokarst lakes alter landscape topography and hydrology in widespread permafrost regions and mobilize significant permafrost carbon pools, including releasing methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Despite this, the dynamics of lake evolution, permafrost thawing, and carbon mobilization are not well known. We present a 3-D numerical model of thermokarst lakes on organic-rich yedoma permafrost terrains with surface water flow and pooling naturally defining lakes that deepen, expand laterally, and drain due to talik formation, bank retreat, and both gradual and catastrophic drainage. We predict the 3-D pattern of microbial methane production within the talik over time. As a first model test and calibration, beginning with small protolakes, we simulated 10,000 years of evolution of Pear and Claudi lakes, two neighboring thermokarst features on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Simulated lakes approximated observed bathymetry, but results are sensitive to initial topography and soil ice content. Local topography caused markedly different dynamics for the two lakes. Pear expanded rapidly across low-relief topography, fully drained multiple times, and released little methane in later stages due to Pleistocene carbon depletion by the first and largest lake generation. Claudi grew slowly and continuously across high-relief topography, forming high subaerial banks; partial drainages left remnant horseshoe lakes that continued to expand into virgin yedoma, mobilizing carbon at roughly the same rate irrespective of lake drainage. The ˜2× discrepancy between simulated CH4 production and observed emission rates in Claudi likely results from misestimation of hot spot ebullition, labile carbon content, CH4:CO2 production ratio, or microbial CH4 oxidation.

  18. A late Quaternary lake record from the Qilian Mountains (NW China): evolution of the primary production and the water depth reconstructed from macrofossil, pollen, biomarker, and isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Zhang, Chengjun; Mischke, Steffen; Herzschuh, Rainer; Mohammadi, Farhid; Mingram, Birgit; Kürschner, Harald; Riedel, Frank

    2005-04-01

    The history (45-0 ka BP) of the aquatic vegetation composition of the shallow alpine Lake Luanhaizi from the NE Tibetan Plateau is inferred from aquatic plant macrofossil frequencies and aquatic pollen and algae concentrations in the sediments. C/N (range: 0.3-100), δ 13C (range: -28 to -15‰), and n-alkane measurements yielded further information on the quantitative composition of sedimentary organic matter. The inferred primary production of the former lake ecosystem has been examined in respect of the alternative stable state theory of shallow lakes [Scheffer, M., 1989. Alternative stable states in eutrophic, shallow freshwater systems: a minimal model. Hydrobiological Bulletin 23, 73-83]. Switches between clear and turbid water conditions are explained by a colder climate and forest decline in the catchment area of Lake Luanhaizi. The macrofossil-based reconstruction of past water depth and salinity ranges, as well as other organic matter (OM) proxies allowed climatic inferences of the summer monsoon intensity during the late Quaternary. Around 45 ka BP, conditions similar to or even moister than present-day climate occurred. The Lake Luanhaizi record is further evidence against an extensive glaciation of the Tibetan Plateau and its bordering mountain ranges during the Last Glacial Maximum. Highest lake levels and consequently a strong summer monsoon are recorded for the early Holocene period, while gradually decreasing lake levels are reconstructed for the middle and late Holocene.

  19. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  20. A 4D sedimentological approach to reconstruct the flood frequency and intensity of Rhône River (Lake Bourget, NW European Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Bruno; Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Arnaud, Fabien; Sabatier, Pierre; Giguet-Covex, Charline; Mélo, Alain; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Perga, Marie-Elodie

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution sedimentological study of the large Lake Bourget (French Alps, 231m a.s.l., 45°45'55N, 5°51'45E) was conducted to reconstruct the flood frequency and intensity (or magnitude) in the area over the last 350 years. Particular emphasis was placed on investigating the spatio-temporal distribution of flood deposits in this large lake basin. The thicknesses of deposits resulting from 30 flood events of the Rhône River were collected over a set of 24 short sediment cores. Deposit thicknesses were compared with instrumental data for the Rhône River discharge for the period from 1853 to 2010. The results show that flood frequency and intensity cannot be reliably reconstructed from a single core because of the inhomogeneous flood-deposit geometry in such a large lake. From all documented flood-deposit thicknesses, volumes of sediment brought into the lake during each flood event were computed through a kriging procedure and compared with the historical instrumental data. The results show that reconstructed sediment volumes are well correlated to maximal flood discharges. This significant correlation suggests that the increase of embankment and dam settlements on the Rhône River during the last 150 years has not significantly affected the transport of the smallest sediment fraction during major flood events. Hence, assessment of the flood-sediment volumes deposited in the large Lake Bourget allowed to reliably reconstruct the flood frequency and intensity of the past Rhône River floods.

  1. Biomarker signatures in sediment cores of Lake Urmia (NW Iran): Potential implications for paleo-climate and paleo-environment reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghipour, Negar; Eglinton, Timothy Ian; McIntyre, Cameron; Darvishi Khatooni, Javad; Hunziker, Daniela; Mohammadi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, in northwest Iran, is the largest saline lake in the Middle East with a surface area of ~ 5000km2. Historical documents indicate its existence since at least 2000 years BC, and palynological investigation of a 100 m-long core suggest it contains a sedimentary record spanning the last 200 ka. Despite this potential as an archive of paleo-climate and paleo-environmental information, to date there has been no molecular organic geochemical investigation or precise dating of these sediments. As part of an exploratory study, we have analyzed material from 3 recently collected 8 m-long cores from the eastern, western and middle part of the lake, with the aim of gaining insight in to past depositional and environmental conditions from biomarker signatures preserved in Lake Urmia sediments. The main objectives are to 1) constrain major source(s) of organic matter and gain insights into carbon cycle and depositional processes from bulk isotopic (δ13Corg, 14Corg) and molecular information, 2) determine the applicability of molecular proxies (TEX86 index derived from glyceroldialkylglycerol tetraethers, GDGTs, and unsaturation index UK37 based on long chain alkenones) for paleo-temperature reconstruction and 3) reconstruct the paleo- vegetation and hydrology from compound-specific stable isotopes (δ13C and δD of n-alkanes). In select samples examined from the three cores, we find the hydrocarbon fractions are dominated by long-chain n-alkanes, with n-C29 and C31 as the dominant homologues in most of the samples. Based on the n-alkane distribution, we distinguish two main types; Type 1 mainly includes the samples deeper than ca 4 m (CPI= 10.2, ACL= 30), characteristic of a terrestrial higher plant source; Type 2 comprises mainly shallower samples (CPI =1.5, ACL = 27.3) which may suggest an increased contribution of aquatic plants. Preliminary GDGT analyses indicate low BIT values for most samples, which suggest little input of soil-derived branched-GDGTs. The

  2. Determination of Sinkholes with Different Geophysical Techniques; A Case Study in Yarımburgaz, Küçükçekmece Lake NW Istanbul, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Savas; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla; Tezel, Okan; Dedecan, Hasan; Oygo, Azat

    2016-04-01

    The Yarımburgaz cave which is located in the city of Istanbul, NW Turkey plays an important host to the first human culture and preserve significant archaeological and paleontological resources. The cave was formed as a result of a subterranean stream erosion on the limestones of the Eocene Kırklareli formation. It has been reported that a double cave with upper and lower entrance chambers exist, although no geophysical research was conducted to detect the cave's trunk passages and the extend of the sediment fill inside the cave. The aim of this study was to test the preferred order for detection the response to different geophysical methods applied on the cave. We therefore carried out an a series of geophysical study to determine the size, position, and depth of sinkholes inside the caves. Integrated methodological approaches including multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) 2- microtremor array method, 3-single station microtremor measurements, 4- electrical tomography (ET) measuruments and 5-microgravity imaging showed that the geophysical response was succesfully applied. Based upon the flow-chart we concluded that the microgravity survey should be applied as a first step to detect the air-filled void and the geometry of the cave. The electric tomography method was well applied showing high resistivity values across the voids. The surface wave method showed that the low-velocity zones are detected in various locations of the cave. In addition we the results of MASW and ReMi methods showed clearly the density variation in the lateral direction. Fundamental frequency value above void decraese according the properties of geological units in lateral directional, especially when they are engineering rock like limestone.

  3. Evidence of orbital forcing in lake-level fluctuations in the Middle Eocene oil shale-bearing lacustrine successions in the Mudurnu-Göynük Basin, NW Anatolia (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocakoğlu, F.; Açıkalın, S.; Yılmaz, İ. Ö.; Şafak, Ü.; Gökçeoğlu, C.

    2012-08-01

    Mudurnu-Göynük basin of the Sakarya Zone in NW Anatolia comprises ca. 1500 m thick Paleocene-Eocene terrestrial to shallow marine succession overlying the Late Cretaceous deeper marine progradational fore-arc sediments. Formed in a foreland setting in relation to southerly situated İzmir-Ankara suture zone, this terrestrial succession (regionally known as Kızılçay group) comprises a thin (<200 m) oil shale-bearing lacustrine section with very good cyclic patterns that potentially serves the quantification of stratigraphy and enlightening the origin of cyclicities of various hierarchy. Our detailed facies analysis on three correlative measured sections showed that mudstone, oil shale and thinner limestone alternations characterize the relatively deeper part of the Eocene lake with probable marine intervention, while thicker limestone, coal, marl and occasional oil shale alternations typify the southern relatively freshwater shoal areas. These facies are frequently organized as meter-scale symmetric to asymmetric transgressive-regressive cycles. Spectral analysis of the mudstone beds and the cycles within the lacustrine succession strongly indicates the occurrence of full bands of Milankovitch with the shortest precession cycle (19 ka) at ca. 2.30 m. Our observations further revealed quite rhythmic thin couplets with estimated durations of 365-730 yr that might represent abrupt climatic changes during deposition. On the other hand, longer duration (ca. 1 Ma) of shoaling and deepening trends in the studied sections were attributed basically to varying subsidence due to tectonic loading in the southerly suture zone. Lastly, regarding the distribution of depositional environments we propose that the oil shale exploration activities should be carried out within a 20 km wide E-W running belt while the southern limits of this belt is more prolific for coal resources.

  4. Generation of an Archaean H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ fluid enriched in Au, W and Mo by fractional crystallization in the Mink Lake intrusion, NW Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, D.R.; Spooner, E.T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Fractional crystallization (FC) of the post-tectonic trondhjemitic Mink Lake intrusion in NW Ontario resulted in a residual H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ low salinity fluid with an isotopic composition (delta /sup 13/C/sub cc/ x = -3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand (1s), delta/sup 18/O/sub cc/ + 10.7 to 15.9 per thousand, deltaD/sub FI/ -70 +/- 9 per thousand (1s) and delta /sup 34/S/sub py/ +0.4 to +2.90 per thousand) compatible with magmatic derivation and extremely similar to that in vein quartz-carbonate-pyrite +/- scheelite, +/- tourmaline, +/- MoS/sub 2/ +/- telluride systems characteristic of major Archaean lode gold deposits. Inward FC of the granodiorite magma (69-71% SiO/sub 2/, Na/sub 2/O/K/sub 2/O = 1.6-3.9), as indicated by trace and REE data, produced a sequence of microgranites and aplitic dykes with mean values by INNA (n=10) for Au of 2.3ppb, Mo = 22ppm and W = 7.3ppm as compared to mean background values in the granodiorite of Au <1ppb, Mo less than or equal to 1ppm with W less than or equal to 3.7ppm (n=4). The latest aplites are observed to coexist with a H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixture and are characterized by carbonate alteration selvages and minor MoS/sub 2/. Subsequent separation of the H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ fluid and interaction with an otherwise fresh granodiorite within the already solidified southern margin, produced MoS/sub 2/ mineralized sub-horizontal quartz veins and larger tabular lenses of carbonate alteration without internal veining. Such zones are anomalously enriched (n=10) in Au (anti x = 153 pbb, range 2-570ppb) Mo (anti x 660ppm, range 1-2500ppm and W (anti x = 61 ppm, range 23-95 ppm).

  5. A 2400-year record of abrupt climate change from Almalou Crate Lake in NW Iran: Investigating the potential influence of solar variability on the climate of West Asia during late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, A.; Pourmand, A.; Canuel, E. A.; Naderi Beni, A.; Lahijani, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Mediterranean climate of northwest Iran is influenced by mid-latitude Westerlies and the winter expansion of the Siberian Anticyclone. Given the significance of this region in development of human civilizations, high-resolution reconstructions of abrupt climate change are of particular interest during the Holocene. Almalou Crater Lake sustains the growth of plants inside the crater of a dormant volcanic cone on the eastern flank of the Sahand volcanic district in NW Iran. At an elevation of 2491 m.a.s.l., the crater is exclusively fed by rainfall during the spring and fall and snowfall during the winter. Preservation of organic matter within the crater can potentially record changes in atmospheric deposition and paleo-environmental conditions over this region. To reconstruct changes in atmospheric aeolian input, we present a high-resolution (sub-decadal) multi-proxy record of climate variability during the last 2400 years from a 3-m peat core recovered from the crater peat bog. Radiocarbon dates of eight samples along the core show a nearly constant rate of accumulation (7.7 mm yr-1, R2=0.98) since 2404×25 cal yr BP. Downcore X-ray fluorescence measurements of selected conservative lithogenic elements (e.g., Al, Si, and Ti) as well as redox-sensitive elements (e.g., Fe and Rb) at 10 mm intervals reveal several periods of elevated abundances related to enhanced atmospheric dust deposition. The co-variations between relative abundances of conservative and redox-sensitive elements as a function of time show significant agreement and attest to the ombrotrophic nature of the entire record. Intervals of enhanced dust deposition inferred from XRF data reveal three short episodes (~ 150-y) at 450-600, 1150-1300, and 1400-1550 cal yr BP, and one prolonged period (500 y) of dust accumulation from 1600 to 2070 cal yr BP. These intervals of high atmospheric dust coincide with historical records of drought and famine in Iran since 2000 BP. Wavelet analysis conducted on the

  6. VIEW LOOKING NW FROM CATWALK OF SE TOWER, SHOWING INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NW FROM CATWALK OF SE TOWER, SHOWING INTERIOR ELEVATION OF TOWER OPPOSITE. NOTE THAT CONCRETE PIERS DO NOT MATCH FOOTINGS PROJECTING SLIGHTLY ABOVE WATER. - Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway, Bridge No. 6, Spanning Calumet River, east of Chicago Skyway (I-90), Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. A Holocene climate record from palaeolakes in NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Y.; Hodell, D. A.; Petrie, C.

    2011-12-01

    The plains of NW India encompasses arid, semi-arid to sub-humid zones and archaeological research indicate this region was intensively settled by the Indus Valley Civilization. The precise climatological and environmental history of this region during the Holocene period remain largely unknown. We present high-resolution isotope proxy records of local palaeoclimate change from lacustrine deposits in two different climatic zones from west to east; Palaeo-lake Riwasa in the semi-arid and paleo-lake Kotla Dahar in the sub-humid region in Haryana plains, India. The oxygen isotope record from palaeolake Riwasa indicates the inception of wet climate conditions and establishment of a deep, permanent lake in the basin at ~8870 14C yr BP, coinciding approximately with the early Holocene maximum in the Indian monsoon. A major desiccation event occurs after ~7000 14C yr BP. Our results from palaeolake Riwasa indicate that the permanent deep-water lake and major desiccation event in semi-arid region pre-dated the urban phase of the Indus Civilization. Palaeolake Kotla Dahar is located further east than Riwasa in the sub-humid zone, and receives 500-700mm rainfall. Calcium carbonate percent of bulk sediments from Kotla Dahar increases down section to a maximum of 72%, indicating the presence of a deep carbonate marl lake. Oxygen isotopes are currently being measured on gastropod and ostracod shells and radiocarbon dates are being obtained from this section. We speculate that the oxygen isotope record from Kotla Dahar may provide critical climate data for the period between 5000-3500 BP, the period of Harappan Urbanism. Our study of palaeo-lakes Riwasa and Kotla Dahar constitute the first oxygen isotope records from the plains of NW India to interpret the palaeoclimate history of this region.

  8. Holocene monsoon variability inferred from palaeolake sediments in NW India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Y.; Hodell, D. A.; Petrie, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    The plains of NW India encompasses arid, semi-arid to sub-humid zones and are characterized by numerous palaeolakes and playas. The sedimentary records from these water bodies provide a rich source of paleoclimatic information. We present a high-resolution, Holocene monsoon-variation record inferred from three palaeolakes lying across the precipitation gradient in NW India; palaeolake Karsandi in arid Rajasthan and palaeolake Riwasa, palaeolake Kotla Dahar in semi-arid and sub-humid regions, respectively, in Haryana plains. Laminated and massive gypsum deposits characterize Palaeolake Karsandi in the arid region. Oxygen isotopes are being measured on the gastropod shells and gypsum hydration of water (Hodell et al 2011) for a continuous isotopic record from Rajasthan. The oxygen isotope record from palaeolake Riwasa in the semi-arid region indicates the inception of a wet period at 9700-9500 cal yr (BP) with the establishment of a deep, permanent lake coinciding with the early Holocene maximum in the Indian monsoon. The deep, permanent-lake phase ended with a desiccation event at approximately 8200 BP coinciding with the '8.2kyr' weakening of the monsoon. In contrast, palaeolake Kotla Dahar, lying further east of Riwasa in the sub-humid region, receives 500-700mm annual rainfall. At Kotla Dahar, bulk CaCO3 (%), gastropod abundance and isotope data indicate that the deep lacustrine sequence ends at c.185 cm. Extrapolating from the AMS radio-carbon dated sediments at 135cm (4870-4650 BP) and 230cm (2000-1870 BP), places the 185 cm horizon at c.3970-3720 BP. Our results so far indicate that the Riwasa paleolake lying west of Kotla Dahar dries earlier than Kotla Dahar during the mid-Holocene. The precise date of the transition from a deep-lake water phase to an ephemeral lake in Kotla Dahar is pending, but the projected date suggests that the event coincides with the decline of the urban phase of the Indus Civilization at c. 3900 BP. These three lakes lying across

  9. Spatial biostratigraphy of NW Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Naseer Ahmed

    2001-07-01

    Mesozoic to Cenozoic biostratigraphy of NW Pakistan has been conducted in order to document the temporal and spatial relationship between different marine strata with the help of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). These relationships were then used to help distinguish different tectonostratigraphic units in the Waziristan and the Kurram areas located at the northwestern margin of the Indo-Pakistani craton. Extensive biostratigraphic work in the Waziristan and Kurram areas enabled to distinguish five tectonostratigraphic units and two significant unconformities in the study area. Different foraminiferal zones from Early Jurassic to Middle Eocenewere developed, although due to random samples these zones are not continuous in the sedimentary record. However continuous biozonation from the Late Paleocene P4 to the Early Eocene P9 (Bolli, 1985) biozone was observed. It is observed that the Santonian stage is generally missing in the sedimentary sequence, and it is only found in the olistoliths. This implies that during the Campanian stage there was instability in the shelf due to ophiolite obduction, which caused the displacement of the Santonian strata. The absence of Early Paleocene (Zone P1--P3) microfauna is suggested by rapid subsidence of the NW Indian shelf beginning in the early Paleocene. Moreover, index fossils for the Palpha, P1a, b, c, d, P2 and P3 biozones are absent in the melange of the Thal area suggesting regional uplift during the Paleocene. The presence of Planorotalites pseudomenardii P4 zone microfauna above the unconformable Upper Cretaceous Kahi melange strata suggest the India-Asia collision age between 58 Ma--56 Ma. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of upper Cretaceous olistoliths was conducted from the Mughal Kot gorge, Baluchistan, Pakistan in order to reveal the depositional history of Late Santonian aged (Dicarinella asymmetrica zone) olistoliths and associated upper Cretaceous to early Tertiary Indo-Pakistani shelf strata

  10. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  11. Fish Lake, Utah - shallow seismic investigation of a lake-filled high-altitude graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. S.; Oliviera-Manna, M.; Bailey, C.; Marchetti, D. W.; Brunelle, A.; Abbott, M. B.; Larsen, D. J.; Stoner, J. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.; Anderson, L.; Power, M. J.; Chavez, V.; Carter, V.; Hart, I.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake formed in a portion of the 20-km x 2.5-km wide NE-SW trending graben within the High Plateaus of Utah, on the border between the Basin and Range to the west and the Canyon Lands east. This presentation focuses on the shallow seismic stratigraphic architecture of the lake. Marchetti et al. (this meeting) focuses details of a shallow core collected in 2014. With a lake surface at 2700m, avg. depth of 27m (max 37m), the lake is flanked NW by a 15° slope up to a formerly glaciated Hightop plateau (3545m) and is bound to the SE by a 30° NW facing slope off the Mytoge crest (3050m). The drainage basin is 74 km2 with ~75% of the catchment draining the Hightop from four distinct streams. Pelican Canyon (glaciated) and Doctor Canyon (unglaciated) provide most drainage into the basin, with Bowery and Twin creeks draining only the slope. These streams flow through organic-rich meadows at the edge of the lake. Only one small stream drains NW into the lake from the small Crater Lakes graben (2850m) off the Mytoge. Bathymetric surveys in the lake highlight a submerged moraine to the NE, a gently sloping bottom that reaches maximum depth off the steep wall to the SE, and small delta-form features off each of the creeks on the NW edge. Chirp seismic surveys (2-16 kHz) consistently penetrate the upper 40-m (up to ~55m). The oldest visible reflectors rise into the submerged moraine to the NE, ending in a complex set of truncated and discontinuous beds eluding to soft sediment push at the front of the glacier. Along the edge near the creeks to the NW, multiple sets of downlapping reflectors, gas pockets, and chaotic beds with lobate tops define what we interpret as deltaic deposition, possible lower lake levels with marsh systems, and slope failures. The majority of the lake is underlain by flat-lying reflectors that bound sedimentary packages spanning the entirety of the basin interior. The uppermost layers have recently been cored where seismic reflectors are continuous

  12. 24. OLD TIOGA ROAD VIEW, NOW MAY LAKE ROAD , ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. OLD TIOGA ROAD VIEW, NOW MAY LAKE ROAD , AT SNOW FLAT. MOUNT HOFFMAN AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NW. GIS: N-37 49 34.6 / W-119 29 58.2 - Tioga Road, Between Crane Flat & Tioga Pass, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  13. The Morphometry of Lake Palmas, a Deep Natural Lake in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Gilberto F.; Gonçalves, Monica A.; Garcia, Fábio da C.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Palmas (A = 10.3km2) is located in the Lower Doce River Valley (LDRV), on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The Lake District of the LDRV includes 90 lakes, whose basic geomorphology is associated with the alluvial valleys of the Barreiras Formation (Cenozoic, Neogene) and with the Holocene coastal plain. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of morphometry and thermal pattern of a LDRV deep lake, Lake Palmas. A bathymetric survey carried out in 2011 and the analysis of hydrographic and wind data with a geographic information system allowed the calculation of several metrics of lake morphometry. The vertical profiling of physical and chemical variables in the water column during the wet/warm and dry/mild cold seasons of 2011 to 2013 has furnished a better understanding of the influence of the lake morphometry on its structure and function. The overdeepened basin has a subrectangular elongated shape and is aligned in a NW-SE direction in an alluvial valley with a maximum depth (Zmax) of 50.7m, a volume of 2.2×108 m3 (0.22km3) and a mean depth (Zmv) of 21.4m. These metrics suggest Lake Palmas as the deepest natural lake in Brazil. Water column profiling has indicated strong physical and chemical stratification during the wet/warm season, with a hypoxic/anoxic layer occupying one-half of the lake volume. The warm monomictic pattern of Lake Palmas, which is in an accordance to deep tropical lakes, is determined by water column mixing during the dry and mild cold season, especially under the influence of a high effective fetch associated with the incidence of cold fronts. Lake Palmas has a very long theoretical retention time, with a mean of 19.4 years. The changes observed in the hydrological flows of the tributary rivers may disturb the ecological resilience of Lake Palmas. PMID:25406062

  14. The morphometry of Lake Palmas, a deep natural lake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Gilberto F; Gonçalves, Monica A; Garcia, Fábio da C

    2014-01-01

    Lake Palmas (A = 10.3km2) is located in the Lower Doce River Valley (LDRV), on the southeastern coast of Brazil. The Lake District of the LDRV includes 90 lakes, whose basic geomorphology is associated with the alluvial valleys of the Barreiras Formation (Cenozoic, Neogene) and with the Holocene coastal plain. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of morphometry and thermal pattern of a LDRV deep lake, Lake Palmas. A bathymetric survey carried out in 2011 and the analysis of hydrographic and wind data with a geographic information system allowed the calculation of several metrics of lake morphometry. The vertical profiling of physical and chemical variables in the water column during the wet/warm and dry/mild cold seasons of 2011 to 2013 has furnished a better understanding of the influence of the lake morphometry on its structure and function. The overdeepened basin has a subrectangular elongated shape and is aligned in a NW-SE direction in an alluvial valley with a maximum depth (Zmax) of 50.7 m, a volume of 2.2×10(8) m3 (0.22 km3) and a mean depth (Zmv) of 21.4m. These metrics suggest Lake Palmas as the deepest natural lake in Brazil. Water column profiling has indicated strong physical and chemical stratification during the wet/warm season, with a hypoxic/anoxic layer occupying one-half of the lake volume. The warm monomictic pattern of Lake Palmas, which is in an accordance to deep tropical lakes, is determined by water column mixing during the dry and mild cold season, especially under the influence of a high effective fetch associated with the incidence of cold fronts. Lake Palmas has a very long theoretical retention time, with a mean of 19.4 years. The changes observed in the hydrological flows of the tributary rivers may disturb the ecological resilience of Lake Palmas. PMID:25406062

  15. Lake Powell

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Lake Powell     View Larger Image ... (14.42 mb)   This true-color image over Lake Powell was acquired by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late March 2000. Lake Powell was formed with the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, on the ...

  16. CONNECTICUT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named lakes in Connecticut. It is a polygon Shapefile that includes all lakes that are named on the U.S. Geologicial Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut, plus other officially named lakes i...

  17. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...   View Larger Image Lake Eyre is a large salt lake situated between two deserts in one of Australia's driest regions. ... the effect of sunglint at the nadir camera view angle. Dry, salt encrusted parts of the lake appear bright white or gray. Purple areas have ...

  18. Lithospheric structure beneath NW Iran using regional and teleseismic travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavali, K.; Motaghi, K.; Sobouti, F.; Ghods, A.; Abbasi, M.; Priestley, K.; Mortezanejad, G.; Rezaeian, M.

    2016-04-01

    We compute a 2-D tomogram using the P wave arrival time readings from a temporary seismic experiment to study the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle in NW Iran. The study area includes the western margins of the South Caspian Basin (SCB), and the Sahand and Sabalan post-collisional volcanoes in NW Iran. We invert 2780 regional and teleseismic relative P wave arrival times recorded by 23 stations along the seismic profile extending from the western shoreline of the Caspian Sea to Lake Urumieh. Our tomographic results show a higher-velocity region beneath the SCB. The observed higher velocities strongly correlate with the observed positive gravity anomalies over the southwestern margins of the Caspian Sea, suggesting an oceanic like nature for the SCB lithosphere. The tomographic results also show several lower-velocity anomalies in the crust. The Sabalan volcano is underlain by a low-velocity zone in the lower crust, which is most likely thermal in nature. In the Sahand region, the lower velocities are considerably shallower in depth and might be controlled by shallow sedimentary structures, as well as an anomalously warm upper crust. The shallow low-velocity regions are connected with deeper low-velocity zones 60-100 km deep in the upper mantle. This pattern points to a possible mantle source of post-collisional volcanism in NW Iran, i.e. the melting of a subducted slab.

  19. Glacier-induced Hazards in the Trans-Himalaya of Ladakh (NW-India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Susanne; Dame, Juliane; Nüsser, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers are important water resources for irrigated crop cultivation in the semi-arid Trans-Himalaya of Ladakh (NW-India). Due to global warming, many glaciers of South Asia have retreated over the last century and further ice loss will threaten local livelihoods in the long run. In the short term, an increase of flood events caused by melting glaciers and permafrost is expected for the Himalayan region. Beside large catastrophic events, small outburst floods are 'more' regularly reported for various parts of the region. This also holds true for the Trans-Himalayan region of Ladakh, where small glaciers exist at high altitudes. Caused by glacier retreat, a number of proglacial lakes have been formed, most of them dammed by ice filled moraines. The potential risk of these lakes is shown by recent reports on glacial lake outburst flood in the villages Nidder in October 2010 and Gya in August 2014. The 2014 flood destroyed several agricultural terraces, a new concrete bridge and two houses. Own remote sensing analyses shows the increase of a moraine dammed proglacial lake in the upper catchment area, which grew from about 0.03 to 0.08 km2 between 1969 and 2014. Because of the relatively stable altitude of the lake level, one can assume that the flood was caused by a piping process, initiated by melted ice bodies in the moraine. Already in the 1990s a small GLOF was observed in the village, which destroyed some fields. As in 2014, the lake was not completely spilled and a short-term decrease of the lake area is detectable in remote sensing data. Thus, further GLOF-events can be expected for the future. Beside physical risk factors, population growth and new infrastructure development along the streams and valleys increases potential damages of floods. Therefore, investigations are required to estimate the risks of these small glacial lakes and the potential flood effected area for the case study of Gya as well as for the whole region of Ladakh. Remote sensing data are

  20. Fluvial sensitivity to Late Quaternary climate changes in NW Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Ioana; Rădoane, Maria; Robu, Delia; Tanţău, Ioan

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial archives became increasingly important for the reconstruction of past environments, as they record a sum of climate, vegetation, hydrologic and anthropic changes. This is especially important for the Late Quaternary, when climate and human activities had recorded large spatial and temporal variations. Here we present a tale of fluvial behavior during the last ca. 24.000 years in NW Romania, based on 1) absolute ages and fluvial architecture of sediments exposed in 8 openings located along the Someşu Mic River, and 2) depth-age models, grain size, LOI and gastropods assemblage analysis on 2 cores located upstream from Ştiucilor Lake, a natural lake along a small tributary of the Someşu Mic River, formed by salt disolution on top of a narrow diapiric anticline. During the Late Glacial (LG), Ştiucilor Lake was more extended then is today, with a high input of coarse materials (sands) from the slopes; and dramatically reducing its size in the Early Holocene, a transition marked by the abrupt occurrence of Holocene gyttja on top of LG sands, 1 km upstream from the present lake. Further upstream, at ca. 4 km from the present day edge of the lake, clays and sandy clays were deposited during the Bolling - Allerod (BA), followed by fine - medium sands of Younger Dryas (YD) age. On top of these sands, clays, sandy clays and gyttja occur, suggesting a returning to a less energetic sedimentary environment in the Holocene. In both cores, the sediments become lacustrine, with clays and fine sands, attesting the expansion of the lake's surface, followed by large fluctuations during the Holocene. The river fed by this stream - Someşu Mic, was a coarse gravel, shallow braided river before the Last Glacial Maximum and until the YD. The channel metamorphosis into a narrow, incised, meandering one, occurred ca. 1500 years after the beginning of the Holocene. However, sedimentological evidences suggest that this transition from braided to meandering channel was not a

  1. 9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  3. LAKE FORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Fork of the Arkansas River Watershed has been adversely affected through mining, water diversion and storage projects, grazing, logging, and other human influences over the past 120 years. It is the goals of the LFWWG to improve the health of Lake fork by addressing th...

  4. Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Gier, Susanne; Hofmann, Christa-Ch.; Janda, Christoph; Bookhagen, Bodo; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    300 MW Baspa II is India's largest private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary to the Sutlej River in the NW Himalaya (India). In this valley the Sangla palaeo-lake has been dammed around 8200 yr BP behind a rock-avalanche dam and Baspa II is located exactly on top of this palaeo-lake. This special location represents a very rare possibility to evaluate the short-term, river load and hydrological parameters measured during the planning and operational stages of Baspa II with the long-term parameters gained from the palaeo-lake sediments from the catchment. Sedimentological and geomorphological investigations of the lacustrine sediments have been used to reconstruct environmental changes during >2500 years of its existence. The Mid-Holocene erosion rates of the Baspa catchment estimated from the volume and duration of deposition of the exposed lake sediments are at 0.7-1.0 mm yr-1, almost identical with the modern erosion rates calculated from river gauge data from Baspa II. Several charcoal layers and charcoal pieces from the uppermost palaeo-lake levels around 5000 cal yr BP might be related to woodland clearance and they possibly represent one of the oldest evidences for human presence in the Baspa Valley during Neolithic time.

  5. Extreme precipitation events in NW Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houssos, E. E.; Bartzokas, A.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, the extreme precipitation events in NW Greece are studied. The data used are daily precipitation totals recorded at the meteorological station of Ioannina University for the period 1970-2002. 156 days with precipitation totals above 35 mm (5% upper limit) are only considered. It is seen that, a minimum frequency of extreme precipitation events appears in the period 1986-1991, which is characterized by a high positive NAO index. For each of the 156 extreme precipitation days, at first, the mean sea level pressure pattern over Europe is constructed by using 273 grid point values. Using Factor Analysis, the dimensionality of the 156×273 data matrix is reduced to 156×5 (84% of the total variance) and then, Cluster Analysis is applied on the results of Factor Analysis. Thus, the 156 cases are grouped objectively to 11 clusters, revealing the main pressure patterns, which favour extreme precipitation in NW Greece. Seven of the patterns are encountered in winter and autumn, while three of them cover a period from autumn to spring and one appears mainly in summer. In all of them the cause of the extreme precipitation event is a low pressure system centred west of Greece or a low pressure trough extended eastwards or southwards up to Greece. In some cases the depression is so strong and extended that it covers the whole Europe and the Mediterranean. In the single summer pattern, rainfall is caused by an extension of the SW Asia thermal low up to the central Mediterranean.

  6. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao )

    1996-01-01

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  7. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao

    1996-12-31

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil & gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  8. Geomorphological analysis of the drainage system on the active convergent system in Azerbaijan, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh Firouz, Amaneh; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Giachetta, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Rivers are important landforms to reconstruct recent tectonic history because they are sensitive to surface movements, especially uplift and tilting. The most important drainage basins of NW Iran are, from north to south, the Arax River, the Urmia Lake and the Ghezel Ozan River catchment. The morphology of the two adjacent catchments draining into the Caspian Sea, the Arax and Ghezel Ozan were studied to better understand the active tectonics and the effect of fault activity on morphology and erosion rate of NW Iran. We performed a quantitative analysis of channel steepness and concavity, from slope-area plots calculated from digital elevation model. This information has been combined with GPS velocity vectors and seismicity. Both catchments developed under uniform climate conditions. Results show that the two rivers are in morphological disequilibrium; they exhibit profiles with prominent convexities and knickpoints. The Arax River shows higher channel steepness and concavity index in downstream part of the profile. Distribution of knickpoints show scattered elevation between 700m and 3000m. GPS rates display shortening 10 ± 2 mma‑1 and 14 ± 2 mma‑1 in upstream and downstream, respectively. The river profiles of Ghezel Ozan River and its tributaries reveal more disequilibrium downstream where channel steepness and concavity index are higher than upstream. Most knickpoints occur between 1000m and 2000m. The amount of shortening by GPS measurement changes from upstream 13 ± 2 mma‑1to downstream 14 ± 2 mma‑1. Recorded earthquakes, such as Rudbar earthquake (Mw=7.3, 1990), are more frequent downstream. The Urmia Lake is surrounded by many small and large catchments. Only major catchments were considered for the analysis. One of the most active faults, the north Tabriz fault, corresponds to a major knickpoints on the Talkhe rud River. Concordance between river profile analysis, GPS and seismotectonic records suggests that the characteristics of the river

  9. Geohydrologic setting of Mirror Lake, West Thornton, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    The drainage basin of Mirror Lake, New Hampshire is characterized by high knobs and ridges and steep land slopes. The lake is situated in the lower part of the basin, largely within glacial drift. Drift in most of the Mirror Lake drainage basin is till, which is as much as 50 meters thick, Crystalline bedrock underlying the drift is composed of schist, slate, and quartz monzonite of earliest Devonian age. These rocks are intensely folded and contain numerous fractures. Three small streams flow into Mirror Lake. Streamflow discharge into Mirror Lake differs between the two largest subbasins. Basin NW, which has a more round shape and thicker glacial drift than basin W, has greater stream discharge as well as greater sustained base flow. Ground water moves into most parts of Mirror Lake, and losses to ground water occur principally on the southeast side. Water-level data from piezometers and bedrock wells indicate dynamic ground-water movement within the fractured bedrock underlying Mirror Lake. These data also indicate very active interchange of ground water between bedrock and the overlying glacial drift. There are particularly strong hydraulic head gradients from the bedrock into the drift in the area between Mirror Lake and Hubbard Brook. (USGS)

  10. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. 3. Top surface of dock including railroad tracks; looking NW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Top surface of dock including railroad tracks; looking NW from shore end. Paving block mill location is partially visible on right one half of photo. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, West Dock, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  12. 10. Side view of cane mill looking NW with steam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Side view of cane mill looking NW with steam engine in background. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  13. 35. PRATER GRADE ROAD VIEW, FACING NW. NOTE WEATHERING STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. PRATER GRADE ROAD VIEW, FACING NW. NOTE WEATHERING STEEL RAIL AND ROAD CUT IN DISTANCE. MONTEZUMA VALLEY OVERLOOK IS JUST TO RIGHT OF DISTANT ROAD CUT. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  14. 2. Photocopy of c. 1906 photograph looking NW at water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of c. 1906 photograph looking NW at water tower with mill pond and pump house in right center foreground; fuel oil storage tank in right background. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  15. 8. August, 1971. SECOND FLOOR LOOKING NW. EVAPORATOR UNITS USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. August, 1971. SECOND FLOOR LOOKING NW. EVAPORATOR UNITS USED IN SEQUENCE TO REDUCE OR CONCENTRATE BEET JUICE. - Utah Sugar Company, Garland Beet Sugar Refinery, Factory Street, Garland, Box Elder County, UT

  16. Elevation of deck truss span over creek, looking NW along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of deck truss span over creek, looking NW along U.S. route 322. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Brandywine Valley Viaduct, Spanning Brandywine Creek & U.S. Route 322, Downingtown, Chester County, PA

  17. 4. Water treatment plant, view to NW, berm in foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Water treatment plant, view to NW, berm in foreground - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  18. Perspective view NW by 310. Note the concrete pier extending ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view NW by 310. Note the concrete pier extending from the bridge in the foreground. This way to allow maximum water flow during floods and rainy periods. - Weaverland Bridge, Quarry Road spanning Conestoga Creek, Terre Hill, Lancaster County, PA

  19. Detail of third span from east end, looking NW. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of third span from east end, looking NW. Note that skew of pier is taken up in first panel of truss. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Selinsgrove Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River, south of Cherry Island, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  20. 1. Barn 3. NW corner. Border shed (Barn A) in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Barn 3. NW corner. Border shed (Barn A) in distance marks southern boundary of the original north barn area. Camera pointed SE. - Longacres, Barn 3, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  1. Infection by Paramphistomidae trematodes in cattle from two agricultural regions in NW Uruguay and NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Sanchís, J; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Macchi, M I; Piñeiro, P; Suárez, J L; Cazapal-Monteiro, C; Maldini, G; Venzal, J M; Paz-Silva, A; Arias, M S

    2013-01-16

    The analysis of infection by Paramphistomidae trematodes was conducted in two agricultural regions with different knowledge on this parasitosis. Faecal and blood samples were collected from 374 cattle in Salto (NW Uruguay) where there is a lack of information about paramphistomosis. A total of 429 cattle from Galicia (NW Spain), an area with previous records of infection by gastric flukes, were sampled. Diagnostics of trematodosis was developed by using a copromicroscopic probe and an ELISA with excretory/secretory antigens collected from adult Calicophoron daubneyi (Paramphistomidae) specimens. Results were evaluated according intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In the Uruguay, the percentage of cattle passing Paramphistomidae-eggs by faeces was 7% (95% Confidence Interval 5, 10). A significantly higher prevalence of paramphistomosis in the Hereford × Angus cattle (OR=3.5) was recorded, as observed for the oldest ruminants (>3.5 years). An overall seroprevalence of 29% (25, 34) was obtained by ELISA, with the highest values in the Friesians (OR=3), the youngest bovines (<2.5 years) and dairy cattle (Friesians). Twenty-six percent (22, 30) of the cattle from Spain passed eggs by faeces, and cattle aged 2.5-7 years reached significant highest prevalences. By means of the ELISA, a percentage of 55 cattle (50, 59) had antibodies against the gastric fluke, and the highest seroprevalence was observed among the bovines under 6 years. It is concluded that paramphistomosis is on the increase in cattle from NW Spain, partly due to the absence of an effective treatment against the trematode. There is a need for reducing the risk of infection by Paramhistomidae spp. in cattle from Uruguay, especially by improving their management to avoid exposure to the gastric trematode. Further studies are in progress for identifying the species of Paramphistomidae affecting ruminants in Uruguay. PMID:22902261

  2. Ancient lakes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspiel, J. M.; Squyres, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The valley systems in Mars' ancient cratered terrain provide strong evidence for a warmer and wetter climate very early in planetary history. The valley systems in some instances debouch into closed depressions that could have acted as local ponding basins for the flow. A survey of the Martian equatorial region shows that numerous local depressions at the confluence of valley systems exist. These depressions (approximately 100 km) typically are characterized by many valleys flowing into them and few or none flowing out. If ponding did take place, these basin would have contained lakes for some period during Mars' early warmer epoch. Although the collection basins are numerous, location of ones that have not suffered significant subsequent geologic modification is difficult. Some morphologic features suggest that volcanic lavas may have filled them subsequent to any early fluvial activity. Two detailed maps of valley systems and local ponding basins in USGC 1:2,000,000 subquadrangles were completed and a third is in progress. The completed regions are in Mare Tyrrhenum (MC-22 SW) and Margarifter Sinus (MC-19 SE), and the region in progress is in Iapygia (MC-21 NW). On the maps, the valley systems and interpreted margins of ponding basins are indicated. The depressions are of interest for two reasons. First, the depressions were surely the sites in which the materials eroded from the valleys were deposited. Such sediments could preserve important information about the physical conditions at the time of deposition. Second, the sediments could preserve evidence of water-atmosphere interactions during the early period of the Martian climate. Atmospheric carbon dioxide would dissolve in water, and solid carbonate minerals would tend to precipitate out to form carbonate sedimentary deposits. Formation of carbonates in this manner might account for some of the CO2 lost from the early more dense atmosphere.

