Science.gov

Sample records for lakes technical progress

  1. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in research to evaluate the impact of utilization of fossil fuels on surface water is reported. Analyses of regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon cycling center on evaluation of quantitative control interactions among the microflora of the pelagial zones of several lakes of progressively greater eutrophy, littoral photosynthetic producer-decomposer complex, and allochthonous inorganic-organic influxes and their biotic processing. The underlying thesis is that quantification of the dynamic carbon fluxes among these components and their rate control mechanisms by physical and chemical factors are fundamental to elucidation of the rate functions of lake eutrophication. A major portion of the research has been directed towards the fate and nutrient mechanisms regulating qualitative and quantitative utilization and losses of organic carbon synthesized within lakes and their drainage basins. It has become increasingly apparent that the wetland and littoral flora, and attendant epiphytic and benthic microflora, have major regulatory controls on biogeochemical cycling of whole lake systems. A major effort on factors regulating the metabolism of littoral macrophytes and attached algae has been coupled to integrated studies on their decomposition and the fate of detrital dissolved and particulate organic matter. These organic products are being coupled to influences on enzymatic activity and inorganic nutrient cycling.

  2. Progress toward lake trout restoration in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holey, Mark E.; Rybicki, Ronald W.; Eck, Gary W.; Brown, Edward H., Jr.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lavis, Dennis S.; Toneys, Michael L.; Trudeau, Tom N.; Horrall, Ross M.

    1995-01-01

    Progress toward lake trout restoration in Lake Michigan is described through 1993. Extinction of the native lake trout fishery by sea lamprey predation, augmented by exploitation and habitat destruction, resulted in an extensive stocking program of hatchery-reared lake trout that began in 1965. Sea lamprey abundance was effectively controlled using selective chemical toxicants. The initial stocking produced a measurable wild year class of lake trout by 1976 in Grand Traverse Bay, but failed to continue probably due to excessive exploitation. The overall lack of successful reproduction lakewide by the late 1970s led to the development and implementation in 1985 of a focused inter-agency lakewide restoration plan by a technical committee created through the Lake Committee structure of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Strategies implemented in 1985 by the plan included setting a 40% total mortality goal lakewide, creating two large refuges designed to encompass historically the most productive spawning habitat and protect trout stocked over their home range, evaluating several lake trout strains, and setting stocking priorities throughout the lake. Target levels for stocking in the 1985 Plan have never been reached, and are much less than the estimated lakewide recruitment of yearlings by the native lake trout stocks. Since 1985, over 90% of the available lake trout have been stocked over the best spawning habitat, and colonization of the historically productive offshore reefs has occurred. Concentrations of spawning lake trout large enough for successful reproduction, based on observations of successful hatchery and wild stocks, have developed at specific reefs. Continued lack of recruitment at these specific sites suggests that something other than stotk abundance has limited success. Poor survival of lake trout eggs, assumed to be related to contaminant burden, occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s, but survival has since increased to equal survival in the

  3. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation.

  4. Lake states regional forest resources assessments: Technical papers. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, H.H.; Vasievich, J.M.

    1997-07-23

    Contains 21 technical working papers prepared for the Lake States regional forest resources assessment, Lake States Forestry Alliance 1995. They represent significant contributions from many individuals and organizations and form the technical background for the Assessment.

  5. 48 CFR 2052.211-71 - Technical progress report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical progress report... Technical progress report. As prescribed at 2011.104-70(b), the contracting officer shall insert the... solicitation. Technical Progress Report (JAN 1993) The contractor shall provide a monthly Technical...

  6. 48 CFR 2052.211-71 - Technical progress report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical progress report... Technical progress report. As prescribed at 2011.104-70(b), the contracting officer shall insert the... solicitation. Technical Progress Report (JAN 1993) The contractor shall provide a monthly Technical...

  7. 48 CFR 2052.211-71 - Technical progress report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical progress report... Technical progress report. As prescribed at 2011.104-70(b), the contracting officer shall insert the... solicitation. Technical Progress Report (JAN 1993) The contractor shall provide a monthly Technical...

  8. 48 CFR 2052.211-71 - Technical progress report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical progress report... Technical progress report. As prescribed at 2011.104-70(b), the contracting officer shall insert the... solicitation. Technical Progress Report (JAN 1993) The contractor shall provide a monthly Technical...

  9. Technical report, Onondaga Lake, New York. Main report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This technical report on Onondaga Lake, New York has compiled existing data to determine which water quality and environmental enhancements are advisable. The report identifies sediment and water quality problems and needs, potential clean-up methodologies, fisheries and fish habitat improvements, and water quality improvements.

  10. Onondaga Lake, New York. Technical annex. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This technical report on Onondaga Lake, New York has compiled existing data to determine which water quality and environmental enhancements are advisable. The report identifies sediment and water quality problems and needs, potential clean-up methodologies, fisheries and fish habitat improvements, and water quality improvements.

  11. Embryonic developmental progression in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) (Walbaum, 1792) and its relation to lake temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Jeffrey D.; Walker, Glenn K.; Adams, Jean V.; Nichols, S. Jerrine; Edsall, Carol C.

    2005-01-01

    Developmental progression of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) embryos was examined with light and scanning electron microscopy. From this examination, key developmental stages were described in detail. The key developmental stages were then applied to individual lake trout egg lots incubated in constant temperatures of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10°C. We used Belehradek's, Thermodynamic, and Power models, and also developed the Zero model to determine stage specific developmental rates of lake trout eggs for each background temperature. From the models, hatch dates and staging were predicted for temperature regimes from Lake Superior (1990–91) and Lake Huron (1996–97). Based on the existing lake temperature data and the observed spawning dates, the Zero and the Power models predict that post peak spawning may contribute significantly to overall recruitment success for these years.

  12. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

    1993-01-01

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

  13. Technical progress by major task. Semiannual technical progress report, September 29, 1997--March 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The technical progress achieved during the period 29 September 1997 through 29 March 1998 on Contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities is described in this report. The report is organized by program task structure: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; RTG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment; RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair.

  14. Progress in Scientific and Technical Communications, 1968 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Scientific and Technical Information.

    This sixth annual report describes progress achieved by the Federal Government in improving the communication of scientific and technical information to support and enhance national science and technology. Included in the report are details regarding the scientific and technical activities of individual Federal Agencies, such as the Atomic Energy…

  15. Solar lease grant program. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Progress on a lease program for the installation of a solar water heater with no installation charge is reported. Information on the announcement of the program, the selection of participants, the contractural agreement, progress on installation of equipment, monitoring, and evaluation is summarized. The status of the budget concerned with the program is announced. Forms used for applications for the program and an announcement from Resource Alternatives for Cilco customers are presented.

  16. Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M. Falco

    2012-09-13

    This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

  17. Technical Entrepreneurship and Technological Progress in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo-Procel, Jose

    This paper describes the Mexican economic environment in terms of general economic conditions from the 1940s to the present, the role of science and technology in industrial progress, and the promotion and support of small companies. The technical entrepreneur is identified as the missing link that would play an important part in the technological…

  18. Assessment Program Technical Progress Report, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCown, Laurie; Fanning, Erin; Eickmeyer, Barbara

    Coconino Community College (CCC) annually assesses its institutional effectiveness to demonstrate its commitment to improving programs and services to students. The 1996-97 Assessment Program Technical Progress Report records the assessment and institutional activities enacted during the academic year, detailing the assessment model, timelines,…

  19. Swallowable Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: Progress and Technical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Guobing; Wang, Litong

    2012-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) offers a feasible noninvasive way to detect the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract and revolutionizes the diagnosis technology. However, compared with wired endoscopies, the limited working time, the low frame rate, and the low image resolution limit the wider application. The progress of this new technology is reviewed in this paper, and the evolution tendencies are analyzed to be high image resolution, high frame rate, and long working time. Unfortunately, the power supply of capsule endoscope (CE) is the bottleneck. Wireless power transmission (WPT) is the promising solution to this problem, but is also the technical challenge. Active CE is another tendency and will be the next geneion of the WCE. Nevertheless, it will not come true shortly, unless the practical locomotion mechanism of the active CE in GI tract is achieved. The locomotion mechanism is the other technical challenge, besides the challenge of WPT. The progress about the WPT and the active capsule technology is reviewed. PMID:22253621

  20. Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative Final Scientific/Technical Report Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B. L.; Roelke, Daniel; Brooks, Bryan; Grover, James

    2010-10-11

    A team of Texas AgriLife Research, Baylor University and University of Texas at Arlington researchers studied the biology and ecology of Prymnesium parvum (golden algae) in Texas lakes using a three-fold approach that involved system-wide monitoring, experimentation at the microcosm and mesocosm scales, and mathematical modeling. The following are conclusions, to date, regarding this organism's ecology and potential strategies for mitigation of blooms by this organism. In-lake monitoring revealed that golden algae are present throughout the year, even in lakes where blooms do not occur. Compilation of our field monitoring data with data collected by Texas Parks and Wildlife and Brazos River Authority (a period spanning a decade) revealed that inflow and salinity variables affect bloom formations. Thresholds for algae populations vary per lake, likely due to adaptations to local conditions, and also to variations in lake-basin morphometry, especially the presence of coves that may serve as hydraulic storage zones for P. parvum populations. More specifically, our in-lake monitoring showed that the highly toxic bloom that occurred in Lake Granbury in the winter of 2006/2007 was eliminated by increased river inflow events. The bloom was flushed from the system. The lower salinities that resulted contributed to golden algae not blooming in the following years. However, flushing is not an absolute requirement for bloom termination. Laboratory experiments have shown that growth of golden algae can occur at salinities ~1-2 psu but only when temperatures are also low. This helps to explain why blooms are possible during winter months in Texas lakes. Our in-lake experiments in Lake Whitney and Lake Waco, as well as our laboratory experiments, revealed that cyanobacteria, or some other bacteria capable of producing algicides, were able to prevent golden algae from blooming. Identification of this organism is a high priority as it may be a key to managing golden algae blooms

  1. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  2. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Elsen, Eckhard; Harrison, Mike; Hesla, Leah; Ross, Marc; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Takahashi, Rika; Walker, Nicholas; Warmbein, Barbara; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2011-11-04

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  3. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  6. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded

  7. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2009-08-06

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring

  8. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2008-12-22

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring

  9. OTEC support services. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, 15 November 1980-14 February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-01

    Technical engineering and management support services for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program are listed along with their objectives. Progress is reported on the following: technical assessments, OTEC system integration, environment and siting considerations, and transmission subsystem considerations. (MHR)

  10. Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

  11. Effects of Great Lakes fish consumption on brain PCB pattern, concentration, and progressive-ratio performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.; Pagano, J.; Sargent, D.; Darvill, T.; Lonky, E.; Reihman, J.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of consumption of Great Lakes fish on progressive ratio performance, and on the pattern and concentrations of brain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), and mirex in the rat. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 30% diet of either Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE), Pacific Ocean salmon, or lab chow control for 20 or 65 days. Following the treatment regimen, half the rats from each group were sacrificed immediately for gas chromatographic analysis of organochlorine contaminants, and the other half were tested on a multiple fixed-ratio-progressive-ratio reinforcement schedule and then sacrificed for analysis. Consumption of Lake Ontario fish resulted in significantly higher levels of brain PCBs, DDE, and mirex relative to controls, but still well within human exposure ranges. Consumption of Lake Ontario fish for 20 or 65 days produced an average brain PCB concentration of 457 and 934 ng/g fat, respectively. Consumption of laboratory rat chow or Pacific Ocean salmon for 20 or 65 days produced an average brain PCB concentration of 240, 464, and 441 ng/g fat, respectively. Moreover, both LAKE-fed groups showed a much more heavily chlorinated pattern of brain PCBs than all control groups, as evidenced by both significant increases in the most heavily chlorinated PCB congeners and significant increases in the average chlorine biphenyl.

  12. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Cooling Technology (ACT), Inc., will perform the following tasks in order to develop an improved, more reliable and more marketable version of their ACT Evaporative Subcooling System: (1) Develop a more stable pump by reducing vibration levels; (2) Design and develop a drainage mechanism that will protect the coil; (3) Apply for Underwriters laboratories approval and perform follow-up and coordination work to complete task to insure product is safe, within its intended applications; (4) Test invention's performance to demonstrate energy savings and long term resistance to scale and corrosion; (5) Contract with the American Refrigeration Institute to perform engineering tests under controlled laboratory conditions; (6) Organize data, and develop technical manual for helping purchasers determining energy savings and inventions merits, and (7) Perform a field test in a cooperative supermarket, where utility usage can be measured on a before and after basis. Tasks 1,2 are completed; task 3 was abandoned for reasons explained in the last quarterly progress report. Progress on tasks 4 and 5 is reported in this paper. (GHH)

  13. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Cooling Technology (ACT), Inc., will perform the following tasks in order to develop an improved, more reliable and more marketable version of their ACT Evaporative Subcooling System: (1) Develop a more stable pump by reducing vibration levels; (2) Design and develop a drainage mechanism that will protect the coil; (3) Apply for Underwriters laboratories approval and perform follow-up and coordination work to complete task to insure product is safe, within its intended applications; (4) Test invention`s performance to demonstrate energy savings and long term resistance to scale and corrosion; (5) Contract with the American Refrigeration Institute to perform engineering tests under controlled laboratory conditions; (6) Organize data, and develop technical manual for helping purchasers determining energy savings and inventions merits, and (7) Perform a field test in a cooperative supermarket, where utility usage can be measured on a before and after basis. Tasks 1,2 are completed; task 3 was abandoned for reasons explained in the last quarterly progress report. Progress on tasks 4 and 5 is reported in this paper. (GHH)

  14. FY 1992 work plan and technical progress reports

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is a division of the University of Nevada System devoted to multidisciplinary scientific research. For more than 25 years, DRI has conducted research for the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) in support of operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). During that time, the research program has grown from an early focus on hydrologic studies to include the areas of geology, archaeology, environmental compliance and monitoring, statistics, database management, public education, and community relations. The range of DRI`s activities has also expanded to include a considerable amount of management and administrative support in addition to scientific investigations. DRI`s work plan for FY 1992 reflects a changing emphasis in DOE/NV activities from nuclear weapons testing to environmental restoration and monitoring. Most of the environmental projects from FY 1991 are continuing, and several new projects have been added to the Environmental Compliance Program. The Office of Technology Development Program, created during FY 1991, also includes a number of environmental projects. This document contains the FY 1992 work plan and quarterly technical progress reports for each DRI project.

  15. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  16. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. First quarterly technical progress report, April 14-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein.

  17. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, 1 January-31 March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R.C.

    1982-04-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein.

  18. Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2000-03-31

    OAK-B135 Monitoring the Durability Performance of Concrete in Nuclear Waste Containment. Technical Progress Report No. 3(NOTE: Part II A item 1 indicates ''PAPER'', but a report is attached electronically)

  19. 76 FR 47613 - Board Meeting: September 13-14, 2011-Salt Lake City, UT; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: September 13-14, 2011--Salt Lake City, UT; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Will Meet To Discuss DOE Plans for Used Fuel Disposition R&D Pursuant to its authority under... Technical Review Board will hold a public meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Tuesday, September 13,...

  20. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and

  1. First Progress Report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Ben A., Jr.; Netrick, LeRoy M.

    This first progress report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) covers the progress of the V-TECS through its first seven months of operation and is designed to provide information to member States, prospective members, and interested agencies, organizations, and foundations. (The fundamental purpose of V-TECS is to…

  2. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Progress and activities are reported on the following four lines of assurance (LOA-1 through 4): prevent accidents, limit core damage, maintain containment integrity, and attenuate radiological consequences. (DLC)

  3. Proceedings of the Lake Wilderness Attention Conference. Interim Technical Report, August 1, 1980 through September 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansman, Marcy, Ed.; Hunt, Earl, Ed.

    This technical report contains papers prepared by the 11 speakers at the 1980 Lake Wilderness (Seattle, Washington) Conference on Attention. The papers are divided into general models, physiological evidence, and visual attention categories. Topics of the papers include the following: (1) willed versus automatic control of behavior; (2) multiple…

  4. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  5. LANL technical progress update for US HJPRR working group

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, David E

    2011-01-06

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Collaboration on Master Alloy Melting; (2) Data for Safety Analysis, (3) HIP can development status, (4) Bond strength quality, (5) Plasma spraying results, and (6) Bare Rolling Larger Rolling Ingots. Significant near term progress has been made in five areas: (1) Collaboration on Master Alloy Melting; (2) HIP can development status; (3) Bond strength quality; (4) Plasma spraying results; and (5) Bare Rolling Larger Rolling Ingots. Significant progress is expected in the next month on several important areas: (1) Intrinsic bond strength of plasma sprayed Zr (2) Advanced Cleaning; (3) Residual Stress Collaboration with INL; and (4) Cost Metric Assessment.

  6. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment; Years 11 and 12, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    pattern for an oligo-mesotrophic lake of decreasing in May, June, and early July, concurrent with the spring phytoplankton bloom, and clearing again as the summer progressed. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-11 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 2-21 {micro}g/L in 2003. With average TP values generally in the range of 3-10 {micro}g/L, Kootenay Lake is considered to be an oligotrophic to oligo-mesotrophic lake. Total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) followed the same seasonal trends as TP in 2002 and 2003 and ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 2-10 {micro}g/L in 2003. Total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 90-380 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 100-210 {micro}g/L in 2003. During both the 2002 and 2003 sampling seasons, TN showed an overall decline in concentration with mid-summer and fall increases at some stations, which is consistent with previous years results. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations showed a more pronounced declining trend over the sampling season compared with TN, corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being used by phytoplankton during summer stratification. DIN ranged from 7-176 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 8-147 {micro}g/L in 2003. During 2003, discrete depth sampling occurred, and a more detailed look at the nitrate concentrations in the epilimnion was undertaken. There was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, which supports the principle of increasing the nitrogen loading and the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio during the fertilizer application period. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in Kootenay Lake were in the range of 1.4-5.1 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 0.5-4.9 {micro}g/L in 2003. Over the sampling season, Chl a at North Arm stations generally increased in spring corresponding with the phytoplankton bloom, decreased during the summer, and increased again in the fall with mixing of the water column. The trend was similar, but less pronounced, at South Arm stations in these years, and spring Chl a concentrations were lower

  7. Extra focal convective suppressing solar collector. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This progress report describes work done on the Extra Focal Convective Suppressing Solar Collector. The topics of the report include sensor refinement for the tracking electronics, tracking controller refinement, system optics evaluation, absorber system material evaluation and performance, tracking hardware evaluation and refinement, and full scale prototype construction and testing.

  8. Assessment Program Technical Progress Report, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickmeyer, Barbara; Hill, Stephen

    This Assessment Program Progress Report (APPR) records the institutional activities that have taken place at Coconino Community College (CCC) during the 1997-98 academic year. It presents models, timelines, accomplishments, and opportunities for improvement in the assessment practices at CCC. Implementation and outcomes information is included for…

  9. Single-electron charging effects. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, S.T.

    1991-12-15

    The status of our project on single-electron tunneling is, again, excellent. As outlined in our original proposal, a key goal for this project has been the development of a scanning tunneling instrument for the purpose of imaging individual particles and tunneling into these particles at high magnetic fields. Further progress is discussed in this report.

  10. Technical review of the SWELL product. Second quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, G.

    1998-03-23

    This progress report describes design and marketing efforts made to reduce the cost of the product, and reassess its market potential in light of reduced manufacturing costs and modified design. Marketing has looked at applications in agriculture, the turf grass industry, and golf coarse applications. The new controller offers energy efficiency in control of valves and minimization of costs associated with hard wired systems.

  11. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. Technical progress report, 1 April-30 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments during the quarter ending June 1981, on the commercial nuclear waste management programs under the direction of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI). The ONWI program is organized into 8 tasks entitled: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. Principal investigators in each of these areas have submitted summaries of quarterly highlights for inclusion in this report. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 5 of these tasks for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  13. Quarterly technical progress report, February 1, 1996--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-28

    This report from the Amarillo National REsource Center for PLutonium provides research highlights and provides information regarding the public dissemination of information. The center is a a scientific resource for information regarding the issues of the storage, disposition, potential utilization and transport of plutonium, high explosives, and other hazardous materials generated from nuclear weapons dismantlement. The center responds to informational needs and interpretation of technical and scientific data raised by interested parties and advisory groups. Also, research efforts are carried out on remedial action programs and biological/agricultural studies.

  14. First quarter technical progress report for Thermally Modified Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfilian, R.E.

    1994-02-28

    This report documents progress on a project to demonstrate suitability of Thermally Modified Sand (TMS) for large scale use by demonstrating its performance on icy roadways maintained by the State of Alaska Department of Transportation. This report deals primarily with the startup of the project and includes initial observations of the effectiveness of the use of the TMS versus the typical salt/sand combination.

  15. Monthly technical progress report, January 1, 1996 - January 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-24

    This is the January 1996 progress report contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities, Cassini RTG Program. Included are discussions on the status of: (1) spacecraft integration and support, (2) engineering support, (3) safety, (4) qualified unicouple production, (5) ETG fabrication, Assembly, and Test, (6) ground support equipment, (7) RTG shipping and launch support, (8) designs, reviews, and mission applications, (9) project management, and (10) CAGO acquisition.

  16. The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS): Technical Implementation Plans and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Steven T.; Law, Casey J.; Baum, Stefi Alison; Chandler, Claire J.; Chatterjee, Shami; Lacy, Mark; Murphy, Eric J.; VLASS Survey Science Group

    2016-01-01

    The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS) was initiated to exploit the science and technical opportunities for a new large radio astronomical survey using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. In March 2015, the proposal for the VLASS underwent a formal Community Review. What emerged from this review is a 5400 hour project to survey the 33885 square degrees of the sky above Declination -40 degrees from 2-4 GHz at 2MHz frequency resolution and 2.5" angular resolution. Over the survey duration of 7 years, each area of the sky will be covered in 3 epochs spaced 32 months apart, to a depth of 0.12mJy/beam rms noise per epoch (0.07mJy/beam combined) in total intensity (Stokes I) and including full polarization. Observations are planned to commence in mid-2016. The raw data will be available in the NRAO archive immediately with no proprietary period and science data products will be provided to the community in a timely manner.In this presentation we describe the survey design and the Technical Implementation Plan (TIP) for the VLASS. The VLASS Basic Data Products (BDP) that will be produced by the survey team include: raw and calibrated visibility data, quick-look continuum images, single-epoch images and spectral image cubes, single-epoch basic object catalogs, and cumulative "static sky" images and image cubes and basic object catalogs to the full survey depth. Calibration, image processing, and analysis for the VLASS will be carried out through automated pipelines being developed at NRAO. Integral to this workflow is maintaining Quality Assurance throughout the system from telescope to archive. The storage and archive services budgeted for the BDP is 1PB for the data and images combined. Significantly higher storage would be required to serve the highest spectral resolution spectral cubes over the full sky area, and thus devising an affordable strategy for providing these services is critical, for example through "Processing on Demand" based on user query of the archive. We will

  17. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1996-04-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components:(1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub- micrometer and micrometer sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct liquefaction of coal. Progress reports for these tasks are presented.

  18. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) preparation of low-rank coals; application of liquefaction processes to low-rank coals; (2) slagging fixed-bed gasification; (3) atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coal; (4) ash fouling and combustion modification for low-rank coal; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization and disposal; and (9) exploratory research.

  19. Texas Experimental Tokamak. Technical progress report, April 1990--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  20. Power Alcohol Plant, Pfister Bros. Farms. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Frederick C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the process engineering and construction of an alcohol plant. Substrate supply, waste carbohydrate material, has been reduced by 20%. Process heat will be supplied by a stoker boiler fired by natural gas in the initial stages, later by a mixture of corn cobs and coal. The design of the cooker is included. The selection of fermentation tanks has not been made. Studies in the selection of yeast for the project are underway. Distillation equipment is described. An appropriate technology for water removal has not been determined. Tests to determine the thermal efficiency of CaO as a water entraining agent are being conducted. The plant layout and construction schedule diagrams are included. (DMC)

  1. ERIP invention 637. Technical progress report 2nd quarter, April 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, G.W.

    1997-07-22

    This technical report describes progress in the development of the Pegasus plow, a stalk and root embedding apparatus. Prototype testing is reported, and includes the addition of precision tillage. Disease data, organic matter, and nitrogen levels results are very briefly described. Progress in marketing is also reported. Current marketing issues include test use by cotton and wheat growers, establishment of dealer relationships, incorporation of design modifications, expansion of marketing activities, and expansion of loan and lease program.

  2. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively.

  4. Development of a polystyrene insulation system. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, J.G.

    1984-09-20

    An adhesive coating system for loose fill polystyrene materials was developed as a product primarily for retrofit insulation of residential buildings that would neither shrink nor settle. Several problems with the coated system including flammability and shrinkage led us to consider an alternative system in which an expanded rock product called perlite was considered as an alternative to polystyrene. The primary problems with perlite are that it is very expensive and the coated structure is extremely brittle. A very attractive commercial market for retrofit insulation using either polystyrene beads or shredded polystyrene was identified. Specifically, it was demonstrated that commercial cement block buildings can be reinsulated by filling the cores of the cement blocks with a payback period of three years. With additional development, it appears that the payback period can be reduced to 2 years at present natural gas prices. The potential market for a commercial system of this kind was analyzed and determined to be on the order of ten billion dollars nationally. The estimated potential energy savings are on order of one quad. At this time, the system is being redesigned to handle commercial buildings which have areas on the order of several hundred thousand square feet. Test marketing of the present system is in progress.

  5. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-04

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase 1: Program Planning--Complete; Phase 2: Development; Phase 3: Selected Specimen--Bench Test. Work is currently being performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, process improvements will be married with new bond coat and ceramic materials systems to provide improvements over currently available TBC systems. Coating reliability will be further improved with the development of an improved lifing model and NDE techniques. This will be accomplished by conducting the following program tasks: II.1 Process Modeling; II.2 Bond Coat Development; II.3 Analytical Lifing Model; II.4 Process Development; II.5 NDE, Maintenance and Repair; II.6 New TBC Concepts. A brief summary of progress made in each of these 6 areas is given.

  6. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1989-02-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Third Progress and Information Report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Connie W.; And Others

    This description of major activities and accomplishments of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of the States (V-TECS) since the second progress report of May, 1975, is designed to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the processes and procedures used by the consortium in achieving its major goal: The production of catalogs…

  8. Second Progress and Information Report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Ben A., Jr.

    This second progress and information report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) is designed to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the processes and procedures used to develop catalogs of performance objectives and the nature of the cooperative efforts of the members in promoting performance-based…

  9. Education, Industrialization and Technical Progress in Mexico. IIEP Research Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padua, Jorge

    This report attempts to analyze the contributions of the educational system and job training programs to industrialization and technical progress in the Conubal zone of the Lower Balsas River of Mexico. The first of the study's three sections consists of two chapters that provide general background. Chapter 1, "Theories of Development and the Role…

  10. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, 27 November--31 December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-24

    This monthly technical progress report provided information on the following tasks: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety analysis; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, and reliability, and contractor acquired government owned (CAGO) property acquisition.

  11. Technical Adequacy and Acceptability of Curriculum-Based Measurement and the Measures of Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Ardoin, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R) and the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are assessment tools widely employed for universal screening in schools. Although a large body of research supports the validity of CBM-R, limited empirical evidence exists supporting the technical adequacy of MAP or the acceptability of either measure for…

  12. Technical Assistance Paper: Third-Grade Student Progression. DPS: 2013-56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Technical Assistance Paper (TAP) is to provide school districts with updates and changes relative to third-grade student progression policies, including information on alternative assessments, promotion criteria and resources. This paper provides: (1) General Information; (2) Student Portfolios for Third-Grade Students; (3)…

  13. Introduction: Policy and Technical Contexts of National Assessment of Educational Progress Validity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    1996-01-01

    A series of studies by the Technical Review Panel (TRP) of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) to improve the quality and utility of the NAEP is introduced, with a description of the NAEP, the creation of the TRP, the education policy issues that influenced the selection of research topics, and the relationship among the…

  14. High explosive safety manual. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Albaugh, L.R.; McBride, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth quarterly technical report on a program to prepare a high explosive safety manual for the Department of Energy. The program is described and progress to date is presented. During this work period, the first draft of the manual was completed and the quantitative risk analysis begun.

  15. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. Technical progress [in FY 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.

    1980-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in plasma physics research. Studies include: (1) plasma production by means of electric discharges; (2) formation of spheromak configuration using combined z and {theta} pinch techniques; (3) plasma instabilities and plasma diagnostics in toroidal experiments.

  16. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1--July 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Progress is reported on research projects related to the following: Electronic resource library; Environment, safety, and health; Communication, education, training, and community involvement; Nuclear and other materials; and Reporting, evaluation, monitoring, and administration. Technical studies investigate remedial action of high explosives-contaminated lands, radioactive waste management, nondestructive assay methods, and plutonium processing, handling, and storage.

  17. Technical and economic feasibility of membrane technology. Fourth technical progress report, June 17-September 16, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sandre, A.

    1980-10-01

    Progress is reported on the investigation of the potential application of reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration and electrodialysis to the system of solids concentration in beet sugar process streams. During this period, emphasis was put on running reverse osmosis tests with a new prototype machine to select the most suitable membranes for the concentrating of sugar solutions. An economic analysis of using reverse osmosis in a factory producing 10/sup 6/ gal/day of thin juice is discussed. (DMC)

  18. Development of superior asphalt recycling agency: Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Lin, Moon-Sun; Chaffin, J.; Liu, Meng; Eckhardt, C.

    1996-04-01

    About every 12 years, asphalt roads must be reworked, and this is usually done by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of failed material, resulting in considerable waste of material and use of new asphalt binder. A good recycling agent is needed, not only to reduce the viscosity of the aged material but also to restore compatibility. Objective is to establish the technical feasibility (Phase I) of determining the specifications and operating parameters for producing high quality recycling agents which will allow most/all the old asphalt-based road material to be recycled. It is expected that supercritical fractionation can be used. The advanced road aging simulation procedure will be used to study aging of blends of old asphalt and recycling agents.

  19. Live/Dead Comparisons of Ostracodes in Temperate Lakes Reveal Evidence of Human Impact and Provides a Tool to Measure the Progress of Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, J.; Kimball, K. C.; Fitzpatrick, S. A.; Michelson, A. V.; Leonard-Pingel, J.

    2015-12-01

    the progress of remediation efforts already underway. Further work will focus on dating the upper centimeter of sediment in these lakes to provide an estimate of how long it takes for death assemblages to accumulate and thus how long it will take to regain high live/dead fidelity in impacted lakes undergoing remediation.

  20. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. First annual technical progress report, April 14-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R C

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein. One of the four units of the US government-owned METF is the Mine Roof Simulator. This unique $10 million test facility was designed to simulate underground mine roof loads and motions. The MRS is a hybrid, analog-digital, computer-controlled, closed-loop, electro-hydraulic, research device capable of applying either loads or displacements in the vertical and one horizontal axis. Its vertical capacity of 3,000,000 pounds can be applied over its 20 by 20 foot active test area. The horizontal load capacity is 1,600,000 pounds. It can simulate coal seam heights of up to 16 feet. Automatic data acquisition and real time display are provided. The most modern, sophisticated technology was used in its design and construction.

  1. Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery Project : Annual Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2009-07-15

    This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively

  2. Biomass energy technology annual technical progress report, FY 1982. Volume II. Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of the BET program is to conduct an integrated R and D program for feedstock production and conversion of organic materials to economically produce energy products that will significantly contribute to meeting long-term US energy needs. In feedstock production, laboratory investigations are being performed to reduce the risks associated with the production of microalgal oils that can be used for energy applications and high-value chemical substitutes. Research also is being done on the biochemical mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production by macroalgal species. There has been significant progress in the DOE Short-Rotation Woods Crops Program aimed at increasing yields of biomass through both improved traditional/conventional silvicultural techniques and short-rotation intensive culture. Studies that evaluate the potential of milkweed as an energy feedstock were completed in FY 1982. In thermochemical conversion, evaluations of a variety of high-performance gasification systems for producing medium-Btu gas and synthesis gas were concluded in FY 1982. Free market forces are expected to stimulate private sector interest in developing the technology and marketing needed to commercialize medium-Btu gasification systems. Medium-Btu gases have numerous beneficial industrial applications, and this technology is close to entry into the marketplace. Progress has been made in FY 1982 toward understanding the basic mechanisms and kinetics affecting the thermochemical processing of biomass through fast pyrolysis and direct liquefaction techniques. In biochemical conversion, fundamental research is being performed on the anaerobic digestion process. FY 1982 research activities also included laboratory-scale experiments on photobiological methods for hydrogen production. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the 3 program areas for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  3. Progress in understanding the importance of coastal wetland nursery habitat to Great Lakes fisheries support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide important habitat for Great Lakes fishes of all life stages. A literature review of ichthyoplankton surveys conducted in Great Lakes coastal wetlands found at least 82 species reported to be captured during the larval stage. Twenty of those sp...

