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Sample records for lamina propria invasion

  1. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength ?ex = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  2. The lamina propria of the bovine seminiferous tubule.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, K H; Mademann, R; Sinowatz, F

    1979-11-01

    The boundary tissue of bovine testicular seminiferous tubules exhibits remarkable regional differences at the level of the seminiferous tubule proper, as compared with its terminal segment. The basal lamina of the seminiferous tubule proper is multilayered and possesses knob-like protrusions. At the level of the terminal segment the basal lamina is highly specialized; in the region of the terminal plug candelabrum-like projections of the tubular basal lamina invade the bases of the modified supporting cells up to a depth of 3.5 microns. The adjoining surface of these supporting cells is densely studded with hemidesmosomes. The elongated peritubular cells are arranged in 3--5 concentric layers around the tubulus seminiferus proper but form a loose association at the level of the terminal segment. Where the terminal segment joins the testicular straight tubule, peritubular cells may assemble to constitute a contractile spiral. Elastic tissue is situated mainly subjacent to the tubular basal lamina and to a lesser degree between the peritubular cell layers. A peritubular space lined by endothelium-like cells may surround the seminiferous tubule proper and also the transitional zone of the terminal segment. PMID:574798

  3. An optimized protocol for isolating lymphoid stromal cells from the intestinal lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells in lymphoid organs, also called lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs), play a pivotal role in immunity by forming specialized microenvironments that provide signals for leukocyte migration, positioning, and survival. Best characterized in lymphoid organs, LSCs are also abundant in the intestinal mucosa, which harbors a rich repertoire of immune cells. However, the lack of efficient procedures for isolation and purification of LSCs from the intestine has been a major limitation to their characterization. Here we report a new method to efficiently isolate, in addition to immune cells, viable lymphoid stromal cells and other stromal subsets from the intestinal lamina propria for subsequent phenotypic and functional analysis. PMID:25599879

  4. Microbiota Controls the Homeostasis of Glial Cells in the Gut Lamina Propria

    PubMed Central

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S.; Lasrado, Reena; McCallum, Sarah; Chng, Song Hui; Snippert, Hugo J.; Clevers, Hans; Pettersson, Sven; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intrinsic neural networks of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from dedicated neural crest progenitors that colonize the gut during embryogenesis and give rise to enteric neurons and glia. Here, we study how an essential subpopulation of enteric glial cells (EGCs) residing within the intestinal mucosa is integrated into the dynamic microenvironment of the alimentary tract. We find that under normal conditions colonization of the lamina propria by glial cells commences during early postnatal stages but reaches steady-state levels after weaning. By employing genetic lineage tracing, we provide evidence that in adult mice the network of mucosal EGCs is continuously renewed by incoming glial cells originating in the plexi of the gut wall. Finally, we demonstrate that both the initial colonization and homeostasis of glial cells in the intestinal mucosa are regulated by the indigenous gut microbiota. PMID:25578362

  5. Empirical Measurements of Biomechanical Anisotropy of the Human Vocal Fold Lamina Propria

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Jordan E.; Siegmund, Thomas; Du, Mindy; Naseri, Elhum; Chan, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    The vocal folds are known to be mechanically anisotropic due to the microstructural arrangement of fibrous proteins such as collagen and elastin in the lamina propria. Even though this has been known for many years, the biomechanical anisotropic properties have rarely been experimentally studied. We propose that an indentation procedure can be used with uniaxial tension in order to obtain an estimate of the biomechanical anisotropy within a single specimen. Experiments were performed on the lamina propria of three male and three female human vocal folds dissected from excised larynges. Two experiments were conducted: each specimen was subjected to cyclic uniaxial tensile loading in the longitudinal (i.e. anterior-posterior) direction, and then to cyclic indentation loading in the transverse (i.e. medial-lateral) direction. The indentation experiment was modeled as contact on a transversely isotropic half-space using the Barnett-Lothe tensors. The longitudinal elastic modulus EL was computed from the tensile test, and the transverse elastic modulus ET and longitudinal shear modulus GL were obtained by inverse analysis of the indentation force-displacement response. It was discovered that the average of EL/ET was 14 for the vocal ligament and 39 for the vocal fold cover specimens. Also, the average of EL/GL, a parameter important for models of phonation, was 28 for the vocal ligament and 54 for the vocal fold cover specimens. These measurements of anisotropy could contribute to more accurate models of fundamental frequency regulation and provide potentially better insights into the mechanics of vocal fold vibration. PMID:22886592

  6. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Braunstein, Jutta; Gras, Judith; Brors, Benedikt; Schwarz, Sonja; Szikszai, Timea; Lasitschka, Felix; Wabnitz, Guido; Heidtmann, Antje; Lee, Young-Seon; Schiessling, Serin; Leowardi, Christine; Al-Saeedi, Mohammed; Ulrich, Alexis; Engelke, Antonia; Winter, Johannes; Samstag, Yvonne; Giese, Thomas; Meuer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis) revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24841635

  7. Microbial colonization influences early B-lineage development in the gut lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R; Portuguese, Andrew J; Meyers, Robin M; Gallagher, Michael P; Cluff-Jones, Kendra; Magee, Jennifer M; Panchakshari, Rohit A; Rodig, Scott J; Kepler, Thomas B; Alt, Frederick W

    2013-09-01

    The RAG1/RAG2 endonuclease (RAG) initiates the V(D)J recombination reaction that assembles immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chain variable region exons from germline gene segments to generate primary antibody repertoires. IgH V(D)J assembly occurs in progenitor (pro-) B cells followed by that of IgL in precursor (pre-) B cells. Expression of IgH ? and IgL (Ig? or Ig?) chains generates IgM, which is expressed on immature B cells as the B-cell antigen-binding receptor (BCR). Rag expression can continue in immature B cells, allowing continued Ig? V(D)J recombination that replaces the initial V?J? exon with one that generates a new specificity. This 'receptor editing' process, which can also lead to Ig? V(D)J recombination and expression, provides a mechanism whereby antigen encounter at the Rag-expressing immature B-cell stage helps shape pre-immune BCR repertoires. As the major site of postnatal B-cell development, the bone marrow is the principal location of primary immunoglobulin repertoire diversification in mice. Here we report that early B-cell development also occurs within the mouse intestinal lamina propria (LP), where the associated V(D)J recombination/receptor editing processes modulate primary LP immunoglobulin repertoires. At weanling age in normally housed mice, the LP contains a population of Rag-expressing B-lineage cells that harbour intermediates indicative of ongoing V(D)J recombination and which contain cells with pro-B, pre-B and editing phenotypes. Consistent with LP-specific receptor editing, Rag-expressing LP B-lineage cells have similar VH repertoires, but significantly different V? repertoires, compared to those of Rag2-expressing bone marrow counterparts. Moreover, colonization of germ-free mice leads to an increased ratio of Ig?-expressing versus Ig?-expressing B cells specifically in the LP. We conclude that B-cell development occurs in the intestinal mucosa, where it is regulated by extracellular signals from commensal microbes that influence gut immunoglobulin repertoires. PMID:23965619

  8. Microbial colonization influences early B-lineage development in the gut lamina propria

    PubMed Central

    Wesemann, Duane R.; Portuguese, Andrew J.; Meyers, Robin M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Cluff-Jones, Kendra; Magee, Jennifer M.; Panchakshari, Rohit A.; Rodig, Scott J.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    The RAG1/RAG2 endonuclease ("RAG") initiates the V(D)J recombination reaction that assembles Ig heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chain variable region exons from germline gene segments to generate primary antibody repertoires1. IgH V(D)J assembly occurs in progenitor (pro-) B cells followed by that of IgL in precursor (pre-) B cells. Expression of IgH ? and IgL (Ig? or Ig?) chains generates IgM, which is expressed on immature B cells as the B cell antigen-binding receptor ("BCR"). Rag expression can continue in immature B cells2, allowing continued Ig? V(D)J recombination that replaces the initial V?J? exon with one that generates a new specificity3–5. This “receptor editing” process, which also can lead to Ig? V(D)J recombination and expression3,6,7, provides a mechanism whereby antigen-encounter at the Rag-expressing immature B cell stage helps shape pre-immune BCR repertoires. As the major site of post-natal B cell development, the bone marrow is the principal location of primary Ig repertoire diversification in mice. Here, we report that early B cell development also occurs within the mouse intestinal lamina propria (LP), where the associated V(D)J recombination/receptor editing processes modulate primary LP Ig repertoires. At weanling age in normally housed mice, the LP contains a population of Rag-expressing B lineage cells that harbor intermediates indicative of ongoing V(D)J recombination and which contain cells with pro-B, pre-B, and editing phenotypes. Consistent with LP-specific receptor editing, Rag-expressing LP B-lineage cells have similar VH repertoires, but significantly different V? repertoires, compared to those of Rag2-expressing BM counterparts. Moreover, colonization of germ-free mice leads to an increased ratio of Ig?-expressing versus Ig?-expressing B cells specifically in the LP. We conclude that B cell development occurs in the intestinal mucosa, where it is regulated by extra-cellular signals from commensal microbes that influence gut Ig repertoires. PMID:23965619

  9. Morphological and histochemical characteristics of the lamina propria in scrotal and abdominal testes from postpubertal boars: correlation with the appearance of the seminiferous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    PINART, E.; BONET, S.; BRIZ, M.; PASTOR, L. M.; SANCHO, S.; GARCÍA, N.; BADIA, E.; BASSOLS, J.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the morphological characteristics and lectin affinity of the testicular lamina propria in healthy boars and in unilateral and bilateral abdominal cryptorchid boars. The lamina propria of scrotal testes from healthy boars and unilateral cryptorchid boars was constituted by an innermost noncellular layer, the basal lamina, and by 2 layers of peritubular cells, each separated by a fibrous layer. The noncellular layers contained collagen fibres and glycoconjugates with abundant N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid residues. The inner peritubular cell layer was composed of myoid cells, the outer layer of fibroblasts. In the abdominal testes of unilateral and bilateral cryptorchid boars, the lamina propria of nondegenerating and degenerating seminiferous tubules appeared thickened due to an increased content of collagen fibres and glycoconjugates. Glycoconjugates showed decreased amounts of fucose, neuraminic acid and galactose, and increased amounts of N-acetylglucosamine residues. The basal lamina formed infoldings toward the seminiferous epithelium and contained small cells. Both inner and outer peritubular cells were fibroblasts of immature appearance. In degenerated seminiferous tubules of bilateral cryptorchid boars, the lamina propria was composed of a thickened and collagenised basal lamina, without peritubular cells and with a low content of glycoconjugates. In scrotal testes, therefore, the lamina propria was implicated in tubular contractility and in mediating the communication and the substrate diffusion between seminiferous tubules and interstitial tissue. Cryptorchidism induced morphological and histochemical alterations in the lamina propria of abdominal testes, which may be linked to evidence from other studies of lack of tubular contractility and defective cell–cell communication and substrate diffusion. The severity of these anomalies correlated with the severity of Sertoli cell alterations. PMID:11693304

  10. Oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with intestinal bacterin stimulates lamina propria T lymphocytes to produce Th1-biased cytokines in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Lianjie; Yin, Chunming; Othtani, Satoru; Aoyama, Katsuhiko; Lu, Changlong; Sun, Xun; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with a proprietary bacterin (immune milk "Sustaina") on mucosal immunity in the intestine of adult mice. C57BL/6 mice were orally given immune or control milk for two weeks, and then lymphocyte population and the cytokine production in lamina propria of colon in normal mice and mice induced colitis by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) were detected. We found that the levels of IFN-? and IL-10 increased, but the levels of IL-17A and IL-4, decreased in lamina propria of colon in immune milk-fed mice as compared with those in control milk-fed mice. Interestingly, oral administration of immune milk partially improved the acute colitis induced by DSS. The levels of TNF-? and IFN-? increased, but IL-6, IL-17A and IL-4 decreased in lamina propria (LP) of colon in immune milk-fed mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results suggest that immune milk may stimulate CD4+ T cells to polarize towards a Th1 type response, but contrarily suppress Th17 and Th2 cells responses in large intestinal LP of mice. The results indicate that this kind of immune milk has is able to promote the maintainance of intestinal homeostasis and enhance protection against infection, and could alleviate the symptoms of acute colitis in mice. PMID:24686517

  11. Oral Administration of Bovine Milk from Cows Hyperimmunized with Intestinal Bacterin Stimulates Lamina Propria T Lymphocytes to Produce Th1-Biased Cytokines in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Lianjie; Yin, Chunming; Othtani, Satoru; Aoyama, Katsuhiko; Lu, Changlong; Sun, Xun; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with a proprietary bacterin (immune milk “Sustaina”) on mucosal immunity in the intestine of adult mice. C57BL/6 mice were orally given immune or control milk for two weeks, and then lymphocyte population and the cytokine production in lamina propria of colon in normal mice and mice induced colitis by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) were detected. We found that the levels of IFN-? and IL-10 increased, but the levels of IL-17A and IL-4, decreased in lamina propria of colon in immune milk-fed mice as compared with those in control milk-fed mice. Interestingly, oral administration of immune milk partially improved the acute colitis induced by DSS. The levels of TNF-? and IFN-? increased, but IL-6, IL-17A and IL-4 decreased in lamina propria (LP) of colon in immune milk-fed mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results suggest that immune milk may stimulate CD4+ T cells to polarize towards a Th1 type response, but contrarily suppress Th17 and Th2 cells responses in large intestinal LP of mice. The results indicate that this kind of immune milk has is able to promote the maintainance of intestinal homeostasis and enhance protection against infection, and could alleviate the symptoms of acute colitis in mice. PMID:24686517

  12. Soluble galectin?3 is a strong, colonic epithelial?cell?derived, lamina propria fibroblast?stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippert, E; Falk, W; Bataille, F; Kaehne, T; Naumann, M; Goeke, M; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonic lamina propria fibroblasts (CLPFs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of fibrosis and strictures in Crohn's disease. Aim To identify colonic epithelial cell (CEC)?derived factors that activate CLPFs. Methods Primary human CECs and CLPFs were isolated from control mucosa and interleukin 8 (IL8) of CLPF cultures was quantified by ELISA. Activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF??B) was shown, and translocation of NF??B was inhibited by a dominant?negative I?B?expressing adenovirus. The major CLPF?activating and IL8 inducing protein was purified using fast?performance liquid chromatography (HiPrep 16/60 Sephacryl S?200 High Resolution Column) and sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis. Results A considerable increase in IL8 secretion by CLPFs cultured in CEC?conditioned media compared with that in unconditioned media (155.00 (10.00)?pg/µg v 1.434 (0.695)?pg/µg) was found. The effect of CEC?conditioned media on CLPF IL8 secretion was NF??B dependent. A protein or DNA array confirmed the involvement of NF??B and activator protein?1. Purification of a candidate band isolated with the use of sodium dodecyl sulphate?polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent sequencing showed soluble galectin?3 to be a strong CLPF?activating factor. Depletion of galectin?3 from conditioned media by immunoprecipitation abolished the CLPF stimulatory effect. Conclusions Using a classical biochemical approach, soluble galectin?3 was identified as a strong activator of CLPFs produced by CEC. Galectin?3 induced NF??B activation and IL8 secretion in these cells and may be a target for future therapeutic approaches to reduce or avoid stricture formation. PMID:16709662

  13. Characterization of upper lamina propria interstitial cells in bladders from patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity and bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gevaert, Thomas; De Vos, Rita; Everaerts, Wouter; Libbrecht, Louis; Van Der Aa, Frank; van den Oord, Joost; Roskams, Tania; De Ridder, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The upper lamina propria (ULP) area of interstitial cells (IC) in bladder has been studied for more than a decade in several species including human beings. Nevertheless there is still lack of uniformity in terminology of this cell layer. The aim of the present study was to add new data to the morphological and immunohistochemical phenotype of these cells and to find out whether this phenotype is changed in bladders from patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and bladder pain syndrome (BPS). Bladder tissue was obtained from a control group and from patients with NDO and BPS. Samples were processed for morphology, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. A morphological and immunohistochemical phenotype for the ULP IC was assessed and changes in this phenotype were looked for in samples from patients with NDO and BPS. The ULP IC were characterized ultrastructurally by the presence of actin filaments with densifications, many caveolae and abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER); on immunohistochemistry ULP IC were immunoreactive for ?-sma, vimentin, CD10 and podoplanin and categorized as interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLC). In NDO and BPS bladders we found a phenotypical shift towards a fibroblastic phenotype which was even more pronounced in the NDO group. In both groups there was also an increased presence in ULP lymphocytes. The ULP area in the human bladder contains a population of ICLC with distinct ultrastructural morphology and immunohistochemical phenotype. Their unique ?-sma+/desmin–/CD34– phenotype allows studying this population in various bladder disorders. In bladders form patients with BPS and NDO, we observed these ULP ICLC to shift towards a fibroblast phenotype. PMID:21251216