  3. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  4. Active tectonics and Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (NW Himalaya, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Grasemann, Bernhard; Gier, Susanne; Hofmann, Christa-Charlotte; Janda, Christoph; Bookhagen, Bodo; Preh, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The Baspa River is one of the most important tributaries to the Sutlej River in the NW Himalaya (India). Its catchment is 1116 km2 in size, ranges from c. 6400 m asl to 1770 m asl and contains India's largest private hydroelectric facility, the 300 MW Baspa II. Geologically, the hydroelectric installation is located in the Higher Himalayan Crystalline, just above the active Karcham Normal Fault, which is reactivating the Early Miocene Main Central Thrust, one of the principal Himalayan faults. The area is seismically active and mass-movements are common. Around 8200 yrs BP the Baspa was dammed by a rock-avalanche dam, leading to the formation of the originally c. 260 m deep palaeo-lake Sangla palaeo-lake. Detailed sedimentological investigations and radiocarbon dating indicate that the palaeo-lake was completely filled with sediments until c. 5100 yrs BP. This makes the Sangla palaeo-lake to a very rare example of a mass-movement dam with very long duration and its lacustrine sediments represent a valuable archive for geological processes and environmental proxies within the Baspa catchment during the c. 3100 years of its existence - which are the aim of our study. At least 5 levels of soft-sediment deformation have been recorded in the exposed part of the lacustrine sediments of Sangla palaeo-lake, including brecciated laminae, overturned laminae, folds, faults and deformation bands, separated by undeformed deposits. They are interpreted as seismites, indicating at least 5 earthquakes within 2500 years strong enough to cause liquefaction. The 300 MW Baspa II hydro-electric power plant has been built exactly on top of this palaeo-lake. This special location represents a very rare possibility to evaluate the short-term, river load and hydrological parameters measured during the planning and operational stages of Baspa II with the long-term parameters gained from the palaeo-lake sediments from the catchment. This data show that the Mid-Holocene erosion rates of the

  5. Quo vadis NW Black Sea benthic ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traian Gomoiu, Marian

    2016-04-01

    / thalasoterapy. Black Sea ecosystem restoration - Certainties and Uncertainties: Pressure on the Danube and other rivers has decreased, chemical discharges have decreased obviously, and yet there appear phenomena of water flowering - "red waters", hypoxia is still present at times and there is mass mortality of fish and other benthic organisms. Why? Signs of recovery should be considered cautiously and uncertainties may be resolved only in a longer time by increasing our scientific efforts. The results of the EU FP7 Project PERSEUS led to the identification of three important issues that should be resolved in order to achieve good environmental status: • Applying an adaptive management to increase the resilience of the ecosystems and to diminish the vulnerability of biodiversity; • Necessity of participative approach by stakeholders; • Identifying and obtaining adequate financial support for new R-D-I projects. Who are the actors in addressing and implementing the actions? • Academic educational and research institutions for adequate working condition; • More specialists trained for taxonomic groups; • Reasonable diversity of coordinating specialists, capable team leaders / satisfactory work packages; • Attracting NGO members towards nature conservation issues; • Resonable stakeholders committed to environmental issues. Studying the results of researches carried out by GeoEcoMar on the Romanian Black Sea coast in recent years, the author concluded that the major problems hampering progress towards a good ecosystem in NW Bent Black Sea are: • lack of diversity in the fields of research, both in theoretical and applied realms; • structural and functional consequences of ecological pressures and the disordered state of the ecosystems in the periods of paroxysmal eutrophication / pollution at the end of the 20th Century; • scarcity of data and knowledge on the Social-Economic System; • high costs of the new marine technology used directly in the sea and

  6. Groundwater hydrochemistry evolution in cyclone driven hydrological regimes, NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, G.; Dogramaci, S.; Grierson, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater reserves supply the water needs of many arid regions around the world. Aquifer recharge in these regions is primarily depended on the amount and distribution of rainfall, coupled with exceedingly high rates of evaporation and interactions with both local and regional geomorphology and geology. In semi-arid northwest Australia, the majority of rainfall is delivered by large but infrequent cyclonic events and relatively more frequent but low intensity frontal systems. Changes to rainfall patterns due to global climate change may impact hydrological regimes, recharge rates and groundwater hydrochemistry. These changes may significantly restrict freshwater resources in the future. Between 2008 and 2012, we analysed >400 groundwater, surface and rainwater samples for stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) and major ion chemistry. We then developed conceptual geochemical models of groundwater evolution for the Hamersley Basin (>100,000 km2) and a salt inventory for the Fortescue Marsh (the largest wetland in NW Australia) [1,2]. Fresh groundwater from the alluvium (-8.02 × 0.83‰) and fractured aquifers (-8.22 × 0.70‰) were hydrochemically similar and characterised by a very narrow range of δ18O [1]. In contrast, δ18O of saline and brine groundwater (TDS >10 g L-1) varies in wide range from +2.5 to -7.2‰ [2]. Most of the fresh and brackish groundwater reflects modern recharge and is evaporated by <20% prior to recharge. In contrast, highly saline and brine groundwater reflects mixing between modern rainfall, brackish water and older deep groundwater. The Fortescue Marsh primarily acts as a terminal basin for surface water from the upper Fortescue River catchment [2]. The stable isotope composition of the deep brine groundwater under the Marsh suggests a complex evolution, which cannot be explained by evaporation under current climatic conditions. The observed salinity and δ18O values may result from progressive evaporation from highly saline

  7. View south up 27th Street rightofway NW (formerly Lyons Mill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south up 27th Street right-of-way NW (formerly Lyons Mill Road) along western edge of Female Union Band Cemetery. Vegetation obscures the cemetery's terraces. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Longevity of Lake Superior lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schram, Stephen T.; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    The age structure of mature lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior increased following a population recovery that has taken place since the 1960s. As the population aged, it became apparent that scales were unreliable aging structures. Beginning in 1986, we examined both scale and sagittal otolith ages from tagged fish with a known period at liberty. We found large discrepancies in scale and sagittal otolith ages of mature fish, such that scale ages were biased low. We estimated lake trout living up to 42 years, which is greater than previously reported from Lake Superior. Investigators studying lake trout population dynamics in the Great Lakes should be aware that lake trout can live longer than previously thought.

  9. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. 14. LOOKING NW FROM EASTERN ABUTMENT, WITH SWING SPAN IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. LOOKING NW FROM EASTERN ABUTMENT, WITH SWING SPAN IN OPEN POSITION. NOTE BUMPER ON CURVED RACK AT BOTTOM LEFT OF FRAME. - Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, Bridge No. Z-6, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Cortland Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  11. MARINA & MAINE STREETS FACING NW. DARKER COLORED HOME ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MARINA & MAINE STREETS FACING NW. DARKER COLORED HOME ON SE CORNER. NYSTROM VILLAGE, LIKE ATCHISON VILLAGE (HAER CA-326-N), HOUSED WORKERS DURING WORLD WAR II - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Nystrom Village, Marina & Maine Streets, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  12. 34. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NW SHOWING (LEFT TO RIGHT), WIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NW SHOWING (LEFT TO RIGHT), WIRE MILL NO. 1, WIRE MILL NO. 2, SCALE HOUSE, BUILDING NO. 69B. (ABUTS NJ-122E-33). - John A. Roebling's Sons Company, Kinkora Works, Support Systems, Roebling, Burlington County, NJ

  13. 25. Stereo view version of Southeast Light looking NW with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Stereo view version of Southeast Light looking NW with picket fence ca. 1890. From a contact print of a glass negative from the Mansfield Collection. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  14. 17. Detail of base of 'Flying Ram' in NW corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail of base of 'Flying Ram' in NW corner of foyer. Camera is looking SW. First doorway beyond fountain leads to basement and men's lounge seen in WA-197-44. Second doorway leads to storefront corner at Seventh Ave. and Olive Way. (Aug. 1991) - Fox Theater, Seventh Avenue & Olive Way, Seattle, King County, WA

  15. Temporal Succession of Ancient Phytoplankton Community in Qinghai Lake and Implication for Paleo-environmental Change.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaoyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Hou, Weiguo; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Jian; Wu, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan lake sediments in NW China are sensitive recorders of climate change. However, many important plankton members do not leave any microscopic features in sedimentary records. Here we used ancient DNA preserved in Qinghai Lake sediments to reconstruct the temporal succession of plankton communities in the past 18,500 years. Our results showed that seven classes and sixteen genera of phytoplankton in the lake underwent major temporal changes, in correlation with known climatic events. Trebouxiophyceae and Eustigmatophyceae were predominant during the cold periods, whereas Chlorophyceae, Phaeophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, and Cyanophyceae were abundant during the warm periods. The inferred changes in temperature, nutrients, precipitation, and salinity, as driven by the Westerlies and summer Monsoon strength, likely contributed to these observed temporal changes. Based on these correlations, we propose the phytoplankton index as a proxy to reconstruct the stadial versus interstadial climate change history in Qinghai Lake. This taxon-specific index is free of terrestrial contamination, sensitive to short-term climatic oscillations, and continuous in recording all climatic events in the lake. The validity of this index and its applicability to other lakes is demonstrated by its good correlations with multiple climate records of Qinghai Lake and another lake on the Tibetan Plateau, Kusai Lake. PMID:26805936

  16. Temporal Succession of Ancient Phytoplankton Community in Qinghai Lake and Implication for Paleo-environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gaoyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Hou, Weiguo; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Jian; Wu, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan lake sediments in NW China are sensitive recorders of climate change. However, many important plankton members do not leave any microscopic features in sedimentary records. Here we used ancient DNA preserved in Qinghai Lake sediments to reconstruct the temporal succession of plankton communities in the past 18,500 years. Our results showed that seven classes and sixteen genera of phytoplankton in the lake underwent major temporal changes, in correlation with known climatic events. Trebouxiophyceae and Eustigmatophyceae were predominant during the cold periods, whereas Chlorophyceae, Phaeophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, and Cyanophyceae were abundant during the warm periods. The inferred changes in temperature, nutrients, precipitation, and salinity, as driven by the Westerlies and summer Monsoon strength, likely contributed to these observed temporal changes. Based on these correlations, we propose the phytoplankton index as a proxy to reconstruct the stadial versus interstadial climate change history in Qinghai Lake. This taxon-specific index is free of terrestrial contamination, sensitive to short-term climatic oscillations, and continuous in recording all climatic events in the lake. The validity of this index and its applicability to other lakes is demonstrated by its good correlations with multiple climate records of Qinghai Lake and another lake on the Tibetan Plateau, Kusai Lake. PMID:26805936

  17. Temporal Succession of Ancient Phytoplankton Community in Qinghai Lake and Implication for Paleo-environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Hou, Weiguo; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Jian; Wu, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan lake sediments in NW China are sensitive recorders of climate change. However, many important plankton members do not leave any microscopic features in sedimentary records. Here we used ancient DNA preserved in Qinghai Lake sediments to reconstruct the temporal succession of plankton communities in the past 18,500 years. Our results showed that seven classes and sixteen genera of phytoplankton in the lake underwent major temporal changes, in correlation with known climatic events. Trebouxiophyceae and Eustigmatophyceae were predominant during the cold periods, whereas Chlorophyceae, Phaeophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, and Cyanophyceae were abundant during the warm periods. The inferred changes in temperature, nutrients, precipitation, and salinity, as driven by the Westerlies and summer Monsoon strength, likely contributed to these observed temporal changes. Based on these correlations, we propose the phytoplankton index as a proxy to reconstruct the stadial versus interstadial climate change history in Qinghai Lake. This taxon-specific index is free of terrestrial contamination, sensitive to short-term climatic oscillations, and continuous in recording all climatic events in the lake. The validity of this index and its applicability to other lakes is demonstrated by its good correlations with multiple climate records of Qinghai Lake and another lake on the Tibetan Plateau, Kusai Lake.

  18. Evidence for volcanism in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, L.; Greeley, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Venera 15/16 radar data for an area in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus, show an area with moderate radar return and a smooth textured surface which embays low lying areas of the surrounding mountainous terrain. Although this unit may be an extension of the lava plains of Lakshmi Planum to the southeast, detailed study suggests a separate volcanic center in NW Ishtar Terra. Lakshmi Planum, on the Ishtar Terra highland, exhibits major volcanic and tectonic features. On the Venera radar image radar brightness is influenced by slope and roughness; radar-facing slopes (east-facing) and rough surfaces (approx. 8 cm average relief) are bright, while west-facing slopes and smooth surfaces are dark. A series of semi-circular features, apparently topographic depressions, do not conform in orientation to major structural trends in this region of NW Ishtar Terra. The large depression in NW Ishtar Terra is similar to the calderas of Colette and Sacajawea Paterae, as all three structures are large irregular depressions. NW Ishtar Terra appears to be the site of a volcanic center with a complex caldera structure, possibly more than one eruptive vent, and associated lobed flows at lower elevations. The morphologic similarity between this volcanic center and those of Colette and Sacajawea suggests that centralized eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanism in Ishtar. The location of this volcanic center at the intersection of two major compressional mountain belts and the large size of the calders (with an inferred larg/deep magma source) support a crustal thickening/melting rather than a hot-spot origin for these magmas.

  19. Acanthocorbis mongolica nov. spec.: description of the first freshwater loricate choanoflagellate (Acanthoecida) from a Mongolian lake.

    PubMed

    Paul, Markus

    2012-01-01

    A new acanthoecid choanoflagellate species, Acanthocorbis mongolica sp. nov. was found in preserved phytoplankton samples from the freshwater lake Bayan Nuur (Uvs Nuur Basin, NW Mongolia) in concentrations of up to 1.8×10(5)cellsL(-1). It is the first well-documented species of the mainly marine order Acanthoecida to be found in a freshwater lake. The lorica structures were studied with scanning electron microscopy. Key morphological features of the vase-shaped lorica are spine bases that are composed of multiple (2-4) parallel costal strips, and the existence of two transverse costae. The ecological implications of this find are discussed. PMID:21862298

  20. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  2. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  3. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  4. Measurements, Fingerprint, Modeling - Compiling a sediment budget in a data scarce catchment in NW Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Schumann, Thomas; Wilkinson, Scott; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    In regard to the quantitative and qualitative water problems in Jordan the soil layer and its physical integrity is important to slow down runoff, guarantee infiltration, and a sensible parameter in terms of hydrologic modeling. Erosion harms this potential and needs to be better understood and quantified in the region. Therefore, a multiple response approach was implemented to compile a sediment budget for the research area Wadi Al-Arab in the NW of Jordan (263,5km2). The climate is Mediterranean to semi-arid with <300 to 550mm of rain in winter. Mainly marl and limestone of the Upper Cretaceous and the Paleocene make up the catchment's geology. The area is characterized by an agricultural basin in the east and an increase in relief energy to the west and south. Different field measurements were implemented on relevant sediment sources, such as olive orchards, agricultural fields, natural vegetated slopes and exposed rock with patchy vegetation as well as the Wadi Al Arab Dam Lake as the final sink. The focus involved the quantification of the yearly sediment yields and the deposition in the lake, respectively. In a second step a multiple sediment fingerprint was applied including the geochemical differentiation of the sources with inorganic elements and radio nuclides. The relative importance of each source could be calculated on the basis of lake sediment samples. Results of these two approaches cover different spatial scales and only partly integrate the transport way. Hence, they cannot be directly compared but consider the problem from different perspectives and are used in the final step to calibrate and validate the setup of the SedNet model (Wilkinson et al. 2008) for the catchment. The model offers the possibility to incorporate additional raster information, includes additional sources such as gully and bank erosion, and takes account for different areas of deposition according to the measured and regionalized discharge in the region. Its' implementation

  5. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  6. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  7. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  8. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  9. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  10. The Enigma of the Origin of Round, Deep, Rimed Lakes in the Russian Heartland-Was Lake Smerdyachie Formed During the Impact of an Extraterrestrial Body?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D. H.; Gusiakov, V. K.; Kiselev, A.; Amelin, I. I.; Breger, D. L.; McCafferty, P.

    2014-12-01

    The heartland of Russia has many enigmatic deep lakes. Shallow lakes have a more obvious origin, perhaps as kettle lakes, oxbow lakes or subsidence features. Deep lakes, particularly round lakes with partial or complete rims are more problematic. Traditionally, round or nearly round lakes with rims are candidates for Holocene age impact structures. The problem is that there are too many such lakes in the Russian heartland- a minimum of 15 deep, round lakes with diameters between 0.2 and 3 km. Even with a possibly increased impact rate during the Holocene, these deep lakes would represent the entire budget of Holocene impacts concentrated in one small region of the Earth. We examine here Lake Smerdyachie, a previously proposed impact lake. Smerdyachie is perfectly round with a raised rim. It has a diameter of about 350 meters and a maximum water depth of over 30 m. The basement at Smerdyachie is at~40 meters depth. It consists of Carboniferous age carbonate rock with fossils of brachiopods, crinoids and gastropods. The overlying material consists of unconsolidated, sand and silt-sized, quartz-rich sediments. We found clasts of brachiopod, crinoid and gastropod-bearing Carboniferous carbonate rock up to 32 cm in diameter on the SE rim of Smerdyachie. These clasts are present over about 1/3 of the total circumference of the lake. We also made panned concentrates of the sediment on the rim. To the NW, the concentrated sediment has a negative magnetic susceptibility (-0.07 to -0.03 cgs units), consistent with a higher concentration of pulverized limestone. To the SE, the sediment has a positive magnetic susceptibility (0.06 to 0.35 cgs units). The areas of positive magnetic susceptibility lie on the SE two-thirds of the rim of the lake. The highest susceptibility value is from the sample taken closest to the lake shoreline on the SE rim. This spatial distribution of susceptibility could mean that there is a higher concentration of iron rich material on the SE side of

  11. Comparison between mechanisms of CO2 degassing from El Chichon volcanic lake, México, and Specchio di Venere lake, Pantelleria, Italia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, M. P.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Collard, N.; Vita, F.; Pecoraino, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results of the CO2 diffuse emission from the surface of two volcanic lakes: El Chichón (EC) in Mexico and Specchio di Venere (SV) on Pantelleria Island, Italy. Both lakes are drainless, have similar sizes (~2x105 m2) and similar input-output dynamics. However, they are drastically different in water chemistry. The SV lake is alkaline (pH >9) and of a high near constant salinity, whereas EC lake is acidic (pH 2.3) and of a low variable salinity. In the vicinity of both lakes there are thermal grounds with steam vents and hot springs and a high CO2 soil flux. The SV lake has high alkalinity (~70 meq/L), whereas the EC lake is characterized by high concentration of dissolved CO2. CO2 flux measurements from the surface of both lakes were made with the "floating" accumulation chamber. During the flux measuring, gas samples were taken for carbon isotopic analysis. Soil flux measurements were also made in the crater of El Chichon volcano and on the area adjacent to the SV lake. The preliminary results of CO2 fluxes indicate EC lake has a high CO2 flux with a mean value of 3500 g m-2 d-1, with the highest values alignment across NW-SE and NE-SW faults and a high degassing by bubbling gases, especially near the strongest NE fumarolic field. While SV has a mean value of the CO2 flux ~ 10 g m-2 d-1 and limited bubbling on the lake surface. High CO2 flux was measured from the soil near the lake at the Mofeta place. A net mean diffusion flux (without bubbles) from EC lake is about 350 times higher than that from SV lake (3500 g m-2 d-1 vs 10 g m-2 d-1). SV has the total CO2 flux by diffusion of ~3 ton d-1 from an area of 0.3 km2 and the total flux of 0.44 ton d-1 by bubbling areas at SW and S zones. The EC lake has the total CO2 flux of 840 ton d-1 from an area of 0.24 km2. The total CO2 output from SV is nevertheless about two times higher taking into account the seepage from the lake (~ 8 kg s-1) of highly carbonated water.

  12. Food of lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Erkkila, Leo F.; Tetzloff, Clifford L.

    1965-01-01

    Stomachs were examined from 1,492 lake trout and 83 siscowets collected from Lake Superior. Data are given on the food of lake trout of legal size (17 inches or longer) by year, season, and depth of water, and on the relation between food and size among smaller lake trout. Fish contributed 96.7 to 99.9 per cent of the total volume of food in the annual samples. Ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) were most common (52.2 to 87.5 per cent of the volume) in 1950 to 1953 and American smelt ranked first (65.6 per cent of the volume) in 1963. Cottids were in 8.9 to 12.3 per cent of the stomachs in 1950 to 1953 but in only 4.3 per cent in 1963. Insects ranked second to fish in occurrence (9.6 per cent for the combined samples) and crustaceans followed at 3.9 per cent. The greatest seasonal changes in the food of lake trout were among fish caught at 35 fathoms and shallower. The occurrence of Coregonus increased from 34.6 per cent in February-March to 71.1 per cent in October-December. Smelt were in 76.9 per cent of the stomachs in February-March but in only 2.2 per cent in October-December. Cottids, Mysis relicta, and insects were most common in the July-September collections. Lake trout taken at depths greater than 35 fathoms had eaten a higher percentage of Cottidae and Coregonus than had those captured in shallower water. Smelt, ninespine sticklebacks, Mysis, and insects were more frequent in stomachs of lake trout from less than 35 fathoms. Crustaceans comprised more than 70 per cent of the total volume of food for 4.0- to 7.9-inch lake trout but their importance decreased as the lake trout grew larger. Pontoporeia affinis was the most common in the stomachs of 4.0- to 6.9-inch lake trout and Mysis held first rank at 7.0 to 12.9 inches. Ostracods were important only to 4.0- to 4.9-inch lake trout. As the lake trout became larger, the importance of fish grew from 4.4-per cent occurrence at 5.0 to 5.9 inches to 93.9 per cent at 16.0 to 16.9 inches. Smelt were most commonly eaten by

  13. The Lateglacial and Holocene history of annually laminated Lake Tiefer See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Dräger, Nadine; Lampe, Reinhard; Lorenz, Sebastian; Kienel, Ulrike; Schult, Manuela; Słowiński, Michał; Wulf, Sabine; Zawiska, Izabela; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Lake Tiefer See (N 53.59, E 12.53) is one of the rare lakes with a long sequence of annually laminated Holocene sediments in northern Central Europe. The lake is a valuable link between laminated lakes in more oceanic climates of the Eifel region and NW Germany and laminated lakes in the more continental climate of Poland. It thus provides great potential to study past climate, vegetation and human land use along that climate transition. The sediments of Lake Tiefer See show repeated changes in varve quality and composition. To disentangle in how far these changes relate to either past climate change, lake water level fluctuations or to changes in the local environment caused by e.g. human activity, we studied 16 sediment cores taken mainly from the lake margin. Almost all cores show interruptions in sedimentation namely during the mid-Holocene, suggesting that the lake water level has been lowered during this period. However, peat-gyttia alternations point at lake level fluctuations also during the early and late Holocene. Discontinuous sedimentation in cores from intermediate depth points at recurring slumping events. The pollen record additionally indicates prominent alternations in land use intensity throughout the late Holocene. By testing correlation between the hydrological changes, changes in land use intensity and changes in the sediment record we discuss effects of climate change and further factors on varve formation in Lake Tiefer See. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis -ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association; grant number VH-VI-415.

  14. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  15. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles, II; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  16. Potential for Great Thrust Earthquakes in NE Colombia & NW Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, R. G.; Mencin, D.

    2013-05-01

    Sixty-five percent of the ≈19 mm/yr eastward velocity of the Caribbean Plate north of Aruba and the Guajira peninsula relative to the South American plate is accommodated by dextral slip on the Bocono Fault system in NW Venezuela at 12±1 mm/yr, the remaining ~3 mm/yr of shear apparently distributed to the NW of the fault (Perez et al., 2011). The N40E strike of the Bocono fault system, however, requires that 10.6±1 mm/yr of convergence should accompany this partitioned dextral shear, but GPS measurements reveal that less than 25% of this convergence occurs across the Venezuelan Andes. The remaining 6-8 mm of convergence is presumably accommodated by incipient subduction between the Bocono fault and a trench 300 km NW of the northern coast of Colombia. Hence NW Venezuela and NE Colombia may occasionally host great earthquakes. Our current poor understanding of the geometry of the plate interface permits the plate to be locked 300 km down-dip and possibly 600 km along-strike, and if the plate slips in 10 m ruptures it could do so every 1200 years in a M~9 earthquake. No great earthquake has occurred since 1492, since when ~4 m of potential slip has developed, but should slip occur on just 10% of the hypothesized décollement (100x150 km) it could do so now in an Mw=8.2 earthquake. In that a potential Mw>8 earthquake poses a future seismic and tsunami threat to the Caribbean it is important to examine whether great earthquakes have occurred previously near the NW Venezuela coast. It is possible that creep accommodates the entire convergence signal, since there is no suggestion from microseismicity for an abrupt locked-to-sliding transition, as, for example, signifies its location in the Himalaya. An alternative measure of future potential seismic energy release is to identify the locus and rate of present-day strain contraction. To this end, Venezuelan, Colombian and US (CU and UNAVCO) investigators are installing an array of more than a dozen continuous operating

  17. Backscatter from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes near Barrow, Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Wakabayashi, H.; Weeks, W. F.; Morris, K.

    1993-01-01

    The timing of freeze-up and break-up of Arctic lake ice is a potentially useful environmental indicator that could be monitored using SAR. In order to do this, it is important to understand how the properties and structure of the ice during its growth and decay affect radar backscatter and thus lake ice SAR signatures. The availability of radiometrically and geometrically calibrated digital SAR data time series from the Alaska SAR Facility has made it possible for the first time to quantify lake ice backscatter intensity (sigma(sup o)) variations. This has been done for ice growing on shallow tundra lakes near Barrow, NW Alaska, from initial growth in September 1991 until thawing and decay in June 1992. Field and laboratory observations and measurements of the lake ice were made in late April 1992. The field investigations of the coastal lakes near Barrow confirmed previous findings that, (1) ice frozen to the lake bottom had a dark signature in SAR images, indicating weak backscatter, while, (2) ice that was floating had a bright signature, indicating strong backscatter. At all sites, regardless of whether the ice was grounded or floating, there was a layer of clear, inclusion-free ice overlaying a layer of ice with dense concentrations of vertically oriented tubular bubbles. At some sites, there was a third layer of porous, snow-ice overlaying the clear ice.

  18. 14. Stairs in far NW corner of the North Section, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Stairs in far NW corner of the North Section, as viewed from atop pier. This photo, along with phot WA-116-E-1, are the only photographs of the North Section of Drydock 3 that were approved by the U.S. Navy for inclusion in this HAER report. The brick building in center distance is the Building 59, the Pattern Shop, which has been documented in the HAER report No. WA-116-A. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 3, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  19. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  20. New data on the Lateglacial period of SW Europe: a high resolution multiproxy record from Laguna de la Roya (NW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Sobrino, C.; Heiri, O.; Hazekamp, M.; van der Velden, D.; Kirilova, E. P.; García-Moreiras, I.; Lotter, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    High-resolution multiproxy analyses were performed on a 128 cm section of organic sediments accumulated in a small mountain lake in NW Iberia (Laguna de la Roya, 1608 m asl). The pollen stratigraphy together with radiocarbon dating provided the basis for a chronology ranging from 15,600 to 10,500 cal yr BP. Chironomid-inferred July air temperatures suggest a temperature range from 7 to 13 °C, also evidencing two well-established cold periods which may be equivalent to the INTIMATE stages GS-2a and GS-1. Furthermore, a number of short cold events (with summer temperatures dropping about 0.5-1 °C) appear intercalated within the Lateglacial Interstadial (possibly equivalent to the INTIMATE cold events GI-1d, GI-1c2 and GI-1b) and the early Holocene (possibly equivalent to the 11.2 k event). The temperature variations predicted by our reconstruction allow explaining the changes in local conditions and productivity of the lake inferred from the biological record of the same sediment core. Furthermore, they also agree with the local and regional vegetation dynamics, and the main oscillations deduced for the vegetation belts. Based on its chronology our multiproxy record indicates a similar temperature development in NW Iberia as inferred by the Greenland δ18O record, the marine deep-sea records off the Atlantic Iberian Margin, and other chironomid-based Lateglacial temperature reconstructions from Europe. Nevertheless, the impact of most of the less intense Lateglacial/early Holocene cold events in NW Iberia was most probably limited to very sensitive sites that were very close to ecotonal situations. Particularly, our new pollen record indicates that they were represented as three minor environmental crises occurring during the Lateglacial Interestadial in this area. The Older Dryas event (in our usage corresponding to the Aegelsee Oscillation in Central Europe and event GI-1d in central Greenland) has previously been described in this region, but its age and

  1. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  2. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  3. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead.

  4. Numerical modeling of Drangajökull Ice Cap, NW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Jarosch, Alexander H.; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Pálsson, Finnur; Muñoz-Cobo Belart, Joaquín; Þorsteinsson, Þorsteinn; Jóhannesson, Tómas; Sigurðsson, Oddur; Harning, David; Miller, Gifford H.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug

    2016-04-01

    Over the past century the Arctic has warmed twice as fast as the global average. This discrepancy is likely due to feedbacks inherent to the Arctic climate system. These Arctic climate feedbacks are currently poorly quantified, but are essential to future climate predictions based on global circulation modeling. Constraining the magnitude and timing of past Arctic climate changes allows us to test climate feedback parameterizations at different times with different boundary conditions. Because Holocene Arctic summer temperature changes have been largest in the North Atlantic (Kaufman et al., 2004) we focus on constraining the paleoclimate of Iceland. Glaciers are highly sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation amount. This sensitivity allows for the estimation of paleoclimate using glacier models, modern glacier mass balance data, and past glacier extents. We apply our model to the Drangajökull ice cap (~150 sq. km) in NW Iceland. Our numerical model is resolved in two-dimensions, conserves mass, and applies the shallow-ice-approximation. The bed DEM used in the model runs was constructed from radio echo data surveyed in spring 2014. We constrain the modern surface mass balance of Drangajökull using: 1) ablation and accumulation stakes; 2) ice surface digital elevation models (DEMs) from satellite, airborne LiDAR, and aerial photographs; and 3) full-stokes model-derived vertical ice velocities. The modeled vertical ice velocities and ice surface DEMs are combined to estimate past surface mass balance. We constrain Holocene glacier geometries using moraines and trimlines (e.g., Brynjolfsson, etal, 2014), proglacial-lake cores, and radiocarbon-dated dead vegetation emerging from under the modern glacier. We present a sensitivity analysis of the model to changes in parameters and show the effect of step changes of temperature and precipitation on glacier extent. Our results are placed in context with local lacustrine and marine climate proxies as well

  5. Ocean - ice sheet interaction along the NW European margin during the last glacial phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, L. W. M.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.; Hjelstuen, B. O. B.

    2015-12-01

    The NW European continental margin was repeatedly covered by shelf edge glaciations during the last glacial cycles. Here, we present a compilation of new and previously published data from a SW to NE transect of 8 sediment cores raised along the upper continental slope. This study aims to investigate the interaction between sea surface conditions and the variability seen in the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) and the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) during the last 13-40 ka BP. Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) counts, IRD flux data, grain size data, the content of the polar planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin) and ∂18O measurements were compiled and combined with new Bayesian age models. From 40-24.5 ka BP the build up and consecutive confluence of the BIIS and the FIS are reflected in sediment composition and flux data. Pulses of large quantities of fine material to the southern part of the transect suggest riverine BIIS related influx. The sediment composition in cores close to the Norwegian channel indicates that the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) was only active between 24.5-18.5 ka BP during the last glacial stage. The planktonic foraminifera data during this period strongly suggests a dependence of NCIS extent variability and pulses in warm Atlantic water entering the Nordic Seas. In the northernmost cores rapidly deposited, laminated sediments and ∂18O spikes in planktonic foraminifera dated to 18.5 ka BP were interpreted as meltwater plume deposits. This may reflect NCIS retreat allowing BIIS and FIS to unzip and route ice dammed lake- and meltwater to the margin. In conclusion, the investigation suggests a close co-variation in extent of marine based parts of the BIIS, the FIS and ocean circulation while demonstrating the strong influence of the local glacial history on standard open marine proxies. This suggests that tuning chronologies of single marine records to ice cores in some regions might be more challenging than previously

  6. Evolution and erosional dynamics of intermontane basins on the Puna Plateau, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Puna Plateau in NW Argentina is the southern part of the second-largest orogenic plateau on Earth with a mean elevation of 4.0 ± 0.5 km (±2s). The Puna is an integral part of the south-central Andes that exhibit a steep E-W topographic and climatic gradient: The first windward topographic rise east of the Puna constitutes a significant orographic barrier resulting in high orographic rainfall. Westward, the higher-elevation areas of the windward flanks become progressively drier, until arid conditions are attained in the orogen interior. The Puna repeatedly experienced significant paleoclimatic changes reflected by fluvial and lacustrine terraces associated with lake highstands related to deeper penetration of moisture into the orogen and thus an orogenward shift of the climate gradient. The southern Puna is compartmentalized into more than 500 separate, internally-drained sedimentary basins with varying catchment size. Here, we quantify the erosion-rate gradients and their impact on basin evolution and their importance on the formation of the plateau morphology. We rely on sedimentary archives, digital topography, and a new set of cosmogenic inventories of river sands (10Be) and bedrock-erosion rates (10Be and 26Al) from the eastern and central plateau. Erosion rates from internally drained catchments in the eastern plateau are similar to the externally drained, semi-arid intermontane basins in the E Cordillera, which bounds the plateau, but are ten-fold (or more) lower than erosion rates in the humid and steep sections along the eastern windward flanks. Within the plateau realm, erosion rates are ten-fold lower in the central than in the eastern parts. We analyze high-resolution topography from ASTER- and interferometry-derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that we have validated with more 10'000 differential GPS ground control points. We demonstrate distinct topometric gradients across the Puna that can be linked to spatial variations in rainfall and

  7. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  8. Paleofloods and ancient fishing weirs in NW Iberian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveen, Willem; Sanjurjo-Sanchez, Jorge; Goy-Diz, Ana; Veldkamp, Antonie; Schoorl, Jeroen M.

    2014-07-01

    A 15-m-thick, fluvial sedimentary record of the NW Iberian lower Miño River was studied. Grain-size analyses were performed and twelve samples were dated using optically stimulated luminescence dating techniques, documenting a 1300-yr-old reconstructed fluvial record that does not match with known climate fluctuations in the area, but is linked instead to the construction of a series of ancient fishing weirs (pesqueiras). The sedimentation phases are in agreement with known episodes of increased population density, which suggests active use of the pesqueiras. A number of sedimentation hiatuses in the fluvial record point towards damage to the pesqueiras during large-scale flooding in the Miño River basin, and a sudden drop in population probably due to the arrival of the plague in the 13th century AD. The oldest sedimentation phases started just after 700 AD, and we infer that the first pesqueiras were constructed around this time. This timing coincides with the transition of the NW Iberian landscape towards a more intensively used agricultural landscape, as evidenced from other geo-archeological investigations. The results demonstrate that the pesqueiras are several hundreds of years older than known from historical records, but not so old as to date back to the Roman occupation.

  9. Climate or vegetation change - what drove Holocene lake level fluctuations in NE-Germany?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Blume, Theresa; Dreibrodt, Janek; Heidbüchel, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Lake Tiefer See (N 53.59, E 12.53) is one of the rare lakes with a long sequence of annually laminated Holocene sediments in northern Germany. The lake is a valuable link between laminated lakes in more oceanic climates of the Eifel region and NW Germany and laminated lakes in the more continental climate of Poland. The lake provides great potential to study past climate, vegetation and human land use along that climate transition; it is thus a core study site of the ICLEA virtual institute. One prominent feature of Lake Tiefer See are pronounced lake level fluctuations during the Holocene. Such changes are often interpreted in terms of climatic fluctuations. However, climate fluctuations are supposed to be small during the Holocene. Groundwater formation and thus lake levels may on the other hand be strongly influenced by the plant cover. We therefore hypothesize that the lake level fluctuations have largely been driven by vegetation change in the catchment area. To validate this hypothesis, we test whether the magnitude and timing of the lake level changes corresponds to vegetation change in the catchment area. Analysis is based on quantitative vegetation analysis that includes both the REVEALS model and the extended downscaling approach (EDA). REVEALS translates pollen deposition from large lakes such as Tiefer See into regional vegetation cover. This method produces a continuous record of vegetation change, yet it is unable to reconstruct vegetation patterns in the catchment area. We therefore for specific time slices additionally apply the EDA to explore these patterns. Both methods are now available in the R package DISQOVER. Vegetation cover and estimates of climate variables are then used to estimate cumulative transpiration and ultimately groundwater recharge. Differences in groundwater recharge are likely to cause fluctuations in groundwater levels and thus also lake levels, as this lake is largely groundwater fed. While only rough estimates, these

  10. Late-Glacial to early Holocene basin development of annually laminated Lake Tiefer See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Lorenz, Sebastian; Schult, Manuela; Lampe, Reinhard; Dräger, Nadine; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    Lake Tiefer See (N 53.59°, E 12.53°) is one of the rare lakes with a long sequence of annually laminated Holocene sediments in northern Central Europe. The lake is thus of great potential for past climate, vegetation and human land use studies. It furthermore provides a valuable link between laminated lakes in more oceanic climates of the Eifel region and NW Germany and laminated lakes in the more continental climate of Poland. The sediments of Lake Tiefer See are not uniform but show repeated changes in varve composition and include several non-varved sequences. Interpreting these changes requires a sound understanding of the deposition processes in the lake and the development of the lake basin itself. While modern sediment deposition is studied in an extensive monitoring program, we explore lake basin development using numerous cores from the lake margins down to the bottom of the lake. The lake is exceptionally deep (62 m) with steep slopes and may thus be susceptible to sediment re-deposition and focusing. Most marginal cores, which reach down to 10 m water depth, show a prominent basal peat layer. This peat layer indicates that basin development started by paludification of an originally flat surface following dead-ice melting. However, even in neighboring cores the timing of the onset of peat formation appears to differ substantially. While in some cores, the prominent Laacher See Tephra (12.880 cal. BP) is found at the bottom of the peat layer, it is found well above the peat basis in other cores. Dead-ice melting may thus initially have produced a pattern of shallow depressions with ongoing peat formation within a still terrestrial surface. The formation of the deep lake is than indicated by an abrupt shift to calcareous gyttjas, which show an initially increased silicate content. The lake obviously only developed long after first peat deposition, possibly in the early Holocene. Further dates to verify this hypothesis are expected. In several marginal

  11. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  12. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  13. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6) "Watering"; (7) "Soil Erosion by Water"; (8) "Soil…

  14. Venezuela: Lake Maracaibo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Oil Slicks on Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela     View Larger Image Several oil slicks occurred on Lake Maracaibo in northwestern Venezuela between ... wave facets divert reflected rays into many directions. An oil film dampens the presence of small wind-driven "capillary" waves, resulting ...

  15. Lake Effect Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The lake effect is particularly clear in this Sea-viewing Wide field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) true-color image of the North American Great Lakes region, acquired December 5, 2000. Lakes Nipigon, Superior, and Michigan show striking contrasts between clear and cloudy air as the wind blows from the northwest across the lakes. As it flows across the relatively warm lakes, the cold dry air gathers heat and moisture from the surface. The warm moist air rises into the atmosphere and mixes vigorously with the cold dry air above. The layer of warm moist air deepens as it travels across the lake. Some of the evaporated water from the lake condenses into streamers of fog rising from the surface, while much of the moisture condenses to form a stratocumulus cloud in the upper half of the mixed layer. The cloud-forming water droplets may freeze into ice crystals and, due to accumulated water deposition over time, grow into snowflakes. This process can generate snowstorms that produce significant amounts of snowfall downwind. It is not uncommon for lake effect snowstorms to produce as much as two feet of snow within a 24-hour period in northwestern parts of New York and Pennsylvania. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  16. GREAT LAKES LIMNOLOGY MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has primary responsibility within the U.S. for conducting surveillance monitoring of the offshore waters of the Great Lakes. This monitoring is intended to fulfill provis...

  17. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  18. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  20. Lake trophic applications: Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts to classify the water quality characteristics of lakes using LANDSAT imagery are reported. Image processing and registration techniques are described. A lake classification scheme which involves the assignment of a trophic class number was used in the data analysis. The resulting values were compared to the corresponding rank assignment derived from field measurements.

  1. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  2. An investigation of the origin of Rock City and cause of piping problems at Mountain Lake, Giles County, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Nidal Walid

    Mountain Lake is one of only two natural lakes in the state of Virginia. The lake's origin has been attributed to either a natural solution-collapse basin, or to a landslide damming the valley of northwesterly flowing Pond Drain, or to a NW-SE trending fracture lineation. The lake is located within the breached northwest limb of a gently plunging anticline, a part of the larger Valley and Ridge physiographic province. In recent years, the lake drained almost completely, exposing the lake bottom and revealing the presence of four sinkhole-like depressions, containing piping holes at their sides and bottoms, at the northeastern and northwestern margins of the lake. This study focuses on the most likely origin of large sandstone blocks present at the northern end of the lake in an area locally referred to as "Rock City", including mapping of the block locations and analyzing the mode and extent of displacement that they have undergone. An additional objective is to investigate the piping potential of the lake-bottom sediment and its role in seepage out of the lake basin causing lake-level fluctuations. Mapping of Rock City was conducted by taking GPS readings at the corners of the rock blocks and using ArcMap Software. Investigations of the displacement mode of the rock blocks was done by comparing the measured orientations of principal discontinuity sets, forming the rock-block boundaries, with discontinuity orientations of undisturbed outcrops within the headscarp, using stereonet analysis. Grain size analysis, Atterberg limits, and a compaction-mold permeameter test were used to evaluate lake sediment's susceptibility to piping. Field observations and discontinuity data analysis indicate that Rock City is a landslide that dammed the valley of Pond Drain, consequently forming the lake. The primary mode of slope movement involves lateral spreading that is associated with extension occurring along discontinuities. The Tuscarora Sandstone rock blocks comprising Rock

  3. Structural Setting of the Emerson Pass Geothermal Anomaly, Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Faulds, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Pyramid Lake area is favorable for geothermal development due to the tectonic setting of the region. The Walker Lane belt, a dextral shear zone that accommodates ~20% relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates, terminates northwestward in northeast California. NW-directed dextral shear is transferred to WNW extension accommodated by N-to -NNE striking normal faults of the Basin and Range. As a consequence, enhanced dilation occurs on favorably oriented faults generating high geothermal potential in the northwestern Great Basin. The NW-striking right-lateral Pyramid Lake fault, a major structure of the northern Walker Lane, terminates at the southern end of Pyramid Lake and transfers strain to the NNE-striking down to the west Lake Range fault, resulting in high geothermal potential. Known geothermal systems in the area have not been developed due to cultural considerations of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe. Therefore, exploration has been focused on discovering blind geothermal systems elsewhere on the reservation by identifying structurally favorable settings and indicators of past geothermal activity. One promising area is the northeast end of Pyramid Lake, where a broad left step between the west-dipping range-bounding faults of the Lake and Fox Ranges has led to the formation of a broad, faulted relay ramp. Furthermore, tufa mounds, mineralized veins, and altered Miocene rocks occur proximal to a thermal anomaly discovered by a 2-m shallow temperature survey at the north end of the step-over in Emerson Pass. Detailed geologic mapping has revealed a system of mainly NNE-striking down to the west normal faults. However, there are three notable exceptions to this generality, including 1) a prominent NW-striking apparent right-lateral fault, 2) a NW-striking down to the south fault which juxtaposes the base of the mid-Miocene Pyramid sequence against younger late Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and 3) a NNE-striking down to the east normal fault

  4. Assessing the potential environmental impact of Athabasca oil sands development in lakes across Northwest Saskatchewan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, J. M.; Cumming, B. F.; Das, B.; Sanei, H.