  4. Examining the Technical Adequacy of Second-Grade Reading Comprehension Measures in a Progress Monitoring Assessment System. Technical Report # 08-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Liu, Kimy; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This technical report describes the development of reading comprehension assessments designed for use as progress monitoring measures appropriate for 2nd Grade students. The creation, piloting, and technical adequacy of the measures are presented. The following are appended: (1) Item Specifications for MC [Multiple Choice] Comprehension - Passage…

  5. Technical background information for the environmental and safety report, Volume 4: White Oak Lake and Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, T.W.; Kelly, B.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Eldridge, J.S.; Bird, J.C.; Shank, K.E.; Tsakeres, F.S.

    1982-03-01

    This report has been prepared to provide background information on White Oak Lake for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental and Safety Report. The paper presents the history of White Oak Dam and Lake and describes the hydrological conditions of the White Oak Creek watershed. Past and present sediment and water data are included; pathway analyses are described in detail.

  6. 76 FR 79536 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Lake Michigan; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... telephone number is incorrect as well as the frequency of VHF Channel 16. These corrections will ensure the... a radio frequency used for contacting the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan. Under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3... radio frequency that is used for contacting the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan. Background...

  7. Restoring and protecting the world`s lakes and reservoirs. World Bank technical paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dinar, A.; Seidl, P.; Olem, H.; Jorden, V.; Duda, A.

    1995-10-01

    The paper calls attention to the particular problems that lakes and reservoirs have suffered as a result of increased siltation, nutrient loading, toxics, habitat degradation, over-exploitation, and changes to marginal ecosystems. It identifies vital components of the water-based ecosystem requiring special consideration to maintain biodiversity, including wetlands and marginal floodplains inextricably linked to lakes and reservoirs.

  8. Evaporation by mechanical vapor recompression. Technical progress report, January 1, 1980-April 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, C.H.; Coury, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Progress for the period from January 1, 1980 to April 1, 1980, in the development of a study of the application of the technologies of Mechanical Vapor Recompression and Falling Film Evaporation as applied to the beet sugar industry is reported. Progress is reported in the following areas: technical literature search; report on visit to European factories using these technologies; energy balance studies of facories offered by the industry as candidates for the demonstration plants; and report on energy balance studies and the recommendations as to the site for the demonstration plant.

  9. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Eighteenth quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  10. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Chaffin, J.; Lin, Moon-Sun

    1995-07-01

    About 27 million tons of asphalt and nearly twenty times this much aggregate are consumed each year to build and maintain over two million miles of roads in this country. Over a cycle of about 12 years on the average, these roads must be reworked and much of these millions of tons of rock and asphalt cannot be reused with present recycling technology. Instead, much of the maintenance is accomplished by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of the failed material. This results in considerable waste of material, both in terms of quality aggregate and in terms of asphalt binder. In addition, the new asphalt binder represents a significant source of potential energy. The main impediment to recycling asphalt binder is the poorly developed science of recycling agent composition and, as a result, optimum recycling agents are not available. An excellent recycling agent should not only be able to reduce the viscosity of the aged material, but it must also be able to restore compatibility. The properties of the old material and recycling agent must be compatible to give both good initial properties and aging characteristics, and this must be understood. The agent must also be inexpensive and easily manufactured. A large quantity of potential feedstock for the production of recycling agents is available and much of it is now fed to cokers. This material could be recovered by supercritical extraction which is an existing refinery technology. A supercritical pilot plant is available at Texas A&M and has been used to produce fractions for study. The objective of this research is to establish the technical feasibility of determining the specifications and operating parameters necessary to produce high quality recycling agents which will allow most old asphalt-based road material to be recycled.

  11. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This detailed report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project demonstrates an advanced thermal coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to high-quality, low-sulfur fuel. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the project was to expand market awareness and acceptability for the products and the technology. The use of covered hopper cars has been successful and marketing efforts have focused on this technique. Operational improvements are currently aimed at developing fines marketing systems, increasing throughput capacity, decreasing operation costs, and developing standardized continuous operator training. Testburns at industrial user sites were also conducted. A detailed process description; technical progress report including facility operations/plant production, facility testing, product testing, and testburn product; and process stability report are included. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of granular flows: Technical progress report, quarter ending 09/30/93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    This Technical Progress Report for the quarter ending 09/30/93 describes work on two tasks which are part of nuclear magnetic resonance studies of granular flows. (1) Research has been directed toward improving concentration measurements under reasonably fast conditions. (2) The process continues of obtaining comprehensive velocity, concentration, and diffusion information at several angular velocities of the cylinder for seeds (mustard, sesame, and sunflower seeds) flowing in a half-filled cylinder.

  14. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, October 2--October 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-24

    The technical progress achieved during the period 2 October through 29 October, 1995 is described herein. This report is organized by program task structure: (1) spacecraft integration and liaison; (2) engineering support; (3) safety; (4) qualified unicouple production; (5) ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; (6) ground support equipment (GSE); (7) RTG shipping and launch support; (8) designs, reviews, and mission applications; (9) project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and GACO maintenance and repair; and CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

  15. Cassini RTG Program monthly technical progress report, July 28--August 24, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-24

    The technical progress achieved during this period is described. This report is organized by program task structure: (1) spacecraft and integration liaison; (2) engineering support; (3) safety; (4) qualified unicouple production; (5) ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; (6) ground support equipment (GSE); (7) RTG shipping and launch support; (8) designs, reviews, and mission applications; (9) project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair; and (10) CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

  16. Confined Vortex Scrubber. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards. This is to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber. This is the first quarterly technical progress report under this contract. Accordingly, a summary of the cleanup concept and the structure of the program is given here.

  17. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, October 30--November 26, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-24

    The technical progress achieved during the period 30 October through 26 November, 1995 is described herein. This report is organized by program task structure: (1) spacecraft integration and liaison; (2) engineering support; (3) safety; (4) qualified unicouple production; (5) ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; (6) ground support equipment (GSE); (7) RTG shipping and launch support; (8) designs, reviews, and mission applications; (9) project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and GACO maintenance and repair; and CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

  18. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Reports on a quarterly basis. This report comprises the first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for Year 2 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the sixteen (16) technical projects encompassed by the Year 2 Agreement for the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents; Microbial enrichment for enhancing in-situ biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes; Treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters; Drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; Chemical destruction of chlorinated organic compounds; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organics, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled polyion films for gas-phase chemical sensors; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; A systematic database of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Dust control methods for insitu nuclear and hazardous waste handling; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; and Socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration technologies.

  19. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Section 1 contains a report of the progress by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research on the following tasks: laboratory support (liquefaction in dewaxed and hydrotreated dewaxed solvent); CO pretreatment (effect of process variables on CO pretreatment, CO-pretreated product characterization, and liquefaction results); and iron based dispersed catalysts (production, characterization and testing of sulfated hematites and reaction model development). Section 2 contains a progress report by CONSOL, Inc. on the following tasks: laboratory support; pretreatment work on dewaxing; pretreatment work on agglomeration; and economic evaluation. Progress by Sandia National Laboratories is reported in Section 3 on the following: laboratory support (TGA methods) and solvent pretreatment (coker tar hydrogenation and coal liquefaction results). Section 4 gives a preliminary technical assessment by LDP Associates on the following: baseline economic assessment; assessment of improved coal conversion; and fluid coking.

  20. Technical challenges and solutions in representing lakes when using WRF in downscaling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, M. S.; Nolte, C. G.; Spero, T. L.; Bullock, O. R.; Alapaty, K.; Herwehe, J. A.; Gula, J.; Bowden, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is commonly used to make high-resolution future projections of regional climate by downscaling global climate model (GCM) outputs. Because the GCM fields are typically at a much coarser spatial resolution than the target regional downscaled fields, lakes are often poorly resolved in the driving global fields, if they are resolved at all. In such an application, using WRF's default interpolation methods can result in unrealistic lake temperatures and ice cover at inland water points. Prior studies have shown that lake temperatures and ice cover impact the simulation of other surface variables, such as air temperatures and precipitation, two fields that are often used in regional climate applications to understand the impacts of climate change on human health and the environment. Here, alternative methods for setting lake surface variables in WRF for downscaling simulations are presented and contrasted.

  1. Management Plan for Experimental Reintroduction of Sockeye into Skaha Lake; Proposed Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation, 2004 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Howie; Smith, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Okanagan River sockeye salmon, which spawn near the town of Oliver, B.C., have their farther upstream migration limited by several water control and diversion dams. Stock numbers have been declining for many years and the Okanagan Native Alliance Fisheries Department (ONAFD) has been the principal advocate of a program to restore their numbers and range by reintroducing them into upstream waters where they may once have occurred in substantial numbers Some investigators have warned that without effective intervention Okanagan sockeye are at considerable risk of extinction. Among a host of threats, the quality of water in the single nursery areas in Osoyoos Lake. is deteriorating and a sanctuary such as that afforded in larger lakes higher in the system could be essential. Because the proposed reintroduction upstream has implications for other fish species, (particularly kokanee, the so-called ''landlocked sockeye'' which reside in many Okanagan lakes), the proponents undertook a three-year investigation, with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, to identify possible problem areas, and they committed to an interim experimental reintroduction to Skaha Lake where any problems could be worked out before a more ambitious reintroduction, (e.g. to Okanagan Lake) could be formally considered. The three-year investigation was completed in the spring of 2003. It included an assessment of risks from disease or the possible introduction of unwanted exotic species. It also considered the present quality and quantity of sockeye habitat, and opportunities for expanding or improving it. Finally ecological complexity encouraged the development of a life history model to examine interactions of sockeye with other fishes and their food organisms. While some problem areas were exposed in the course of these studies, they appeared to be manageable and the concept of an experimental reintroduction was largely supported

  2. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 1 October 1982 - 30 September, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in three parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator. The second and third parts are concerned with the experimental results.

  3. Dating of sediments from four Swiss prealpine lakes with (210)Pb determined by gamma-spectrometry: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, V; Klemt, E; Röllin, S; Astner, M; Sahli, H

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the most important problems in dating lake sediments with unsupported (210)Pb are summarized and the progress in gamma-spectrometry of the unsupported (210)Pb is discussed. The main topics of these studies concern sediment samples preparation for gamma-spectrometry, measurement techniques and data analysis, as well as understanding of accumulation and sedimentation processes in lakes. The vertical distributions of artificial ((137)Cs, (241)Am, (239)Pu) and natural radionuclides ((40)K, (210,214)Pb, (214)Bi) as well as stable trace elements (Fe, Mn, Pb) in sediment cores from four Swiss lakes were used as examples for the interpretation, inter-comparison and validation of depth-age relations established by three (210)Pb-based models (CF-CSR, CRS and SIT). The identification of turbidite layers and the influence of the turbidity flows on the accuracy of sediment dating is demonstrated. Time-dependent mass sedimentation rates in lakes Brienz, Thun, Biel and Lucerne are discussed and compared with published data. PMID:25875007

  4. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  5. Monthly technical progress report, 29 January 1996--25 Februray 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the technical progress made on the radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities for the Cassini space probe mission to the planet Saturn. The probe is designated for launch in October of 1997. This report covers the project reporting period from 29 January 1996 through 25 February 1996. The report is organized by program task structure and includes activities for: spacecraft integration and liason; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; ETG fabrication, assembly, and testing; RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews and mission applications; quality assurance, reliability and contract changes; and CAGO acquisition.

  6. Demonstrate fuel disassembly/encapsulation. Technical progress report, April 1981-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-08-03

    Work on this project is focused on demonstrating disassembly and encapsulation of nuclear fuels as a means to increase spent fuel storage. The effort commenced on April 17, 1980, and is progressing satisfactorily. The Equipment/Procedure Preparation sub-task is essentially complete. The Equipment Demonstration sub-task and the Process Assessment Studies sub-task continue. The equipment design effort associated with the first sub-task, the component testing and checking associated with the second sub-task, and the technical studies and investigations associated with the latter sub-task continue to verify the feasibility of this concept to enhance the use of fuel storage resources.

  7. CGE simulation analysis on the labor transfer, agricultural technical progress, and economic development in Chongqing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Ran, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The basic structure of a CGE model dividing Mainland China into two parts, including Chongqing and rest regions, is described. Based on this CGE model, both the unilateral impact and collaborative impact of two policies, agricultural technical progress and supporting policies for improving rural labor transfer on the economic development in Chongqing, are simulated and analyzed. The results demonstrate that compared with the sum of each unilateral policy effect, the collaboration of two policies has more effective impact on facilitating the labor transfer, promoting regional economic growth, and improving income and welfare of urban and rural residents. PMID:24892037

  8. CGE Simulation Analysis on the Labor Transfer, Agricultural Technical Progress, and Economic Development in Chongqing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heng; Ran, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The basic structure of a CGE model dividing Mainland China into two parts, including Chongqing and rest regions, is described. Based on this CGE model, both the unilateral impact and collaborative impact of two policies, agricultural technical progress and supporting policies for improving rural labor transfer on the economic development in Chongqing, are simulated and analyzed. The results demonstrate that compared with the sum of each unilateral policy effect, the collaboration of two policies has more effective impact on facilitating the labor transfer, promoting regional economic growth, and improving income and welfare of urban and rural residents. PMID:24892037

  9. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This reports reports the progress/efforts performed on six technical projects: 1. systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; 2. site remediation technologies (SRT):drain- enhanced soil flushing for organic contaminants removal; 3. SRT: in situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; 4. excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; 5. chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; and 6. development of organic sensors: monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors.

  10. Heber geothermal binary demonstration project quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1982--December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, R.G.; Allen, R.F.; Dixon, J.R.; Hsiao, W.P.; Liparidis, G.S.; Lombard, G.L.; Nelson, T.T.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this quarterly technical progress report is to document work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of October 1, 1982--December 31, 1982. The work was performed by San Diego Gas and Electric Company under the support and cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Imperial Irrigation District, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Southern California Edison Company. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluid Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  11. Heber geothermal binary demonstration project quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1982--September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, R.G.; Allen, R.F.; Dixon, J.R.; Hsiao, W.P.; Liparidis, G.S.; Lombard, G.L.; Nelson, T.T.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this quarterly technical progress report is to document work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of July 1, 1982--September 30, 1982. The work was performed by San Diego Gas and Electric Company under the support and cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Imperial Irrigation District, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Southern California Edison Company. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluid Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  12. Heber geothermal binary demonstration project quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1982--March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, R.G.; Allen, R.F.; Alsup, R.A.; Liparidis, G.S.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this quarterly technical progress report is to document work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of January 1, 1982, through March 31, 1982. The work was performed by San Diego Gas and Electric Company under the support and cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Imperial Irrigation District, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Southern California Edison Company. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluid Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  13. Heber geothermal binary demonstration project quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1982--June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, R.G.; Allen, R.F.; Alsup, R.A.; Liparidis, G.S.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this quarterly technical progress report is to document work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of April 1, 1982-June 30, 1982. The work was performed by San Diego Gas and Electric Company under the support and cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Imperial Irrigation District, the California Department of Water Resources, and the Southern California Edison Company. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluid Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  14. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1996 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, Daniel; Knoetek, W. Ladd Hansen, Barry

    1997-06-01

    Kokanee salmon Oncorhynchus nerka were introduced into Flathead Lake in 1916. The kokanee population declined in the 1960s and 1970s, and kokanee disappeared from Flathead Lake in the late 1980s. Their disappearance has been attributed to the long-term effects of the construction and operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr dams, excessive harvest by anglers, and changes in the lake food web induced by the introduction of opossum shrimp Mysis relicta. Attempts to reestablish kokanee in the Flathead Lake ecosystem between 1988 and 1991 were unsuccessful. In 1991, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) wrote a mitigation plan to restore kokanee to Flathead Lake. In 1993, MFWP, CSKT, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wrote a mitigation implementation plan that initiated a 5-year test program to use hatchery-reared fish to reintroduce kokanee to the lake. Stocking hatchery-reared kokanee into Flathead Lake began in 1993; the 5-year {open_quotes}kokanee test{close_quotes} started in 1994 and is scheduled to continue through 1998. The annual stocking objective is 1 million yearling kokanee (6-8 in long). Criteria used to evaluate the success of the 5-year test are (1) 30% survival of kokanee 1 year after stocking, (2) yearling-to-adult survival of 10%, and (3) annual harvest of 50,000 kokanee ({ge} 11 in) and fishing effort {ge} 100,000 angler hours.

  15. Wisconsin's Lake Superior Basin Water Quality Study. Technical Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickas, Albert B., Ed.

    This hydrologic study focuses on Wisconsin's Lake Superior Basin. Water is the most important natural resource in this area which includes Douglass, Bayfield, Ashland, and Iron counties. This study was undertaken to determine the character of this hydrologic base and to determine the effects and extent of man-influenced disturbances. It includes…

  16. TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE ALKALI LAKE ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT - PHASE I RECONNAISSANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. ampling of s...

  17. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept project; mine waste technology pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  18. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy (DOE) test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD proof-of-concept project; mine waste pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  19. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  20. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  1. Appendixes to the Final Technical Report of the Great Lakes Special Education Instructional Materials Center; Volume 4: Report on Auditory Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, S. Joseph; And Others

    The fourth of four volumes of appendixes to the final technical report of the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center (GLR SEIMC) consists of 21 reports (1973-74) on the classification, development, and evaluation of auditory learning materials; a report of activities and materials from the Consortium on Auditory…

  2. Technical report for the alkali lake ecological assessment, phase 1 reconnaissance (FY 91 and FY 92)

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.

    1993-03-01

    The report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. Sampling of soil, sediment, groundwater, soil-dwelling invertebrates and vegetation confirmed that hazardous materials from the waste disposal area are migrating westerly within the shallow aquifer to West Alkali Lake. Two areas of dead vegetation were identified and permanently marked to determine if these areas are changing in size and location. Preliminary calculations using a linear food-chain model suggested that small mammalian herbivores would probably not display adverse effects due to dietary exposures to the contaminants. However, nestling shorebirds may be exposed to concentrations potentially associated with adverse biological effects.

  3. Great Lakes water quality initiative technical support document for the procedure to determine bioaccumulation factors. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of the document is to provide the technical information and rationale in support of the proposed procedures to determine bioaccumulation factors. Bioaccumulation factors, together with the quantity of aquatic organisms eaten, determine the extent to which people and wildlife are exposed to chemicals through the consumption of aquatic organisms. The more bioaccumulative a pollutant is, the more important the consumption of aquatic organisms becomes as a potential source of contaminants to humans and wildlife. Bioaccumulation factors are needed to determine both human health and wildlife tier I water quality criteria and tier II values. Also, they are used to define Bioaccumulative Chemicals of Concern among the Great Lakes Initiative universe of pollutants. Bioaccumulation factors range from less than one to several million.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  5. The Development and Technical Adequacy of Seventh-Grade Reading Comprehension Measures in a Progress Monitoring Assessment System. Technical Report #1102

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical report describes the process of development and piloting of reading comprehension measures that are appropriate for seventh-grade students as part of an online progress screening and monitoring assessment system, http://easycbm.com. Each measure consists of an original fictional story of approximately 1,600 to 1,900 words with 20…

  6. Examining the Technical Adequacy of Fifth-Grade Reading Comprehension Measures in a Progress Monitoring Assessment System. Technical Report # 08-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This technical report describes the development and piloting of reading comprehension measures developed for use by fifth-grade students as part of an online progress monitoring assessment system, http://easycbm.com. Each comprehension measure is comprised of an original work of narrative fiction approximately 1500 words in length followed by 20…

  7. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-11-01

    On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  10. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  11. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report: Third Quarter, CY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This is the sixteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion) Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility (HGCU). This report covers the period of work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1993. During this quarter, the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) was operated for a total of 1295 hours. This represents 58% availability during July, August, September, and including June 30 of the previous quarter. The operating dates and times since initial operation are summarized. The APF operating temperatures and differential pressures are provided. Details of the APF runs during this quarter are included in this report.

  12. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The technology development of the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Progress is reported on the three tasks. The first task is materials selection, evaluation, and development. The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. Task two is operability, performance, and materials testing. The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. The objectives of the full-scale design task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. (WHK)

  13. Soot formation in synthetic-fuel droplets. First quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    England, G.; Kramlich, J.; Payne, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide detailed information on methods of minimizing soot formation during synthetic liquid fuel combustion under conditions which minimize fuel nitrogen conversion to nitric oxide. The program consists of two tasks. The purpose of the first task, Fuel Screening Studies, is to investigate the impact of fuel properties on particulate production, to establish the importance of droplet size and examine atomizer effects, and to develop techniques for surrogate fuels productions. In the second task, Flame Studies, the fundamental details of soot formation from synfuel droplet combustion will be investigated in variable slip velocity configurations. This present report describes technical progress during the first three months of the program effort (October-December 1980). During this initial period, attention has focused on the definition of the different experimental efforts and on the design and construction of the required hardware. Aspects of this work are discussed.

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: Summaries of the final reports produced by Lehigh University, West Virginia University, and Vander Sande Associates under the Participants Program are presented. Analytical data produced by CONSOL are provided in Appendix I for all samples employed in the Participants Program and issued with the samples to research groups in the Participants Program. A paper was presented at the 1992 US Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Liquefaction Contractors` Review Conference, held in Pittsburgh September 23--24, 1992, entitled ``The Chemical Nature of Coal Liquid Resids and the Implications for Process Development``. It appears as Appendix 2 in this report.

  15. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, CY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This is the ninth technical progress report submitted to the Department of Energy in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1991. During the reporting period, work focused on completing Task 2, Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) Detailed Design and Task 4, Procurement Activities to support the installation of the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APE). The following significant events occurred during this report period: The mechanical/structural contractor (Pullman Power Products) mobilized at the Tidd site in December and began erecting steel framing for the APF. A contract modification was issued to Babcock & Wilcox Co. for the supply of piping materials required for the combustor internal modifications. A contract was awarded to ANARAD, Inc. for a gas analysis system. A contract was prepared and is being processed for electrical erection.

  16. Pipeline gas demonstration plant, Phase I. Quarterly technical progress report for September 1980-November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    Work was performed in the following tasks in Phase I of the Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant Program: Site Evaluation and Selection; Demonstration Plant Environmental Analysis; Feedstock Plans, Licenses, Permits and Easements; Demonstration Plant Definitive Design; Construction Planning; Economic Reassessment; Technical Support; Long Lead Procurement List; and Project Management. The Preliminary Construction Schedule was delivered to the Government on October 3, 1980, constituting an early delivery of the construction schedule called for in the scope of work for Task VI. The major work activity continues to be the effort in Task VI, Demonstration Plant Definitive Design, with two 30% Design Review meetings being held with the Government. Work in Task VII, Construction Planning, was initiated. Work has progressed satisfactorily in the other tasks in support of the Demonstration Plant Program. A Cost Change Proposal was submitted because of an increase in the scope of work and an extension of the schedule for Phase I to 47 months.

  17. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  18. Energy conservation in citrus processing. Technical progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-15

    The principal objective of the work is to identify an economically viable alternative to the existing method of meeting the energy requirements of citrus fruit processing that will substantially reduce the overall energy usage of citrus processing plants. The components which will make up the alternative systems include: evaporators, dryers, refrigeration units, heat pumps, heat engines, heat exchangers, thermal storage units, and ancillary components. These components will be used to form the five operational units of the citrus processing plant. These operational units are: evaporation, drying, refrigeration, pasteurizing and canning, and the plant electrical load that consists of operations such as conveying and juice extraction. The five operational units are then interrelated to varying degrees with respect to energy exchange to form different types of alternative systems. The approach, work plan, and progress of technical work are summarized. (MCW)

  19. Energy conservation in citrus processing. Technical progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-15

    The Sunkist Citrus Plant in Ontario, California, processes about 6 million pounds of citrus fruit per day to make products which include frozen concentrated juice; chilled, pasteurized, natural strength juice; molasses from peel; dried meal from peel; pectin; citrus oil; and bioflavonoids. The energy intensive operations at the plant include concentration, drying, and refrigeration. The objective of the two-year two-phase project is to identify an economically viable alternative to the existing method of meeting energy requirements. Progress on the technical work of Phase I is reported. The following are summarized: requirements (energy price projection, atmospheric emission requirements, citrus juice quality constraints, economic evaluations); characterization (basic citrus processing operations, energy consumption and fruit processed vs time, identification and measurement of energy uses, energy balance for a typical citrus juice evaporator); and thermodynamic analysis (heat pump model, thermal evaporator, and co-generation model).

  20. Low cost silicon process development. Phase III: process optimization and evaluation. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.; Newman, C.; Messina, L.

    1980-03-01

    The goal of the Low Cost Silicon Process Development project is to determine technical and economic feasibility of a tribromosilane-based process for the production of Solar Cell Grade Silicon. To accomplish this project goal, three principal tasks have been defined: (1) an experimental chemistry task; (2) a mini-plant design and construction task; and (3) a mini-plant operation and evaluation task. The scope of the experimental chemistry task includes optimization of the process with design verification studies at bench scale level. The mini-plant design task is focused on construction of a flexible, cost effective mini-plant. The final task is concerned with the generation of sufficient high quality process data through mini-plant operation to support an accurate assessment of the potential of the process for meeting DOE silicon material quality and cost goals. Progress is reported.

  1. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration. Technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from July 1, 1993, through September 30, 1993. The ACCP Demonstration Project is a US DOE Clean Coal Technology Project. This project demonstrates an advanced thermal coal drying process coupled with physical cleaning techniques that are designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After drying, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal.

  2. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1992-12-01

    The ultimate oojective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. This report presents a summary of technical progress of the well log analysis of Kuparuk Field, Northslope, Alaska.

  3. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Seventeenth quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  4. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1982 on Energy Conversion Research and Development Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the continued design work for the low mass flow train superheater. The detailed design of this component continued and the overall arrangement drawing for the superheater and air heater was finalized. The air heater procurement reached the point of contract award, but the actual purchase order award was held up pending receipt of additional funding from the Department of Energy. Testing activity reported includes two additional tests in the LMF1C series, which concludes this test series. Test data are presented, along with preliminary analyses for the combustor, nozzle, diagnostic channel, diffuser, radiant furnace/secondary combustor and Materials Test Module. In addition to the nitrogen oxide test measurements, corrosion and erosion rates for the boiler tube specimens and the materials test module are reported.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power

  6. Coastal wetland support of Great Lakes fisheries: progress from concept to quantification.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishery support is recognized as a valuable ecosystem service provided by aquatic systems but is harder to quantify than to describe conceptually. In this paper, we intersect data on fish inhabiting Great Lakes coastal wetlands with information on commercial and recreational har...

  7. Cle Elum Lake Sockeye Salmon Restoration Feasibility Study, 1986-1988 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, Thomas A.

    1988-10-01

    In 1986, a multi-year project to evaluate the biological feasibility of reestablishing anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) runs to Cle Elum Lake in the Yakima River Basin was established between the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). This program involves the capture, spawning, and rearing of disease-free donor stock in 1987 and 1988 and assessment of juvenile outmigration and survival from Cle Elum Lake in 1989 and 1990. Work in 1987--1988 involved collection of adult sockeye salmon from the Lake Wenatchee run and incubation and rearing of progeny as donor stock. In July 1987, 263 adults were captured at the Dryden fishway on the Wenatchee River and transferred to net-pens in Lake Wenatchee. Adults were held approximately 90 days and spawned, and the eggs were transferred to a quarantine hatchery. Pre-spawning survival was 95.1%, and all spawners were certified as being free of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) and other replicating viruses. Egg viability averaged about 40%; however, eyed egg to hatch survival was over 99%. Juveniles are being reared in quarantine, and survival to date is about 92%. The NMFS currently has over 131,000 fry (0.7 g average weight) in culture. Fry have been certified twice (at 0.12 g and 0.25 g average weight) as being free of IHN and other replicating viruses. Viral certification will continue throughout rearing. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Progress towards design elements for a Great Lakes-wide aquatic invasive species early detection network

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal systems are vulnerable to introduction of a wide variety of non-indigenous species (NIS), and the desire to effectively respond to future invaders is prompting efforts towards establishing a broad early-detection network. Such a network requires statistically...

  9. The Mark Twain Lake/Salt River CEAP Project – Progress and Preliminary Findings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mark Twain Lake collects drainage from approximately 6600 km2 of the Salt River basin, most of which represents the Midwest claypan major land resource area. Thus, it is likely the watershed most prone to surface runoff in the CEAP benchmark network. High surface runoff from agricultural land wi...

  10. Cle Elum Lake Sockeye Salmon Restoration Feasibility Study, 1987-1989 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, Thomas A.

    1990-02-01

    This report summarizes research activities conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) from July 1988 through March 1989 relating to the Cle Elum Lake sockeye salmon restoration feasibility study. During this period, efforts focused on collection and spawning of adult sockeye salmon from the Wenatchee River, incubation of eggs from the 1988-brood, and the rearing of juveniles from the 1987-brood. In late July and early August 1988, 520 adult sockeye salmon were captured at fishways on the Wenatchee River and transferred to net-pens in Lake Wenatchee. Fish were held to maturity in late September and early October, spawned, and eggs incubated at a quarantine hatchery in Seattle, WA. The 336 sockeye salmon successfully spawned from the net-pens at Lake Wenatchee were surveyed for the presence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and other replicating viruses. In addition, 13 and 5 sockeye salmon spawners were surveyed from spawning grounds on the White and Little Wenatchee Rivers, respectively, from within the Lake Wenatchee system. 12 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Panama coal to methanol project. Phase I. Feasibility Study. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    This Technical Progress Report contains the results of the investigations performed for the Panama Coal to Methanol Project: Technical efforts associated with the gasification technology evaluation; evaluation of other related process technologies; results of the venture analyses, including the efforts made for structuring the project; results of the ongoing financial analyses and cost projections, including potential and use applications of methanol in Japan primarily for combustion turbine-combined cycle steam/electric utilization. At this time, and for the next few years, the Panama-based methanol fuel is more expensive than oil. However, when measured in terms of KWH production cost in Japan, the use of methanol fuel in combustion turbine, combined-cycle operations appears to create less expensive electric power than that produced from conventional coal direct fired operations using imported coal. This cost advantage arises from significantly lower capital costs and enhanced performance efficiencies associated with combined cycle power generators as contrasted with conventional coal plants equipped with scrubbers. Environmental and social land-use benefits are also much greater for the methanol fuel plant. The cost of electricity from a methanol-fueled combined cycle plant is also expected to compare favorably in Japan with electrical costs from a future liquefied natural gas fired plant.

  12. Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Shake flask tests were completed of microbial pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Rosebud subbituminous coal. Significant amounts of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and Be were removed from this coal. Analyses in connection with leach column tests of Pittsburgh coal were completed and confirmed significant removal of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and As from this coal. Although Hg was not removed from Pittsburgh coal by microbial attack, there was a correlation between HCl leaching of Hg from this coal and the extent of depyritization. Since HgS is soluble in HCl, the results suggest HgS is exposed by chemical and microbial dissolution of coal pyrite. Column tests with cleaned Indiana No. 5 coal are in progress and show significant early dissolution of Ni, Mn, Cd, Co and As. A final shake flask test with Kentucky No. 9 coal was begun. Pittsburgh coal with a low content of fines was shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in preparation for slurry column tests of HAP precursor removal. Project results were presented at the PETC contractor`s conference held in Pittsburgh. A project progress review meeting was also held with the PETC technical project monitor.