  14. Secretory effects of kinins on colonic epithelium in relation to prostaglandins released from cells of the lamina propria.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. A.; Hoult, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    1. Sheets of muscle-stripped rat and rabbit colon with epithelium intact or removed were mounted in Ussing-type chambers for recording of transepithelial p.d., resistance and short circuit current (Isc), and measurement by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of the release of prostaglandins into serosal and mucosal bathing solutions. 2. In epithelial-intact preparations prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), PGE1, PGF2 alpha, U46619 and prostacyclin (10(-7)-10(-6) M) caused increases in Isc and transepithelial p.d., in (approximate) descending order of potency. Epithelial-removed preparations did not exhibit any transepithelial p.d. 3. In epithelial-intact preparations, lysyl-bradykinin (LBk) applied serosally but not mucosally caused increased p.d. and release of PGE2 (and to a lesser extent other prostaglandins) into serosal but not mucosal bathing solutions. In epithelial-removed tissues, responsiveness to LBk was maintained, but it did not exhibit 'sidedness', i.e. LBk was effective when applied on either side and PGE2 release occurred into both compartments. 4. Indomethacin and other non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) abolished the LBk-induced p.d. and reduced PGE2 release if applied serosally but not mucosally in epithelial-intact preparations. In epithelial-removed tissues, indomethacin added to either side abolished prostaglandin release into both compartments. 5. Calcium removal from serosal but not mucosal bathing solution (Ca2+-free EGTA Krebs) abolished p.d. generation by LBk in epithelial-intact preparations, and reduced PGE2 release in rabbit but not rat colon. Similarly, in epithelial-removed preparations, calcium removal did not affect kinin-induced PGE2 generation in rat but strongly attenuated it in rabbit colon. 6. We conclude that (i) kinins activate the arachidonate cascade principally by interactions with cells in the subepithelial (lamina propria) layer, rather than with the epithelial cells themselves, (ii) PGE2 contributes substantially to the kinin-induced increase of transepithelial p.d. as a messenger released from kinin-responsive subepithelial cells and acting on the basolateral pole of the epithelial cells, (iii) the apparent sidedness of colonic epithelium in terms of responses to kinins, NSAIDs and calcium removal is due to the barrier properties of the epithelial cell layer, and (iv) there are differences in calcium sequestration and apparent calcium dependence of prostaglandin biosynthesis between rat and rabbit colonic subepithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 1 PMID:3207989

  15. Distribution of macrophages and granulocytes expressing L1 protein (calprotectin) in human Peyer's patches compared with normal ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjerke, K; Halstensen, T S; Jahnsen, F; Pulford, K; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Antibodies to the cytosolic leucocyte L1 protein (or calprotectin) were examined for reactivity with macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils identified by paired immunofluorescence staining in sections of normal human ileal mucosa, including Peyer's patches. Macrophages were recognised by expression of the myelomonocytic antigen CD68 (monoclonal antibody KP1). Neutrophilic granulocytes were identified by their content of neutrophil elastase, and eosinophilic granulocytes by monoclonal antibody EG2. Virtually all CD68+ macrophages in normal lamina propria and Peyer's patches were L1- and the same was true for most extravasated macrophages in normal peripheral lymph nodes. Some mesenteric lymph nodes, however, and all peripheral lymph nodes with overt pathological processes (malignant lymphoma) contained many CD68+L1+ macrophages. Numerous L1+ cells were also localised to the crypt region and to some extent beneath the villous epithelium in normal lamina propria, but they were mainly identified as EG2+ eosinophils. Such cells were remarkably scarce or absent beneath the follicle associated epithelium in the dome region of Peyer's patches, where CD68+L1- macrophages were abundant. Also subepithelial and interfollicular CD68- interdigitating dendritic cells in Peyer's patches (recognised by antibody to S-100 protein) were usually unreactive with L1 antibody. The L1 protein shows a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities in vitro, and its putative antiproliferative properties are interesting in relation to the immunosuppression postulated to take place in lamina propria. The virtual absence of L1 producing cells beneath the follicle associated epithelium in Peyer's patches may support the immunostimulatory function of these macrophage rich structures, which are held to be crucial for induction of specific mucosal immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8244101

  16. Eosinophils from Murine Lamina Propria Induce Differentiation of Naïve T Cells into Regulatory T Cells via TGF-?1 and Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Hu, Wei-Lin; Ge, Yu-Mei; Lin, Xu’ai; Li, Lan-Juan; Pan, Jian-Ping; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Treg cells play a crucial role in immune tolerance, but mechanisms that induce Treg cells are poorly understood. We here have described eosinophils in lamina propria (LP) that displayed high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a rate-limiting step during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis, and expressed TGF-?1 mRNA and high levels of ATRA. Co-incubation assay confirmed that LP eosinophils induced the differentiation of naïve T cells into Treg cells. Differentiation promoted by LP eosinophils were inhibited by blocked either TGF-?1 or ATRA. Peripheral blood (PB) eosinophils did not produce ATRA and could not induce Treg differentiation. These data identifies LP eosinophils as effective inducers of Treg cell differentiation through a mechanism dependent on TGF-?1 and ATRA. PMID:26587591

  17. Reappraisal of Serosal Invasion in Patients With T3 Colorectal Cancer by Elastic Stain: Clinicopathologic Study of 139 Surgical Cases With Special Reference to Peritoneal Elastic Lamina Invasion.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Yukihiro; LeVea, Charles; Dibaj, Shiva; Habib, Fadi; Cheney, Richard; Kanehira, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Context .- Peritoneal elastic lamina invasion (PELI) has been reported to be an important adverse prognostic factor in pT3 colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the data supporting this contention are limited. Objective .- To clarify the associations between PELI of pT3 CRC and prognostic significance, 139 consecutive surgical cases of pT3 CRC were examined. Design .- One hundred thirty-nine consecutive in-house surgical cases of pT3 CRC between 1993 and 2011 were examined. Thirty consecutive surgical cases of pT4a CRC resected during the same period were examined for comparison. Case selections were restricted to pT3 CRCs with the sections containing the deepest adenocarcinoma invasion partially or entirely covered with the peritoneum. Elastic staining was performed on one section containing the deepest tumor invasion partially or entirely covered with the peritoneum. The associations between the presence of PELI and clinicopathologic factors including prognosis of the patients were examined. Results .- Peritoneal elastic lamina invasion was identified in 23.0% (32 of 139) of the pT3 CRCs. PELI was associated with primary site (P = .006), lymph node metastasis (P < .001), lymphovascular invasion (P < .001), recurrence (P = .007), and patient's age (P = .002). The proportions of patients with a 4-year recurrence-free period in those with negative PELI, positive PELI, and pT4a tumor were 90.3%, 66.7%, and 28.9%, respectively (P < .001). Conclusions .- Elastic staining is useful to evaluate the serosal invasion of CRC. Positive PELI is a significant predictive factor for lymph node metastasis and recurrence-free survival in patients with pT3 CRC. This indicates that pT3 tumors with PELI should be treated like pT4a tumors. PMID:26717059

  18. Characterization of the vocal fold lamina propria towards voice restoration

    E-print Network

    Hahn, Mariah S

    2004-01-01

    During normal speech, human vocal folds sustain greater than 100 high impact collisions each second. When the pliability of this complex biomechanical system is reduced by scarring, voice quality may be compromised. ...

  19. Organelle rearrangement and cell volume changes during squeezing invasion of peritoneal elastic lamina by targeted murine breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Parsons, D F; Marko, M; Leith, A

    1991-01-01

    Murine breast cancer cell lines were developed to selectively invade the peritoneum while they proliferated in ascites form in the abdominal cavity. In a dominant form of invasion, tumor cells showed special affinity for elastin fibers and squeezed through narrow gaps in the elastic fiber meshwork of the stroma. Even in fixed tissue, such cells could be recognized as being in the process of invasive migration because of their dumbbell shape. This appearance was similar to that of diapedetic blood cells traversing bone marrow sinus endothelium. Three-dimensional STERECON graphics reconstruction from serial thick sections of 44 such cells was carried out. The reconstructions showed that, in mid-penetration, the cells spread extensively over the exterior surface of the elastic fiber meshwork. The cell surface contact of these forward projections was mainly with the elastic fiber outer coat of microfibrils, but small areas of the cell surface also fused directly to inner-core elastin. The morphological rearrangement of the cytoskeleton was minimal in both types of attachment areas. The location of these forward facing attachments is consistent with mechanisms for pulling the invasive cell through the gap. Lamellopodia formation and clustering of cytoplasmic organelles occurred more commonly at the forward-facing part of the cell. Morphometry of the reconstructions showed that a contraction of the whole cell occurred during the squeezing/migration process suggestive of an additional pushing process. However, our invasive cell lines showed marked differences in the degree of cell shrinkage. The process of adhesion and squeezing of tumor cells through elastin meshworks in vivo is clearly a complex phenomenon. Changes in cell surface activity appear to play a significant role in establishing the necessary 'foothold' component of invasion and, possibly, in the generation of tractive force as well. PMID:1887432

  20. Infliximab treatment induces apoptosis of lamina propria T lymphocytes in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    ten Hove, T; van Montfrans, C; Peppelenbosch, M P; van Deventer, S J H

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Treatment with infliximab induces remission in about 70% of patients with steroid refractory Crohn's disease. Because Crohn's disease is considered to be mediated by uncontrolled activation of mucosal T lymphocytes, we hypothesised that infliximab could induce apoptosis of T lymphocytes. Methods: Induction of apoptosis in vivo was studied in 10 patients with therapy refractory Crohn's disease. In vitro, resting or stimulated Jurkat T cells were incubated with infliximab. Results: Infusion of infliximab (5 mg/kg) in steroid refractory patients with Crohn's disease induced a clinical response in 9/10 patients but did not influence expression of activation markers, homing receptors, memory cells, Fas expression, or Bax/Bcl-2 expression on peripheral blood T lymphocytes. In contrast, a significant increase in CD3 and TUNEL positive cells within colonic biopsies was detected 24 hours after infusion of infliximab, suggesting that infliximab stimulates apoptosis of activated T lymphocytes but not of resting T cells. To test this hypothesis, the effects of infliximab on Jurkat T cells were investigated. We observed that infliximab induced apoptosis and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio of CD3/CD28 stimulated Jurkat T cells but not of unstimulated Jurkat cells. Conclusions: Our data indicate that infliximab treatment causes a rapid and specific increase in apoptosis of T lymphocytes in the gut mucosa. These findings may explain the rapid and sustained therapeutic effects of infliximab in Crohn's disease. PMID:11788561

  1. The intriguing plant nuclear lamina

    PubMed Central

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a complex protein mesh attached to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which is also associated with nuclear pore complexes. It provides mechanical support to the nucleus and nuclear envelope, and as well as facilitating the connection of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton, it is also involved in chromatin organization, gene regulation, and signaling. In metazoans, the nuclear lamina consists of a polymeric layer of lamins and other interacting proteins responsible for its association with the INM and chromatin. In plants, field emission scanning electron microscopy of nuclei, and thin section transmission electron microscopy of isolated nucleoskeletons, reveals the lamina to have a similar structure to that of metazoans. Moreover, although plants lack lamin genes and the genes encoding most lamin-binding proteins, the main functions of the lamina are fulfilled in plants. Hence, it would appear that the plant lamina is not based on lamins and that other proteins substitute for lamins in plant cells. The nuclear matrix constituent proteins are the best characterized structural proteins in the plant lamina. Although these proteins do not display strong sequence similarity to lamins, their predicted secondary structure and sub-nuclear distribution, as well as their influence on nuclear size and shape, and on heterochromatin organization, suggest they could be functional lamin analogs. In this review we shall summarize what is currently known about the organization and composition of the plant nuclear lamina and its interacting complexes, and we will discuss the activity of this structure in the plant cell and its nucleus. PMID:24808902

  2. The intriguing plant nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a complex protein mesh attached to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which is also associated with nuclear pore complexes. It provides mechanical support to the nucleus and nuclear envelope, and as well as facilitating the connection of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton, it is also involved in chromatin organization, gene regulation, and signaling. In metazoans, the nuclear lamina consists of a polymeric layer of lamins and other interacting proteins responsible for its association with the INM and chromatin. In plants, field emission scanning electron microscopy of nuclei, and thin section transmission electron microscopy of isolated nucleoskeletons, reveals the lamina to have a similar structure to that of metazoans. Moreover, although plants lack lamin genes and the genes encoding most lamin-binding proteins, the main functions of the lamina are fulfilled in plants. Hence, it would appear that the plant lamina is not based on lamins and that other proteins substitute for lamins in plant cells. The nuclear matrix constituent proteins are the best characterized structural proteins in the plant lamina. Although these proteins do not display strong sequence similarity to lamins, their predicted secondary structure and sub-nuclear distribution, as well as their influence on nuclear size and shape, and on heterochromatin organization, suggest they could be functional lamin analogs. In this review we shall summarize what is currently known about the organization and composition of the plant nuclear lamina and its interacting complexes, and we will discuss the activity of this structure in the plant cell and its nucleus. PMID:24808902

  3. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Isharwal, Sumit; Konety, Badrinath

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) comprises about 70% of all newly diagnosed bladder cancer, and includes tumors with stage Ta, T1 and carcinoma in situ (CIS.) Since, NMIBC patients with progression to muscle-invasive disease tend to have worse prognosis than with patients with primary muscle-invasive disease, there is a need to significantly improve risk stratification and earlier definitive treatment for high-risk NMIBC. Materials and Methods: A detailed Medline search was performed to identify all publications on the topic of prognostic factors and risk predictions for superficial bladder cancer/NMIBC. The manuscripts were reviewed to identify variables that could predict recurrence and progression. Results: The most important prognostic factor for progression is grade of tumor. T category, tumor size, number of tumors, concurrent CIS, intravesical therapy, response to bacillus Calmette–Guerin at 3- or 6-month follow-up, prior recurrence rate, age, gender, lymphovascular invasion and depth of lamina propria invasion are other important clinical and pathological parameters to predict recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the Spanish Club UrológicoEspañol de Tratamiento Oncológico (CUETO) risk tables are the two best-established predictive models for recurrence and progression risk calculation, although they tend to overestimate risk and have poor discrimination for prognostic outcomes in external validation. Molecular biomarkers such as Ki-67, FGFR3 and p53 appear to be promising in predicting recurrence and progression but need further validation prior to using them in clinical practice. Conclusion: EORTC and CUETO risk tables are the two best-established models to predict recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC though they tend to overestimate risk and have poor discrimination for prognostic outcomes in external validation. Future research should focus on enhancing the predictive accuracy of risk assessment tools by incorporating additional prognostic factors such as depth of lamina propria invasion and molecular biomarkers after rigorous validation in multi-institutional cohorts. PMID:26604439

  4. Endoscopic treatments for small gastric subepithelial tumors originating from muscularis propria layer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Ye, Li-Ping; Mao, Xin-Li

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive endoscopic resection has become an increasingly popular method for patients with small (less than 3.5 cm in diameter) gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) originating from the muscularis propria (MP) layer. Currently, the main endoscopic therapies for patients with such tumors are endoscopic muscularis excavation, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. Although these endoscopic techniques can be used for complete resection of the tumor and provide an accurate pathological diagnosis, these techniques have been associated with several negative events, such as incomplete resection, perforation, and bleeding. This review provides detailed information on the technical details, likely treatment outcomes, and complications associated with each endoscopic method for treating/removing small gastric SETs that originate from the MP layer. PMID:26327758

  5. The lamina cribrosa of Ornithorhynchus (Monotremata, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Zeller, U

    1988-01-01

    A vestigial and transitory lamina cribrosa was found in nestling platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). The heads of two nest-young (180 and 333 mm length), one subadult and one adult Ornithorhynchus were serially sectioned and studied with special reference to the development of the nasal region. In nest-young Ornithorhynchus an irregularly shaped bar of cartilage develops at the foramen olfactorium advehens. In the subadult it is largely resorbed, and in the osseous skull of the adult it is completely lacking. Ontogeny and topographical relationships of this bar of cartilage indicate that it is part of a lamina cribrosa. It embraces the ramus medialis of the nervus ethmoidalis and the arteria ethmoidalis, as do the corresponding parts of the lamina cribrosa of Tachyglossus. Compared to other parts of the chondrocranium this bar develops late in ontogeny, as does the lamina cribrosa of other mammals. Therefore, it can be concluded that part of the lamina cribrosa is present for a short period during the ontogeny of Ornithorhynchus, contrary to earlier reports. As in many other water-adapted mammals, the olfactory system of Ornithorhynchus is reduced. This suggests that the rest of the lamina cribrosa of Ornithorhynchus is secondarily reduced. The common ancestor of Ornithorhynchus and Tachyglossidae most probably possessed a lamina cribrosa which can be traced back to the common mammalian stock. The lamina cribrosa developed only once in the phylogeny of mammals. Its lack in the adult Ornithorhynchus is not a "reptilian" character. PMID:3223609

  6. Size dependence of ozone lamina characteristics and their correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizan, Peter; Lastovicka, Jan; Kozubek, Michal

    2015-09-01

    Ozone profiles contain narrow layers of substantially enhanced or reduced ozone, called positive and negative laminae, respectively. They reflect both evolutions of stratospheric ozone content and stratospheric dynamics. Here we deal only with positive laminae. The following lamina characteristics are investigated in dependence on lamina size: the number of laminae per profile, the overall ozone amount in laminae per profile and the ozone amount in one lamina at the European ozonosonde stations. An important role of the vertical resolution of ozonesonde measurements is specified. Lamina characteristics for Legionowo and Lindenberg, and small lamina (<2 mPa) characteristics for all stations suffer with effects of vertical resolution of measurements. For this reason they are not used here for long-term trend investigations. The long-term evolution of the ozone amount in one lamina does not display a trend. The results for the three remaining stations, Hohenpeissenberg, Payerne and Uccle, are largely consistent with our previous results on lamina behaviour, which means that our previous results on trends in laminae (e.g., Križan and Laštovi?ka, 2005; Laštovi?ka et al., 2014) are basically correct. The number of laminae per profile and the overall ozone amount in laminae per profile show negative trends before (1979-1995) and rather positive trends after (1996-2011) the reversal of trends in total columnar ozone over Europe. Both parameters reach the highest values for small laminae and with increasing size they decrease. Correlations between characteristics of laminae of different size ranges at individual stations are better for neighbour lamina ranges than for distant lamina ranges. The number of statistically significant correlations of laminae of the same size between pairs of stations is much higher for large laminae above 4 mPa, probably due to processes responsible for their formation and their expected larger horizontal size.