    2011-12-01

    The continued development of Canada's Athabasca oil sands poses a significant environmental challenge. Low buffered boreal lakes located downwind of the prevailing eastward wind direction may be threatened by acidification and elevated inputs of airborne contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). An accurate assessment of the impact that increased levels of bitumen production may have on lakes in the region requires an understanding of the historic variability within these systems prior to at least the past several decades. Here we report concentrations of PAHs, δ13C and δ15N of organic matter (OM), Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses, and distributions of n-alkanes in dated sediment cores from ten lakes located across NW Saskatchewan. Concentrations of PAHs were relatively low (< 100 ng/g for Σ 16 EPA Priority PAHs at each lake) and in general showed no substantial increases over the past 30 years. Retene, which is often associated with the combustion of coniferous wood, was generally the most abundant PAH amongst those reported, demonstrating the importance of forest fires as a principal PAH source. Plots of Hydrogen Index (HI) versus Oxygen Index (OI) fell within a relatively narrow range typical for sediments containing a high content of algal-derived OM. Relatively lower C/N ratios and higher abundances of C17 n-alkane in more recent sediments pointed to an increasingly larger component of algal-derived OM. In all ten lakes δ13C showed gradual upcore depletions that fell within the expected range for fossil fuel combustion (i.e., Suess effect), although this alone may not explain the up to ~3% depletion observed in several of the lakes. In conjunction with the other upcore trends these data may suggest a possible increase in primary productivity over the past several decades in many of the lakes studied. δ15N signatures were more variable, showing upcore increases in some lakes and upcore depletions in others. The increasingly lighter values

  5. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  6. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  7. Spatial patterns in PCB concentrations of Lake Michigan lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Brown, Edward H., Jr.; Eck, Gary W.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the PCB body burden in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of the Great Lakes is from their food. PCB concentrations were determined in lake trout from three different locations in Lake Michigan during 1994–1995, and lake trout diets were analyzed at all three locations. The PCB concentrations were also determined in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), five species of prey fish eaten by lake trout in Lake Michigan, at three nearshore sites in the lake. Despite the lack of significant differences in the PCB concentrations of alewife, rainbow smelt, bloater, slimy sculpin, and deepwater sculpin from the southeastern nearshore site near Saugatuck (Michigan) compared with the corresponding PCB concentrations from the northwestern nearshore site near Sturgeon Bay (Wisconsin), PCB concentrations in lake trout at Saugatuck were significantly higher than those at Sturgeon Bay. The difference in the lake trout PCB concentrations between Saugatuck and Sturgeon Bay could be explained by diet differences. The diet of lake trout at Saugatuck was more concentrated in PCBs than the diet of Sturgeon Bay lake trout, and therefore lake trout at Saugatuck were more contaminated in PCBs than Sturgeon Bay lake trout. These findings were useful in interpreting the long-term monitoring series for contaminants in lake trout at both Saugatuck and the Wisconsin side of the lake.

  8. Atypical coastal environmental change during Copper Age - Bronze Age transition (Rio de Moinhos, NW Portugal) - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Helena; Danielsen, Randi

    2015-04-01

    The research is part of an ongoing project of geo-archaeology from Rio de Moinhos beach (Esposende, NW Portugal), where an extensive area of dark sedimentary outcrops and a large amount of ceramic remains from a Roman shipwreck are present. The dark sedimentary deposit, presenting tree stumps and roots in life position, partially covers a rocky platform that extends seawards. Over the platform, that presents many pits of sea urchins (infralittoral environment) as well as salt pans (supratidal environment), a marine rusty conglomerate is present in some places. Several hand gauge cores were extracted in the sedimentary deposit whose maximum depth do not exceed 50cm. Samples from cores and outcrops were analysed for grain size, mineralogical composition, pollen and diatom content and radiocarbon dated. This work concerns sediment size analysis, dating and pollen. Tree stumps and roots of Alnus glutinosa dated 6310-6220 cal BP are in the base of the sedimentary sequence that presents a gradual passage from very fine sands to clayey silts, all of them organic and very poorly sorted. Pollen analysis revealed an initial wetland habitat containing Alnus, inundated ca 5645-5585 cal BP due to rising sea level at the time. A brackish lagoon formed at the site presumably protected by a clastic barrier seaward. Similar formations of lagoons are detected all along the Portuguese coast, typically disappearing with time due to sand infilling. In this case, however, the brackish lagoon turned into a fresh water lake ca 4485-4440 cal BP. This may have been a natural development caused by permanent closing of the clastic barrier but human interference cannot be excluded as anthropic activity was detected since formation of the lagoon. The lake seems to have filled in with sand at some point in time subsequent to ca 3750-3725 cal BP, the date of the top lake sediment. However, shipwreck vestiges from the Roman Period presently dispersed over the lake sediment, suggests a later date

  9. Resolution experiments for NW Pacific subduction zone tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spakman, Wim; Van Der Hilst, Rob; Wortel, Rinus; Stein, Seth

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from an investigation of the resolving power of ISC/NEIC P travel-time data in tomographic inversions for the geometry of the subduction zones in the NW Pacific. From thermal models for the Kurile, Janan, Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Ryukyu slabs, three-dimensional synthetic velocity anomalies for subducting slabs are generated and projected onto a cell model for the uppermost 1400 km of the mantle. These synthetic models are used to compute synthetic delay times for ray paths corresponding to the source and receiver locations used for the actual data, add Gaussian noise, invert the synthetic data, and compare the resulting velocity structure to the initial synthetic models. This comparison is illustrated for sections through the Kuriles and the Mariana arcs. A variety of resolution artifacts are observed, which in many cases resemble features visible in the tomographic results obtained from inverting the actual ISC/NEIC data.

  10. The photometric variability of the Be star NW Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Marinova, M. M.; BožiĆ , H.; Harmanec, P.

    1999-08-01

    {NW Ser} is a bright (V = 6.1 - 6.2) active Be star which is known to vary photometrically on a time scale of hours to days. Using both Hipparcos and ground-based photometry, and using light curve, autocorrelation, power spectrum analysis and phase dispersion minimalization techniques, we have concluded that the period is close to 0.46d - a period typical of stars of this type, and in good agreement with the value of 0.488d, recently determined by Hubert & Floquet from Hipparcos data. It is possible that the period is near twice this value, but the evidence is not strong. We also find a period of about 5d. from both the ground-based and Hipparcos data.

  11. 51. (Credit JTL) Interior view (looking NW) of new pumping ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. (Credit JTL) Interior view (looking NW) of new pumping room built in 1921. In the right foreground is #1 low service pump built in 1897. Installed at McNeil in 1898, it was not moved during the building of this room in 1921. Beyond is a 5 mgd capacity Worthington-Snow cross-compound, duplex crank-and-fly-wheel engine built in 1920. Behind the worthington is an 8 mgd Allis-Chalmers engine of the same configuration. it was built in 1911, but not installed at McNeil until 1927. Both engines have condensers. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  12. Evidence of offshore lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2003-01-01

    Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef, an offshore reef complex, was an historically important spawning area believed to represent some of the best habitat for the rehabilitation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron. Since 1986, lake trout have been stocked on these offshore reefs to reestablish self-sustaining populations. We sampled with beam trawls to determine the abundance of naturally reproduced age-0 lake trout on these offshore reefs during May-July in 1994-1998 and 2000-2002. In total, 123 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at Six Fathom Bank, and 2 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at nearby Yankee Reef. Our findings suggest that this region of Lake Huron contains suitable habitat for lake trout spawning and offers hope that lake trout rehabilitation can be achieved in the main basin of Lake Huron.

  13. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  14. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  15. Projected future wave climate in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Prat, M.; Sierra, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Projected future regional wave climate scenarios at a high temporal-spatial scale were obtained for the NW Mediterranean Sea, using five combinations of regional-global circulation models. Changes in wave variables were analyzed and related to the variations of the forcing wind projections, while also evaluating the evolution of the presence of the different types of sea states. To assess the significance of the changes produced, a bootstrap-based method was proposed, which accounts for the autocorrelation of data and correctly reproduces the extremes. For the mean climate, relative changes of Hs up to ±10% were obtained, whereas they were around ±20% for the extreme climate. In mean terms, variations of Hs are similar to those associated with wind speed but are enhanced/attenuated, respectively, when fetch conditions are favorable/unfavorable. In general, most notable alterations are not in the Hs magnitude but rather in its direction. In this regard, during the winter season, it is interesting to note that the significant deviations between the results derived from the two global circulation models are larger than those between regional models. ECHAM5 simulated an enhanced west wind flow that is translated into more frequent W-NW waves, whereas the HadCM3Q3 global model gives rise to the east component, which contributes to a higher intensity and number of storms coming from such a direction and directly affects the wind-sea/swell distribution of coastal stretches that face east, like the Catalan coast. Different patterns of change were obtained during the summer when a common rise of NE-E waves was found.

  16. Evolution of ancient Lake Ohrid: a tectonic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Reicherter, K.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Grützner, C.

    2010-06-01

    Lake Ohrid Basin is a graben structure situated in the Dinarides at the border of the Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Albania. It hosts one of the oldest lakes in Europe and is characterized by a basin and range-like geological setting together with the half-graben basins of Korca, Erseka and Debar. The basin is surrounded by Palaeozoic metamorphics in the northeast and north and Mesozoic ultramafic, carbonatic and magmatic rocks in the east, northwest, west and south. Palaeocene to Pliocene units are present in the southwest. With the basin development, Neogene sediments from Pliocene to recent deposited in the lows. Three major deformation phases lead to the basin formation: A) NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene; B) uplift and diminishing compression during Messinian - Pliocene; C) vertical uplift and (N)E-(S)W extension from Pliocene to recent. Neotectonic activity of the study area concentrates on N-S trending normal faults that flank the Ohrid Basin on the east and west. Seismic activity with moderate to strong events is documented during the last 2000 y; the seismic hazard level is among the highest of the Balkan Peninsula. Activity of the youngest faults is evidenced by earthquake data and field observations. Morphotectonic features like a wind-gap, fault scarps, a stepped series of active normal faults, deformed palaeosols, and fault-related hydrothermal activity are preserved around Lake Ohrid and allow delineating the tectonic history. It is shown that the Lake Ohrid Basin can be characterized as a seismogenic landscape. This paper presents a tectonic history of the Lake Ohrid Basin and describes tectonic features that are preserved in the recent landscape. The analysis of morphotectonic features is used to derive the deformation history. The stratigraphy of the area is summarized and concentrates on the main units.

  17. Evolution of ancient Lake Ohrid: a tectonic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Reicherter, K.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Grützner, C.

    2010-10-01

    Lake Ohrid Basin is a graben structure situated in the Dinarides at the border of the Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Albania. It hosts one of the oldest lakes in Europe and is characterized by a basin and range-like geological setting together with the halfgraben basins of Korca, Erseka and Debar. The basin is surrounded by Paleozoic metamorphics in the northeast and north and Mesozoic ultramafic, carbonatic and magmatic rocks in the east, northwest, west and south. Paleocene to Pliocene units are present in the southwest. With the basin development, Neogene sediments from Pliocene to recent deposited in the lows. There are three major deformation phases: (A) NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene; (B) uplift and diminishing compression during Messinian - Pliocene; (C) vertical uplift and (N)E-(S)W extension from Pliocene to recent led to the basin formation. Neotectonic activity of the study area concentrates on N-S trending normal faults that bound the Ohrid Basin eastwards and westwards. Seismic activity with moderate to strong events is documented during the last 2000 yrs; the seismic hazard level is among the highest in Albania and Macedonia. Activity of the youngest faults is evidenced by earthquake data and field observations. Morphotectonic features like fault scarps, a stepped series of active normal faults, deformed paleosols, a wind gap and fault-related hydrothermal activity are preserved around Lake Ohrid and allow delineating the tectonic history. It is shown that the Lake Ohrid Basin can be characterized as a seismogenic landscape. This paper presents a tectonic history of the Lake Ohrid Basin and describes tectonic features that are preserved in the recent landscape. The analysis of morphotectonic features is used to derive the deformation history. The stratigraphy of the area is summarized and concentrates on the main units.

  18. High-resolution palaeoecological and sedimentological records as a tool for understanding pre- and protohistoric settlement and land-use systems in Sandy Flanders (NW Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court-Picon, Mona; Polfliet, Tim; Serbruyns, Lynn; de Smedt, Phillippe; Zwertvaegher, Ann; Bats, Machteld; de Reu, Jeroen; Werbrouck, Ilke; Verniers, Jacques; Crombe, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The area of Sandy Flanders, situated between the North Sea coast and the lower course of the Scheldt River in NW Belgium, is a relatively flat and low-lying area situated at the southern limit of the lowland cover sand region of the NW European plain. During the Late Pleniglacial and the Late Glacial, numerous, generally small but elongated sand dunes, shallow lakes and wet depressions were formed. During the last three decades intense archaeological prospection has taken place in this region, which is now one of the most intensively surveyed areas of NW Europe. This has led to the production of archaeological distribution maps, which show a distinct pattern regarding the temporal and spatial distribution of these archaeological sites. Some areas with a presumed high ecological value, such as the large but shallow Late Glacial fossil lake of the Moevaart Depressie (ca. 15km long and 2,5km wide), seem to have been attractive settlement locations in Prehistory, given the high amount of close-lying sites along its borders and on the cover sand ridge on its northern border. Habitation however seems to have ‘moved' in time, and is completely absent in Protohistory and even the Roman Period. During the Late Glacial and Holocene the landscape in the Belgian area of Sandy Flanders was subjected to major changes due to climatic fluctuations, and besides human factors, environmental conditions such as topography, soil, vegetation, but also hydrology and climate, may have influenced settlement conditions throughout time and played a role in this change in site location and the occupational history of the region. In this light an inter-disciplinary project 'Prehistoric settlement and land-use systems in Sandy Flanders (NW Belgium): a diachronic and geoarchaeological approach' (GOA project, UGent), involving archaeology, geography, palaeoecology, sedimentology and geophysical survey, has been undertaken. The study of both "empty" and densely inhabited areas is ongoing and

  19. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E., Jr.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  20. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  1. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E.; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations. PMID:24062731

  2. LAKE RESTORATION BY DILUTION: MOSES LAKE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dilution water, low in macronutrients, was added to Moses Lake on three occasions in 1977 and once in 1978 during the spring-summer period. The addition resulted in reducing the annual average inflow concentration of phosphorus from about 130-140 micrograms/l to 100 micrograms/l....

  3. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead. In this harsh desert environment, color infrared photography readily penetrates haze, detects and portrays vegetation as shades of red.

  4. 3. Mass Movements, Erosion Patterns and Sediment Transport along the Sutlej River (NW-Himalaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Thiede, R. C.; Strecker, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of mass movements in active orogens can provide valuable insights into the relation between sedimentation and erosion processes. In areas of high relief, hillslope processes dominate surface geomorphology and can lead to the damming of rivers and formation of lakes upstream. These basins provide a record of natural climatic variations along the river profile and divide the regions in different sedimentational and erosional compartments. To characterize the variations, digital elevation models were used for quantitative analysis of topography, basin-fill volume, and active channel gradients. High-resolution spatial data (digitized 1:25,000 to 1:100,000 topographic maps) and ASTER-derived digital elevation models (DEM) were processed to analyze topography. Combined with geological field measurements and observations we could distinguish erosional patterns within several study areas in the NW Himalayas. Precipitation data were derived from calibrated passive microwave satellite data (SSMI), providing information on a 10 year time series at sufficient spatial resolution (12.5 km2). Modern sediment flux and transport, discharge, geomorphic field observations including river width and slope define the boundary conditions for surface erosion calculations. The Sutlej Valley (32N, 78E) in NW India is dominated by the antecedent Sutlej River, the third-largest river in the Himalayas. It flows perpendicular through the orogen and cuts through all major geologic units of the Tethyan Himalaya, High and Lesser Himalayan Crystallines, and Lower Himalayan units. The geomorphologic changes across thrust faults bounding these units provide valuable insights into the evolution of the orogen. Tectonically active sectors of the orogen are manifested by pronounced knickpoints in longitudinal river profiles that cross active thrust faults. In contrast to other parts of the Himalayas, no (re-) activation of the MCT and STDS can be seen in the

  5. Tectonic versus climate influence on landscape evolution: A case study from the upper Spiti valley, NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoop, A.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Brauer, A.; Shahzad, F.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken structural, geomorphological, and morphometric analyses to investigate the role of tectonism and climate in the landscape evolution in the upper Spiti valley, NW Himalayas. Geomorphometric analyses coupled with field investigations reveal active tectonic deformation in the Spiti region. The calculated geomorphic indices (steepness, concavity and Hack) demonstrate uplift/subsidence along the Kaurik-Chango fault, whereas transverse topographic index (T-index) reveals basin tilting associated with active faulting near Hansa and Lingti valley. Investigation of well-dated Mane palaeolake sediments also provides evidence of regional tectonic instability. Four episodes (ca. 7.8, 7.4, 6.5 and 6.1 cal ka) of neotectonic activity have been identified during the period of the lake's existence. We have also compiled data on the regional climate variability and compared it with the age of the Mane palaeo-landslide. Our results indicate that the landslide occurred towards the end of the early Holocene intensified monsoon phase and is located near an active fault. Our data on regional tectonic instability and the coincidences of modern and palaeo-landslides with zones of active deformation suggest that tectonism is an important factor governing landscape stability in the Spiti region.

  6. Can lake sensitivity to desiccation be predicted from lake geometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Aminnezhad, Mousa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-08-01

    Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and man-made reservoirs. Using the LGI index, lakes can be classified into five groups: groups 1-4 when LGI is 0.5-2.5, 2.5-4.5, 4.5-6.5 and 6.5-8.5, respectively, and group 5 when LGI is >8.5. Naturally shallow and vast lakes and wetlands fall into the first group and deep man-made reservoirs in narrow valleys are in group 5. The response of three different lake systems (LGI 0.75, 2.75 and 6.5) to different water flow scenarios was then simulated using the water balance equation. From this, the index 'potential lake area' (Apot) was developed to show lake responses to changed hydro-climatological conditions. Apot and LGI can be used to classify lakes into open or closed systems. Simulations showed that lakes with low LGI have a shorter response time to flow and climate changes. As a result, the impact of water balance restoration is faster for lakes with low LGI than for lakes with high LGI. The latter are also more vulnerable to climate variation and change.

  7. GREAT LAKES PLANKTON PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton, which have short carbon turnover rates, are sensitive to water quality conditions and grazing by zooplankton, and thus respond rapidly to perturbations of the lake ecosystem. The determination of phytoplankton abundance and species composition is one method to tra...

  8. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  9. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  10. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  11. WHISKER LAKE WILDERNESS, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Whisker Lake Wilderness in northeastern Wisconsin was evaluated. Only a strip along the southwest corner of the wilderness is assessed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the massive sulfide type. The geologic terrain precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources. Sand and gravel and peat in swampy lowlands are the only resources of the Whisker lake Wilderness.

  12. Dragon Lake, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nicknamed 'Dragon Lake,' this body of water is formed by the Bratskove Reservoir, built along the Angara river in southern Siberia, near the city of Bratsk. This image was acquired in winter, when the lake is frozen. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on December 19, 1999. This is a natural color composite image made using blue, green, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  13. A Holocene speleothem record from Morocco, NW Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassenburg, Jasper; Fietzke, Jan; Richter, Detlev; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    A well dated Holocene speleothem (stalagmite) from the Middle Atlas Mountains in Morocco has been investigated for its continental climate record. The aim is to compile an improved understanding of the climatically complex triple point of the North Atlantic, Mediterranean and Saharan / Monsoonal climate realms in NW Africa. At present, only few studies concerning continental climate reconstructions from NW Africa have been published (Lamb et al. 1995, Cheddadi et al. 1998, Genty et al. 2006). Given the significance of this region, this lack of data forms a strong motivation for additional, well dated climate records. The speleothem (GP2) was sampled in the 'Grotte de Piste' (ca 800 m above sea level), mean annual precipitation is about 930 mm (mainly falling in the winter season) and the mean annual temperature is about 13° C. GP2 is 60 cm tall and grew - based on U/Th MC-ICP-MS data - continuously between 11.5 kyr BP (early Holocene) and 2.9 kyr BP (late Holocene). X-Ray Diffraction data indicate a mainly aragonitic mineralogy. 'Hendy tests' suggest that CaCO3 precipitation was close to isotopic equilibrium with respect to oxygen isotopes, however kinetic effects might have influenced carbon isotopes. Carbon and oxygen isotope data have been measured along a transect with increments of approximately 1 mm representing a resolution of about 15 yrs. Highly covariant oscillations in δ13C and δ18O with an average cyclicity of about 410 yrs. are observed. These oscillations coincide with macroscopically visible high density and low density layers, possibly reflecting a higher or lower amount of inclusions and perhaps higher and lower growth rates. Geochemical analysis of speloan aragonite is accompanied by cave monitoring that has started in November 2009. Parameters quantified include: drip water parameters, cave air humidity, pCO2 and cave air temperature. Precipitation experiments using watch glasses will also be performed. References Cheddadi, R., Lamb, H. F

  14. Brittle reactivation of ductile shear zones in NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Eric; Koehn, Daniel; Passchier, Cees

    2014-05-01

    Existing structural elements, such as shear zones, are regarded to have a significant influence on the orientation and extent of younger structures. Thus, shear zones are seen as a primary controlling factor on the development of rift zones (e.g. Piqué & Laville, 1996). Indeed, reactivation of such structures is observed in numerous areas. However, information on the amount of offset associated with a reactivation is often lacking. Reactivation of shear zones is also reported of in NW Namibia in relation to the South Atlantic Rifting (Marsh et al., 2001; Stanistreet & Charlesworth, 2001). Here, we present the results of a quantitative study on this reactivation. NW Namibia is characterized by the ~N-S trending Kaoko Belt which developed during the assemblage of Gondwana in the Neo-Proterozoic and incorporates a number of shear zones, e.g. the Purros Shear Zone and Three Palms Shear Zone, which run sub-parallel to the present-day continental margin. The shear zones are partly covered by the extrusives of the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province (~133 Ma) which extruded shortly before or during the onset of the Atlantic rifting (e.g. Blaich et al., 2011). Combining the analysis of satellite imagery and digital elevation models with extensive field work, we identified numerous faults tracing the old shear zones along which the Etendeka basalts were down-faulted. Listric faults developed along the shear zones and accumulated vertical offsets up to 900 m. The faults developed in areas where the foliation along the shear zones is steepest, indicating that a dip of >65° is necessary for normal reactivation. A basin developed along the section where the shear zone is supposedly widest. Our results contribute to the view that the basement inheritance plays a significant role on rifting processes and that the reactivation of shear zones can accumulate significant amounts of displacement. References: Blaich, O.A. et al. (2011). Journal of Geophysical Research - Solid

  15. Late Cenozoic stress field distribution in Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, S.; Bekler, T.; Tutkun, S. Z.; Kurcer, A.; Ates, O.; Bekler, F. N.; Kalafat, D.

    2009-04-01

    Biga Peninsula is a seismically active region both in instrumental and historical period in NW Turkey. In this part, middle and southern branches of North Anatolian Fault are represented by Etili, Can-Biga, Yenice-Gonen, Manyas-Danisment, Lapseki, Sinekci, Terzialan, Dogruca, Uluabat, Edincik, Pazarkoy-Hamdibey-Kalkim, Edremit, Yigitler, Sarikoy-Inova, Troia and Karabiga Faults. All of these faults are responsible of the seismic activity in Biga Peninsula. Historical earthquakes happened in 29, 155, 170, 543, 620, 1440, 1737, 1855, 1865 and 1875. Furthermore, as for instrumental period, Saros Gulf-Murefte earthquakes (M:7.3 and M:6.3) in 1912, Erdek Gulf (M:6.4) and Can-Biga (M:6.3) in 1935, Edremit Gulf-Ayvaci k (M:6.8) in 1944, Yenice-Gonen (M:7.2) in 1953, Gonen (M:5.8) in 1964, Edremit-Baki rcay (M:5.5) in 1971, Biga (M:5.8) in 1983, Kusgolu-Manyas (M:5.2) and Bandirma (M:5.0) in 2006. In this study, we determined the Late Cenozoic stress field distribution and present-day tectonic regimes both fault-slip data (by 253 fault planes) and earthquake focal mechanism solutions (by 58 earthquakes) were investigated by the inversion methods. The results indicate that a transtensional stress regime is dominant with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE directed compression (1) and NE-SW to ENE-WSW directed extension (3), which yielded a NE-SW, ENE-WSW and also E-W trending strike-slip faulting faults with a normal component. While a transtensional tectonic regime has an active component in Biga Peninsula, a local and consistent transpressional tectonic regime were determined along an E-W trending narrow zone in the northern part of the Biga Peninsula also. The tectonic regime and stress field is resulted from interactions both continental collision of Eurasian/Anatolian/Arabian plate in the east and subduction processes (roll back and/or slab-pull) of the African plate along the Cyprus and Hellenic arc in the Mediterranean region.

  16. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  17. Early Pleistocene lake formation and hominin origins in the Turkana-Omo rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepre, Christopher J.

    2014-10-01

    Prior research has correlated the formation of Plio-Pleistocene lakes in East Africa to global/regional climate changes and interpreted the lacustrine basins as significant settings of hominin evolution. Paleo-Lake Lorenyang from the Turkana-Omo rift is important to these issues, as its marginal deposits contain some of, if not the earliest currently known specimens of Acheulian stone tools and African Homo erectus. Magnetostratigraphic and sedimentological evidence indicates that the oldest preserved paleo-Lake Lorenyang deposits are dated at 2.148-2.128 Ma and derive from the NW Turkana basin, predating those from the Omo basin by ˜100 kyr and the NE Turkana basin by ˜190 kyr. Apparently, the lake expanded asynchronously in the rift, potentially due to a volcano-tectonic influence on the location of drainage networks, depositional slopes, or topographic elevation differences within and between the basins at the time of flooding. The onset of the lake temporally coincides with the eruption of basalt lava flows dated to 2.2-2.0 Ma that blocked the southeast outlet of the Turkana basin. This provides a plausible mechanism for hydrologic closure and lacustrine basin formation through volcano-tectonic impounding. It also points to a non-climatic cause for the initial formation of paleo-Lake Lorenyang at ˜2.14 Ma. First appearances for African H. erectus (˜1.87 Ma) and Acheulian tools (˜1.76 Ma) in the Turkana-Omo rift postdate the lake's initial formation by about 270 kyr and 380 kyr, respectively. Such timing differences contrast with studies that correlate all three to the 400-kyr-eccentricity maximum at 1.8 Ma. Although the Turkana-Omo rift is just one example, it does provide alternative insights to views that link climate, hominin evolution, and lake formation in East Africa.

  18. 14. ENTRANCE AT FIFTEENTH AND W STREETS, N.W., NOTE MOLDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ENTRANCE AT FIFTEENTH AND W STREETS, N.W., NOTE MOLDED CONCRETE FORMS, August 1976 - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 11. Building H9; 3/4 view, looking NW; showing relationship of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Building H-9; 3/4 view, looking NW; showing relationship of wheeling ramp to building. (Ryan and Harms) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  20. 52. VIEW LOOKING N.W. AT THE AUTOCLAVE BUILDING, PIPING FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW LOOKING N.W. AT THE AUTOCLAVE BUILDING, PIPING FOR THE AMMONIA DISTILLATE IN FOREGROUND. MAY 21, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  1. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  2. Availability of lake trout reproductive habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A decades-long program to reestablish self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the four lower Great Lakes produced excellent fisheries supported by stocked fish. These fish spawned widely and small numbers of their offspring were collected intermittently from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario, but no self-sustaining stocks were established. Irt this paper we address habitat sufficiency as a factor in the failure of stocked lake trout to established self-sustaining populations in the four lower Great Lakes. We present the previously unpublished results of lake trout spawning habitat surveys conducted at seven sites in the Great Lakes since 1987 and we compare them with the published results of similar surveys conducted at 24 other sites in the four lower lakes since 1981. Our evaluation indicates all but two of these sites can support the production of viable fry from spawnings by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are stocked in the Great Lakes. However, some of the best spawning, egg, and fry habitat in the lower Great Lakes seems to be at deeper offshore sites that may be unattractive to these shallow-water strains. Thus, we suggest also stocking the lower four lakes with strains from Lake Superior that might more fully exploit the best spawning habitat at these deeper, offshore sites.

  3. Ba-rich sanidine megacrysts in trachytic rocks of Eslamy volcano, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Asadpour, Manijeh; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Eslamy volcano is located on a peninsula at the eastern coast of Urumieh lake, NW Iran. The complex stratovolcano with gentle slope flanks exposes a collapsed caldera in the central part. Specific features are different sanidine rich rocks that occur in form of ejecta and flows. According to the field observations they are products of one volcanic event. XRF measurements show they all have trachytic compositions. Typical for this locality are the large sanidine phenocrysts. In the trachytic flow the sanidine crystals reach average size of ~4 cm embedded in a greenish-blue matrix consisting mainly of crystallized feldspar and subordinate pyroxen. Occasionally feldspar megacrysts of approx. 10 cm were observed. Na content of the sanidine megacrysts varies between 0.05 - 0.5 pfu with higher concentrations in the cores. Furthermore they show oscillatory zoning patterns caused by variations of Ba content (0-0.04 pfu). The matrix of the trachytic flow consist mainly of interlocking sanidine crystals (0.05-0.45 pfu Na) partly with Ba-rich cores containing up to 0.06 pfu Ba. In contrast to the megacrysts they show slightly higher Fe contents (0.025-0.035 pfu). The volcanic ejecta with bombs of approx. 50 cm in size were found in one distinct layer within a pyroclastic horizon. The average diameter of the feldspar phenocrysts is much smaller (0.5-2 cm). Sanidine is the main phase of these rocks (up to 80 %). As mafic phase up to 30 % pyroxen (mainly diospide) ± biotite can be observed. Accessories are magnetite ± apatite ± titanite ± zircon. In contrast to the flow rocks the main phase of the matrix of the ejecta is always glass with higher Fe2O3 (total) contents (up to 6 wt.-%) indicating a fast cooling of the sample due to ejection. They are completely depleted in Ba. In two samples zoned feldspar relicts enclosed in glass show remolten rims. Similar to flow rocks the feldspar phenocrysts of all ejecta show a complex zoning pattern, e.g. three samples expose high

  4. Semiquantitative multi-hazard risk assessment concepts for a himalayan watershed in NW-Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, M.; Leber, D.; Haeusler, H.; Agner, P.; Payer, T.; Tobgay, T.; Wangda, D.

    2003-04-01

    In the Pho Chhu watershed in NW-Bhutan, settlement activity concentrates on broad and pro-duc-tive valley areas, 50 to 80 kilometres downstream of glacial flood sources. Despite an time lag of 5 to 7 hours between initiation and arrival of the breach flood, the low reliability of telecommunication line results in a short pre-warning time. Upstreams, at the main Himalayan ridge, several glaciers coalescence at the valley end, forming a glacial environment with highly inter-linked, possibly hazardous glacial and gravitational processes, which also endanger small isolated settlements nearby the glaciers. Here glacial lake outbursts may be triggered by glacier surges out of water pockets, surge waves due to ice or rock fall and inherent in-stability of the moraines themselves. During flood propagation lateral gravitational processes in loose sediments and tills may result in temporal blockage. Therefore a three stage risk management concept is proposed, dividing into: (1) Local, quickly to establish countermeasures, such as technical measures with low maintenance expenditure and low failure risk, manual monitoring and improved manual telecommunication line. (2) Regional hazard zone delineation to enable hazard awareness and preparedness, and limited relocation activity. (3) And finally regional implementation of an technical early warning system. Hazard risk assessment is carried out by means of qualitative mapping of gravitative processes and quantitative process simulation of dam stability, dam breaching and flood propagation. As time series for identification of accurate time-magnitude relations are not available or questionable due to the changing environmental con-ditions, scenario modelling of the governing processes is utilised to account for process magnitude relation and process inter-linkage. Based on these procedures a semi-quantitative hazard zonation concept, taking into account quantitative process influence zones and qualitative frequency estimation has

  5. Reprocessing and Interpretation of the High Resolution Seismic Data from Northern Marmara Continental Shelf, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasif, Aslıhan; Dondurur, Derman; Ergintav, Semih; Cifci, Gunay

    2015-04-01

    The Marmara Sea is an inland sea located in the NW of Turkey with a maximum depth of 1270 m, and consists of a 3 major sub-basins. The active dextral North Anatolian Fault (NAF) passes through the basins, which shapes the general morphology and forms the tectonic settlement of the Marmara Sea. The investigations for the Marmara Sea are now important since İstanbul city, which is the most populous and economically the most important city of Turkey, is located just north of the Marmara Sea, quite close to the NAF. In order to define the morphology and structural state of the northern continental shelf of the Marmara Sea, we collected 224 km of multichannel high resolution seismic and 338 km of Chirp subbottom profiler data along the shallow shelf in 2007. A 600 m long, 96 channel digital seismic streamer, and a Generator-Injector (GI) gun was used to obtain high resolution seismic data. The Chirp data was collected a 2.75-6.75 kHz over-the-side-mount transducer system. The data have been processed using a conventional data processing flow. The scope of the present study is to re-process and to interpret the seismic and Chirp data between Silivri and Sarayburnu on the northern Marmara shelf up to 100 m water depth. The active tectonic characteristics of the area, especially its geological connection with the terrestrial area, are investigated using acoustic data. In addition, offshore continuity of the of the Çatalca Fault zone is investigated. The Çatalca Fault enters the shelf along the B. Çekmece Lake and can be tracked in the SSE direction on the seismic data. The seismic data is tied to North Marmara-1 well located on the central part of the shelf area, and distributions and thicknesses of the pre-Miocene sediments are mapped using a jump-correlation to the well information. The seismic data located at the southernmost part of the shelf along the shelf break also indicate the presence of active sediment erosion. Behind the shelf break, the slope inclination

  6. Tectonic deformations of the NW Novaya Zemlya Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopiev, Andrei; Ershova, Victoria; Khudoley, Andrey; Sobolev, Nikolay; Petrov, Eugeniy

    2016-04-01

    The Novaya Zemlya archipelago comprises two main islands (Northern and Southern). Structural studies were conducted in the northwestern part of Northern Island, composed mainly of Upper Proterozoic-Carboniferous rocks. The structural style is dominated by NW-striking folds, clearly recognized on geological maps. The folds are typically overturned to the northwest. Southeast-dipping axial-plane cleavage is widely distributed. Tectonic transportation in Mesozoic time was directed from southeast to northwest. The bedding-cleavage intersection lineation plunges to southeast and southwest, parallel to the axes of large and small folds. The dip angle of the lineation is high, ranging up to 30o or, rarely even more. Dip angle of the intersection lineation is highly variable over a short distance, pointing to occurrence of several stages of deformation. The intersection lineation plunge angels are likely close to dip angles of bedding on the early-stage fold limbs, most of which were gentle to open ones. The early folding is presumably related to Caledonian or Ellesmerian orogenies.

  7. Assessment of Quercus flowering trends in NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jato, V.; Rodríguez-Rajo, F. J.; Fernandez-González, M.; Aira, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper sought to chart airborne Quercus pollen counts over the last 20 years in the region of Galicia (NW Spain) with a view to detecting the possible influence of climate change on the Quercus airborne pollen season (APS). Pollen data from Ourense, Santiago de Compostela, Vigo and Lugo were used. The Quercus airborne pollen season was characterized in terms of the following parameters: pollen season start and end dates, peak pollen count, pollen season length and pollen index. Several methods, dates and threshold temperatures for determining the chill and heat requirements needed to trigger flowering were applied. A diverse APS onset timing sequence was observed for the four cities as Quercus flowers few days in advance in Vigo. The variations observed could be related to differences in the meteorological conditions or the thermal requirements needed for flowering. Thermal requirements differed depending on local climate conditions in the study cities: the lowest values for chilling accumulation were recorded in Vigo and the highest in Lugo, whereas the lowest heat accumulation was achieved in Vigo. Differences in APS trends between cities may reflect variations in weather-related trends. A significant trend towards rising Quercus pollen indices and higher maximum daily mean pollen counts was observed in Ourense, linked to the more marked temperature increase across southern Galicia. A non-uniform trend towards increased temperatures was noted over the study period, particularly in late summer and early autumn in all four study cities. Additionally, an increase in spring temperatures was observed in south-western Galicia.

  8. Contaminants in American alligator eggs from Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Lake Okeechobee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Percival, H.F.; Jennings, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 elements were measured in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) eggs collected in 1984 from Lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Okeechobee in central and south Florida. Organochlorine pesticides were highest in eggs from Lake Apopka. None of the elements appeared to be present at harmful concentrations in eggs from any of the lakes. A larger sample of eggs was collected in 1985, but only from Lakes Griffin, a lake where eggs were relatively clean, and Apopka, where eggs were most contaminated. In 1985, hatching success of artificially incubated eggs was lower for Lake Apopka, and several organochlorine pesticides were higher than in eggs from Lake Griffin. However, within Lake Apopka, higher levels of pesticides in chemically analyzed eggs were not associated with reduced hatching success of the remaining eggs in the clutch. Therefore, it did not appear that any of the pesticides we measured were responsible for the reduced hatching of Lake Apopka eggs.

  9. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  10. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  11. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  12. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  13. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  14. Lake Sarez, Tajikistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Sarez (top), deep in the Pamir mountains of Tajikistan, was created 90 years ago when a strong earthquake triggered a massive landslide that, in turn, became a huge dam along the Murghob River, now called the Usoi Dam. The resulting lake is perched above surrounding drainages at an elevation greater than 3000m, and is part of the watershed that drains the towering Akademi Nauk Range (see the regional image, lower). The lake is 61 km long and as deep as 500 m, and holds an estimated 17 cubic km of water. The area experiences considerable seismic activity, and scientists fear that part of the right bank may slump into the lake, creating a huge wave that will top over and possibly breach the natural dam. Such a wave would create a catastrophic flood downstream along the Bartang, Panj and Amu Darya Rivers, perhaps reaching all the way to the Aral Sea. Currently, central Asian governments, as well as the World Bank and the UN are monitoring the dam closely, and have proposed gradually lowering the lake level as a preventive measure. More information about the lake is available at the following web sites: Lake Sarez Study group, UN Report, Reliefweb Digital photograph numbers ISS002-E-7771 and ISS002-E-7479 were taken in the spring of 2001 from Space Station Alpha and are provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  15. High Resolution Environmental Magnetic Study of a Holocene Sedimentary Record from Zaca Lake, Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Kirby, M. E.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic studies of Holocene lake sediments recovered from Zaca lake have yielded a 3000-year high resolution record of environmental variability and paleolimnology. Zaca lake is a small oligomictic lake ~12m deep situated 730 m above sea level in the steep canyons of the San Rafael mountains, NW of Santa Barbara. Throughout much of the year Zaca lake is anaerobic below 7m. Hydrogen sulfide, fed into the lake via runoff and local sulphur springs, is present throughout the hypolimnion with concentrations sometime exceeding 30 mg/ l. During the summer months when the lake is stratified, light colored carbonate rich microlaminae are formed; and often during the winter months when the lake overturns, killing the anaerobic bacteria, black microlamina rich in iron sulfide are deposited on the lake floor, creating a stratigraphy reflecting patterns of environmental variability on annual to millennial scales. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from 8.5 m of core recovered from the central region of Zaca lake. Ages, constrained using radiocarbon chronostratigraphy, yielded sedimentation rates of 2-10 mm/yr with an average rate of 3 mm per yr over the 3000 yr interval. Parameters reflecting decadal scale variability in magnetic concentration (susceptibility, ARM, SIRM) and grainsize (ARM/Chi) were measured every 2 cm. Additional rock magnetic tests, including thermal demagnetization of three component IRM, were applied at selected intervals to constrain the magnetic mineralogy. These data were combined with analyses of clastic grain size, % calcium carbonate and % organics to create a multiproxy record of environmental variability. Results show that Zaca lake has had a complex depositional history. Anthropogenic effects associated with European colonization are present in the upper meters. Most notable, however, is a dramatic shift in the magnetic parameters and mineralogy between the upper and lower half of the core (circa 1300 ybp) indicating a shift in regime

  16. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  17. Long term monitoring system integrated in an elevational gradient in NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilla, J.; Malizia, A.; Osinaga, O.; Blundo, C.; Grau, R.; Malizia, L.; Aráoz, E.