  13. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Fourteenth quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1990-- January 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  14. Colorado School of Mines Low Energy Nuclear Physics Project technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1990-01-05

    This report summarizes the activity and accomplishments of the Colorado School of Mines Low Energy Nuclear Physics project during the calendar year 1989. Many of the projects which were anticipated in the original grant proposal have been completed. Among these completed projects we include of study of the radiative capture of low energy protons on {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 11}B. Preliminary measurements of the branching ratios and yields of these reactions were reported in last year's Technical Progress Report. These measurements are now complete and have been used to extract the respective astrophysical S-factors and the corresponding thermonuclear reactivities. While not complete, progress has been made in some of the other originally proposed studies. Among these include a fairly extensive study of the interaction of low energy deuterons with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li. In the course of this study we have made a solid observation of the Oppenheimer-Phillips effect in the D-{sup 6}Li system. Progress has been made in our study of the radiative capture of alpha particles by deuterons, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li but considerable work remains in these studies. In our earlier reports we noted the observation of d-d reactions during the bombardment of deuterated targets with energetic beams of protons, alpha particles, and other light-to-medium ions. We believe we now understand this phenomenon and feel it has some fairly significant consequences both for our studies and for those of other researchers. Our susceptibility to mob hysteria led us to invest a significant effort in cold nuclear fusion, both employing a fairly unique accelerator based approach at CSM and as one of the gamma ray diagnosticians on the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Cold Fusion Task Force.

  15. Cle Elum Lake Restoration Feasibility Study: Fish Husbandry Research, 1988-1991 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, Thomas A.

    1991-09-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are involved in a project to evaluate the feasibility of re-establishing anadromous salmon runs to Cle Elum Lake in the Yakima River Basin of Washington state. Historically, the Yakima River system supported large runs of anadromous salmonids that contributed significantly to the Columbia River harvest. Habitat destruction and overfishing drastically reduced run abundance prior to the early 1900s. Salmon runs were eliminated from upper reaches of the Yakima River Basin with development of irrigation storage reservoirs without fishways in the early 1900s. The goal of the NMFS/BPA project is to determine if it is feasible for anadromous salmonids to recolonize the habitat above Cle Elum Dam under the present format of irrigation water withdrawal from the reservoir. The primary concern is whether anadromous fish can successfully exit Cle Elum Lake and survive downstream passage through the Yakima and Columbia Rivers to the ocean.

  16. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on several different projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Furnace Projects for waste destruction; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project for removal of radioactive materials; and Spray Casting Project.

  17. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry reactor systems. Technical progress report for period ending July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Huff, G.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This is the first technical progress report on this grant, which had an effective date of initiation of March 9, 1981. During this period preliminary experimental results were obtained on the effects of reactant transport across the gas-liquid interface on synthesis gas conversion and product selectivity, utilizing an iron catalyst in a laboratory-scale, well-mixed slurry reactor.

  18. Final Technical Progress Report: Development of Low-Cost Suspension Heliostat; December 7, 2011 - December 6, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, W.

    2013-01-01

    Final technical progress report of SunShot Incubator Solaflect Energy. The project succeeded in demonstrating that the Solaflect Suspension Heliostat design is viable for large-scale CSP installations. Canting accuracy is acceptable and is continually improving as Solaflect improves its understanding of this design. Cost reduction initiatives were successful, and there are still many opportunities for further development and further cost reduction.

  19. [Chemical risk in operating rooms and technical progress: the obligations and responsibilities of law].

    PubMed

    Oddo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We are going to consider the specific applications of the new legal system and of the most recent body of laws to those work environments of particular risk, such as healthcare facilities and in particular operating rooms. In such environments, volatile chemicals classified as "dangerous" are used with consequent exposure to "chemical risk", both of those persons professionally involved, depending on the type of activity, and of the patients to whom such activities are addressed in the same environment. Once the chemical risk is framed in the existing regulatory system, it must be specifically evaluated the application of the same principle to the particular chemical risk arising from the use of anesthetic agents in the operating room, for example sevoflurane and desflurane, being careful to test wether and how much this risk can be eliminated or reduced to minimum in relation to the new achievements of the technical progress. So, as soon as the quality of "dangerous chemical agent" of the "volatile chemicals" and of the "volatile liquid anesthetic" (sevoflurane and desflurane) as well--which are characterized by a lower degree of toxicity and for this reason are mostly used in current chemical practice, preferable to some anesthetic gases such as nitrous oxide--is legally verified, it is necessary to relate the scientific and technical data which result from the current "state of art" also to the other binding regulations that are imposed for the "prevention and protection from chemical agents", according to the relative Title IX of the TUSL (Unique text for Safety and Health at Work). PMID:24640081

  20. The Impact of the Adequate Yearly Progress Requirement of the Federal "No Child Left Behind" Act on Schools in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Edward W.; Mathis, William J.; Garcia, David R.

    2005-01-01

    This study finds that nearly every school in the Great Lakes states is threatened to fail the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements mandated by the federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) Act. NCLB holds schools and districts accountable for student achievement on state standardized tests and schools that do not make AYP face sanctions. A…

  1. The Impact of the Adequate Yearly Progress Requirement of the Federal "No Child Left Behind" Act on Schools in the Great Lakes Region. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Edward W.; Mathis, William J.; Garcia, David R.

    2005-01-01

    This executive summary describes a study that finds nearly every school in the Great Lakes states is threatened to fail the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements mandated by the federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) Act. NCLB holds schools and districts accountable for student achievement on state standardized tests and schools that do not…

  2. Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project; Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Dave

    2003-11-01

    This annual report is a precursor to the final technical report we will be writing the next contract period. Consequently, this report, covering the period between September 27, 2002, and September 26, 2003, represents a progress report towards the final technical report we anticipate completing by September 26, 2004. Sample analysis and field work have progressed well and we anticipate no further delays. There are 4 objectives: (1) To quantify secondary production Moses Lake; (2) To quantify the influence of predation on target fishes in Moses Lake; (3) To quantify mortality of selected fished in Moses Lake; and (4) To assess effects of habitat changes from shoreline development and carp on the fish community in Moses Lake.

  3. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Final technical progress report No. 14, [July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-17

    This is the fourteenth Technical Progress Report, describing work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-FC22-90PC89663, ``Development of a Coal Quality Expert.`` The contract is a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy, CQ Inc., and ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. This report covers the period from July 1 through September 30, 1993. Five companies and five host utilities have teamed with CQ Inc. and ABB/CE to perform the work on this project. The work falls under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program category of ``Advanced Coal Cleaning.`` The 51-month project will provide the utility industry with a PC expert system to confidently and inexpensively evaluate the potential for coal cleaning, blending, and switching options to reduce emissions while producing lowest cost electricity. Specifically, this project will: (1) Enhance the existing Coal Quality Information System (CQIS) database and Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) to allow confident assessment of the effects of cleaning on specific boiler cost and performance; and (2) develop and validate a methodology, Coal Quality Expert (CQE) which allows accurate and detailed predictions of coal quality impacts on total power plant capital cost, operating cost, and performance based upon inputs from inactive bench-scale tests.

  4. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Second quarterly technical progress report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the eleventh technical progress report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Ohio Power company for the Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Second Quarter of CY 1992. Activities included: The Tidd combustor internals were modified to connect the hot gas system for slipstream operation; Various pre-operational activities were completed, including pneumatic leak testing of the HGCU system, operation of the closed cycle cooling water system, operation of the back pulse compressor and air preheater, and checkout of the back pulse skid. Initial operation of the system using the bypass cyclone occurred during May 21--23, 1992; On May 23, 1992, an expansion joint ruptured, forcing the unit to be shut down. The failure was later determined to be due to stress corrosion. Following the expansion joint failure, a complete engineering review of the system was undertaken and is continuing; Contract Modification No. 6 was issued to Westinghouse during this quarter. This modification is for APF surveillance testing services; A purchase order was issued to Battelle for ash sampling hardware and testing services.

  5. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, July 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The major accomplishments during this reporting period include completion of Task 1 and progression into Phase II, Task 2 design activities. A brief laboratory-scale test was conducted during this reporting period to confirm heat transfer coefficients for various sections of the Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized bed Combustion (PAFBC) system. The heat transfer coefficient was determined to be approximately 50 Btu/hr ft{sup 2} {degrees}F inside the eductor and tailpipe of the pulse combustor as thin the fluidized bed. well as for the surfaces immersed within the fluidized bed. Communications with potential host sites for the Phase III field demonstration activities continued during this reporting period. These discussions along with discussions with environmental regulatory personnel in the State of Maryland indicate that the throughput of the field demonstration facility should be increased to greater than 36 million Btu/hr. An 8 in. {times} 8 in. fluidized bed unit would be too small to satisfy this requirement; its projected firing rate is only 33 million Btu/hr. Major effort during this reporting period was devoted to assessing the reasonableness of increasing the size of the field test facility from a technical and cost standpoint.

  6. Assessment of pulverized coal-fired combustor performance. First quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.; Clark, W.; Payne, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to provide the engineering tools necessary for an authoritative assessment of the performance of industrial furnaces firing pulverized coal. The program incorporates two experimental tasks and is constructed around an analytical task which will identify and upgrade the family of computer programs required to undertake the performance analysis studies. These analytical tools will be used to predict the effect of parameters such as fuel type and furnace variables on combustor performance, and to identify those properties which have a major impact on thermal performance. The second task uses a combustion reactor to screen the key variables identified and to provide data on the properties of coal particulate matter which affect heat transfer performance. Verification of the engineering analytical approach will be provided by measurements made in a pilot-scale furnace. This present report discusses technical progress during the first three months of the program, and considers the selection of the appropriate analytical tools and preliminary details of the experimental system.

  7. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, May 1991--July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990`s, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  8. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Technology development for the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Work is being done under three tasks as described in the following. (1) materials selection, evaluation, and development: The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The scope of the work will include compilation of materials data, materials selection for testing and design studies, materials property determination, liaison with refractory manufacturers and other organizations to encourage development of materials and fabrication technology, establishment of preliminary HTAH material specifications, analyses of test materials, and development of criteria for thermal stress limits for crack-tolerant refractory materials. (2) operability, performance, and materials testing: The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. (3) full-scale design concepts: The objectives of this task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. Progress is described. (WHK)

  9. Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-05-01

    Brief progress reprots are presented for the following tasks: development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation and product market study; the impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; injection into coal seams for simultaneous co[sub 2] mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the Koppleman Series C'' process using a batch; test unit with powder river basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; contained recovery of oily wastes field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; insitu treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils; development and demonstration of a wood-fired. Gas turbine system; solid state NMR analysis of mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; and acid-mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment development for the stockett/sand coulee area

  10. Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    Progress reports are briefly described for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation and product market study; the impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; injecton into coal seams for simultaneous CO[sub 2] mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the Koppleman Series C'' process using a batch; test unit with powder river basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; contained recovery of oily wastes field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; insitu treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils; development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; solid state NMR analysis of Mowry Formation Shale from different sedimentary basins; and acid-mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment development for the stockett/sand coulee area

  11. Jointly sponsored research program quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the Koppelman ``Series C`` Power River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; and in-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

  12. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on a multi-task research contract directed toward developing the technology for an MHD steam combined cycle power plant. During the period two tests were conducted in the DOE Coal Fired FLow Facility. Both of these tests were part of the western coal proof-of-concept (POC) test series. The report describes the performance of the tests and provides some preliminary performance data on particulate removal systems during the tests. The performance of ceramic tubes being tested for high temperature air heater application is described. Performance of advanced diagnostics equipment from both UTSI and MSU is summarized. The results of experiments designed to determine the effects of potassium compounds on combustion are included. Plans for analysis of metal tube specimens previously removed from the test train are discussed. Modeling and analysis of previous test data include a deposition model to predict ash deposition on tubes, mass balance results, automated data screening and chemical analyses and the data base containing these analyses. Laboratory tests on sealing ceramic tubes and corrosion analyses of previously tested tubes are reported.

  13. Heterogeneous kinetics of coal gasification. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1983-30 June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Ganapathi, R.

    1983-01-01

    In the current quarterly technical progress report we present data and results on transient kinetic studies of the steam-char reaction system for activated coconut and lignite chars. These experiments were conducted in a fashion similar to the previous char-CO/sub 2/ studies, under approximately the same experimental conditions. The two principal product species, H/sub 2/ and CO, were monitored using the automatic mass programming system developed especially for this project. In order to perform the steam-char experiments, the original apparatus was modified by the addition of a steam generation/condensate removal system. The steam-char reaction system, being somewhat more complex than the CO/sub 2/-char reaction system, was modeled with a six-parameter, elementary kinetic scheme. The ''effective'' active site concentrations determined from the steam gasification data were of the same order of magnitude, and behaved in a similar fashion, to those obtained for the CO/sub 2/ gasification studies. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. 21 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    This report is the twenty-first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-77ET10069 for EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development Phase V. A detailed comparison of RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields has been initiated. This study builds off previous yield modeling results, which found that RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields were generally consistent given the scatter of the data, although some differences were noted. These pilot unit yield differences have now been quantified, and operating/configurational differences which account for some of them have been identified. Preliminary yield comparison results after correcting for these known process differences between the pilot plants indicate that: RCLU and CLPP yields are generally consistent; ECLP's conversion is about 5 lb/100 lb DAF coal lower than RCLU/CLPP at comparable operating conditions; and work has been initiated to define the EDS slurry preheater feed system design (based on slurry distributor manifold guidelines and coking correlation predictions, which influence furnace pass control issues such as slurry flow measurement). EDS hydrotreated naphtha showed a low level of systemic toxicity to rats exposed to the vapor six hours per day, five days per week for thirteen weeks.

  15. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report No. 24, Third quarter, CY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This is the twenty-fourth and final Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1995. All activity this quarter was directed toward the completion of the program final report. A draft copy of the final report was forwarded to DOE during this quarter, and DOE submitted their comments on the report to AEPSC. DOE requested that Westinghouse write an appendix to the report covering the performance of the fail-safe regenerator devices during Tad operation, and Westinghouse subsequently prepared the appendix. Additional DOE comments were incorporated into the report, and it will be issued in camera-ready form by the end of October, 1995, which is the program end date. Appendix 1 presents the results of filter candle posttest examination by Westinghouse performed on selected filter candles following final shutdown of the system.

  16. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project fourth quarterly technical progress report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the 23rd technical progress report submitted to the Department of Energy in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant. This report covers the period from October 1, 1992 to December 31, 1992. Major activities during this period involve: (1) The unit was operated for a total of 714 hours (including gas turbine air prewarming). There were seven gas turbine starts, seven bed preheater starts, and seven operating periods with coal fire. The peak gross output of 64 MWH was achieved for the period of 1000 to 1100 hours on November 23, 1992. The longest coal fire was 285 hours beginning at 1211 hours on November 25, 1992. (2) Total gross generation was 24,643, and coal consumption was 11,900 tons. (3) The hot gas clean up system was commissioned. (4) Active end fluidization system to address sparge duct cracking and deformation problem was jointly initiated by ABB carbon, B&W and AEPSC. (5) All testing continued using Plum Run dolomite. This approach was taken as a conservative means to avoid sintering and unit trips which were encountered during the previous two start-ups in September using limestone and (6) monitoring of solid, liquid and gaseous waste streams, as detailed in the operations phase monitoring requirements in the EMP, were performed.

  17. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  18. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1994, through March 31, 1994. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  19. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-08-01

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Process oils from Wilsonville Run 262 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 262 was operated from July 10 through September 30, 1991, in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) configuration with ash recycle. The feed coal was Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal. The high/low temperature sequence was used. Each reactor was operated at 50% of the available reactor volume. The interstage separator was in use throughout the run. The second-stage reactor was charged with aged Criterion 324 catalyst (Ni/Mo on 1/16 inch alumina extrudate support). Slurry catalysts and sulfiding agent were fed to the first-stage reactor. Molyvan L is an organometallic compound which contains 8.1% Mo, and is commercially available as an oil-soluble lubricant additive. It was used in Run 262 as a dispersed hydrogenation catalyst precursor, primarily to alleviate deposition problems which plagued past runs with Black Thunder coal. One test was made with little supported catalyst in the second stage. The role of phenolic groups in donor solvent properties was examined. In this study, four samples from direct liquefaction process oils were subjected to O-methylation of the phenolic groups, followed by chemical analysis and solvent quality testing.

  1. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

  2. Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Deans, H.A.

    1994-05-01

    This is a progress report on work performed by Western Research Institute for the U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in the period October- December 1993. Tasks addressed include: development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; the impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the koppelman {open_quotes}series c{close_quotes} process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} series pilot plant tests; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

  3. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1987--February 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-03

    Department of Energy Participation in the Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project began officially on November 9, 1987. Even though their financial participation began at this time, they will receive technical information from the start of the project which was on January 1, 1987. The Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project is progressing in Phase I with the majority of the emphasis on facility design, site characterization and the environmental work. The site characterization field work is estimated to be completed by the end of February with the final report completion towards the end of Phase I. The facility design effort is close to the 40% level. It is anticipated that all permits will be applied for in Phase I and most of them will be granted by the end of Phase I. The obtaining of the private financing continues to be a major activity in the project. All of the financing must be in place before the continuation for DOE funding to Phase II will be applied for.

  4. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1993. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low- rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  5. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes. Progress report, 1 August 1985-1 February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollutants is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. The principle objective is to examine how seasonal changes in lake water transparency are related to annual acidic load. Further, the relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes is being investigated.

  6. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multi-task contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing has occurred or is scheduled, and the planned effort for this period was to maintain the DOE CFFF facility in a standby status and to complete test reports.

  7. Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics coal-fired flow facility for the period April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multitask contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing occurred or was scheduled during the quarter, but the DOE CFFF facility was maintained in a standby status.

  8. Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 1 of 3, 2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hammell, Larry; Machin, Deanna; Long, Karilyn

    2001-06-01

    Historical records indicate that sockeye salmon were once found in most of the lakes in the Okanagan River Basin. Currently, the only sockeye population within the Okanagan River Basin is found in Osoyoos Lake. Abundance of this stock has declined significantly in the last fifty years. The Okanagan Nation and tribes in the U.S. have proposed re-introducing the species into Okanagan Lake, which has a large rearing capacity. However, assessing the potential benefits and risks associated with a reintroduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake is difficult because of uncertainties about factors that determine production of Okanagan sockeye, and potential interactions with other species in Okanagan Lake. Associated with this proposal are the potential risks of re-introduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. One of these is the effects of sockeye on the resident Okanagan Lake kokanee population, which has declined significantly in the past several years because of habitat loss due to human encroachment, competition with introduced mysid shrimp, and the reduction of biological productivity in the lake as municipalities have moved to more complete effluent treatment. Another concern is the possibility of the transmission of diseases that are currently not found in Okanagan and Skaha lakes from re-introduced sockeye to resident fish. An additional concern is the risk that exotic species (e.g. tench, largemouth bass), that have become established in southern Okanagan Lakes (principally as a result of purposeful introductions in the US Columbia/Okanagan river system), may be able to extend their range to Skaha and Okanagan Lakes, through fish ladders provided at the outlets of Vaseaux (McIntyre Dam) and Skaha Lakes (Okanagan Falls Dam), for natural upstream migration of sockeye. A transboundary multi-agency workshop was hosted in November of 1997 to discuss the potential risks and benefits of reintroducing sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. These discussions were

  9. PFBC HGCU test facility technical progress report. First Quarter, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This is the eighteenth Technical Progress Report submitted in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. During this quarter, the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up System operated for 835 hours during six separate test runs. The system was starting into a seventh run at the end of the quarter. Highlights of this period are summarized below: the longest run during the quarter was approximately 333 hours; filter pressure drop was stable during all test runs this quarter using spoiling air to the primary cyclone upstream of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF); the tempering air system was commissioned this quarter which enabled the unit to operate at full load conditions while limiting the gas temperature in the APF to 1,400 F; during a portion of the one run, the tempering air was removed and the filter operated without problems up to 1,450 F; ash sampling was performed by Battelle personnel upstream and downstream of the APF and ash loading and particle size distribution data were obtained, a summary report is included; a hot area on the APF head was successfully repaired in service; a hot spot on the top of an expansion joint was successfully repaired by drilling holes from the inside of the pipe and pumping in refractory insulation; a corrosion inspection program for the HGCU system was issued giving recommendations for points to inspect; filter internal inspections following test runs 13 and 17 revealed a light coating (up to 1/4 inch thick) of residual ash on the candles and some ash bridging between the dust sheds and inner rows of candles. Data from these inspections are included with this report.

  10. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  11. Instrumentation of dynamic gas pulse loading system. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaupt, H.

    1992-04-14

    The overall goal of this work is to further develop and field test a system of stimulating oil and gas wells, which increases the effective radius of the well bore so that more oil can flow into it, by recording pressure during the gas generation phase in real time so that fractures can be induced more predictably in the producing formation. Task 1: Complete the laboratory studies currently underway with the prototype model of the instrumentation currently being studied. Task 2: Perform field tests of the model in the Taft/Bakersfield area, utilizing operations closest to the engineers working on the project, and optimize the unit for various conditions encountered there. Task 3: Perform field test of the model in DGPL jobs which are scheduled in the mid-continent area, and optimize the unit for downhole conditions encountered there. Task 4: Analyze and summarize the results achieved during the complete test series, documenting the steps for usage of downhole instrumentation in the field, and compile data specifying use of the technology by others. Task 5: Prepare final report for DOE, and include also a report on the field tests completed. Describe and estimate the probability of the technology being commercialized and in what time span. The project has made substantial technical progress, though we are running about a month behind schedule. Expenditures are in line with the schedule. Increased widespread interest in the use of DGPL stimulation has kept us very busy. The computer modeling and test instrumentation developed under this program is already being applied to commercial operations.

  12. Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center quarterly technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Encouraging progress was made toward the development of acid rain control technology. PETC competitively selected and awarded contracts totaling over $8 million over the next three years to firms proposing new concepts for reducing the costs of cleaning the flue gas emissions of older, coal-burning power plants. PETC and ANL have undertaken a joint venture in dry flue-gas scrubbing that will ultimately lead to testing of a sorbent for combined SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ removal in Argonne's 20-megawatt spray dryer. The overall objective of a high-sulfur coal research program is to conduct a broad spectrum of coal-related research in order to increase and expand the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. In the liquefaction program area, operations with Wyodak subbituminous coal are proceeding smoothly (Run 249) at the Wilsonville Process Development Unit. Understanding the processes involved in catalyst deactivation is important to the development of longer lived catalysts. In the area of process analysis, PETC has acquired a new version of ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineeering) software. The new version was recently installed on PETC's VAX/VMS operating system and is the most up-to-date version currently available. Work at PETC has resulted in the development and testing of a highly automated capillary tube viscometer for use with heavy coal-derived liquids. Results of PETC research in Fischer-Tropsch product characterization were also shared with the technical community. A particularly difficult analytical problem in the characterization of Fischer-Tropsch products is quantitative determination of carbon number distributions by compound class. PETC scientists developed a method that uses capillary gas chromatographic techniques to make these determinations. A paper describing the method was the lead article in the July 1985 issue of the Journal of Chromatographic Science and was featured on the cover.

  13. Green River formation water flood demonstration project, Uinta Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the project was to understand the water flood mechanisms underway in Monument Butte unit water flood and apply the technology, if possible to the Travis and the Boundary units. The purpose of the project was also to transfer the water flood technology to nearby units/fields/reservoirs. Technical progress is briefly described for the Monument Butte Unit, Travis Unit, and Boundary Unit.

  14. Lake Winnipeg Basin: Advocacy, challenges and progress for sustainable phosphorus and eutrophication control.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Malley, Diane F; Watts, Paul D

    2016-01-15

    Intensification of agricultural production worldwide has altered cycles of phosphorus (P) and water. In particular, loading of P on land in fertilizer applications is a global water quality concern. The Lake Winnipeg Basin (LWB) is a major agricultural area displaying extreme eutrophication. We examined the eutrophication problem in the context of the reemerging global concern about future accessibility of phosphate rock for fertilizer production and sustainable phosphorus management. An exploratory action research participatory design was applied to study options for proactivity within the LWB. The multiple methods, including stakeholder interviews and surveys, demonstrate emerging synergies between the goals of reversing eutrophication and promoting food security. Furthermore, shifting the prevalent pollutant-driven eutrophication management paradigm in the basin toward a systemic, holistic and ecocentric approach, integrating global resource challenges, requires a mutual learning process among stakeholders in the basin to act on and adapt to ecosystem vulnerabilities. It is suggested to continue aspects of this research in a transdisciplinary format, i.e., science with society, in response to globally-expanding needs and concerns, with a possible focus on enhanced engagement of indigenous peoples and elders. PMID:26475238

  15. Progress report on the geothermal assessment of the Jordan Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Darling, R.; Davis, D.A.; Gwynn, J.W.; Murphy, P.J.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D.

    1981-05-01

    Two known geothermal areas have been investigated previously in the Jordan Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah. These reports indicate meteoric water is being circulated to depth and heated by the ambient temperature derived from normal heat flow. This warm water subsequently migrates upward along permiable fault zones. The gravity survey conducted in the valley indicates a number of fault blocks are present beneath the unconsolidated valley sediments. The faults bounding these blocks could provide conduits for the upward migration of warm water. Four areas of warm water wells, in addition to the two known geothermal areas, have been delineated in the valley. However, the chemistry of the Jordan Valley is quite complex and at this time is not fully understood in regard to geothermal potential. Thick sequences of unconsolidated valley fill could conceal geothermal areas due to lateral dispersion or dilution within the principal aquifer, as well as retardation of warm water flow allowing time for cooling prior to discharge in wells or springs. Other areas are possibly diluted and cooled by high quality, ground water recharge from snow melt in the Wasatch Range.

  16. OTEC support services. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, February 15-May 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Lipari, M. V.

    1980-05-01

    Technical engineering and management support services provided by the VSE Corporation for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program of the Ocean Systems Branch, Division of Central Solar Technology are reported. Tasks include: (1) survey, analysis, evaluation, and recommendation concerning program performance; (2) program technical monitoring; (3) development and implementation of methodology to identify and evaluate program alternatives; (4) technical assessments; (5) OTEC system integration; (6) environment and siting considerations; and (7) transmission subsystem considerations. (WHK)

  17. Learning Progressions: Tools for Assessment and Instruction for All Learners. Technical Report #1307

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáez, Leilani; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Conceptually, learning progressions hold promise for improving assessment and instruction by precisely outlining what students know and don't know at particular stages of knowledge and skill development. Based upon a synthesis of the literature, a rationale for the use of learning progressions maps to clarify how learning progresses in…

  18. Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States. Second Progress and Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Ben A., Jr.

    The report is designed to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the processes and procedures used to develop catalogs of performance objectives, criterion-referenced measures, and performance guides for learners in vocational-technical education. It reports on the efforts of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States…

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACHIEVEMENT MEASURES FOR TRADE AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. PROGRESS REPORT NUMBER FOUR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, THOMAS S.

    DURING THE FIRST YEAR OF THE PROJECT, TO DISCOVER MORE ADEQUATE WAYS OF MEASURING IMPORTANT TACTILE-KINESTHETIC MODALITIES, APPROXIMATELY 40 INSTRUCTORS WITHIN THE NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, WORKING WITH PROJECT STAFF MEMBERS, COMPLETED A CURRICULUM ANALYSIS FOR THE TECHNICAL OR TRADE SPECIALITY IN…

  20. A Practical Demonstration Project in Teaching Technical Mathematics; Final Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Thomas J.; Witzke, Paul T.

    The primary purposes of this developmental and demonstration project were to reduce the number of dropouts and failures and to increase the amount of learning in the technical mathematics core courses. In June 1965 a decision was made to pilot test locally developed programed units in technical mathematics. After the identification of the desired…

  1. Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research, Technical Quarterly Progress Report. October 1, 1998--December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-19

    Major accomplishments during this reporting period by the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) are: AGTSR submitted FY99 program continuation request to DOE-FETC for $4M; AGTSR submitted program and workshop Formation to the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) initiative; AGTSR distributed research accomplishment summaries to DOE-FETC in the areas of combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from Arizona State, Cornell, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Clemson, Texas and Georgia Tech; AGTSR prepared background material for DOE-FETC on three technology workshops for distribution at the DOE-ATS conference in Washington, DC; AGTSR coordinated two recommendations for reputable firms to conduct an economic impact analysis in support of new DOE gas turbine initiatives; AGTSR released letters announcing the short-list winners/non-winners from the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR updated fact sheet for 1999 and announced four upcoming workshops via the SCIES web page AGTSR distributed formation to EPRI on research successes, active university projects, and workshop offerings in 1999 AGTSR continued to conduct telephone debriefings to non-winning PI's born the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR distributed completed quarterly progress report assessments to the IRB experts in the various technology areas AGTSR provided Formation to GE-Evandale on the active combustion control research at Georgia Tech AGTSR provided information to AlliedSignal and Wright-Pat Air Force Base on Connecticut's latest short-listed proposal pertaining to NDE of thermal barrier coatings AGTSR submitted final technical reports from Georgia Tech - one on coatings and the other on active combustion control - to the HU3 for review and evaluation AGTSR coordinated the format, presentation and review of 28 university research posters for the ATS Annual Review Meeting in November, 1998 AGTSR published a research summary paper at the ATS Annual

  2. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelscher, Brian

    1990-04-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  4. Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-09-01

    This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

  5. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Bertsch,

    2002-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of The University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory's research mission during the 2002 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of 76 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 50 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members, staff, and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section titled Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 51. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, stable isotopes, sandhills ecology, and phytoremediation: (1) A collaborative study between Dr. Tom Hinton at SREL and scientists at SRTC demonstrated the feasibility of using illite clay to sequester 137Cs in sediments along the P and R reactor cooling canal system, where approximately 3,000 acres of land are contaminated. Overall, the study showed significant decreases in cesium concentrations and bioavailability following the addition of illite with no sign of harm to the ecosystem. While the cesium remains sequestered from the biosphere, its radioactivity decays and the process progresses from contaminant immobilization to remediation. (2) SREL's stable isotope laboratory is now fully functional. Stable isotope distributions in nature can provide important insights into many historical and current environmental processes. Dr. Christopher Romanek is leading SREL's research in this area

  6. [List and drag forces on droplets and particles in wall-bounded shear flows]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.B.

    1992-11-01

    This project has two goals, to calculate the lift force on a spherical droplet or particle that translates through a shear flow, and to measure the inertial migration velocity that is caused by the lift force. The focus of the study is on a range of Reynolds numbers that has been shown to be of importance in the inertial deposition of aerosols from turbulent shear flows. Aspects of current technical progress summarized are the asymptotic analysis, computer simulations, and experimental measurements. Future plans and resulting publications are given.

  7. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Technical progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.

    1994-06-01

    The primary objective of this project is to examine factors affecting technical and economic success of horizontal well applications. The project`s goals will be accomplished through five tasks designed to evaluate the technical and economic success of horizontal drilling, highlight current limitations, and outline technical needs to overcome these limitations. Data describing operators` experiences throughout the domestic oil and gas industry will be gathered and organized. MEI databases containing detailed horizontal case histories will also be used. All these data will be categorized and analyzed to assess the status of horizontal well technology and estimate the impact of horizontal wells on present and future domestic oil recovery and reserves. Accomplishments for this quarter are presented.

  8. GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    SHENOY, A.S.

    2003-05-01

    A271 GT-MHR COMMERCIALZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2003. Petten advised GA the start of the HFR-EU2 irradiation is being delayed until late July 2004. HFR-EU1 (pebble fuel) is also delayed until February/March 2004. The reason for the delays was implementation of new financial regulations at Petten that delayed the contracts for capsule fabrication. Review of the MHR-2 Fuel Product Specification was completed. Revision of the specification to incorporate the review results is in progress. Detailed test matrices have been drafted for capsule irradiation tests and for post-irradiation heating tests proposed for development and qualification of advanced coated-particle fuels capable of meeting anticipated VHTR fuel performance requirements.