  7. Schwann cell basal lamina and nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ide, C; Tohyama, K; Yokota, R; Nitatori, T; Onodera, S

    1983-12-12

    Nerve segments approximately 7 mm long were excised from the predegenerated sciatic nerves of mice, and treated 5 times by repetitive freezing and thawing to kill the Schwann cells. Such treated nerve segments were grafted into the original places so as to be in contact with the proximal stumps. The animals were sacrificed 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after the grafting. The grafts were examined by electron microscopy in the middle part of the graft, i.e. 3-4 mm distal to the proximal end and/or near the proximal and distal ends of the graft. In other instances, the predegenerated nerve segments were minced with a razor blade after repetitive freezing and thawing. Such minced nerves were placed in contact with the proximal stumps of the same nerves. The animals were sacrificed 10 days after the grafting. Within 1-2 days after grafting, the dead Schwann cells had disintegrated into fragments. They were then gradually phagocytosed by macrophages. The basal laminae of Schwann cells, which were not attacked by macrophages, remained as empty tubes (basal lamina scaffolds). In the grafts we examined, no Schwann cells survived the freezing and thawing process. The regenerating axons always grew out through such basal lamina scaffolds, being in contact with the inner surface of the basal lamina (i.e. the side originally facing the Schwann cell plasma membrane). No axons were found outside of the scaffolds. One to two days after grafting, the regenerating axons were not associated with Schwann cells, but after 5-7 days they were accompanied by Schwann cells which were presumed to be migrating along axons from the proximal stumps. Ten days after grafting, proliferating Schwann cells observed in the middle part of the grafts had begun to sort out axons. In the grafts of minced nerves, the fragmented basal laminae of the Schwann cells re-arranged themselves into thicker strands or small aggregations of basal laminae. The regenerating axons, without exception, attached to one side of such modified basal laminae. Collagen fibrils were in contact with the other side, indicating that these modified basal laminae had the same polarity in terms of cell attachment as seen in the ordinary basal laminae of the scaffolds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6661636

  8. Removal of insect basal laminae using elastase.

    PubMed

    Levinson, G; Bradley, T J

    1984-01-01

    We have used the enzyme elastase to remove the basal lamina of epithelia from two insects: the upper Malpighian tubules of Rhodnius prolixus and imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster. Removal of the basal lamina was confirmed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Use of the technique on the Malphighian tubules of Rhodnius reveals for the first time the three-dimensional organization of the circumferential folds of the basal plasma membrane. Elastase is much more effective in removing the basal lamina than are the enzymes hyaluronidase, collagenase, and chymotrypsin, either alone or in combination. Following elastase treatment, cells of the Malpighian tubules dissociate with only mild mechanical agitation into single, viable cells. Treatment with elastase removes the basal laminae of imaginal discs of Drosophila and accelerates evagination as has been previously described for trypsin. To obtain single cell preparations from elastase-treated imaginal discs, mechanical stirring in Ringer low in Ca2+ was required. In addition to its usefulness in cell isolation, elastase treatment allows examination of the effect of removal of basal laminae on the physiology and development of insect epithelia. PMID:6431633

  9. The influence of elastin-like recombinant polymer on the self-renewing potential of a 3D tissue equivalent derived from human lamina propria fibroblasts and oral

    E-print Network

    Hasýrcý, Vasýf

    into the genetic content of a host organism such as microorganisms, plants or other eukaryotic organisms. This way the presence of a pluristratified epithelium and an ultrastructurally well-organized basement membrane X represents any natural or modified amino acid, except proline [2]. The first ELR products were

  10. Studies of immunity and bacterial invasiveness in mice given a recombinant salmonella vector encoding murine interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Dunstan, S J; Ramsay, A J; Strugnell, R A

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was expressed in Salmonella typhimurium in an attempt to increase the mucosal immune response against the bacterium. Murine IL-6 was PCR amplified from cDNA, cloned, sequenced, and found to be functionally active when expressed in S. typhimurium BRD509, the (delta)aroA (delta)aroD vaccine strain. Expression of murine IL-6 did not appear to adversely affect the growth of salmonellae, as the construct was retained in the absence of antibiotic selection and the growth rate was unaffected compared with that of the parent strain in vitro. However, IL-6 expression led to a significant reduction in bacterial invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes and small intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes were isolated from mice orally immunized with BRD509 expressing IL-6 (pKK233-2/IL-6), and the number of antibody-secreting cells was determined by the ELISPOT technique. No differences were observed between mice immunized with BRD509(pKK.233-2/IL-6) and those immunized with BRD509(pKK233-2) with respect to the antibody subclass-specific responses elicited despite the markedly reduced invasiveness of the former. Serum antibody responses were also examined by a kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and equivalent levels of antibody response were detected in mice given BRD509(pKK233-2/IL-6) and those given BRD509(pKK233-2). The humoral immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharides was also examined in transgenic IL-6-deficient mice given oral inocula of BRD509. Equivalent numbers of antibody-secreting cells (ELISPOTs) were observed in the spleens and laminae propriae of both IL-6-deficient (-/-) mice and control (+/+) mice harboring an intact IL-6 gene, whereas small, yet significant differences in the serum immunoglobulin A ELISA titers were observed. These data suggest that the immunoglobulin A response against Salmonella lipopolysaccharides is largely IL-6 independent. PMID:8698502

  11. Studies of immunity and bacterial invasiveness in mice given a recombinant salmonella vector encoding murine interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, S J; Ramsay, A J; Strugnell, R A

    1996-07-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was expressed in Salmonella typhimurium in an attempt to increase the mucosal immune response against the bacterium. Murine IL-6 was PCR amplified from cDNA, cloned, sequenced, and found to be functionally active when expressed in S. typhimurium BRD509, the (delta)aroA (delta)aroD vaccine strain. Expression of murine IL-6 did not appear to adversely affect the growth of salmonellae, as the construct was retained in the absence of antibiotic selection and the growth rate was unaffected compared with that of the parent strain in vitro. However, IL-6 expression led to a significant reduction in bacterial invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes and small intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes were isolated from mice orally immunized with BRD509 expressing IL-6 (pKK233-2/IL-6), and the number of antibody-secreting cells was determined by the ELISPOT technique. No differences were observed between mice immunized with BRD509(pKK.233-2/IL-6) and those immunized with BRD509(pKK233-2) with respect to the antibody subclass-specific responses elicited despite the markedly reduced invasiveness of the former. Serum antibody responses were also examined by a kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and equivalent levels of antibody response were detected in mice given BRD509(pKK233-2/IL-6) and those given BRD509(pKK233-2). The humoral immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharides was also examined in transgenic IL-6-deficient mice given oral inocula of BRD509. Equivalent numbers of antibody-secreting cells (ELISPOTs) were observed in the spleens and laminae propriae of both IL-6-deficient (-/-) mice and control (+/+) mice harboring an intact IL-6 gene, whereas small, yet significant differences in the serum immunoglobulin A ELISA titers were observed. These data suggest that the immunoglobulin A response against Salmonella lipopolysaccharides is largely IL-6 independent. PMID:8698502

  12. Discrimination of cortical laminae using MEG

    PubMed Central

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Typically MEG source reconstruction is used to estimate the distribution of current flow on a single anatomically derived cortical surface model. In this study we use two such models representing superficial and deep cortical laminae. We establish how well we can discriminate between these two different cortical layer models based on the same MEG data in the presence of different levels of co-registration noise, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cortical patch size. We demonstrate that it is possible to make a distinction between superficial and deep cortical laminae for levels of co-registration noise of less than 2 mm translation and 2° rotation at SNR > 11 dB. We also show that an incorrect estimate of cortical patch size will tend to bias layer estimates. We then use a 3D printed head-cast (Troebinger et al., 2014) to achieve comparable levels of co-registration noise, in an auditory evoked response paradigm, and show that it is possible to discriminate between these cortical layer models in real data. PMID:25038441

  13. Autophagy mediates degradation of nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhixun; Xu, Caiyue; Donahue, Greg; Shimi, Takeshi; Pan, Ji-An; Zhu, Jiajun; Ivanov, Andrejs; Capell, Brian C; Drake, Adam M; Shah, Parisha P; Catanzaro, Joseph M; Ricketts, M Daniel; Lamark, Trond; Adam, Stephen A; Marmorstein, Ronen; Zong, Wei-Xing; Johansen, Terje; Goldman, Robert D; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2015-11-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a catabolic membrane trafficking process that degrades a variety of cellular constituents and is associated with human diseases. Although extensive studies have focused on autophagic turnover of cytoplasmic materials, little is known about the role of autophagy in degrading nuclear components. Here we report that the autophagy machinery mediates degradation of nuclear lamina components in mammals. The autophagy protein LC3/Atg8, which is involved in autophagy membrane trafficking and substrate delivery, is present in the nucleus and directly interacts with the nuclear lamina protein lamin B1, and binds to lamin-associated domains on chromatin. This LC3-lamin B1 interaction does not downregulate lamin B1 during starvation, but mediates its degradation upon oncogenic insults, such as by activated RAS. Lamin B1 degradation is achieved by nucleus-to-cytoplasm transport that delivers lamin B1 to the lysosome. Inhibiting autophagy or the LC3-lamin B1 interaction prevents activated RAS-induced lamin B1 loss and attenuates oncogene-induced senescence in primary human cells. Our study suggests that this new function of autophagy acts as a guarding mechanism protecting cells from tumorigenesis. PMID:26524528

  14. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  15. How lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) activates Torsin

    E-print Network

    Ingram, Jessica R.

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1) resides at the nuclear envelope and interacts with Torsins, poorly understood endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized AAA+ ATPases, through a conserved, perinuclear domain. We determined ...

  16. Autophagy Devours the Nuclear Lamina to Thwart Oncogenic Stress.

    PubMed

    Leidal, Andrew M; Debnath, Jayanta

    2015-12-01

    A recent study by Dou et al. (2015) in Nature extends the functions of autophagy to the nucleus, where it mediates the degradation of the nuclear lamina upon oncogenic insults to reinforce cellular senescence. PMID:26651287

  17. Fate of the Molar Dental Lamina in the Monophyodont Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dosed?lová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S.; Veselá, Iva; Krej?í, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  18. A biomathematical model for pressure-dependent lamina cribrosa behavior.

    PubMed

    Dongqi, H; Zeqin, R

    1999-06-01

    Investigating the relationship between intraocular pressure and the behavior of the lamina cribrosa (the primary site of the optic nerve damage in glaucoma) is important to insight into the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In most previous studies, unsuitable approaches were used since the lamina cribrosa was not taken as the main target. In the present study, a linear model of elastic mechanics theory on the bending of thin circular plate was developed for this purpose. The structural features of the lamina cribrosa and the forces acting on the lamina cribrosa were analyzed, and the constitutive equation was formulated. The general solution on a class of Kármán Equation and the analytic solution on fixed boundary conditions were obtained, and from them, the morphological changes and the mechanical properties such as retrodisplacement and force distributions of the lamina cribrosa under pressure were derived. Some of the clinical phenomena occurring in glaucoma damage were explained with the results. Theoretical values were compared with the experimental data obtained by other investigators. The effects of structural parameters on susceptibilities to glaucoma damage were discussed. The biomathematical model, serving as formalistic expressions of the well-known hypothesis of pressure-dependent optic nerve damage in glaucoma, should make it possible for us to further understand and manage this disease. PMID:10332621

  19. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  20. The human autodiagnostic system (Rexed's laminae as diagnostic neuroprocessors)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernavskii, D. S.; Karp, V. P.; Rodshtat, I. V.

    1994-01-01

    A position is formulated according to which the therapeutic effect of a puncture action is a result of the correction of defects in the human autodiagnostic system (ADS). The structure and functions of the ADS are examined from the points of view of pattern recognition, neurocomputing, and neurophysiology. The necessary conditions that the ADC must satisfy are formulated. It is shown that the theoretical conditions are satisfied by Rexed's laminae, which are a part of the central nervous system and form the grey matter of the spinal cord. The available biochemical and morphological data are utilized in an examination of the operating mechanism of Rexed's laminae as a whole (as an ADS) and each lamina individually (as neuroprocessors that perform specific functions). Potential defects in the recognition system and methods for their correction by signals produced at biological active points by EHF puncture are examined.

  1. Neurons innervating the lamina in the butterfly, Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Shibasaki, Hiromichi; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2013-05-01

    The butterfly Papilio xuthus has compound eyes with three types of ommatidia. Each type houses nine spectrally heterogeneous photoreceptors (R1-R9) that are divided into six spectral classes: ultraviolet, violet, blue, green, red, and broad-band. Analysis of color discrimination has shown that P. xuthus uses the ultraviolet, blue, green, and red receptors for foraging. The ultraviolet and blue receptors are long visual fibers terminating in the medulla, whereas the green and red receptors are short visual fibers terminating in the lamina. This suggests that processing of wavelength information begins in the lamina in P. xuthus, unlike in flies. To establish the anatomical basis of color discrimination mechanisms, we examined neurons innervating the lamina by injecting neurobiotin into this neuropil. We found that in addition to photoreceptors and lamina monopolar cells, three distinct groups of cells project fibers into the lamina. Their cell bodies are located (1) at the anterior rim of the medulla, (2) between the proximal surface of the medulla and lobula plate, and (3) in the medulla cell body rind. Neurobiotin injection also labeled distinct terminals in medulla layers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Terminals in layer 4 belong to the long visual fibers (R1, 2 and 9), while arbors in layers 1, 2 and 3 probably correspond to terminals of three subtypes of lamina monopolar cells, respectively. Immunocytochemistry coupled with neurobiotin injection revealed their transmitter candidates; neurons in (1) and a subset of neurons in (2) are immunoreactive to anti-serotonin and anti-?-aminobutyric acid, respectively. PMID:23407865

  2. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria as a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Angkathunyakul, Napat; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Molagool, Sani; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan

    2015-01-01

    Visceral myopathy is one of the causes of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Most cases pathologically reveal degenerative changes of myocytes or muscularis propia atrophy and fibrosis. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria is extremely rare. We report a case of a 9-mo-old Thai male baby who presented with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologic findings showed abnormal layering of small intestinal muscularis propria with an additional oblique layer and aberrant muscularization in serosa. The patient also had a short small bowel without malrotation, brachydactyly, and absence of the 2nd to 4th middle phalanges of both hands. The patient was treated with cisapride and combined parenteral and enteral nutritional support. He had gradual clinical improvement and gained body weight. Subsequently, the parenteral nutrition was discontinued. The previously reported cases are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26078585

  3. Nuclear lamina builds tissues from the stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Yixian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that nuclear lamins, the type V intermediate filament proteins, are required for proper building of at least some organs. As the major structural components of the nuclear lamina found underneath the inner nuclear membranes, lamins are ubiquitously expressed in all animal cells. How the broadly expressed lamins support the building of specific tissues is not understood. By studying Drosophila testis, we have uncovered a mechanism by which lamin-B functions in the cyst stem cell (CySC) and its differentiated cyst cell, the cell types known to form the niche/microenvironment for the germline stem cells (GSC) and the developing germ line, to ensure testis organogenesis 1. In this extra view, we discuss some remaining questions and the implications of our findings in the understanding of how the ubiquitous nuclear lamina regulates tissue building in a context-dependent manner. PMID:25483250

  4. Biomass investment in leaf lamina versus lamina support in relation to growth irradiance and leaf size in temperate deciduous trees.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ulo; Kull, Olevi

    1999-05-01

    Foliar biomass investment in support and assimilative compartments was studied in four temperate deciduous tree species along a natural light gradient across the canopy. The species ranked according to shade tolerance as Betula pendula Roth. < Populus tremula L. < Fraxinus excelsior L. < Tilia cordata Mill. Long-term light conditions at sampling locations were characterized as seasonal mean integrated quantum flux density (Q(int), mol m(-2) day(-1)) estimated by a method combining hemispherical photography and light measurements with quantum sensors. Leaf morphology was altered by Q(int) in all species. Both lamina and petiole dry mass per lamina area (LMA and PMA, respectively) increased with increasing Q(int). Shade-tolerant species had lower LMA at low Q(int) than shade-intolerant species; however, PMA was not related to shade tolerance. Across species, the ratio of petiole dry mass to lamina dry mass (PMR) varied from 0.07 to 0.21. It was independent of Q(int) in the simple-leaved species, but decreased with increasing Q(int) in the compound-leaved F. excelsior, which also had the largest foliar biomass investment in petioles. Differences in leaf mass and area, ranging over four orders of magnitude, provided an explanation for the interspecific variability in PMR. Species with large leaves also had greater biomass investments in foliar support than species with smaller leaves. This relationship was similar for both simple- and compound-leaved species. There was a negative relationship between PMR and petiole N concentration, suggesting that petioles had greater carbon assimilation rates and paid back a larger fraction of their construction cost in species with low PMR than in species with high PMR. This was probably the result of a negative relationship between PMR and petiole surface to volume ratio. Nevertheless, petioles had lower concentrations of mineral nutrients than laminas. Across species, the ratio of petiole N to lamina N varied from only 3 to 6%, demonstrating that petiole costs are less in terms of nutrients than in terms of total biomass, and that the petiole contribution to carbon assimilation is disproportionately lower than that of the lamina contribution. PMID:12651556

  5. Statistical characterization of the fatigue behavior of composite lamina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to predict statistically the effects of constant and variable amplitude fatigue loadings on the residual strength and fatigue life of composite lamina. The parameters in the model were established from the results of a series of static tensile tests and a fatigue scan and a number of verification tests were performed. Abstracts for two other papers on the effect of load sequence on the statistical fatigue of composites are also presented.