    2013-05-01

    Ecological trends and ranges of variability are poorly known in the tropical and subtropical Andes. Long term studies are powerful tools to detect the response of vegetation dynamics, biodiversity and hydrological cycle to these trends. We present a long term monitoring system in NW Argentinean mountains, including forest permanent plots at different elevations and high elevation grasslands, encompassing more than 3.000 m elevation range. Long term studies include: 1) 66 ha of mountain forest permanent plots along the Yungas elevational gradient from c. 400 to 2500 masl , and latitudinal gradient (22-28S) with 45 plots in mature forests and 28 in secondary forests originated in grazing, agriculture and selective logging. Some of these permanent plots have achieved 20 years of monitoring and all of them are included in the "Red de Bosques Andinos" a network created recently, together with c. 10 institutions and more than 130 (c. 120 ha) forest permanent plots from Argentina to Colombia Andes. 2) Two GLORIA (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments) sites, above 4000 masl with more than 170 species recorded, including one re-measurement. This system is included in GLORIA network (www.gloria.ac.at) and in GLORIA Andes (http://www.condesan.org/gloria), and 3) more than 15 satellite monitored high Andean lakes and a wide extension of vegas (75800 ha in Argentinean puna). A digital database is being implemented to organize and provide access to the information generated by these three systems coordinated by the Instituto de Ecología Regional (http://www.iecologia.com.ar). These monitoring data are analyzed together with instrumental and dendrochronological data to describe the dynamics of these ecosystems over an area of 20 million hectares distributed between 22 and 28°S. Some of the most significant results to date include: 1) secondary mountain forests are expanding over grasslands and agriculture lands, and tend to converge toward mature forest

  18. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin with the upstream side of the outlet structure visible at photo center, view to north-northwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  19. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  20. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  1. Mono Lake Excursion Reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    The Mono Lake Excursion as recorded in the Mono Basin, CA, has an older part that is about negative 30 degrees inclination and about 300 degrees declination during low relative field intensity. Those paleomagnetic directions are closely followed by greater than 80 degrees positive inclination and east declination of about 100 degrees during higher relative field intensity. A path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) for the older part followed from old to young forms a large clockwise loop that reaches 35 degrees N latitude and is centered at about 35 degrees E longitude. That loop is followed by a smaller one that is counterclockwise and centered at about 70 degrees N latitude and 270 degrees E longitude (Denham & Cox, 1971; Denham, 1974; Liddicoat & Coe, 1979). The Mono Lake Excursion outside the Mono Basin in western North America is recorded as nearly the full excursion at Summer Lake, OR (Negrini et al., 1984), and as the younger portion of steep positive inclination/east declination in the Lahontan Basin, NV. The overall relative field intensity during the Mono Lake Excursion in the Lahontan Basin mirrors very closely the relative field intensity in the Mono Basin (Liddicoat, 1992, 1996; Coe & Liddicoat, 1994). Using 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dates (Kent et al., 2002) and paleoclimate and relative paleointensity records (Zimmerman et al., 2006) for the Mono Lake Excursion in the Mono Basin, it has been proposed that the Mono Lake Excursion might be older than originally believed and instead be the Laschamp Excursion at about 40,000 yrs B.P. (Guillou et al., 2004). On the contrary, we favor a younger age for the Mono Lake Excursion, about 32,000 yrs B.P., using the relative paleointensity in the Mono Basin and Lahontan Basin and 14C dates from the Lahontan Basin (Benson et al., 2002). The age of about 32,000 yrs B.P. is also in accord with the age (32,000- 34,000 yrs B.P.) reported by Channell (2006) for the Mono Lake Excursion at ODP Site 919 in the Irminger Basin

  2. The Quaternary Tahoe-Medicine Lake trough: The western margin of the Basin and Range transition, NE California

    SciTech Connect

    Page, W.D. . Geoscience Dept.); Sawyer, T.L. ); Mclaren, M.K.; Savage, W.U.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1993-04-01

    The Tahoe-Medicine Lake trough is a series of small right-stepping, en echelon tectonic depressions that extend 400 km NNW from Lake Tahoe to near the Oregon border. The trough developed since the Miocene, and forms the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Mountains, and the western boundary of the Plumas province and Modoc Plateau, which are transitional to the Basin and Range. The geomorphic expression of the trough indicates late Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity along its length. The continuity of the structure, however, has been masked in places by volcanic deposits that have filled or partly filled the tectonic lows. Moderate historical earthquakes (M5-6) have occurred only along the southern trough. Microearthquakes prominently follow the trough from Lake Tahoe north [omega] Lake Almanor. From there northward, seismicity patterns are predominantly shallow (<5 km) volcanic-related clusters at Mt. Lassen, Medicine Lake, and Tennent and Stephens passes. Geologic and seismicity data indicate that the NW-trending south-central section has a significant component of right-slip, which appears to be related to the Walker Lane shear zone. To the south, the trough is the NNW-striking, 10- to 20-km-wide Tahoe depression, which extends from Lake Tahoe to the Sierra Valley and is partly filled with Quaternary volcanic deposits near Truckee. The escarpment and probable displaced moraines along this section indicate late Pleistocene and possibly Holocene activity. Seismicity is diffuse except in the vicinity of the 1966 Truckee earthquake (M6.0). Northward, from Sierra Valley to American Valley, the trough changes trend to the NW, and is the 6-km-wide Plumas trench, which down-faults the Mehrten Fm. (Miocene to early Pliocene) about 1,000 m.

  3. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. PMID:27104923

  4. Preliminary Vertical Slip Rate for the West Tahoe Fault from six new Cosmogenic 10Be Exposure Ages of Late Pleistocene Glacial Moraines at Cascade Lake, Lake Tahoe, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, I. K. D.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Kent, G. M.; Owen, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The West Tahoe Fault is the primary range bounding fault of the Sierra Nevada at the latitude of Lake Tahoe. It is a N-NW striking, east dipping normal fault that has a pronounced onshore quaternary scarp extending from highway 50 southwest of Meyers, CA to Emerald Bay. At Cascade Lake, the fault cuts and progressively offsets late Pleistocene right lateral moraines. The fault vertically offsets the previously mapped Tahoe moraine ~83 m and the Tioga moraine ~23 m, measured from lidar data. Seventeen samples were collected for 10Be cosmogenic age analysis from boulders on both the hanging and footwalls of the fault along the crests of these moraines.We report here the initial analysis of 6 of these boulders and currently await processing of the remainder. The 10Be exposure ages of 3 boulders each on the younger Tioga and older Tahoe moraines range from 12.7 +/- 1.6 to 20.7 +/- 3.3 ka and 13.3 +/- 2.1 to 72.5 +/- 8.8 ka, respectively. Using the oldest ages as minima, these preliminary results suggest that the slip rate has averaged ~1 mm/yr since the penultimate glaciation, in accord with estimates of previous workers, and place additional bounds on the age of glaciation in the Lake Tahoe basin. The Last Glacial Maxima and penultimate glaciation near Lake Tahoe thus appear to coincide with the Tioga and Tahoe II glaciations of the Eastern Sierra.

  5. ERS-1 SAR backscatter changes associated with ice growing on shallow lakes in Arctic Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Wakabayashi, H.; Weeks, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial and temporal backscatter intensity (sigma(sup o)) variations from ice growing on shallow lakes during winter 1991-92 near Barrow, NW Alaska, have been quantified for the first time using ERS-I C-band SAR data acquired at the Alaska SAR Facility. A field and laboratory validation program, including measurements of the thickness and structure-stratigraphy of the ice, indicates that sigma(sup o) values are strongly dependent on whether the ice freezes to the lake bottom, or remains afloat. Backscatter intensity decreases significantly when the ice grounds on the bottom. Strong backscatter from floating ice is attributed to a specular ice-water interface and vertically oriented tubular bubbles. During the spring thaw, backscatter undergoes a reversal; sigma(sup o) values from ice that was grounded increase, while sigma(sup o) values from ice that was afloat decrease. This phenomenon has not previously been reported.

  6. Cyclostratigraphy of Uppermost Carboniferous-to-Lower Triassic Terrestrial Deposits in Bogda Mountains, NW China - A Potential Astrostratigraphic Proxy Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Tabor, N. J.; Crowley, J. L.; Miggins, D. P.; Obrist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lithologic and stratigraphic evidence from the uppermost Carboniferous-Lower Triassic fluvial-lacustrine deposits in the Tarlong-Taodonggou half-graben of southern Bogda Mountains, NW China shows 3 orders of depositional cyclicity. The section is thick (~1,700 m), relatively complete, and well-constrained by radiometric ages, as a potential candidate for Permo-Triassic astrostratigraphy in the mid-latitude of NE Pangea. 10 low-order cycles (LCs) are defined by their dominant depositional environments and prominent cycle boundaries. Upper Gzhelian-mid Sakamarian Lower, Middle, and Upper Daheyan LCs are composed mainly of meandering and braided stream deposits, formed during initial and early rifting. The Upper Daheyan LC contains mature Calcisols, indicating a subhumid-semi-arid climatic change. They were transgressed conformably by lake-margin, deltaic, and profundal deposits of the mid-Sakamarian-Artinskian Lucaogou and Hongyanchi LCs, indicating rapid graben subsidence. Contrasting lithologies suggest highly-fluctuating arid-subhumid conditions at the intermediate and high-order cycle scales. The two LCs are separated by a fluvial-incision and correlative deltaic downlap surface, indicating an uplifting event. Lake regression and fluvial peneplanation at the end of Hongyanchi LC is indicated by fluvial erosion and deposition of the thin (1-10s m) Lower Quanzijie LC, suggesting a tectonic uplift and/or climatic change. The basal two mature Calcisols and top Gleysols of the Upper Quanzijie LC containing fluvial and loess (?) deposits indicate an arid-to-humid climatic change. The two Quanzijie LCs span over Kungurian (?)-Capitanian ages and signify the beginning of late rifting. The humid condition magnified in overlying thick (~800 m) Lopingian-lower Induan Wutonggou LC, composed of deltaic, lake-margin, and meandering stream deposits. The overlying fluvial-lake margin deposits of the Induan Jiucaiyuan LC indicate a combination of tectonic uplift and a climatic

  7. The April-June 2007 Trichonis Lake earthquake swarm (W. Greece): New implications toward the causative fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassaras, I.; Kapetanidis, V.; Karakonstantis, A.; Kaviris, G.; Papadimitriou, P.; Voulgaris, N.; Makropoulos, K.; Popandopoulos, G.; Moshou, A.

    2014-01-01

    On 10 April 2007, three moderate earthquakes with Mw = 4.9-5.1 occurred in the vicinity of Trichonis Lake (W. Greece). A local network composed of 12 three-component digital seismographs was installed in the epicentral area and recorded more than 1600 events. The double-difference algorithm HYPODD, incorporating both catalog and waveform cross-correlation differential travel-time data, was applied for the successful relocation of 1490 earthquakes. The latter led to the distinction of a main NW-SE trending and NE-dipping zone, as well as of three neighboring faults; a conjugate NW-SE striking and SW-dipping marginal fault mapped along the northeastern flanks of the lake; a E-W trending and south-dipping low-angle normal fault, possibly related to the major Agrinio Fault Zone (AFZ), parallel to the northern bank of the lake; a NE-SW striking and NW-dipping normal fault, likely related to a segment of the active Evinos fault, located south of the lake. Calculation of the Coulomb stress induced by the combination of the 1975 Mw = 6.0 event and the three largest events of 10 April 2007 on the inferred structures, reveals that most of the seismicity lies within the "stress-loaded" region, except for the westernmost activity, which probably belongs to the deep part of the AFZ. A total of 178 reliable focal mechanisms were determined by regional and local body-wave modeling (5 largest events) and P-wave first motion polarity data. The types of the obtained focal mechanisms are predominantly normal and strike-slip, however, numerous earthquakes were found to exhibit reverse faulting. Inversion of focal mechanism data showed that the prevailing principal horizontal component σ3 is quite homogeneous throughout the activated area with a roughly NW-SE trend, parallel to the strike of the Hellenides. On the contrary, the compressional field σ1 appears in two patterns: NE-SW trending onshore and NW-SE trending beneath the lake. This apparent rotation of σ1 by 90° reveals a

  8. A study of petroleum system in Chuhuangkeng anticline, NW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiang, S.; Tsai, L. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Since energy demand is still increasing in the world, the exploration of unconventional fossil fuel becomes more and more important today. Miaoli area of the NW Western Foothill Belt, Taiwan, had been a major oil and gas producing field in the past, important oil/gas producing structures include Tiechenshen, Chinshui and Chuhuangkeng anticline. The reservoir rocks of unconventional resources need to be examined to illustrate the remaining hydrocarbon potential of Chuhuangkeng anticline. A standard evaluation procedure for assessing integrated geochemical parameters can thus be established. In this study, we combine various geochemical parameters including TOC, porosity, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance measurement to assess the HC potential of shale gas reservoirs. The results show that Wuchishan and Mushan Formations possess the best hydrocarbon potential in Chuhuangkeng anticline. The maturation of Wuchishan and Mushan Formations are both in oil window (Ro of Wuchishan formation =1.7% , Ro of Mushan =1.01~1.53% ). The maturation of Shitih Formation barely reached oil window, however the shallower depth and less exploration cost are the advantages of Shitih Formation. Moreover, Wuchishan Formation is a dry gas field and Mushan Formation is a condensate gas field. The results of porosity show that there are secondary porosity existed in Mushan Formation which provides the extra storage space for hydrocarbon. Additionally, Piling Shale is a good cap rock on top of Mushan formation, it further benefits the conservation of oil and gas in Mushan Formation. In conclude, Mushan Formation is the most potential HC target in future shale gas exploration.

  9. Late Cenozoic Deformation in the Western Tarim Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Burbank, D. W.; Chen, J.; Li, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Tian Shan in NW China is one of the most active regions of intracontinental deformation in the world, accommodating a large fraction (~40%) of the shortening from the Indo-Eurasian collision. The western Tarim Basin, situated between the southern Tian Shan and Pamir Mountains, manifests this deformation through a series of east-west trending fault-related folds that have formed during the late Cenozoic. Previous studies in this region have focused on the kinematics, style, and timing of detachment folds related to folding within the foreland basin of the southern Tian Shan. In contrast, this study focuses on the deformation caused by fault-propagation folding resulting from the northward movement of the Pamir. The rates of deformation are calculated using a combination of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages, structural mapping and differential GPS surveys of fault scarps and deformed terrace surfaces crossing active folds. OSL dating provides the time since the sediment was last exposed to daylight, i.e., time since burial. Consequently, OSL is useful for dating the abandonment of terrace surfaces due to tectonic (fold growth) or climatic events. OSL quartz samples were collected from silt lenses within gravel topping the terraces. Most of the quartz OSL signals are weak, thus several grain sizes (silt (4-11 µm, 8-15 µm) and sand (90-125 µm)) were analyzed and different integrations of the shine-down curves were explored to calculate equivalent doses. The implications for different equivalent doses and ages on the calculation of rates of deformation are also addressed.

  10. Shear zone reactivation during South Atlantic rifting in NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Passchier, C. W.; Salomon, E.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of inherited structures during rifting as well as an influence of inherited structures on the orientation of a developing rift has long been discussed (e.g. Piqué & Laville, 1996; Younes & McClay, 2002). Here, we present a qualitative and quantitative study of shear zone reactivation during the South Atlantic opening in NW Namibia. The study area comprises the Neo-Proterozoic rocks of the Kaoko Belt which was formed during the amalgamation of Gondwana. The Kaoko Belt encompasses the prominent ~500 km long ductile Purros shear zone and the Three Palms shear zone, both running sub-parallel to the present continental margin. The Kaoko Belt is partly overlain by the basalts of the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province, which with an age of ~133 Ma were emplaced just before or during the onset of the Atlantic rifting at this latitude. Combining the analysis of satellite imagery and digital elevation models with extensive field work, we identified numerous faults tracing the old shear zones along which the Etendeka basalts were down-faulted. The faults are often listric, yet we also found evidence for a regional scale basin formation. Our analysis allowed for constructing the geometry of three of these faults and we could thus estimate the vertical offsets to ~150 m, ~500 m, and ~1100 m, respectively. Our results contribute to the view that the basement inheritance plays a significant role on rifting processes and that the reactivation of shear zones can accumulate significant amounts of displacement. References: Pique, A. and E. Laville (1996). The Central Atlantic rifting: Reactivation of Paleozoic structures?. J. Geodynamics, 21, 235-255. Younes, I.A. and K. McClay (2002). Development of accommodation zones in the Gulf of Suez-Red Sea rift, Egypt. AAPG Bulletin, 86, 1003-1026.

  11. Petrography, palynology and depositional environment of Gelibolu coals, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirtaş, Ferdi; Bozcu, Mustafa; Koşun, Erdal

    2014-05-01

    Upper Oligocene and Miocene coal samples collected from two outcrops in the Gelibolu Peninsula, NW Turkey were analyzed petrographically and palynologically to determine the depositional environment of the coals. Microscopic studies reveal that the studied coal samples from both locations are characterized by high amount of huminite group macerals, ranging from 46 to 78% (mineral-included basis). The prevailing maceral from this group is gelinite (31-65%), it can be easily seen on all studied samples, indicative of high gelification degree of organic matter. Relatively low amount of liptinite (does not exceed 9%) and inertinite (does not exceed 8%) are also observed in the coals. The mineral matter content is variable but generally high, varying from 5 to 37%, as in other Turkish coals and consists mostly of clay minerals, quartz, calcite and pyrite. The mean reflectance values range from 0.502 to 0.564% suggesting that rank of coal is subbituminous (ASTM). The chemical properties of coal including calorific value, volatile matter and fixed carbon content are also in accordance with rank of coal. Facies indices based on maceral ratios (Tissue Preservation Index vs. Gelification Index and ABC ternary diagrams) were used to interpret to depositional environment of coals. Low tissue preservation index (TPI) and high gelification index (GI) values are observed. These indices indicate that the coals deposited in limnic environment. High pH and strongly reducing conditions inferred from the presence of framboidal pyrite and also evidenced by low TPI values. The palynological assembly of the coals dominated by angiosperm pollen and spore, however, gymnosperms were rarely seen. Herbaceous/sedge plants are common in Miocene coal samples.

  12. The Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary tectonic history of NW California

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.; Moley, K.; Aalto, K.R. . Dept. of Geology); Renne, P.R. . Berkeley Geochronology Center)

    1993-04-01

    A thick sequence of Late Miocene to Pleistocene sediments thought to represent deposition in a Neogene forearc basin are preserved in the structural basin referred to as the Eel River basin' located offshore of NW California and SE Oregon. The southern portion of this structural basin comes on land in the vicinity of Eureka where the marine and fluvial Wildcat Group is exposed. Basal Wildcat Group sediments are fluvial and littorial. Marine sandstones of the Wildcat Group contain K-spar concentrations of 5.5% and are believed to represent a fresh source. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar laser probe analyses of Wildcat Group micas yield dates of 52--57, 66--75, 128.5 and 299--303 Ma. The presence of Idaho detritus throughout the Neogene Wildcat Group indicates that the Klamath Mountains remained low during the Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Younger fluvial sediments in this region contain primarily locally derived detritus indicating local uplift of the Klamath Mountains. To the north, at Crescent City, thin remnants of the near-shore Saint George Formation and the eastern estuarine and fluvial Wimer Formation are lowermost Pliocene in age (5 ma). The presence of the highly erodible Wilmer Formation on uplifted plateaus in an area of extreme rainfall suggest that these sediments represent only the lowermost portion of an originally much thicker sequence. Consequently, the sediments confined to the present day Eel River basin do not represent the lateral extent of the original forearc basin. Sandstones and conglomerates of the Saint George and Wimer Formation indicate a local Klamath provenance derivation.

  13. Assessment of Quercus flowering trends in NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Jato, V; Rodríguez-Rajo, F J; Fernandez-González, M; Aira, M J

    2015-05-01

    This paper sought to chart airborne Quercus pollen counts over the last 20 years in the region of Galicia (NW Spain) with a view to detecting the possible influence of climate change on the Quercus airborne pollen season (APS). Pollen data from Ourense, Santiago de Compostela, Vigo and Lugo were used. The Quercus airborne pollen season was characterized in terms of the following parameters: pollen season start and end dates, peak pollen count, pollen season length and pollen index. Several methods, dates and threshold temperatures for determining the chill and heat requirements needed to trigger flowering were applied. A diverse APS onset timing sequence was observed for the four cities as Quercus flowers few days in advance in Vigo. The variations observed could be related to differences in the meteorological conditions or the thermal requirements needed for flowering. Thermal requirements differed depending on local climate conditions in the study cities: the lowest values for chilling accumulation were recorded in Vigo and the highest in Lugo, whereas the lowest heat accumulation was achieved in Vigo. Differences in APS trends between cities may reflect variations in weather-related trends. A significant trend towards rising Quercus pollen indices and higher maximum daily mean pollen counts was observed in Ourense, linked to the more marked temperature increase across southern Galicia. A non-uniform trend towards increased temperatures was noted over the study period, particularly in late summer and early autumn in all four study cities. Additionally, an increase in spring temperatures was observed in south-western Galicia. PMID:25108375

  14. Timing and Spatial Distribution of Loess in Xinjiang, NW China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Song, Yougui; Yan, Libin; Chen, Tao; An, Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    Central Asia is one of the most significant loess regions on Earth, with an important role in understanding Quaternary climate and environmental change. However, in contrast to the widely investigated loess deposits in the Chinese Loess Plateau, the Central Asian loess–paleosol sequences are still insufficiently known and poorly understood. Through field investigation and review of the previous literature, the authors have investigated the distribution, thickness and age of the Xinjiang loess, and analyzed factors that control these parameters in the Xinjiang in northwest China, Central Asia. The loess sediments cover river terraces, low uplands, the margins of deserts and the slopes of the Tianshan Mountains and Kunlun Mountains and are also present in the Ili Basin. The thickness of the Xinjiang loess deposits varies from several meters to 670 m. The variation trend of the sand fraction (>63 μm) grain-size contour can indicate the local major wind directions, so we conclude that the NW and NE winds are the main wind directions in the North and South Xinjiang, and the westerly wind mainly transport dust into the Ili basin. We consider persistent drying, adequate regional wind energy and well-developed river terraces to be the main factors controlling the distribution, thickness and formation age of the Xinjiang loess. The well-outcropped loess sections have mainly developed since the middle Pleistocene in Xinjiang, reflecting the appearance of the persistent drying and the present air circulation system. However, the oldest loess deposits are as old as the beginning of the Pliocene in the Tarim Basin, which suggests that earlier aridification occurred in the Tarim Basin rather than in the Ili Basin and the Junggar Basin. PMID:25970617

  15. Timing and Spatial Distribution of Loess in Xinjiang, NW China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Song, Yougui; Yan, Libin; Chen, Tao; An, Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    Central Asia is one of the most significant loess regions on Earth, with an important role in understanding Quaternary climate and environmental change. However, in contrast to the widely investigated loess deposits in the Chinese Loess Plateau, the Central Asian loess-paleosol sequences are still insufficiently known and poorly understood. Through field investigation and review of the previous literature, the authors have investigated the distribution, thickness and age of the Xinjiang loess, and analyzed factors that control these parameters in the Xinjiang in northwest China, Central Asia. The loess sediments cover river terraces, low uplands, the margins of deserts and the slopes of the Tianshan Mountains and Kunlun Mountains and are also present in the Ili Basin. The thickness of the Xinjiang loess deposits varies from several meters to 670 m. The variation trend of the sand fraction (>63 μm) grain-size contour can indicate the local major wind directions, so we conclude that the NW and NE winds are the main wind directions in the North and South Xinjiang, and the westerly wind mainly transport dust into the Ili basin. We consider persistent drying, adequate regional wind energy and well-developed river terraces to be the main factors controlling the distribution, thickness and formation age of the Xinjiang loess. The well-outcropped loess sections have mainly developed since the middle Pleistocene in Xinjiang, reflecting the appearance of the persistent drying and the present air circulation system. However, the oldest loess deposits are as old as the beginning of the Pliocene in the Tarim Basin, which suggests that earlier aridification occurred in the Tarim Basin rather than in the Ili Basin and the Junggar Basin. PMID:25970617

  16. Mesozooplankton metabolism and feeding in the NW Iberian upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, José Alejandro; Ceballos, Sara; Anadón, Ricardo

    2004-09-01

    Mesozooplankton size-fractionated biomass, feeding, and metabolic rates were investigated during a cruise conducted off NW Spain in August 1998. Based on different hydrographic conditions observed throughout the study area (upwelling events nearshore and stratified waters offshore), the sampling area was divided into coastal and oceanic zones. Both phytoplankton and mesozooplankton biomass were higher in the coastal upwelling than in the offshore zone. Size structure analysis shows that the small fraction (200-500 μm) of mesozooplankton was more important than the larger fractions (500-1000 μm and >1000 μm) in the open ocean in terms of both biomass and grazing activity. The relationship between copepod ingestion rate and the concentration of chlorophyll a >5 μm resembled a type II functional response. Saturation occurred at the coastal stations, where copepod gut contents were highest. The grazing impact on both phytoplankton biomass and primary production seemed to be higher offshore (5.7 and 12.9%, respectively) than in upwelled waters (5.2 and 5.2%), although the differences were not statistically significant. Phytoplankton ingestion was enough to fulfil the basal metabolism of mesozooplankton in the upwelling area (102.1% of the minimum carbon requirements met) but not in the offshore (45.9%). Feeding activity and metabolic measurements on mesozooplankton point to a herbivorous food web in the coastal upwelling zone and a multivorous food web in the stratified open oceanic waters. The amount of metabolic end products released by mesozooplankton was higher in the coastal zone, but mesozooplankton played a more important role as nutrient regenerators in the multivorous food web (30.3 and 21.7% of the nitrogen and phosphorus phytoplankton demand accounted for ammonium and phosphate excretion, respectively) than in the herbivorous one (3.8% for ammonium and 2.6% for phosphate).

  17. Safinamide: FCE 26743, NW 1015, PNU 151774, PNU 151774E.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Safinamide [NW 1015, PNU 151774E; FCE 26743] is a potent anticonvulsant and antiparkinsonian compound that is being developed by Newron Pharmaceuticals in Europe. It has been shown to antagonise the calcium and sodium channels, as well as inhibit monoamine oxidase type-B (MAO-B). Phase III trials for the treatment of Parkinson's disease are underway in Germany and Europe, while phase II trials in patients with epilepsy are ongoing in Italy. Newron Pharmaceuticals was founded at the end of 1998 after Pharmacia & Upjohn announced its worldwide restructuring programme. Newron obtained the rights to safinamide, which Pharmacia Corporation (now Pfizer) had been developing as PNU 151774E. Safinamide was originated by Farmitalia-CarloErba in Italy. Newron now owns all intellectual property associated with the drug.A multinational phase II trial for Parkinson's disease in Europe has shown positive results in slowing the progression of the disease; however, due to the placebo-effect seen in this study, a longer (6-month) phase IIb study is planned for the second quarter of 2003. In July 2003, Newron received an IND from the US FDA authorising a phase I trial to confirm that no dietary restrictions are needed in patients while being treated with safinamide. This study is be conducted in 12 healthy volunteers at the University of Vienna, Austria, and will be followed by efficacy studies in Parkinson's disease in the US. Five phase I trials were completed in April 2001 in Switzerland. Safinamide combines sodium and calcium channel modulatory activity with monoamine oxidase B inhibition. PMID:15563241

  18. Grounding zone wedges, Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebesco, Michele; Urgeles, Roger; Özmaral, Asli; Hanebuth, Till; Caburlotto, Andrea; Hörner, Tanja; Lantzsch, Hendrik; LLopart, Juame; Lucchi, Renata; Skøtt Nicolaisen, Line; Giacomo, Osti; Sabbatini, Anna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Swath bathymetry within Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea) shows a seafloor characterized by E-W trending megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) overprinted by transverse Grounding Zone Wedges (GZWs), which give the trough a stair profile (Rebesco et al., 2011). GZWs are formed by deposition of subglacial till at temporarily stable ice-stream fronts in between successive episodic retreats (Rüther et al., 2012; Bjarnadóttir et al., 2012). Sub-bottom data show that present-day morphology is largely inherited from palaeo-seafloor topography of GZWs, which is draped by a deglacial to early Holocene glaciomarine sediments (about 15 m thick). The ice stream that produced such subglacial morphology was flowing from East to West inside Kveithola Trough during Last Glacial Maximum. Its rapid retreat was likely associated with progressive lift-offs, and successive rapid melting of the grounded ice, induced by the eustatic sea-level rise (Lucchi et al., 2013). References: Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Rüther, D.C., Winsborrow, M.C.M., Andreassen, K., 2012. Grounding-line dynamics during the last deglaciation of Kveithola, W Barents Sea, as revealed by seabed geomorphology and shallow seismic stratigraphy. Boreas, 42, 84-107. Lucchi R.G., et al. 2013. Postglacial sedimentary processes on the Storfjorden and Kveithola TMFs: impact of extreme glacimarine sedimentation. Global and Planetary Change, 111, 309-326. Rebesco, M., et al. 2011. Deglaciation of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet - a swath bathymetric and subbottom seismic study from the Kveitehola Trough. Marine Geology, 279, 141-14. Rüther, D.C., Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Junttila, J., Husum, K., Rasmussen, T.L., Lucchi, R.G., Andreassen, K., 2012. Pattern and timing of the north-western Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and indications of episodic Holocene deposition. Boreas 41, 494-512.

  19. DENSITY VARIATIONS IN THE NW STAR STREAM OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, R. G.; Richer, Harvey B.; McConnachie, Alan W. E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca

    2011-04-20

    The Pan Andromeda Archeological Survey (PAndAS) CFHT Megaprime survey of the M31-M33 system has found a star stream which extends about 120 kpc NW from the center of M31. The great length of the stream, and the likelihood that it does not significantly intersect the disk of M31, means that it is unusually well suited for a measurement of stream gaps and clumps along its length as a test for the predicted thousands of dark matter sub-halos. The main result of this paper is that the density of the stream varies between zero and about three times the mean along its length on scales of 2-20 kpc. The probability that the variations are random fluctuations in the star density is less than 10{sup -5}. As a control sample, we search for density variations at precisely the same location in stars with metallicity higher than the stream [Fe/H] = [0, -0.5] and find no variations above the expected shot noise. The lumpiness of the stream is not compatible with a low mass star stream in a smooth galactic potential, nor is it readily compatible with the disturbance caused by the visible M31 satellite galaxies. The stream's density variations appear to be consistent with the effects of a large population of steep mass function dark matter sub-halos, such as found in LCDM simulations, acting on an approximately 10 Gyr old star stream. The effects of a single set of halo substructure realizations are shown for illustration, reserving a statistical comparison for another study.

  20. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes, 36,000 miles of streams, and…

  1. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  2. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  3. Reevaluation of lake trout and lake whitefish bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Kao, Yu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Using a corrected algorithm for balancing the energy budget, we reevaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the laboratory and for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in the laboratory and in the field. For lake trout, results showed that the bioenergetics model slightly overestimated food consumption by the lake trout when they were fed low and intermediate rations, whereas the model predicted food consumption by lake trout fed ad libitum without any detectable bias. The slight bias in model predictions for lake trout on restricted rations may have been an artifact of the feeding schedule for these fish, and we would therefore recommend application of the Wisconsin lake trout bioenergetics model to lake trout populations in the field without any revisions to the model. Use of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for coregonids resulted in overestimation of food consumption by lake whitefish both in the laboratory and in the field by between 20 and 30%, on average. This overestimation of food consumption was most likely due to overestimation of respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit to the observed consumption in our laboratory tanks. The adjusted model predicted the consumption in the laboratory and the field without any detectable bias. Until a detailed lake whitefish respiration study can be conducted, we recommend application of our adjusted version of the Wisconsin generalized coregonid bioenergetics model to lake whitefish populations in the field.

  4. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  5. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  6. Testing a numerical model for thermokarst lake expansion using morphologic measurements, N. Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plug, L. J.; Walter, K.; Grosse, G.; Anthony, P.; Smith, M.

    2008-12-01

    The initiation and growth of thermokarst lakes are major factors in the dynamics of ice-rich permafrost lowlands in N. America and Siberia. These landscapes may be a globally-significant influence to past and present climates, because they store Pleistocene and Holocene C and may release it as CH4 to the atmosphere over relatively rapid time-scales. A numerical model that combines thermal processes (heat flow in lake water and permafrost) and geomorphic processes (thaw subsidence and mass movement) is a new and promising tool to investigate the influence of substrate, ground ice content, and climate on the expansion of thermokarst lakes. Models also might be used to predict dynamics of lakes and related biogeochemical processes in coming decades, given anticipated continued warming in high latitude regions. The geomorphic processes that shape natural thaw lake margins include a complicated range of diffusive and advective processes spanning simple creep to more complicated mechanisms including ice wedge melting, thaw slumping, peat-block toppling, turbidity flows, and possibly animal disturbance. The model treats the combined and time-averaged effect of these processes using new and relatively simple algorithms for slope failure and transport distance, which together produce both diffusive and advective behavior. Initial comparisons of the model with measured lake bluffs and bathymetry indicated a good match, but more measurements are needed to fully test and calibrate the model. We measured the bluff morphology and bathymetry of selected lakes of various sizes and age in the Kitluk River, Seward Peninsula, NW Alaska using sonar and DGPS. The region is characterized by continuous permafrost, a highly dissected and dynamic thermokarst landscape, uplands of Late Pleistocene permafrost deposits with high excess ice contents, and a large total volume of permafrost-stored carbon. We drive the model using approximate ground ice conditions for each lake, and compare

  7. Use of Geoenvironmental Impact of Climate Change in Management and Assessment Lake Nasser, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed El Gammal, El

    2010-05-01

    This study monitor how to management the water stored after High Dam in the biggest artificial global lake (Lake Nasser), Integration of physical features and water level changes within the lake curse and margins. Statistical data presented, interpreted and correlated with using remote sensing technique in change detection. Different Landsat images acquired at different times (1970, 1982, 1987, 2000, 2003 and 2008) have been used by the ERDAS and ARC-GIS techniques to estimate the movements of lake borders and water fluctuation proportional to water sizes in place. Regards to water fluctuation degree, the lake can be divide into 4 classes in lake's sectors: 1, show maximum change degree, 2 show medium change degree, 3 slight to neglected change degree, and 4, no change. Functions control the water fluctuation in Lake Nasser are; (i) the granite and Nubia sandstone outcrops, (ii) NW, E-W and NE structure in order, (iii) low topography. Water level change detection on Landsat images in different dates elucidates big variation between different lake sectors, there are strangle points and other useful localities that yields environmental implication. The strangle points detected in the curse of River Nile and after 40 years since lake initiation, the water are more strangled in this curse because of the water velocity before the High Dam was high speed can pass toward the north in Nile annual flood but after the dam, the water velocity decreased. Due to decrease of velocity, the water go to narrow incised wadis (Khors) in the Nile high flood plus the sands drift, these khors are bounded by hard Nubia sandstone already saturated by water and it consider the main underground water reservoir in Egypt. In addition, the entrance of the lake in Halfa inside Sudan is subjected to suspended sediments (mud) forming new delta plus the sands drift that impair the reservoir in Egypt. Wadi Allaqui have 250 km length and 2 km average width, it's is the 5th order channel inside a

  8. Fish Lake, Utah - a promising long core site straddling the Great Basin to Colorado Plateau transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, D. W.; Abbott, M. B.; Bailey, C.; Wenrich, E.; Stoner, J. S.; Larsen, D. J.; Finkenbinder, M. S.; Anderson, L.; Brunelle, A.; Carter, V.; Power, M. J.; Hatfield, R. G.; Reilly, B.; Harris, M. S.; Grimm, E. C.; Donovan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fish Lake (~7x1.5 km and 2696 m asl) is located on the Fish Lake Plateau in central Utah. The Lake occupies a NE-striking tectonic graben; one of a suite of grabens on the Plateau that cut 21-26 Ma volcanic rocks. The lake outflows via Lake Creek to the NE where it joins Sevenmile Creek to become the Fremont River, a tributary to the Colorado River. A bathymetric survey reveals a mean depth of 27 m and a max depth of 37.2 m. The lake bottom slopes from NW to SE with the deepest part near the SE wall, matching the topographic expression of the graben. Nearby Fish Lake Hightop (3545 m) was glaciated with an ice field and outlet glaciers. Exposure ages indicate moraine deposition during Pinedale (15-23 ka) and Bull Lake (130-150 ka) times. One outlet glacier at Pelican Canyon deposited moraines and outwash into the lake but the main basin of the lake was never glaciated. Gravity measurements indicate that lake sediments thicken toward the SE side of the lake and the thickest sediment package is modeled to be between 210 and 240 m. In Feb 2014 we collected cores from Fish Lake using a 9-cm diameter UWITECH coring system in 30.5 m of water. A composite 11.2-m-long core was constructed from overlapping 2 m drives that were taken in triplicate to ensure total recovery and good preservation. Twelve 14C ages and 3 tephra layers of known age define the age model. The oldest 14C age of 32.3±4.2 cal ka BP was taken from 10.6 m. Core lithology, CT scans, and magnetic susceptibility (ms) reveal three sediment packages: an organic-rich, low ms Holocene to post-glacial section, a fine-grained, minerogenic glacial section with high ms, and a short section of inferred pre-LGM sediment with intermediate composition. Extrapolating the age model to the maximum estimated sediment thicknesses suggest sediments may be older than 500-700 ka. Thus Fish Lake is an ideal candidate for long core retrieval as it likely contains paleoclimatic records extending over multiple glacial cycles.

  9. A multidisciplinary geomatics approach to morphometric and morphotectonic analysis of the Cannobino Basin (Piemonte Region, NW-Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacenetti, Marco; Ghiraldi, Luca; Giardino, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the morphometric and morphotectonic characterization of the Cannobino Basin (Piemonte Region, NW-Italy). The basin is drained by the Cannobino river; in its first 8 km, it flows SE to NW along a wide valley characterized by glacial landforms; thereafter it suddenly turns South assuming a W to E direction, by flowing in a deeply entrenched valley to the intermontane basin of the Maggiore Lake. This area belongs to the Lepontine Alps, which from the geological point of view belong to the Southern Alps. His Hercynian basement is divided in two units: Ivrea-Verbano Zone (IVZ) and Serie dei Laghi (SDL). The IVZ outcrops in the northern sector of the basin, while the SDL outcrops in the southern and central sector. They separated by the Cossato-Mergozzo-Brissago (CMB) and Pogallo lines (PL). These major discontinuities and the neoctonic activity of their shear zones possibly control Quaternary evolution of the alpine relief. Detailed studies of the area are needed for understanding possible interactions of neotectonic activity, fluvial/glacial erosional/depositional processes and slope dynamics. Our focus is on drainage basin characteristics and its evolutionary stages in response to local and regional base level changes and to differential rock uplift. GIS methodologies combined with DEMs analyses are among the most common geomatics approaches to geomorphology. Based on this framework, an evaluation of the geomorphometric characteristic of the Cannobino Basin has been carried out by using an aerial LIDAR DEM (5x5 meters, Regione Piemonte, 2009). The workflow followed for calculating the geomorphic indexes can be summarized in different steps: i) drainage network extraction and hierarchization; ii) lineament features digitalization and interpretation; iii) azimuthal distribution of drainage pattern; iv) DEM analysis and evaluation of linear, areal indexes and SWAT profile. The multidisciplinary and innovative

  10. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  11. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  12. Institutional aspects of lake management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Stephen M.; Rumery, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The major barriers to successful lake management are institutional. However, in contrast to the technical and limnological dimensions of lake management, the institutional aspects of managing lakes have received little attention. The institutional factors that are important for successful lake management outcomes are: overlapping areal jurisdiction among governmental units, fragmented functional program responsibilities, ineffective coordination, limited authority, financial constraints, private sector roles, and inadequate public awareness and consensus. The range of typical institutional problems confronting lake management are well illustrated through experiences from the state of Wisconsin, USA. Because lake management programs with institutional shortcomings rarely realize their goals, it is critical to assimilate, evaluate, and apply our experience to date with the institutional arrangements necessary to effectively manage lake resources.

  13. CONTOURITES IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contour currents influence sedimentation in an area 15 km wide and 65 km long at the base of the slope off the Keweenaw Peninsula in Lake Superior, northwestern Michigan. Seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz) from this area show distinct wavy reflectors in a scoured trough at a d...

  14. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the ... should be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. The canyons and peaks of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains are ...

  15. Quebec: Lake Manicouagan

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... and other erosional processes have reduced the extent of the crater, with the original diameter estimated at about 100 kilometers. This ... metamorphic effects are abundant in the target rocks of the crater floor. Today Lake Manicouagan serves as a reservoir and is one of ...

  16. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  17. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  18. Echoes of Bark Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duenkel, Nicky; Hemstreet, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Two former staff members reflect on their feelings about the August 1995 closing of Bark Lake Leadership Centre (Ontario, Canada), which for 49 years had offered outdoor adventure and environmental education courses to youth and adults. They discuss their experiences as both students and teachers at the center, which helped shape their careers in…

  19. Upwellings in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaraev, M. N.; Troitskaya, E. S.; Blinov, V. V.; Ivanov, V. G.; Gnatovskii, R. Yu.

    2012-02-01

    Based on shipboard and satellite observations, the characteristics of upwelling in Lake Baikal in the period of direct temperature stratification have been determined for the first time. Coastal upwellings appear annually under the effect of run-down and alongshore winds and are traced along the coast to a distance of up to 60-100 km and up to 250 km in North Baikal. Analogous to the way it occurs in seas, water rises from the depths of 100-200 m (350 m as a maximum) at the velocity of 0.1 × 10-2-6.5 × 10-2 cm/s. Divergence in the field of intràbasin cyclonic macrovortices produces upwelling in the Baikal pelagic zone and downwelling in the vicinity of shores; this lasts from 7 to 88 days and covers the depth interval of 80-300 m in August and up to 400-800 m in early-mid November. The area of upwellings occupies up to 20-60% of the separate basins of the lake. Vertical circulation of water in the field of pelagic upwellings leads to intensification of coastal currents and to formation of the thermobar with a heat inert zone in the central part of the lake in November, and this thermobar is not observed in other lakes, at that.

  20. LAKE TAHOE VISIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Visibility monitoring and airborne particulate sampling in the Lake Tahoe Basin were used to document visual air quality levels and to assess the relative impacts of major contributing emission source categories. Visibility data were obtained by long path contrast and particle sc...