  9. Space Power MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) System: Third quarterly technical progress report, 1 November 1987-31 January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-15

    This progress report of the Space Power MHD System project presents the accomplishments during 1 November 1987 through 31 January 1988. The scope of work covered encompasses the definition of an MHD power system conceptual design and development plan (Task 1). Progress included the following: Subcontracts were issued to the MIT Plasma Fusion Center and the Westinghouse R and D Center. The performance of the 100 MW 500 sec. power system was optimized and the design concept finalized, including mass and energy balances. Mass and cost estimates were prepared. A design review was held at DOE/PETC. This also included the review of the technical issues definition and of the R and D Plan. Following the review, a final iteration on the conceptual design was initiated. Formulation of the R and D Plan was continued. Preparation of the Task 1 R and D Report was initiated. 12 figs.

  10. Characterization of porosity via secondary reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    In this quarterly technical Progress report, we summarize the progress which has been achieved with the development of the small angle scattering capability to be used in the current project. In particular, the following was accomplished during the reporting period. The parameter estimation code, MARQFIT, has been tested and is fully operational. The code has been applied to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data on coals swollen with deuterated solvents. Application of the FPPS model to these data indicated that the large sphere distribution apparently requires a mean greater than 1000{Angstrom}. This was attributed to the influence of interparticle voids. Specific surface areas were also estimated for these coals. Application of this model to the coal chars used in the current project will not be subject to the same effects.

  11. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chrology, permuted title, and author, Volume 11(1) through Volume 20(6)

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1980-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review, covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume II, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Volume 20, No. 6 (November-December 1979). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 600 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last ten years are listed in this index.

  12. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 4. Technical Report # 09-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  13. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 1. Technical Report # 0919

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grade 1. These measures, available as part of easyCBM [TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from schools…

  14. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Kindergarten. Technical Report # 0921

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in kindergarten. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from…

  15. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 8. Technical Report # 09-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  16. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 5. Technical Report # 09-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  17. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 2. Technical Report # 0920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  18. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 7. Technical Report 0908

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  19. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 3. Technical Report # 09-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  20. Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. First quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This document is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled {open_quotes}Prototype Development of an Apparatus to Locate and Map Sea Floor Petroleum Seepages{close_quotes}. This report describes progress in three areas: electronic design, mechanical design, and experiment/research.

  1. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 6. Technical Report 09-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  2. OTEC support services. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 15 May-14 August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    System integration, system engineering, and management support services provided by the VSE Corporation for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program of the Ocean Systems Branch, Division of Central Solar Technology, DOE are described. The services are provided under seven task areas: (1) survey, analysis, evaluation, and recommendation concerning program performance; (2) program technical monitoring; (3) development and implementation of methodology to identify and evaluate program alternatives; (4) technical assignments; (5) OTEC system integration; (6) environment and siting considerations; and (7) transmission subsystem considerations. (WHK)

  3. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-11-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: single particle measurement of size and charge; electrodynamic balance for trapping single particles for measurement; and tribocharging of coal particles passed through a circular tube.

  4. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development.

  5. Tunable composite membranes for gas separations. Quarterly technical progress report, May--July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1996-08-05

    Significant progress has been made in the synthesis and characterization of conducting polymer composite membranes for gas separations. Zeolite/polyalkylthiophene composite membranes have been prepared and characterized for zeolite NaY.

  6. [A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors]. Technical progress report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-12-31

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  7. Information and Communications Technical Support Services to the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following tasks: development of safety publications, conference support, planning and reporting, MORT A/I video, print products, special graphics, and SAFE software development.

  8. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, May 1, 1997--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Progress summaries are provided from the Amarillo National Center for Plutonium. Programs include the plutonium information resource center, environment, public health, and safety, education and training, nuclear and other material studies.

  9. Technical progress report for the quarter 1 October-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments on the commercial nuclear waste management programs and on the geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The program is organized into eight tasks: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. (DLC)

  10. Mathematics Technical Report: Exercise Volume. National Assessment of Educational Progress. Report No. 04-MA-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    Included in Chapter 1 of this report are background information on the 1972-73 mathematics assessment; details of the computational formulas used in reporting results; and explanations of the technical documentation, exercise presentation, documentation pages, scoring guides, and data tables for released and unreleased exercises. The remainder of…

  11. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  12. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACHIEVEMENT MEASURES FOR TRADE AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. PROGRESS REPORT NUMBER THREE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, THOMAS S.

    DURING THIS PERIOD FROM SEPTEMBER 1 THROUGH NOVEMBER 30, 1966, 35 FIELD CONSULTANTS COMPLETED ANALYSIS OF THEIR INDIVIDUAL TRADE AND TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS. THESE ANALYSES WERE DEVELOPED INTO AN OUTLINE TO SERVE AS A GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING ACHIEVEMENT TESTS. THE FINAL OUTLINE WAS DIVIDED INTO AS MANY DIFFERENT AREAS AS THE CONSULTANTS FELT NECESSARY…

  13. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Third quarterly technical progress report, December 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    Examination of the paleolithic and geomorphic records to determine the local and regional impact of past climates will advance assessment of Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. The project includes the integration of botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components to accomplish this goal. Paleobotanical studies will reconstruct the response of vegetation to climate change at the community and the organismal levels by integrating data obtained from nearly continuous sediment records of pollen, plant macrofossils, and stable isotopes from fossil woodrat middens. The goal of the paleofaunas study is to construct a history of Great Basin vertebrates, particularly mammals, that will provide empirical evidence of past environmental and climatic conditions within the Great Basin as it is recorded by the animals. Taxonomic composition of archaeological and paleontological faunas from various areas within the Great Basin and morphological change within individual mammalian taxa at specific localities are being investigated to monitor faunal response to changing environmental conditions. The objective of the geomorphology component of the paleoenvironmental program is to document the responses of surficial processes and landforms to the climatic changes documented by studies of packrat middens, pollen, and faunal distributions. The project will focus on: (1) stratigraphic relationships between lake deposits and aeolian or fluvial sediments and landforms; (2) cut and fill sequences in floodplain and river-channel deposits; (3) identification of periods of dune mobility and stability; (4) documentation of episodes of alluvial fan and terrace development and erosion; and (5) correlation of (3) and (4) to climatically driven lake-level fluctuation as revealed by shoreline features such as strandlines and beach ridges. Accomplishments for this period are presented for these studies.

  14. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-07-20

    Twelve weld overlay hardfacing alloys have been selected for preliminary erosion testing based upon a literature review. Four of the selected coatings were deposited on a 1018 steel substrate using plasma arc welding process. During the past quarter, the remaining eight coatings were deposited in the same manner. Ten samples from each coatings were prepared for erosion testing. Microstructural characterization of each coating is in progress. This progress report describes coating deposition and sample preparation procedures. Relation between coatings hardness and formation of cracks in coatings is discussed.

  15. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1997--January 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report provides information on projects conducted by the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, a consortium of Texas A&M University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Texas. Progress is reported for four major areas: (1) plutonium information resource; (2) environmental, safety, and health; (3) communication, education, training, and community involvement; and (4) nuclear and other material studies. Environmental, safety, and health projects reported include a number of studies on high explosives. Progress reported for nuclear material studies includes storage and waste disposal investigations.

  16. Experimental Program Final Technical Progress Report: 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Edward R.

    2014-09-12

    This is the final technical report of the grant DE-FG02-04ER41301 to the University of Colorado at Boulder entitled "Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics" and describes the results of our funded activities during the period 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012. These activities were primarily carried out at Fermilab, RHIC, and the German lab DESY. Significant advances in these experiments were carried out by members of the Colorado group and are described in detail.

  17. Support services for ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composites. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W.

    1996-12-27

    Ceramic and advanced alloy corrosion in fossil energy systems is being investigated. During 1995-6, ash was collected for testing corrosion resistance of materials in air-blown fluidized-bed gasification systems. Descriptions of the activities are presented in this report, which is an extension of a technical paper on testing corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems. A section of this report covers factors affecting the composition of ash deposits.

  18. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    The primary objective of this project is to examine factors affecting technical and economic success of horizontal well applications. The project`s goals will be accomplished through five tasks designed to evaluate the technical and economic success of horizontal drilling, ascertain its limitations, and outline technical needs to overcome these limitations. Data describing operators` experiences throughout the domestic oil and gas industry will be gathered and organized. MEI databases containing detailed horizontal case histories will also be used. All these data will be categorized and analyzed to assess the status of horizontal well technology and determine the impact of horizontal wells on present and future domestic oil recovery and reserves. A spreadsheet data file was constructed from well data describing 3885 domestic horizontal wells, the total as of the summer of 1993. Most domestic effort in horizontal drilling has been focused on fractured carbonate formations. Three principal formations are the focus of this activity: The Austin Chalk in Texas, the Bakken Shale in North Dakota, and the Niobrara in Colorado and Wyoming. Results from this formation type are well known and a large volume of published results is available. Given the scope of the present study, it was decided to limit the analyses to formations other than these three fractured carbonates. Based on domestic well data, 431 horizontal wells have been completed in other formations. These wells were highlighted for detailed study.

  19. Examining the Technical Adequacy of Progress Monitoring Using Early Writing Curriculum-Based Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, David D.; Lembke, Erica S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 4 early writing measures used to monitor the early writing progress of 1st-grade students. We administered the measures to 23 1st-grade students biweekly for a total of 16 weeks. We obtained 3-min samples and conducted analyses for each 1-min increment. We scored samples using 2 different methods: correct…

  20. National Assessment of Educational Progress. Career and Occupational Development Technical Report: Exercise Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    Exercises given to a national probability sample of 9-year-olds, 13-year-olds, 17-year-olds, and young adults (ages 26-35) to measure achievement of five broad objectives of career and occupational development (COD) are contained in this document. (The exercises were administered by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), an…

  1. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-07-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following: modification to the electrostatic separator; review of DOE specifications for minimum beneficiation and calculations of grinding requirements based on washability; two-pass beneficiation; analysis of different sieve fractions; measurement of charge to mass ratio as a function of height of deposition; and charging of coal against different materials.

  2. [Radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities]. Monthly technical progress report, 1 April--28 April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Tehnical progress achieved during this period on radioisotope thermoelectric generators is described under the following tasks: engineering support, safety analysis, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication/assembly/test, RTG shipping/launch support, design/review/mission applications, and project management/quality assurance/reliability.

  3. Connecticut Assessment of Educational Progress Citizenship/Social Studies 1977-78 Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Sherry; Sorce, Patricia

    The document describes an instrument used to measure citizenship social studies achievement and skills for 9-, 13-, 17-, and 26 to 35-year-olds in Connecticut. Based on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (ED 049 113), objectives were to collect baseline data for future use in determining knowledge, to compare results with national…

  4. Energy conservation in citrus processing. Technical progress report No. 2, April 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, M.A.; Lari, R.I.; Moore, N.R.; Broussard, M.R.; Gyamfi, M.

    1981-03-15

    Systems that reduce energy usage and are economically viable in the citrus fruit processing industry are identified. The preliminary results of Phase I are presented. Alternative systems to be considered are classified and denoted as central, modular, integrated, and combined. Progress is reported on the central and modular systems. (MCW)

  5. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report: First quarter (January--August 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Project goals, project tasks, progress on tasks, and problems encountered are described and discussed for each of the studies that make up the Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project for Yucca Mountain. These studies are: Paleobotany, Paleofauna, Geomorphology, and Transportation. Budget summaries are also given for each of the studies and for the overall project.

  6. ENHANCED RECOVERY UTILIZING VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES AND A DISTRIBUTED POWER SYSTEM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2004-02-11

    This report describes the progress made during first six months of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. During this period, project plan, demonstration plan and project schedule were developed, equipment was ordered and baseline data was collected.

  7. Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS): PIRLS 2006 Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael O., Ed.; Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Kennedy, Ann M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA)'s Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) provides internationally comparative data about students' reading achievement in primary school (the fourth grade in most participating countries). PIRLS also provides extensive information about the home and…

  8. Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hanenburg, W.H.; Lacy, R.G.; Van De Mark, G.D.

    1981-06-01

    Work completed on the nominal 65 Megawatt (Mwe gross) Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project, located at Heber, California, during the period of September 15, 1980, through March 31, 1981 is documented. Topics covered in this quarterly report include progress made in the areas of Wells and Fluids Production and Injection Systems, Power Plant Design and Construction, Power Plant Demonstration, and Data Acquisition and Dissemination.

  9. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  10. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report briefly describes recent progress in eight projects. The projects are entitled Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Spray Casting Project; and Watervliet Arsenal Project.

  11. Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics. Technical progress report, June 15, 1991--June 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses progress on the following research: quark cluster model; solving quantum field theories in non-perturbative regime;relativistic wave equations, quarkonia and electron-positron resonances; nuclear dependence at large transverse momentum; factorization at the order of power corrections; single-spin asymmetries; and hadronic photon production. (LSP)

  12. [Studies of the fundamental nature of catalytic acidity, sites and intermediates]: Final performance (technical progress) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This project was concerned with the fundamental nature of catalyst acidity in the H-zeolites and silica/alumina cracking catalysts. This report summarizes the progress on this project over the past five years. The titles of the twelve papers generated by this research are provided in the attached bibliography in chronological order.

  13. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes. Progress report, 1 August 1986-1 February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollution is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern U.S. and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. How seasonal changes in lake transparency are related to annual acidic load was examined. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units was also examined. The utility of Thematic Mapper based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes was investigated. The potential for this optical response is related to a number of local ecophysical factors with bedrock geology being, perhaps, the most important. Other factors include sulfate deposition, vegetative cover, and terrain drainage/relief. The area of southern Ontario contains a wide variety of geologies from the most acid rain sensitive granite quartzite types to the least sensitive limestone dolomite sediments. Annual sulfate deposition ranges from 1.0 to 4.0 grams/sq m.

  14. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Chander, S.; Gutterman, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

  15. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1993-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 4 wt% ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt% ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases.

  16. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

  17. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Tenth quarterly technical progress report, [September--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Kittle, J.D.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Fry, I.J.; Traunero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N.; Chakravanty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    1991-12-13

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The specific technical objectives of the project are to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotrophic bacterium; and conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  18. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Fry, I.; Wyza, R.E.; Palmer, D.T.; Zupancic, T.J.; Conkle, H.N.

    1990-06-14

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotropic bacterium; conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  19. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Fry, I.; Wyza, R.E.; Palmer, D.T.; Zupancic, T.J.; Conkle, H.N.

    1990-03-15

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: Clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; Return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; Transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotrophic bacterium; Conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  20. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Ninth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Fry, I.J.; Tranuero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N.; Chakravanty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    1991-09-13

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotropic bacterium; conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  1. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Preparation of the baseline economic assessment, based on Wilsonville Run {number_sign}263J, continued. This baseline study will serve as the reference against which the results of this program will be compared. During the quarter calculation of the material and energy balances for the conceptual commercial plant were completed and estimation of the investment for the main process units was begun (Wyoming plant site basis). A presentation on the technical results of the baseline study was prepared and delivered at the Quarterly Project Review Meeting in Pittsburgh.

  2. Coal-feeder development. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The pilot-scale piston-feeder development is progressing satisfactorily and should proceed as planned. The bench scale testing of components, sub-system and critical areas continued to provide very useful information in support of the development of the complete feeder. The K30M seals and polyurethane scrapers are showing very promising results. The components development facility is being upgraded and testing at the bench scale level should be vigorously perused. The upgrading of the pilot scale feeder and its system will be emphasized during the next quarter to perform feeder capabilities and limitations testing. No progress on the 5.5-in. diameter pilot scale screw feeder has been made because IRRI is waiting decision from METC as to when the feeder can be installed on the 42-in. gas producer.

  3. Progress under the USDI-SWCC agreement for technical cooperation in desalination

    SciTech Connect

    Jamjoom, I.M.R.; Al-Yousef, A.R.F.; Heizer, R.T.

    1981-07-01

    Progress is reported on two desalination projects in Saudi Arabia sponsored by a joint agreement of the Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) and the US Department of the Interior (USDI). Project A, research, development, and training center (R, D and T), conducts needs analyses and trains Saudi Arabians to operate and maintain desalination plants. Project B is developing the technology for large-scale multistage flash (MSF) evaporation plants. A recent change in focus is deemphasizing project B, but the Joint Agreement continues to make progress on its goals. The appendix presents a summary of the operation and projects and lists the major design features of the R, D and T Center. 1 reference, 1 table. (DCK)

  4. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Annual technical progress report, [1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  5. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1995-10-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet engine fuels has five components: development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer-sized and micrometer particles suspended in fuels during thermal stresses; characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct coal liquefaction. Progress is described.

  6. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, E.

    1998-11-01

    Brief progress reports are presented on the following tasks: design packages for retrofits at the Dunkirk Station; fuel supply and site development plans; major equipment guarantees and project risk sharing; power production commitment; power plant site plan, construction and environmental permits; and experimental strategies for system evaluation. The paper then discusses in more detail the following: feedstock development efforts; clone-site testing and genetic studies; and efforts at outreach, extension and technology transfer.

  7. U.C. Davis high energy particle physics research: Technical progress report -- 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    Summaries of progress made for this period is given for each of the following areas: (1) Task A--Experiment, H1 detector at DESY; (2) Task C--Experiment, AMY detector at KEK; (3) Task D--Experiment, fixed target detectors at Fermilab; (4) Task F--Experiment, PEP detector at SLAC and pixel detector; (5) Task B--Theory, particle physics; and (6) Task E--Theory, particle physics.

  8. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1979-August 31, 1980. [Univ. of Rochester

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: statistical spectroscopy (including random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions, and to problems of ergodicity; group symmetries in spectral-distribution theory; electromagnetic and ..beta.. transitions); meson scattering and absorption by nuclei (including general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, statistical theory of absorption); and meson currents in electromagnetic transitions.

  9. Shale oil value enhancement research. First quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bunger, J.W.; Russell, C.P.; Devineni, P.A.V.; Cogswell, D.E.; Wiser, J.W.

    1993-06-25

    Concurrent progress is being made in all key areas, namely, separation, characterization and market assessment. The market area, not one of our traditionally strong areas, has been going better than expected. We believe this is due mainly to the emerging interest in new and unconventional materials. The characterization work has been progressing solidly with the fundamental Z-BASIC correlations providing information not heretofore available in the chemical literature. Our agreement with Hewlett-Packard regarding the purchase of equipment at a reduced price is complete and the gc-ms will be ordered shortly. The separation work has progressed satisfactorily although an unexpected amount of time has been required for ``facilities`` and ``equipment`` related issues. Some of these issues have dealt with safety and regulatory compliance when storing larger quantities of samples. These now seem to be solved. We have a lot of direct experience in shale oil separations dating back to the OXY project and before. Also, we will streamline our work by going to prepacked micro-separation tools for some of our separation characterization work. This will allow us to stay on schedule. Overall, we are on schedule with the project. All administration requirements are in place and the accounting and financial records are current.

  10. The information age as a work in progress: Implications for technical communicators

    SciTech Connect

    Preecs, B.L.

    1992-07-01

    The commercial media system in the United States is in the midst of radical, even revolutionary changes. Cable television companies are vying with telephone companies to provide advanced communications and information services to both homes and businesses. Recent decisions by the Federal Communications Commission to allow television networks to buy cable television systems create the possibility of bypassing local television stations. Computer companies are planning joint ventures with entertainment companies. The publishing, broadcasting, advertising, communications, and information-services businesses are converging into one universal, digital, interactive industry with annual revenues exceeding $120 billion. The same technology-driven changes also affect government. State and local governments are experimenting with delivering some government services electronically. While early experiments focus on easily delivered services, such as auto licenses, more complex applications are underway, such as creating information networks for economic development or converting property and utility records into computerized maps. The Information Age has arrived, and the implications for Society for Technical Communication (STC) members can hardly be overstated. Technical communicators will face changes in the way they work and how their work is distributed.

  11. Deep Vadose Zone Remediation: Technical and Policy Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress in Achieving Cleanup Endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

    2013-02-24

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

  12. User's guide. RPGrow$: A red pine growth and analysis spreadsheet for the lake states. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hyldahl, A.A.; Grossman, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    RPGrow$ is a spreadsheet that interactively calculates stand-level growth and yield predictions with financial analysis for red pine plantations in the Lake States. The spreadsheet is based on basal area growth models from Wambach (1967), Buckman (1962), and Lundgren and Belcher (1982). The financial analysis is based on discounted cash flow. The user inputs site index, stand age, basal area, trees/acre, thinning regime, incremental cost data, and price data. The growth model will automatically project stands for 70 years.

  13. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The aims of this research program are to advance to bench-scale testing, concepts that have the potential for making net reductions in direct coal liquefaction process costs. The research involves a teaming arrangement between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and LDP Associates. Progress reports are presented for: Task 2.1.1 development of a catalyst screening test (UK/CAER); Task 2.1.2 activation of impregnated catalysts (UK/CAER); Task 2.2 laboratory support (CONSOL); Task 3 continuous operations/parametric studies (Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.) and; Task 4.4 conceptual design, preliminary technical assessment (LDP Associates).

  14. Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1993--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Lu, W.; Mackinnon, J.A.; Zhang, L.H.

    1993-07-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, we summarize some recent steam reactivity data obtained for two different chars - a Wyodak coal char, and a nonmineral matter-containing resin char. In particular, the following was accomplished during the reporting period: Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra obtained from steam-gasified chars were examined. At least two major CO-liberating features were identified for the resin char samples - one centered ca. 1000{degrees}C and the other ca. 1050{degrees}C. The presence of catalytic mineral matter appears to be related to the appearance of an additional low temperature feature for the Wyodak char. Although the total amount of surface oxygen seems to be a gross indicator of reactivity, analysis of the desorption data assuming two different types of oxygen surface complexes, each exhibiting a single desorption activation energy, shows that the reactivity cannot be explained by the desorption rates of the complexes alone.

  15. Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report, February 1, 1999--May 1, 1999: Report number 4

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-15

    This report summarizes the technical progress achieved during the fourth quarter of the EPRI project. The focus of work during this reporting period was the construction of an electronic control module for the coke detector probe. The electronic control module supervises the actuation and data collection functions of the probe sensor. Basic operation of the probe controller was confirmed. The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. This aim will be met by constructing a probe that will be tested using simulated coke deposits that are positioned inside of a bench-scale furnace. Successful development of the coke detector will provide industry with the only available method for on-line measurement of coke deposits.

  16. Early lung cancer detection in uranium miners with abnormal sputum cytology. Technical progress report, July 31, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    1992-08-01

    This work supported by the United States of Energy, continues to add data on the health affects of cigarette smoking and radon exposure on uranium miners. Since the last Technical Progress Report in July or 1991, 537 sputum cytology samples have been collected on the 300 uranium workers in the surveillance study. To date there are 436 lung cancer cases in the Uranium Miner Tumor Registry with diagnostic slides from surgery and/or autopsy; an additional 40 cases have been diagnosed with sputum cytology only. In March of 1991 the Geno Saccomanno Uranium Workers Archive was established at St. Mary`s Hospital and Medical Center as a depository for biological specimens and epidemiological data from the 17,700 uranium miners who have been a part or the study.

  17. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, July 11, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section.

  18. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming.

  19. Progress in Emission Efficiency of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes: Basic Understanding and Its Technical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Tetsuo; Takada, Noriyuki

    2013-11-01

    The technical history of when and how the basic understanding of the emission efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was established over the last 50 years is described. At first, our understanding of emission efficiency in single-crystal and thin-film electroluminescence (EL) devices in the early stages before the Eastman-Kodak breakthrough, that is, the introduction of the concept of multilayer structures, is examined. Then our contemplation travels from the Eastman-Kodak breakthrough towards the presently widely accepted concept of emission efficiency. The essential issues concerning the emission efficiency of OLEDs are summarized to help readers to obtain a common understanding of OLED efficiency problems, and detailed discussions on the primary factors that determine emission efficiency are given. Finally, some comments on remaining issues are presented.

  20. Diagnostic development and support of MHD Test Facilities. Technical progress report, October 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  1. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The technical approach of the contract has been expanded to provide additional economic evaluation of related process options. Additional data will be developed in the following areas to facilitate these evaluations. The effect of several modified pretreatments on liquefaction will be investigated. These include catalytic and thermal dewaxing of distillate solvents, the effect that adding light resid to distillate solvent has on hydrotreating and dewaxing, the liquefaction behavior of dense-media separated low-rank coals, and methods of selectively removing oxygen from low-rank coals. Additional chemical, physical, and performance information on improved first-stage catalysts will be developed. Upgrading of ash concentrate to recover catalysts and improve low-rank coals will be assessed. The conversion of residual fractions to distillate by hydropyrolysis will be evaluated. The economic impact of these processes will be determined.

  2. West Hackberry Tertiary Project. Quarterly technical progress report, March 3, 1993--June 3, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gillham, T.H.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of the West Hackberry Tertiary Project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of combining air injection with the Double Displacement Process for tertiary oil recovery. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering oil through gravity drainage. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid. The target reservoir for the project is the Camerina C-1,2,3 Sand located on the West Flank of West Hackberry Field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. This reservoir has been unitized and is designated as the WH Cam C RI SU. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the use of air injection in the Double Displacement Process can economically recover oil in reservoirs where tertiary oil recovery is presently uneconomic.

  3. The Progression of Podcasting/Vodcasting in a Technical Physics Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    Technology such as Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, clickers, podcasting, and learning management suites is becoming prevalent in classrooms. Instructors are using these media in both large lecture hall settings and small classrooms with just a handful of students. Traditionally, each of these media is instructor driven. For instance, podcasting (audio recordings) provided my technical physics course with supplemental notes to accompany a traditional algebra-based physics lecture. Podcasting is an ideal tool for this mode of instruction, but podcasting/vodcasting is also an ideal technique for student projects and student-driven learning. I present here the various podcasting/vodcasting projects my students and I have undertaken over the last few years.

  4. Vacuum heat treating furnace: Technical quarterly progress report No. 11, January 19, 1989--April 10, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    At the present time the project effort is in the TASK 3 stage of operational test cycles. The system operated and functioned completely through the 1st shake-down cycle and is continuing to operate through additional selected demonstration cycles. As noted in the prior No's 9 and 10 quarter, report comments these demonstration cycles with the Marketable Prototype Unit (MPU) are being limited to water as the quench medium. As discussed with my Inventions Coordinator Mr. Jack Aellen recently it is desirable, at this time, to restrict the MPU to water use only. It is anticipated that the project will be completed within the final project date of July 10, 1989. Additional Task 3 Special Testing (with water) is still to be accomplished, however, the writer does not expect any technical problems. Although the project has exceeded original overall budget and schedule estimates, the final project product has completely met expectations.

  5. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Technical progress report, January--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.; Cook, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`S computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  6. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.

    1995-07-01

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

  7. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, [1 April--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Blythe, G.

    1993-07-15

    On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Station in November, 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. Project efforts primarily consisted of project management activities and reporting. Review comments were received for the draft Technical Note that was submitted last quarter. A paper was prepared summarizing results from this site for presentation at the 1993 SO{sub 2} Control Symposium which is planned for August. For Option 1, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, results from another program co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association are being combined with results from DOE-funded testing. Three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set point operation. All testing was completed by November, 1992. Project efforts during the current quarter were primarily in data reduction and reporting. The draft Technical Note for the Merom site was submitted in early April, and review comments were received in late May and early June. Option 2 involves testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. For this option, baseline testing was conducted in February. The upgrade option scheduled to be tested at this site was sodium formate additive. However, based on interim results from other sites and feedback from the Technology Working Group for this project, it was decided to test both sodium formate and DBA additive at Pirkey. Parametric testing with DBA additive was conducted in March, and parametric testing with sodium formate was conducted in April. Based on the initial results from the parametric test series, DBA appeared to be the more attractive upgrade option for this site. Consequently, a DBA additive consumption test was conducted in May. Option 3 and 4 are discussed briefly.

  8. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  9. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Semi annual technical progress report, September 26, 1994--April 2, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-20

    The technical progress achieved during the period 26 September 1994 through 2 April 1995 on Contract DE-AC03-91SF18852 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities is described herein. Monthly technical activity for the period 27 February 1995 through 2 April 1995 is included in this progress report. The report addresses tasks, including: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple production; ETG Fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment; RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair; and CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

  10. Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility for the period April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multitask contract to develop the necessary technology for the steam bottoming plant of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. A Proof-Of-Concept (POC) test was conducted during the quarter and the results are reported. This POC test was terminated after 88 hours of operation due to the failure of the coal pulverizer main shaft. Preparations for the test and post-test activities are summarized. Modifications made to the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are described and measurements of its performance are reported. The baghouse performance is summarized, together with actions being taken to improve bag cleaning using reverse air. Data on the wet ESP performance is included at two operating conditions, including verification that it met State of Tennessee permit conditions for opacity with all the flow through it. The results of experiments to determine the effect of potassium seed on NO{sub x} emissions and secondary combustion are reported. The status of efforts to quantify the detailed mass balance for all POC testing is summarized. The work to develop a predictive ash deposition model is discussed and results compared with deposition actually encountered during the test. Plans to measure the kinetics of potassium and sulfur on flames like the secondary combustor, are included. Advanced diagnostic work by both UTSI and MSU is reported. Efforts to develop the technology for a high temperature air heater using ceramic tubes are summarized.

  11. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming portion of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. The experimental program was effectively terminated and reoriented to preparation of reports on previous tests and maintaining the DOE facility. In this report, the results of tube corrosion studies for the samples removed after 500 hours of western coal testing are summarized. Plans for evaluating the tube samples after termination of the tests at 1,047 hours are discussed. The status of development of models to predict ash deposition on conductive heat transfer tubes and their validation with experimental data is presented. Modeling and experiments to induce agglomeration of particulate are also discussed. Significant accomplishments, findings and conclusions include: In summary, corrosion measurements on typical, commercial stainless steels and on low and intermediate chromium steels after 639 hours of LMF5 exposure in the SHTM test sections revealed corrosion that was generally acceptable in magnitude if corrosion kinetics are parabolic, but, except for the higher chromium alloys 253MA and 310, not if kinetics are linear. The production of bilayer scales, and the large amount of scale separation and fragmentation make long term parabolic kinetics unlikely, and result in a high likelihood for breakaway corrosion.

  12. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-04-25

    Research is presently being conducted to develop a criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in Circulated Fluidized Beds. During the last two quarters tensile tests were performed at 400{degrees}C for the Ultimet, Inconel-625, 316L SS, C-22, and Stellite-6 wrought alloys. Also, the erosion tests for these materials at 400{degrees}C were completed. The results of mechanical and erosion tests are used to correlate mechanical properties of selected wrought alloys such as tensile toughness, ductility, strain hardening coefficient and yield strength to their erosion resistance at 400{degrees}C. Preliminary results of correlations between erosion resistance of wrought alloys at 400{degrees}C and their mechanical properties are presented in this progress report.

  13. Base program on energy related research. Quarterly technical progress report, August--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following area of studies: oil and gas; advanced systems applications; environmental technologies; and applied energy science. Oil and gas includes the following tasks: CROW{sup TM} process modeling; and miscible-immiscible gas injection processes. Advanced systems applications covers: development and optimization of a process for the production of a premium solid fuel from Western U.S. coals; development of an on-line alkali monitoring probe; optimization of the recycle oil process for Eastern oil shale; and process support and development. Tasks in the environmental technologies are: solid waste management; and remediation of contaminated soils. Applied energy science covers heavy oil/plastics co-processing.

  14. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  15. Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1944--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    In work related to the design and construction of the Process Development Unit (PDU) this quarter involved further detail design and a real start to the construction activities. Status updates are given below for each discipline in the Task 2.0 and 3.0 headings. This work is progressing well. with the caveat of several small slips in the scheduling. On the catalyst development front this quarter was extremely productive. Many catalyst screening experiments were completed and they showed that control of the reaction exotherm is going to be quite challenging under PDU conditions. The presence of much more efficient reactor design and the ability to maintain closer to isothermal conditions is expected to give a significant advantage in actual PDU operation. A major concern at the moment is the cost of La in the catalyst being used. An action plan to remedy this is being put together.

  16. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic olefins in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic olefins, such as 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin) and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), are highly reactive donor compounds that readily donate their hydrogen to coal and model acceptors when heated to temperatures of 200{degrees}C and above. These donors are active donors in the low severity liquefaction of coal at 350{degrees}C as shown in the research performed in this project. The infrared studies are being performed in a high temperature infrared cell that was obtained from AABSPEC. Modifications to that cell have been made and have been reported in previous progress reports.