  6. Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P. C. Dave P.; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J. David; Spinler, Kyle R.; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination. PMID:23990565

  7. Adaptations for nocturnal and diurnal vision in the hawkmoth lamina.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Anna L; Ribi, Willi A; Warrant, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Animals use vision over a wide range of light intensities, from dim starlight to bright sunshine. For animals active in very dim light the visual system is challenged by several sources of visual noise. Adaptations in the eyes, as well as in the neural circuitry, have evolved to suppress the noise and enhance the visual signal, thereby improving vision in dim light. Among neural adaptations, spatial summation of visual signals from neighboring processing units is suggested to increase the reliability of signal detection and thus visual sensitivity. In insects, the likely neural candidates for carrying out spatial summation are the lamina monopolar cells (LMCs) of the first visual processing area of the insect brain (the lamina). We have classified LMCs in three species of hawkmoths with considerably different activity periods but very similar ecology-the diurnal Macroglossum stellatarum, the nocturnal Deilephila elpenor and the crepuscular-nocturnal Manduca sexta. Using this classification, we investigated the anatomical adaptations of hawkmoth LMCs suited for spatial summation. We found that specific types of LMCs have dendrites extending to significantly more neighboring cartridges in the two nocturnal and crepuscular species than in the diurnal species, making these LMC types strong candidates for spatial summation. Moreover, while the absolute number of cartridges visited by the LMCs differed between the two dim-light species, their dendritic extents were very similar in terms of visual angle, possibly indicating a limiting spatial acuity. The overall size of the lamina neuropil did not correlate with the size of its LMCs. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:160-175, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100612

  8. The laryngeal primordium and epithelial lamina. A new interpretation.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Domenech-Mateu, J M

    1990-01-01

    The laryngeal primordium is present in both the laryngotracheal sulcus (LTS) and the primitive pulmonary sac (PPS). Its early period of development may be subdivided into two phases. The first phase (Stage 11) is represented by what is traditionally referred to as the LTS, located directly beneath the PP4 on the ventral wall of the foregut (primary segment), and by the PPS which is situated at its caudal end. The LTS will represent the primordium of the upper or membranous infraglottic cavity region; whereas the PPS, will give rise not only to the bronchial tree, but also to the primordium of the trachea and the lower or cartilaginous region of the infraglottic cavity. The second phase (Stages 13 and 14) is distinguished by the cranial growth of the LTS above the PP4 and therefore by its absorption into the floor of the primitive pharynx in the mesobranchial area (secondary segment), which will develop into the primordium of the vestibule of the larynx. Similarly, we observed that in the development of the laryngeal cavity there are two temporally and spatially separate epithelial structures: the epithelial septum and the epithelial lamina. In this respect we differ from other authors who are of the opinion that there is a single structure (the epithelial lamina). The epithelial septum is a primary structure responsible for the final configuration of the LTS, as it contributes to the development of the lower end of the primary segment of the LTS and also to the creation of the secondary segment. The epithelial lamina is a secondary structure which appears inside the LTS as a result of pressure exerted by the mesenchyme on its lateral walls, without having any effect on the morphogenesis of the LTS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2081706

  9. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  10. Automated Measurement and Statistical Modeling of Elastic Laminae in Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Hu, Jin-Jia; Humphrey, Jay D.; Liu, Jyh-Charn

    2010-01-01

    Structural features of elastic laminae within arteries can provide vital information for both the mechanobiology and the biomechanics of the wall. In this paper, we propose, test, and illustrate a new computer-based scheme for automated analysis of regional distributions of elastic laminae thickness, inter-lamellar distances, and fragmentation (furcation points) from standard histological images. Our scheme eliminates potential artifacts produced by tissue cutting, automatically aligns tissue according to physiologic orientations, and performs cross-sectional measurements along radial directions. A statistical randomized complete block design (RCBD) and F-test were used to assess potential (non)-uniformity of lamellar thicknesses and separations along both radial and circumferential directions. Illustrative results for both normotensive and hypertensive thoracic porcine aorta revealed marked heterogeneity along the radial direction in nearly stress-free samples. Clearly, regional measurements can provide more detailed information about morphologic changes that cannot be gained by globally averaged evaluations alone. We also found that quantifying Furcation Point densities offers new information about potential elastin fragmentation, particularly in response to increased loading due to hypertension. PMID:20221934

  11. Neurohumoral Integration of Cardiovascular Function by the Lamina Terminalis.

    PubMed

    Cancelliere, Nicole M; Black, Emily A E; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation, such as vascular tone, fluid volume and blood osmolarity, are quite often mediated by signals circulating in the periphery, such as angiotensin II and sodium concentration. Research has identified areas within the lamina terminalis (LT), specifically the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), the subfornical organ and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, as playing crucial roles detecting and integrating information derived from these circulating signals. The median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) is a third integrative structure within the LT that influences cardiovascular homeostasis, although to date, its role is not as clearly elucidated. More recent studies have demonstrated that the CVOs are not only essential in the detection of traditional cardiovascular signals but also signals primarily considered to be important in the regulation of metabolic, reproductive and inflammatory processes that have now also been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. In this review, we highlight the critical roles played by the LT in the detection and integration of circulating signals that provide critical feedback control information contributing to cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26531751

  12. Evolution of centrosomes and the nuclear lamina: Amoebozoan assets.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Ralph; Batsios, Petros; Meyer, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The current eukaryotic tree of life groups most eukaryotes into one of five supergroups, the Opisthokonta, Amoebozoa, Archaeplastida, Excavata and SAR (Stramenopile, Alveolata, Rhizaria). Molecular and comparative morphological analyses revealed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) already contained a rather sophisticated equipment of organelles including a mitochondrion, an endomembrane system, a nucleus with a lamina, a microtubule-organizing center (MTOC), and a flagellar apparatus. Recent studies of MTOCs, basal bodies/centrioles, and nuclear envelope organization of organisms in different supergroups have clarified our picture of how the nucleus and MTOCs co-evolved from LECA to extant eukaryotes. In this review we summarize these findings with special emphasis on valuable contributions of research on a lamin-like protein, nuclear envelope proteins, and the MTOC in the amoebozoan model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. PMID:25952183

  13. Dynamic Failure of a Lamina Meshwork in Cell Nuclei under Extreme Mechanical Deformation

    E-print Network

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Dynamic Failure of a Lamina Meshwork in Cell Nuclei under Extreme Mechanical Deformation Zhao Qin protein meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. It confers mechanical strength to the cell's nucleus and also sustains the overall structural integrity of the cell. The rupture of nuclear lamina is involved

  14. Investigating Invasives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightbody, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Invasive species, commonly known as "invasives," are nonnative plants, animals, and microbes that completely take over and change an established ecosystem. The consequences of invasives' spread are significant. In fact, many of the species that appear on the Endangered Species list are threatened by invasives. Therefore, the topic of invasive

  15. Constitutive nuclear lamina-genome interactions are highly conserved and associated with A/T-rich sequence

    E-print Network

    Meuleman, Wouter

    In metazoans, the nuclear lamina is thought to play an important role in the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes, by providing anchoring sites for large genomic segments named lamina-associated domains (LADs). ...

  16. A method for preparing skeletal muscle fiber basal laminae

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.C.; Carlson, B.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Previous attempts to prepare skeletal muscle basal laminae (BL) for ultrastructural analyses have been hampered by difficulties in successfully removing skeletal muscle proteins and cellular debris from BL tubes. In the present study the authors describe a two phase method which results in an acellular muscle preparation, the BL of which are examined by light, transmission electron, and scanning electron microscopy. In the first phase, excised rat extensor digitorum longus muscles are subjected to x-radiation and then soaked in Marcaine to inhibit muscle regeneration and to destroy peripheral muscle fibers. The muscles are then grafted back into their original sites and allowed to remain in place 7-14 days to allow for maximal removal of degenerating muscle tissue with minimal scar tissue formation. In the second phase, the muscle grafts are subjected sequentially to EDTA, triton X-100, DNAase, and sodium deoxycholate to remove phagocytizing cells and associated degenerating muscle tissue. These procedures result in translucent, acellular muscle grafts which show numerous empty tubes of BL backed by endomysial collagenous fibers. These preparations should be useful for morphological analyses of isolated muscle BL and for possible in vitro studies by which the biological activity of muscle BL can be examined.

  17. Basal Lamina Mimetic Nanofibrous Peptide Networks for Skeletal Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yasa, I Ceren; Gunduz, Nuray; Kilinc, Murat; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the coordination and regulation of cell adhesion, recruitment, differentiation and death. Therefore, equilibrium between cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and matrix-associated signals are important for the normal functioning of cells, as well as for regeneration. In this work, we describe importance of adhesive signals for myoblast cells' growth and differentiation by generating a novel ECM mimetic peptide nanofiber scaffold system. We show that not only structure but also composition of bioactive signals are important for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation by mimicking the compositional and structural properties of native skeletal muscle basal lamina. We conjugated laminin-derived integrin binding peptide sequence, "IKVAV", and fibronectin-derived well known adhesive sequence, "RGD", into peptide nanostructures to provide adhesive and myogenic cues on a nanofibrous morphology. The myogenic and adhesive signals exhibited a synergistic effect on model myoblasts, C2C12 cells. Our results showed that self-assembled peptide nanofibers presenting laminin derived epitopes support adhesion, growth and proliferation of the cells and significantly promote the expression of skeletal muscle-specific marker genes. The functional peptide nanofibers used in this study present a biocompatible and biodegradable microenvironment, which is capable of supporting the growth and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. PMID:26555958

  18. Basal Lamina Mimetic Nanofibrous Peptide Networks for Skeletal Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yasa, I. Ceren; Gunduz, Nuray; Kilinc, Murat; Guler, Mustafa O.; Tekinay, Ayse B.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the coordination and regulation of cell adhesion, recruitment, differentiation and death. Therefore, equilibrium between cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and matrix-associated signals are important for the normal functioning of cells, as well as for regeneration. In this work, we describe importance of adhesive signals for myoblast cells’ growth and differentiation by generating a novel ECM mimetic peptide nanofiber scaffold system. We show that not only structure but also composition of bioactive signals are important for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation by mimicking the compositional and structural properties of native skeletal muscle basal lamina. We conjugated laminin-derived integrin binding peptide sequence, “IKVAV”, and fibronectin-derived well known adhesive sequence, “RGD”, into peptide nanostructures to provide adhesive and myogenic cues on a nanofibrous morphology. The myogenic and adhesive signals exhibited a synergistic effect on model myoblasts, C2C12 cells. Our results showed that self-assembled peptide nanofibers presenting laminin derived epitopes support adhesion, growth and proliferation of the cells and significantly promote the expression of skeletal muscle-specific marker genes. The functional peptide nanofibers used in this study present a biocompatible and biodegradable microenvironment, which is capable of supporting the growth and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. PMID:26555958

  19. Basal Lamina Mimetic Nanofibrous Peptide Networks for Skeletal Myogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasa, I. Ceren; Gunduz, Nuray; Kilinc, Murat; Guler, Mustafa O.; Tekinay, Ayse B.

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the coordination and regulation of cell adhesion, recruitment, differentiation and death. Therefore, equilibrium between cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and matrix-associated signals are important for the normal functioning of cells, as well as for regeneration. In this work, we describe importance of adhesive signals for myoblast cells’ growth and differentiation by generating a novel ECM mimetic peptide nanofiber scaffold system. We show that not only structure but also composition of bioactive signals are important for cell adhesion, growth and differentiation by mimicking the compositional and structural properties of native skeletal muscle basal lamina. We conjugated laminin-derived integrin binding peptide sequence, “IKVAV”, and fibronectin-derived well known adhesive sequence, “RGD”, into peptide nanostructures to provide adhesive and myogenic cues on a nanofibrous morphology. The myogenic and adhesive signals exhibited a synergistic effect on model myoblasts, C2C12 cells. Our results showed that self-assembled peptide nanofibers presenting laminin derived epitopes support adhesion, growth and proliferation of the cells and significantly promote the expression of skeletal muscle-specific marker genes. The functional peptide nanofibers used in this study present a biocompatible and biodegradable microenvironment, which is capable of supporting the growth and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes.

  20. Occurrence of ozone laminae near the boundary of the stratospheric polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.J.; Vaughan, G. ); Kyro, E. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report on observations of laminae in ozone distributions observed at high northern latitudes near the polar vortex. Regions of enhanced and depleted ozone density are observed. Data from ozonesonde collections and lidar measurements during the Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Expedition (AASE) are analyzed, and compared with earlier work. The ozonesonde archives of the World Meteorological Organization are also examined in this analysis. The laminae are observed to distribute differently as a function of season, and with the potential temperature. Transport of ozone equatorward is also found with a class of these laminae.

  1. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for in vivo imaging of lamina cribrosa

    PubMed Central

    Vilupuru, Abhiram S.; Rangaswamy, Nalini V.; Frishman, Laura J.; Smith, Earl L.; Harwerth, Ronald S.; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    The lamina cribrosa has been postulated from in vitro studies as an early site of damage in glaucoma. Prior in vivo measures of laminar morphology have been confounded by ocular aberrations. In this study the lamina cribrosa was imaged after correcting for ocular aberrations using the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) in normal and glaucomatous eyes of rhesus monkeys. All measured laminar morphological parameters showed increased magnitudes in glaucomatous eyes relative to fellow control eyes, indicating altered structure. The AOSLO provides high-quality images of the lamina cribrosa and may have potential as a tool for early identification of glaucoma. PMID:17429488

  2. Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER) for the treatment of a case of huge esophageal tumor arising in the muscularis propria: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Wei, Li-Li; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Sha, Qi-Mei; Huang, Ya; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic Interventional Treatment is of little trauma and less complications in the treatment of esophageal tumor and leads to faster recovery and fewer days of hospitalization. This study was aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic interventional therapy for huge esophageal tumor arising in the muscularis propria. Methods: The patient was treated by submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER). Results: The huge esophageal tumor was resected completely by STER technique, with little trauma and less complications. The size of the resected tumor was 5.5×3.5×3.0 cm. Conclusion: Submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection is a safe and efficient technique for treating Huge Esophageal Tumor originating from muscularis propria layer. PMID:26629086

  3. Nuclear envelope disassembly and nuclear lamina depolymerization during germinal vesicle breakdown in starfish.

    PubMed

    Stricker, S A; Schatten, G

    1989-09-01

    During germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) in starfish, the nuclear envelope disassembles before the nuclear lamina completely depolymerizes, judging from correlative ultrastructural, immunolabeling, and light microscopic analyses. At 13 degrees C, prophase-arrested oocytes of Pisaster ochraceus begin GVBD and rapidly undergo nuclear envelope disassembly about 50 min after addition of the maturation-inducing hormone 1-methyladenine (1-MA). The nuclear lamina of these oocytes, however, remains present for 10-20 min following the vesiculation of the nuclear envelope. Completion of GVBD, as evidenced by a blending of the nuclear contents with the surrounding cytoplasm, occurs within about 15 min after the nuclear lamina has fully depolymerized. Immunofluorescence studies also indicate that a marked increase in the phosphorylations of nuclear proteins precedes the structural reorganizations of the nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina during GVBD. PMID:2670637

  4. Anatomical organization of the rat organum vasculosum laminae terminalis.

    PubMed

    Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Bourque, Charles W

    2015-08-15

    The organum vasculosum of the laminae terminalis (OVLT) is a circumventricular organ located along the ventral part of the anterior wall of the third ventricle. Because it lacks a complete blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-borne signals detected in the OVLT provide the brain with information from the periphery and contribute to the generation of centrally mediated responses to humoral feedback and physiological stressors. Experimental studies on the rat OVLT are hindered by a poor understanding of its precise anatomical dimensions and cellular organization. In this study, we use histological techniques to characterize the spatial outline of the rat OVLT and to examine the location of neurons, astrocytes, tanycytes, and ependymocytes within its confines. Our data reveal that OVLT neurons are embedded in a dense network of tanycyte processes. Immunostaining against the neuronal marker NeuN revealed that neurons are distributed throughout the OVLT, except for a thick midline septum, which comprises densely packed cells of unknown function or lineage. Moreover, the most ventral aspect of the OVLT is devoid of neurons and is occupied by a dense network of glial cell processes that form a thick layer between the neurons and the pial surface on the ventral aspect of the nucleus. Lastly, combined detection of NeuN and c-Fos protein following systemic injection of hypertonic NaCl revealed that neurons responsive to this stimulus are located along the entire midline core of the OVLT, extending from its most anterior ventral aspect to the more caudally located "dorsal cap" region. PMID:26017494