  1. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  2. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  3. SAR measurements of coastal features in the NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Martinez Benjamin, Juan Jose; Diez, Margarita; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar

    2013-04-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a useful tool to study both marine water dynamics and its pollution, this is relevant near the coastline, where river pollution may be also important. Oil spills and natural slicks are detected with SAR [1-3] to reveal river and vessel pollution as well as the complex eddy and current interaction in the ocean surface near the coastline. In the framework of the ESA and European Union contracts, more than 1000 SAR images of the North-west Mediterranean Sea area taken between December 1996 and December 2008 are presented using self-similar traces that may be used to parametrize mixing at both limits of the Rossby Deformation Radius scale. Results show the ability to identify different SAR signatures and at the same time provide calibrations for the different local configurations of vortices, spirals, oil spills and tensioactive slicks that eventually allow predicting the behaviour of different tracers and pollutants in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Thanks to different polarization and intensity levels in satellite imagery can be used to distinguish between natural and man-made sea surface features due to their distinct self-similar as a function of spill parameters, environmental conditions and history of both oil release and weather conditions. (Environmental factors determine [4] spreading, drift and weathering of oil on the sea surface - see: Behaviour oil at sea). Detecting the low contrast patches depends also on the speckle noise which always presents in the image. Application of different filters (available for example in several image processing software (Matlab, Envi, IDL) to the radar data decreases noise level and improves the feature detecting in the image [1] Bezerra, M.O., Diez, M., Medeiros, C., Rodriguez, A., Bahia, E., Sanchez-Arcilla, A. and Redondo, J.M. 1998. Study on the influence of waves on coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied Scientific Research 59, pp.191-204. [2] Carrillo, A., A., Sanchez,, M

  4. Submarine Explosive Eruptions: Physical Volcanology of NW Rota-1, Marianas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deardorff, N. D.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; Cashman, K. V.

    2006-12-01

    The discovery of an actively erupting submarine arc volcano is a scientific breakthrough that greatly extends our understanding of submarine volcanism. NW Rota-1, located at 14¢X40'N in the Mariana volcanic arc, is a conical basaltic andesite volcano with a summit at 517 m b.s.l, a base at 2700 m, and a diameter of 16- km. In April 2006, on the most recent cruise of the "Submarine Ring of Fire" (SROF) expeditions, violently explosive submarine eruptions were observed and sampled at the active vent, Brimstone Pit (550 m depth), through the use of JASON II remotely operated vehicle (ROV). During six dives repeated observations made at close range over a week documented a diverse and increasingly energetic range of activity that culminated in explosive bursts of glowing red lava propelled by violently expanding gases. Preliminary work shows erupted clasts to vary greatly in density (vesicularity) and crystallinity. Densities of representative larger clasts are moderately high (1700-1900 kg/m3, or ~ 30-40% vesicularity assuming a solid density of 2800 kg/m3; Fig 5b), although the more vigorous activity clearly produced some lower density (< 1000 kg/m3;> 66% vesicularity) material. Grain sizes were measured in 1.0 intervals from -5 to 3 using dry sieving techniques. The grain size distribution is approximately log normal with a mode at -1 (2 mm). Clast morphology consists of three components: (1) very glassy juveniles ranging from light to dark brown (sideromelane), often fluidal and irregularly shaped with obvious vesicle stretching, (2) phenocryst-rich blocky juveniles ranging from dark brown to black (tachylite), (3) non-juvenile lithics are equant, often rounded, ranging from light grey to dark grey and are often coated with altered material. Initial FTIR analyses show a lack of CO2 and a range of H20 from 0.3-1.15wt%, with the average approximately in equilibrium for 550 m water depth. The high vesicularity of the samples collected directly from Brimstone Pit and

  5. An Operational Coastal Forecasting System in Galicia (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balseiro, C. F.; Carracedo, P.; Pérez, E.; Pérez, V.; Taboada, J.; Venacio, A.; Vilasa, L.

    2009-09-01

    The Galician coast (NW Iberian Peninsula coast) and mainly the Rias Baixas (southern Galician rias) are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, supporting a very active fishing and aquiculture industry. This high productivity lives together with a high human pressure and an intense maritime traffic, which means an important environmental risk. Besides that, Harmful Algae Blooms (HAB) are common in this area, producing important economical losses in aquiculture. In this context, the development of an Operational Hydrodynamic Ocean Forecast System is the first step to the development of a more sophisticated Ocean Integrated Decision Support Tool. A regional oceanographic forecasting system in the Galician Coast has been developed by MeteoGalicia (the Galician regional meteorological agency) inside ESEOO project to provide forecasts on currents, sea level, water temperature and salinity. This system is based on hydrodynamic model MOHID, forced with the operational meteorological model WRF, supported daily at MeteoGalicia . Two grid meshes are running nested at different scales, one of ~2km at the shelf scale and the other one with a resolution of 500 m at the rias scale. ESEOAT (Puertos del Estado) model provide salinity and temperature fields which are relaxed at all depth along the open boundary of the regional model (~6km). Temperature and salinity initial fields are also obtained from this application. Freshwater input from main rivers are included as forcing in MOHID model. Monthly mean discharge data from gauge station have been provided by Aguas de Galicia. Nowadays a coupling between an hydrological model (SWAT) and the hydrodynamic one are in development with the aim to verify the impact of the rivers discharges. The system runs operationally daily, providing two days of forecast. First model verifications had been performed against Puertos del Estado buoys and Xunta de Galicia buoys network along the Galician coast. High resolution model results

  6. Lake level variability in Silver Lake, Michigan: a response to fluctuations in lake levels of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    Sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan, can be used to constrain the timing and elevation of Lake Michigan during the Nipissing transgression. Silver Lake is separated from Lake Michigan by a barrier/dune complex and the Nipissing, Calumet, and Glenwood shorelines of Lake Michigan are expressed landward of this barrier. Two Vibracores were taken from the lake in February 2000 and contain pebbly sand, sand, buried soils, marl, peat, and sandy muck. It is suggested here that fluctuations in the level of Lake Michigan are reflected in Silver Lake since the Chippewa low phase, and possibly at the end of the Algonquin phase. An age of 12,490 B.P. (10,460±50 14C yrs B.P.) on wood from a buried Entisol may record the falling Algonquin phase as the North Bay outlet opened. A local perched water table is indicated by marl deposited before 7,800 B.P. and peat between 7,760-7,000 B.P. when Lake Michigan was at the low elevation Chippewa phase. Continued deepening of the lake is recorded by the transition from peat to sandy muck at 7,000 B.P. in the deeper core, and with the drowning of an Inceptisol nearly 3 m higher at 6,410 B.P. in the shallower core. A rising groundwater table responding to a rising Lake Michigan base level during the Nipissing transgression, rather than a response to mid-Holocene climate change, explains deepening of Silver Lake. Sandy muck was deposited continually in Silver Lake between Nipissing and modern time. Sand lenses within the muck are presumed to be eolian in origin, derived from sand dunes advancing into the lake on the western side of the basin.

  7. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  8. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes

    PubMed Central

    Paul Antony, Chakkiath; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  9. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  10. Subsurface structural mapping of Northern Nasser Lake region, Aswan, Egypt, using Bouguer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Salah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempt to delineate the subsurface structures for the tectonic active region of Northern Nasser Lake using integrated interpretation techniques of gravity data with seismicity. The depths to the gravity sources, and the locations of the contacts of density contrast were estimated. Two methods were used for estimating source depths and contact locations: horizontal gradient (HG) and Euler deconvolution methods. Moreover, power spectral analysis, bandpass and upward continuation techniques were applied to evaluate the shallow and deep seated structures. Shallow depth structures were ranging between 0.30 km and 0.80 km. However, two average levels (interfaces) at depth 3.1 km and 7.2 km below the measuring level were revealed for the intermediate and deep seated structures respectively. Results of Euler deconvolution method suggested that, in the eastern part of the area, the basement could be observed on the ground and has become deeper in the central part. The interpreted structural map reveals that the area is affected by a set of faults trending mainly in the NW, E-W, N-S and NE-SW directions. Actually, this map has confirmed the idea that the intersections between the N-S and E-W striking faults along Nasser Lake area have generated seismic pulses. Moreover, three seismic zones (Z1, Z2 and Z3) are well correlated with the fault trends of the subsurface structures as derived from the horizontal gradient map. The present results suggest that there exist seismically-active fault east of High Dam, passing throughout Aswan reservoir from north to south. This fault is occupying region of high stress values which may generate large earthquakes in future, as it has long extension over several kilometers. Furthermore, the evaluated intruded volcanic bodies are found almost at the intersections between the E-W and NW oriented faults. Finally, the area is dissected by basement uplifts and troughs controlled mainly by the NW-SE faults.

  11. The 2000/60/EC Water Framework Directive and the Flooding of the Brown Coal Meirama Open Pit (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J.; Juncosa, R.

    2009-04-01

    Coal mining in Galicia (NW Spain) has been an important activity which came to an end in December, 2007. Hence, for different reasons, the two large brown coal mines in Galicia (the As Pontes mine, run by ENDESA GENERACIÓN, and the Meirama mine, owned by Lignitos de Meirama, S.A., LIMEISA), have started closure procedures, both of which are considering the flooding of the mine pits to create two large lakes (~8 km2 in As Pontes and ~2 km2 in Meirama). They will be unique in Galicia, a nearly lake-free territory. An important point to consider as regards the flooding of the lignite mine pits in Galicia is how the process of the creation of a body of artificial water will adapt to the strict legal demands put forth in the Water Framework Directive. This problem has been carefully examined by different authors in other countries and it raises the question of the need to adapt sampling surveys to monitor a number of key parameters -priority substances, physical and chemical parameters, biological indicators, etc.- that cannot be overlooked. Flooding, in both cases consider the preferential entrance into the mine holes of river-diverted surface waters, in detriment of ground waters in order to minimize acidic inputs. Although both mines are located in the same hydraulic demarcation (i.e. administrative units that, in Spain, are in charge of the public administration and the enforcement of natural water-related laws) the problems facing the corresponding mine managers are different. In the case of Meirama, the mine hole covers the upper third part of the Barcés river catchment, which is a major source of water for the Cecebre reservoir. That reservoir constitutes the only supply of drinking water for the city of A Coruña (~250.000 inhabitants) and its surrounding towns. In this contribution we will discuss how mine managers and the administration have addressed the uncertainties derived from the implementation of the Water Framework Directive in the particular case of

  12. Potential strategies for recovery of lake whitefish and lake herring stocks in eastern Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldenburg, K.; Stapanian, M.A.; Ryan, P.A.; Holm, E.

    2007-01-01

    Lake Erie sustained large populations of ciscoes (Salmonidae: Coregoninae) 120 years ago. By the end of the 19th century, abundance of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) had declined drastically. By 1925, the lake herring (a cisco) population (Coregonus artedii) had collapsed, although a limited lake herring fishery persisted in the eastern basin until the 1950s. In the latter part of the 20th century, the composition of the fish community changed as oligotrophication proceeded. Since 1984, a limited recovery of lake whitefish has occurred, however no recovery was evident for lake herring. Current ecological conditions in Lake Erie probably will not inhibit recovery of the coregonine species. Recovery of walleye (Sander vitreus) and efforts to rehabilitate the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Erie will probably assist recovery because these piscivores reduce populations of alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which inhibit reproductive success of coregonines. Although there are considerable spawning substrates available to coregonine species in eastern Lake Erie, eggs and fry would probably be displaced by storm surge from most shoals. Site selection for stocking or seeding of eggs should consider the reproductive life cycle of the stocked fish and suitable protection from storm events. Two potential sites in the eastern basin have been identified. Recommended management procedures, including commercial fisheries, are suggested to assist in recovery. Stocking in the eastern basin of Lake Erie is recommended for both species, as conditions are adequate and the native spawning population in the eastern basin is low. For lake herring, consideration should be given to match ecophenotypes as much as possible. Egg seeding is recommended. Egg seeding of lake whitefish should be considered initially, with fingerling or yearling stocking suggested if unsuccessful. Spawning stocks of whitefish in the western basin of Lake

  13. Late Miocene Rise of C4 Vegetation in NW Africa from Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C. A.; deMenocal, P. B.; Polissar, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    When and why did NW Africa become dry? The answers to these important questions have proven elusive. Strong climate controls on African vegetation today make knowledge of past changes a valuable proxy for understanding NW Africa's climate evolution. Various lines of geologic and paleobotanical evidence indicate that NW African landscapes changed from more humid conditions in the late Oligocene/early Miocene to arid/hyper-arid environments by the late Pliocene. As proxies for the paleohydrological and paleovegetation signatures of this event, we analyzed leaf wax n-alkane stable isotopes (δDwax and δ13Cwax) at Ocean Drilling Program Site 659 (20°N), offshore West Africa, from 0 - 25 Ma. Between 25 to 10 Ma, n-alkane δ13Cwax values were persistently very low (-31‰) suggesting that C3 vegetation dominated NW African landscapes over this interval. Between 10-7 Ma there is a marked, positive secular δ13Cwax shift (in excess of 4‰) suggesting the initial growth and establishment of C4 Sahel grasslands. δ13Cwax shows a sustained positive trend (>7‰ total) until 1 Ma. The 10-7 Ma date for the establishment of NW African C4 grasslands is earlier than comparable records from South Africa and South Asia. We will also present low-resolution isotope data from equatorial ODP Site 959 (3°N) and compare these data with Site 659 (20°N) to reconstruct the development of the modern vegetation and hydrological gradients in NW Africa over this time span.

  14. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake volume aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate lake volume (i.e. bathymetry) are usually only collected on a lake by lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. ...

  15. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  16. Lake Erie...Take a Bow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Maureen; Dunlevy, Margie

    This elementary school teaching unit was developed as a part of a series of teaching units that deal with Lake Erie. This unit was developed to enable children to: (1) identify the Great Lakes and pick out Lake Erie on a map; (2) demonstrate knowledge of Lake Erie's origin and geography; (3) list some uses of Lake Erie; and (4) give examples of…

  17. Fecundity of hatchery lake trout in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, John D.; O'Gorman, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Fecundity (egg number) was determined from 26 stocked (617-800 mm, total length) lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) collected in western Lake Ontario during September 1992. Previous to this study, fecundity was evaluated only once in Lake Ontario using native stocks in 1927. The following relationships between fecundity and total length (TL) and weight (W) were obtained. Fecundity = -12,492 + 25.87 TL(mm) and Fecundity = -1,010 + 1,307 W(kg). Relative fecundity (number of eggs per kg of body weight) was unrelated to body weight and averaged 1,592 eggs kg-1. Fecundity of contemporary lake trout based on length was significantly lower than that of historic native stocks, but was similar to contemporary stocked lake trout in Lake Superior.

  18. Lake Garda, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 29, 2000 and covers an area of 30 by 57 km in northern Italy. Lake Garda was formed by glaciers during the last Ice Age, and is Italy's largest lake. Lago di Garda lies in the provinces of Verona, Brescia, and Trento, and is 51 kilometers (32 miles) long and from 3 to 18 kilometers (2 to 11 miles) wide. The Sarca is its chief affluent, and the lake is drained southward by the Mincio, which discharges into the Po River. Many villas are situated on its shores. On the peninsula of Sirmione, at the southern end of the lake, are the ruins of a Roman villa and a castle of the Scaligers, an Italian family of the 16th century. The RIGHT image has the land area masked out, and a harsh stretch was applied to the lake values to display variations in sediment load. Also visible are hundreds of boats and their wakes, criss-crossing the lake.

    The image is centered at 45.6 degrees north latitude, 10.6 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for

  19. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  20. Genetic diversity of Diporeia in the Great Lakes: comparison of Lake Superior to the other Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abundances of Diporeia have dropped drastically in the Great Lakes, except in Lake Superior, where data suggest that population counts actually have risen. Various ecological, environmental, or geographic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the greater abundance of Lake Supe...

  1. Aeolian sand preserved in Silver Lake: a new signal of Holocene high stands of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2005-01-01

    Aeolian sand within lake sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan can be used as a proxy for the timing of high lake levels of Lake Michigan.We demonstrate that the sand record from Silver Lake plotted as percent weight is in-phase with the elevation curve of Lake Michigan since the mid-Holocene Nipissing Phase. Because fluctuations in Lake Michigan's lake level are recorded in beach ridges, and are a response to climate change, the aeolian sand record within Silver Lake is also a proxy for climate change. It appears that increases in dune activity and lake sand are controlled by similar climatic shifts that drive fluctuations in lake level of Lake Michigan. High lake levels destabilize coastal bluffs that drive dune sand instability, and along with greater wintertime storminess, increase niveo-aeolian transport of sand across lake ice. The sand is introduced into the lake each spring as the ice cover melts.

  2. Life history of lake herring in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Beil, Joseph

    1964-01-01

    The average annual commercial catch of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) in U.S. waters of Lake Superior was nearly 12 million pounds in 1929-61. This production contributed 62.4 percent of the total U.S. take of lake herring for the Great Lakes. About 90 percent of the annual catch is taken from small-mesh gill nets during the November-December spawning season. The life-history studies were based on 12,187 fish collected in 1950-62; past growth was computed for 3,779 specimens collected from commercial landings at: Duluth, Minn.; Bayfield, Wis.; and Portage Entry and Marquette, Mich.

  3. Morphotectonic analysis of the Kaftar lake basin in the High Zagros Mountain Belt, (Fars province, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhoudi, Gh.; Samiee Ardabili, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Kaftar lake basin is located in the High Zagros Mountain Belt in the southwest of Namdan plain in the northern part of Fars province (Iran). The studied area surrounded by Gandboi ridge with E-W trend in the north and NW-SE trended Bareaftab anticline in the south. The main faults in the studied area are Moosakhani and Korchool (Kaftar) thrust faults, which are recorded in the Iran aeromagnetic map with T-12 and T-46, respectively. These faults are on the south eastern edge of the Zagros thrust system. With this study, in which we have used automatic lineament extraction algorithm from multi sources, high resolution morphometric data, analysis of morphotectonic elements based on high spatial resolution satellite imagery and digital elevation model, and field study. We have tried to detect the tectonic activities and understand the origin and evolution of the Kaftar lake basin. Based on analysis of existing data and results of this study, Gandboi ridge is a syncline with complex topography uplifted and rotated by Korchool fault. Bareaftab anticline, which is located in the hanging wall of Moosakhani fault, is a fault propagation fold and has also been formed by this fault. Based on the bed rock map of Namdan plain,The Kaftar lake has been produced in a depression within folds caused by Korchool fault. The high tectonic and karstic activities as well as the fact that the lake is not salty, indicatig a drain of the lake, proved that the Kaftar lake is a part of a polje of the karst system of Namdan plain.

  4. Hydrology of Lake County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular Florida. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Not so Great Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In 1965, Frank Sinatra won the Grammy Award for his album, "September of My Years;" "Early Bird," the first commercial communications satellite, was launched; and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Selma, Alabama, during demonstrations against voter-registration rules.The year 1965 was also the last time water levels in the U.S. Great Lakes were as low as they are now.

  6. Not so Great Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In 1965, Frank Sinatra won the Grammy Award for his album, “September of My Years” “Early Bird,” the first commercial communications satellite, was launched; and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Selma, Alabama, during demonstrations against voter-registration rules.The year 1965 was also the last time water levels in the U.S. Great Lakes were as low as they are now.

  7. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (∼51 000 pyrosequencing reads; V1 and V2 regions) and Sanger sequencing of 200 near-full-length polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clones. Automated classifiers (Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and Greengenes) were problematic for the 454-FLX reads (wrong domain or phylum), although BLAST analysis of the 454-FLX reads against the phylogenetically placed full-length Sanger sequenced PCR clones proved reliable. Most of the archaeal diversity was associated with vents, and as expected there were differences between the vents and the near-surface photic zone samples. Thaumarchaeota dominated all samples: vent-associated organisms corresponded to the largely uncharacterized Marine Group I, and in surface waters, ∼69–84% of the 454-FLX reads matched archaeal clones representing organisms that are Nitrosopumilus maritimus-like (96–97% identity). Importance of the lake nitrogen cycling was also suggested by >5% of the alkaline vent phylotypes being closely related to the nitrifier Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. The Euryarchaeota were primarily related to the uncharacterized environmental clones that make up the Deep Sea Euryarchaeal Group or Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group-6. The phylogenetic parallels of Yellowstone Lake archaea to marine microorganisms provide opportunities to examine interesting evolutionary tracks between freshwater and marine lineages. PMID:21544103

  8. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  9. Angora Fire, Lake Tahoe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On the weekend of June 23, 2007, a wildfire broke out south of Lake Tahoe, which stretches across the California-Nevada border. By June 28, the Angora Fire had burned more than 200 homes and forced some 2,000 residents to evacuate, according to The Seattle Times and the Central Valley Business Times. On June 27, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the burn scar left by the Angora fire. The burn scar is dark gray, or charcoal. Water bodies, including the southern tip of Lake Tahoe and Fallen Leaf Lake, are pale silvery blue, the silver color a result of sunlight reflecting off the surface of the water. Vegetation ranges in color from dark to bright green. Streets are light gray, and the customary pattern of meandering residential streets and cul-de-sacs appears throughout the image, including the area that burned. The burn scar shows where the fire obliterated some of the residential areas just east of Fallen Leaf Lake. According to news reports, the U.S. Forest Service had expressed optimism about containing the fire within a week of the outbreak, but a few days after the fire started, it jumped a defense, forcing the evacuation of hundreds more residents. Strong winds that had been forecast for June 27, however, did not materialize, allowing firefighters to regain ground in controlling the blaze. On June 27, authorities hoped that the fire would be completely contained by July 3. According to estimates provided in the daily report from the National Interagency Fire Center, the fire had burned 3,100 acres (about 12.5 square kilometers) and was about 55 percent contained as of June 28. Some mandatory evacuations remained in effect. NASA image by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  10. Method for lake restoration

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Gaynor W.; Mercer, Basil W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for removing pollutants or minerals from lake, river or ocean sediments or from mine tailings is disclosed. Magnetically attractable collection units containing an ion exchange or sorbent media with an affinity for a chosen target substance are distributed in the sediments or tailings. After a period of time has passed sufficient for the particles to bind up the target substances, a magnet drawn through the sediments or across the tailings retrieves the units along with the target substance.

  11. 27 CFR 9.184 - Trinity Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Provisional Edition 1982. (c) Boundary. The Trinity Lakes viticultural area is located in Trinity County in northern California. The boundary encompasses Trinity Lake and Lewiston Lake, both within the Trinity...

  12. 27 CFR 9.184 - Trinity Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Provisional Edition 1982. (c) Boundary. The Trinity Lakes viticultural area is located in Trinity County in northern California. The boundary encompasses Trinity Lake and Lewiston Lake, both within the Trinity...

  13. 27 CFR 9.184 - Trinity Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Provisional Edition 1982. (c) Boundary. The Trinity Lakes viticultural area is located in Trinity County in northern California. The boundary encompasses Trinity Lake and Lewiston Lake, both within the Trinity...

  14. 27 CFR 9.184 - Trinity Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Provisional Edition 1982. (c) Boundary. The Trinity Lakes viticultural area is located in Trinity County in northern California. The boundary encompasses Trinity Lake and Lewiston Lake, both within the Trinity...

  15. 27 CFR 9.184 - Trinity Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Provisional Edition 1982. (c) Boundary. The Trinity Lakes viticultural area is located in Trinity County in northern California. The boundary encompasses Trinity Lake and Lewiston Lake, both within the Trinity...

  16. Landsat analysis of lake quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Fisher, L. T.; Holmquist, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The trophic status of a number of inland lakes in Wisconsin has been assessed. The feasibility of using both photographic and digital representations of Landsat imagery was investigated during the lake classification project. The result of the investigation has been a semi-automatic data acquisition and handling system which, in conjunction with an analytical categorization scheme, can be used to classify all the significant lakes in the state.

  17. Flexible transparent conducting composite films using a monolithically embedded AgNW electrode with robust performance stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Jin, Jungho; Ko, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Jung-Yong; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2013-12-01

    We report on the performance of an all-in-one flexible hybrid conducting film employing a monolithically embedded AgNW transparent electrode and a high-performance glass-fabric reinforced composite substrate (AgNW-GFRHybrimer film). Specifically, we perform in-depth investigations on the stability of the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film against heat, thermal oxidation, and wet chemicals to demonstrate the potential of the hybrid conducting film as a robust electrode platform for thin-film optoelectronic devices. With the ease of large-area processability, smooth surface topography, and robust performance stability, the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film can be a promising platform for high-performance optoelectronic devices.We report on the performance of an all-in-one flexible hybrid conducting film employing a monolithically embedded AgNW transparent electrode and a high-performance glass-fabric reinforced composite substrate (AgNW-GFRHybrimer film). Specifically, we perform in-depth investigations on the stability of the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film against heat, thermal oxidation, and wet chemicals to demonstrate the potential of the hybrid conducting film as a robust electrode platform for thin-film optoelectronic devices. With the ease of large-area processability, smooth surface topography, and robust performance stability, the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film can be a promising platform for high-performance optoelectronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further characteristics of AgNW-GFRHybrimer films and thermal oxidation of AgNW on glass. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05348b

  18. Photochemical production of organic matter triplet states in water samples from mountain lakes, located below or above the tree line.

    PubMed

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Brigante, Marcello; Mailhot, Gilles; Vione, Davide

    2012-08-01

    The production of triplet states (T(*)) of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), reacting with the probe molecule 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) was measured upon irradiation of water samples, taken from lakes located in a mountain area (NW Italy) between 1450 and 2750 m above sea level. The lakes are located below or above the tree line and surrounded by different vegetation types (trees, alpine meadows or exposed rocks). The most photoactive samples belonged to lakes below the tree line and their fluorescence spectra and CDOM optical features suggested the presence of a relatively elevated amount of humic (allochthonous) material. The lowest (negligible) photoactivity was found for a lake surrounded by exposed rocks. Its CDOM showed an important autochthonous contribution (due to in-lake productivity) and considerably higher spectral slope compared to the other samples, suggesting low CDOM molecular weight and/or aromaticity. Among the samples, CDOM photoactivity (measured as the rate of TMP-reactive T(*) photoproduction) decreased with changing vegetation type in the order: trees, meadows, rocks. It could be connected with decreasing contribution from catchment runoff and increasing contribution from autochthonous processes and possibly precipitation. PMID:22575209

  19. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  20. Progress toward lake trout restoration in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holey, Mark E.; Rybicki, Ronald W.; Eck, Gary W.; Brown, Edward H., Jr.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lavis, Dennis S.; Toneys, Michael L.; Trudeau, Tom N.; Horrall, Ross M.

    1995-01-01

    Progress toward lake trout restoration in Lake Michigan is described through 1993. Extinction of the native lake trout fishery by sea lamprey predation, augmented by exploitation and habitat destruction, resulted in an extensive stocking program of hatchery-reared lake trout that began in 1965. Sea lamprey abundance was effectively controlled using selective chemical toxicants. The initial stocking produced a measurable wild year class of lake trout by 1976 in Grand Traverse Bay, but failed to continue probably due to excessive exploitation. The overall lack of successful reproduction lakewide by the late 1970s led to the development and implementation in 1985 of a focused inter-agency lakewide restoration plan by a technical committee created through the Lake Committee structure of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Strategies implemented in 1985 by the plan included setting a 40% total mortality goal lakewide, creating two large refuges designed to encompass historically the most productive spawning habitat and protect trout stocked over their home range, evaluating several lake trout strains, and setting stocking priorities throughout the lake. Target levels for stocking in the 1985 Plan have never been reached, and are much less than the estimated lakewide recruitment of yearlings by the native lake trout stocks. Since 1985, over 90% of the available lake trout have been stocked over the best spawning habitat, and colonization of the historically productive offshore reefs has occurred. Concentrations of spawning lake trout large enough for successful reproduction, based on observations of successful hatchery and wild stocks, have developed at specific reefs. Continued lack of recruitment at these specific sites suggests that something other than stotk abundance has limited success. Poor survival of lake trout eggs, assumed to be related to contaminant burden, occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s, but survival has since increased to equal survival in the

  1. Glacioisostasy and Lake-Level Change at Moosehead Lake, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balco, G.; Belknap, D.F.; Kelley, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Reconstructions of glacioisostatic rebound based on relative sea level in Maine and adjacent Canada do not agree well with existing geophysical models. In order to understand these discrepancies better, we investigated the lake-level history of 40-km-long Moosehead Lake in northwestern Maine. Glacioisostasy has affected the level of Moosehead Lake since deglaciation ca. 12,500 14C yr B.P. Lowstand features at the southeastern end and an abandoned outlet at the northwestern end of the lake indicate that the lake basin was tilted down to the northwest, toward the retreating ice sheet, by 0.7 m/km at 10,000 14C yr B.P. Water level then rose rapidly in the southeastern end of the lake, and the northwestern outlet was abandoned, indicating rapid relaxation of landscape tilt. Lowstand features at the northwestern end of the lake suggest that the lake basin was tilted to the southeast at ca. 8750 14C yr B.P., possibly as the result of a migrating isostatic forebulge. After 8000 14C yr B.P., water level at the southeastern end was again below present lake level and rose gradually thereafter. We found no evidence suggesting that postglacial climate change significantly affected lake level. The rebound history inferred from lake-level data is consistent with previous interpretations of nearby relative sealevel data, which indicate a significantly steeper and faster-moving ice-proximal depression and ice-distal forebulge than geophysical models predict. ?? 1998 University of Washington.

  2. Airborne radioactivity Survey of part of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 133 square miles of Saratoga NW quadrangle, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  3. 23. Building N9; 3/4 view, looking NW at loading dock. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Building N-9; 3/4 view, looking NW at loading dock. The view also shows the relationship of the blast barricades to the building. (Ryan) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  4. 13. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., ABERDEEN 1.5 mi. NW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. RAILROAD BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, MONROE CO., ABERDEEN 1.5 mi. NW of Amory. St. Louis and San Francisco RR bridge. Steam locomotive and coal train cross bridge on 10 August 1921. Credit: Owned by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer. Copied by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF NW CORNER OF BUILDING 1'S W WING, SHOWING THE PILASTERS, TERRA COTTA PANELS, AND THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE CORNICE ELEMENTS; LOOKING ENE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  6. Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leib, Thomas; Cole, Dan

    2015-06-30

    In late September 2014 development of the Lake Charles Clean Energy (LCCE) Plant was abandoned resulting in termination of Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project which was a subset the LCCE Plant. As a result, the project was only funded through Phase 2A (Design) and did not enter Phase 2B (Construction) or Phase 2C (Operations). This report was prepared relying on information prepared and provided by engineering companies which were engaged by Leucadia Energy, LLC to prepare or review Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) for the Lake Charles Clean Energy Project, which includes the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project in Lake Charles, Louisiana. The Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project was to be a large-scale industrial CCS project intended to demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. The Scope of work was divided into two discrete sections; 1) Capture and Compression prepared by the Recipient Leucadia Energy, LLC, and 2) Transport and Sequestration prepared by sub-Recipient Denbury Onshore, LLC. Capture and Compression-The Lake Charles CCS Project Final Technical Report describes the systems and equipment that would be necessary to capture CO2 generated in a large industrial gasification process and sequester the CO2 into underground formations. The purpose of each system is defined along with a description of its equipment and operation. Criteria for selection of major equipment are provided and ancillary utilities necessary for safe and reliable operation in compliance with environmental regulations are described. Construction considerations are described including a general arrangement of the CCS process units within the overall gasification project. A cost estimate is provided, delineated by system area with cost breakdown showing equipment, piping and materials

  7. Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, and Lake Mead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A snowfall in the American West provides contrast to the landscape's muted earth tones and indicates changes in topography and elevation across (clockwise from top left) Nevada, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. In Utah, the southern ranges of the Wasatch Mountains are covered in snow, and the Colorado River etches a dark ribbon across the red rock of the Colorado Plateau. In the center of the image is the reservoir created by the Glen Canyon Dam. To the east are the gray-colored slopes of Navaho Mountain, and to the southeast, dusted with snow is the region called Black Mesa. Southwest of Glen Canyon, the Colorado enters the Grand Canyon, which cuts westward through Arizona. At a deep bend in the river, the higher elevations of the Keibab Plateau have held onto snow. At the end of the Grand Canyon lies another large reservoir, Lake Mead, which is formed by the Hoover Dam. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Holocene lake-level fluctuations of Lake Aricota, Southern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Placzek, C.; Quade, Jay; Betancourt, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Lacustrine deposits exposed around Lake Aricota, Peru (17?? 22???S), a 7.5-km2 lake dammed by debris flows, provide a middle to late Holocene record of lake-level fluctuations. Chronological context for shoreline deposits was obtained from radiocarbon dating of vascular plant remains and other datable material with minimal 14C reservoir effects (<350 yr). Diatomites associated with highstands several meters above the modern lake level indicate wet episodes. Maximum Holocene lake level was attained before 6100 14C yr B.P. and ended ???2700 14C yr B.P. Moderately high lake levels occurred at 1700 and 1300 14C yr B.P. The highstand at Lake Aricota during the middle Holocene is coeval with a major lowstand at Lake Titicaca (16?? S), which is only 130 km to the northeast and shares a similar climatology. Comparisons with other marine and terrestrial records highlight emerging contradictions over the nature of mid-Holocene climate in the central Andes. ?? 2001 University of Washington.

  9. The near extinction of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1957-01-01

    Comparisons in 1949 and 1950 of numbers of legal-sized lake trout caught in large-mesh nets with numbers of small fish taken in chub nets showed that both large and small lake trout declined over the same period, and that by these years the decline may have been greater among small than among legal-sized fish.

  10. ARE LAKES GETTING WARMER? REMOTE SENSING OF LARGE LAKE TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies (Levitus et al., 2000) suggest a warning of the world ocean over the past 50 years. Freshwater lakes could also be getting warmer but thermal measurements to determine this are lacking. Large lake temperatures are vertically and horizontally heterogeneous and vary ...

  11. Geographical distributions of lake trout strains stocked in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Schaner, Ted

    1996-01-01

    Geographical distributions of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) stocked at seven locations in U.S. waters and at four locations in Canadian waters of Lake Ontario were determined from fish caught with gill nets in September in 17 areas of U.S. waters and at 10 fixed locations in Canadian waters in 1986-95. For fish of a given strain stocked at a given location, geographical distributions were not different for immature males and immature females or for mature males and mature females. The proportion of total catch at the three locations nearest the stocking location was higher for mature fish than for immature fish in all 24 available comparisons (sexes combined) and was greater for fish stocked as yearlings than for those stocked as fingerlings in all eight comparisons. Mature fish were relatively widely dispersed from stocking locations indicating that their tendency to return to stocking locations for spawning was weak, and there was no appreciable difference in this tendency among strains. Mature lake trout were uniformly distributed among sampling locations, and the strain composition at stocking locations generally reflected the stocking history 5 to 6 years earlier. Few lake trout moved across Lake Ontario between the north and south shores or between the eastern outlet basin and the main lake basin. Limited dispersal from stocking sites supports the concept of stocking different genetic strains in various parts of the lake with the attributes of each strain selected to match environmental conditions in the portion of the lake where it is stocked.

  12. Biology of young lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John; Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1956-01-01

    Experimental fishing with gill nets of 5 mesh sizes (2 3/8 to 3 inches) in Lake Michigan in 1930-32 yielded more than 16,000 young lake trout. Data are presented here on age, growth, length-weight relationship, abundance, geographical and bathymetric distribution, and other details of their biology.

  13. Active and Fossil Geothermal Activity at Lake Chapala, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zârate-del Vall, P.

    2002-12-01

    Geothermal systems are very abundant in the tectonically active zones of the earth's crust and the Citala rift, where Lake Chapala is located, is not the exception. The Lake Chapala basin is characterized by its paleo- and actual geothermal activity that includes: thermal springs, fossil sinter deposits and hydrothermal petroleum manifestations. Thermal springs occur both inside and outside the lake. The spring water in out-shore thermal springs around Lake Chapala is carbonate (Medina-Heredia A, 1986). To the NE area is San Luis Agua Caliente (69°C; ~ 240 mg L-1 [HCO3]1) in the NW at Jocotepec (36°C; ~263mg L-1 [HCO3]-); in the South we find Tuxcueca and Tizap n El Alto (30°C; 193 mg L-1 [HCO3]-). However, there is an exception, the spring water at the San Juan Cosal sector (North), which is sulfate (64-83°C; ~479 mg L-1, [SO4]-2). Examples of in-shore thermal springs are "Los Gorgos" (near South shore) and "El Fuerte" (near East shore and temporary "out-shore" because of actual severe drought); the characterisation of water of this in-shore sites is in progress. On the SE shore and five km NW from Regules village, outcrops a carbonate deposit named "La Calera". This carbonate fossil sinter outcrops 2 km in E-W direction and 600 m in N-S direction and overlays andesitic rock. With a thickness of approximately 5m and a roughly horizontal attitude, the carbonated sinter material is characterized by both massive and banded structure. When massive, it is colored in yellow brownish and grey and elsewhere it shows a pseudo-brecciated structure and when banded, alternated of yellow and dark millimetre bands can be seen; is characterized by vuggy porosity and silica (quartz and chalcedony) vein lets. Under microscope a pseudo-micritic texture is observed; vugs coated by iron oxides, are filled with calcite, and/or quartz, chalcedony and clay minerals. Six samples of carbonate of "La Calera" deposit were analysed for their stable isotopes (LODC-UParis VI). From δ 13

  14. The Lake Ohrid SCOPSCO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Bernd; Wilke, Thomas; Krastel, Sebastian; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Leng, Melanie J.; Francke, Alexander; Baumgarten, Henrike; Cvetkoska, Aleksandra; Giacco, Biagio; Lacey, Jack H.; Leicher, Niklas; Levkov, Zlatko; Lindhorst, Katja; Reed, Jane M.; Zhang, Xiaosen; Sadori, Laura; Vogel, Hendrik; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Wonik, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP SCOPSCO project at Lake Ohrid in Macedonia and Albania was one of the most successful lake drilling campaigns worldwide. Drilling took place from April to June 2013 and yielded more than 2000 m of sediments from four different sites in the lake. The maximum penetration was 569 m below lake floor and the overall recovery at all drill sites was > 95 %. Almost two years after the drilling operation, core opening and processing as well as biological and geological analyses are still ongoing. However, most of the cores from the main drill site, the so-called DEEP site in the centre of the lake, are meanwhile opened and reveal a unique record of lake history. The extraordinary quality of seismic, borehole logging and core data allows us to achieve the major goals of the SCOPSCO project. Seismic data, diatoms and coarse-grained sediments in the basal cores indicate that Lake Ohrid had no marine origin, as it was speculated in the past. The data show that Lake Ohrid established in a highly dynamic pull-apart basin with varying fluvial and shallow water conditions. On top of these basal sediments, borehole logging data, XRF scanning data, carbonate, and the amount of organic matter indicate a complete and high resolution succession of glacial / interglacial cycles and interspersed stadials and interstadials. This allows us to determine the establishment of Lake Ohrid by means of chronostratigraphic tuning to about 1.3 to 1.5 Ma ago. Additional, independent age control is given by paleomagnetic data and by numerous tephra layers, which can be correlated with well-dated proximal tephra deposits in Italy. The uppermost 350 m of the sediment record contain more than 30 tephras, which makes the Lake Ohrid record to the rosetta stone of distal Italian tephra deposits in the Balkan region. The unique sediment record of Lake Ohrid is fundamental to obtain crucial information on the overall goal of the SCOPSCO project, i.e. to clarify why Lake Ohrid has one of highest

  15. Feeding competition between larval lake whitefish and lake herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for competition for food between larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake herring (C. artedi) 1- to 8-wk of age was explored in a series of 1-h laboratory feeding studies. Feeding started at 2-wk post-hatch. Learning and fish size appear to be more important than prey density at the onset of feeding. Species differed in their feeding behavior and consumption noticeably by 5-wk and substantially by 8-wk. Lake whitefish generally were more aggressive foragers than lake herring, attacking and capturing more prey. At high plankton density at 8-wk, lake herring feeding was depressed in mixed-fish treatments. This difference in competitive food consumption between the two coregonids occurs at a critical life stage, and when combined with other biotic and abiotic factors, may have a significant impact on recruitment.

  16. Forecasting Lake-Effect Snow in the Great Lakes Using NASA Satllite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the forecast of the lake effect snow in the Great Lakes region using models and infrared estimates of Great Lake Surface Temperatures (GLSTs) from the MModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Terra and Aqua satellites, and other satellite data. This study analyzes Lake Erie and Lake Ontario which produce storm total snowfall ranged from 8-18 inches off of Lake Ontario and 10-12 inches off of Lake Erie for the areas downwind.

  17. An urban lake remediation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, S.E.; Gardner, K.H.; Jennings, A.A.

    1998-07-01

    Circumstances provided the opportunity to study a small urban lake as the surrounding municipalities attempted to improve its aesthetic quality by dredging. This manuscript focuses primarily on the sediments in the system: accumulation rates, the expected dynamics of the lake bed drying process, and the influence of the sediments on water quality.

  18. The Great Lakes Food Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marjane L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a play for students in grades four to nine that incorporates the scientific names, physical characteristics, feeding habits, interactions, and interdependence of the plants and animals that make up the Great Lakes food web to facilitate the learning of this complex system. Includes a Great Lakes food web chart. (AIM)

  19. NATIONAL LAKE ASSESSMENT MONITORING DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA designed the National Lake Assessment in 2005-6 with field sampling being completed in 2007. The objective of the assessment is to estimate the ecological condition of lakes and reservoirs nationally. The objective of this paper is to describe the national survey desi...

  20. New England Lakes & Ponds Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The New England Lakes and Ponds Project provides a consistent and first time comprehensive assessment of the ecological and water quality condition of lakes and ponds across the New England region. The project is being conducted by EPA along with the New England Interstate Water...

  1. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  2. Planktonic diatoms of Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinwand, Jerry F.

    1969-01-01

    The major species of diatoms in surface collections from Lake Ontario in September 1964 were Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria crotonensis, and Tabellaris fenestrata. Dominant species in the deep-water samples were Stephanodiscus astraea, S. astraea var. mintula, and F. crotonensis. The diatom flora in surface collections varied among several stations in the eastern end of the lake.

  3. GREAT LAKES CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments are a significant problem in the Great Lakes basin. Although discharges of toxic substances to the Great Lakes have been reduced in the last 20 years, persistent high concentrations of contaminants in the bottom sediments of rivers and harbors have raised...

  4. Venous lakes of the hands

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.M.; Hessel, S.J.; Joseph, R.B.; Bodell, L.S.

    1985-09-01

    Following pharmacologic vasodilation, multiple vascular lakes were observed on angiograms of the hand in 55 patients. Most had no history of vascular anomalies or disease. The authors believe that these lakes are venous structures and that their filling is a physiologic phenomenon.