  17. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  18. [Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1998-04-25

    During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

  19. Great basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report first quarter (year 2), June--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal Progress reports are presented for: Paleobotenical studies in the Great Basin; Paleofaunas studies in the Great Basin; Geomorphology studies in the Great Basin; and Transportation. The goal of the transportation project is to compare the results from three models (FESWMS-2DH, DAMBRK, and FLO-2D) that have been suggested as appropriate for evaluating flood flows on alluvial fans with the results obtained from the traditional one-dimensional, stochastic model used in previous research performed by DRI for the Yucca Mountain Project.

  20. Innovative hybrid gas/electric chiller cogeneration. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, G.

    2000-07-01

    A meeting was held at Alturdyne's facility in San Diego to discuss project progress. Cliff Carpenter, the NETL Program Manager, attended the meeting. As a result of the meeting, several decisions were made: (1) A General Motors engine would be specified as the prime mover; (2) A Carrier reciprocating compressor would be specified, however a Hitachi screw compressor with an integral oil sump was an interesting candidate if it was available in the right size and for the right price; (3) The motor/generator would provide two functions: as an induction motor and as a synchronous generator. The variable speed, constant frequency feature will not be included in the first generation product; and (4) The refrigerant will be R134-A.

  1. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` (Co-P.I.`s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,`` (Co-P.I.`s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  2. Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics. Technical progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    Progress during the last year is reviewed under the following topics: relativistic hadron--nucleus and nucleus--nucleus collisions (heavy meson production, photon production and fragmentation functions--direct photon production with the QCM and photon fragmentation functions, Cronin efffect and multiple scattering, effective nuclear parton distributions); solving quantum field theories in nonperturbative regime; light-front dynamics and high-spin states (soft form factor of the pion and nucleon for transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers, light front spinors for high-spin objects); high-energy spin physics; relativistic wave equations, quarkonia, and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} resonances; associated production of Higgs boson at collider energies, and microscopic nuclear many-body theory and reactions. 135 refs.

  3. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-01-25

    Research is presently being conducted to develop a criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in Circulated Fluidized Beds. Initially, eleven weld overlay alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All eleven coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. The coating deposition and sample preparation procedures were described in the second quarterly report. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400{degree}C and their erosion resistance was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. The results of the tests are discussed in the third quarterly report. No correlations were found between room temperature hardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature. During the last quarter tensile tests were performed at 400{degree}C for the Ultimet, Inconel-625, 316L SS, C-22, and Stellite-6 wrought alloys. The erosion tests for these materials at 400{degree}C are in progress. The results of mechanical and erosion tests will be used to correlate mechanical properties of selected wrought alloys such as tensile toughness, ductility, strain hardening coefficient and yield strength to their erosion resistance at 400{degree}C. Also, the erosion behavior of the wrought alloys compared with similar weld alloys will be analyzed. The experimental procedure and results of the tensile tests are presented in this progress report.

  4. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Blythe, G.

    1994-04-28

    The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. For Option 1, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set point operation. Option 2 has involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options at Pirkey. On Option 3, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, a DBA additive performance and consumption test was conducted in late February through mid-March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are discussed in Section 3 of this progress report. Option 4 is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages and increase liquid-phase sulfite alkalinity, and to increase the venturi absorber pressure drop to improve gas/liquid contacting. Parametric testing of these upgrade options was conducted in late March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are also discussed in Section 3 of this progress report.

  5. IMPLICATION OF LAKE WATER RESIDENCE TIME ON THE CLASSIFICATION OF NORWEGIAN SURFACE WATER SITES INTO PROGRESSIVE STAGES OF NITROGEN SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal behaviour of NO3- in surface water is often used as an indicator on a catchment's ability to retain N from atmospheric deposition. In this paper, we classify 12 pristine sites (five streams and seven lakes) in southernmost Norway according to the N saturation stage conce...

  6. Progress and plans of a remote sensing program for the International Field Year for the Great Lakes (IFYGL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polcyn, F. C.; Wagner, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 coverage of the 32,000 square mile Lake Ontario Basin is being used to study short term and seasonal changes which affect many aspects of water problems in the Great Lakes. As part of the International Field Year for the Great Lakes (IFYGL), a coordinated, synoptic study of the Lake Ontario Basin, processed ERTS-1 imagery will contribute to the data base of synchronized observations being made by investigators from many U.S. and Canadian government agencies and universities. The first set of ERTS data has been received and will be processed shortly for parameters of hydrological and limnological significance such as land use, terrain features, and water quality. When complete, nine ERTS-1 frames recorded during a substantially clear period will provide coverage of the entire Basin. Seven frames show all but a small portion of the southern and eastern end of the Basin. Many drainage basin characteristics are clearly identifiable on the imagery.

  7. Upgraded coal interest group. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.; Lebowitz, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    The interest group got under way effective January 1, 1994, with nine utility members, EPRI, Bechtel, and the Illinois Clean Coal Institute. DOE participation was effective October 1, 1994. The first meeting was held on April 22, 1994 in Springfield, Illinois and the second meeting was held on August 10--11, 1994 at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Technical reviews were prepared in several areas, including the following: status of low rank coal upgrading, advanced physical coal cleaning, organic sulfur removal from coal, handling of fine coal, combustion of coal water slurries. It was concluded that, for bituminous coals, processing of fines from coal cleaning plants or impoundments was going to be less costly than processing of coal, since the fines were intrinsically worth less and advanced upgrading technologies require fine coal. Penelec reported on benefits of NOX reductions when burning slurry fuels. Project work was authorized in the following areas: Availability of fines (CQ, Inc.), Engineering evaluations (Bechtel), and Evaluation of slurry formulation and combustion demonstrations (EER/MATS). The first project was completed.

  8. Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    Objectives, accomplishments, procedures, and results are briefly described for each of the following 18 research projects: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; The impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC Coke Process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C Process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; CROW{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; In situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; and Acid-mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area.

  9. West Hackberry Tertiary Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gillham, T.; Cerveny, B.; Turek, E.

    1996-04-10

    The goal of the West Hackberry Tertiary Project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of combining air injection with the Double Displacement Process for tertiary oil recovery. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering oil through gravity drainage. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid. The target reservoir for the project is the Camerina C-1,2,3 sand located on the West Flank of West Hackberry Field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the use of air injection in the Double Displacement Process can economically recover oil in reservoirs where tertiary oil recovery is presently uneconomic. The first quarter of 1996 was outstanding both in terms of volume of air injected and low cost operations. More air was injected during this quarter than in any preceding quarter. The compressors experienced much improved run time with minimal repairs. Low operating costs resulted from no repairs required for injection or production wells. A discussion of the following topics are contained herein: (1) performance summary for the injection and production wells, (2) air compressor operations, (3) updated bottom hole pressure data, (4) technology transfer activities and (5) plans for the upcoming quarter.

  10. Pipeline gas demonstration plant, Phase I. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, R.J.

    1981-03-01

    Work was performed in the following areas of the Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant Program: site evaluation and selection; demonstration plant environmental analysis; feedstock plans, licenses, permits and easements; demonstration plant definitive design; construction planning; economic reassessment; technical support; long lead procurement list; and project management. Major work activity continued to be the effort on Demonstration Plant Definitive Design. A Construction Readiness Audit was held on January 14 to 16, 1981 by a Government/Procon team to review the project and assess the readiness of the project to proceed into the construction phase. Documents for the 60% Design Review were prepared for ICGG review and submitted to the Contracting Officer's authorized representative prior to transmittal to the Corps of Engineers for review. The Corps of Engineers conducted a design audit. The primary objective of the audit was to prepare an independent estimate of the work remaining to complete Phase I of the project. Work continued on the production of a single bid package for the Demonstration Plant, suitable for release to a single constructor, and organized so it can be easily broken down into subpackages by construction specialty. A formal audit of the ICGG R/QA Plan and implementation thereof was performed February 11-12, 1981 by the Corps of Engineers. The Contract Deliverable Final Feedstock-Product-Waste Disposal Plan was delivered to the Government on February 25, 1981.

  11. Indiana University high energy physics, Task A. Technical progress report, April 1991--April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Hanson, G.; Martin, H.; Marshall, T.; Mir, R.; Mouthy, T.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.; Teige, S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.

    1992-10-01

    During this reporting period the group has been carrying out programs in several areas. These are presented in this paper is follows: The group was a collaborator in the Mark II experiment at the SLC and completed analysis on the experiment. Three students completed their theses this reporting period; the group is the prime mover in (E672), a high mass dimuon experiment which now in its final data collection period. Our group is also a collaborator in the DO collider experiment which is now preparing for the first data run in 1992; the group is a collaborator in the OPAL experiment at LEP which is now taking data. The group also is working on the development of a major offline facility shift and on a silicon vertex chamber for 1993; the group is the prime mover in the construction of a major new experiment (E852) in precision meson spectroscopy. A test run is presently underway and data taking will begin in 1993; and the group is a prime mover in the tracking design of the SDC experiment. The SDC has completed the Technical Design report. Construction will begin in 1993.

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  13. Michigan Middle Start Studies of Middle Start School Improvement, Lake Middle School: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Pritha

    This case study documented the collaboration of Lake Middle School (pseudonym for a school in Michigan) with Middle Start, a middle-grades reform model and its progress and struggles implementing the model. Middle Start was coordinated by the Michigan Middle Start Partnership, and alliance that provided technical assistance, professional…

  14. Algal growth potentials and heavy-metal concentrations of the primary streams to upper Beaver Lake. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.L.; Green, W.R.; Steele, K.F.; Wickliff, D.

    1986-06-01

    Algal-growth potential was inhibited by heavy metals in upper Beaver Lake, Arkansas. Upper Beaver Lake receives water from three tributaries. One contains a small reservoir and the combined streams receive sewage input. Collections were made approximately monthly at eight sites for the Algal Assay Bottle Test (AABT) and heavy-metal analysis. In general, AABT results indicated that the collections above the sewage input were phosphorus-limited while those below were nitrogen- or combined nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited. Growth inhibition occurred during summer and early fall at various sites with greater inhibition at the confluence of the streams. No inhibitions occurred at the site below the sewage input. Heavy-metal concentrations had an overall tendency to increase downstream. Values within the small reservoir were 50-100% higher than in the feeder stream. Highest values of Pb were observed below the reservoir. SO/sub 4/, Cl, Mg, Ca, Na and K had high values during low flow in August-October. Mn, Pb, and Fe exceeded EPA-recommended standards for drinking water.

  15. Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 3 of 3, 2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Evelyn, Trevor; Lawrence, Shayla; Alexis, Fabian

    2003-05-01

    The Okanagan Nation Alliance in Canada and Colville Confederated Tribes in the U.S. have proposed re-introducing sockeye salmon to their historic range (Figure 1). The purpose of this project has been to assess the risks and benefits of an experimental sockeye re-introduction into Skaha Lake, by completing the following six objectives over three years: (1) Disease risk assessment; (2) Exotic fish risk assessment; (3) Inventory of sockeye salmon habitat and opportunities for habitat enhancement; (4) Development of a life-cycle model of sockeye, including interaction with resident kokanee; (5) Development of an experimental design and; (6) Finalization of a plan for re-introduction of sockeye salmon into Skaha Lake and associated monitoring programs. The following compilation of reports includes the third year of assessments for Objectives 1-3, the model design document for Objective 4, experimental design strategies for Objective 5 and a 2000-2003 project summary for Objective 6. For a full list of reports completed over the three years of the project, please refer to Table 1. The actual re-introduction and monitoring plan is currently being developed based upon options and strategies identified during the Year 3 analyses review workshop in March 2003. The information contained in this plan, as well as the information gathered from the re-introduction itself, will support future decisions on protection and restoration strategies for the Okanagan River sockeye stock.

  16. Precombustion removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors. Technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-19

    This project involves the development of an optimized, bench-scale processing circuit capable of efficiently removing trace elements from, run-of-mine coals. The optimized circuit will be developed using characterization data obtained from detailed washability studies and release analyses tests conducted with several eastern U.S. coals. The optimized circuit will incorporate a variety of conventional and advanced coal cleaning processes which are believed to be the most cost-effective and commercially viable. The coal products from the optimized circuit will be further treated with complexing agents specifically designed to extract organometallic trace elements that are difficult to remove by physical cleaning operations. Finally, innovative bioremediation schemes will be investigated as a means of controlling the release of trace elements from the process waste streams. Emphasis has been placed on the development of a processing circuit which (1) maximizes the rejection of trace elements, (2) minimizes the production of coal fines which are costly to process and less marketable, and (3) minimizes the downstream impacts of the process waste streams on the environment. During the past quarter, the project work plan and all associated technical/management reports were successfully completed. In addition, three coal samples have been selected for use in the proposed test program based on input provided by the industrial project participants. Formal requests to ship the coal samples to the testing facility have also been made. Steps have also been undertaken to prepare the coal receiving areas for crushing, sizing and storing of the procured coals. Work is now under way to complete the coal acquisition and sample preparation activities and to initiate the proposed trace element characterization studies and bench-scale test work.

  17. Microsupercomputers: Design and implementation. Semi-annual technical progress report, April-October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, J.L.; Horowitz, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    1. Executive Summary. A summary of progress for the period April 1989 through October 1989 follows: (1) Parallel Architecture: The Stanford DASH multiprocessor advances the state of parallel computing by combining the programmability of shared-memory machines with the scalability of distributed-memory machines. (2) Parallel Software: We have developed a compiler algorithm that applies a large set of loop-level optimizations to improve data locality in programs. (3) Super-Scalar Design: We have investigated how much parallelism is available at the lowest level -- in the base instruction stream of a processor. (4) Multi-level Caches: The presence of a second-level cache can decrease the optimum size and cycle time of the first-level cache, and significantly improve performance beyond the best attainable with a single level of caching. (5) Testers: A single chip tester, called Testarossa, contains a dRAM for the test vector storage, a decompressor to increase the effective vector size, and the pin electronics for 16 DUT pins. (6) Computer Aided Design: In the area of algorithm and tool development for high-level synthesis we have targeted two goals: control generation for synthesized structures and relative scheduling techniques under timing constraints. (7) Simulation: The goal of this research is to provide application tools for the proposed scalable shared memory multiprocessor.

  18. [Recent technical research hot spots and development progresses in medical whole-body positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Su, Zhihong; Xu, Jianfeng; Zou, Yirong; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-02-01

    Medical whole-body positron emission tomography (PET), one of the most successful molecular imaging technologies, has been widely used in the fields of cancer diagnosis, cardiovascular disease diagnosis and cranial nerve study. But, on the other hand, the sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-noise-ratio of the commercial medical whole-body PET systems still have some shortcomings and a great room for improvement. The sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-noise-ratio of PET system are largely affected by the performances of the scintillators and the photo detectors. The design of a PET system is usually a trade-off in cost and performance. A better image quality can be achieved by optimizing and balancing the key components which affect the system performance the most without dramatically increases in cost. With the development of the scintillator, photo-detector and high speed electronic system, the performance of medical whole-body PET system would be dramatically improved. In this paper, we report current progresses and discuss future directions of the developments of technologies in medical whole-body PET system. PMID:25997296

  19. Advanced converter technology. Technical progress report, May 23, 1979-May 22, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Banic, C. V.; Eckhouse, S. A.; Kornbrust, F. J.; Lipman, K.; Peterson, J. L.; Rosati, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define an advanced converter system employing 1980's technology in all subsystem and component areas for use in electrochemical energy storage systems. Additional experimental effort will validate elements of the advanced commutation circuitry on a full-scale breadboard basis. Improved models of battery electrical characteristics are beng defined and experimental apparatus is being designed to measure these characteristics and to enable better definition of the battery-power conditioner interface. Improvement of energy-storage system performance through modification of battery converter characteristics will also be investigated. During this first year of the contract, a new more advanced concept for power conditioning based on a concept defined by United Technologies Corporation for fuel cell use was evaluated. This high switching frequency concept has the potential for significantly reducing the size and cost of battery plant power conditioners. As a result, the Department of Energy authorized redirection of the program to first evaluate this new concept and then to reorient the program to adopt this concept as the primary one. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  20. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, E.

    1997-08-01

    Detailed task progress reports and schedules are provided for the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The focus of the project is on developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-H of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is under way. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill power station. Phase-III will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis.

  1. Supramolecular structures for photochemical energy conversion. Technical progress report, 1993--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This research project is concerned with the design, synthesis and study by photochemical and spectroscopic methods of complex molecular devices that mimic some important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Properly engineered molecules of this type can functionally mimic photosynthetic light harvesting (singlet-singlet energy transfer between chromophores), photoprotection from light-initiated singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoid polyenes), and, most importantly, photoinduced multistep electron transfer to generate charge-separated states that preserve some of the photon energy as chemical potential. During the last three years, progress has been made on several fronts, all of which are related to the overall goal. A biomimetic system based on carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads has been constructed that demonstrates photoinduced transmembrane charge separation which in turn drives transmembrane proton transfer. Another investigation has focused on the use of proton transfer reactions to stabilize the initial products of photoinduced electron transfer and thereby increase the yield of long-lived charge separation. A third study has investigated the influence of rigid molecular geometries and short donor-acceptor separations on photoinduced electron transfer reactions. Finally, generation and quenching of singlet molecular oxygen by chlorophyll aggregates has been studied. All four studies are described and results are discussed.

  2. Colorado School of Mines fusion gamma ray diagnostic project. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-02-14

    This report summarizes the 1991 calendar year activities of the fusion gamma ray diagnostics project in the Physics Department at the Colorado School of Mines. Considerable progress has been realized in the fusion gamma ray diagnostic project in the last year. Specifically we have achieved the two major goals of the project as outlined in last year`s proposed work statement to the Office of Applied Plasma Physics in the DOE Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy. The two major goals were: (1) Solution of the severe interference problem encountered during the operation of the gamma ray spectrometer concurrent with high power levels of the neutral beam injectors (NBI) and the ICRH antenae. (2) Experimental determination of the absolute detection efficiency of the gamma ray spectrometer. This detection efficiency will allow the measured yields of the gamma rays to be converted to a total reaction rate. In addition to these two major accomplishments, we have continued, as permitted by the TFTR operating schedule, the observation of high energy gamma rays from the 3He(D,{gamma})5Li reaction during deuterium NBI heating of 3He plasmas.

  3. Coolside waste management research. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    TCLP analysis of the Coolside pellets and Ottawa base sand materials were completed. The metal concentrations for the 8 RCRA metals were well below the trigger values with all but Ag and Se being below the drinking water standard levels. The initial and final pH values showed the sand had essentially no neutralization capacity while the neutralization capacity of the pilot plant materials was above the 0.7 meq/g upper level for use of extraction solution {number_sign}1 but well below the 2 meq/g upper level of the {number_sign}2 solution neutralization capacity. Complete metals analysis in addition to the RCRA metals are also reported. Complete metals, proximate, and ultimate analyses for the pilot plant test samples were completed. Sizable concentrations of calcium well above the Coolside samples were observed. Interpretation of these results are in progress. Monitoring of swell on Coolside solid waste samples compacted in CBR molds continued with no increase in swell being observed since the last reporting period. The permeability of a specimen remolded near 95% of standard dry density and optimum moisture content and aged at room temperature for 178 days was 1.72 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm/sec.

  4. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1994-07-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 3 subtasks which are described: Pyrolysis of n-alkylbenzenes; Thermal decomposition of n-tetradecane in near-critical region; and Re-examining the effects of reactant and inert gas pressure on tetradecane pyrolysis--Effect of cold volume in batch reactor. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, is subtask, Effects of high surface area activated carbon and decalin on thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Screening potential jet fuel stabilizers using the model compound dodecane; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, is subtask, Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels. 25 refs., 64 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, E.

    1997-08-01

    Detailed task progress reports and schedules are provided for the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The focus of the project is on developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-1, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-II of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is under way. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill power station. Phase-III will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis.

  6. Diffraction studies of the structure of glasses and liquids: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Houston program on glasses and liquids has continued over the year with an expanded activity into vitreous TiO/sub 2/ and amorphous metals/quasicrystals. The modeling study of vitreous SiO/sub 2/ has been published and the study of amorphous melanin is well underway in-house. We have also begun some promising modeling work on the icosahedral glass model (IGM) for quasicrystals and have completed a preliminary study of epitaxial diamond crystal growth on the (111) silicon crystal surface (initially undertaken to study the expected ''amorphous'' diamond-like phase). The work on GLAD at the Argonne IPNS continues on schedule under the direction of Dr. David L. Price. The status of the Phase I instrument has been published and the Phase II development is underway with an evacuated flight path, additional detectors and a final data acquisition system in progress. It is our expectation that the final instrument will be the most advanced of its kind in the world for the study of a wide variety of problems in glasses, liquids and amorphous materials.

  7. Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 16, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Continuous progress is being made toward the contract objectives in our attempt to produce {open_quotes}Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane.{close_quotes} Specifically, gains have been achieved in Task 1.0 Catalyst Development and Separation Unit Operation Development and Task 4.0 PDU Startup. Catalyst development continued forward to examine the copper, lanthanum, and lithium loadings as well as support surface area in four factor, two level, fully crossed design experiments carried out at five temperatures between 290{degrees}C and 310{degrees}C. Eight of the sixteen runs have been completed. Evaluation of these runs as a three factor, two level, fully crossed experiment has yielded some useful information. The choice of the Cu/La/Li metals system has been confirmed, and the high Cu, low La, low Li system hasn`t proven itself to be the most active at this point. Chemical feeds were brought on-line to the PDU. Small amounts of methyl chloride were made before the system was shut down due to equipment failure. Glass-lined equipment was found to be failing due to chemical etching. Replacement equipment with other materials of construction have been ordered. In addition, the FTIR windows clouded soon after chemical feeds were started. This materials problem is also being investigated.

  8. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  9. MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Brosnan, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF) are described. On Task 1, the first phase of the downstream quench system was completed. On Task 2, all three combustor sections were completed, hydrotested, ASME code stamped, and delivered to UTSI. The nozzle was also delivered. Fabrication of support stands and cooling water manifolds for the combustor and vitiation heater were completed, heat transfer and thermal stress analysis, along with design development, were conducted on the generator and radiant furnace and secondary combustor installation progressed as planned. Under Task 3 an Elemental Analyzer and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer/Graphite Furnace were received and installed, sites were prepared for two air monitoring stations, phytoplankton analysis began, and foliage and soil sampling was conducted using all study plots. Some 288 soil samples were combined to make 72 samples which were analyzed. Also, approval was granted to dispose of MHD flyash and slag at the Franklin County landfill. Task 4 effort consisted of completing all component test plans, and establishing the capability of displaying experimental data in graphical format. Under Task 7, a preliminary testing program for critical monitoring of the local current and voltage non-uniformities in the generator electrodes was outlined, electrode metal wear characteristics were documented, boron nitride/refrasil composite interelectrode sealing was improved, and several refractories for downstream MHD applications were evaluated with promising results.

  10. Plasma physics research. Technical progress report, 1 February 1979-30 September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress during the 20-month period, Feburary 1, 1979 to September 30, 1980 on the University of Wisconsin Plasma Physics contract is described. Most of the work centers around two large experimental devices, the Levitated Octupole and Tokapole II. A major upgrade of the Octupole was begun to include 1.8 MW of neutral beam heating and 2 MW of ICRH. Meanwhile, gun optimization and low field operation has resulted in the attainment of 35% beta, a factor of 9 above the single fluid ballooning limit. The Tokapole has operated reliably for the past two years and has been used to study axisymmetric instability of dee, inverse dee, and square shaped plasmas. Low q (approx. 0.6) discharges with flat current profiles are obtained. ICRF heating studies were brought to a conclusion. The device is presently being used to study Alfven wave heating, ECRH startup, poloidal ohmic heating, and plasma ohmic heating, and plasma surface interactions. Smaller efforts on divertor simulation and plasma potential studies in a single ring device and plasma theory are also described.

  11. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, May 10, 1988--August 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-30

    The US Department of Energy and Energy International, Inc. have entered into a Cooperative Agreement to conduct a cost-shared field test demonstrating the operation of commercial-scale steeply dipping bed underground coal gasification (UCG) modules to provide the synthesis gas for a small-scale commercial ammonia plant. The field test and the commercial ammonia plant will be located near Rawlins, Wyoming. During this demonstration test, two or more modules will be operated simultaneously until one module is completely consumed and an additional module is brought on line. During this period, the average coal gasification rate will be between 500 and 1,200 tons per day. A portion of the raw UCC product gas. The UCG facility will continue to operate subsequent. to the demonstration to provide feedstock for the commercial plant. Energy International is responsible for accomplishing specific objectives in accordance with the Statement of Work by designing, installing, operating and monitoring the performance of the UCG modules as the feedstock source for the small-scale commercial ammonia plant. During this period, the project activities focused on project structuring, financing, and project management activities. Because the negotiations with investors were not completed on the schedule anticipated, adjustment of the schedule and activities was necessary. All major activities requiring the expenditure of funds were halted and work was suspended pending the availability of funds and new schedules. These changes have dictated the level of progress or delays for all of the tasks of the project throughout the period of this report.

  12. Capillary electrokinetic separations with optical detection. Technical progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This program seeks the development of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques and associated optical methods of detection. Fundamental studies of pertinent separation and band broadening mechanisms are being conducted, with the emphasis on understanding systems that include highly-ordered assemblies as running buffer additives. The additives include cyclodextrins, affinity reagents, and soluble (entangled) polymers and are employed with capillary electrophoresis, CE and/or micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, MECC modes of separation. The utility of molecular modeling techniques for predicting the effects of highly ordered assemblies on the retention behavior of isomeric compounds is under investigation. The feasibility of performing separations using a non-aqueous solvent/fullerene electrochromatographic system is being explored. The analytical methodologies associated with these capillary separation techniques are being advanced through the development of retention programming instumentation/techniques and new strategies for performing optical detection. The advantages of laser fluorimetry are extended through the inclusion of fluorogenic, reagents in the running buffer. These reagents include oligonucleotide intercalation reagents for detecting DNA fragments. Chemiluminescence detection using post-capillary reactors/flow cells is also in progress. Successful development of these separation and detection systems will fill current voids in the capabilities of capillary separation techniques.

  13. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report: Fourth quarter, March--May, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    Examination of the paleoenvironmental and geomorphic records to determine the local and regional impact of past climates will advance the assessment of Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. Paleobotanical studies will reconstruct the response of vegetation to climate change at the community and the organismal levels in order to identify periods of mesic climate at Yucca Mountain and the adjacent region during the last 20,000 to 50,000 years. Constructing a history of Great Basin vertebrates, particularly mammals, will provide empirical evidence of past environmental and climatic conditions within the Great Basin. The objective of the geomorphology component of the program is to document the responses of surficial processes and landforms to the climatic changes documented by studies of packrat middens, pollens, and faunal distributions. The goal of the transportation component is to compare the results from three models (FESWMS-2DH, DAMBRK, and FLO-2D) that have been suggested as appropriate for evaluating flood flows on alluvial fans with the results obtained from the traditional one-dimensional, stochastic model used in previous research for the Yucca Mountain Project. Progress on all these tasks is described.

  14. Amorphous silicon research: Phase II. Annual technical progress report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research performed during Phase II of a three-phase, three-year program under NREL Subcontract No. ZAN-4-13318-02. The research program is intended to expand, enhance and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for the development of high-performance, two-terminal multijunction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) alloy modules. It is now well recognized that a multifunction, multibandgap approach has the potential of achieving the highest stable efficiency in a-Si:H alloy solar cells. In this approach, the bandgap of the materials of the component cell is varied in order to capture a wide spectrum of the solar photons. Significant progress has been made in the development of materials and cell design in the last few years, and a stable module efficiency of 10.2% has been demonstrated over one-square-foot area using a triple-junction approach in which the bottom two component cells use hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy. In order to meet the Department of Energy goal of achievement of 12% stable module efficiency, it is necessary to make further improvements in each of the component cells. This has been the thrust of the current program.

  15. Methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this contract is to develop a process for converting light alkane gases to methyl chloride via oxyhydrochlorination using highly selective, stable catalysts in fixed-bed reactors designed to remove the large amount of heat generated, so as to control the reaction temperature. Further, the objective is to obtain the engineering data base necessary for developing a commercially feasible process and to evaluate the economics of the process. Significant progress was made in catalyst and PDU development this quarter. The key points of these developments are: Initial discussions have taken place with a catalyst supplier. United Catalysts, Inc. UCI came up with some good catalyst development suggestions and has agreed to produce a batch of catalyst for the PDU; previous plans for supply of methane for the PDU have fallen through. New options. including getting gas from Carrollton Utilities, are being evaluated; and PDU equipment installation is completed. and piping is 40% complete. The electrical work is close to being finished, and the instrumentation is underway.

  16. Technical progress report during Phase 1 of the continuous fiber ceramic composites program

    SciTech Connect

    Richerson, D.W.

    1994-03-15

    United States industry has a critical need for materials that are lightweight, strong, tough, corrosion resistant and capable of performing at high temperatures; such materials will enable substantial increase in energy efficiency and reduction in emissions of pollutants. Continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are an emerging class of materials which have the potential for the desired combination of properties to meet the industrial needs. A $10 billion annual market has been estimated for CFCC products by the year 2010, which equates to over 100,000 industrial sector jobs. The CFCC program began in the spring of 1992 as a three-phase 10-year effort to assess potential applications of CFCC materials, develop the necessary supporting technologies to design, analyze and test CFCC materials, conduct materials and process development guided by the applications assessment input, fabricate test samples and representative components to evaluate CFCC material capabilities under application conditions, and analyze scaleability and manufacturability plus demonstrate pilot-scale production engineering. DOE awarded 10 Phase I cooperative agreements to industry-lead teams plus identified generic supporting technology projects. This document highlights the broad progress and accomplishments on these contracts and support technology projects during Phase I.

  17. Spectroscopy, reaction, and photodissociation in highly vibrationally excited molecules. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Highly vibrationally excited molecules often control the course of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, combustion, plasmas, and many other environments. The research described in this Progress Report uses laser excitation and interrogation techniques to study and control the dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In particular, they show that it is possible to unravel the details and influence the course of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction. The experiments use laser excitation of overtone vibrations to prepare highly vibrationally excited molecules, frequently with single quantum state resolution, and laser spectroscopy to monitor the subsequent behavior of the excited molecule. We have studied the vibrationally mediated photodissociation and the bond- and state-selected bimolecular reaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules. In the first process, one photon creates a highly excited molecule, a second photon from another laser dissociates it, and light from a third laser detects the population of individual product quantum states. This approach allows us to explore otherwise inaccessible regions of the ground and excited state potential energy surface and, by exciting to the proper regions of the surface, to control the breaking of a selected chemical bond. In the second process, the highly vibrationally excited molecule reacts with an atom formed either in a microwave discharge or by photolysis and another laser interrogates the products. We have used this approach to demonstrate mode- and bond-selected bimolecular reactions in which the initial excitation controls the subsequent chemistry. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Progress in digestive endoscopy: Flexible Spectral Imaging Colour Enhancement (FICE)-technical review

    PubMed Central

    Negreanu, L; Preda, CM; Ionescu, D; Ferechide, D

    2015-01-01

    Background. A substantial advance in digestive endoscopy that has been made during the last decade is represented by digital chromoendoscopy, which was developed as a quicker and sometimes better alternative to the gold standard of dye spraying. Fujifilm developed a virtual coloration technique called Flexible spectral Imaging Color Enhancement (FICE). FICE provides a better detection of lesions of “minimal” esophagitis, of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus and of squamous cell esophageal cancer. The use of FICE resulted in an improvement in the visualization of the early gastric cancer, being less invasive, and time consuming than the classic dye methods. Current evidence does not support FICE for screening purposes in colon cancer but it definitely improves characterization of colonic lesions. Its use in inflammatory bowel disease is still controversial and in video capsule endoscopy is considered a substantial progress. Conclusions. The use of FICE endoscopy in routine clinical practice can increase the diagnostic yield and can provide a better characterization of lesions. Future studies to validate its use, the good choice of channels, and the “perfect indications” and to provide common definitions and classifications are necessary. PMID:26664462

  19. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report, second quarter, September--November, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Progress is described in the four tasks associated with this project. Task 1, Paleobotanical studies in the Great Basin, has as its objective the reconstruction of the response of vegetation to climate in order to identify periods of mesic climate at Yucca Mountain during the last 20,000 to 50,000 years. Past extremes in infiltration rates are expected to serve as estimates of climate that may be expected during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mtn. Task 2, Paleofaunas, will construct a history of Great Basin vertebrates that will provide empirical evidence of past environmental and climatic conditions. The objective of Task 3, Geomorphology, is to document the responses of surficial processes and landforms to the climatic changes documented by studies of packrat middens, pollen, and faunal distributions. The goal of Task 4, Transportation, is to compare the results from three models that have been suggested as appropriate for evaluating flood flows on alluvial fans with the results obtained from the traditional one-dimensional, stochastic model used in previous research for Yucca Mountain. This research looked at three alluvial fans with rail transportation alignments crossing them.