  5. Synaptic input of rat spinal lamina I projection and unidentified neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dahlhaus, Anne; Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Spinal lamina I projection neurones that transmit nociceptive information to the brain play a pivotal role in hyperalgesia in various animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Consistently, activity-dependent long-term potentiation can be induced at synapses between primary afferent C-fibres and lamina I projection neurones but not unidentified neurones in lamina I. The specific properties that enable projection neurones to undergo long-term potentiation and mediate hyperalgesia are not fully understood. Here, we have tested whether lamina I projection neurones differ from unidentified neurones in types or strength of primary afferent input and/or action potential-independent excitatory and inhibitory input. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record synaptic currents in projection and unidentified lamina I neurones in a transverse lumbar spinal cord slice preparation from rats between postnatal day 18 and 37. Lamina I neurones with a projection to the parabrachial area or the periaqueductal grey were identified by retrograde labelling with a fluorescent tracer. The relative contribution of NMDA receptors versus AMPA/kainate receptors to C-fibre-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents of lamina I neurones significantly decreased with age between postnatal day 18 and 27, but was independent of the supraspinal projection of the neurones. We did not find a significant contribution of kainate receptors to C-fibre-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents. Lamina I projection and unidentified neurones possessed functional GABAA and glycine receptors but received scarce action potential-independent spontaneous GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory input as measured by miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. The miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequencies were five times higher in projection than in unidentified neurones. The predominance of excitatory synaptic input to projection neurones, taken together with the previous finding that their membranes are more easily excitable than those of unidentified neurones, may facilitate the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation. PMID:15878938

  6. Partial chemical characterization of the anionic sites in the basal lamina of fenestrated capillaries.

    PubMed

    Simionescu, M; Simionescu, N; Palade, G E

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of anionic sites in the basal laminae of the blood capillaries of the murine pancreas was studied in specimens fixed in ruthenium red (RR)-glutaraldehyde mixtures. The sites appeared as discrete, small (6 to 18 nm) particles distributed throughout the three laminae but concentrated primarily in the lamina rara externa, in which--spaced 80-100 nm apart--they formed a planar, partially ordered lattice comparable to that revealed by cationized ferritin in previous studies (M. Simionescu, N. Simionescu, and G. E. Palade, 1982, J. Cell Biol. 95, 425-434). The chemical nature of the anionic sites was explored by incubating fresh tissue specimens in solutions of selected enzymes before fixation in RR-glutaraldehyde mixtures. Pronase P and papain removed completely the anionic sites and left behind an extensively degraded and disorganized basal lamina. Trypsin caused the removal of anionic sites only, did not degrade the rest of the basal lamina, but detached it completely from the endothelium. Chondroitinase ABC reduced slightly the size and the surface density of RR-stainable particles, and detached focally the rest of the basal lamina from the endothelium and pericytes. Crude heparinase caused a nearly complete removal of anionic sites, and pure heparitinase gave comparable but less extensive results. Similar effects were recorded on the basal laminae of smooth muscle fibers and pancreatic acini and ducts. The results indicate that the anionic sites of all basal laminae examined are contributed primarily by heparin sulfate proteoglycans and trace amounts of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. PMID:6521660

  7. Basal Lamina Scaffold-Anatomy and Significance for Maintenance of Orderly Tissue Structure

    PubMed Central

    Vracko, Rudolf

    1974-01-01

    The basal lamina is an extracellular scaffold positioned between parenchymal cells and connective tissue. Parenchymal cells attach to one of its surfaces and the other is anchored to connective tissue. By its presence it defines the spatial relationships among similar and dissimilar types of cells and between these cells and the space occupied by connective and supportive tissues. Replenishment of cells which have died during normal functioning or have become damaged in course of injury occurs with new cells in an orderly way along the framework of the basal lamina scaffold. This process appears to be aided by the polarity of the basal lamina and by an apparent specificity for cell types, and it enables multicellular organisms to reconstitute histologic structures of most tissues and organs to what they were prior to loss of cells. If the basal lamina is destroyed, the healing in most tissues results in formation of scar and loss of function. The properties of the basal lamina concerned with maintenance of histologic order in organs and tissues offer new ways to interpret the pathogenesis of several common disorders, including emphysema, scars, adhesions, cirrhosis of liver and excessive accumulation of basal lamina material as, for example, it occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2Fig 8 PMID:4614671

  8. Analysis of Isentropic Transport in the Lower Tropical Stratosphere from Laminae Observed in Shadoz Ozone Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portafaix, T.; Bencherif, H.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Begue, N.; Culot, A.

    2014-12-01

    The subtropical dynamical barrier located in the lower stratosphere on the edge of the Tropical Stratospheric Reservoir (TSR), controls and limits exchanges between tropical and extratropical lower stratosphere. The geographical position of stations located near from the edge of the Tropical Stratospheric Reservoir is interesting since they are regularly interested by air-mass filaments originated from TSR or mid-latitudes. During such filamentary events, profiles of chemical species are modified according to the origin and the height of the air mass. These perturbations called "laminae" are generally associated to quasi-horizontal transport events. Many SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) stations from all around the southern tropics were selected in order to study the variability of laminae. Profiles from ozonesondes were analyzed to detect laminae using a statistical standard deviation method from the climatology. Time series of laminae were investigated by a multilinear regression model in order to estimate the influence of several proxy on laminae variability from 1998 to 2013. Different forcings such as QBO, ENSO or IOD were applied. The first objective is to better quantify isentropic transport as function of the station location and the influence of the QBO on the laminae occurrences. Finally, cases studies were conducted from high-resolution advection model MIMOSA. These allow us to identify the air mass origin and to highlight privileged roads where meridional transport occurs between tropics and midlatitudes.

  9. Invasive Candidiasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida . Unlike Candida ... mouth and throat (also called “thrush”) or vaginal “yeast infections,” invasive candidiasis is a serious infection that ...

  10. Long-term trends in the northern extratropical ozone laminae with focus on European stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Krizan, Peter; Kozubek, Michal

    2014-12-01

    Narrow layers of substantially enhanced ozone concentration in ozonesonde-observed ozone profiles, called positive ozone laminae, reveal much stronger trend than the stratospheric and total ozone itself. They seem to be sensitive to both the ozone concentration and even more to changes in the stratospheric dynamics. We are studying long-term trends of strong positive laminae based on balloon-borne ozone sounding in Europe, Japan, North America and Arctic over 1970-2011 with focus on European stations due to their highest frequency of ozone sounding. Laminae characteristics exhibit strong negative trend till the mid-1990s (decrease by 50% or more). In more recent years this negative trend reverses to a positive trend. According to regression analysis, several factors play a role in the trend in laminae in Europe, namely NAO, EESC and the behavior of the winter polar stratospheric vortex represented here by the 10 hPa polar temperature. On the other hand, several factors are found not to play a significant role in the long-term trend in laminae.

  11. Subfrontal trans-lamina terminalis approach to a third ventricular craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Chang, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are benign, partly cystic epithelial tumors that can rarely occur in a retrochiasmatic location with involvement of the third ventricle. The lamina terminalis is an important neurosurgical corridor to these craniopharyngiomas in the anterior portion of the third ventricle. We present a video case of a large midline suprasellar and third ventricular craniopharyngioma in a 32-year-old male with visual disturbances. The tumor was approached with a subfrontal translamina terminalis exposure, and a gross-total resection of the tumor was achieved. This surgery involved working through a lamina terminalis fenestration around the optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tracts, and the anterior communicating artery complex. This video illustrates the techniques employed in performing a transbasal anterior skull base approach to the third ventricle and demonstrates vivid surgical anatomy of neurovascular structures around the lamina terminalis. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/fCYMgx8SnKs . PMID:26722678

  12. The human autodiagnostic system (Rexed`s laminae as diagnostic neuroprocessors)

    SciTech Connect

    Chernavskii, D.S.; Karp, V.P.; Rodshtat, I.V.

    1994-07-01

    A position is formulated according to which the therapeutic effect of a puncture action is a result of the correction of defects in the human autodiagnostic system (ADS). The structure and functions of the ADS are examined from the points of view of pattern recognition, neurocomputing, and neurophysiology. The necessary conditions that the ADC must satisfy are formulated. It is shown that the theoretical conditions are satisfied by Rexed`s laminae, which are a part of the central nervous system and form the grey matter of the spinal cord. The available biochemical and morphological data are utilized in an examination of the operating mechanism of Rexed`s laminae as a whole (as an ADS) and each lamina individually (as neuroprocessors that perform specific functions). Potential defects in the recognition system and methods for their correction by signals produced by biologically active points by EHF puncture are examined.

  13. [Analgesia of the axilla using a paravertebral catheter in the lamina technique].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, G; Oppitz, N; Schöne, S; Richter-Heine, I; Höhne, M; Koltermann, C

    2006-04-01

    A 62-year-old female suffered from therapy-resistant pain in the axilla after lymphadenectomy. The pain ranged from 8-10 on the numeric rating scale (NRS) despite multimodal pain therapy (non-steroid anti-rheumatics, opioids, physiotherapy, acupuncture). A paravertebral trial injection was performed preoperatively on the laminae of the thoracic vertebrae Th 2-Th 4. As the patient responded well, a paravertebral catheter was inserted close to Th 4 directly before the revision operation took place the following day. The case study describes the possibilities of eliminating pain segmentally in the axilla and an alternative technique to a paravertebral block (lamina technique). PMID:16404582

  14. The role of endolithic cyanobacteria in the formation of lithied laminae in Bahamian stromatolites

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    The role of endolithic cyanobacteria in the formation of lithi®ed laminae in Bahamian stromatolites The microboring activity of endolithic cyanobacteria plays a major role in the formation of the dominant lithi primarily of ®ne-grained carbonate sand that is trapped and bound by the ®lamentous cyanobacteria

  15. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in SCS-6/Ti 15-3 MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Monotonic tests were conducted at room temperature (RT), 538 C and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics were different in monotonic tension and compression loading whereas some of those differences could be attributed to residual stress effects. There were other differences because of changes in damage and failure modes. The inelastic deformation in the (0)(sub 8) lamina under compression was controlled primarily by matrix plasticity, although some evidence of fiber-matrix debonding was observed. Failure of the specimen in compression was due to fiber buckling in a macroscopic shear zone (the failure plane). The inelastic deformation mechanisms under compression in (90)(sub 8) lamina were controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity, and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture was a new damage mode observed for MMC's. Constitutive response was predicted for both the (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) laminae, using AGLPLY, METCAN, and Battelle's Unit Cell FEA model. Results from the analyses were encouraging.

  16. Remodeling of the Nuclear Envelope and Lamina during Bovine Preimplantation Development and Its Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Popken, Jens; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Schmid, Volker J.; Strauss, Axel; Guengoer, Tuna; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard; Cremer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a major remodeling of the nuclear envelope and its underlying lamina during bovine preimplantation development. Up to the onset of major embryonic genome activation (MGA) at the 8-cell stage nuclei showed a non-uniform distribution of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). NPCs were exclusively present at sites where DNA contacted the nuclear lamina. Extended regions of the lamina, which were not contacted by DNA, lacked NPCs. In post-MGA nuclei the whole lamina was contacted rather uniformly by DNA. Accordingly, NPCs became uniformly distributed throughout the entire nuclear envelope. These findings shed new light on the conditions which control the integration of NPCs into the nuclear envelope. The switch from maternal to embryonic production of mRNAs was accompanied by multiple invaginations covered with NPCs, which may serve the increased demands of mRNA export and protein import. Other invaginations, as well as interior nuclear segments and vesicles without contact to the nuclear envelope, were exclusively positive for lamin B. Since the abundance of these invaginations and vesicles increased in concert with a massive nuclear volume reduction, we suggest that they reflect a mechanism for fitting the nuclear envelope and its lamina to a shrinking nuclear size during bovine preimplantation development. In addition, a deposit of extranuclear clusters of NUP153 (a marker for NPCs) without associated lamin B was frequently observed from the zygote stage up to MGA. Corresponding RNA-Seq data revealed deposits of spliced, maternally provided NUP153 mRNA and little unspliced, newly synthesized RNA prior to MGA, which increased strongly at the initiation of embryonic expression of NUP153 at MGA. PMID:25932910

  17. The lateral enamel lamina--component of tooth primordia in selected mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Witter, K; Matulová, P; Mísek, I

    2002-01-01

    The lateral enamel lamina (LEL) is a part of the enamel organ, which is probably not involved in tooth formation. It represents, besides the "stalk" of the tooth primordium, a second interconnection between enamel organ and oral epithelium or vestibular lamina. We detected the LEL in the sheep (Ovis aries), the dolphin (Stenella attenuata), and the vole (Microtus agrestis) by light microscopy and computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction. The LEL could be found in cap to bell stage tooth primordia, most clearly in slowly developing tooth germs. LEL-like structures have been furthermore described or depicted in tooth germs of the mouse, the elk (Alces alces), the dugong (Dugong dugong), the elephant (Loxodonta africana), and the human. Probably it is a part of all mammalian tooth primordia that undergoes regression during morphogenesis of the enamel organ. As a reducing structure, it should be considered in studies of tooth development. PMID:12494916

  18. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  19. Sensitivity of vocal fold vibratory modes to their three-layer structure: Implications for computational modeling of phonation

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Rajat

    of the lamina propria, deep layer of the lamina propria, and the thy- roaryenoid muscle (or vocalis) (Titze-fold paralysis/paresis and involves the insertion of a synthetic implant into the larynx via a window cut

  20. Application of grating shearography to the experimental analysis of a single fabric lamina under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Ryul; Molimard, Jerume; Vautrin, Alain; Surrel, Yves

    2002-06-01

    Grating shearography is an extension of moire interferometry where a shearing element is included in the imaging part of the setup. It is possible to obtain all three components of the in-plane strains, the in-plane rotation and the two out-of-plane slopes. The presented application is an experimental investigation of the mechanical behavior of a plain woven graphite fiber reinforced polymer composite lamina under tensile loading.

  1. Significance of host cell kinases in herpes simplex virus type 1 egress and lamin-associated protein disassembly from the nuclear lamina

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Natalie R.; Roller, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be a steric barrier to the herpesvirus capsid. Disruption of the lamina accompanied by phosphorylation of lamina proteins is a conserved feature of herpesvirus infection. In HSV-1-infected cells, protein kinase C (PKC) alpha and delta isoforms are recruited to the nuclear membrane and PKC delta has been implicated in phosphorylation of emerin and lamin B. We tested two critical hypotheses about the mechanism and significance of lamina disruption. First, we show that chemical inhibition of all PKC isoforms reduced viral growth five-fold and inhibited capsid egress from the nucleus. However, specific inhibition of either conventional PKCs or PKC delta does not inhibit viral growth. Second, we show hyperphosphorylation of emerin by viral and cellular kinases is required for its disassociation from the lamina. These data support hypothesis that phosphorylation of lamina components mediates lamina disruption during HSV nuclear egress. PMID:20674954

  2. Multi-scale Rule-of-Mixtures Model of Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Lamina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Roddick, Jaret C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    A unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy lamina in which the carbon fibers are coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes is modeled with a multi-scale method, the atomistically informed rule-of-mixtures. This multi-scale model is designed to include the effect of the carbon nanotubes on the constitutive properties of the lamina. It included concepts from the molecular dynamics/equivalent continuum methods, micromechanics, and the strength of materials. Within the model both the nanotube volume fraction and nanotube distribution were varied. It was found that for a lamina with 60% carbon fiber volume fraction, the Young's modulus in the fiber direction varied with changes in the nanotube distribution, from 138.8 to 140 GPa with nanotube volume fractions ranging from 0.0001 to 0.0125. The presence of nanotube near the surface of the carbon fiber is therefore expected to have a small, but positive, effect on the constitutive properties of the lamina.