  5. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality. PMID:27620102

  6. Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Jackson

    2008-03-14

    The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

  7. "Lake Woebegone," Twenty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannell, John Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Almost 20 years ago, the author wrote--and then privately published--the two "Lake Woebegone" reports, named after Garrison Keillor's mythical Minnesota town where "all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." The first "Lake Woebegone" report documented that all 50 states were testing above the…

  8. Europa's Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. While models have suggested that partial melt within a thick shell or melt-through of a thin shell may form chaos, neither model has been able to definitively explain all observations of chaos terrain. However, we present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. Our analysis of the geomorphology of Conamara Chaos and Thera Macula, was used to infer and test a four-stage lens-collapse chaos formation model: 1) Thermal plumes of warm, pure ice ascend through the shell melting the impure brittle ice above, producing a lake of briny water and surface down draw due to volume reduction. 2) Surface deflection and driving force from the plume below hydraulically seals the water in place. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid generates fractures from below, allowing brines to enter and fluidize the ice matrix. 4) As the lens and now brash matrix refreeze, thermal expansion creates domes and raises the chaos feature above the background terrain. This new "lense-collapse" model indicates that chaos features form in the presence of a great deal of liquid water, and that large liquid water bodies exist within 3km of Europa's surface comparable in volume to the North American Great Lakes. The detection of shallow subsurface "lakes" implies that the ice shell is recycling rapidly and that Europa may be currently active. In this presentation, we will explore environments on Europa and their analogs on Earth, from collapsing Antarctic ice shelves to to subglacial volcanos in Iceland. I will present these new analyses, and describe how this new perspective informs the debate about Europa's habitability and future exploration.

  9. Lava Lakes on Io?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Howell, R.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J. S.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; Galileo NIMS Team

    2003-05-01

    At least 152 active volcanic centers have been identified on Jupiter's moon Io [Lopes et al., 2003, submitted to Icarus]. Eruptions at these centers include lava flows (``Promethean" type eruptions), explosive ``Pillanian" eruptions [Keszthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106, 33,025-52] and volcanism confined within patera walls (``Lokian", Lopes et al., 2003). Understanding the Lokian eruption mechanism is particularly important because paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic constructs on Io's surface [Radebaugh et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 33,005-33,020] and patera volcanism is the most common eruption type on Io. We use observations from Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and compare them with images from Galileo's Solid State Imaging system (SSI) to map the distribution of thermal emission at several Ionian paterae. This allows us to examine how thermal emission correlates with visible features, and to investigate how thermal emission varies with time. Galileo's close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 allowed NIMS to observe the volcanoes at relatively high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, observations of the several paterae reveal that the greatest thermal emission occurs at the edges. This can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the base of the patera (caldera) walls, similar to what has been observed at lava lakes on Earth. Comparison with terrestrial analogs shows that several Ionian active paterae, such as Loki, Tupan, and Emakong, have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes on Earth. We discuss these results and their implications for eruption styles and resurfacing on Io. This work was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  10. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  11. Choking Lake Winnipeg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; Little, L. J.; Dodgson, K. A.; MacDonald, R. J.; Graham, J.

    2009-12-01

    The problems of waterway eutrophication and coastal zone hypoxia are reaching epidemic proportions. Fresh water and coastal marine environments around the world are suffering unprecedented pollution loadings. We are developing an education program to address the dramatic need for public, community and K-12 education about the harsh impacts of elevated nutrient loads on fresh and marine water environments. The Lake Winnipeg watershed is adopted as the poster child of fresh water eutrophication in western North America. The watershed, one of the largest on the continent, is in rapid decline due to pollution, population pressures and water diversion. A concerted education program is needed to change personal and society actions that negatively impact the Winnipeg watershed; and the confluence of the watershed - Lake Winnipeg. But the education program goes beyond Lake Winnipeg. Negative impacts of nutrient loads are adversely affecting environments right to the oceans. Major dead zones that are expanding on our continental shelves due to nutrient overloading threaten to coalesce into extensive regions of marine life die-off. This presentation outlines the documentary education production process under development. We are building a series of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) for national television networks. The PSAs will direct educators, stakeholders and citizens to an associated website with educational video clips detailing the issues of eutrophication and hypoxia. The video clips or webisodes, present interviews with leading scientists. The discussions address the causes of the problems, and presents workable solutions to nutrient overloads from a variety of sources. The webisodes are accompanied by notes and advice to teachers on ways and means to use the webisodes in classrooms. The project is fully funed by a group of Canadian Community Foundations, with the understanding the work wil be available free to educators anywhere in the world. Our education

  12. L-Lake macroinvertebrate community

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1996-06-01

    To characterize the present benthic macroinvertebrate community of L-Lake, Regions 5 and 7 of the reservoir were sampled in September 1995 at the same locations sampled in 1988 and 1989 during the L-Lake monitoring program. The macroinvertebrate community of 1995 is compared to that of 1988 and 1989. The species composition of L-Lake`s macroinvertebrate community has changed considerably since 1988-1989, due primarily to maturation of the reservoir ecosystem. L-Lake contains a reasonably diverse macroinvertebrate community that is capable of supporting higher trophic levels, including a diverse assemblage of fish species. The L-Lake macroinvertebrate community is similar to those of many other southeastern reservoirs, and there is no indication that the macroinvertebrate community is perturbed by chemical or physical stressors.

  13. Isotopic composition of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway water just prior to final drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Helie, J.; McKay, J.; Lalonde, A.

    2006-12-01

    Controversies persist with respect to the impact of the final drainage of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway on the thermohaline circulation of the North Atlantic, some 8.4 ka ago. The lack of response of planktic foraminifer isotope records, off Hudson Strait (i.e., at the outlet of the drainage channel) constitutes one of the most puzzling elements in this debate. However, data on the isotopic composition of drainage waters are needed to estimate the response of the 18-O-salinity relationship in NW Atlantic surface waters. In the literature, a large array of isotopic compositions have been suggested, notably for modeling experiment purposes. Scattered information about the isotopic composition of Lake Agassiz water does exist. It includes isotopic measurements of pore waters of lacustrine sediments [1], analyses of oxygen isotopes in cellulose from algal or plant remains [2], and stable isotope compositions of concretions from varves [3]. Whereas, relatively low oxygen isotope values (apx. -25 per mil vs. VSMOW) are inferred for Lake Agassiz waters during cold pulses of the deglaciation, most data suggest much higher values during the final stages of Lake Agassiz-Ojiway, just prior to its drainage. Calcareous concretions from Lake Ojibway varves (not necessarily contemporaneous to the lacustrine stage) yielded oxygen isotope compositions of about -10 per mil (vs. VPDB), suggesting values as high as -14 per mil (vs. VSMOW) for pore waters (assuming a 0-4 degrees C temperature range). Similar high values (as high as -8 per mil vs. VSMOW [1]) were also estimated from pore water analyses of contemporaneous Lake Agassiz sediments. Here, we used a core raised from Eastern Hudson Bay, off Great Whale River, to further document isotopic compositions of the lake waters prior to their drainage into the North Atlantic. The 7.40 m long core has an apx. 1.3 m-thick lacustrine layer at its base, including the drainage sub- layer. It is overlain by Tyrrell Sea clays. Scarce valves of Candona

  14. Mineralogy, geochemistry and genesis of the modern sediments of Seyfe Lake, Kırşehir, central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önalgil, Nergis; Kadir, Selahattin; Külah, Tacit; Eren, Muhsin; Gürel, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Seyfe Lake (Kırşehir, Turkey) is located within a depression zone extending along a NW-SE-trending fault in central Anatolia. Evaporite and carbonate sediments occur at the bottom of the lake which is fed by high-sulfate spring and well waters circulating N-S through salt domes. The recent sediments of Seyfe Lake are deposited in delta, backshore, beach, mud-flat and shallow lake environments. In the mud-flat environment, calcite, gypsum, halite, and thenardite are associated with fine-grained detrital sediments. Sediments from the margin to the lake center are distributed as calcite, gypsum and halite ± thenardite, yielding an annular distribution pattern. An increase in Na2O, SO3, and S, and a decrease in CaO toward the lake center are due to sediment distribution. On the other hand, a positive correlation of SiO2 with MgO, K2O, Na2O, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 + TiO2 is attributed to the presence of smectite, illite and feldspar. In addition, a positive correlation of Sr and Ba with CaO is related to the amount of gypsum in the sediments. Strontium is associated with in situ gypsum crystals; it increases in the intermediate and central zones of the lake as a result of a relative increase in salinity toward the lake center. The association of Sr with gypsum in the sediments suggests that Ca and Sr were derived from Sr-bearing evaporites and their carbonate host rocks, which were the likely aquifers for the brine. The S- and O-isotopic compositions of sulfate crystals range from +19.1‰ to +21.7‰ and from +16.9‰ to +20.9‰ SMOW, respectively, suggesting precipitation in a closed lake system. A relative increase of oxygen and sulfur isotope ratios toward the lake center suggests dissolution of gypsum in the host rock, with contributions from circulating groundwater and sulfate reduction (possibly by bacterial reduction). 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios range from 0.707286 to 0.707879, suggesting a non-marine Oligo-Pliocene evaporitic host rock source for precipitation in

  15. PLAT X41601 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAT X-4-160-1 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY BETWEEN OLIVE STREET (1020 EAST) AND 1000 EAST STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 12049, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  16. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127 Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore...

  17. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127 Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore...

  18. 78 FR 17097 - Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ... temporary safety zone within the navigable waters of Lake Havasu and the London Bridge Channel for the Lake... Triathlon will consist of 600 participants. The waterside swim course consists of 1500 meters in Lake...

  19. 77 FR 33309 - Safety Zone; Race on the Lake, Onondaga Lake, Syracuse, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Race on the Lake, Onondaga Lake, Syracuse... temporary safety zone on Onondaga Lake, Syracuse, NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Onondaga Lake during the Race on the Lake powerboat races. This temporary safety...

  20. 76 FR 2579 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... blasting operations for the placement of a water intake pipe in Lake Mead during the first 6 months of...

  1. 75 FR 20920 - Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Grand Prix, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Grand Prix, Lake Havasu, AZ... temporary safety zone upon the navigable waters of Lake Havasu on the Colorado River in Lake Havasu City, Arizona for the Lake Havasu Grand Prix. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the...

  2. 77 FR 9652 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake Linden... administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake..., Chicago, Illinois, C-14J, 60604, (312) 886-6609. Comments should reference the Lake Linden Superfund...

  3. 75 FR 13232 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... Pipe from Lake Mead throughout 2010. This safety zone is necessary to ensure non-authorized...

  4. The April 2007 earthquake swarm near Lake Trichonis and implications for active tectonics in western Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiratzi, A.; Sokos, E.; Ganas, A.; Tselentis, A.; Benetatos, C.; Roumelioti, Z.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Andriopoulos, G.; Galanis, O.; Petrou, P.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the April 2007 earthquake swarm (Mw 5.2) which occurred at the vicinity of Lake Trichonis (western Greece). First we relocated the earthquakes, using P- and S-wave arrivals to the stations of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN), and then we applied moment tensor inversion to regional broad-band waveforms to obtain the focal mechanisms of the strongest events of the 2007 swarm. The relocated epicentres, cluster along the eastern banks of the lake, and follow a distinct NNW-ESE trend. The previous strong sequence close to Lake Trichonis occurred in June-December 1975. We applied teleseismic body waveform inversion, to obtain the focal mechanism solution of the strongest earthquake of this sequence, i.e. the 31 December 1975 (Mw 6.0) event. Our results indicate that: a) the 31 December 1975 Mw 6.0 event was produced by a NW-SE normal fault, dipping to the NE, with considerable sinistral strike-slip component; we relocated its epicentre: i) using phase data reported to ISC and its coordinates are 38.486°N, 21.661°E; ii) using the available macroseismic data, and the coordinates of the macroseismic epicentre are 38.49°N, 21.63°E, close to the strongly affected village of Kato Makrinou; b) the earthquakes of the 2007 swarm indicate a NNW-SSE strike for the activated main structure, parallel to the eastern banks of Lake Trichonis, dipping to the NE and characterized by mainly normal faulting, occasionally combined with sinistral strike-slip component. The 2007 earthquake swarm did not rupture the well documented E-W striking Trichonis normal fault that bounds the southern flank of the lake, but on the contrary it is due to rupture of a NW-SE normal fault that strikes at a ˜ 45° angle to the Trichonis fault. The left-lateral component of faulting is mapped for the first time to the north of the Gulf of Patras which was previously regarded as the boundary for strike-slip motions in western Greece. This result signifies the

  5. LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE ATRAZINE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured PCBs, mercury, trans-nonachlor, and atrazine in rivers, the atmosphere, sediments, lake water, and the food chain. A mathematical model will predict what effect reducing pollution will have on the lake, and its large fish (lake trout ...

  6. LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE: MODELING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured PCBs, mercury, trans-nonachlor, and atrazine in rivers, the atmosphere, sediments, lake water, and the food chain. A mathematical model will predict what effect reducing pollution will have on the lake, and its large fish (lake trout ...

  7. LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE PCB DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured PCBs, mercury, trans-nonachlor, and atrazine in rivers, the atmosphere, sediments, lake water, and the food chain. A mathematical model will predict what effect reducing pollution will have on the lake, and its large fish (lake trout ...

  8. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  9. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Boundaries. The Clear Lake viticultural area is located in southwestern Lake County, California. The... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake....

  10. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Boundaries. The Clear Lake viticultural area is located in southwestern Lake County, California. The... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake....

  12. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  13. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  14. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Boundaries. The Clear Lake viticultural area is located in southwestern Lake County, California. The... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake....

  15. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  16. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Boundaries. The Clear Lake viticultural area is located in southwestern Lake County, California. The... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake....

  17. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Boundaries. The Clear Lake viticultural area is located in southwestern Lake County, California. The... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake....

  18. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of measured glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38), and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), there are distinct outliers in the dataset. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume, and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion, and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled dataset to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  19. 33 CFR 125.08 - Great Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Lakes. 125.08 Section 125... VESSELS § 125.08 Great Lakes. The term Great Lakes as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters....

  20. EPA Research Strengthens Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth, the Great Lakes (Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, Ontario and Superior) are a source of economic prosperity, recreation and raw materials. Human activity, however, has resulted in pollution and other stressors. The Great Lakes curren...

  1. 33 CFR 125.08 - Great Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Lakes. 125.08 Section 125... VESSELS § 125.08 Great Lakes. The term Great Lakes as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters....

  2. TOXAPHENE IN THE GREAT LAKES. (R825246)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the most current data for toxaphene in the water, sediments, and biota of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. Concentrations in water range from 1.1 ng/L in Lake Superior to 0.17 ng/L in Lake Ontario. Lake Superior has the highest water concentrati...

  3. The Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Noriyuki

    For the last couple of decades, the Great Lakes have undergone rapid surface warming. In particular, the magnitude of the summer surface-warming trends of the Great Lakes have been much greater than those of surrounding land (Austin and Colman, 2007). Among the Great Lakes, the deepest Lake Superior exhibited the strongest warming trend in its annual, as well as summer surface water temperature. We find that many aspects of this behavior can be explained in terms of the tendency of deep lakes to exhibit multiple regimes characterized, under the same seasonally varying forcing, by the warmer and colder seasonal cycles exhibiting different amounts of wintertime lake-ice cover and corresponding changes in the summertime lake-surface temperatures. In this thesis, we address the problem of the Great Lakes' warming using one-dimensional lake modeling to interpret diverse observations of the recent lake behavior. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  4. Possible temperate lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; MacKenzie, Shannon; Wilson, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We analyze southern mid-latitude albedo-dark features on Titan observed by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). In exploring the nature of these features we consider their morphology, albedo, and specular reflectivity. We suggest that they represent candidates for potential temperate lakes. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes would indicate that surface liquid can accumulate and remain stable away from Titan's poles. Candidate lakes were identified by looking for possible shorelines with lacustrine morphology. Then, we applied an atmospheric correction that empirically solved for their surface albedo. Finally, we looked for a specular reflection of the sky in the identified candidates. Using this prescription, we find two candidates that remain as potential temperature lakes. If candidate features do represent temperate lakes on Titan, they have implications for formation mechanisms such as clouds and rainfall or, in low elevation areas, percolation and subsurface flow. Clouds were observed near candidate lake locations on the T66 flyby and this latitude band showed many clouds during southern summer. Our techniques can be applied to areas of Titan that lack RADAR coverage to search for mid- and low-latitude lakes in the future.

  5. Rehabilitation of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Helsel, D.R.; MacKinnon, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive rehabilitation plan was developed and implemented to shift Delavan Lake, Wisconsin, from a hypereutrophic to a mesotrophic condition. The plan was threefold: (1) reduce external phosphorus (P) loading by applying Best Management Practices in the watershed, enhance an existing wetland, and short-circuit the inflows through the lake, (2) reduce internal P loading by treating the sediments with alum and removing carp, and (3) rehabilitate the fishery by removing carp and bigmouth buffalo and adding piscivores (biomanipulation). The first and second parts of the plan met with only limited success. With only minor reductions in internal and external P loading, P concentrations in the lake returned to near pre-treatment concentrations. The intensive biomanipulation and resulting trophic cascade (increased piscivores, decreased planktivores, increased large zooplankton populations, and reduced phytoplankton populations) eliminated most of the original problems in the lake (blue-green algal blooms and limited water clarity). However, now there is extensive macrophyte growth and abundant filamentous algae. Without significantly reducing the sources of the problems (high P loading) in Delavan Lake, the increased water clarity may not last. With an improved understanding of the individual components of this rehabilitation program, better future management plans can be developed for Delavan Lake and other lakes and reservoirs with similar eutrophication problems.

  6. The Stability of Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, F.; Llewellin, E. W.; Woods, A. W.; Gladstone, C.

    2007-12-01

    Lava lakes may exhibit complex cycles of filling and draining on time-scales of hours to weeks. Such activity is recorded at Pu`u `O`o, Hawai`i. Other examples, e.g. Erta Ale in Ethiopia, do not display these draining episodes; instead an 'equilibrium' system is observed in which the lake may persist for years. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of lava lakes and identify behavioural regimes distinguished by system geometry and gas content. Laboratory analogue modelling shows that even a simple conduit-lake system, driven by a constant gas flux, can display steady-state equilibrium or cyclic behaviour, depending on the rate of gas flux. A theoretical approach to the same system captures this range of behaviour. By testing the stability of an 'equilibrium' lake to small perturbations, we show that the degree of stability is controlled by the ratio of conduit to lake areas, and the gas volume fraction at the top of the conduit. Despite the simplicity of the modelled system, a rich spectrum of behaviour is found. The model predicts that a stable system must drain over time. This implies that lakes which exhibit ongoing degassing for years or decades (e.g. Erta Ale) either must have an exogenous supply of gas bubbles from depth, or an effective conduit convection mechanism must exist.

  7. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; restricted areas—(1) The areas. That portion of Lake Mead extending 700 feet upstream...

  8. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; restricted areas—(1) The areas. That portion of Lake Mead extending 700 feet upstream...

  9. Microplastics in Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Xue, Yingang; Li, Lingyun; Yang, Dongqi; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu; Li, Daoji; Shi, Huahong

    2016-09-01

    In comparison with marine environments, the occurrence of microplastics in freshwater environments is less understood. In the present study, we investigated microplastic pollution levels during 2015 in Taihu Lake, the third largest Chinese lake located in one of the most developed areas of China. The abundance of microplastics reached 0.01 × 10(6)-6.8 × 10(6) items/km(2) in plankton net samples, 3.4-25.8 items/L in surface water, 11.0-234.6 items/kg dw in sediments and 0.2-12.5 items/g ww in Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea). The average abundance of microplastics was the highest in plankton net samples from the southeast area of the lake and in the sediments from the northwest area of the lake. The northwest area of the lake was the most heavily contaminated area of the lake, as indicated by chlorophyll-α and total phosphorus. The microplastics were dominated by fiber, 100-1000 μm in size and cellophane in composition. To our best knowledge, the microplastic levels measured in plankton net samples collected from Taihu Lake were the highest found in freshwater lakes worldwide. The ratio of the microplastics in clams to each sediment sample ranged from 38 to 3810 and was negatively correlated to the microplastic level in sediments. In brief, our results strongly suggest that high levels of microplastics occurred not only in water but also in organisms in Taihu Lake. PMID:27381875

  10. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  11. Early eutrophication in the lower great lakes:.

    PubMed

    Schelske, C L; Stoermer, E F; Conley, D J; Robbins, J A; Glover, R M

    1983-10-21

    New Evidence from Biogenic Silica in Sediments New evidence from studies of biogenic silica and diatoms in sediment cores indicates that eutrophication in the lower Great Lakes resulted from nutrient enrichment associated with early settlement and forest clearance. Diatom production peaked from 1820 to 1850 in Lake Ontario, at about 1880 in Lake Erie, but not until 1970 in Lake Michigan. This is the first reported sediment record of the silica-depletion sequence for the Great Lakes. PMID:17734831

  12. Chemiluminescent lateral-flow immunoassays by using in-situ synthesis of CdS NW photosensor.

    PubMed

    An, Byoung-Gi; Kim, Hong-Rae; Kang, Min-Jung; Park, Jae-Gwan; Chang, Young Wook; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2016-07-13

    A hypersensitive CdS nanowire (NW) photosensor was fabricated by an in-situ synthesis process that involved the direct synthesis of CdS NWs on an interdigitated electrode (IDE). Analysis of the photoresponse properties showed that the newly synthesized photosensor had enhanced sensitivity and a highly reproducible photoresponse compared to photosensors prepared from CdS NW suspensions. The NW photosensor was applied to measure the chemiluminescence of luminol, and the sensitivity was compared to a commercial photosensing system. Finally, the feasibility of the CdS NW photosensor for the application to the medical diagnosis of the human hepatitis B surface antigen (hHBsAg) was demonstrated using a lateral-flow immunoassay with a chemiluminescent signal band. PMID:27237842

  13. Flexible transparent conducting composite films using a monolithically embedded AgNW electrode with robust performance stability.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Jin, Jungho; Ko, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Jung-Yong; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2014-01-21

    We report on the performance of an all-in-one flexible hybrid conducting film employing a monolithically embedded AgNW transparent electrode and a high-performance glass-fabric reinforced composite substrate (AgNW-GFRHybrimer film). Specifically, we perform in-depth investigations on the stability of the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film against heat, thermal oxidation, and wet chemicals to demonstrate the potential of the hybrid conducting film as a robust electrode platform for thin-film optoelectronic devices. With the ease of large-area processability, smooth surface topography, and robust performance stability, the AgNW-GFRHybrimer film can be a promising platform for high-performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:24284890

  14. Marine sedimentary record of Meltwater Pulse 1a along the NW Barents Sea continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulia Lucchi, Renata; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Macrì, Patrizia; Rebesco, Michele; Pedrosa, Maria Teresa; Giorgetti, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    The upper continental slope of the Storfjorden-Kveithola Trough Mouth Fans (NW Barents Sea) contains a several m-thick late Pleistocene sequence of plumites composed of laminated mud interbedded with sand/silt layers. Radiocarbon ages revealed that deposition occurred during about 130 years at a very high sedimentation rate of 3.4 cm a-1, at about 7 km from the present shelf break. Palaeomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses confirm the existence of a prominent, short-living sedimentary event. The plumites appear laterally continuous and were correlated with the sedimentary sequences described west of Svalbard and neighbouring glacial depositional systems representing a major event at regional scale appointed to correspond to the deep-sea sedimentary record of Meltwater Pulse-1a. We also present new sedimentological and geochemical insights, and multi-beam data adding information on the palaeoenvironmental characteristics during MWP-1a and ice sheet decay in the NW Barents Sea.

  15. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Integrating CCHP with NW Food Processing Plant #1: Modeling Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Wagner, Anne W.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Thornton, John

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has launched a project funded by the Bonneville Power Association (BPA) to identify strategies for increasing industrial energy efficiency and reducing energy costs of Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA) plants through deployment of novel combinations and designs of variable-output combined heat and power (CHP) distributed generation (DG), combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) DG and energy storage systems. Detailed evaluations and recommendations of CHP and CCHP DG systems will be performed for several Northwest (NW) food processing sites. The objective is to reduce the overall energy use intensity of NW food processors by 25% by 2020 and by 50% by 2030, as well as reducing emissions and understanding potential congestion reduction impacts on the transmission system in the Pacific Northwest.

  16. Lake trout in the Great Lakes: Basin-wide stock collapse and binational restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was important to the human settlement of each of the Great Lakes, and underwent catastrophic collapses in each lake in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The timing of lake trout stock collapses were different in each lake, as were the causes of the collapses, and have been the subject of much scientific inquiry and debate. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize and review pertinent information relating historical changes in Great Lakes lake trout stocks, binational efforts to restore those stocks, and progress toward stock restoration. This presentation attempts to generalize patterns across the Great Lakes, rather than to focus within each lake. Lake specific analyses have been used to understand lake specific causes and effects, but there is continuing debate about some of these causes and effects. A basinwide review may suggest mechanisms for observed changes that are not evident by lake specific analysis.

  17. LIMNOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF CULTURALLY EUTROPHIC SHAGAWA LAKE AND ADJACENT OLIGOTROPHIC BURNTSIDE LAKE, MINNESOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limnological characteristics for 1971-1972 of culturally eutrophic Shagawa Lake, Minnesota, were compared to those of the immediately upstream, oligotrophic Burntside Lake to evaluate the effects of domestic waste-water discharge to Shagawa Lake. Typical characteristics of Shagaw...

  18. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Milstead, W. Bryan; Urrutia, M. Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Information about lake morphometry (e.g., depth, volume, size, etc.) aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate measures of lake morphometry, particularly lake depth, are usually collected on a lake-by-lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. To span the gap between studies of individual lakes where detailed data exist and regional studies where access to useful data on lake depth is unavailable, we developed a method to predict maximum lake depth from the slope of the topography surrounding a lake. We use the National Elevation Dataset and the National Hydrography Dataset – Plus to estimate the percent slope of surrounding lakes and use this information to predict maximum lake depth. We also use field measured maximum lake depths from the US EPA's National Lakes Assessment to empirically adjust and cross-validate our predictions. We were able to predict maximum depth for ∼28,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States with an average cross-validated RMSE of 5.95 m and 5.09 m and average correlation of 0.82 and 0.69 for Hydrological Unit Code Regions 01 and 02, respectively. The depth predictions and the scripts are openly available as supplements to this manuscript. PMID:21984945

  19. Double-gated Si NW FET sensors: Low-frequency noise and photoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, F.; Khondkaryan, H.; Arakelyan, A.; Zadorozhnyi, I.; Pud, S.; Vitusevich, S.

    2016-08-01

    The transport, noise, and photosensitivity properties of an array of silicon nanowire (NW) p+-p-p+ field-effect transistors (FETs) are investigated. The peculiarities of photosensitivity and detectivity are analyzed over a wide spectrum range. The absorbance of p-Si NW shifts to the short wavelength region compared with bulk Si. The photocurrent and photosensitivity reach increased values in the UV range of the spectrum at 300 K. It is shown that sensitivity values can be tuned by the drain-source voltage and may reach record values of up to 2-4 A/W at a wavelength of 300 nm at room temperature. Low-frequency noise studies allow calculating the photodetectivity values, which increase with decreasing wavelength down to 300 nm. We show that the drain current of Si NW biochemical sensors substantially depends on pH value and the signal-to-noise ratio reaches the high value of 105. Increasing pH sensitivity with gate voltage is revealed for certain source-drain currents of pH-sensors based on Si NW FETs. The noise characteristic index decreases from 1.1 to 0.7 with the growth of the liquid gate voltage. Noise behavior is successfully explained in the framework of the correlated number-mobility unified fluctuation model. pH sensitivity increases as a result of the increase in liquid gate voltage, thus giving the opportunity to measure very low proton concentrations in the electrolyte medium at certain values of the liquid gate voltage.

  20. Looking for Larvae Above an Erupting Submarine Volcano, NW Rota-1, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Chadwick, W.; Breuer, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    In 2009 the first marine protected areas for deep-sea hydrothermal vents in U.S. waters were established as part of the Volcanic Unit of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument. In this region, hydrothermal vents are located along the Mariana Arc and back-arc spreading center. In particular hydrothermal vents are located near the summit of NW Rota-1, an active submarine volcano on the Mariana Arc which was erupting between 2003 through 2010 and ceased as of 2014. In late 2009, NW Rota-1 experienced a massive landslide decimating the habitat on the southern side of the volcano. This presented an enormous natural disturbance to the community. This project looked at zooplankton tow samples taken from the water column above NW Rota-1 in 2010, searching specifically for larvae which have the potential to recolonize the sea floor after such a major disturbance. We focused on samples for which profiles with a MAPR sensor indicated hydrothermal plumes in the water column. Samples were sorted in entirety into coarse taxa, and then larvae were removed for DNA barcoding. Overall zooplankton composition was dominated by copepods, ostracods, and chaetognaths, the majority of which are pelagic organisms. Comparatively few larvae of benthic invertebrates were found, but shrimp, gastropod, barnacle, and polychaete larvae did appear in low numbers in the samples. Species-level identification obtained via genetic barcoding will allow for these larvae to be matched to species known to inhabit the benthic communities at NW Rota-1. Identified larvae will give insight into the organisms which can re-colonize the seafloor vent communities after a disturbance such as the 2009 landslide. Communities at hydrothermal vents at other submarine volcanoes in the Monument also can act as sources for these planktonic, recolonizing larvae. As the microinvertebrate biodiversity in the Monument has yet to be fully characterized, our project also provides an opportunity to better describe both

  1. Hydrological cycles and trends in the NW Argentine Andes since 1940

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variability characterizes the hydrometeorological pattern in the NW Argentine Andes, draining parts of the most populated and economically important areas of South America. During the summer monsoon season (DJF), the eastern flanks of the central Andes are characterized by deep convection, exposing them to extreme hydrometeorological events. These often result in floods and landslides with disastrous effects on the local populations. Here, we analyze river discharge to explore long-term hydrological variability in NW Argentine Andes and the linked climate controlling processes. We rely on 13 daily river discharge time series relevant to drainage basins spanning several size orders (102-104 km2) starting in 1914 and define different hydro-climate indices both for the mean and the extreme hydrological events. We apply quantile regression to investigate long-term trends and spectral analysis associated with cross-correlation with SST-based climate indices to identify links to large-scale climate variability modes. River discharge presents a pronounced and coherent variability signal in South America, particularly for wide drainage basins, such as the Amazon and Paraná/La Plata rivers, strongly associated to Pacific and Atlantic Oceans Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies (i.e. ENSO, PDO, AMO). Our analysis evidences that in the NW Argentine Andes, mean discharge values are characterized by statistically significant, mostly positive, long-term trends since 1940, whereas the extreme events present a more non-unidirectional trend pattern. Also, coherent multi-annual to multi-decadal cycles characterizing the discharge pattern have been identified, suggesting that processes linked to SST anomaly-modes strongly control the hydrometeorology variability in the NW Argentina Andes.

  2. Airborne radioactivity survey of parts of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, J.R.

    1954-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in 266 square miles of Savery NW and Savery NE quadrangles, Wyoming. This area is part of a larger survey made in southern Carbon and Sweetwater Counties by the U. S. Geological Survey, November 9-24, 1953. The work was undertaken as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  3. Evidence for an Ancient Buried Landscape on the NW Rim of Hellas Basin, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Bleamaster, Leslie F., III; Mest, Scott C.; Mustard, John F.; Vincendon, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Hellas basin is the largest (2000+ km across) well-preserved impact structure on Mars and its deepest depositional sink [e.g., 1]. The Hellas rim and adjacent highlands are of special interest given the possibility of paleolakes on the basin floor [2-4], recent studies of potential localized fluvial/lacustrine systems [2, 5-17], and evidence for phyllosilicates around and within impact craters north of the basin [18-26]. We are producing a 1:1.5M-scale geologic map of eight MTM quadrangles (-25312, -25307, -25302, -25297, -30312, -30307, -30302, -30297) along Hellas NW rim. The map region (22.5-32.5degS, 45- 65degE) includes a transect across the cratered highlands of Terra Sabaea, the degraded NW rim of Hellas, and basin interior deposits of NW Hellas Planitia. No previous mapping studies have focused on this region, although it has been included in earlier global and regional maps [27-29].

  4. Mercury content and their risk assessment in farmed shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei from NW Mexico.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarez, C G; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Osuna-López, J I; Voltolina, D; Frías-Espericueta, M G

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the total mercury content in hepatopancreas and edible muscle of the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei cultured along the NW coast of Mexico, and to evaluate the potential human health risk due to their consumption. Samples were obtained between May and June 2010 in 26 shrimp farms from the three most important shrimp-producing states of NW Mexico, and total Hg was analyzed after reduction with SnCl2 in a mercury analyzer. The ranges of Hg concentrations of the hepatopancreas were 0.101±0.03-0.184±0.13 μg g(-1) in Sonora, 0.077±0.055-0.813±0.363 μg g(-1) in Sinaloa and 0.139±0.037-0.791±0.33 μg g(-1) in Nayarit. In the muscle, values were from 0.078±0.02 to 0.539±0.09 μg g(-1) in Sonora, 0.154±0.03-0.861±0.423 μg g(-1) in Sinaloa and 0.121±0.041-1.48±0.44 μg g(-1) in Nayarit. Considering the concentrations of Hg in the muscle and the national consumption rate, shrimp farmed in NW Mexico does not represent a risk for human health (HQ<1). PMID:25303662

  5. Characterization of Lake Michigan coastal lakes using zooplankton assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Goodrich, Maria L.; Murphy, Paul C.; Davis, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Zooplankton assemblages and water quality were examined bi-weekly from 17 April to 19 October 1998 in 11 northeastern Lake Michigan coastal lakes of similar origin but varied in trophic status and limnological condition. All lakes were within or adjacent to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan. Zooplankton (principally microcrustaceans and rotifers) from triplicate Wisconsin net (80 I?m) vertical tows taken at each lake's deepest location were analyzed. Oxygen-temperature-pH-specific conductivity profiles and surface water quality were concurrently measured. Bray-Curtis similarity analysis showed small variations among sample replicates but large temporal differences. The potential use of zooplankton communities for environmental lake comparisons was evaluated by means of BIOENV (Primer 5.1) and principal component analyses. Zooplankton analyzed at the lowest identified taxonomic level yielded greatest sensitivity to limnological variation. Taxonomic and ecological aggregations of zooplankton data performed comparably, but less well than the finest taxonomic analysis. Secchi depth, chlorophyll a, and sulfate concentrations combined to give the best correlation with patterns of variation in the zooplankton data set. Principal component analysis of these variables revealed trophic status as the most influential major limnological gradient among the study lakes. Overall, zooplankton abundance was an excellent indicator of variation in trophic status.

  6. Structural and lithologic relationships in the Raleigh metamorphic belt near Lake Gaston, Virginia and North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, P.E.; Horton, J.W. Jr. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary results of mapping along the NC-VA State line eastward from the Buggs Is. granite about 35 km to the Hollister fault zone yield new information about structural and lithologic relationships in the Raleigh metamorphic belt. The layered rocks are predominantly two-mica schist and sillimanite-mica schist interlayered with lesser amounts of muscovite-biotite-quartz-plagioclase paragneiss and hornblende-biotite gneiss. The overall rock assemblage here differs from those along strike near Goochland, VA, and near Raleigh, NC, and is reminiscent of an accretionary complex. Bodies of foliated to massive two-mica granite are abundant and commonly contain garnet. One body, the Wise pluton, contains a N--NW-striking, steeply dipping foliation, but the intrusive contact of the granite with the metamorphic rocks is discordant. The most prominent regional foliation, parallel to transposed compositional layering, is axial planar to relict, reclined, isoclinal outcrop-scale folds. This foliation is folded at both outcrop and map scale by open folds plunging NW and SW. Some foliated, two-mica granite sheets are warped by the open folds; other bodies of similar granite cut across these folds. Sillimanite needles are locally aligned with the hinges of some of the open folds, an indication that sillimanite-muscovite-grade metamorphism was associated with this folding event. The two-mica granites resemble other late Paleozoic granites in the region. If these granites prove to be late Paleozoic (Alleghanian), then the deformation and metamorphism that produced sillimanite along the hingelines also must be Alleghanian. Relatively younger, NW- and SE-plunging crenulations and chevron folds are associated with a crenulation cleavage that dips steeply NE or SW. Sillimanite needles are folded by these crenulations. Crenulation cleavage and related folds may have developed in response to transpression of these rocks between the dextral Lake Gordon and Hollister mylonite zones.

  7. Lake restoration technology transfer assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

  8. LAKE WATER TEMPERATURE SIMULATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functional relationships to describe surface wind mixing, vertical turbulent diffusion, convective heat transfer, and radiation penetration based on data from lakes in Minnesota have been developed. hese relationships have been introduced by regressing model parameters found eith...

  9. Spatial variation among lakes within landscapes: Ecological organization along lake chains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Webster, Katherine E.; Riera, Joan L.; Kratz, Timothy K.; Baron, Jill S.; Bukaveckas, Paul A.; Kling, George; White, David S.; Caine, Nel; Lathrop, Richard C; Leavitt, Peter R.

    1999-01-01

    Although limnologists have long been interested in regional patterns in lake attributes, only recently have they considered lakes connected and organized across the landscape, rather than as spatially independent entities. Here we explore the spatial organization of lake districts through the concept of landscape position, a concept that considers lakes longitudinally along gradients of geomorphology and hydrology. We analyzed long-term chemical and biological data from nine lake chains (lakes in a series connected through surface or groundwater flow) from seven lake districts of diverse hydrologic and geomorphic settings across North America. Spatial patterns in lake variables driven by landscape position were surprisingly common across lake districts and across a wide range of variables. On the other hand, temporal patterns of lake variables, quantified using synchrony, the degree to which pairs of lakes exhibit similar dynamics through time, related to landscape position only for lake chains with lake water residence times that spanned a wide range and were generally long (close to or greater than 1 year). Highest synchrony of lakes within a lake chain occurred when lakes had short water residence times. Our results from both the spatial and temporal analyses suggest that certain features of the landscape position concept are robust enough to span a wide range of seemingly disparate lake types. The strong spatial patterns observed in this analysis, and some unexplained patterns, suggest the need to further study these scales and to continue to view lake ecosystems spatially, longitudinally, and broadly across the landscape.

  10. Lake County renewable energy plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This report documents the preparation of a renewable energy plan for Lake County, Oregon. It is the County's intention to adopt this plan as a supporting document to its Comprehensive Plan and implementing ordinances. The consideration of renewable energy in its land-use planning program is a statutory requirement for Lake County, and under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act such renewable resource planning also fulfills regional energy objectives on a local level.

  11. Burrowing saves Lake Erie clams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    Freshwater unionid clams in North America have been virtually eliminated from waters that are colonized by zebra mussels. Near total mortality has been reported in western Lake Erie, but we have discovered a large population of native clams in a Lake Erie wetland that shows little sign of infestation. Field observations and laboratory experiments show that warm summer water temperatures and soft, silt-clay sediments trigger burowing by clams. This discourages infestation and physically removes any attached zebra mussels.

  12. Global lake surface water temperatures from ATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCallum, Stuart; Merchant, Christopher J.; Layden, Aisling

    2013-04-01

    The ATSR Reprocessing for Climate - Lake (ARC-Lake) project applies optimal estimation (OE) retrievals and probabilistic cloud screening methods to provide lake surface water temperature (LSWT) estimates from the series of (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometers. This methodology is generic (i.e. applicable to all lakes) as variations in physical properties such as elevation, salinity, and atmospheric conditions are accounted for through the forward modelling of observed radiances. In the initial phases of ARC-Lake, LSWTs were obtained for 258 of Earth's largest lakes. In the final phase of the project, the dataset is extended by applying the OE methodology to smaller lakes, providing LSWT data from 1991 to 2012 for approximately 1000 lakes. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the ARC-Lake project, its publically available data products and some applications of these products.

  13. Mitigation alternatives for L Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.B.

    1988-11-03

    The current condition of L Lake/Steel Creek was summarized in a report to SCDHEC in June 1988 which reported that the L Lake and Steel Creek ecosystems were adequately developing towards balanced biological communities. If mitigation for L Lake inputs, specifically temperature and nutrients, are required, several viable alternatives are available. A report prepared by Spencer in 1986 discusses the various options available for cooling L-Reactor discharges. In effect, a small cooling tower is the only realistic solution to reducing effluent temperatures. Nutrient mitigation can take several approaches including upstream sewage treatment, hypolimnetic withdrawal, dilution of input water by Par Pond water, precipitation of nutrients, and sediment oxidation. None of these systems would influence the thermal regime, but would significantly reduce nutrient input into the system. One beneficial use of L-Lake thermal effluents is algaculture, the production of useful algae. A document prepared in 1988 concludes that algaculture is a technically and economically feasible mitigation alternative for L Lake and could allow L Lake to be handled under Section 318 of the Clean Water Act.

  14. The Role of Trans Tensional Structures and Lake Mead Reservoir in Groundwater Flow in Black Canyon, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV-AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justet, L.; Beard, S.

    2010-12-01

    the AZ extensional corridor and NW-SE trans tension related to the Lake Mead shear zone are the main controls on groundwater flow in the vicinity of HD and Boulder City Pluton. Most groundwater in BC appears to discharge along the NW-striking Palm Tree fault that parallels the northern edge of the pluton. Supported by trends in chemistry, an alignment of similar-elevation springs along a N-S striking fault that extends the length of west BC may be a flow path for groundwater from north BC to south of the pluton. South of the pluton, dikes intrude many of the faults and appear to act as flow barriers. Groundwater in this part of BC may flow through stacked layers of brecciated volcanic rock prevalent in the area. Flow from laterally adjacent valleys into BC would have to cross a N-S structural fabric that is not favored kinematically. Existing information implies an overall absence of significant surface discharge in BC prior to construction of HD. This indicates that the head created by impoundment of the Colorado River has likely pushed old, slow moving groundwater through CRV and, possibly, south Lake Mead Valley, to the surface in BC where it discharges as springs and seeps.

  15. The size-distribution of Earth's lakes.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Seekell, D A

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth's lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km(2) are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km(2) are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  16. INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18272, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  17. 200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST OF "MAIN' STREET. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18273, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  18. CO2 emission from lake-filled Katanuma crater, Narugo volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, E.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Mori, T.; Perez, N.