  20. University of Tennessee Space Institute. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The major activities discussed in this quarterly report are concerned with the initiation of testing in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility in the LMF1D test series. This test series is designed to provide basic data on seed/slag interaction as a function of diffuser exit temperature and slag carryover rate for the coal fired MHD system with slag screen installed. During the quarter two shakedown tests and three tests in the test series were conducted. Data is reported on the flow train performance, including the combustor, the slag screen, radiant furnace and the materials test module. Analysis of data from the LMF1C test series continues and a summary of the NO/sub x/ data analysis is provided. A summary of the results of application of advanced diagnostic equipment provided by UTSI, Mississippi State University and the Babcock and Wilcox Company is included. In Task 2 the arrival on site of the low temperature air heater is reported. A progress report on the procurement, engineering and installation of the superheater components is included.

  1. Moving finite elements in 2-D. Technical progress report, year 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, R.J.

    1984-04-03

    The moving finite element (MFE) method has emerged as a potentially potent and interesting method for solving partial differential equations (PDE's) with large gradients. The principal feature of the MFE method is that the grid node co-ordinates, themselves, are dependent variables and are calculated at each time step so as to minimize a PDE residual in some norm. This has the effect of moving the grid nodes continuously and systematically to those positions which minimize PDE numerical solution errors. Research on the MFE method to this time has been advanced by a relatively small number of groups and individual investigators. Of these, the presently proposing group at Science Applications, Inc. (SAI), in Pleasanton, California, has pursued simultaneously developments of the basic theory, numerical analysis, and real-world applications under sponsorship of the DOE and others. The results of our MFE research to date in both 1-D and 2-D transient PDE systems have been quite positive, as well as laden with indicators for further advancements. We report the progress of this third year of 2-D MFE research and indicate those research tasks which should now be pursued into their next logical stages of advancement for large-gradient PDE problems in 2-D.

  2. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  3. A Trend Analysis of Manufacturing-Related Program Graduates of Community and Technical Colleges: Great Lakes and Plains Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eighmy, Myron A.

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturers in the United States are struggling to recruit and hire high-skilled workers needed to maintain productivity and to compete globally. While the total number employed in the manufacturing sector is shrinking, the demand for high-skilled workers has increased. Community and technical colleges have traditionally been an important source…

  4. Kokanee Impacts Assessment and Monitoring on Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, Annual Progress Report for October 1995-September 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Maiolie, Melo A.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to Monitor Lake Pend Oreille's kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi population. Data will serve as a baseline for evaluating the benefits of a higher winter lake level beginning in 1996. We estimated the kokanee population in Lake Pend Oreille using a Hauser-type midwater trawl during August 1995 and September 1996. Population estimates in 1995 were 4.55 million age-0 kokanee, 2.87 million age-1 kokanee, 1.52 million age-2 kokanee, 0.74 million age-3 kokanee, 0.15 million age-4 kokanee, and 42,000 age-5 kokanee. Population estimates in 1996 were 5.42 million age-0 kokanee, 3.57 million age-1 kokanee, 3.17 million age-2 kokanee, 0.67 million age-3 kokanee, 0.44 million age-4 kokanee, and no age-5 kokanee. These were two of the highest total populations of kokanee since trawling began in 1977; largely due to high numbers of young kokanee. The densities of age-4 and 5 kokanee (which make up the bulk of the fishery), however, were the lowest on record in 1995 and average in 1996. We also surveyed traditional shoreline and tributary spawning areas. Counts of kokanee spawning in tributaries during 1995 were relatively consistent with previous years (6,261 kokanee). Counts of spawners along the shorelines reached a new record low of only 74 kokanee; a 93 percent decline from 1994. During December 1996, both counts dropped to their lowest point on record. Only 49 fish were seen spawning along the shorelines, and only 819 fish were seen in tributary streams. These low counts may have been partially due to higher lake levels during the spawning seasons. Higher than normal lake levels made additional gravel available for kokanee spawning in many areas of the lake. Possibly this caused kokanee to spread along the shorelines and reduced the spawner counts. Kokanee fry that had been fin clipped and stocked at the Cabinet Gorge Fish Hatchery Ladder in 1991 and 1992 returned at a rate of 0.27% and 0.14% once they matured. This return rate was much

  5. Aligning Mathematics Assessment Standards: Oklahoma and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). REL Technical Brief. REL 2008-No. 010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kathy L.; Brite, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This technical brief examines the current alignment between Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests (OCT) and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAPE) mathematics framework. It looks at the extent to which current state assessment standards cover the content on which 2009 NAPE assessments will be based. Applying the methodology used by…

  6. The Development of Early Literacy Measures for Use in a Progress Monitoring Assessment System: Letter Names, Letter Sounds and Phoneme Segmenting. Technical Report # 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    In this technical report, the authors describe the development alternate forms of three types of early literacy measures as part of a comprehensive progress monitoring literacy assessment system developed in 2006 for use with students in Kindergarten through fourth grade. They begin with a brief overview of the two conceptual frameworks underlying…

  7. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.D.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed boilers is in progress. Preliminary results indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. In these instances it was observed that large particles were forming within the bed which were larger that the feed. Four operators could confirm that the larger bed particles had formed due to bed particles sticking together or agglomerating. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with these deposits being found most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Examples of these agglomerates and deposits have been received from five of the surveyed facilities. Also during this quarter, a bulk sample of Illinois No. 6 coal was obtained from the Fossil Energy Program at Ames Laboratory here at Iowa State University and prepared for combustion tests. This sample was first ground to a top-size of 3/8`` using a jaw crusher then a size fraction of 3/8`` {times} 8 (US mesh) was then obtained by sieving using a Gilson Test-Master. This size fraction was selected for the preliminary laboratory-scale experiments designed to simulate the dense bed conditions that exist in the bottom of CFB combustors. To ensure uniformity of fuel composition among combustion runs, the sized coal was riffled using, a cone and long row method and stored in bags for each experiment. During this quarter additional modifications were made to achieve better control of fluidization regimes and to aid in monitoring the hydrodynamic and chemical conditions within the reactor.

  8. Development of hydroconversion of biomass to synthetic fuels. Technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-04-01

    The physical and chemical characterization tests with maple hardwood were completed. Corn stover tests are in progress. The maple hardwood had uniform properties for various size fractions unlike the Douglas fir hog fuel. The ash fusion temperatures for maple hardwood were measured up to 2700/sup 0/F, which is significantly higher than those for coal ash. Studies were conducted to determine the fluidized behavior of mixtures of sand and 5 to 67 vol % of char. Measurements of the bed pressure drop and fluidizing gas velocity were made at several bed heights. At fluidization gas velocities below that of pure sand, the sand provided smooth fluidization and good mixing with the larger, lower density char particles. Drying aspects of maple were examined in terms of front-end drying that will use recovered waste heat. This is important because a constant-moisture feedstock is preferred. Initial thermobalance tests of low-temperature drying typical of front-end, recovered-heat systems were conducted. Linear, well-defined behavior was found for moisture loss in time. Nonisothermal thermobalance runs were made to define temperatures where significant reactions occur and to establish if there is any effect of particle size. Rapid heat-up rate devolatilization of maple hardwood was studied in a free-fall apparatus able to feed and collect large quantities (g/min) of material. Greater than 75% conversion was obtained in less than 0.3 second, and higher hydrogen pressure increased the light hydrocarbon product yield. Isothermal thermobalance experiments were conducted to establish the kinetics of the steam-char reaction. A first-order kinetic model was developed. Further work involved a confirmation of the PDU design values in terms of the information developed in the above work. Additional PDU design details were completed.

  9. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.; Liang, J.T.; Schrader, R.; Hagstrom, J. II; Liu, J.; Wavrik, K.

    1998-10-01

    In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water

  10. Surface properties of photo-oxidized bituminous coals. Technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Davis, A.; Chander, S.

    1996-12-31

    During this report period, a vitrinite concentrate from the mvb Splash Dam seam (DECS-30) was prepared and analyzed. Results show that the concentrate was 91 vol % vitrinite and that the sample has been adequately protected from oxidation under refrigerated storage in argon. The 9% level of contamination within the vitrinite resulted from the extreme friability of the coal and to the dispersion of fine grains of semifusinite and micrinite. Polished blocks containing vitrain bands that were prepared, irradiated in blue-light and employed in contact angle measurements were evaluated using specular reflectance-mode FT-IR for changes in functional group chemistry. Infrared spectra from unexposed areas of vitrinite and those irradiated for 1, 5 and 10 min for six coals ranging in rank from hvCb to mvb were obtained using a FTS 175 spectrometer with a Bio-Rad UMA 500 microscope accessory. Preliminary results demonstrate that photo-oxidation occurred during irradiation, becoming progressively more intense with increasing irradiation time; however, the magnitude of this change diminished with increasing rank. A relatively steady increase in the carbonyl region (1,800--1,650 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a decrease in the aliphatic region (2,950--2,850 cm{sup {minus}1}) of the spectra supports this observation and is similar to observations made in the past for natural weathering and laboratory oxidation of coals. A series of tests was initiated to photo-oxidize powdered vitrains using the BLAK-RAY ultraviolet lamp evaluated last quarter. Samples of four vitrinite concentrates were exposed to UV light for 10 mins per side. These and the corresponding whole-seam channel samples and raw vitrinite concentrates were submitted for initial microflotation tests which have not been completed at this time.

  11. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1994-10-26

    Research is presently being conducted to develop a criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in Circulated Fluidized Beds. Initially, eleven weld overlay alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All eleven coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400 C and their erosion resistance was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. No correlations were found between room temperature hardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature. It was suggested that weld overlays mechanical properties such as fracture strength, toughness and work hardening rates may contributed to their erosion resistance. During the previous two quarters the microhardness tests were performed on the eroded samples in order to determine the size of the work hardened zone and the change in the coatings hardness due to erosion. As a result of these measurements it was established that one group of coatings deformed plastically, while another did not. In addition, the measurements of the weld overlays microhardness at 400 C were made. The coatings microhardness at 400 C was plotted versus their volume erosion rates. During the last quarter, erosion tests were performed for Inconel-625, 316L SS, and Iron-Aluminide wrought alloys in order to compare their erosion behavior with similar weld overlays. The results of microhardness profile measurements for all weld overlay coatings were analyzed. The factors that contribute to the erosion resistance of the coatings that deformed plastically are discussed in this progress report.

  12. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  13. Technical Progress Report for PEPCO: Turbo-Z Battery Charging System

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-22

    The authors are entering the final phase of development for this project. Work has been imparted to define the components of the flexible battery charger control board. Detailed analog and digital circuits are complete. Improved analog to digital and digital to analog converters have been selected for use with the control board. The control board schematics are complete and construction of the hardware is in progress. The programming of the circuit board modules is underway. The documentation and circuit schematic drawings are in process. The test stand has added the integration of a dedicated fast computer/microprocessor to control the test stand. This will allow measurements to be taken and recorded more often. This has required modification of the software. The software is being debugged. The modules to be controlled by the test stand microprocessor include the charger module, the battery simulator, the discharge pulse, and discharger. Integrating these components will greatly enhance design and testing. An SCR charger power module has been has been designed, built, and debugged. The circuits for the battery simulator and discharge pulse have been detailed and debugged. The discharge pulse characteristics have been defined and designed. The charger power and discharge pulse modules can be used with either the test stand or the flexible control board. This work is the result of extensive catalog and internet research for the test stand and control board components. The documentation for the project is underway. It is important to have this documentation for reference purposes. Also, the drawing schematics will help with future projects, and they will help with flow-charting the projects for all parties involved. The drawings and some output parameters as of June 1999 are attached.

  14. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 5 subtasks which are described: Literature review on thermal stability of jet fuels; Pyrolytic and catalytic reactions of potential endothermic fuels: cis- and trans-decalin; Use of site specific {sup 13}C-labeling to examine the thermal stressing of 1-phenylhexane: A case study for the determination of reaction kinetics in complex fuel mixtures versus model compound studies; Estimation of critical temperatures of jet fuels; and Surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor system. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Characterization of solid gums, sediments, and carbonaceous deposits, is subtask, Studies of surface chemistry of PX-21 activated carbon during thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Exploratory screening and development potential of jet fuel thermal stabilizers over 400 C; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, are 4 subtasks: Novel approaches to low-severity coal liquefaction and coal/resid co-processing using water and dispersed catalysts; Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels; Design of a batch mode and a continuous mode three-phase reactor system for the liquefaction of coal and upgrading of coal liquids; and Exploratory studies on coal liquids upgrading using mesopores molecular sieve catalysts. 136 refs., 69 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.

    1994-07-01

    Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

  16. Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 2 of 3, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Christopher; Machin, Deanna; Wright, Howie

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the findings from YEAR 2 of a three-year disease risk assessment. The Okanagan Nation Fisheries Commission (ONFC) and the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT) are investigating the risks involved in re-introducing sockeye salmon into Skaha Lake, part of their historical range (Ernst and Vedan 2000). The disease risk assessment compares the disease and infection status of fish above and below McIntyre Dam (the present limit of sockeye migration). The disease agents identified that are of a particular concern are: infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus type 2 (IHNV type2), erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), the whirling disease agent (Myxobolus cerebralis), and the ceratomyxosis agent (Ceratomyxa shasta).

  17. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-03-22

    The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm

  18. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura; Rosier, Brenda

    2001-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related to these declines include habitat loss and

  19. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism: Biogeochemistry and controls of nutrient flux dynamics in lakes: Technical progress report, 1 July 1987--30 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Our work has continued and expanded in the region of nutrient fluxes, uptake mechanisms, and recycling in microcommunities on the plants and within the plants. Limiting nutrient factors are dissolved inorganic carbon, phosphorus, and in some cases, nitrogen. The macrophyte-epiphyte complex exists in a viscous medium where regions of greatly reduced flow and no turbulence occur at surfaces. As a result of the greatly reduced flow, lack of turbulence,and extremely slow rate of diffusion in water, diffusional processes predominate within the boundary layer. During periods of high metabolic activity (i.e., during photosynthesis) nutrients are likely to become depleted within the boundary layer, constraining production and placing the macrophyte and associated microflora in direct nutrient competition. Once nutrients have entered the complex via diffusion or sedimentation from the bulk phase, or uptake through the macrophyte rhizosphere, exit across the boundary layer is retarded. The close juxtaposition of the biota results in a rapid cycling and, ultimately, in concentration of nutrients. This occurs until the end of the macrophyte vegetative life span when the supporting macrophyte loses its integrity and release of dissolved matter exceeds the retentive capacity of the microbiota. A quantity of this material released by the macrophyte is retained in the epiphyton when the macrophyte-epiphyte complex sinks to the sediment. 324 refs., 6 figs.

  20. I-NERI QUARTERLY TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT - JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2005-03-01

    codes. The three categories of experiments were performed in the facility; (1) upper pool cooling trip test, (2) LOFC experiment, (3) emissivity measurement experiment. (C) Prof. NO continued Task 3. (Prof NO) The experimental work of air ingress is going on without any concern: Geometry and size effect test has been completed. The conversion factor for internal surface area was obtained through this experiment. Burn-off test was performed and the uniformity of internal reaction was confirmed. (D) INEEL engineers continued to extend the diffusion model for multiple chemical species and made some calculations. (E) Prof. Lee and Martin at University of Michigan continued to analyze the effect of the stochastic fuel on the neutronic analysis and have initiated fuel depletion calculations for the VHTGR core. Progress during the past quarter includes: Further analysis of stochastic fuel geometry; Preliminary Monte Carlo depletion of full-core VHTGR; and Installation of MCNP5 on Unix cluster.

  1. Sedimentological evidences for progressive drying of the Sahara during the last 6000 years from the annually laminated record of Lake Yoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francus, Pierre; von Suchodoletz, Hans; Dietze, Michael; Verschuren, Dirk; Kröpelin, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Lake Yoa is a perennial lake entirely fed by groundwater and located in the Saharan desert of Northern Chad. It contains a unique continuous and high-resolution record of the climate history of the eastern Sahara for the last 6000 years (Kröpelin et al. 2008). Analyses of aquatic and terrestrial paleoecosystems revealed a slow and progressive drying of the region since mid-Holocene (Kröpelin et al. 2008 and Eggermont 2008). Here, we describe the sedimentological evolution of this finely laminated, undisturbed, 7.5 m-long sequence. Comparison of lamination counts with radiocarbon and 137-Cs dates indicates that these couplets are annual, i.e. varves. Counts were made using Fe, and Ca/Ti profiles as well as radiographs acquired using an Itrax µ-XRF core scanner with 100 µ resolution. Three facies could be distinguished. From 6 ka until 1.1 ka, couplets are: (1) a dark brown layer composed of organic matter, aeolian sands and finer detrital material; (2) a light brown layer of neoformed calcite. After 1.1 ka, couplets are formed by (1) a detrital layer consisting of a mixture of aeolian and resuspended material rich in both Fe and Ca and (2) organic-rich material. The change in varve facies corresponds to an abrupt decrease in Ca content and the simultaneous disappearance of neoformed calcite. This may be attributed to exhaustion of carbonate sources in the aquifer or surrounding dry lake beds as well as to a decrease of primary productivity triggering the precipitation of neoformed calcite. The laminated facies are intercalated with the third facies, of which there are relatively few. It consists of few coarser beds indicative of higher energy events due to changes in lake level or dune migration towards the coring site. Magnetic susceptibility broadly increases from bottom to top and may be indicative of the combined effect of changes in the sediment source and redox conditions in the water column. The clay fraction is interpreted to be of aeolian or fluvial

  2. A 200 year sedimentary record of progressive eutrophication in Lake Greifen (Switzerland): Implications for the origin of organic-carbon-rich sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hollander, D.J. ); McKenzie, J.A. ); Haven, H.L. ten )

    1992-09-01

    Over the past 200 years Lake Greifen, a small lake in northeastern Switzerland, has undergone dramatic changes in primary productivity and eutrophication due to increased nutrient supply from agricultural activity and industrialization. A 40 year historical record of the water-column chemistry indicates that productivity and eutrophication reached a maximum in 1974, after which stricter regulations on the input of nutrients resulted in a progressive decrease. Collected cores show the sedimentary expression of this anthropogenically induced eutrophication by a well-developed annual sedimentation and by enhanced values of total organic carbon, organic-carbon accumulation rates, and hydrogen indices (HI) of the kerogens. Analyses of the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary carbonates and organic matter reveal that the fractionation between these two phases varies with the HI of kerogens. This observation is explicable in terms of changing productivity and preservation of the organic matter, and the CO[sub 2 (aq)] budget of the water body. The authors propose that if high primary productivity were primarily responsible for the preservation and accumulation of organic matter, then a negative correlation will occur between [Delta][delta][sup 13]C[sub calcite-organic matter]([Delta][delta][sup 13]C[sub cal-om]) and HI values. In an environment with relatively low to moderate productivity but with bottom-water anoxia, a positive correlation will exist between [Delta][delta][sup 13]C[sub cal-om] and HI values. This study of Lake Greifen has implications for understanding paleoenvironmental controls on ancient organic-carbon-rich sediments.

  3. Strong assortative mating by diet, color, size, and morphology but limited progress toward sympatric speciation in a classic example: Cameroon crater lake cichlids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H

    2013-07-01

    Models predict that sympatric speciation depends on restrictive parameter ranges, such as sufficiently strong disruptive selection and assortative mating, but compelling examples in nature have rarely been used to test these predictions. I measured the strength of assortative mating within a species complex of Tilapia in Lake Ejagham, Cameroon, a celebrated example of incipient sympatric adaptive radiation. This species complex is in the earliest stages of speciation: morphological and ecological divergence are incomplete, species differ primarily in breeding coloration, and introgression is common. I captured 27 mated pairs in situ and measured the diet, color, size, and morphology of each individual. I found strong assortative mating by color, size, head depth, and dietary source of benthic or pelagic prey along two independent dimensions of assortment. Thus, Ejagham Tilapia showed strong assortative mating most conducive to sympatric speciation. Nonetheless, in contrast to a morphologically bimodal Sarotherodon cichlid species pair in the lake, Ejagham Tilapia show more limited progress toward speciation, likely due to insufficient strength of disruptive selection on morphology estimated in a previous study (γ = 0.16). This supports the predicted dependence of sympatric speciation on strong assortment and strong disruptive selection by examining a potentially stalled example in nature. PMID:23815664

  4. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  5. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report for period October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Progress reports are presented for: Task 1 management plan; Task 2.1 laboratory support (University of Kentucky/Center for Applied Energy Research); Task 3 continuous operations/parametric studies (Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.); Task 4.1 process modeling; and Task 4.4 preliminary technical assessment (LDP Associates). Some of the high points for this period are: the activity of the base catalyst prepared by pressure filtration of the Wilsonville Run 262E V-1082 ashy resid was determined and compared with the conversion of coal in the absence of any added catalyst; this material was found to contain 740 mg Mo/kg; in the catalyst screening test, the pressure filtered solids that had been added to the reaction mixture to a level equivalent to the solids contained in Wilsonville Run 263J gave coal conversion of 98.2% with a resid conversion of 24%; and the effect of presulfiding conditions on activating a Mo-impregnated coal with different H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures at different temperatures and reaction times was investigated.

  6. Fundamental characterization of alternate fuel effects in continuous combustion systems. Summary technical progress report, August 15, 1978-January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Blazowski, W.S.; Edelman, R.B.; Wong, E.

    1980-02-27

    The overall objective of this contract is to assist in the development of fuel-flexible combustion systems for gas turbines as well as Rankine and Stirling cycle engines. The primary emphasis of the program is on liquid hydrocarbons produced from non-petroleum resources. Fuel-flexible combustion systems will provide for more rapid transition of these alternative fuels into important future energy utilization centers (especially utility power generation with the combined cycle gas turbine). The specific technical objectives of the program are: (a) develop an improved understanding of relationships between alternative fuel properties and continuous combustion system effects, and (b) provide analytical modeling/correlation capabilities to be used as design aids for development of fuel-tolerant combustion systems. This is the second major report of the program. Key experimental findings during this reporting period concern stirred combustor soot production during operation at controlled temperature conditions, soot production as a function of combustor residence time, an improved measurement technique for total hydrocarbons and initial stirred combustor results of fuel nitrogen conversion. While the results to be presented concern a stirred combustor which utilizes premixed fuel vapor/oxidant mixtures, a new combustor which combusts liquid fuel injected into the reactor as a spray has been developed and will be described. Analytical program progress includes the development of new quasiglobal models of soot formation and assessment of needs for other submodel development.

  7. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Feeley, O.C.; Johansson, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize oxygenated fuel ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from coal-derived H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} synthesis via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-proanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. Both organic and inorganic catalysts will be investigated, and the better catalysts will be subjected to long term performance studies. The project is divided into the following three tasks: (1) synthesis of high octane ethers from alcohol mixtures containing predominantly methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol over superacid resins, (2) inorganic catalysts for the synthesis of high octane ethers form alcohols, and (3) long term performance and reaction engineering for scale-up of the alcohols-to-ether process. A summary of technical progress is provided in this report.

  8. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

  9. Production of low-cost hydrogen. [Eleventh quarterly] technical progress report, [April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report presents the results of work accomplished during the period April 1, 1992 through June 30, 1992 under Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC26367 entitled ``Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen.`` The overall objective of this program is to verify the ability of the MTCI indirectly heated fluid-bed gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from liquefaction by-product streams and from char produced in mild gasification processes. The characterization unit was renovated and another burner/exhaust designed to replace the one that has been in use for several years. Initial shakedown tests for bed calcination indicated that the gasifier should be changed with fresh limestone and kept at temperature, with whatever make-up was required to maintain bed height until calcination was completed as determined by the CO concentration. Char gasification was then initiated and two relatively long-term tests (15.5 and 10.5 hours) were completed at two different temperatures.

  10. 1993 Annual progress report for subsidiary agreement No. 2 (1991--1996) between AECL and US/DOE for a radioactive waste management technical co-operative program

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    A coordinated research program on radioactive waste disposal is being carried out by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the US Department of Energy. This annual report describes progress in the following eight studies: Fundamental materials investigations; In-situ stress determination; Development of a spent fuel dissolution model; Large block tracer test--Experimental testing of retardation models; Laboratory and field tests of in-situ hydrochemical tools; Cigar Lake--Analogue study, actinide and fission product geochemistry; Performance assessment technology exchange; and Development of multiple-well hydraulic test and field tracer test methods.

  11. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1987 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1988-05-01

    Estimated kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 6.01 million during late summer 1987. This estimate is 40% higher than the 1986 estimate and is the second largest population estimate since 1977. Higher abundance is predominantly a result of enhanced fry survival and recruitment. Hatchery-reared fry contribution was 22% of total fry recruitment in 1987, compared to 8% in 1986, and resulted from a fivefold increase in survival. Much of this improvement can be attributed to the large (52 mm) fry produced at Cabinet Gorge Hatchery in 1987 and represents the first measurable contribution of the new hatchery to the kokanee rehabilitation program. Survival of hatchery-reared fry released into Clark Fork River was nearly one-half that of fry released into Sullivan Springs due to poor flow conditions and potentially high predation during migration from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery to Lake Pend Oreille. Wild fry survival was enhanced by early availability of forage (cladocern zooplankton) during fry emergence in late spring. Cladoceran production began three weeks earlier in 1987 than 1986, which resulted from reduced Mysis abundance and earlier thermal stratification of Lake Pend Oreille, which helped segregate cladocerans from mysid predation. Kokanee dry otolith coding was evaluated to provide a reliable long-term mark. Analysis of daily growth increments on otoliths was used successfully in 1987 to differentiate fry from various release sites. The technique will be refined during 1988 to include coding fry otoliths with water temperature fluctuations during hatchery residence. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1986 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1987-02-01

    Estimated kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 4.3 million during September 1986. This estimate was similar to 1985 and indicates continued suppression of the kokanee population since initial decline in the late 1960s. Atypically high survival of wild fry resulted in similar fry recruitment in 1986 as 1985, whereas hatchery-reared fry contributed only 8% to total fry recruitment as a result of low post-release survival (3%). Fry released into the Clark Fork River from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery had very low survival during emigration to Lake Pend Oreille, resulting from poor flow conditions and potentially high predation. Fry survival during emigration was twice as high during nighttime flows of 16,000 cfs than 7,800 cfs. Emigration also was faster during higher flows. Several marks were tested to differentially mark fry release groups to help determine impacts of flow and other factors on fry survival. Survival of fry marked with tetracycline and fluorescent dye was high (>99%) during the 10-week study. In contrast, survival of fry marked with fluorescent grit marks ranged from 5 to 93%, depending on application pressure and distance from the fry. Retention was high (>96%) for tetracycline and grit marks during the study, whereas dye marks were discernible (100%) for only one week. 23 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index.

  14. Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

    2002-12-31

    Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

  15. Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul D. Ronney

    2004-08-26

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. The corona generator can also be used as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. Higher peak pressures and faster pressure rise times were realized consistently in all test chambers versus standard spark plug ignition. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder to The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions including cylinder pressure monitoring. A ceramic corona electrode has been designed that fits in the new test engine and is capable of withstanding the pressures and temperatures encountered inside the combustion chamber. The corona ignition system was tested on the engine and an increase in both peak pressure and IMEP were seen in the initial test. There are issues that must be addressed before on-engine testing can continue such as EMF interference from the corona generator and electrical insulation on portions of the piston and cylinder head to prevent arcing. The EMF issue can be solved with proper shielding and grounding and various ceramic coatings are being researched for electrical insulation.

  16. Investigation of heat transfer and combustion in the Advanced Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Technical progress report No. 2, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.

    1994-04-01

    This technical report summarizes the research performed and progress achieved during the period of January 1, 1994 to March 31, 1994. Design and fabrication of the exploratory cold test model was continued with an arrangement of the auxiliary systems. The auxiliary systems are consisted of air supply system, test chamber, air humidifying unit, and instrumentations for measuring air flow rate, particle size distribution, and particle collision frequency/mass flux. The electrostatic impact probe and associated signal processing unit were designed and fabricated to measure particle mass flux and particle-probe collision frequency in the exploratory cold model. The progress of this project has been on schedule.

  17. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi annual technical progress report, 1 April 1996--29 September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-20

    This technical progress report discusses work on the Radioisotope Generators and Ancillary Activities for the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft is expected to launch in October 1997, and will explore Saturn and its moons. This progress report discusses issues in: spacecraft integration and liason, engineering support, safety, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication and testing, ground support equipment, RTG shipping and launch support, designs, reviews and mission application. Safety analysis of the RTGs during reentry and launch accidents are covered. This report covers the period of April 1 to September 29, 1996.

  18. [Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion]. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, October 1 through December 31, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; (2) hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; (3) combustion gas turbine; (4) fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  19. Active sites in char gasification. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1984-31 March 1984. [Polymers of phenol-formaldehyde family; chars produced from model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suubers, E.M.; Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.

    1984-05-01

    This project is concerned with the study of the nature and behavior of active sites in gasification of chars produced from synthesized model compounds, primarily of the phenol-formaldehyde family of resins. The current technical progress report presents further developments on resin synthesis and characterization and the design of a pyro-gasifier reactor for transient kinetic studies of the chars produced from the model compounds. 7 references, 12 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  1. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas. Technical progress report, August 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S.

    1993-01-29

    The theoretical model for the absorption part of a particular type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) (see Technical Progress Report No. 7) has been developed. The numerical simulations of the model compare well with the experimental results presented in the last report (Technical Progress Report No. 7). A number of experiments were carried out also for Mode 2 type of operation by varying the time for initial pressurization of the hollow fiber module as well as the total absorption time. These were done to provide a basis for comparison with the theoretical model to be developed later. We have initiated RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents such as 19.5 % aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) for the absorption of C0{sub 2} from a C0{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture. Six experiments were carried out using Mode 3 type of operation and a C0{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture containing 9.9% CO, and balance N{sub 2}. Excellent purification was obtained. No C0{sub 2} was observed in the purified high pressure gas outlet for absorption time of up to 14 seconds; the purified high pressure gas flow rate was also considerable. Module No. 5 was used for all experiments. The details of the module are given in Technical Progress Report No. 7.

  2. State Plan for Postsecondary Vocational Technical Education. 2001 Report on Progress toward the Statewide Public Policy Initiatives and Goals for Missouri Postsecondary Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Coordinating Board for Higher Education, Jefferson City.

    In April 1998, Missouri's Coordinating Board for Higher Education established basic indicators against which outcomes of the state's investments in postsecondary technical education are measured. One year later, the Coordinating Board approved a set of performance measures to be used to guide research on the results of Missouri's postsecondary…

  3. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1990 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.