  3. MacroH2A1 associates with nuclear lamina and maintains chromatin architecture in mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuhua; Lv, Pin; Yan, Guoquan; Fan, Hui; Cheng, Lu; Zhang, Feng; Dang, Yongjun; Wu, Hao; Wen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In the interphase nucleus, chromatin is organized into three-dimensional conformation to coordinate genome functions. The lamina-chromatin association is important to facilitate higher-order chromatin in mammalian cells, but its biological significances and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. One obstacle is that the list of lamina-associated proteins remains limited, presumably due to the inherent insolubility of lamina proteins. In this report, we identified 182 proteins associated with lamin B1 (a constitutive component of lamina) in mouse hepatocytes, by adopting virus-based proximity-dependent biotin identification. These proteins are functionally related to biological processes such as chromatin organization. As an example, we validated the association between lamin B1 and core histone macroH2A1, a histone associated with repressive chromatin. Furthermore, we mapped Lamina-associated domains (LADs) in mouse liver cells and found that boundaries of LADs are enriched for macroH2A. More interestingly, knocking-down of macroH2A1 resulted in the release of heterochromatin foci marked by histone lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and the decondensation of global chromatin structure. However, down-regulation of lamin B1 led to redistribution of macroH2A1. Taken together, our data indicated that macroH2A1 is associated with lamina and is required to maintain chromatin architecture in mouse liver cells. PMID:26603343

  4. MacroH2A1 associates with nuclear lamina and maintains chromatin architecture in mouse liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yuhua; Lv, Pin; Yan, Guoquan; Fan, Hui; Cheng, Lu; Zhang, Feng; Dang, Yongjun; Wu, Hao; Wen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In the interphase nucleus, chromatin is organized into three-dimensional conformation to coordinate genome functions. The lamina-chromatin association is important to facilitate higher-order chromatin in mammalian cells, but its biological significances and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. One obstacle is that the list of lamina-associated proteins remains limited, presumably due to the inherent insolubility of lamina proteins. In this report, we identified 182 proteins associated with lamin B1 (a constitutive component of lamina) in mouse hepatocytes, by adopting virus-based proximity-dependent biotin identification. These proteins are functionally related to biological processes such as chromatin organization. As an example, we validated the association between lamin B1 and core histone macroH2A1, a histone associated with repressive chromatin. Furthermore, we mapped Lamina-associated domains (LADs) in mouse liver cells and found that boundaries of LADs are enriched for macroH2A. More interestingly, knocking-down of macroH2A1 resulted in the release of heterochromatin foci marked by histone lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and the decondensation of global chromatin structure. However, down-regulation of lamin B1 led to redistribution of macroH2A1. Taken together, our data indicated that macroH2A1 is associated with lamina and is required to maintain chromatin architecture in mouse liver cells. PMID:26603343

  5. Invasive Bluegills

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2008-02-13

    Broadcast Transcript: Those pesky invasive species! How to deal with them? You can shoot them. You can spray them. Or you can call them haute cuisine and eat them which is what is being done here in Japan to combat the out-of-control bluegill...

  6. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed.

  7. Reorganization of Nuclear Pore Complexes and the Lamina in Late-Stage Parvovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Elina; Niskanen, Einari A; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2015-11-15

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection induces reorganization of nuclear structures. Our studies indicated that late-stage infection induces accumulation of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and lamin B1 concomitantly with a decrease of lamin A/C levels on the apical side of the nucleus. Newly formed CPV capsids are located in close proximity to NPCs on the apical side. These results suggest that parvoviruses cause apical enrichment of NPCs and reorganization of nuclear lamina, presumably to facilitate the late-stage infection. PMID:26311881

  8. Vibration Measurement on Reticular Lamina and Basilar Membrane at Multiple Longitudinal Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The longitudinal distribution of the organ of Corti vibration is important for both understanding the energy delivery and the timing of the cochlear amplification. Recent development on low coherence interferomtry technique allows measuring vibration inside the cochlea. The reticular lamina (RL) vibration spectrum demonstrates that RL vibration leads the basilar membrane (BM). This phase lead is consistent with the idea that the active process may lead the BM vibration. In this study, measurements on multiple longitudinal locations demonstrated similar phase lead. Results on this study suggests that there may be another longitudinal coupling mechanism inside the cochlea other than the traveling wave on BM.

  9. Maintenance of Glia in the Optic Lamina Is Mediated by EGFR Signaling by Photoreceptors in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ming; Sun, Y. Henry

    2015-01-01

    The late onset of neurodegeneration in humans indicates that the survival and function of cells in the nervous system must be maintained throughout adulthood. In the optic lamina of the adult Drosophila, the photoreceptor axons are surrounded by multiple types of glia. We demonstrated that the adult photoreceptors actively contribute to glia maintenance in their target field within the optic lamina. This effect is dependent on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands produced by the R1-6 photoreceptors and transported to the optic lamina to act on EGFR in the lamina glia. EGFR signaling is necessary and sufficient to act in a cell-autonomous manner in the lamina glia. Our results suggest that EGFR signaling is required for the trafficking of the autophagosome/endosome to the lysosome. The loss of EGFR signaling results in cell degeneration most likely because of the accumulation of autophagosomes. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for the role of adult neurons in the maintenance of glia and a novel role for EGFR signaling in the autophagic flux. PMID:25909451

  10. Directed targeting of chromatin to the nuclear lamina is mediated by chromatin state and A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jennifer C.; Luperchio, Teresa Romeo; Wong, Xianrong; Cohen, Erez; Wheelan, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear organization has been implicated in regulating gene activity. Recently, large developmentally regulated regions of the genome dynamically associated with the nuclear lamina have been identified. However, little is known about how these lamina-associated domains (LADs) are directed to the nuclear lamina. We use our tagged chromosomal insertion site system to identify small sequences from borders of fibroblast-specific variable LADs that are sufficient to target these ectopic sites to the nuclear periphery. We identify YY1 (Ying-Yang1) binding sites as enriched in relocating sequences. Knockdown of YY1 or lamin A/C, but not lamin A, led to a loss of lamina association. In addition, targeted recruitment of YY1 proteins facilitated ectopic LAD formation dependent on histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and histone H3 lysine di- and trimethylation. Our results also reveal that endogenous loci appear to be dependent on lamin A/C, YY1, H3K27me3, and H3K9me2/3 for maintenance of lamina-proximal positioning. PMID:25559185

  11. Interannual Variability of Ozone in the Winter Lower Stratosphere and the Relationship to Lamina and Irreversible Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Douglass, Anne R.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Yoshida, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    We use the high-resolution dynamic limb sounder (HIRDLS) high-vertical resolution ozone profiles in the northern hemisphere lower stratosphere to examine the meridional transport out of the tropics. We focus on February 2005.2007 when there are differences in the dynamical background in the lower stratosphere due to the states of the quasibiennial oscillation and polar vortex. HIRDLS data reveal a large number of low ozone laminae that have the characteristics of tropical air at midlatitudes. More laminae are observed in February in 2006 than in 2005 or 2007. Because laminae can form, move out of the tropics, and return to the tropics without mixing into the midlatitude ozone field, the number of laminae is not directly related to the net transport. We use equivalent latitude coordinates to discriminate between reversible and irreversible laminar transport. The equivalent latitude analysis shows greater irreversible transport between the tropics and lower midlatitudes in both 2005 and 2007 compared to 2006 despite the higher number of laminae observed in 2006. Our conclusion that there was more irreversible transport of tropical air into the lower midlatitudes in 2005 and 2007 is supported by equivalent length analysis of mixing using microwave limb sounder N2O measurements. This study shows that reversibility must be considered in order to infer the importance of lamination to net transport.

  12. Genome-wide Maps of Nuclear Lamina Interactions in Single Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kind, Jop; Pagie, Ludo; de Vries, Sandra S; Nahidiazar, Leila; Dey, Siddharth S; Bienko, Magda; Zhan, Ye; Lajoie, Bryan; de Graaf, Carolyn A; Amendola, Mario; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A; Jalink, Kees; Dekker, Job; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-09-24

    Mammalian interphase chromosomes interact with the nuclear lamina (NL) through hundreds of large lamina-associated domains (LADs). We report a method to map NL contacts genome-wide in single human cells. Analysis of nearly 400 maps reveals a core architecture consisting of gene-poor LADs that contact the NL with high cell-to-cell consistency, interspersed by LADs with more variable NL interactions. The variable contacts tend to be cell-type specific and are more sensitive to changes in genome ploidy than the consistent contacts. Single-cell maps indicate that NL contacts involve multivalent interactions over hundreds of kilobases. Moreover, we observe extensive intra-chromosomal coordination of NL contacts, even over tens of megabases. Such coordinated loci exhibit preferential interactions as detected by Hi-C. Finally, the consistency of NL contacts is inversely linked to gene activity in single cells and correlates positively with the heterochromatic histone modification H3K9me3. These results highlight fundamental principles of single-cell chromatin organization. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26365489

  13. Disruption of the Aortic Elastic Lamina and Medial Calcification Share Genetic Determinants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Susanna S.; Martin, Lisa J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Meng, Haijin; Wang, Xuping; Zhao, Wei; Ingram-Drake, Leslie; Nebohacova, Martina; Mehrabian, Margarete; Drake, Thomas A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Disruption of the elastic lamina, as an early indicator of aneurysm formation, and vascular calcification frequently occur together in atherosclerotic lesions of humans. Methods and Results We now report evidence of shared genetic basis for disruption of the elastic lamina (medial disruption) and medial calcification in an F2 mouse intercross between C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ on a hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E (ApoE?/?) null background. We identified 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 6, 13, and 18, which are common to both traits, and 2 additional QTLs for medial calcification on chromosomes 3 and 7. Medial disruption, including severe disruptions leading to aneurysm formation, and medial calcification were highly correlated and occurred concomitantly in the cross. The chromosome 18 locus showed a striking male sex-specificity for both traits. To identify candidate genes, we integrated data from microarray analysis, genetic segregation, and clinical traits. The chromosome 7 locus contains the Abcc6 gene, known to mediate myocardial calcification. Using transgenic complementation, we show that Abcc6 also contributes to aortic medial calcification. Conclusions Our data indicate that calcification, though possibly contributory, does not always lead to medial disruption and that in addition to aneurysm formation, medial disruption may be the precursor to calcification. PMID:20031637

  14. Lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP)2? and nucleoplasmic lamins in adult stem cell regulation and disease.

    PubMed

    Gesson, Kevin; Vidak, Sandra; Foisner, Roland

    2014-05-01

    A-type lamins are components of the lamina network at the nuclear envelope, which mediates nuclear stiffness and anchors chromatin to the nuclear periphery. However, A-type lamins are also found in the nuclear interior. Here we review the roles of the chromatin-associated, nucleoplasmic LEM protein, lamina-associated polypeptide 2? (LAP2?) in the regulation of A-type lamins in the nuclear interior. The lamin A/C-LAP2? complex may be involved in the regulation of the retinoblastoma protein-mediated pathway and other signaling pathways balancing proliferation and differentiation, and in the stabilization of higher-order chromatin organization throughout the nucleus. Loss of LAP2? in mice leads to selective depletion of the nucleoplasmic A-type lamin pool, promotes the proliferative stem cell phenotype of tissue progenitor cells, and delays stem cell differentiation. These findings support the hypothesis that LAP2? and nucleoplasmic lamins are regulators of adult stem cell function and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we discuss potential implications of this concept for defining the molecular disease mechanisms of lamin-linked diseases such as muscular dystrophy and premature aging syndromes. PMID:24374133

  15. Protease inhibitor 15, a candidate gene for abdominal aortic internal elastic lamina ruptures in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Falak, Samreen; Schafer, Sebastian; Baud, Amelie; Hummel, Oliver; Schulz, Herbert; Gauguier, Dominique; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat develops spontaneous ruptures of the internal elastic lamina (RIEL) of the abdominal aorta (AA) and iliac arteries. Prior studies with crosses of the BN/Orl RJ (susceptible) and LOU/M (resistant) showed the presence of a significant QTL on chromosome 5 and the production of congenic rats proved the involvement of this locus. In this study, we further dissected the above-mentioned QTL by creating a new panel of LOU.BN(chr5) congenic and subcongenic lines and reduced the locus to 5.2 Mb. Then we studied 1,002 heterogeneous stock (HS) rats, whose phenotyping revealed a low prevalence and high variability for RIEL. High-resolution mapping in the HS panel detected the major locus on chromosome 5 (log P > 35) and refined it to 1.4 Mb. Subsequently, RNA-seq analysis on AA of BN, congenics, and LOU revealed expression differences for only protease inhibitor 15 (Pi15) gene and a putative long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) within the linkage region. The high abundance of lincRNA with respect to reduced Pi15 expression, in conjunction with exertion of longitudinal strain, may be related to RIEL, indicating the potential importance of proteases in biological processes related to defective aortic internal elastic lamina structure. Similar mechanisms may be involved in aneurysm initiation in the human AA. PMID:24790086

  16. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  17. Origin of laminae in Holocene-Pleistocene evaporitic sequence of salt-flat playas, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.; Warren, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Salt-flat playas of West Texas-New Mexico are represented by a series of north-south aligned Holocene-Pleistocene dried salt lakes. Shallow (up to 100 cm) cores on the alkali flats of these lakes reveal a well-defined sequence of alternating dark and light laminae in the evaporitic sediments. These laminates bear a close resemblance to the laminated calcite-, dolomite-, and anhydrite-bearing sequences of the Middle Devonian Winnipegosis Formation of western Canada, Permian Castile Formation of west Texas and New Mexico, and recent sediments from hypersaline pools of the Gulf of Aqaba and other locations. XRD studies, augmented by petrographic evidence, show that laminates from the salt-flat playas are comprised of layers of differing mineral composition. The darker layers are dominated by gypsum (average 36.89%), halite (average 27.71%), calcite (average 17.74%), and dolomite (average 15.81%), whereas lighter layers are impoverished in calcite and dolomite and consist mainly of gypsum (average 72.86%) and halite (average 27.14%). Beside the mineralogic variations, the laminae also differ significantly in the abundance of total organic matter (TOM) content, with darker laminae being invariably richer (average 51% TOM in contrast to average 21% in lighter laminae). Micritic sediments that are relatively less altered by later recrystallization have retained a higher concentration of organic matter. In the gypsiferous sediments, which seem to owe their origin to a micritic mass, the organic matter is widely dispersed. In addition to the interspersed organic matter in evaporitic laminae, laminae comprised exclusively of algal mats also are common in these sequences. Liquids chromatographic studies reveal that these algal mats are remarkably similar in their hydrocarbon content to that of the algal mats that are now growing sporadically on the moist playa surfaces.

  18. The role of lamina cribrosa cells in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Deborah M; O'Brien, Colm J

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic progressive optic neuropathy. There are extracellular matrix (ECM) changes associated with optic disc cupping in the optic nerve head (ONH) and subsequent visual field defects. The primary risk factor for onset and progression of glaucoma is raised intraocular pressure (IOP). Elevated IOP causes deformation at the ONH specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also deposition of ECM causing the LC to initially undergo thickening and posterior migration with eventual shearing and collapse of the LC plates leading to a thin fibrotic connective tissue structure/scar. Cells that populate the LC region of the ONH are those cells that are positive for GFAP (the astrocytes) and those negative for GFAP (the LC cells). The LC cell plays an integral role in ECM remodelling producing ECM when exposed to high level mechanical stretch, TGF- ?1 and a hypoxic environment. PMID:26675406

  19. The Biophysical Properties of Basal Lamina Gels Depend on the Biochemical Composition of the Gel

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Kerstin; Boettcher, Kathrin; Zahler, Stefan; Lieleg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) depends sensitively on the biochemical and biophysical properties of the matrix. An example for a biological ECM is given by reconstituted basal lamina gels purified from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma of mice. Here, we compare four different commercial variants of this ECM, which have all been purified according to the same protocol. Nevertheless, in those gels, we detect strong differences in the migration behavior of leukocyte cells as well as in the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. We show that these differences correlate with the mechanical properties and the microarchitecture of the gels which in turn arise from small variations in their biochemical composition. PMID:25689062

  20. Measurement of Basilar Membrane, Reticular Lamina, and Tectorial Membrane Vibrations in the Intact Mouse Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2011-11-01

    A scanning low-coherence heterodyne interferometer (SLHI) was developed for measuring the microstructural vibration inside the cochlear partition of the intact living cochlea of mice. The sensitivity, frequency response, and dynamic range of the SLHI are comparable with those of a sensitive laser interferometer but the SLHI has a higher spatial resolution along the optical axis. The magnitude and phase of sound-induced vibrations were measured as a function of the focal position along the optical axis. Our data show that the SLHI has sufficient sensitivity, dynamic range, and temporal and spatial resolution to measure sub-nanometer vibrations of the basilar membrane, reticular lamina, and tectorial membrane in the intact living mouse cochlea. High spatial and temporal resolution, compact heterodyne design, and scanning capability make this interferometer an ideal tool to study molecular mechanisms of hearing in normal and genetically-modified mice.

  1. The climate reconstruction in Shandong Peninsula, North China during the last millennia based on stalagmite laminae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Cheng, K.; Chi, H.; Shen, C.; Wang, C.; Ma, Q.

    2015-10-01

    Stalagmite ky1 was collected from Kaiyuan Cave in coastal areas of Shandong Peninsula, northern China, located at warm temperate zone and East Asia monsoon area, it was 75 mm in length, and the top 42.77 mm developed 678 laminae. Based on high precision dating with U-230Th technique, by continuous laminae counting, it can be confirmed that the 1st and 678th layer were 1217 and 1892 AD from top to bottom respectively. By the measurement of layer thickness and ?18O values, we got the layer thickness data and ?18O value time series data from 1217 to 1892 AD, analyzed the climatic significance of layer thickness variation on the basis of comparison. The result show that, in the 678 years from 1217 to 1892 AD, both the layer thickness variation of stalagmite ky1 and the variation of layer thickness fluctuation degree have obvious staged characteristic, and completely synchronized with the contemporaneous summer monsoon intensity/precipitation in time. Among, the thickness of layer and summer monsoon intensity/precipitation have negative correlation themselves. On the other hand, the layer thickness and the fluctuation degree of summer monsoon intensity/precipitation have positive correlation themselves. Therefore, Kaiyuan Cave, in the coastal area of warm temperate zone and East Asia monsoon area, the variation of layer thickness are relate to climatic factors variation themselves, and relate to climate stability degree in addition. For to achieve this, in the coastal area of warm temperate zone and East Asia monsoon area, the climate change between LIA and MWP, in addition to presented like less precipitation and low temperature that is to say dry and cold, also showed the climate stability degree obvious decreased.