    2010-12-01

    Narugo volcano is composed by four dacitic Holocene age lava domes surrounding the 400 m wide lake-filled Katanuma crater. A large caldera, 5.5 x 7 km NW of the city of Sendai was formed by paroxysmal eruptions 45 ka ago and after this activity, lava flows and lava domes were formed in the inner part of the caldera. The only known eruption at Narugo in historical time occurred in 837 AD. Katanuma is known as one of the most acidic lakes in the world and boiling springs, water vapour and volcanic gases are discharged from the lake botton. As a result of this degassing, a relatively intense volcanic gas emission is observed along the lake surface in the form of gas bubbles. To compute the total CO2 degassing rate through Katanuma water lake surface, a CO2 emission survey was carried out on August 2010. CO2 efflux measurements were performed on the water surface by means of a portable NDIR sensor at 86 sampling sites, following a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method.CO2 efflux values ranged between 16 and 14300 g m-2 d-1. CO2 efflux map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation. An important CO2 degassing structure was observed at the water surface, located on its west half part, with a N-S trending. An averaged map of 200 equiprobable simulations allowed us to compute 35.2 ± 4.1 t/d of CO2 released to the atmosphere through the water surface on a area of 0.14 km2. These results suggest clearly that monitoring CO2 emission rate from lake-filled Katanuma crater will contribute to improve the Narugo volcano surveillance program as well as our knowledge on the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, which is actually estimated about 136 Mt year-1 (Pérez et al., 2010). Reference: Pérez et al., 2010. CVL 7 Workshop Costa Rica, March 2010.

  19. Seismicity and Tectonics of the Lake Tahoe Basin through the Truckee, California Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, T.; Ruhl, C. J.; Schmauder, G. C.; Smith, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    East dipping range bounding normal faults, NE-trending sinistral, and NW-trending dextral strike-slip faults of the Tahoe-Truckee, California-Nevada area define the transtensional strain environment of the Northern Walker Lane. North of Long Valley, California, the Sierran front is comprised of a series of left-stepping normal faults that terminate in the northern Lake Tahoe basin area. Directly north of Lake Tahoe, slip is transferred through the Truckee, California area and northward through a complex distribution of primarily conjugate strike-slip and minor normal fault systems. The recent identification of the Polaris fault zone extends Northern Walker Lake Belt dextral slip south of the Mohawk Valley fault zone to Truckee. The region accommodates as much as 10 mm/yr of dextral shear and has a history of M6+ earthquakes. In contrast to the general lack of background seismicity associated with major range bounding normal faults in the Tahoe region, there is abundant seismicity north of the Lake through this slip transfer zone (i.e., focal mechanisms of small magnitude earthquakes provide limited constraints on the dips of major range bounding normal faults). A NE-SW-trending zone of seismicity north of Lake Tahoe and extending into southeast Reno, Nevada, includes several M4+ strike-slip and normal faulting sequences, and numerous identifiable structures. An M4.5 (2004), M4.8 (2005), and associated general increase in seismicity in the N. Tahoe area may have been triggered by broader deformation resulting from a Moho-depth dike injection event in late 2003 (von Seggern et al., 2008). Preliminary analysis of short-period focal mechanisms reveals a change in T-axis trend from ESE west of the California-Nevada border to ENE east of the border. Focal mechanism and moment tensor solutions produce a ratio of 9/1 strike-slip to normal solutions in contrast to range bounding east dipping normal structures. Earthquake relocations display distinct lineaments of seismicity

  20. Hydrogeology of the Lake Miona area, northeast Sumter County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Lake Miona area, in northeast Sumter County, is characterized by karstic depressions that contain lakes, ponds, and marshes that drain vertically to the upper Floridan aquifer. Lake Miona, Black Lake, and Cherry Lake are the prominent water features of the area. When the lake levels are lowest, the lakes are not connected, but at higher levels, they become connected and water flows eastward from Lake Miona through Black Lake to Cherry Lake. The chemical and biological conditions in the lakes are such that, although they support a large population of submerged aquatic plants, no problem with algae blooms was observed. (USGS)

  1. Lake water quality mapping from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The lakes in three LANDSAT scenes were mapped by the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. Field checking the maps by three separate individuals revealed approximately 90-95% correct classification for the lake categories selected. Variations between observers was about 5%. From the MDAS color coded maps the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. This lake was closely checked and a pollution source of 100 cows was found in the springs which fed this lake. The theory, lab work and field work which made it possible for this demonstration project to be a practical lake classification procedure are presented.

  2. Lake water quality mapping from Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In the project described remote sensing was used to check the quality of lake waters. The lakes of three Landsat scenes were mapped with the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. From the MDAS color coded maps, the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. The lake was closely checked, and the presence of 100 cows in the springs which fed the lake could be identified as the pollution source. The laboratory and field work involved in the lake classification project is described.

  3. Investigation of the dramatic changes in lake level of the Bosten Lake in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengjing; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaode; Chen, Yongmin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Bosten Lake, located in the arid region of northwest China, is the largest inland freshwater lake in China. Water resources in Bosten Lake are of great importance for the regional drinking water supply, agricultural irrigation, and economic development of Xinjiang province. In this study, the dynamics of the lake level in Bosten Lake were investigated from 1956 to 2010. We found that the lake level experienced three different periods of change due to the combined influences of climate variation and human activities. Generally, the lake level has shown a significant downward trend since the first observation started in 1956 and dropped to its lowest level in 1987. Thereafter, the lake level presented a continuous upward trend and rose to its highest value in 2002. Then, the level decreased dramatically from 2002 to 2010. A water balance model and the climate elasticity method were used to estimate the reasons for the lake level changes of Bosten Lake. The results showed that an increase in lake evaporation led to the continuous decrease in lake level from 1958 to 1987. Then, human-controlled lake outflow and increasing lake inflow together led to the increase in lake level from 1988 to 2002. During 2003 to 2010, the emergency project of transferring water to Tarim River led to the increase in lake outflow, while the lake inflow obviously decreased because of a decrease in precipitation. These factors resulted in a sharp decrease in the lake level from 2003 to 2010. The changes in lake level indicate changes in available water resources from Bosten Lake. This reason for the analysis of the change in lake level in this study is to support the water resources management of Bosten Lake.

  4. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  5. Lakes in Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchitta, Baerbel K.

    2010-10-01

    The paper reviews the evolution of hypotheses of lakes in Valles Marineris through observations made from the time of Mariner and continuing through the Viking, MGS, MO, MEx, and MRO missions. Several pertinent findings from these missions are addressed, including: The morphology and composition of the interior layered deposits (ILD); the question whether ILD are deposited inside the troughs or exhumed from the walls; the possible existence of ancestral basins; the derivation of water; arguments for an origin as aqueous, eolian, or pyroclastic sediments, or sub/ice volcanoes; origin of inclined layers, mounds and moats; and age relations of features within and peripheral to the troughs. A possible scenario begins with the collapse of ice-charged ground into ancestral basins along structural planes of weakness due to Tharsis stresses, about 3.5 Ga ago. The basins rapidly filled with water from ground ice, subterranean aquifers, or nearby valley networks. The water spilled out of the peripheral troughs and flowed across high plateaus into early outflow channels. The ancestral basins then filled with sediments derived from valley networks or from trapped eolian or pyroclastic deposits. Alternatively, volcanoes rose under the water or ice to form tuyas. The water was highly acidic, and sediments may have been deposited directly as evaporites or were later altered to evaporites by the brines or by hydrothermal activity. Percolating fluids produced iron oxide concretions. Similar alteration would have affected the putative volcanoes. Most of the ILD were emplaced early in the troughs' history. Shortly thereafter, more water erupted from the peripheral troughs and formed additional chaos and outflow channels. The ancestral basins were breached by erosion and tectonism, and the through-going Coprates/Ius graben system developed. Major lakes within the Valles Marineris dried up and vigorous wind erosion reduced the friable, evaporite-rich sediments to isolated mounds

  6. Dongting Lake, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images show dramatic change in the water at Dongting Lake in Hunan province, China. A flood crest surged down the Yangtze River in late August of this year, but the embankments made by residents there held. The left image was acquired on September 2, 2002 and shows the extent of the lake. The right image was obtained March 19, 2002 before the flooding began.

    These images were acquired on September 2, 2002 and March 19,2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as

  7. Hydrology of Central Florida Lakes - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central Florida. The landscape of central Florida is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. Florida has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the Florida peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in Florida are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central Florida and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central Florida since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central Florida, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central Florida lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central

  8. Numerical simulations of Lake Vostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchitser, E.; Tremblay, B.

    2003-04-01

    Numerical simulations of Lake Vostok We present a systematic approach towards a realistic hydrodynamic model of lake Vostok. The lake is characterized by the unusual combination of size (permitting significant geostrophic motion) and an overlying ice sheet several kilometers thick. A priori estimates of the circulation in the deep lake predict a mostly geostrophic circulation driven by horizontal temperature gradients produced by the pressure-dependent freezing point at the base of the (non-uniform) ice sheet. Further preliminary (remote) research has revealed the steep topography and the elliptical geometry of the lake. A three dimensional, primitive equation, free surface, model is used as a starting point for the Lake configuration. We show how the surface pressure gradient forces are modified to permit a simulation that includes the hydrostatic effects of the overlying ice sheet. A thermodynamic ice model is coupled with the circulation component to simulate the ice accretion/melting at the base of the ice sheet. A stretching of the terrain following vertical coordinate is used to resolve the boundary layer in the ice/water interface. Furthermore, the terrain-following coordinate evolves in time, and is used to track the evolution of the ice sheet due to ice accretion/melting. Both idealized and realistic ice sheet bottom topographies (from remote radar data) are used to drive the simulations. Steady state and time evolving simulations (i.e., constant and evolving ice sheet geometry) will be descirbed, as well as a comparison to an idealized box model (Tremblay, Clarke, and Hohman). The coastline and lake bathymetry used in the simulation are derived from radar data and are accurately represented in our model.

  9. Eutrophication of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeton, Alfred M.

    1965-01-01

    Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior are classified as oligotrophic lakes on the basis of their biological, chemical, and physical characteristics. Lake Ontario, although rich in nutrients, is morphometrically oligotrophic or mesotrophic because of its large area of deep water. Lake Erie, the most productive of the lakes and the shallowest, is eutrophic. Several changes commonly associated with eutrophication in small lakes have been observed in the Great Lakes. These changes apparently reflect accelerated eutrophication in the Great Lakes due to man's activity. Chemical data compiled from a number of sources, dating as early as 1854, indicate a progressive increase in the concentrations of various major ions and total dissolved solids in all of the lakes except Lake Superior. The plankton has changed somewhat in Lake Michigan and the plankton, benthos, and fish populations of Lake Erie are greatly different today from those of the past. An extensive area of hypolimnetic water of Lake Erie has developed low dissolved oxygen concentrations in late summer within recent years.

  10. Lake and reservoir restoration guidance manual: first edition

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.; Thornton, K.

    1988-02-01

    This manual provides guidance to lake managers, homeowners, lake associations, and laypersons on lake and reservoir restoration, management and protection. It also provides information on how to identify lake problems, evaluate practices for restoring and protection lakes, watershed management, and creating a lake-management plan.

  11. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE LOWER END OF TWIN LAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE LOWER END OF TWIN LAKES SHOWING THE HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS AT THE EDGE OF THE WATER NEAR CENTER OF THE PHOTO WITH THE NEW TWIN LAKES DAM JUST BEHIND. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  12. Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    If you live in Europe and buy roses, there is a good chance that they were grown in Kenya specifically, in one of the colossal greenhouses that blot out the once wild shores of Lake Naivasha, 90km north-west of Nairobi. Some 25% of Europe's cut flowers come from Kenya. After a tentative start in the 1980s the industry is now the country's third-largest foreign-currency earner, bringing in $120m a year. But the recent violence in Kenya is having a major impact on the flower growers. A local trade union says 3,000 of the 30,000 workers employed in Naivasha's flower farms have abandoned their jobs. Kenya emerged as a flower power when Israel scaled down its own industry. It has since lost business to neighboring Ethiopia, which offers tax breaks and better security, but Naivasha's perfect intensity of sunlight and days of near-constant length should keep it on top.

    The ASTER image was acquired February 2, 2008, covers an area of 25 x 26.6 km, and is located near 0.8 degrees south latitude, 36.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Large floods and rapid deglaciation of the Lake Michigan Lobe and environs, ca. 19 to 18 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, B.; Brown, S.; Hajic, E.; Konen, M.

    2007-12-01

    Our collective research indicates that features attributed to large floods are associated with events separated in time by about 900 years. The oldest event is interpreted from a long and narrow morainal gap floored by coarse sand and gravel outwash that likely formed by a plungepool and migration of this nickpoint via overflow of Glacial Lake Wauponsee across the Marseilles Moraine near Oswego, Illinois. The weighted mean of four AMS C-14 ages of tundra plant stems and leaves identified from the base of the overlying lake fill is 18,900 ± 35 cal yr BP (15,710 ± 35 yr BP). The age of another overflow channel across the Marseilles Moraine is not yet known, but similar channel floor elevations relative to the Oswego channel suggest that they were contemporaneous. Landforms attributed to a younger large flood are located downstream of where the Fox River breaches the Woodstock Moraine in Algonquin, Illinois. Radiocarbon ages of tundra plant fossils preserved in sediment of ice-walled and slackwater lakes associated with the Woodstock and West Chicago Moraines indicate the younger floods likely predate 18,080 cal yr BP (14,860 ± 40 yr BP; UCIAMS-26265). A statistically similar age of 18,000 cal yr BP (14,830 ± 50 yr BP; B-207031) was obtained from organics preserved in a slackwater lake deposit in the Illinois River valley near Havana. The slackwater lake basin is floored by coarse gravelly sand attributed to the latest stage of flooding. At this time, the similar C-14 ages are the only evidence that link the proglacial and distal sites (more than 150 km apart) to the same flood. Based on continuity of morainic ridges, we believe that the large floods that eroded scarps into the southern margin of the Valparaiso Moraine north and parallel to the Kankakee River in NW Indiana and NE Illinois are contemporaneous with the younger large floods discussed above. The scarp was eroded by meltwater from interlobate areas of the Lake Michigan and Huron-Erie Lobes. The rate of

  14. Exploring trends, causes, and consequences of declining lipids in Lake Superior lake trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of lake trout to forage in deepwater habitats is facilitated by high lipid content, which affords buoyancy. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 80 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 80 m. Siscowets have been known f...

  15. What can the National Lake Assessment Tell Us about Ecosystem Service Benefits in Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The condition of lakes, ponds, and reservoirs is often viewed as existing along a continuum from pristine to impacted. The 2007 National Lake Survey was conducted to assess the condition of the nation’s lakes. Over 1,000 lakes were surveyed and detailed physical and chemical da...

  16. Estimate of net trophic transfer efficiency of PCBs to Lake Michigan lake trout from their prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Quintal, Richard T.; Begnoche, Linda J.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) body burden accumulated by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Laurentian Great Lakes is from their food. We used diet information, PCB determinations in both lake trout and their prey, and bioenergetics modeling to estimate the efficiency with which Lake Michigan lake trout retain PCBs from their food. Our estimates were the most reliable estimates to date because (a) the lake trout and prey fish sampled during our study were all from the same vicinity of the lake, (b) detailed measurements were made on the PCB concentrations of both lake trout and prey fish over wide ranges in fish size, and (c) lake trout diet was analyzed in detail over a wide range of lake trout size. Our estimates of net trophic transfer efficiency of PCBs to lake trout from their prey averaged from 0.73 to 0.89 for lake trout between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. There was no evidence of an upward or downward trend in our estimates of net trophic transfer efficiency for lake trout between the ages of 5 and 10 years old, and therefore this efficiency appeared to be constant over the duration of the lake trout's adult life in the lake. On the basis of our estimtes, lake trout retained 80% of the PCBs that are contained within their food.

  17. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.140 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules....

  18. 33 CFR 162.130 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. 162.130 Section 162.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.130 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. (a) Purpose....

  19. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules. 162.132 Section 162.132 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.132 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules....

  20. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports....

  1. 33 CFR 162.134 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; traffic rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; traffic rules. 162.134 Section 162.134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.134 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; traffic rules. (a) Detroit River....

  2. Energy density of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lakes Huron and Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, S.A.; Nalepa, T.F.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rediske, R.R.; Schneeberger, P.J.; He, J.X.

    2006-01-01

    We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002–2004. We determined energy density and percent dry weight for lake whitefish from both lakes and lipid content for Lake Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained relatively constant with further increases in fish weight. Energy density, adjusted for weight, was lower in Lake Huron than in Lake Michigan for both small (≤800 g) and large fish (>800 g). Energy density did not differ seasonally for small or large lake whitefish or between adult male and female fish. Energy density was strongly correlated with percent dry weight and percent lipid content. Based on data from commercially caught lake whitefish, body condition was lower in Lake Huron than Lake Michigan during 1981–2003, indicating that the dissimilarity in body condition between the lakes could be long standing. Energy density and lipid content in 2002–2004 in Lake Michigan were lower than data for comparable sized fish collected in 1969–1971. Differences in energy density between lakes were attributed to variation in diet and prey energy content as well as factors that affect feeding rates such as lake whitefish density and prey abundance.

  3. 33 CFR 162.130 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. 162.130 Section 162.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.130 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. (a) Purpose....

  4. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules. 162.132 Section 162.132 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.132 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules....

  5. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports....

  6. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.140 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules....

  7. Competition between larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) for zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1998-01-01

    Diet and growth of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) were compared in mesocosm experiments in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Fish were sampled from single-species and mixed assemblages in 2-m3 cages for 8 weeks during April and May. Both species initially ate mostly cyclopoid copepodites and small cladocerans (Bosmia spp.). Schoener's index of diet overlap showed considerable overlap (70-90%). Lake whitefish ate Daphnia spp. and adult copepods about 2 weeks earlier than did lake herring, perhaps related to their larger mean mouth gape. Lake whitefish were consistently larger than lake herring until the eighth week, especially in the sympatric treatments. Lake whitefish appeared to have a negative effect on the growth of lake herring, as lake herring in mixed-species treatments were smaller and weighed less than lake herring reared in single-species treatments. The diet similarities of lake whitefish and lake herring larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes. The greater initial size of lake whitefish could allow them to eat larger prey earlier and thereby limit availability of these prey to lake herring at a crucial period of development.

  8. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona. 110.127 Section 110.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127 Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow...

  9. 78 FR 17869 - Safety Zone; Desert Storm Shootout; Lake Havasu, Lake Havasu City, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Desert Storm Shootout; Lake Havasu, Lake... establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the Colorado River in Lake Havasu, Lake...

  10. Glacial-Lake Outburst Erosion of the Grand Valley, Michigan, and Impacts on Glacial Lakes in the Lake Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehew, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence in the Grand Valley, which drained the retreating Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and later acted as a spillway between lakes in the Huron and Erie basins and in the Michigan basin, suggests that at least one drainage event from glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago was a catastrophic outburst that deeply incised the valley. Analysis of shoreline and outlet geomorphology at the Chicago outlet supports J H Bretz's hypothesis of episodic incision and lake-level change. Shoreline features of each lake level converge to separate outlet sills that decrease in elevation from the oldest to youngest lake phases. This evidence, coupled with the presence of boulder lags and other features consistent with outburst origin, suggests that the outlets were deepened by catastrophic outbursts at least twice. The first incision event is correlated with a linked series of floods that progressed from Huron and Erie basin lakes to glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago and then to the Mississippi. The second downcutting event occurred after the Two Rivers Advance of the Lake Michigan Lobe. Outbursts from the eastern outlets of glacial Lake Agassiz to glacial Lake Algonquin are a possible cause for this period of downcutting at the Chicago outlets.

  11. Episodic acidification of Adirondack lakes during snowmelt

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.A.; Driscoll, C.T.; Van Dreason, R.; Yatsko, C.P.

    1990-07-01

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. In some systems lake outlet ANC reaches negative values. The authors examined outlet water chemistry from II Adirondack lakes during 1986 and 1987 snowmelts. In these lakes, SO concentrations were diluted during snowmelt and did not depress ANC. For lakes with high baseline ANC values, springtime ANC depressions were primarily accompanied by basic cation dilution. For lakes with low baseline ANC, No increases dominated ANC depressions. Lakes with intermediate baseline ANC were affected by both processes and exhibited larger ANC depressions. Ammonium dilution only affected wetland systems. A model predicting a linear relationship between outlet water ANC minima and autumn ANC was inappropriate. To assess watershed response to episodic acidification, hydrologic flow paths must be considered. (Copyright (c) 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.)

  12. Recent Warming of Lake Kivu

    PubMed Central

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A.; Crowe, Sean A.; Hecky, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient. PMID:25295730

  13. Neoichnology at lake margins: Implications for paleo-lake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Jessica M. M.; Sheldon, Nathan D.

    2010-07-01

    Neoichnological studies provide significant information that can aid in the interpretation of ancient ichnological assemblages. Here we examine, for the first time, the pattern in both vertebrate and invertebrate trace distribution and abundance that can be seen in two geographically separate, but broadly analogous, contemporary semi-arid climate lake margin settings in an effort to describe taphonomic processes relevant to paleo-lake systems. Lake margin to supralittoral zone transects were made at Ruby Reservoir, Montana (USA) and La Sotonera, Spain and vegetation cover, trace cover %, trace diversity, and substrate characteristics were recorded. Similar patterns in trace distribution were seen through the eulittoral to supralittoral zones, with the majority of traces identified within a single transect present at both sites. However, a few traces attributed to larger organisms were found to be unique to each and in some instances, could to be assigned to a specific trace maker. The eulittoral zone was considered to have characteristics attributable to the Scoyenia ichnofacies, however, analysis of the supralittoral zone shows some characteristics of both the Coprinisphaera and the Mermia ichnofacies. In addition, a transitional zone between a Scoyenia-like ichnofacies and a fully terrestrial assemblage was found, which may enable continental ichnofacies to be further refined for application to paleo-lake systems. Study of the distribution of traces with distance along the transects also suggests taphonomic biases against the preservation of certain types of traces (e.g., avian) due to seasonal fluctuations of the lake level and the subsequent reduced preservation potential for lake-proximal traces.

  14. Lake evaporation estimates in tropical Africa (Lake Ziway, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Legesse, Dagnachew; Gasse, Françoise; Travi, Yves; Chernet, Tesfaye

    2001-05-01

    Estimates of evaporation from an open shallow lake in tropical Africa (Lake Ziway, Main Ethiopian Rift) are made by using monthly hydrometeorological data available for the past three decades. On the one hand, annual average estimates are inferred from three climatic approaches, which can be applied in areas with limited meteorological data. The lake energy balance yields an evaporation rate of 1780 mm yr -1, assuming a Bowen ratio of 0.15 (that of Lake Victoria). The Penman method gives an annual evaporation rate of 1870 mm. The complementary relationship lake evaporation model (CRLE) applied on monthly averaged values of air temperature, air humidity and sunshine duration gives 1730 mm yr -1. The sensitivity of each method to changes in input variables is analyzed in order to test the stability of the resulting estimates. This helps discuss uncertainties and possible inter-annual variations of the evaporation rate. On the other hand, the monthly lake level records together with precipitation and river discharge data between 1969 and 1990, allow us to estimate the water balance, providing an annual rate of 1937 mm for the combined evaporation and groundwater losses. The chloride budget is used to discriminate the groundwater from the evaporation loss. It gives us an annual evaporation rate of 1740 mm and a corresponding groundwater loss of 200 mm yr -1. The groundwater loss estimate is of the same order of magnitude as the surface outflow, but the associated error in the former is significant because the result is sensitive to the poorly known chloride content of river inflows. Our results can be used to forecast the impact of increased water consumption in the basin.

  15. Periodic floods from glacial Lake Missoula into the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia, northeastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1984-08-01

    At least 15 floods ascended the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia during a single glaciation. Varves between 14 of the flood beds indicate one backflooding every 35 to 55 yr. This regularity suggests that the floods came from an ice-dammed lake that was self-dumping. Probably the self-dumping lake was glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, because the floods accord with inferred emptyings of that lake in frequency and number, apparently entered Lake Columbia from the east, and produced beds resembling backflood deposits of Lake Missoula floods in southern Washington.

  16. A multiproxy study of Holocene water-depth and environmental changes in Lake St Ana, Eastern Carpathian Mountains, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E. K.; Buczkó, K.; Braun, M.; Jakab, G.

    2009-04-01

    allow the following main inference to be made: Lake Saint Ana is a vulnerable ecosystem; hydrological, biological and chemical processes in the lake are heavily influenced by the lakeshore forest and the soil underlying it. In-lake productivity is higher under deciduous canopy and litter, and considerably repressed by coniferous canopy and litter. The lake today subsists in a managed environment, that is however far from its natural state. This would be a dense Fagus sylvatica forest supplying more nutrients and keeping up a more productive in-lake flora and fauna. An overview of the regional Holocene lake-level records suggests that the general lake-level trends of this study agree with other records in the region, except for the lat 2,700 years, for which conflicting trends were found. The pollen based palaeo-precipitation record in NW Romania signals lower precipitation, while our, and some other records, signal significant increase in available moisture. Further studies are needed to resolve this problem.

  17. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38) and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), and indeed are auto-correlated, there are distinct outliers in the data set. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled data set to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  18. Bathythermal habitat use by strains of Great Lakes- and Finger Lakes-origin lake trout in Lake Huron after a change in prey fish abundance and composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Krueger, Charles C.; Taylor, William W.

    2012-01-01

    A study conducted in Lake Huron during October 1998–June 2001 found that strains of Great Lakes-origin (GLO) lake trout Salvelinus namaycush occupied significantly higher temperatures than did Finger Lakes-origin (FLO; New York) lake trout based on data from archival (or data storage) telemetry tags that recorded only temperature. During 2002 and 2003, we implanted archival tags that recorded depth as well as temperature in GLO and FLO lake trout in Lake Huron. Data subsequently recorded by those tags spanned 2002–2005. Based on those data, we examined whether temperatures and depths occupied by GLO and FLO lake trout differed during 2002–2005. Temperatures occupied during those years were also compared with occupied temperatures reported for 1998–2001, before a substantial decline in prey fish biomass. Temperatures occupied by GLO lake trout were again significantly higher than those occupied by FLO lake trout. This result supports the conclusion of the previous study. The GLO lake trout also occupied significantly shallower depths than FLO lake trout. In 2002–2005, both GLO and FLO lake trout occupied significantly lower temperatures than they did in 1998–2001. Aside from the sharp decline in prey fish biomass between study periods, the formerly abundant pelagic alewife Alosa pseudoharengus virtually disappeared and the demersal round goby Neogobius melanostomus invaded the lake and became locally abundant. The lower temperatures occupied by lake trout in Lake Huron during 2002–2005 may be attributable to changes in the composition of the prey fish community, food scarcity (i.e., a retreat to cooler water could increase conversion efficiency), or both.

  19. Monitoring change in Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Freeman, Michael L.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Carling, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake, only limited water quality monitoring has occurred historically. To change this, new monitoring stations and networks—gauges of lake level height and rate of inflow, moored buoys, and multiple lake-bottom sensors—will provide important information that can be used to make informed decisions regarding future management of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem.

  20. Outer synchronization investigation between WS and NW small-world networks with different node numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangye; Li, Chengren; Li, Tingting; Yang, Yi; Wang, Chen; He, Fangjun; Sun, Jingchang

    2016-09-01

    Some typical dual-ring erbium-doped fiber lasers with hyperchaos behaviors are taken as nodes to construct two kinds of small-world networks-NW and WS networks. Based on Lyapunov stability theorem, the appropriate controllers are designed and the outer synchronization between the small-world networks with diverse structures and different node numbers is further investigated. The simulation results show that the perfect synchronization between the complex small-world networks is realized, which is of potential application for all optical communication network.

  1. Atmospheric-Pressure Processed Silver Nanowire (Ag-NW)/ZnO Composite Transparent Conducting Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, John D.; Aggarwal, Shruti; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Ginley, David S.

    2015-06-14

    Composite transparent contacts (TCs) based on metal nanowires and metal oxide matrix materials hold great promise for high performance transparent contacts for photovoltaics and opto-electronic technologies with the potential of all-atmospheric pressure processing. The metal nanowire mesh can provide both electrical conductivity and mechanical robustness against bending while the matrix material can both control the electrical interface and protect the metal nanowires. Here, we demonstrate all atmospheric pressure processed Ag-NW/ZnO composite TCs that are 90% transparent in the visible with sheet resistance Rs ~= 10 Ohms/sq. In addition, the composite TCs have higher infrared transmission than conventional TCO films with the same sheet resistance.

  2. Pollen loads of eucalypt and other pollen types in birds in NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Neumann, Max

    2015-12-01

    Here we present the amount of pollen of eucalypt and pollen of other types for birds captured in two bird ringing stations for 14 months (March 2014 to April 2015) in NW Spain. Common and latin names of all birds species captured, together with the number of captured individuals (N), prevalence of eucalypt pollen (percentage of individuals with eucalypt pollen) and of pollen of other types and average pollen loads per individual for eucalypt and other pollen types is presented. See [1] for further information and discussion. PMID:26568978

  3. Pollen loads of eucalypt and other pollen types in birds in NW Spain

    PubMed Central

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Neumann, Max

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the amount of pollen of eucalypt and pollen of other types for birds captured in two bird ringing stations for 14 months (March 2014 to April 2015) in NW Spain. Common and latin names of all birds species captured, together with the number of captured individuals (N), prevalence of eucalypt pollen (percentage of individuals with eucalypt pollen) and of pollen of other types and average pollen loads per individual for eucalypt and other pollen types is presented. See [1] for further information and discussion. PMID:26568978

  4. The Neo-Tethyan subduction zone(s,?) in Azerbaijan, NW Iran: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, Anna; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Faridi, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Azerbaijan in NW Iran, and in particular the Khoy ophiolitic complex, require more detailed documentation to integrate them as elements of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. They are attributed to multiple accretion and collision after subduction and closure of the Tethys Ocean and related seaways. We are interested in the pre- to syn-collisional relationships between the ophiolitic, arc and other magmatic units. This work investigates to what extent single or multiple collisions and orogeny have shaped the NW Iranian Plateau. In particular, we want to understand the changes in deformation style within the collision zone and the effects of several possibly coeval events such as closure of two suture zones separated by an arc and possibly followed by slab break-off(s). Fieldwork focused on sampling the different magmatic rock units to specify the structural record and the structural relationships between the various lithological units. Cretaceous to Quaternary, regionally distributed magmatic rocks were collected to have good resolution of their changes in space and time. Petrological, geochemical and isotope studies will characterize magmatic rocks and their sources. Major and trace element geochemistry of mantle and crustal suites of the Khoy ophiolitic complex help to constrain the tectonic setting. Two complexes were defined on the basis of K-Ar dating (Khalatbari-Jafari et al., 2004). An older, probably subducted ophiolite of Triassic-Jurassic age and a younger non-metamorphic ophiolite of Late Cretaceous age. Fossil-bearing sediments provide stratigraphic ages of important contacts. Preliminary results are present in form of bulk rock and trace element chemistry of ultramafic and mafic rocks of the Khoy ophiolite(s, ?) and offer a first possibility to compare the data with already existing publications. Additionally, petrological studies of various magmatic rocks present first products for a starting discussion on the geodynamic evolution of the NW part of

  5. Three new species of Pruvotinidae (Mollusca: Solenogastres) from Antarctica and NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamarro, Maria; García-Álvarez, Oscar; Urgorri, Victoriano

    2013-09-01

    The family Pruvotinidae (Solenogastres, Cavibelonia) includes thirty species of fifteen genera grouped in five subfamilies. These subfamilies are defined by the combination of the presence or absence of hollow hook-shaped sclerites, the presence or absence of a dorsopharyngeal gland and the type of ventrolateral foregut glandular organs: type A, type C or circumpharyngeal. In this paper, three new species of the family Pruvotinidae are described: Pruvotina artabra n. sp. and Gephyroherpia impar n. sp. from NW Spain, and Pruvotina manifesta n. sp. from Antarctic Peninsula. These new descriptions increase the global knowledge of Solenogastres biodiversity.

  6. Origin of postcollisional intrusions in NW Anatolia, Turkey: Implications for magma chamber processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aysal, Namık

    2013-04-01

    Post-collisional magmatic activities of NW Anatolia are represented by a series of granitic intrusions and volcanic successions in the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey. These plutonic rocks have distinct textures, chemical compositions and Sr-Nd isotope characteristics. They consist of coarse grained, equigranular and/or hypidiomorphic textured granite, gronodiorite, monzogranite, quartz-monzonite, pyroxene-monzonite and leucocratic alkali feldspar granites. These intrusions are composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene and biotite. However, leucocratic facies rocks contain tourmaline with minor amount of mafic minerals. Accessory phases are represented by zircon, apatite, monozite, magnetite, sphene and rarely allanite. ASI values of the plutonic rocks vary between 0.7 and 1.24. These intrusive rocks are therefore classified as metaluminous-peraluminous with I-type affinity. K2O contents show that the intrusive rock samples show calc-alkaline, high K-calc-alkaline and shoshonitic character. Initial 87Sr/86Sr(t) (0.69980-0.70835), 143Nd/144Nd(t) (0.51238-0.51247) isotope ratios and negative ɛNd(t) (-4.4 - -2.6) values imply that these intrusive rocks could have been derived from enriched mantle sources. N-MORB normalized spidergrams of NW Anatolian plutonic rocks display enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), light rare earth elements (LREE) and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE) indicating hydrous melting of a mantle wedge in a subduction zone and/or enrichment of the mantle source with an inherited subduction component from an ancient arc magmatism. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element spidergrams are indicative of the importance of plagioclase and amphibole fractionation. On tectonic discrimination diagrams, all granite samples fall into the volcanic arc granite, syn and post-collisional granite fields. The geochemical data also indicate that a number of magma chamber processes involving magma mixing, fractional

  7. Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

  8. First evidence of successful natural reproduction by planted lake trout in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nester, Robert T.; Poe, Thomas P.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-two lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) swim-up fry, 24-27 mm long, were captured with emergent fry traps and a tow net in northwestern Lake Huron on a small nearshore reef off Alpena, Michigan, between May 10 and June 1, 1982. These catches represent the first evidence of successful production of swim-up fry by planted, hatchery-reared lake trout in Lake Huron since the lake trout rehabilitation program began in 1973.

  9. EPISODIC ACIDIFICATION OF ADIRONDACK LAKES DURING SNOWMELT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. n some systems lake out...

  10. 27 CFR 9.177 - Alexandria Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Lake Darling at benchmark (BM) 1366, which is an unmarked bridge on County Road 11, known as the... road known as County Road 62; then (5) North along County Road 62 on to the Lake Miltona, East, Minn...; then (10) South along County Road 34 until the point where County Road 34 runs parallel to Lake...

  11. 27 CFR 9.128 - Seneca Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Cross Road, which changes to Cretsley Road, to its intersection with Mud Lake Road (County Road 23) on... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seneca Lake. 9.128 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Seneca Lake”....

  12. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  13. 27 CFR 9.177 - Alexandria Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Lake Darling at benchmark (BM) 1366, which is an unmarked bridge on County Road 11, known as the... road known as County Road 62; then (5) North along County Road 62 on to the Lake Miltona, East, Minn...; then (10) South along County Road 34 until the point where County Road 34 runs parallel to Lake...

  14. 27 CFR 9.177 - Alexandria Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Lake Darling at benchmark (BM) 1366, which is an unmarked bridge on County Road 11, known as the... road known as County Road 62; then (5) North along County Road 62 on to the Lake Miltona, East, Minn...; then (10) South along County Road 34 until the point where County Road 34 runs parallel to Lake...

  15. 27 CFR 9.128 - Seneca Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Cross Road, which changes to Cretsley Road, to its intersection with Mud Lake Road (County Road 23) on... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seneca Lake. 9.128 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Seneca Lake”....

  16. 27 CFR 9.128 - Seneca Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Cross Road, which changes to Cretsley Road, to its intersection with Mud Lake Road (County Road 23) on... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seneca Lake. 9.128 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Seneca Lake”....

  17. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  18. 27 CFR 9.177 - Alexandria Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Lake Darling at benchmark (BM) 1366, which is an unmarked bridge on County Road 11, known as the... road known as County Road 62; then (5) North along County Road 62 on to the Lake Miltona, East, Minn...; then (10) South along County Road 34 until the point where County Road 34 runs parallel to Lake...

  19. 27 CFR 9.128 - Seneca Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Cross Road, which changes to Cretsley Road, to its intersection with Mud Lake Road (County Road 23) on... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seneca Lake. 9.128 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Seneca Lake”....

  20. 27 CFR 9.177 - Alexandria Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Lake Darling at benchmark (BM) 1366, which is an unmarked bridge on County Road 11, known as the... road known as County Road 62; then (5) North along County Road 62 on to the Lake Miltona, East, Minn...; then (10) South along County Road 34 until the point where County Road 34 runs parallel to Lake...

  1. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  2. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  3. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  4. 27 CFR 9.128 - Seneca Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Cross Road, which changes to Cretsley Road, to its intersection with Mud Lake Road (County Road 23) on... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seneca Lake. 9.128 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Seneca Lake”....

  5. Hydrology of Lake Butler, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James L.; Schiffer, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Butler is one of the lakes that collectively make up the Butler chain of lakes in the headwaters of the Kissimmee River, Florida. The bottom configuration of the lake is typical of relict karst features formed during lower stages in sea level. The top of the Floridan aquifer is 50 to 100 feet below the land surface. The drainage area of Lake Butler is approximately 14.5 sq mi and is comprised of sub-basins of other lakes in the vicinity. Surface outflow from Lake Butler is generally southward to Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Kissimmee River. The extremes in lake stage for the period 1933-81 are 94.67 ft on June 23, 1981 and 101.78 ft on September 13, 1960. The median lake stage for this period was 99.28 ft above sea level. The quality of water in Lake Butler is excellent, based on studies of physical, chemical, and biological conditions by the Orange County Pollution Control Department. The lake water is slightly acidic and soft (48 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate). Pesticides in water were below detection levels at two sites sampled in the lake, but were detected in the bottom sediments. (USGS)

  6. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lake Erie. 9.83 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved...

  7. 33 CFR 117.797 - Lake Champlain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain. 117.797 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.797 Lake Champlain. (a) The drawspan... United States. (b) The draw of the US2 Bridge, mile 91.8, over Lake Champlain, between South Hero...

  8. 33 CFR 117.993 - Lake Champlain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain. 117.993 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Vermont § 117.993 Lake Champlain. (a) The drawspan for... vessels of the United States. (b) The draw of the US2 Bridge, mile 91.8, over Lake Champlain,...

  9. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from...

  10. Great Lakes Education Booklet, 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Natural Resources, Lansing.

    This booklet integrates science, history, and environmental education to help students acquire a basic understanding of the importance of the Great Lakes located in the United States. The packet also contains a Great Lakes Basin resource map and a sand dune poster. These materials introduce students to a brief history of the lakes, the diversity…

  11. A reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan was reviewed and updated, making use of recent estimates of watershed and atmospheric nitrogen loads. The updated total N load to Lake Michigan was approximately double the previous estimate from the Lake Michigan Mass Balance study ...

  12. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from...

  13. 33 CFR 117.993 - Lake Champlain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Champlain. 117.993 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Vermont § 117.993 Lake Champlain. (a) The drawspan for... vessels of the United States. (b) The draw of the US2 Bridge, mile 91.8, over Lake Champlain,...

  14. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lake Erie. 9.83 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved...

  15. Lake Okeechobee seepage monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Donald J.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected at the five original monitoring sites along the south shore of Lake Okeechobee from January 29, 1970 to June 28, 1972. In order to use the hydrographs in this report to full advantage, they should be studied in conjunction with Meyer's graphs and text (1971). During steady-state conditions, water seeps from the lake through the filtercake and through the aquifers beneath the dike. At those sites where the filtercake is missing, or has about the same permeability as the aquifers, the seepage from the lake is about equivalent to the flow through the aquifers. Present data are insufficient to determine whether or not filtercake buildup has reduced seepage. No appreciable change in drainage occurred during the observed period.

  16. Lake sensitivity to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Shurkin, J.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-06-01

    Research in the Adirondacks suggests that watershed dynamics are the key to a lake's vulnerability to acidification. The Electric Power Research Institute's Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) produced a computer model that successfully integrated the physical and chemical factors that determine these dynamics. The research required an unprecedented level of awareness of how watersheds work and how rain, soil, forests, and rocks interact. One outcome of the field and laboratory studies was the finding that some soils act as buffers, taking certain ions out of the water, while some added ions. While the ability of the watershed as a whole to neutralize acid is the main determinant of a lake's vulnerability, seasonal changes demonstrate that time is a factor. The model is in demand to test water in other locations and to explore buffering agents. 2 figures.

  17. Lake Volume Monitoring from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, J.-F.; Abarca-del-Río, R.; Bergé-Nguyen, M.; Arsen, A.; Drolon, V.; Clos, G.; Maisongrande, P.

    2016-03-01

    Lakes are integrators of environmental change occurring at both the regional and global scale. They present a wide range of behavior on a variety of timescales (cyclic and secular) depending on their morphology and climate conditions. Lakes play a crucial role in retaining and stocking water, and because of the significant global environmental changes occurring at several anthropocentric levels, the necessity to monitor all morphodynamic characteristics [e.g., water level, surface (water contour) and volume] has increased substantially. Satellite altimetry and imagery are now widely used together to calculate lake and reservoir water storage changes worldwide. However, strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward, and specific approaches need to be developed. We present a review of some of these methodologies by using lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked to the observation of climate change impact on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variation using the limited remote sensing measurements available over short time periods, even though the time series are probably too short to directly link these results with climate change. Indeed, there are many processes and factors, like the influence of lake morphology, that are beyond observation and are still uncertain. The time response for lakes to reach a new state of equilibrium is a key aspect that is often neglected in current literature. Observations over a long period of time, including maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with service continuity over decades, are therefore necessary especially when the ground gauge network is too limited. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g., SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) will also be suitable for complete

  18. The High-Lakes Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Grin, Edmond A.; Chong, Guillermo; Minkley, Edwin; Hock, Andrew N.; Yu, Youngseob; Bebout, Leslie; Fleming, Erich; Häder, Donat P.; Demergasso, Cecilia; Gibson, John; Escudero, Lorena; Dorador, Cristina; Lim, Darlene; Woosley, Clayton; Morris, Robert L.; Tambley, Cristian; Gaete, Victor; Galvez, Matthieu E.; Smith, Eric; Uskin-Peate, Ingrid; Salazar, Carlos; Dawidowicz, G.; Majerowicz, J.