    1991-03-01

    Rehabilitation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka in Lake Pend Oreille met with some success in 1990, but unexpected results have raised new questions. Estimated kokanee abundance during late August of 1990 was about 6.9 million fish. This is a decline of 19% from 1989, a continued decrease since 1988. The decreased population was attributed to low stocking of hatchery fry (7.3 million), lower wild fry survival in 1990 (1.5%), and exceptionally poor survival of fish ages 3+ and 4+. Average survival of the older fish was only 11% in 1990 compared to 72% in prior years. Compensatory survival was noted for kokanee ages 1+ and 2+, with an average of 81% in 1990 compared to 44% in 1989. Hatchery fry comprised 47% of the total kokanee fry recruitment in 1990 (80% of fry biomass). This contribution ranked third behind 1988 and 1989 since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. Survival of hatchery fry was 20%, the second highest since this investigation began. Findings of 1990 indicate a more comprehensive approach to managing kokanee must take into account predator stockings and predator/prey interaction. An unexpected low adult escapement was responsible for an egg-take of only 5.6 million eggs in 1990, 58% of the previous year, which will limit experimental stocking in 1991. Modification of the fish ladder at the Cabinet Gorge Fish Hatchery to improve adult escapement is strongly recommended to increase egg-take. 27 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Thermal stratification of Dilute Lakes. Evaluation of regulatory processes and biological effects before and after base addition: Effects on brook trout habitat and growth. Technical report series

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, C.L.; Josephson, D.; Keleher, C.; Gloss, S.P.

    1993-04-01

    The authors address the significance of changes in summer thermal stratification patterns of Adirondack lakes affected by acidification to cold-water fish populations inhabiting these sensitive lakes. The brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is the primary cold-water fish species indigenous to acid-sensitive lakes in the Adirondack region of northern New York State; the ability of these lakes to sustain this important sport species is highly dependent on the availability of adequate summer habitat, consisting of cool, well-oxygenated water. The authors hypothesized that acidification-induced reductions in the thermal stability of sensitive Adirondack lakes could lead to degradation of potential brook trout habitat. These hypotheses were addressed in the study by utilizing data available from previous lake liming studies in the Adirondack region, brook trout growth data from management studies in the region, and the extensive Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation (ALSC) data base. More than 70% of the small, shallow ALSC lakes were classified as predominantly weakly stratified systems that would be potentially sensitive to changes in thermal stratification status resulting from relatively small changes in color and transparency.

  5. Phosphate and carbonate mass balances and their relationships to ground-water inputs at Beaver Lake, Waukesha County, Wisconsin. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.E.; Cherkauer, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The water and chemical budgets of Beaver Lake, Waukesha County, Wisconsin were examined to determine the role of groundwater and sediments in controlling lake quality in a seepage lake. Groundwater dominates the water budget, providing 70% of annual inflow and 60% of the outflow. The 15-m deep lake diverts flow from a depth of at least 90 m in the glacial aquifer of which it is a part. Acting as a flow-through system, the lake receives inflow predominantly from nearshore springs. Outflow occurs in the deeper parts of the lake. Groundwater provides more than 90% of the mass inflow of the major chemicals examined (Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, SO4, Cl and NO3). It is also the major path of outflow for chemicals, accounting for more than 60% of the lake's loss of all the above ions except Ca and HCO3. Sedimentation of 270 + or - 82 g/sqm/yr of precominatly CaCO3 marl with significant silica and organic matter accounts for removal of 43 and 15% of the Ca and HCO3, respectively. Losses of Mg, Na, K, S and Cl to the sediment are insignificant. Data on NO3 fluxes indicate groundwater provides more N than can be accounted for in water and sediment effluxes. Seasonal denitrification in the lake's hypolimnion may account for the difference.

  6. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  7. Lake trout in the Great Lakes: Basin-wide stock collapse and binational restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was important to the human settlement of each of the Great Lakes, and underwent catastrophic collapses in each lake in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The timing of lake trout stock collapses were different in each lake, as were the causes of the collapses, and have been the subject of much scientific inquiry and debate. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize and review pertinent information relating historical changes in Great Lakes lake trout stocks, binational efforts to restore those stocks, and progress toward stock restoration. This presentation attempts to generalize patterns across the Great Lakes, rather than to focus within each lake. Lake specific analyses have been used to understand lake specific causes and effects, but there is continuing debate about some of these causes and effects. A basinwide review may suggest mechanisms for observed changes that are not evident by lake specific analysis.

  8. Institutional aspects of lake management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Stephen M.; Rumery, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The major barriers to successful lake management are institutional. However, in contrast to the technical and limnological dimensions of lake management, the institutional aspects of managing lakes have received little attention. The institutional factors that are important for successful lake management outcomes are: overlapping areal jurisdiction among governmental units, fragmented functional program responsibilities, ineffective coordination, limited authority, financial constraints, private sector roles, and inadequate public awareness and consensus. The range of typical institutional problems confronting lake management are well illustrated through experiences from the state of Wisconsin, USA. Because lake management programs with institutional shortcomings rarely realize their goals, it is critical to assimilate, evaluate, and apply our experience to date with the institutional arrangements necessary to effectively manage lake resources.

  9. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    The materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  10. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini mission. Semi annual technical progress report, 2 October 1995--31 March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-20

    The technical progress achieved during the period 2 October 1995 through 31 March 1996 on Contract No. DE-AC03-91SF18852, Radioisotope Generators and Ancillary Activities is described herein. This report is organized by the program task structure as follows: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance and reliability, contract changes, non-capital CAGO acquisition, and CAGO maintenance; contract acquired government-owned property (CAGO) acquisition; and program calendars.

  11. Final Technical Progress Report: High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program; July 14, 2010 - January 13, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, L.

    2012-03-01

    This is the final technical progress report of the High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program. Alta Devices has successfully completed all milestones and deliverables established as part of the NREL PV incubator program. During the 18 months of this program, Alta has proven all key processes required to commercialize its solar module product. The incubator focus was on back end process steps directed at conversion of Alta's high quality solar film into high efficiency 1-sun PV modules. This report describes all program deliverables and the work behind each accomplishment.

  12. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 6, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-05-03

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1- March 31, 1996.

  13. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-16

    This document contains the second quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTE{trademark} Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale testing circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). The project schedule timeline by task series for the twelve month project, as it was laid out in the initial Project Work Plan. At the present time, all tasks are progressing according to schedule with the exception of the Task 800 Circuit Testing and Sample Prep and Task 1000 Circuit Decommissioning, which have slipped approximately five weeks due to delays incurred within in the project.

  14. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a prototype culm-combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis and Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction during the period October 1, 1980 through December 31, 1980. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. The final detail design effort was completed and the final design report submitted. Progress on procurement activity authorized by full Phase II release on March 20, 1980, is discussed. Following approval by DOE, a purchase order was placed with the Norflor Construction Corporation for the prototype plant construction which began in November. Construction of the access roadway installation of the electric power, sewer and water lines was completed during this reporting period. Boiler construction continued.

  15. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Technical progress report, 1 April 1995--30 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-08-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The AirConditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  16. Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-15

    This report details the progress of the three tasks of this project. The tasks are: (1) develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

  17. Career and Technical Education: States Aligning Programs to Meet Workforce Needs. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 15, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer Dounay

    2014-01-01

    Across the 50 states, career and technical education (CTE) programs at the K-12 and postsecondary levels have seen enormous policy action - 2013 alone saw at least 78 substantive policy changes via legislation, state board rules and executive orders specific to CTE and workforce development. What are the drivers behind this sudden policymaker…

  18. Fourth Progress and Information Report of the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States. (V-TECS.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Connie W.; And Others

    Five areas of concern relating to the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) are documented in this report. First, following an introduction which discusses the purpose of the V-TECS system (to develop materials for performance based instruction), the organizational structure of the sixteen state consortium is presented,…

  19. Career/Technical Education: Not Your Father's Vocational Education. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 14, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer Dounay

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, career/technical education (CTE) has risen to the top of the education policy agenda for governors, legislators, and agency heads. As a result of informed interest among key education leaders, the CTE policies and programs being advocated and implemented today bear little resemblance to those in place not long ago. Among the…

  20. New York City School Survey 2008-2010: Assessing the Reliability and Validity of a Progress Report Measure. Technical Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Lori; Cole, Rachel; Kemple, James J.; Lent, Jessica; McCormick, Meghan; Segeritz, Micha

    2013-01-01

    The Research Alliance for New York City Schools examined Department of Education (DOE) School Survey data from 2008-2010 to better understand the richness and complexities of the information elicited by the Survey from parents, students, and teachers. This document provides the appendices to the technical report "New York City School Survey…

  1. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

  2. Development and evaluation of supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry for polar and high-molecular-weight coal components. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, E.K.; Smith, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report reviews the technical progress made over the first 18 months of the program. Our goals include the design, development, and evaluation of a combined capillary column supercritical fluid chromatograph/high-performance mass spectrometer capable of analyzing high-molecular-weight polar materials and evaluating the system's potential for application in coal conversion process monitoring. The program includes not only the development and evaluation of the required instrumentation, but the development of polar fluids and compatible chromatographic stationary phases needed for efficient separation and analysis of polar and high-molecular-weight compounds. A new chromatograph/mass spectrometer interface and new mass spectrometer ion source have been designed, constructed, and evaluated using low-polarity supercritical fluids such as pentane. Results from the evaluations have been used to modify the instrumentation to improve performance. The design and fabrication of capillary flow restrictors from fused silica tubing has been explored. Research has also been conducted toward advancing the technology of fabricating high-performance chromatographic columns suitable for use with polar supercritical fluids. Results to date support our initial belief that high-resolution supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC)/high-performance mass spectrometry (MS) will provide a significantly enhanced analytical capability for broad classes of previously intractable fuel components. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July--30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  4. Development of a retrofit coal combustor for industrial applications, (Phase 2). Technical progress report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The objective of Phase I of the program for the development of a retrofit pulse coal combustor for industrial applications was to design, fabricate, test and evaluate advanced chamber designs at the laboratory-scale utilizing several fuels (Task 1). The activities were structured to provide design criteria for scaling up to the pilot-scale level for the demonstration of a pulse combustor fired with coal-water mixtures for industrial boiler and process heater retrofit applications. The design data and information acquired during Task 1 of the initial phase was to develop scale-up design criteria for scaling the laboratory-scale design to pilot-scale including interface requirements for the field demonstration. The scale-up pilot unit design was to be sufficiently developed to allow fabrication of the unit for testing in the existing test facility upon DOE exercising its option for the follow-on activities of this program. These follow-on activities (Phase II) included the fabrication, test, and engineering evaluation of the pilot-scale combustor as well as technical and laboratory test support activities for reducing the technical risks and costs of development at the pilot-scale. Based on the information, test, data and technical support activities, a retrofit combustor system was to be designed for field demonstration. An additional effort was added to the contract by modification A005. This modification added a Phase IA in place of the original Task 2 of Phase I activity. This interim phase consisted of three technical tasks described in previous quarterly reports. Phase II was initiated in April 1989.

  5. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  6. Development of process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  7. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1987-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.

  8. IGR NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} control technology. Second technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-25

    The technical work during this reporting term has principally involved the continued development, optimization and improvement of freezing drying techniques for solid ceramic oxide electrolyte powder preparation, preliminary optimization of the calcining of the ceramic electrolyte freeze dried powders to allow for optimum processing to the IGR composite, and determining (initial) electrochemical properties of the stabilized ceramic solid electrolyte at a variety of temperatures in air.

  9. Plasma research in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Annual technical progress report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S.C.

    1993-11-01

    We present physics results divided into the four categories (confinement optimization, transport measurements, fluctuations and fluctuation-induced transport, and fluctuation suppression). For simplicity, we highlight a subset of original MST results which are presented as 13 specific conclusions (not listed in order of importance), each followed by a brief elaboration. Within each of the four categories we also present other progress.

  10. Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Hogg, R.; Fonseca, A.

    1993-09-01

    The main objectives of the project are to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20 percent moisture. Progress is described.

  11. Green River formation water flood demonstration project, Unita Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this project was to understand the successful water flood in the Monument Butte unit and apply it to other units and other reservoirs. Expanding the Monument Butte Water Flood was also one of the objectives. This report provides progress in the areas of field drilling and production results and modeling the boundary unit.

  12. Reading Achievement in Disadvantaged Children as a Consequence of Non Verbal Perceptual Training. Final Technical Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David; Deblinger, Jo Ann

    The theoretical orientation based on perceptual development, proposed by Piaget in 1961, is the starting point of this investigation. According to Piaget, the perception of the young child is "centered" on dominant aspects of the field. With maturity, perception becomes "decentered" and progressively freed from the field. The visual training…

  13. Project TALENT: Period Covered by Report, 1 June 1972 - 31 August 1972. Technical Progress Report No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, John C.

    This progress report on Project TALENT, covering the period 1 June 1972 - 31 August 1972, contains five sections. The sections are as follows: I. Major Activities during This Quarter (reports on 73 different tasks); II. Activities Planned during the Next Quarter (related to 9 tasks); III. Utilization, Dissemination, and Recognition of Outcomes of…

  14. Technical Adequacy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Progress Monitoring Measures for Kindergarten and First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, David D.; Lembke, Erica S.; Lee, Young-Sun; Pappas, Sandra; Chiong, Cynthia; Ginsburg, Herbert P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine six early numeracy measures used to monitor the mathematics progress of kindergarten and first-grade students. Seventy-one kindergarten students and 75 first-grade students were administered the measures each week. Delayed-alternate form reliability was adequate for instructional decision making on some…

  15. Performance measurement and analysis techniques for parallel and distributed programs. Technical progress report, August 1, 1993--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.P.; Larus, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    During the first of our grant, we have made substantial progress on our performance tools research. We have concentrated on our techniques for dynamic program instrumentation and on support of high-level parallel languages and environments. In addition, we have performed an interesting, study in a related area, virtual memory scheduling for parallel systems.

  16. Main research accomplishments since the grant was last reviewed competitively. [Final technical progress report, November 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1993-11-01

    This project deals with the characterization of DNA repair genes and their encoded proteins involved in the incision step of excision repair and in postreplication repair and mutagenesis following exposure to UV light in eukaryotes: the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans. Summarized in this report is progress in achieving the goals of this project.

  17. Technical support services to assist the Office of Environmental Audit in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on Environmental Compliance issues. Technical progress report, February 16, 1991--August 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    HALLIBURTON NUS received authorization from DOE on August 14, 1987 to provide technical support to assist the Office of Environmental Audit (OEV) in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on environmental compliance issues. The overall contract is to accomplish a one-time, no-fault baseline Survey of all DOE operating facilities, and to provide technical assistance and support for the resolution of environmental compliance issues. NUS has completed the Preliminary Reports and continues to support DOE on the Prioritization and Tiger Team Assessment efforts. The project requires a broad range of environmental protection expertise, necessitating senior-level personnel as the primary project staff. Many of the tasks assigned by DOE require quick startup and performance, and several tasks may be active at any one time. The objective of the DOE Environmental Survey Program is to identify and prioritize areas of existing environmental risk at 36 DOE facilities. NUS`role is to technically assist the Office of Environmental Audit in the implementation of the Surveys.

  18. High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

  19. Atmospheric Reanalyses-Recent Progress and Prospects for the Future. A Report from a Technical Workshop, April 2010. Volume 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele M.; Dee, Dick; Woollen, Jack; Compo, Gilbert P.; Onogi, Kazutoshi; Gelaro, Ron; Bosilovich, Michael G.; daSilva, Arlindo; Pawson, Steven; Schubert, Siegfried; Suarez, Max; Barker, Dale; Kamahori, Hirotaka; Kistler, Robert; Saha, Suranjana

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, developers representing each of the major reanalysis centers met at Goddard Space Flight Center to discuss technical issues - system advances and lessons learned - associated with recent and ongoing atmospheric reanalyses and plans for the future. The meeting included overviews of each center s development efforts, a discussion of the issues in observations, models and data assimilation, and, finally, identification of priorities for future directions and potential areas of collaboration. This report summarizes the deliberations and recommendations from the meeting as well as some advances since the workshop.

  20. A computational model for coal transport and combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1995-04-01

    In the period of September 1, 1994 to November 30, 1994, further progress was made in the analysis of granular materials in ducts and passages with bumpy walls. The analysis of gravity chute flows was completed. Additional results on flows of gas-solid mixtures in vertical ducts were obtained. The results were compared with the experimental data of Tsuji an co-worker and Miller and Gidaspow and good agreement was obtained. The computational model was used to study two-phase flows in a horizontal duct. Significant progress was made in the formulation of chemically active two-phase solid-fluid flows. The experimental study of mono-granular layer simple shear flow device was completed. Preparation of the final report was initiated.

  1. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-07-01

    During this report period, additional progress was made in accomplishing the tasks of the project. In particular, the computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed. The model was applied to the dispersion analysis of particles in a circular duct and the transport and deposition of particles in a recirculating region. A model for resuspension of particles from various surfaces in a gas flow is also being developed. The new model accounts for the surface adhesion, as well as the hydrodynamic forces and torques. In addition, the model includes the effect of surface roughness and the structure of near wall turbulent flow. Progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  2. Microbial communities in subsurface environments: Diversity, origin, and evolution. Project technical progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, S.A.

    1994-05-02

    This report summarizes the progress made from 9-1-93 to 5-1-94 on this DOE grant. As participants in the subsurface science program, the authors are assessing the influence of environmental conditions on the distribution and evolution of subsurface microorganisms employing molecular techniques. The approach utilizes 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of gene sequences, and sequencing techniques. Continued progress towards identifying target sequences for selected microbial types and groups is being made by analysis of rRNA sequence data for subsurface microorganisms and other microorganisms in the rRNA databases. Hybridization probes for these target sequences are being produced and used to classify isolated strains of subsurface microbes into focus clades useful for testing origins hypotheses.

  3. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1995-05-04

    Progress during the sixth quarter of a three-year study was made in two task areas: (1) parametric testing of the target coals, and (2) analysis of samples from the combustion tests. A new microanalysis system was acquired (no cost to DOE) and is now functional, although development of analysis routines for the system is still in progress. This system has significantly increased our analytical throughput and has provided increased reliability. Parametric testing of the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal (weathered) was initiated this quarter. Initial analytical results from these tests show sulfur release and iron transformations as a function of test conditions and sampling location. A new supply of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal has been shipped and will be used to contrast behavior between the oxidized (weathered) and unoxidized Pittsburgh fuels. Finally, specific tasks for the next quarter have been identified and reported.

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--May 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-06-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  5. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--May 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-11-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  6. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-10-01

    The general goal of this project is to provide a fundamental understanding of deposition processes of flyash and pulverized coal particles in coal combustors and coal gasifiers. In the period of April 1 to June 30, 1996, further research progress was made. The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was applied to the dispersion and deposition analysis. The study of particle transport and deposition in a circular duct was completed and the major findings are summarized. A detailed model for particle resuspension process in a gas flow is developed. The new model accounts for the surface adhesion, surface roughness, as well as the structure of near wall turbulent flows. The model also accounts for all the relevant hydrodynamic forces and torques exerted on the particle attached to a surface. Progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  7. Burrowing mayflies as indicators of ecosystem health: Status of populations in western Lake Erie, Saginaw Bay and Green Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, T.A.; Bur, M.T.; Gorman, O.T.; Schaeffer, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Environment Canada are supporting the development of indicators of ecosystem health that can be used to report on progress in restoring and maintaining the Great Lakes ecosystem, as called for in the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between the United States and Canada. One indicator under development is based on burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia: Ephemeroptera: Ephemeridae). We sampled in western Lake Erie, Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron), and Green Bay (Lake Michigan) in spring 2001 at 117 stations covering about 1,870 km2 of lake bed, to determine the status of nymphal populations of Hexagenia, and to provide information that would further the technical development of an indicator of ecosystem health based on Hexagenia. In western Lake Erie, density and biomass of nymphs were generally highest on fine-grained substrate in offshore waters and were lower on coarser substrates in near shore waters. Nymphs were virtually absent from Saginaw Bay, where only one nymph was collected at 28 stations. Nymphs were collected at only 6 of 48 stations in Green Bay, and density and biomass were highest at the northern end of the bay. Polluted sediments are likely responsible for the absence or low density and biomass of nymphs observed on fine-grained substrates in western Lake Erie, Saginaw Bay, and Green Bay, all of which historically supported abundant populations.

  8. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1988--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  9. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells. Interim quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Prouse, D.; Elangovan, S.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L.

    1989-12-31

    During this quarter, progress was made at Ceramatec in seal development and conductivity measurements of YIG compositions. A creep test was completed on the porous/dense/porous triilayer. IGT provided a discussion on possible interconnect materials. The following tasks are reported on: cell design analysis, program liaison and test facility preparation, cell component fabrication/development, out-of-cell tests. 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  10. Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    Objective is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to study the microporous structure of coals. During this quarter, we have: performed a presaturation experiment on Wyodak subbituminous coal, monitored the progress of Xe adsorption in an anthracite, focusing on the changes observed in the external-surface adsorbed gas signal, used an echo sequence to obtain {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra of Blind Canyon hvAb coal, and improved and repeated the successive oxygen adsorption and desorption experiment on a microporous carbon.

  11. Fischer-tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1995-01-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following two tasks: (1) diffusion coefficients of F-T products in supercritical fluids; and (2) Fischer-Tropsch reaction related studies. The objectives for this quarter for task 1 were to measure molecular diffusion coefficients and effective diffusivities at the same conditions. The objectives for task 2 were to conduct two additional tests with the Ruhrchemie catalyst and a catalyst synthesized in our laboratory under supercritical conditions.

  12. Laboratory experiments to simulate CO{sub 2} ocean disposal. Draft technical progress report, August 15, 1995--February 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Masutani, S.M.

    1996-04-15

    The primary objective of this investigation is to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and the environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems. These strategies exploit the very large storage capacity of the deep ocean. In most systems proposed to date, CO{sub 2} extracted from a combustor is liquefied and transported to the deep ocean via a submerged conduit and discharged, usually as a jet. Hydrodynamic instability induces break-up of the jet into droplets which will be buoyant at depths above 3,000m. Dissolution of the rising droplets may be inhibited by a solid hydrate film that forms on the surface of the droplets. The complex mechanisms of liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up, droplet dispersion and coalescence, and dissolution in the deep ocean environment are not well understood. The present investigation seeks to address several of the major technical uncertainties by conducting two categories of laboratory tests which will: (1) characterize size spectra and velocities of the dispersed CO{sub 2} phase in the near-field of the atomized jet; and (2) estimate rates of mass transfer from single rising droplets of liquid CO{sub 2} encased in a thin hydrate shell.

  13. Extremely-low-frequency (ELF) communications system ecological monitoring program: Summary of 1990 progress. Technical report, 1 Jan-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Abromavage, M.M.; Zapotosky, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    A long term ecological monitoring program is being conducted to monitor for possible electromagnetic effects that operation of the U.S. Navy's ELF Communications System might have to resident biota and their ecological relationships. Monitoring studies were selected through a peer reviewed, competitive bidding process in mid-1982, and work on most studies began in late summer of that year. Preliminary activities of the program consisted of site selection, characterization of critical study aspects, and validation of assumptions made in original proposals. Data collection for studies at the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility (NRTF)-Clam Lake, Wisconsin was completed, as scheduled, during 1990. Data collection for studies at the NRTF-Republic, Michigan is planned to continue through 1992. This report summarizes the progress of the monitoring program during 1990. To date, investigators conclude that on effects have occurred on biota exposed to EM Fields produced by either a fully operational or an intermittently energized ELF transmitting produced by either a fully operational or an intermittently energized ELF transmitting facility.

  14. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13--December 12, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-12

    Eighteen 10-acre infill wells have been drilled and completed as part of the Field Demonstration phase of the project at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit (NRU). The fourteen producing wells are pumped-off and producing at stable rates. The four injection wells are completed and have been on injection for three to four weeks. Current Unit production is approximately 3,400 STBO/D, of which approximately 900 STBO/D is being produced from the 10-acre infill wells. A change in the Statement of Work has been approved so that additional 10-acre infill wells can be drilled and/or 20-acre producing wells can be converted to injection during the next quarter as budget constraints and rig availability allow. Technical progress is described for the quarter in many related areas: implementation of the field demonstration; reservoir characterization; reservoir management activities and performance analysis; reservoir simulation; and technology transfer.

  15. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T.

    1997-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-94MT94011 during the period September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 which covers the nineth quarter of the project. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. As the environmental regulations become more stringent, infrared burners are receiving increasing interests.

  16. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. First quarterly technical progress report, September 30, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1994-01-10

    The objective of this project is to increase the oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin, Utah, by demonstration of improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field. Low productivity is attributed to gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Tertiary Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This phase will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress is described for: outcrop studies of the Green River Formation; subsurface studies of the Bluebell field; and engineering studies of the reservoirs in the Green River Formation and the Wasatch Formation.

  17. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress for this quarter are discussed for subsurface and engineering studies.

  18. An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, Jesse

    1999-01-01

    OAK-B135 An Investigation of the Mechanism of IGA/SCC of Alloy 600 in Corrosion Accelerating Heated Crevice Environments. Technical Progress Report. This program focuses on understanding the mechanisms causing corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the effects of the proposed remedial measures. The crevice formed by the tube/tube support plate (T/TSP) intersection in a PWR steam generator is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities (referred to as hideout) in the steam generator water. The restricted mass transport in the small crevice volume prevents the species, which concentrate during the generation of steam, from quickly dispersing into the bulk water. The concentrated solutions in crevices have been a contributing cause of several forms of corrosion of steam generator tubes including intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC), pitting, and wastage.

  19. Environmental assessment of Oklahoma abandoned drilling and production sites and associated public education outreach activities. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, M.

    1996-01-29

    Oklahoma oil producers and royalty owners are taking part in the nation`s first oil industry funded environmental cleanup and education program. The program is administered by the Oklahoma Energy Resources Board (OERB), a state agency which was created by the Oklahoma Independent Energy Education and Marketing Act. The purpose of this project will be accomplished through two primary objectives: (1) Conduct environmental assessment of abandoned oil and gas drilling and production sites where no responsible owner can be found and transfer environmental technology to oil and gas operators; and (2) Provide a comprehensive public education/outreach program to increase public awareness of the importance of the Oklahoma oil (and gas) industry. Technical progress is reported for these tasks.

  20. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-07-31

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from April 1 - June 30, 1996.

  1. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 4, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-11-06

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 29, 1995.

  2. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 2, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-05-05

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 to March 31, 1995.

  3. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  4. Use of corn-distiller's solubles from an ethanol plant for aquaculture. Semi-annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.C.; Lewis, W.M.

    1982-03-12

    It appears reasonable that potential exists for using corn distiller's solubles for the controlled production of aquatic organisms (aquaculture). Results of initial laboratory studies which have focused on assessing the short-term effects of various concentrations of corn distiller's solubles on water quality and aquatic organisms (fish, macrocrustaceans, microcrustaceans, and algae) are described. These results, coupled with results of studies currently in progress, will be used to identify a suitable quantity of corn distiller's solubles for daily application to the earthen ponds that will be used in the field production trials.

  5. Transport function and reaction mechanism of vacuolar H{sup +}- translocation inorganic pyrophosphatase. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    These studies describe progress made in the definition of the transport capabilities and reaction mechanism of the V-PPase through biochemical analyses of native membrane vesicles isolated from etiolated hypocotyls of Vigna radiate and by reconstitution of the purified enzyme into artificial liposomes; delineation of the ligand requirements of the V-PPase; and the delineation of sequence motifs implicated in substrate-binding through the development of strategies for selective cleavage of the M{sub r} 66,000 polypeptide and the mapping of covalently modified peptide fragments.

  6. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1994-05-02

    Progress during the second quarter of a three-year study was made in two areas: Coal selection and characterization, combustor modifications and preliminary testing. Potential sources for coal have been identified and an attempt will be made to use the same coals as a similar doe study. Advances have continued in our SEM-based analytical techniques. Modifications to an existing reactor system have been initiated. A new coal feeder has been installed and tested. Finally, specific tasks for the next quarter have been identified and reported.

  7. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility. January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported in developing technology for steam bottoming cycle of the coal-fired MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. During this period, no testing was scheduled in the DOE Coal-Fired Flow Facility. The report covers facilities modification and maintenance in preparation for a 225 hour POC test that is scheduled for early next quarter. The modifications to the dry ESP to replace the electrodes with smaller diameter wires is discussed. Continued work on the rotary vacuum filter, which is designed to separate the more soluble potassium carbonate from the potassium sulfate and fly ash, is reported. Environmental activities for the quarter are summarized.

  8. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology: Final quarterly technical progress no. 2, 1 July - 30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Toseland, B.A.; Tischer, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  9. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-24

    This document contains the third quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale flotation circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan, as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelve-month project schedule. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I -- Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing; Phase II -- ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project was performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through June, 1993, and was the major focus of the project. It involved testing of the continuous 200--300 lb/hr. circuit; and Phase III -- Project Finalization: The project finalization phase is occurring from July through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and involves finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This Third Quarterly Technical Progress Report principally summarizes the results from the benchscale testing with the second coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Coal), which occurred in April through June, 1993. It also contains preliminary economic evaluations that will go into the Final Report, as well as the plan for the final reporting task.

  10. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  11. Synthesis of oxygenate products for high volume fuels applications. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-08

    The objective of this project is to develop high yield syntheses of oxygenate products that are liquid at room temperature using as starting materials dimethy ether (DME) or methanol. The identified products include: Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC), 1,1-Dimethoxyethane (DMOE), C{sub 2}{sup +} Alcohols/Ethers (C{sub 2}AE). The technical strategy is outlined below: (A) Synthesis of DMC via oxidative carbonylation of DME instead of methanol. Since this synthesis would not co-produce water as a byproduct, there is a potential for very high DME conversions in contrast to the low (ca 20%) conversions obtained in conventional plants. Technical emphasis will be placed on development of a supported copper catalyst with a capability for cleavage of DME into its chemisorbed organic moieties. (B) Synthesis of 1,1-dimethoxymethane (DMOE) from acetylene/CO/H{sub 2} process streams obtained from commercial methane oxidative pyrolysis processes. In the overall processing scheme the syngas would be converted to DME. The wet acetylene stream would be partially condensed to retain an equivalent of water and then condensed with DME to produce EMOE. (C) Direct conversion of DME or DME/methanol to ethanol/propanol or their methyl ethers. Under the influence of functionalized alcohol condensation catalysts developed exclusively at Amoco it should be possible to achieve direct conversion of dimethyl ether (or methanol) to ethanol/propanol and/or the methyl ethers of these alcohols. Although this reaction is not currently known, a combination of key catalyst components from identified systems should result in a DME conversion catalyst to C{sub 2}+ oxygenates. (D) Reaction of DME or acetylene with synthesis gas (CO/H{sub 2}) or methanol. A variety of catalysts will be tested for conversion of acetylene/CO/H{sub 2} or acetylene/methanol to propylene and conversion of DME/CO/H{sub 2} or DME/methanol to dimenthyoxymethane (DMM) and/or other oxygenates.

  12. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 5, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-06

    Work continued as planned and scheduled. Total expenditures are below budget. Task 2 is complete. Task 3 is complete except for R, D & T Plan -- Phase II. Task 4 is currently slightly behind schedule but is projected to finish on or ahead of schedule. Task 5 was started early. The following major deliverables were issued: (1) Technical Paper for `93 International Joint Power Generation Conference. (2) Technical Paper for IEA Second International Conference, and (3) Topical Report by EAR on Air Toxics. Subtask 4.1 -- Engineering Analysis in support of the CGU design is nearly complete and partial design specifications are being employed in Task 5. Subtask 4.2 -- Experimental Research efforts consisted of the first series of Drop Tube Furnace tests. Data is being analyzed. Subtask 4.3 -- Modeling work to data resulted in input files for Boiler Simulation Facility and flow pattern convergence was attained. Particle combustion is the next step. This work will be reported on at the next Quarterly Project Review meeting. Task 5 was started early to facilitate Task 6 schedule and quality. Integration of the SNO{sub x} Hot Scheme into the boiler and turbine/feedwater train was optimized and design work on the boiler and ``backend`` is underway. Cost estimating assumptions and methodology were discussed at length and finalized. The RAM analysis is nearly complete. BOP engineering is in progress. No changes to the Work Plan are anticipated for the next quarter.