  2. Heat treatment of retinal pigment epithelium induces production of elastic lamina components and antiangiogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Sekiyama, Eiichi; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Yoneda, Kazuhito; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakao, Shintaro; Walshe, Tony E.; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Miller, Joan W.; Kinoshita, Shigeru; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. In advanced AMD, new vessels from choriocapillaris (CC) invade through the Bruch's membrane (BrM) into the retina, forming choroidal neovascularization (CNV). BrM, an elastic lamina that is located between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and CC, is thought to act as a physical and functional barrier against CNV. The BrM of patients with early AMD are characterized by decreased levels of antiangiogenic factors, including endostatin, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), as well as by degeneration of the elastic layer. Motivated by a previous report that heat increases elastin expression in human skin, we examined the effect of heat on human ARPE-19 cell production of BrM components. Heat treatment stimulated the production of BrM components, including TSP-1, PEDF, and tropoelastin in vitro and increased the antiangiogenic activity of RPE measured in a mouse corneal pocket assay. The effect of heat on experimental CNV was investigated by pretreating the retina with heat via infrared diode laser prior to the induction of CNV. Heat treatment blocked the development of experimental CNV in vivo. These findings suggest that heat treatment may restore BrM integrity and barrier function against new vessel growth.—Sekiyama, E., Saint-Geniez, M., Yoneda, K., Hisatomi, T., Nakao, S., Walshe, T. E., Maruyama, K., Hafezi-Moghadam, A., Miller, J. W., Kinoshita, S., D'Amore, P. A. Heat treatment of retinal pigment epithelium induces production of elastic lamina components and anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:22067481

  3. Spinal cord injury causes plasticity in a subpopulation of lamina I GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kimberly J; Hochman, Shawn

    2008-07-01

    Dysfunction of the spinal GABAergic system has been implicated in pain syndromes following spinal cord injury (SCI). Since lamina I is involved in nociceptive and thermal signaling, we characterized the effects of chronic SCI on the cellular properties of its GABAergic neurons fluorescently identified in spinal slices from GAD67-GFP transgenic mice. Whole cell recordings were obtained from the lumbar cord of 13- to 17-day-old mice, including those having had a thoracic segment (T8-11) removed 6-9 days prior to experiments. Following chronic SCI, the distribution, incidence, and firing classes of GFP+ cells remained similar to controls, and there were minimal changes in membrane properties in cells that responded to current injection with a single spike. In contrast, cells displaying tonic/initial burst firing had more depolarized membrane potentials, increased steady-state outward currents, and increased spike heights. Moreover, higher firing frequencies and spontaneous plateau potentials were much more prevalent after chronic SCI, and these changes occurred predominantly in cells displaying a tonic firing pattern. Persistent inward currents (PICs) were observed in a similar fraction of cells from spinal transects and may have contributed to these plateaus. Persistent Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels likely contributed to the currents as both were identified pharmacologically. In conclusion, chronic SCI induces a plastic response in a subpopulation of lamina I GABAergic interneurons. Alterations are directed toward amplifying neuronal responsiveness. How these changes alter spinal sensory integration and whether they contribute to sensory dysfunction remains to be elucidated. PMID:18480373

  4. In Vivo Changes in Lamina Cribrosa Microarchitecture and Optic Nerve Head Structure in Early Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Kevin M.; Sredar, Nripun; Patel, Nimesh B.; Rajagopalan, Lakshmi; Queener, Hope M.; Twa, Michael D.; Harwerth, Ronald S.; Porter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The lamina cribrosa likely plays an important role in retinal ganglion cell axon injury in glaucoma. We sought to (1) better understand optic nerve head (ONH) structure and anterior lamina cribrosa surface (ALCS) microarchitecture between fellow eyes of living, normal non-human primates and (2) characterize the time-course of in vivo structural changes in the ONH, ALCS microarchitecture, and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in non-human primate eyes with early experimental glaucoma (EG). Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) images of the ONH were acquired cross-sectionally in six bilaterally normal rhesus monkeys, and before and approximately every two weeks after inducing unilateral EG in seven rhesus monkeys. ONH parameters and RNFLT were quantified from segmented SDOCT images. Mean ALCS pore area, elongation and nearest neighbor distance (NND) were quantified globally, in sectors and regionally from adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope images. In bilaterally normal monkeys, ONH parameters were similar between fellow eyes with few inter-eye differences in ALCS pore parameters. In EG monkeys, an increase in mean ALCS Depth (ALCSD) was the first structural change measured in 6 of 7 EG eyes. A decrease in mean minimum rim width (MRW) simultaneously accompanied this early change in 4 of 6 EG eyes and was the first structural change in the 7th EG eye. Mean ALCS pore parameters were among the first or second changes measured in 4 EG eyes. Mean ALCS pore area and NND increased in superotemporal and temporal sectors and in central and peripheral regions at the first time-point of change in ALCS pore geometry. RNFLT and/or mean ALCS radius of curvature were typically the last parameters to initially change. Survival analyses found mean ALCSD was the only parameter to significantly show an initial change prior to the first measured loss in RNFLT across EG eyes. PMID:26230993

  5. Lamina Cribrosa Microarchitecture in Normal Monkey Eyes Part 1: Methods and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Howard; Reynaud, Juan; Gardiner, Stuart; Grimm, Jonathan; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, J. Crawford; Yang, Hongli; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To introduce quantitative postmortem lamina cribrosa (LC) microarchitecture (LMA) assessment and characterize beam diameter (BD), pore diameter (PD), and connective tissue volume fraction (CTVF) in 21 normal monkey eyes. Methods. Optic nerve heads (ONHs) underwent digital three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and LC beam segmentation. Each beam and pore voxel was assigned a diameter based on the largest sphere that contained it before transformation to one of twelve 30° sectors in a common cylinder. Mean BD, PD, and CTVF within 12 central and 12 peripheral subsectors and within inner, middle, and outer LC depths were assessed for sector, subsector, and depth effects by analysis of variance using general estimating equations. Eye-specific LMA discordance (the pattern of lowest connective tissue density) was plotted for each parameter. Results. The ranges of mean BD, PD, and CTVF were 14.0 to 23.1 ?m, 20.0 to 35.6 ?m, and 0.247 to 0.638, respectively. Sector, subsector, and depth effects were significant (P < 0.01) for all parameters except subsector on CTVF. Beam diameter and CTVF were smaller and PD was larger within the superior-temporal (ST) and inferior-temporal (IT) sectors (P < 0.05). These differences were enhanced within the central versus peripheral subsectors. Beam diameter and CTVF were larger and PD was smaller (P < 0.05) within the middle LC layer. Lamina cribrosa microarchitecture discordance most commonly occurred within the ST and IT sectors, varied by eye, and generally diminished as CTVF increased. Conclusions. Our data support previous characterizations of diminished connective tissue density within the ST and IT ONH regions. The clinical importance of eye-specific LMA discordance warrants further study. PMID:25650423

  6. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePLUS

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  7. PARP1- and CTCF-Mediated Interactions between Active and Repressed Chromatin at the Lamina Promote Oscillating Transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Honglei; Sifakis, Emmanouil G; Sumida, Noriyuki; Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Scholz, Barbara A; Svensson, J Peter; Chen, Xingqi; Ronnegren, Anna L; Mallet de Lima, Carolina Diettrich; Varnoosfaderani, Farzaneh Shahin; Shi, Chengxi; Loseva, Olga; Yammine, Samer; Israelsson, Maria; Rathje, Li-Sophie; Németi, Balázs; Fredlund, Erik; Helleday, Thomas; Imreh, Márta P; Göndör, Anita

    2015-09-17

    Transcriptionally active and inactive chromatin domains tend to segregate into separate sub-nuclear compartments to maintain stable expression patterns. However, here we uncovered an inter-chromosomal network connecting active loci enriched in circadian genes to repressed lamina-associated domains (LADs). The interactome is regulated by PARP1 and its co-factor CTCF. They not only mediate chromatin fiber interactions but also promote the recruitment of circadian genes to the lamina. Synchronization of the circadian rhythm by serum shock induces oscillations in PARP1-CTCF interactions, which is accompanied by oscillating recruitment of circadian loci to the lamina, followed by the acquisition of repressive H3K9me2 marks and transcriptional attenuation. Furthermore, depletion of H3K9me2/3, inhibition of PARP activity by olaparib, or downregulation of PARP1 or CTCF expression counteracts both recruitment to the envelope and circadian transcription. PARP1- and CTCF-regulated contacts between circadian loci and the repressive chromatin environment at the lamina therefore mediate circadian transcriptional plasticity. PMID:26321255

  8. Stochastic and cyclic deposition of multiple subannual laminae in an urban lake (Twin Lake, Golden Valley, Minnesota, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrbo, A.; Ustipak, K.; Demet, B.

    2013-12-01

    Twin Lake, a small, deep, meromictic urban lake in Minneapolis, Minnesota, annually deposits two to 10 laminae that are distinguished from one another by composition and resulting color. Sediment sources are both autochthonous and allochthonous, including pure and mixed laminae of authigenic calcite, algal organic matter, and diatoms, as well as at least three distinct types of sediment gravity flow deposits. Diagenetic iron sulfide and iron phosphate phases are minor components, but can affect color out of proportion to their abundance. We used L*a*b* color from digital images of a freeze core slab, and petrographic smear slides of individual laminae, to categorize 1080 laminae deposited between 1963 and 2010 CE (based on lead-210 dating). Some causal relationships exist between the ten categories identified: diatom blooms often occur directly above the debris of gravity flows that probably disrupt the phosphate-rich monimolomnion and fertilize the surface waters; calcite whitings only occur after diatom blooms that increase calcite saturation. Stochastic events, as represented by laminae rich in siliciclastics and other terrigenous material, or shallow-water microfossils and carbonate morphologies, are the dominant sediment source. The patterns of cyclic deposition (e.g., summer and winter sedimentation) that produce 'normal' varve couplets in some lakes are continually interrupted by these stochastic events, to such an extent that spectral analysis finds only a weak one-year cycle. Sediments deposited before about 1900, and extending through the entire Holocene sequence (~10m) are varve couplets interrupted by thick (20-90 cm) debris layers, indicating that gravity flows were lower in frequency but greater in magnitude before the historical period, probably due to an increased frequency of disturbance under urban land-use.

  9. Invasive Species Anthony Ricciardi

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Chapter 10 Invasive Species Anthony Ricciardi Glossary Biological invasion The process by which of biological invasions. Invasional meltdown The phenomenon in which multiple nonnative species facilitate one organisms released into an area. Definition of the Subject Biological invasion is the process by which

  10. Invasive Species Conservation Biology

    E-print Network

    Gottgens, Hans

    Invasive Species Conservation Biology Dr. Philpott Thanks to Dr. Mayer for many images and text #12 ­ Habitat modification Biological impacts Other impacts Economics Public Health #12;Invasive Species · Bluegrass in Kentucky · Zebra mussels in Lake Erie #12;Invasive Species · Terminology · Routes of Invasion

  11. Estrogen status and psychophysical stress modify temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in a lamina-specific manner in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen status and psychological stress contribute to the expression of several chronic pain conditions including temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD). Sensory neurons that supply the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region terminate in laminae I and V of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc/C1-2 region); however, little is known about lamina specificity and environmental influences on the encoding properties of TMJ brainstem neurons. To test the hypothesis that Vc/C1-2 neurons integrate both interoceptive and exteroceptive signals relevant for TMJ nociception, we recorded TMJ-evoked activity in superficial and deep laminae of ovariectomized rats under high and low estradiol (E2) and stress conditions. Rats received daily injections of low (LE) or high (HE) dose E2 and were subjected to forced swim (FS) or sham swim conditioning for 3 days. The results revealed marked lamina specificity in that HE rats displayed enhanced TMJ-evoked activity in superficial, but not deep, laminae independent of stress conditioning. By contrast, FS conditioned rats displayed increased background firing and TMJ-evoked activity of neurons in deep, but not superficial, laminae independent of E2 status. FS also enhanced TMJ-evoked masseter muscle activity and suggested the importance of deep dorsal horn neurons in mediating evoked jaw muscle activity. In conclusion, E2 status and psychophysical stress play a significant role in modifying the encoding properties of TMJ-responsive medullary dorsal horn neurons with a marked lamina specificity. PMID:23607965

  12. Clock and clock-controlled genes are differently expressed in the retina, lamina and in selected cells of the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Damulewicz, Milena; Loboda, Agnieszka; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The retina and the first optic neuropil (lamina) of Drosophila show circadian rhythms in various processes. To learn about the regulation of circadian rhythms in the retina and lamina and in two cell types, glial and the lamina L2 interneurons, we examined expression of the following clock genes; per, tim, clk, and cry and clock-controlled genes (ccgs); Atp?, nrv2, brp, Pdfr. We found that the expression of gene studied is specific for the retina and lamina. The rhythms of per and tim expression in the retina and glial cells are similar to that observed in the whole head and in clock neurons, while they differ in the lamina and L2 cells. In both the retina and lamina, CRY seems to be a repressor of clk expression. In L2 interneurons per expression is not cyclic indicating the other function of PER in those cells than in the circadian molecular clock. In contrast to per and tim, the pattern of clk and cry expression is similar in both the retina and lamina. The retina holds the autonomous oscillators but the expression of cry and ccgs, Atp? and nrv2, is also regulated by inputs from the pacemaker transmitted by PDF and ITP neuropeptides. PMID:26441524

  13. Clock and clock-controlled genes are differently expressed in the retina, lamina and in selected cells of the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Damulewicz, Milena; Loboda, Agnieszka; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The retina and the first optic neuropil (lamina) of Drosophila show circadian rhythms in various processes. To learn about the regulation of circadian rhythms in the retina and lamina and in two cell types, glial and the lamina L2 interneurons, we examined expression of the following clock genes; per, tim, clk, and cry and clock-controlled genes (ccgs); Atp?, nrv2, brp, Pdfr. We found that the expression of gene studied is specific for the retina and lamina. The rhythms of per and tim expression in the retina and glial cells are similar to that observed in the whole head and in clock neurons, while they differ in the lamina and L2 cells. In both the retina and lamina, CRY seems to be a repressor of clk expression. In L2 interneurons per expression is not cyclic indicating the other function of PER in those cells than in the circadian molecular clock. In contrast to per and tim, the pattern of clk and cry expression is similar in both the retina and lamina. The retina holds the autonomous oscillators but the expression of cry and ccgs, Atp? and nrv2, is also regulated by inputs from the pacemaker transmitted by PDF and ITP neuropeptides. PMID:26441524

  14. Computer simulation of wound closure in epithelial tissues: Cell-basal-lamina adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tatsuzo; Honda, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    The mechanism of wound closure in epithelial tissues, i.e., cell monolayer sheets, is investigated through computer simulations. A wound means an area in which some cells have been removed from the normal tissue. The vertex dynamics cell model [T. Nagai and H. Honda, Philos. Mag. B 81, 699 (2001)], which describes morphogenesis of epithelial tissues using the concepts of statistical physics, is modified and applied to the closure of small wounds without mitosis. It is shown that cell-basal-lamina adhesion governs the wound closure competing with cell-cell adhesion and cell elasticity. The simulation results reproduce the actual wound closure process qualitatively and partly quantitatively. The closing proceeds with the translation of the edges of wound polygons toward the wound center and the intermittent reduction in the number of polygon edges. Over time, the process leads to an exponential decrease in the wound area. A shape factor is introduced to describe the wound shape quantitatively and is used to examine the time variation thereof. A method for determining model parameters by comparison with the experiments is given.

  15. The Role of Endolithic Cyanobacteria in the Formation of Lithified Laminae in Bahamian Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, L.; Macintyre, I.; Reid, R. P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The microboring activity of endolithic cyanobacteria plays a major role in the formation of lithified laminae in modern marine stromatolites in the Exuma Cays, Bahamas. These stromatolites are composed primarily of fine grained carbonate sand that is trapped and bound by the filamentous cyanobacteria Schizothrix sp. Periodic introduction of coccoid endolithic cyanobacteria, Solentia sp., results in formation of lithified horizons, 200 to 1000 micron thick. We used SEM and petrographic analyses to examine both naturally occurring lithified layers dominated by endoliths and fused oolitic crusts generated in the laboratory by activity of endolithic cyanobacteria (Solentia sp.). Fused grain crusts consist of micritized grains that are welded together at point contacts. Micritization results from extensive microboring and rapid (days to weeks) carbonate precipitation within the bore holes. This precipitation appears to occur concurrently with further endolithic activity within the grain, Infilling of bore holes that cross from one grain to another at point contacts results in grain welding, Thus, while microboring destroys original grain textures, at the same time the endolith activity plays a constructional role in stromatolite growth by forming lithified layers of welded grains. These framework structures help to stabilize and preserve the stromatolite deposits.