    2009-06-01

    The High Lakes Project is a multidisciplinary astrobiological investigation studying high-altitude lakes between 4200 m and 6000 m elevation in the Central Andes of Bolivia and Chile. Its primary objective is to understand the impact of increased environmental stress on the modification of lake habitability potential during rapid climate change as an analogy to early Mars. Their unique geophysical environment and mostly uncharted ecosystems have added new objectives to the project, including the assessment of the impact of low-ozone/high solar irradiance in nonpolar aquatic environments, the documentation of poorly known ecosystems, and the quantification of the impact of climate change on lake environment and ecosystem. Data from 2003 to 2007 show that UV flux is 165% that of sea level with maximum averaged UVB reaching 4 W/m2. Short UV wavelengths (260-270 nm) were recorded and peaked at 14.6 mW/m2. High solar irradiance occurs in an atmosphere permanently depleted in ozone falling below ozone hole definition for 33-36 days and between 30 and 35% depletion the rest of the year. The impact of strong UVB and UV erythemally weighted daily dose on life is compounded by broad daily temperature variations with sudden and sharp fluctuations. Lake habitat chemistry is highly dynamical with notable changes in yearly ion concentrations and pH resulting from low and variable yearly precipitation. The year-round combination of environmental variables define these lakes as end-members. In such an environment, they host ecosystems that include a significant fraction of previously undescribed species of zooplankton, cyanobacterial, and bacterial populations.

  19. Fertilization of eggs of Lake Michigan lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in lake water: Effect of PCBs (Aroclor 1254)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, N.R.; Berlin, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Various studies indicate that PCBs appear to have an adverse effect on the viability of fertilized eggs and subsequent early life stages of lake trout and related species. Our tests detected no impairment of fertilization of lake trout eggs in PCB-dosed lake water. The concentration of PCBs in the fertilization medium that we used was more than 20 times as high as estimated ambient levels in southeastern Lake Michigan and it appears unlikley that ambient levels of PCBs in the water at fertilization would contribute significantly to the apparent widespread reproductive failure of lake trout there.

  20. Barnacles Tell no Lies - Bioclastic deposits and in-situ balanid colonies delineate shorelines of the Holocene palaeolake at Tayma (NW Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Max; Frenzel, Peter; Pint, Anna; Dinies, Michèle; Gleixner, Gerd; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Neugebauer, Ina; Plessen, Birgit; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    radiocarbon data from the thickest bioclastic shoreline deposit (Engel et al. 2012) and corrections for hardwater effects, the formation of the highest shoreline overlaps with the most humid phase of maximum grassland expansion at around 8600-8000 cal BP inferred from the pollen record of sediments inside the sabkha basin (Dinies et al. 2015). During that time, the lake had a perennial regime, brackish to seasonally even hypersaline conditions, a depth of up to 17 m and a minimum area of 22 km², thus testifying to the profound impact the early to mid-Holocene humid phase had on vegetation, hydrography, and sedimentary environs of NW Arabia. Dinies, M., Plessen, B., Neef, R., and Kürschner, H.: When the desert was green: Grassland expansion during the early Holocene in northwestern Arabia. Quatern. Int., 382, 293-302, 2015. Engel, M, Brückner, H., Pint, A., Wellbrock, K., Ginau, A., Voss, P., Grottker, M., Klasen, N., and Frenzel, P.: The early Holocene humid period in NW Saudi Arabia - sediments, microfossils and palaeohydrological modelling. Quatern. Int., 266, 131-141, 2012. Enzel, Y., Kushnir, Y., and Quade, J.: The middle Holocene climatic records from Arabia: Reassessing lacustrine environments, shift of ITCZ in Arabian Sea, and impacts of the southwest Indian and African monsoons. Global Planet. Change, 129, 69-91, 2015.

  1. Lava Lakes in Io's Paterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Milazzo, M.; Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Geissler, P.

    2002-05-01

    New Galileo images and Galileo and Cassini temperature data lend credence to previous proposals that some of the paterae on Io contain lava lakes, similar in some ways to those observed on Earth. Galileo's October 2001 I32 flyby produced spectacular new high resolution observations of Io's paterae, their margins, and floors. Images reveal where lavas have filled Emakong Patera and overtopped its margins. Landslides from the peaks of Tohil Mons are not present on the adjacent floor of a dark patera, perhaps because they have slumped into a molten lava pit. Dark lavas have filled and drained back from colorful Tupan Patera, leaving a ring of material on its walls. This patera also shows evidence of interaction between molten sulfur and silicate lavas, a relationship observed at the terrestrial Poas Volcano (Francis et al., 1980, Nature 283, 754-756; Oppenheimer and Stevenson, 1990, La Recherche 21,1088-1090). The extremely uniformly dark materials in many other paterae could also be lava lakes. Pele Volcano on Io, in particular, has previously been considered a lava lake based on several characteristics (Davies et al., 2001, JGR 106,33,079-33,103). Recent analyses of eclipse images of Pele from Cassini reveal average temperatures of 1375 K, with variations on short (~10 minute) timescales, consistent with active fountaining in a lava lake. Similar oscillations around high temperatures over these time scales are seen in terrestrial lava lakes, such as at Kupaianaha (Flynn et al., GRL, 19,6461-6476, 1993) and Erta Ale (Bessard, Caillet and others, in progress). Nightside high resolution (60 m/pixel) images from Galileo I32 reveal a region of overturning and convection, with some areas reaching in excess of 1800 K, verifying very high-temperature components identified in high-resolution NIMS data (Lopes et al., 2001, JGR, 106, 33,053-33,078). This region is ringed with small hotspots, comparable to locations of breakup and fountaining at the margins of many terrestrial

  2. Remote sensing and lake eutrophication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Horne, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    An infrared photograph of part of Clear Lake, Cal., shows complex patterns of blue-green algal blooms which were not observed by conventional limnological techniques. Repeated observations of patterns such as these can be used to chart the surface movement of these buoyant algae and can also be used to help control algal scums in eutrophic lakes. Although it is believed that most of the observed patterns resulted from Aphanizomenon (a few were also observed which resulted from suspended sediment), spectral signatures of the algal patterns varied.

  3. Neotectonic Studies of the Lake Ohrid Basin (FYROM/Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadine, H.; Liermann, A.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Reicherter, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Lake Ohrid Basin located on 693 m a.s.l. at the south-western border of Macedonia (FYROM) with Albania is a suitable location for neotectonic studies. The lake is set in an extensional basin-and-range-like situation, which is influenced by the roll-back and detachment of the subducted slab of the Northern Hellenic Trench. The seismicity record of the area lists frequent shallow earthquakes with magnitudes of up to 6.6, which classifies the region as one of the highest risk areas for Macedonia and Albania. A multidisciplinary approach was chosen to reveal the stress history of the region. Tectonic morphology, paleostress analysis, remote sensing and geophysical investigations have been taken out to trace the landscape evolution. Furthermore, apatite fission-track (A-FT) analysis and t-T-path modelling was performed to constrain the thermal history and the exhumation rates. The deformation history of the basin can be divided in three major phases. This idea is also supported by paleostress data collected around the lake: 1. NW-SE shortening from Late Cretaceous to Miocene with compression, thrusting and uplift; 2. Uplift and diminishing compression in Late Miocene causing strike-slip and normal faulting; 3. Vertical uplift and E-W extension from Pliocene to present associated with local subsidence and (half-) graben formation. The initiation of the Ohrid Basin can be dated to Late Miocene to Pliocene. The morphology of the basin itself shows features, which characterize the area as an active seismogenic landscape. The elongated NS-trending basin is limited by the steep flanks of Galicica and Mokra Mountains to the E and W, which are tectonically controlled by normal faulting. This is expressed in linear step-like fault scarps on land with heights between 2 and 35 m. The faults have lengths between 10 and 20 km and consist of several segments. Post-glacial bedrock fault scarps at Lake Ohrid are long-lived expressions of repeated surface faulting in tectonically

  4. Crustal structure between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Lane R.

    1964-01-01

    Interpretation of a reversed seismic-refraction profile between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California, indicates velocities of 6.15 km/sec for the upper layer of the crust, 7.10 km/sec for an intermediate layer, and 7.80 km/sec for the uppermost mantle. Phases interpreted to be reflections from the top of the intermediate layer and the Mohorovicic discontinuity were used with the refraction data to calculate depths. The depth to the Moho increases from about 30 km near Lake Mead to about 40 km near Mono Lake. Variations in arrival times provide evidence for fairly sharp flexures in the Moho. Offsets in the Moho of 4 km at one point and 2 1/2 km at another correspond to large faults at the surface, and it is suggested that fracture zones in the upper crust may displace the Moho and extend into the upper mantle. The phase P appears to be an extension of the reflection from the top of the intermediate layer beyond the critical angle. Bouguer gravity, computed for the seismic model of the crust, is in good agreement with the measured Bouguer gravity. Thus a model of the crustal structure is presented which is consistent with three semi-independent sources of geophysical data: seismic-refraction, seismic-reflection, and gravity.

  5. Urban lake sediment chemistry: Lake design, runoff, and watershed impact

    SciTech Connect

    Amalfi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Sediments of twenty-two urban lakes and stormwater discharge into five of the impoundments were analyzed for the presence of selected metallic priority pollutants, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and volatile and extractable organic compounds. The concentration (mg/kg dry weight) ranges of metals in lake sediments were: arsenic 7-29, cadmium < 0.5-0.5, chromium 14-55, lead <1-138, selenium <0.01-1.1, silver 0.2-2.1, copper 25-2760, nickel 5-40, and zinc 33.9-239. Concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 30 to 4400 mg/kg (wet weight). Organic priority pollutants detected in the urban lake impoundments included tetrachlorethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane, phthalate esters, chloroform, and dichlorobromomethane. Stormwater runoff contained measurable quantities of arsenic, chromium, lead, selenium, copper, nickel, zinc, and petroleum hydrocarbons; whereas organic priority pollutants were not detected. Stormwater runoff pollutant loads indicated that runoff provides a significant contribution of metals and petroleum hydrocarbons to lake sediments.

  6. Post Audit of Lake Michigan Lake Trout PCB Model Forecasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan (LM) Mass Balance Study was conducted to measure and model polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other anthropogenic substances to gain a better understanding of the transport, fate, and effects of these substances within the system and to aid managers in the env...

  7. Feeding ecology of lake whitefish larvae in eastern Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.; Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Wallbridge, Tim; Chiavelli, Rich

    2009-01-01

    We examined the feeding ecology of larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Chaumont Bay, Lake Ontario, during April and May 2004-2006. Larvae were collected with towed ichthyoplankton nets offshore and with larval seines along the shoreline. Larval feeding periodicity was examined from collections made at 4-h intervals over one 24-h period in 2005. Inter-annual variation in diet composition (% dry weight) was low, as was spatial variation among collection sites within the bay. Copepods (81.4%), primarily cyclopoids (59.1%), were the primary prey of larvae over the 3-year period. Cladocerans (8.1%; mainly daphnids, 6.7%) and chironomids (7.3%) were the other major prey consumed. Larvae did not exhibit a preference for any specific prey taxa. Food consumption of lake whitefish larvae was significantly lower at night (i.e., 2400 and 0400 h). Substantial variation in diet composition occurred over the 24-h diel study. For the 24-h period, copepods were the major prey consumed (50.4%) and their contribution in the diet ranged from 29.3% (0400 h) to 85.9% (1200 h). Chironomids made up 33.4% of the diel diet, ranging from 8.0% (0800 h) to 69.9% (0400 h). Diel variation in the diet composition of lake whitefish larvae may require samples taken at several intervals over a 24-h period to gain adequate representation of their feeding ecology.

  8. Distribution of heavy metals in sediment cores of Lake Pamvotis (Greece): a pollution and potential risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, K; Stamoulis, K; Papachristodoulou, C; Tziamou, E; Markantonaki, C; Tsodoulos, I

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations and vertical distributions of metals in surface sediments of Lake Pamvotis (NW Greece) were assessed using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. A wide range of values was determined, associated with the specific types of contaminating effluents draining into different parts of the lake. Overall, Cr levels ranged from 43 to 3295 mg kg(-1), Ni from 13 to 372 mg kg(-1), Cu from 15 to 24,985 mg kg(-1), Zn from 129 to 22,983 mg kg(-1), Zr from 64 to 4063 mg kg(-1) and Pb from 19 to 2634 mg kg(-1). Principal component analysis revealed distinct elemental fingerprints in each sampling location, while correlation analysis and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provided insight to metal association and pollution sources. Enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices were calculated to quantify sediment contamination, and potential ecotoxic effects were evaluated based on sediment quality guidelines. Moderate to very severe enrichment in Zn, Cu and Pb was evidenced in sediments near the lake's outflow. The proximity of these sampling points to a heavy traffic national road suggests that roadway runoff is the dominant source of elevated metal levels. Contribution from municipal sewage water discharges from the nearby communities should also be accounted for. Moderate to very severe Zn and Pb enrichment was determined in the vicinity on the main lake's inflow, primarily associated with runoff and leaching from agricultural land. Very severe to extremely severe Cr enrichment was detected in the same location, most likely associated with wastewater discharged into the lake over several decades, by nearby-operating leather tanneries. The above two locations were ranked at the highest priority level in terms of potential ecological risk. PMID:25527434

  9. Photocurrent enhancement of SiNW-FETs by integrating protein-shelled CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, Sang Hyun; Kulkarni, Atul; San, Boi Hoa; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kim, Doyoun; Park, Kwang Su; Lee, Min Ho; Kim, Taesung; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a new strategy to increase the photoresponsivity of silicon NW field-effect transistors (FETs) by integrating CdSe quantum dots (QDs) using protein shells (PSs). CdSe QDs were synthesized using ClpP, a bacterial protease, as protein shells to control the size and stability of QD and to facilitate the mounting of QDs on SiNWs. The photocurrent of SiNW-FETs in response to light at a wavelength of 480 nm was enhanced by a factor of 6.5 after integrating CdSe QDs because of the coupling of the optical properties of SiNWs and QDs. As a result, the photoresponsivity to 480 nm light reached up to 3.1 × 106, the highest value compared to other SiNW-based devices in the visible light range.We proposed a new strategy to increase the photoresponsivity of silicon NW field-effect transistors (FETs) by integrating CdSe quantum dots (QDs) using protein shells (PSs). CdSe QDs were synthesized using ClpP, a bacterial protease, as protein shells to control the size and stability of QD and to facilitate the mounting of QDs on SiNWs. The photocurrent of SiNW-FETs in response to light at a wavelength of 480 nm was enhanced by a factor of 6.5 after integrating CdSe QDs because of the coupling of the optical properties of SiNWs and QDs. As a result, the photoresponsivity to 480 nm light reached up to 3.1 × 106, the highest value compared to other SiNW-based devices in the visible light range. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07901b

  10. Spatial distribution and sources of perfluorochemicals in the NW Mediterranean coastal waters (Catalonia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Avila, Juan; Meyer, Johan; Lacorte, Silvia

    2010-09-01

    This study provides the first evidence of the sources and loads of perfluorochemicals (PFCs) to the NW Mediterranean Sea. Five PFCs were analyzed in 45 seawater samples collected along the Catalan coast. Total PFCs ranged from 0.07 to 13.0 ng/l, being the levels higher in ports than in coastal waters. To determine the sources of PFCs, 8 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluents and 6 rivers discharging to the sea were also analyzed. WWTP effluents contained total PFCs levels ranging from 3.47 to 132 ng/l but due to the relatively low discharge flows, they contributed to 34.7 g/d to the sea. Total PFCs in rivers ranged from 2.24 to 21.9 ng/l and were the principal PFCs contributors to the sea. Overall, a total load of 190 g/d of PFCs are discharged to the NW Mediterranean coast. The effects and risk of PFCs discharges to the Mediterranean basin are discussed. PMID:20630635

  11. Kashmir Basin Fault and its tectonic significance in NW Himalaya, Jammu and Kashmir, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The Kashmir Basin Fault is located in the Jammu and Kashmir region of Kashmir Basin in NW Himalaya, India. It is a classic example of an out-of-sequence thrust faulting and is tectonically active as observed from multiple geological evidences. Its geomorphology, structure and lateral extent indicate significant accommodation of stress since long, which is further supported by the absence of a large earthquake in this region. It seems this fault is actively accommodating some portion of the total India-Eurasia convergence, apart from two well-recognised active structures the Medlicott-Wadia Thrust and the Main Frontal Thrust, which are referred in Vassallo et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 411:241-252, 2015). This requires its quantification and inclusion into slip distribution scheme of NW Himalaya. Therefore, it should be explored extensively because this internal out-of-sequence thrust could serve major seismic hazard in KB, repeating a situation similar to Muzaffarabad earthquake of Northern Pakistan in 2005.

  12. Organic micropollutants in coastal waters from NW Mediterranean Sea: sources distribution and potential risk.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Avila, Juan; Tauler, Romà; Lacorte, Silvia

    2012-10-01

    This study provides a first estimation on the sources, distribution and risk of organic micropollutants (OMPs) in coastal waters from NW Mediterranean Sea. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates and alkylphenols were analyzed by solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-EI-MS/MS). River waters and wastewater treatment plant effluents discharging to the sea were identified as the main sources of OMPs to coastal waters, with an estimated input amount of around of 25,800 g d(-1). The concentration of ΣOMPs in coastal areas ranged from 17.4 to 8442 ng L(-1), and was the highest in port waters, followed by coastal and river mouth seawaters. A summarized overview of the patterns and sources of OMP contamination on the investigated coastal sea waters of NW Mediterranean Sea, as well as of their geographical distribution was obtained by Principal Component Analysis of the complete data set after its adequate pretreatment. Alkylphenols, bisphenol A and phthalates were the main contributors to ΣOMPs and produced an estimated significant pollution risk for fish, algae and the sensitive mysid shrimp organisms in seawater samples. The combination of GC-MS/MS, chemometrics and risk analysis is proven to be useful for a better control and management of OMP discharges. PMID:22706016

  13. The geostatistical approach for structural and stratigraphic framework analysis of offshore NW Bonaparte Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ali; Salim, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed; Gaafar, Gamal Ragab; Yusoff, Wan Ismail Wan

    2016-02-01

    Geostatistics or statistical approach is based on the studies of temporal and spatial trend, which depend upon spatial relationships to model known information of variable(s) at unsampled locations. The statistical technique known as kriging was used for petrophycial and facies analysis, which help to assume spatial relationship to model the geological continuity between the known data and the unknown to produce a single best guess of the unknown. Kriging is also known as optimal interpolation technique, which facilitate to generate best linear unbiased estimation of each horizon. The idea is to construct a numerical model of the lithofacies and rock properties that honor available data and further integrate with interpreting seismic sections, techtonostratigraphy chart with sea level curve (short term) and regional tectonics of the study area to find the structural and stratigraphic growth history of the NW Bonaparte Basin. By using kriging technique the models were built which help to estimate different parameters like horizons, facies, and porosities in the study area. The variograms were used to determine for identification of spatial relationship between data which help to find the depositional history of the North West (NW) Bonaparte Basin.

  14. A mid-Holocene candidate tsunami deposit from the NW Cape (Western Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Simon Matthias; Falvard, Simon; Norpoth, Maike; Pint, Anna; Brill, Dominik; Engel, Max; Scheffers, Anja; Dierick, Manuel; Paris, Raphaël; Squire, Peter; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Although extreme-wave events are frequent along the northwestern coast of Western Australia and tsunamis in 1994 and 2006 induced considerable coastal flooding locally, robust stratigraphical evidence of prehistoric tropical cyclones and tsunamis from this area is lacking. Based on the analyses of X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) of oriented sediment cores, multi-proxy sediment and microfaunal analyses, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and 14C-AMS dating, this study presents detailed investigations on an allochthonous sand layer of marine origin found in a back-barrier depression on the NW Cape Range peninsula. The event layer consists of material from the adjacent beach and dune, fines and thins inland, and was traced up to ~ 400 m onshore. Although a cyclone-induced origin cannot entirely be ruled out, the particular architecture and fabric of the sediment, rip-up clasts and three subunits point to deposition by a tsunami. As such, it represents the first stratigraphical evidence of a prehistoric, mid-Holocene tsunami in NW Western Australia. It was OSL-dated to 5400-4300 years ago, thus postdating the regional mid-Holocene sea-level highstand.

  15. The influence of atmospheric circulation types on regional patterns of precipitation in Marmara (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltacı, H.; Kındap, T.; Ünal, A.; Karaca, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, regional patterns of precipitation in Marmara are described for the first time by means of Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis. Daily values of winter precipitation data based on 19 meteorological stations were used for the period from 1960 to 2012. Five clusters of coherent zones were determined, namely Black Sea-Marmara, Black Sea, Marmara, Thrace, and Aegean sub-regions. To investigate the prevailing atmospheric circulation types (CTs) that cause precipitation occurrence and intensity in these five different rainfall sub-basins, objective Lamb weather type (LWT) methodology was applied to National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis of daily mean sea level pressure (MSLP) data. Precipitation occurrence suggested that wet CTs (i.e. N, NE, NW, and C) offer a high chance of precipitation in all sub-regions. For the eastern (western) part of the region, the high probability of rainfall occurrence is shown under the influence of E (SE, S, SW) atmospheric CTs. In terms of precipitation intensity, N and C CTs had the highest positive gradients in all the sub-basins of the Marmara. In addition, although Marmara and Black Sea sub-regions have the highest daily rainfall potential during NE types, high daily rainfall totals are recorded in all sub-regions except the Black Sea during NW types.

  16. Dyking Mechanism and Melting transfer, Misho granitoid Pluton (NW of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, M.; Mohssen, M.

    2009-04-01

    Misho granitoid pluton are exposed in NW of Misho elevation and SW of Marand depression (Nw of Iran). Mineralogical paragenesis of pluton contain unhedral to sub-hedral quartz, alkaline feldspar (microcline and sub-hedral to unhedral orthoclase), two type biotites, subhedral to euhedral plagioclase (oligoclase to albite), two type zircon, magmatic epidote, sphene and apatite. Pluton, samples show geochemical characteristic of syn - to post - collisional environment, s-type granite and allocktonous. Pluton located in faulted area with Paleozoic respect dating. Source rocks of Pluton are meta - graywake and meta - pelite mixed. One type of zircon and biotite are restitic. Pluton samples have textures that indicate the effect and evidence of pressure syn - crystallization. Field geological, mineralogical and geochemical characteristic of samples from this pluton associated with enclaves riched in mica and shapes of pluton suggest quick arising and dyking mechanism as main mechanism for melt transfer. This caused restitic zircon and biotite remained, there for main mechanism of arising and generation of this pluton are dyking with propagation of fractures so that diaprism process and mechanism have very low role and effect in emplacement and melt transfer of Misho granitoid. Key Words: Misho Pluton, Restitic biotite, Arising mechanism, Dyking

  17. Decadal changes in the distribution of common intertidal seaweeds in Galicia (NW Iberia).

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-Corbeira, Cristina; Barreiro, Rodolfo; Cremades, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Seaweed assemblages in Atlantic Europe are been distorted by global change, but the intricate coastal profile of the area suggests that susceptibility may differ between regions. In particular, NW Iberia is an important omission because no study has systematically assessed long-term changes in a large number of species. Using intertidal surveys for 33 common perennial seaweeds, we show that the average number of species per site declined significantly from 1998-99 to 2014 in NW Iberia. The largest drops in site occupancy were detected in kelps, fucoids, and carrageenan-producing Rhodophyta. Parallel analyses revealed significant upward trends in SST, air temperature, and strong waves; meanwhile, nutrients decreased slightly except in areas affected by local inputs. Similar changes reported for subtidal assemblages in other parts of Atlantic Europe suggest that the drivers may be ubiquitous. Nonetheless, a more proper assessment of both global and local impacts, will require further surveys, and the regular monitoring of intertidal perennial seaweeds appears as a cost-effective alternative to discriminate genuine long-term trends from transitory fluctuations. PMID:26707882

  18. Paleomagnetic investigation of the Early Permian Panjal Traps of NW India; regional tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Denis; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Ali, Jason R.; Ahmad, Talat; Dar, Reyaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The ∼289 Ma Panjal Traps of NW India (Kashmir) are part of a series of rift-related mafic suites (Abor, Sikkim etc.) that were erupted onto northern India (present-day coordinates) around the same time as separation of the Cimmerian blocks of Qiangtang and Sibumasu. We report new data from only the second paleomagnetic investigation of this unit. Standard alternating field and thermal demagnetization methods were used to isolate characteristic magnetizations from seven outcrops at three locations within the Kashmir Valley, NW India. Analysis of four sections (14 individual cooling units) from close to Srinagar, that together form a tectonically coherent sequence spanning ∼3 km of stratigraphy, yield a single-component, primary magnetization with a mean direction of Dec: 134.8°, Inc: 55.3° (α95 = 8.9°, k = 21.0). An inclination-only mean of 52.5° (α95 = 8.9°, k = 47.2) gives a paleolatitude of ∼33°S (±5°). A paleopole of 110.5°E 8.4°S (A95 = 10.7) is also calculated. Assuming the magnetization records a portion of the reverse polarity Kiaman Superchron, the new result indicates extrusion of the Panjal Traps basalts at mid-latitudes in the southern hemisphere. By inference this constrains the location of central Gondwana, and informs debates related to Cimmeria's detachment from Gondwana.

  19. Post-rift unroofing of the NW Africa passive continental margin during the Central Atlantic opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Many passive margins considered as being stable for long times, show however late uplift and exhumation at regional scale as assessed by low temperature geochronometry. A large amount of Lower Cretaceous terrigeneous sediments laid down in most of basins along the NW Africa continental margins indicate that a major episode of erosion occurred during early post-rift period in the Central Atlantic. AFT and (U-Th)/He dating performed, along a roughly >500 km N-S transect, on pre-Mesozoic basement rocks from Western Meseta to the Anti-Atlas (Morocco, NW Africa) document a fully unexpected widespread unroofing during the Middle-Late Jurassic to early Late Cretaceous, with AFT and (U-Th)/He ages ranging respectively between 120-170Ma and 115-165Ma. A well documented age cluster of 140±20Ma measured for the Moroccan Meseta, Atlas domains and Anti-Atlas belt designates those domains as potentially being the source areas of the detritic sediments considering the proximity of the depositional basins. Absence of major fault separating the Anti-Atlas from the rest of the Western African Craton during the Mesozoic suggests the unroofing region to extend further in Morocco, as far south as the Reguibat (Mauritania) or even New Guinea, documented by our investigation, and perhaps even further when confirmed by additional AFT and AHe data.

  20. Low deuterium content of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragotzkie, R.A.; Friedman, I.

    1965-01-01

    Lake Vanda in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is permanently ice-covered and permanently stratified, with warm, salty water near the bottom. Deuterium analyses of lake water from several levels indicate that the lake has a low deuterium content, and that it is stratified with respect to this isotope. This low deuterium content supports the evidence from the lake's ionic content that the saline layer is not of marine origin, and it indicates that evaporation from the ice surface has taken place. The stratification of the lake with respect to deuterium suggests that the upper and lower layers of water were formed at different times from different sources of glacial melt water.

  1. Common plankton of Twin Lakes, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.M.

    1983-02-01

    A series of studies is being performed to evaluate the effects of the Mt. Elbert Pumped-Storage Powerplant on the ecology of Twin Lakes. Twin Lakes are a pair of connected dimictic lakes, formed as the result of glacial action on alluvial deposits. This report presents a taxonomic species study of the common plankton collected since 1974 from Twin Lakes. A total of 11 zooplankters and 14 phytoplankters were identified from the limnetic zone of Twin Lakes and the associated Mt. Elbert Forebay. The four divisions of zooplankton included four species of Rotifera (rotifer), three species of Copepoda (copepod), three species of Cladocera (cladoceran), and one species of Mysidacea (opossum shrimp).

  2. Tapping rocks for Terror Lake hydro project

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, O.V.

    1983-12-01

    The Terror Lake hydro project in Alaska is described. Terror Lake is a small alpine lake surrounded by barren glacier-scoured, rocky mountain tops and plateaus that do not retain moisture. The method for obtaining more water for the hydro project in Kodiak is unique. The basic program was to dam up the outlet of Terror Lake and raise the water level 170 ft. from approximately 1250 ft. above sea level to 1420 ft. Although the megawatt output of the project is small, the concept of the Terror Lake Project has an epic scale to it.

  3. Evaluation of offshore stocking of Lake Trout in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.; Strang, T.G.; Lantry, J.R.; Connerton, M.J.; Schanger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Restoration stocking of hatchery-reared lake trout Salvelinus namaycush has occurred in Lake Ontario since 1973. In U.S. waters, fish stocked through 1990 survived well and built a large adult population. Survival of yearlings stocked from shore declined during 1990–1995, and adult numbers fell during 1998–2005. Offshore stocking of lake trout was initiated in the late 1990s in response to its successful mitigation of predation losses to double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus and the results of earlier studies that suggested it would enhance survival in some cases. The current study was designed to test the relative effectiveness of three stocking methods at a time when poststocking survival for lake trout was quite low and losses due to fish predators was a suspected factor. The stocking methods tested during 2000–2002 included May offshore, May onshore, and June onshore. Visual observations during nearshore stockings and hydroacoustic observations of offshore stockings indicated that release methods were not a direct cause of fish mortality. Experimental stockings were replicated for 3 years at one site in the southwest and for 2 years at one site in the southeast. Offshore releases used a landing craft to transport hatchery trucks from 3 to 6 km offshore out to 55–60-m-deep water. For the southwest site, offshore stocking significantly enhanced poststocking survival. Among the three methods, survival ratios were 1.74 : 1.00 : 1.02 (May offshore : May onshore : June onshore). Although not statistically significant owing to the small samples, the trends were similar for the southeast site, with survival ratios of 1.67 : 1.00 : 0.72. Consistent trends across years and sites indicated that offshore stocking of yearling lake trout during 2000–2002 provided nearly a twofold enhancement in survival; however, this increase does not appear to be great enough to achieve the 12-fold enhancement necessary to return population abundance to restoration

  4. 12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-50, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF DISCHARGE BASIN. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  5. 11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-1950, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF UPSTREAM WING WALLS. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  6. Fracture network heterogeneity in continental lithosphere: An example from the Lewisian Gneiss Complex, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. C.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K.; Conway, A.; Krabendam, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pre-existing ductile and brittle structures in continental lithosphere are thought to influence the orientation and spatial characteristics of subsequent deformation sets. By using quantitative techniques to describe fracture attributes it should be possible to determine whether these pre-existing weaknesses affect fracture network development. To test this hypothesis, the mainland Lewisian Gneiss Complex (LGC), in NW Scotland is being used as an example. The Late Archaean - Early Proterozoic LGC comprises TTG gneisses, mafic and ultramafic dykes and meta-volcanic and meta-sedimentary sequences that were accreted as a series of terranes during the Precambrian. Three regional fracture trends are recognised (from oldest to youngest); (1) steeply-dipping NW-SE Paleoproterozoic faults (mainly sinistral oblique) that are preferentially developed as foliation-parallel structures in pre-existing ductile shear zones (2) N-S to ENE-WSW trending, hematite stained normal fault ‘ladder fractures’ associated with the deposition of the overlying Neoproterozoic (1.2 Ga.) Stoer Group rift-related sediments. (3) NE-SW trending younger (likely Mesozoic) faults. Each fault set is associated with characteristic fault rock and mineral assemblages. The present project focuses on characterising these fracture sets on the regional to outcrop scale, using a variety of remote and fieldwork analysis techniques. Regional data comprises 2D lineament maps created from high resolution NEXTMap® digital elevation models. Outcrop data consists of 1D sample lines and 2D photo-mosaics which have allowed fracture attribute characterisations to be made. This project centres on the Assynt and Rhiconich terranes to assess the heterogeneity in fracture networks due to variations in lithology and metamorphic grade. Results from statistical analysis of outcrop and regional orientation data show that the tonalitic and granulite-facies Assynt terrane shows a correlation between intense foliation and

  7. 3D Full Seismic Waveform Tomography of NW Turkey and Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk, Yesim; Fichtner, Andreas; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2015-04-01

    Northward collision of the Arabian plate with the Eurasian plate, and interaction of the motion between dynamic processes originated from the subduction of the African plate beneath the Aegean generated very complex tectonic structures in the study region. Western Turkey is among one of the most active extensional regions in the world and the study area is mainly located where the extensional Aegean and the right-lateral strike-slip North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) intersects. Therefore, the tectonic framework of the NW Turkey and the Marmara region is mainly characterized by the transition between the strike-slip tectonics to the extensional tectonics. The Sea of Marmara region has been subjected to several active and passive seismic investigations, nevertheless the accurate knowledge on the heterogeneity in the crust and upper mantle beneath the study area still remains enigmatic. On small-scale tomography problems, seismograms strongly reflect the effects of heterogeneities and the scattering properties of the Earth. Thus, the knowledge of high-resolution seismic imaging with an improved 3D radially anisotropic crustal model of the NW Turkey will enable better localization of earthquakes, identification of faults as well as the improvement of the seismic hazard assessment. For this purpose, we aim to develop 3D radially anisotropic subsurface structure of the Sea of Marmara and NW Turkey crust based on full waveform adjoint tomography method. The earthquake data were principally obtained from the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) and Earthquake Research Center (AFAD-DAD) database. In addition to this, some of the seismic waveform data extracted from the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN) stations that are located within our study region were also used in this study. We have selected and simulated waveforms of earthquakes with magnitudes 4.0 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.7 occurred in the period between 2007-2014 to determine the 3D velocity

  8. Hydrodynamic characterization of the bottom boundary layer in a coastal upwelling system (Ría de Vigo, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villacieros-Robineau, N.; Herrera, J. L.; Castro, C. G.; Piedracoba, S.; Roson, G.

    2013-10-01

    The hydrodynamics of the bottom boundary layer (BBL) in the Ría de Vigo (NW Iberian Peninsula) are studied for the first time, identifying their possible forcing factors and filling a previous lack of knowledge about the coastal upwelling system of NW Iberian Peninsula. For tackling this subject, high resolution time series of bottom currents by means of a downwards looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (3 m above the bottom) were recorded in the inner part of the Ría de Vigo covering the four seasons of the climate year 2004-2005.

  9. The magmatic plumbing of the submarine Hachijo NW volcanic chain, Hachijojima, Japan: long distance lateral magma transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Itoh, J.; Kawanabe, Y.; Tsujino, T.

    2005-12-01

    Recent geophysical observations on basaltic composite volcanoes in Izu-Bonin arc reveal the process of long distance lateral magma transport within the shallow middle crust. Such intrusion events sometimes caused flank fissure eruption and also triggered a formation of collapsed caldera (Miyakejima 2000). To clarify a long-distance magma transport system of the basaltic composite volcano in volcanic arc from geological and petrological aspects, we investigated a submarine volcanic chain (Hachijo NW chain) nested Hachijo Nishiyama volcano, a frontal composite volcano in the northern Izu arc. The volcanic chain extends 15 km from Hachijo-Nishiyama volcano and is composed of ridges and many small cones with basal diameters generally less than 2km. Dredge sampling recovered basaltic lavas and spatters. A diving survey using a ROV (Hyper Dolphin) revealed pillow lava flows on steep slopes and accumulation of spatters and agglutinates near the eruption center. Basalts from the Hachijo NW chain generally have more primitive composition (up to nearly 7% of MgO) compared to the basaltic rocks from the Nishiyama. The bulk magma composition of Hachijo NW chain is controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase while plagioclase accumulation was indicated by aluminum-rich character of the Nishiyama volcano and its subaerial satellite cones. Trace element ratios unaffected by melting or crystal fractionation (e.g., Nb/Zr) are not significantly different between the Nishiyama and the Hachijo NW chain. This implies that the sources of magma for these volcanic systems are basically identical. However, ratios affected by melting process are significantly different between the two. Hachijo NW chain shows lower LREE/HREE and Zr/Y, implying difference in degree of partial melting of the source. Other possible processes for producing these differences in trace element characteristics include crustal assimilation. These results obtained so far appear to

  10. Hydrology of Lake Carroll, Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, S.E.; Hayes, R.D.; Stoker, Y.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lakeshore property around Lake Carroll has undergone extensive residential development since 1960. This development increased the lake shoreline, altered surface water flow to and from the lake, and may have affected lake-stage characteristics. Some areas of the lake were dredged to provide fill material for lakefront property. Water-balance analyses for 1952-60, a predevelopment period, and 1961-80, a period of residential development, indicate that both net surface water flow to the lake and downward leakage from the lake to the Floridan aquifer were greater after 1960. These changes were due more to changes in the regional climate and related changes in ground-water levels than to changes associated with residential development. Results of water quality analyses in 1980-81 are within State limits for surface waters used for recreation and wildlife propagation. (USGS)

  11. Geographic Analysis of Alaska Lake Districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Zimmerman, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The state of Alaska has over 400,000 lakes greater than 0.01 km2 in surface area covering approximately 3.3% of the landscape. As in most lake-rich regions, these lakes are unevenly distributed on the landscape. So in order to better understand how lakes are organized on the landscape and relate this geographic organization to other climatologic, geologic, and biogeographic characteristics, we analyzed the spatial distribution of Alaska lakes. Using a combination of numerical abundance and surface-area extent of lakes, we selected lake density thresholds to identify and delineate 22 lake districts in Alaska. The total area of these 22 lakes districts occupy 16% of Alaska, yet encompass 64% of lakes and 76% of lake surface-area. The three largest lake districts are associated with the Yukon-Kuskokwin Delta, the Northern Arctic Coastal Plain, and the mountain front of the Alaskan Range on the Alaska Peninsula. Interestingly, these largest lake districts are covered by >17% lakes, while most of the smaller lake districts we identified have <10% lake cover. Of the remaining smaller lake districts, 9 are associated with mountain fronts or intermountain basins, 4 are associated with coastal plains, 3 are associated with floodplains and deltas, and 3 occur in high-elevation or mountain terrain. The highest numerical lake densities occur at deltas, while relatively lower densities occur in mountainous areas where individual lakes are often larger in surface area and likely volume. Comparison of these lake districts were made to permafrost distribution, glacial history, lithology, watershed position, and regional hydrologic budgets and regimes to better understand where lake-rich regions occur, why, and how they might change in the future. Ten of the 22 lake districts occur in areas dominated by continuous permafrost, 6 occur in areas of discontinuous or sporadic permafrost, and the other 6 occur in regions without perennially frozen soils. The majority of lake districts

  12. Seasonal Reversals of Groundwater Flow Around Lakes and the Relevance to Stagnation Points and Lake Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Munter, James A.

    1981-08-01

    Several researchers have observed seasonal reversals in the direction of groundwater flow around lakes. If these reversals are prolonged and are accompanied by the formation of a stagnation point, they may have a significant effect on a lake's water and nutrient budgets. The formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake (i.e., a lake that receives groundwater through part of the lake basin and recharges the groundwater system over the rest of the lake basin) is accomplished by the formation of a groundwater mound on the downgradient side of the lake. In this paper the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at Snake Lake, Wisconsin, is investigated with the aid of two-dimensional transient computer models applied in cross section and areally. The analysis demonstrates the potential for the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake and provides some insight into the transient development of the stagnation point.

  13. INTERACTIVE PIT LAKES 2004 CONFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD and the workshop provide a pit lakes forum for the exchange of scientific information on current domestic and international approaches, including arid and wet regions throughout the world. These approaches include characterization, modeling/monitoring, and treatment and r...

  14. Eutrophication of lakes and rivers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eutrophication is an ecological process, akin to aging, in which a water body is increasingly enriched with organic matter. While the most obvious signs of eutrophication in lakes and rivers involve algal blooms and fish kills, the systemic of eutrophication, although profound, are often not as noti...

  15. LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN ESTUARY CONSERVATION PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nature Conservancy will conduct a series of a least four science expert workshops to develop a Site Conservation Plan for the Lake Pontchartrain Estuary and adjacent wetlands. The objective of the Site Conservation Plan is to identify conservation targets, threats or stresse...

  16. The Source of Lake Wobegon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Richard P.

    2005-01-01

    John J. Cannell's late 1980s "Lake Wobegon" reports suggested widespread deliberate educator manipulation of norm-referenced standardized test (NRT) administrations and results, resulting in artificial test score gains. The Cannell studies have been referenced in education research since, but as evidence that high stakes (and not cheating or lax…

  17. Multiple Waterspouts at Lake Tahoe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotjahn, Richard

    2000-04-01

    At least six waterspouts occurred at a large alpine lake in the western United States over several hours during 26 September 1998. Photographs showing the conditions as well as representative examples of this extremely rare event are presented. Some mechanisms are discussed that may explain the persistence of the convection and the low-level vorticity that gave rise to the waterspouts.

  18. CHED Events: Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2009-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings planned for the Spring 2009 ACS Meeting in Salt Lake City will be in the Marriott City Center Hotel. Check the location of other CHED events, the CHED Social Event, the Undergraduate Program, Sci-Mix, etc. because many will be in the Salt Palace Convention Center.

  19. Alternative attractors of shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, M

    2001-07-17

    Ponds and shallow lakes can be very clear with abundant submerged plants, or very turbid due to a high concentration of phytoplankton and suspended sediment particles. These strongly contrasting ecosystem states have been found to represent alternative attractors with distinct stabilizing feedback mechanisms. In the turbid state, the development of submerged vegetation is prevented by low underwater light levels. The unprotected sediment frequently is resuspended by wave action and by fish searching for food causing a further decrease of transparency. Since there are no plants that could serve as refuges, zooplankton is grazed down by fish to densities insufficient to control algal blooms. In contrast, the clear state in eutrophic shallow lakes is dominated by aquatic macrophytes. The submerged macrophytes prevent sediment resuspension, take up nutrients from the water, and provide a refuge for zooplankton against fish predation. These processes buffer the impacts of increased nutrient loads until they become too high. Consequently, the response of shallow lakes to eutrophication tends to be catastrophic rather than smooth, and various lakes switch back and forth abruptly between a clear and a turbid state repeatedly without obvious external forcing. Importantly, a switch from a turbid to a stable clear state often can be invoked by means of biomanipulation in the form of a temporary reduction of the fish stock. PMID:12806081

  20. BACTERIAL INHIBITORS IN LAKE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The populations of six bacterial genera fell rapidly after their addition to sterile lake water but not after their addition to buffer. The decline in numbers of two species that were studied further, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Micrococcus flavus, occurred even when the buffer was...