  13. Oxidation of phenolics in supercritical water. Combined quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1995--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Over the past two quarters, our work has focused on three main areas. The first area of interest involved a reexamination of the rate laws that were formed in past quarters. A possible error was discovered for the analytical methods used in the o-cresol oxidation study and the data were corrected, yielding a new rate equation. The data for hydroxybenzaldehydes were studied again, this time as a system of parallel oxidation and thermolysis reactions. The second area in which progress was made was the study of the thermolysis of nitrophenols and dihydroxybenzenes in supercritical water. These investigations were needed to determine the effect that pyrolysis or hydrolysis had on our previous supercritical water oxidation experiments. Thirdly, we have continued to investigate the use of molecular orbital theory in the determination reactivity indices. A reactivity index, such as the enthalpy of formation, may be used in a structure-reactivity relationship to summarize the kinetics for the oxidation of phenolics in supercritical water. Progress in each of these areas is summarized.

  14. Rate inhibition of steam gasification by adsorbed hydrogen. Technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    Our efforts over the past three months have emphasized the following: (1) the continued construction and assembly of the gasification reactors and associated hardware; and (2) preparation and characterization of the chars to be used in the gasification studies. The construction of the experimental system is progressing smoothly and should be completed within one month. Modifications to the old high-pressure reactor are now complete, and the Inconel sample holder has been fabricated and assembled. The ceramic tubes which make up the high-temperature, low pressure reactor have been assembled, including cementing of the required quartz frits into place. All components of the reaction systems, including fittings, are now in hand and final assembly of all components is nearing completion. The final design of the system is somewhat more complex than originally proposed, but offers in return greater flexibility of operation, more precise flow control and switching of flows, and greater operator safety. Preparation of the Saran and coal chars to be used in the experimental studies is progressing well. Saran char is prepared by pyrolysis of Dow MA 127 Saran resin in nitrogen at 900{degrees}C for 30 min (heatup rate of 10{degrees}C/min). We conduct the pyrolysis in a horizontal quartz tube reactor enclosed in a Lindberg tube furnace which is controlled by an Omega 2010 linear temperature controller. The Saran resin is placed in shallow alumina boats.

  15. Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, 1 December 1979-29 February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Reeves, G. B.

    1980-03-20

    The component technology base required for improved industrial gas turbine conversion efficiency is discussed. Specific goals are to demonstrate the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling technologies required to achieve industrial gas turbine efficiencies of 34 to 36% simple cycle and 45 to 48% in combined cycle operation while reducing the number of compressor and turbine parts 80% over state-of-the-art units. The approach involves combining some of the most advanced aircraft turbine cooling and high-pressure compressor technology with the simplicity and ruggedness required of industrial engines to achieve not only improved performance, but also increased durability and low initial cost. The program currently consists of two phases. Phase I, which has been completed, included the conceptual definition of an industrial gas turbine capable of meeting the above goals and the aerothermodynamic designs of compressor and turbine component test rigs. Phase II, which is in progress, consists of component validation testing of the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling designs which evolved in Phase I. During this quarter, work continued on Phase II, Task III - Compressor Rig Assembly and Test. Assembly of the compressor rig has been completed and final preparation of the rig for transporting to the test facility is in progress.

  16. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence. Technical progress report, September 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  17. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). Technical progress report & continuation proposal, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.D.

    1997-10-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the CAMOS to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of CAMOS activities from February 1, 1993 to January 31, 1994. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier progress reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the CAMOS study on the field that is being conducted by the Panel on the Future of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (FAMOS). During the above period, CAMOS has continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of CAMOS has been presented in the recently-published report Research Briefing on Selected Opportunities in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences. That report has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government as well as the community-at-large. In keeping with its charge to monitor the health of the field, CAMOS launched a study designed to highlight future directions of the field.

  18. Analysis/control of in-bed tube erosion phenomena in the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system. Technical progress report No. 4, [July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong W.

    1993-11-01

    This technical report Summarizes the research work performed and progress achieved during the period of July 1, 1993 to September 30, 1993. Design and fabrication of the electrostatic impact probe were continued for measuring particle-tube collision frequency in the bench-scale FBC model. To verify the working principle of the electrostatic impact probe and to establish the reliability of probe readings, several readings were performed. The number of impact particles can be conveniently read from the frequency counter by the impact probe, which was reproducible and consistent data. The erosion measurement was conducted under different superficial fluidizing velocity in the bench-scale FBC model. Results of specific weight loss versus excess air velocity (air velocity above the minimum fluidization velocity) show the dominant effect of the fluidizing velocity on the tube erosion. The project has been progressing well. Measurement of the particle-tube collision frequency will be conducted under different tube location by the electrostatic impact probe. Instrumentation for the measurement of the in-bed tube erosion will be continued under various operating conditions. In addition to that, the relationship between the results of particle-tube collision frequency and the measurement of in-bed tube erosion will be predicted.

  19. Investigation of heat transfer and combustion in the advanced fluidized bed combustor (FBC). Technical progress report No. 1, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    This technical report summarizes the research work performed and progress achieved during the period of October 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993. The newly-concept of exploratory fluidized bed based on the integrating the advantages of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) and cyclonic combustor was designed to study the gas and particle flows and to develop control techniques for gas-particle flow in the FBC. The test chamber was made of transparent acrylic tube with 6in. I.D. to facilitate visual observation. Eight nozzles (s) were made at the freeboard in different levels to provide secondary air, which will generate strong swirling flow field. The progress of this project has been on schedule. Design and fabrication of the exploratory cold test model will be continued with an arrangement of the auxiliary system. After completion of the design/fabrication of the system, the system test will be conducted for the overall system. Instrumentations for the gas/particle flow will be arranged with the auxiliary system. The electrostatic impact probe and associated signal processing units will be designed and fabricated for measuring particle mass flux.

  20. Analysis/control of in-bed tube erosion phenomena in the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system. Technical progress report No. 3, [April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong W.

    1993-07-01

    This technical report summarizes the research work performed and progress achieved during the period of during the period of April 1, 1993 to June 30, 1993. The erosion test was conducted in the bench-scale FBC model along with the preparation of the test particles/tube specimens. The effect of the tube-to-distributor (T-to-D) clearance was discussed on the tube specific weight loss for low, medium, and high superficial velocities. Electrostatic impact probes for measuring the particle-surface collision frequency were designed to verify the some of the measurement and to identify the primary erosion points. The erosion models were briefly to understand the phenomena of in-bed erosion. The project has been progressing well. Instrumentation for the erosion-measuring will be continued: to measure the tube weight loss under different operating conditions. Development of the electrostatic probes will be continued and implemented for measuring the particle-tube collision frequency in the bench-scale FBC model.

  1. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.; Ershaghi, I.; Davies, D.; Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J.

    1995-07-28

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  2. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.

    1995-01-10

    This is the eighth quarterly technical progress report. During this quarter the project was initiated, after transfer via a novation agreement, at the Colorado School of Mines. Project initiation activities have included: set up of catalyst synthesis apparatus; training on x-ray diffraction and FTIR apparatus; set up of catalyst testing reactor; set up of reactor product analytical systems; and set up of method development for measuring catalyst acidity via FTIR. At the end of this quarter significant progress had been made towards completion of these initiation activities. Several catalyst syntheses have been performed and the catalysts characterized by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The catalyst testing reactor system is operational. Reactor product analysis system is nearing completion. Initiation of this system was delayed by the unavailability of a Valco valve which has just recently arrived. Set up of the in-situ FTIR cell for catalyst acidity studies has begun. In this report the results of several catalyst syntheses are reported along with characterization results. In particular, impregnation of vanadyl pyrophosphate with potassim nitrate dramatically reduced the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Such groups may be important in the non-selective, total oxidation of hydrocarbons. Also, preliminary experimental results on FTIR spectra of adsorbed pyridine are presented. It is shown that pyridine adsorbed on the catalyst surface can be easily observed by the diffuse reflectance IR technique. We plan to apply this technique to measurement of the acid site strength of surfaces modified with promoters.

  3. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, May 15, 1996--July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report very briefly summarizes study results and includes an experimental plan developed for the fundamental study of heat transfer in thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers. The study will investigate the influence of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the thermosyphon flow side of the heat exchanger, and the influence of the flow rate on the forced flow side of the heat exchanger. Detailed temperature, flow rate, and pressure data will be obtained for four, seven, and nine tube-in-shell heat exchanger designs. Correlations will be developed for the heat transfer and friction coefficients, and a semi-empirical model will be developed to predict the performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heaters.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of granular flows. Technical progress report for the quarter ending June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    In this project, the authors report the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to granular flows. In particular, flows of granular materials in a partially filled, horizontal, rotating cylinder (rotating drum or a kiln), have been studied by NMR to yield not only the velocity and concentration fields, but also the diffusions coefficient components which are related to the velocity fluctuations. The velocity is measured from phase images whereas the concentration is measured from amplitude images by an imaging sequence containing flow compensation plus appropriate corrections for intensity attenuation caused by diffusion. Experiments with two solid phases yielding different NMR signals can be used to study mixing/demixing phenomena such as segregation; the authors have imaged radial segregation of a mixture of mustard seeds with glass beads of identical sizes but different densities. Progress to date is described briefly.

  5. Development of a $10/kW bipolar separator plate. Technical quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The authors have identified a moldable graphite blend separator plate material, have molded complex shape bipolar separator plates, have tested the molded plate properties and function in single fuel cells, and have designed a conceptual rapid manufacturing line. In this quarter, the project received a three-month interim funding period to continue progress while the proposal is in DOE review. Thus, this fourth quarterly report is submitted in place of the originally scheduled final report for this project. All of the objectives of this project have been accomplished. Specifically, the electrical, chemical, and physical properties of the molded separator plates have met or exceeded the DOE specifications. Performance and endurance tests of the molded plates in single cells have shown comparable performance to the state-of-art machined graphite separator plates. The DOE cost target of $10 per kW appears to be achievable with the low cost composite materials.

  6. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed and used to analyze the transport and dispersion of particles in a recirculating flow region. The model for resuspension of particles from surfaces in a gas flow is also further developed; it accounts for the surface adhesion as well as hydrodynamic forces and torques. It includes effects of the structure of near wall turbulent flows as well as surface roughness. In addition, a direct numerical simulation procedure for analyzing the particle removal process in turbulent gas flows is also developed. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows is being extended to include the effect of particle rebound. Further progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  7. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory for the period January 1, 1980 through March 31, 1980. A series of experiments was conducted with three western coals to study the relationship between coal properties and liquefaction behavior. All three coals were low in iron (0.2 to 0.4%, dry coal basis) and processing in both the SRC I and SRC II modes does not appear to be feasible at normal conditions without added catalyst. Adding 1 to 2% pyrite to the feed slurry increased oil yields considerably while reducing SRC and IOM yields and improved operability. Product quality was also generally improved by the catalyst. Operability and oil yields were generally found to be better at 450/sup 0/C than at 465/sup 0/C.

  8. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

  9. High resolution, low cost solar cell contact development. Quarterly technical progress and schedule report, September 28, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of the contract covers the development and evaluation of forming solar cell collector grid contacts by the MIDFILM process. This is a proprietary process developed by the Ferro Corporation which is a subcontractor for the program. The MIDFILM process attains line resolution characteristics of photoresist methods with processing related to screen printing. The surface to be processed is first coated with a thin layer of photoresist material. Upon exposure to ultraviolet light through a suitable mask, the resist in the non-pattern area cross-links and becomes hard. The unexposed pattern areas remain tacky. The conductor material is applied in the form of a dry mixture of metal and frit particles which adhere to the tacky pattern area. The assemblage is then fired to ash the photopolymer and sinter the fritted conductor powder. Effort was concentrated during this period on the establishment, optimization and identification of problem areas of the MIDFILM process. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  10. Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, N.R.; Ward, J.S.; Brower, K.R.; Cather, S.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to show how gas can flow from the rock matrix to natural or induced fracures and be commercially produced. Flow of gas within the rock matrix has been shown to be largely controlled by sheet-like pores at grain boundaries, which are pressure sensitive. In this quarterly report, progress is reported in the following areas of advanced core analysis of low permeability gas sands: (1) surface area measurements; (2) helium porosimetry; (3) comparison of permeabilities for preserved cores and for cores subjected to drying; (4) pore space and fractures as related to diagenesis of multiwell sandstones; and (5) imbibition behavior of tight sands. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility: October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Progress is reported on a multitask contract to develop technology for steam bottoming cycle of a Combined Cycle MHD Steam Power Plant. The report describes a 314 hour proof-of-concept (POC) test completed during the quarter. Results include secondary combustion and effect of potassium on the light-off temperature, fouling of heat transfer surfaces, particulate clean-up device performance and advanced diagnostic system performance. Test results on ceramic materials and tubes directed toward the development of a high temperature recuperative air heater are summarized. Results of data analysis of previous tests that are reported include the continuing analysis of tube materials that were exposed to 1500 and 2000 hours of eastern coal fired operation during the previously completed 2000 hour POC test series on eastern, high sulfur coal.

  12. A computational model for coal transport and combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1991-12-31

    During the last three months, considerable progress has been made in formulation of the thermodynamically consistent rate dependent model for turbulent two-phase flows. The basic governing equations were derived and the case of a simple shear flow was also analyzed. Preliminary comparisons with the available experimental data were also performed. The thermodynamical approach was successfully formulated for developing a stress transport model for granular flows. The appropriate constitutive equations were derived and it was shown that the model contains the existing kinetic theory results as special limiting cases. The formulation also allows for the possible rotation of the frame of reference. Using a kinetic-based model which includes frictional losses, several rapid granular shear flows including Couette and gravity flows were analyzed. Preliminary comparisons with experimental data were also performed. The experimental setup for the simple shear flow device is being designed. The procedure for constructing the device is being studied.

  13. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  14. Exploratory research on solvent-refined-coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1980. Six coals and a coal blend, representing the Interior, Rocky Mountain, Eastern and Northern Great Plains Provinces, were processed in the SRC I and SRC II modes to study the relationship between coal properties and liquefaction behavior. Disposable catalysts and specific compounds were added to Loveridge, Kaiparowits and Blacksville No. 2 coals during SRC II mode liquefaction. Kentucky 9/14, Indiana V and Loveridge coals were processed at short residence times (4 to 9 minutes) in the SRC I mode to evaluate the effects of temperature, pressure, residence time and disposable catalyst addition. Finally, coal from the Powhatan No. 1 Mine was evaluated as a feedstock for major coal liquefaction facilities.

  15. Dual cure low-VOC coating process: Phase 3. Semi-annual technical progress report, October 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    Objective of Phase 3 is to complete proof-of-principle testing in full-scale systems of the dual cure photocatalyst technology developed in earlier phases. Phase 3 commercial applications are aerospace topcoats, aerospace primers, and solventless manufacture of tape backings. Progress was made in improving urethane/acrylate formulation for aerospace topcoats, particularly in reverse impact, initial gloss, and loss retention during accelerated weathering. Formulations have now been developed which meet all initial criteria; the formulation was optimized. Aerospace primer formulations based on epoxy/flexibilizer systems were evaluated. Because of cure consistency problems and the increased need for non-chromated primers, work on aerospace primer system was de-emphasized to allow greater effort on development and commercialization of aerospace topcoat. Work on solventless backing saturants for electrical tape backings has been completed; optimal dual cure resin formulations have been used in preparing complete tape constructions.

  16. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1995-07-31

    Progress during the seventh quarter of a three-year study was made in four task areas: (1) analysis of coals, (2) improvements to the reactor system, (3) parametric testing of the target coals, and (4) analysis of samples from the combustion tests. A problem with our analysis system was discovered and corrected. Recent analyses of the Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal (after repulverizing) were redone and results are reported. A new design of the deposit probe and an air preheater were added this quarter. Parametric testing of the Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 coal continued this quarter. Analytical results from these tests show sulfur release and iron transformations as a function of test conditions and sampling location. Deposit samples were also collected from the Pittsburgh coal at three different stoichiometric ratios. Operating conditions appeared to have a significant effect on deposit formation. Finally, specific tasks for the next quarter have been identified and reported.

  17. Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Hogg, R.; Fonseca, A.

    1994-06-01

    The main objectives of the project are to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20% moisture. The program consists of three phases, namely: model development; laboratory studies; and field testing. The Pennsylvania State University is developing a theoretical model for hyperbaric filtration systems, whereas the University of Kentucky is conducting experimental studies to investigate fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction and application of high pressure filter in fine coal dewatering. The optimum filtration conditions identified in Phase 1 and 2 will be tested in a Consol Inc. coal preparation plant using an Andritz Ruthner portable hyperbaric filtration unit. Progress to date is described.

  18. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report No. 10, January 1997--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1997-02-28

    In previous progress reports, we reported our study on the proposed mechanism for the formation of chlorinated organics during combustion, in which molecular chlorine is thought to be the key starting material. The objective of this quarter of study was to quantitatively test the inhibiting effect of SO{sub 2} on the formation of Cl{sub 2} during the combustion of MSW. The experiments were conducted under conditions close to those employed in the AFBC system. The principle analytical technique used for identification of the products from these experiments was GC/MS system. The results indicate that the production of Cl{sub 2} decreases when the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the gaseous mixture increases.

  19. Electrolytic degradation of lithia-stabilized. beta. ''-alumina. Technical progress report, July 1, 1980-May 15, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Virkar, A.V.

    1981-06-01

    Progress is described in the following areas; (1) effect of Se and Pb on the sodium/..beta..''/ sodium cell studies; (2) transformation toughening of ..beta..''-alumina with small additions of unstabilized zirconia; (3) theoretical development of the model; (4) determination of current and potential distribution by the conformal transformation method; (5) determination of critical current density; and (6) fabrication of Ag-..beta..''-alumina. Important findings include (1) additions of selenium to Na/..beta..''alumina/Na cells drastically lowers the cell resistance and its temperature dependency is also altered; (2) ..beta..''-alumina can be significantly strengthened by the addition of ZrO/sub 2/; (3) experimentally determined i/sub Cr/ is in the range of 10 to 20 amps/cm/sup 2/; and (4) current concentration factor calculations have shown that the cracks in the center of a nonwetted area could be deleterious. Experimental evidence has been found. (WHK)

  20. Controlling incipient oxidation of pyrite for improved rejection. Technical progress report for the ninth quarter, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.

    1995-07-01

    The major objectives of this work are (1) to determine the Eh-pH conditions under which pyrite is stable, (2) to determine the mechanism of the initial stages of pyrite oxidation, and (3) to determine if the semi-conducting properties of pyrite effects its oxidation behavior. It is known that moderate oxidation of pyrite produces a hydrophobic surface product. This hydrophobic product makes it extremely difficult to depress pyrite in coal flotation circuits. The eventual objective of this work is to prevent pyrite oxidation in order to better depress pyrite in coal flotation circuits. It has been shown that by holding the potential of pyrite at its stable potential during fracture, pyrite undergoes neither oxidation nor reduction. It has also been found that fresh pyrite surfaces created by fracture in an electrochemical begin to oxidize at potentials that are about 200 mV more negative than the potentials reported in the literature for pyrite oxidation. This report period, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies were continued. As discussed in the seventh quarterly progress report, the impedance of pyrite does not show the characteristics expected for either semi-conducting or metallic electrodes. Additional studies were conducted to confirm the anomalous impedance behavior. For this purpose, freshly fractured surfaces were progressively polished on 600 and 1,200 grit silicon carbide paper, and with 0.3 {micro} {alpha}-alumina and 0.05 {micro} {gamma}-alumina micropolish. Polishing is known to introduce defects in the lattice structure of semi-conducting electrodes and it was anticipated that the defects would effect the interfacial capacitance.

  1. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the second program quarter from October 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has co-ordinated funding for Task 1 from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program (SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2--8. Progress in all tasks are reported. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. An existing unit at IGT was modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures (>1300{degree}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2--5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD (thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD (flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been installed and calibrated. A total of seventy runs on MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, ZrS{sub 2} catalysts as well as quartz wool were performed. As high as 61% H{sub 2}S conversion was observed.

  2. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-06-14

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern US coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR). The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The technical research was initiated on October 1, 1992, and a detailed work plan and work schedule were developed. During this reporting period, research was conducted to evaluate the liberation characteristics of various pyrite samples, to determine the electrochemical reactions that influence the hydrophobicity of pyrite, and to examine the potential use of electrochemical methods for controlling the flotation and depression of pyrite.

  3. Studies of granular flow down an inclined chute. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 June 1992--12 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, D.M.

    1992-12-01

    The driving force for the granular flow in the experimental region is gravity. The vehicle which re-circulates this flow is an 46 cm Corra-Trough belt conveyor manufactured by Buck-El, Inc. A drawing of this conveyor is shown in Figure 3. Entrance and exit chambers were designed to route the flow between the chute and the conveyor. Both devices had to be flexible because the position of the chute relative to the conveyor changes each time the angle of the chute is changed. Finally, to control the entering flow more accurately, an adjustable gate apparatus was constructed. The first step in setting up the chute is angle adjustment. The granular material used in the experiments described in this report are technical quality glass spheres, three millimeters in diameter. These beads are produced by Cataphote, Inc. Cataphote lists the tolerances for the 3mm spheres at {plus_minus}0.2 mm. The average mass of a single bead was measured to be 0.034 g which gives an average measured specific gravity of the glass at 2.42 g/cm{sup 3}.

  4. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  5. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Third quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-29

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through December 1995, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The overall objectives of the project are to: Determine the effects of operating time on the characteristics of the recirculating medium in a continuous integrated processing circuit, and subsequently, the sensitivity of cyclone separation performance to the quality of the recirculating medium; and determine the technical and economic feasibility of various unit operations and systems in optimizing the separation and recovery of the micronized magnetite from the coal products. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  6. Advanced photovoltaic concentrator cells. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, 1 December 1979-29 February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, S.W.; Yang, H.T.; Yang, J.J.; Harris, J.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes second quarter activities for a project aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility of advanced high efficiency concentrator solar converters. The goal of the program is to achieve 30% conversion efficiency with a converter operating at 30/sup 0/C under 500 to 1000 SUN AM2 illumination and 25% conversion efficiency with a converter operating at 150/sup 0/C under 500 to 1000 SUN AM2 illumination. The approach is to fabricate two cell, non-lattice matched, monolithic stacked converters using optimum pairs of cells having bandgaps in the range of 1.6 to 1.7 eV and 0.95 to 1.1 eV. The high bandgap cells are to be fabricated using MOCVD or LPE to produce the needed AlGaAs layers of optimized composition, thickness and doping to produce high performance, heteroface homojunction devices. The low bandgap cells are to be similarly fabricated from AlGaSb(As) compositions by LPE. These subcells are then to be joined into a monolithic structure by an appropriate thermal bonding technique which will also form the needed transparent intercell ohmic contact (IOC) between the two subcells. The activities this quarter have been largely focused on the development and study of low bandgap cell structures and attempts to develop suitable techniques for the thermal bonding operation.

  7. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  8. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

  9. GT-MHR COMMERCIALIZATION STUDY TECHNICAL PROGRESS AND COST MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 1 THROUGH NOVEMBER 30, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    SHENOY,AS

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 A copy of the original Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the US and the US for the HFR-EU2 (formally MHR-1) fuel irradiation test was sent to DOE-HQ. The startup of the HFR-EU2 test will likely be delayed until September 2004 depending on completion and check out of the fission gas sweep loop. The initial core nuclear design study using advanced fuel was completed for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This study assessed the nuclear effects of replacing the silicon carbide layer of the TRISO particle with a zirconium carbide layer (TRIZO particle). The study determined that zirconium behaves like a non-burnable poison and to achieve fuel cycle lengths equivalent to those with TRISO fuel, the fixed burnable poison would have to be adjusted. The core nuclear design study is documented in report General Atomics report number PC-000514. A test plan was completed that describes a series of screening tests to provide the technical basis for selecting and qualifying an advanced coated-particle fuel for the VHTR. The test plan is documented in General Atomics report number PC-000510.

  10. Evaluation and test program of a 50-ton-per-day Lantz converter. Second quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The evaluation and test program of a 50-ton-per-day Lantz converter pyrolysis process for producing pyrolytic gas from municipal solid waste was begun in September 1982 at the Marcal Paper Mills plant in Elmwood Park, New Jersey. The Lantz converter, the drier, shredder, moving floor, conveyer, char ram, boiler and other auxiliary equipment were installed and tested by the Lantz America group in a specially constructed building on the Marcal site. During the past three months the plant has been run almost every day, originally using waste paper as the feed stock and then switching to municipal solid waste. Some unexpected technical difficulties were encountered especially with the control system of the Cleaver Brooks boiler and as of this date all of the steam produced in the boiler has just been vented to the atmosphere. Thus the overall operation of the plant is still being debugged and the plant has not been run for periods of more than a few hours at a time. Hopefully a series of sustained, long time runs will be initiated next month so that both meaningful test data can be taken and the steam produced from the pyrolytic gas can be sold to Marcal.

  11. Application of CIS of high-efficiency PV module fabrication. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Basol, B.; Kapur, V.; Leidholm, C.

    1997-08-01

    This is the Phase II Annual Technical Report of the subcontract titled {open_quotes}Application of CIS to High Efficiency PV Module fabrication.{close_quotes} The general objectives of the program are the development of a novel, non-vacuum process for CIS film deposition, optimization of the various layers forming the CIS device structure, and fabrication of high efficiency submodules. The specific goals of the project are the development of 13% efficient small area cells and 10% efficient submodules using a novel, low-cost CIS deposition approach. During this research period, the authors concentrated their efforts on three different areas of research. Within the National CIS Partnership Program, they participated in the {open_quotes}substrate/Mo interactions{close_quotes} working group and investigated issues such as Na diffusion from the soda-lime glass substrate into the Mo layers and CIS films. It was determined that the Na content within the Mo layers was not a strong function of the nature of the Mo film. However, diffusion through the Mo layers was found to be a function of the Mo film characteristics as well as a very strong function of the CIS growth process. Na was found to be on the grain boundaries in Mo and CIS layers.

  12. Lake Powell

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Lake Powell     View Larger Image ... (14.42 mb)   This true-color image over Lake Powell was acquired by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late March 2000. Lake Powell was formed with the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, on the ...

  13. CONNECTICUT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named lakes in Connecticut. It is a polygon Shapefile that includes all lakes that are named on the U.S. Geologicial Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut, plus other officially named lakes i...

  14. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...   View Larger Image Lake Eyre is a large salt lake situated between two deserts in one of Australia's driest regions. ... the effect of sunglint at the nadir camera view angle. Dry, salt encrusted parts of the lake appear bright white or gray. Purple areas have ...

  15. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    During this quarter, significant progress has been made in the following, fronts of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: 1. Design of the special 300-ton coal log compaction machine was completed, Furthermore, much progress has been made in the design of the system needed to feed coal into the coal log compaction machine, and the design of the system to remove logs automatically as soon as they are compacted. 2. Coal mixtures containing different amounts of moisture were compacted into 1.91- inch-diameter coal logs rapidly (in 6 seconds). It was found that for the Mettiki coal tested, the optimum moisture is around 8%. Under the test conditions (room temperature and 3% binders), the rapidly compacted coal logs with 8% moisture had less than 4% weight loss in 350 cycles of circulation. 3. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of using wall lubricants to enhance coal log quality. Both calcium sterarate and MoS{sub 2} were found to be effective. 4. It was found that when the interior of a mold is not cleaned after coal log has been compacted, the coal mixture film clinging to the wall hardens in time and form a hard crust which affects the quality of the next log to be produced. But, if the second log is produced immediately after the first, no hard crust is formed and the quality of the second log, is not affected. 5. Coal logs made with the coal crushed by the Gundlach Company were found to be better than coal logs made with the coal crushed by the CPRC`s hammer mill. 7. A 320-ft-long, 6-inch-diameter coal log pipeline test facility was constructed in Rolla during this period. 8. Completed the simulation of an 8-inch-diameter, 20-mile-long coal log pipeline recirculating loop driven by a pump bypass. 9. Continued improvement was accomplished in the hydraulic model of HCP and CLP to predict pressure drop and capsule velocity for both single capsules and capsule train. Also, work has started to extend the analysis to sloped pipelines.

  16. Precombustion removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-30

    This project involves the development of an optimized, bench-scale processing circuit capable of efficiently removing trace elements from run-of-mine coals. The optimized circuit will be developed using characterization data obtained from detailed washability studies and release analyses tests conducted with several eastern US coals. The optimized circuit will incorporate a variety of conventional and advanced coal cleaning processes which are believed to be the most cost-effective and commercially viable. The coal products from the optimized circuit will be further treated with complexing agents specifically designed to extract organometallic trace elements that are difficult to remove by physical cleaning operations. Finally, innovative bioremediation schemes will be investigated as a means of controlling the release of trace elements from the process waste streams. Emphasis has been placed on the development of a processing circuit which (i) maximizes the rejection of trace elements, (ii) minimizes the production of coal fines which are costly to process and less marketable, and (iii) minimizes the downstream impacts of the process waste streams on the environment. During the past quarter, the project work plan and all associated technical/management reports were successfully approved by the COR (Subtask 1.1--Work Plan Development). Test work is now actively moving forward on several different fronts. In Subtask 2.2--Coal Procurement, arrangements have now been completed to procure/ship the three run-of-mine coals required to complete the project. All steps necessary to properly prepare and store these coals have been made under Subtask 2.3-- Preparation and Storage. For the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, initial characterization studies have been initiated under Subtask 3.1-- Preliminary Analyses and Subtask 3.2--Washability Analysis.

  17. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The project goal is to develop an advanced coal beneficiation technology that can achieve high recovery of the parent coal`s calorific value, while maximizing pyritic sulfur removal. Coal cleaning is to be accomplished by physical means incorporating an advanced form of cycloning or gravimetric process. Evaluation of different media types and their attendant systems for recovery, concentration, and regeneration is to be completed. Phase I, media evaluation, now completed involved a paper study and a number of laboratory tests to eliminate all but the best media options. Phase II, media testing, involved detailed testing of the more promising media and separators in a closed-loop pilot facility circuit. In the final phase, Phase III, it is proposed to test individual components of the process using the optimum medium, separator, and medium recovery systems(s) selected in prior phases. Some of the highlights for this reporting period are: (1) Outomec conducted a second set of hot water wash experiments. These hot water experiments, using prefiltered medium, yielded a significant improvement in calcium nitrate recovery, and showed a consistent decrease in residuum calcium nitrate with increasing wash rate. (2) Several alternatives were investigated for potential reduction in thermal regeneration process costs. Culligan, Spin Tek, and Rochem, manufacturers of reverse osmosis or ultra filtration systems were contacted. Rochem ultimately performed laboratory experiments. Starting with a dilute medium density of 1.07, the Rochem laboratory system achieved a density of 1.11. A density of 1.22 sg would be commercially attainable. This is less than the target medium density of 1.35, meaning that if their system were utilized, some thermal means would still be required to regenerate medium to operating density. (3) Management and Technical Systems initiated work on a preliminary economic study and will submit a report during the next quarterly reporting period.

  18. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, A.H.

    1995-06-28

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

  19. A novel carbon-based process for flue gas cleanup. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Silveston, P.L.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the preliminary technical and economic feasibility of a novel carbon-based process for removal of at least 95% SO{sub 2} and at least 75% NO{sub x} from coal combustion flue gas. In the process, flue gas leaving the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is passed through a trickle bed of activated carbon catalyst employing a periodic flush of low strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2} is oxidized to SO{sub 3} and removed as medium strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2}-free flue gas is then mixed with NH{sub 3}, and the NO{sub x} in the gas is subjected to selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to N{sub 2} over a fixed bed of activated carbon catalyst. In the previous three quarters, a detailed project management plan was prepared describing the experimental setup, work plan, and test plan. The experimental system was completed for SO{sub 2} conversion at Waterloo and for NO{sub x} conversion at RTI. Shakedown experiments were completed. In the present quarter, the NO{sub x} removal performance of two additional modified carbon catalysts (MCCII and MCCIII) was studied. MCCII showed NO{sub x} removal efficiency which was similar to that observed for MCCI. However, MCCI was considerably less active for NO{sub x} removal. SO{sub 2} removal experiments with NO present in the feed gas were performed with MCCI. SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was consistently about 98% over each of 10 cycles and was very similar to that observed earlier with no NO present in the feed. Finally, a preliminary economic evaluation of the process was performed and a project review meeting was held. The economic evaluation showed that the Rn-Waterloo process was competitive with SCR/IFGD and other combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, removal processes.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Technical progress report, second & third quarters, 1993, April 1993--June 1993, July 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by constructing and operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.