  16. Aberrant Synaptic Integration in Adult Lamina I Projection Neurons Following Neonatal Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Craig, Paige E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that neonatal tissue damage evokes alterations in spinal pain reflexes which persist into adulthood. However, less is known about potential concomitant effects on the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, as the degree to which early injury modulates synaptic integration and membrane excitability in mature spinal projection neurons remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury leads to a significant shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition onto identified lamina I projection neurons of the adult mouse spinal cord. The strength of direct primary afferent input to mature spino-parabrachial neurons was enhanced following neonatal tissue damage, whereas the efficacy of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition onto the same population was compromised. This was accompanied by reorganization in the pattern of sensory input to adult projection neurons, which included a greater prevalence of monosynaptic input from low-threshold A-fibers when preceded by early tissue damage. In addition, neonatal incision resulted in greater primary afferent-evoked action potential discharge in mature projection neurons. Overall, these results demonstrate that tissue damage during early life causes a long-term increase in the gain of spinal nociceptive circuits, and suggest that the prolonged consequences of neonatal trauma may not be restricted to the spinal cord but rather include excessive ascending signaling to supraspinal pain centers. PMID:25673839

  17. Cortical Lamina Binding of PET Amyloid and Tau Tracers in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Tsui, Wai; Rusinek, Henry; Butler, Tracy; Mosconi, Lisa; Pirraglia, Elizabeth.; Mozley, David; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Harada, Ryuichi; Furumoto, Shozo; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Okamura, Nobuyuki; de Leon, Mony J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neurofibrillary tau pathology and amyloid beta (A?) plaques, characteristic lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD), show different neocortical laminar distributions. NFT-tau pathology tends to be located closer to the gray-white-matter boundary (G-WB) whereas A? is dispersed throughout the width of the cortical ribbon. Methods Using PET radiotracers for tau and A? lesions, we developed an image analysis tool to measure the distance of tracer-positive voxels to the G-WB. We studied 5 AD and 5 healthy subjects with both 18F-THK5117 (tau) and 11C-PiB (A?) PET. Results We observed that on average tau positive-voxels were closer to the white matter than the A? positive voxels. This effect was found for all AD subjects and for all regions, both before and after regionally adjusting for the non-specific white matter binding of both tracers. The differential laminar pattern was validated at post mortem. Conclusion Within cortical lamina distance measures may be of value in testing PET tracers for their anatomical selectivity. PMID:25572087

  18. An examination of the damage tolerance enhancement of carbon/epoxy using an outer lamina of spectra (R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, D. G.; Nettles, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    Low velocity instrumented impact testing was utilized to examine the effects of an outer lamina of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (Spectra) on the damage tolerance of carbon epoxy composites. Four types of 16-ply quasi-isotropic panels (0, +45, 90, -45) were tested. Some panels contained no Spectra, while others had a lamina of Spectra bonded to the top (impacted side), bottom, or both sides of the composite plates. The specimens were impacted with energies up to 8.5 J. Force time plots and maximum force versus impact energy graphs were generated for comparison purposes. Specimens were also subjected to cross-sectional analysis and compression after impact tests. The results show that while the Spectra improved the maximum load that the panels could withstand before fiber breakage, the Spectra seemingly reduced the residual strength of the composites.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of elastic stain in the assessment of serosal invasion of pT3N0 colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Yi; Arnason, Thomas; Berger, David; Hawkins, Alexander T; Sylla, Patricia; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2013-10-01

    Peritoneal involvement is an important adverse prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC) and determines a shift in the pathologic tumor node metastasis stage. Because peritoneal involvement is difficult to identify, use of special stains highlighting the peritoneal elastic lamina and mesothelial surface has been proposed. This study aims to determine whether use of elastic stain or CK7 immunohistochemistry on a single tissue section can refine the level of tumor invasion and determine whether restaging based on this assessment has prognostic significance in pT3N0 CRCs. Elastic stains were applied to 1 block per case from 244 consecutively resected pT3N0M0 CRCs. CK7 was evaluated in a 169-case subset. The elastic lamina was identified in only 101 cases (41%). Of those, 60 cases (24.6%) displayed elastic lamina invasion (ELI). This finding was associated with significantly worse (P<0.001) disease-free survival (DFS) (5-y DFS=60%) and significantly worse (P=0.01) overall survival (OS) (5-y OS=66.7%) compared with patients with no ELI (5-y DFS=87.8%, OS=92.7%) and those for whom no elastic lamina was identified (5-y DFS=82.5%, OS=86.0%). CK7 staining highlighted mesothelial cells in only 27 of 169 cases tested and helped demonstrate serosal invasion in only 5 cases (3%). In summary, the use of a single elastic stain is a useful and inexpensive method to demonstrate peritoneal involvement by tumor and should be considered for routine use in all pT3N0 CRCs. As tumors with ELI have an adverse prognosis, we propose that they should be upstaged compared with pT3N0 tumors without ELI. PMID:23774172

  20. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47–72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column spinal stability. Attention was given to ensure the correct pre-operative fenestration, complete decompression and the prevention of adhesions. After an average follow-up of 26.4 months, the one year post-operative X-ray radiographs suggested that the successful fusion rate was 88.1%, and this was 100% in the two-year post-operative radiographs. Moreover, the functional recovery rate was 97.9%. Bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion is an ideal surgical method for the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The surgical method retains the spinal posterior column and middle column and results in full decompression and reliable fusion by a limited yet effective surgical approach. PMID:23407794

  1. Endorectal ultrasonography for the assessment of wall invasion and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Y; Yamada, K; Ishizawa, T; Yoshinaka, H; Shimazu, H

    1992-04-01

    Endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) with a flexible-type radial scanner (Aloka Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan; 7.5 MHz) was applied to 120 patients with rectal cancer for the assessment of wall invasion and pararectal lymph node metastasis. Normal rectal wall was described as a five- or seven-layer structure excluding the lowest part within 3 cm from the anal verge. Loss of normal layers basically indicated the existence of cancer invasion. According to UICC classification, we divided the depth of wall invasion into four ultrasonographic levels (uT1-uT4), and results were correlated with histopathologic findings. Overall accuracy of the assessment was 92.0 percent (103/112). Overestimation occurred in 5 of 60 cases with T3 cancer (8.3 percent), and underestimation occurred in 1 of 19 cases with T2 cancer (5.3 percent) and 3 of 60 cases with T3 cancer (5 percent). Inflammatory cell infiltration was found around the cancer in a considerable number of cases. However, the assessment of wall invasion was hardly affected in our hands. Because the muscularis propria of the rectal wall was often recognized as a three-layer structure, uT2 cancer was subdivided into three subgroups of uPM1, uPM2, and uPM3. The assessment of invasion of sublayers in muscularis propria was possible in 14 of 19 cases (73.7 percent), and correct assessment was achieved in 57 percent of the cases. The ultrasonographic demonstration of pararectal lymph nodes was studied on 98 patients. No swollen lymph nodes were detected ultrasonographically in 35 of 98 cases (35.7 percent), but cancer metastasis was found histopathologically in 5 of these 35 cases (14.3 percent). The metastasis was observed more frequently in lymph nodes with a diameter of more than 5 mm (53.8 percent) and in those with a well-defined boundary and with an uneven and markedly hypoechoic pattern (72.3 percent). Although unable to detect minimal cancer foci. ERUS was considered a very useful tool for the assessment of the depth of cancer invasion in the rectal wall and pararectal lymph node metastasis. PMID:1582359

  2. INVASIVE ANTS Invasive species, those species that demonstrate

    E-print Network

    Suarez, Andrew V.

    PART IV INVASIVE ANTS Invasive species, those species that demonstrate ecological, environmental own right. Though invasive ants currently comprise ant species, the contribution of these species to understanding ant ecology is dis- proportional to their number. Invasive ants represent

  3. Invasive Lionfish Removal

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In September 2009, divers carefully capture an invasive red lionfish (Pterois volitans) found near the coast of North Carolina. Invasive lionfish are now established in the hard bottom habitats of North Carolina's coast, where they are abundant....

  4. Lamina Cribrosa Defects and Optic Disc Morphology in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yugo; Akagi, Tadamichi; Hangai, Masanori; Takayama, Kohei; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Suda, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Yamada, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hideo; Unoki, Noriyuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether lamina cribrosa (LC) defects are associated with optic disc morphology in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) eyes with high myopia. Methods A total of 129 POAG patients and 55 age-matched control subjects with high myopia were evaluated. Three-dimensional scan images obtained by swept source optical coherence tomography were used to detect LC defects. Radial B-scans and infrared images obtained by spectral domain optical coherence tomography were used to measure ?-peripapillary atrophy (PPA) lengths with and without Bruch's membrane (BM) (temporal, nasal, superior, and inferior), tilt angle (vertical and horizontal), and disc diameter (transverse and longitudinal). Peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitations (PICCs), disc area, ovality index, and cyclotorsion of the optic disc were analyzed as well. Results LC defects were found in 70 of 129 (54.2%) POAG eyes and 1 of 55 (1.8%) control eyes (P<0.001). Age, sex, spherical equivalent, axial length, intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness were not significantly different among POAG eyes with LC defects, POAG eyes without LC defects, and control eyes. Temporal PPA lengths without BM in all three groups correlated significantly with vertical and horizontal tilt angles, although no PPA length with BM correlated significantly with any tilt angle. PICCs were detected more frequently in POAG eyes with LC defects than those without LC defects (P?=?0.01) and control eyes (P?=?0.02). POAG eyes with LC defects showed a smaller ovality index (P?=?0.004), longer temporal PPA without BM (P<0.001), and larger vertical/horizontal tilt angles (vertical, P<0.001; horizontal, P?=?0.01), and transverse diameter (P?=?0.01). In multivariate analysis for the presence of LC defects, presence of POAG (P<0.001) and vertical tilt angle (P<0.001) were identified as significant. Conclusions The presence of LC defects was associated with myopic optic disc morphology in POAG eyes with high myopia. PMID:25531656

  5. Inhibitor studies of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigated leaf water transport properties in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaves. Leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lam)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were drastically suppressed by NaF (a general metabolic inhibitor). In leaves treated with 0.2 mM HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker), K(lam) declined by 22% when the leaves were sampled in June but the decline was not significant when the leaves were sampled in August. The leaves sampled in June that transpired 30 mM beta-mercaptoethanol following mercury application showed similar K(lam) as those in control leaves transpiring distilled water. When leaves were pressure-infiltrated with 0.1 mM HgCl(2), K(lam) significantly declined by 25%. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor) drastically reduced leaf net CO(2) uptake by the leaves from seedlings and mature trees but did not have any effect on K(lam) regardless of the irradiance at the leaf level during the K(lam) measurements. When PTS(3) (trisodium 3-hydroxy-5,8,10-pyrenetrisulphonate) apoplastic tracer was pressure-infiltrated inside the leaves, its concentration in the leaf exudates did not change from ambient light to high irradiance treatment and declined in the presence of HgCl(2) in the treatment solution. Trembling aspen K(lam) appears to be linked to leaf metabolism and is uncoupled from the short-term variations in photosynthesis. Aquaporin-mediated water transport does not appear to constitute the dominant pathway for the pressure-driven water flow in the leaves of trembling aspen trees. PMID:20022867

  6. Attacking invasive grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In grasslands fire may play a role in the plant invasion process, both by creating disturbances that potentially favour non-native invasions and as a possible tool for controlling alien invasions. Havill et al. (Applied Vegetation Science, 18, 2015, this issue) determine how native and non-native species respond to different fire regimes as a first step in understanding the potential control of invasive grasses.

  7. Invasive species in agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural production of food, feed, fiber or fuel is a local human activity with global ecological impacts, including the potential to foster invasions. Agriculture plays an unusual role in biological invasions, in that it is both a source of non-indigenous invasive species (NIS) and especially s...

  8. Elevated maxi-K(+) ion channel current in glaucomatous lamina cribrosa cells.

    PubMed

    Irnaten, Mustapha; Barry, Richard C; Wallace, Deborah M; Docherty, Neil G; Quill, Barry; Clark, Abbot F; O'Brien, Colm J

    2013-10-01

    The connective tissue plates of the lamina cribrosa (LC) region are continuously exposed to a mechanically dynamic environment. To study how the LC cells respond to these mechanical forces, we measured the mechano-sensitive calcium dependent maxi-K(+) ion channel current in the cell membrane of LC cells of glaucoma and normal subjects. Primary culture LC cells from 7 normal and 7 age matched glaucoma donors were studied. Perfusion of cells with hypotonic solution was used to stretch the cell membrane. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the basal (non stretched) and hypotonic stretch-induced changes in maxi-K(+) ion channel activity in normal and glaucoma LC cells. The role of membrane-type Ca(2+) entry channel inhibition (verapamil) and internal Ca(2+) store re-uptake blockade (2-APB) on maxi-K(+) activity was also examined. Basal and stretched-induced maxi-K(+) current were significantly elevated in the glaucoma LC cells compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In normal LC cells hypotonic stretch elevated the mean maxi-K(+) current from 18.5 ± 5.7 pA/pF (at Vp = +100 mV) to 88.4 ± 12.4 pA/pF (P < 0.05), and from 39.5 ± 7.3 pA/pF to 133.1 ± 18.5 pA/pF in glaucoma LC cells (P < 0.02). Verapamil and 2-APB significantly reduced basal maxi-K(+) current in glaucoma LC cells (33.1 ± 8.2 pA/pF to 17.9 ± 5.6 pA/pF; and 32.2 ± 8.3 pA/pF to 17.3 ± 5.4 pA/pF, P < 0.05, respectively) but not in normal LC cells (P > 0.05). Following hypotonic stretch, verapamil and 2-APB significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the maxi-K(+) current in both normal and glaucoma LC cells. Baseline and hypotonic stretch induced Ca(2+)-dependent maxi-K(+) channel activity are elevated in LC cells of glaucoma patients, which may result from the abnormally high levels of intracellular calcium in glaucoma LC cells. PMID:23906962

  9. Citronellol, a natural acyclic monoterpene, attenuates mechanical hyperalgesia response in mice: Evidence of the spinal cord lamina I inhibition.

    PubMed

    Brito, Renan G; Dos Santos, Priscila L; Quintans, Jullyana S S; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Araújo, Adriano A S; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the anti-hyperalgesic effect of citronellol (CT) and investigated the spinal cord lamina I involvement in this effect. Male mice were pre-treated with CT (25, 50 and 100mg/kg, i.p.), indomethacin (10mg/kg, i.p.), dipyrone (60mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle (saline+Tween 80 0.2%). Thirty minutes after the treatment, 20?L of carrageenan (CG; 300?g/paw), PGE2 (100ng/paw), dopamine (DA; 30?g/paw) or TNF-? (100pg/paw) were injected into the hind paw subplantar region and the mechanical threshold was evaluated with an electronic anesthesiometer. The CT effect on edema formation was evaluated after the right paw subplantar injection of CG (40?L; 1%) through the plethysmometer apparatus. To evaluate the CT action on the spinal cord, the animals were treated with CT (100mg/kg; i.p.) or vehicle (Saline+Tween 80 0.2%; i.p.) and, after 30min, 20?L of CG (300?g/paw; i.pl.) was injected. Ninety minutes after the treatment, the animals were perfused, the lumbar spinal cord collected, crioprotected, cut and submitted in an immunofluorescence protocol for Fos protein. CT administration produced a significantly reduction (p<0.05) in the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by CG, TNF-?, PGE2 and DA when compared with control group. The treatment with CT also significantly (p<0.05) decreased the paw edema. The immunofluorescence showed that the CT decrease significantly (p<0.05) the spinal cord lamina I activation. Thus, our results provide that CT attenuates the hyperalgesia, at least in part, through the spinal cord lamina I inhibition. PMID:26141506

  10. The role of invasive trophoblast in implantation and placentation of primates.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony M; Enders, Allen C; Pijnenborg, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We here review the evolution of invasive placentation in primates towards the deep penetration of the endometrium and its arteries in hominoids. The strepsirrhine primates (lemurs and lorises) have non-invasive, epitheliochorial placentation, although this is thought to be derived from a more invasive type. In haplorhine primates, there is differentiation of trophoblast at the blastocyst stage into syncytial and cellular trophoblast. Implantation involves syncytiotrophoblast that first removes the uterine epithelium then consolidates at the basal lamina before continuing into the stroma. In later stages of pregnancy, especially in Old World monkeys and apes, cytotrophoblast plays a greater role in the invasive process. Columns of trophoblast cells advance to the base of the implantation site where they spread out to form a cytotrophoblastic shell. In addition, cytotrophoblasts advance into the lumen of the spiral arteries. They are responsible for remodelling these vessels to form wide, low-resistance conduits. In human and great apes, there is additional invasion of the endometrium and its vessels by trophoblasts originating from the base of the anchoring villi. Deep trophoblast invasion that extends remodelling of the spiral arteries to segments in the inner myometrium evolved in the common ancestor of gorilla, chimp and human. PMID:25602074

  11. Incorporation of the nuclear pore basket protein Nup153 into nuclear pore structures is dependent upon lamina assembly: evidence from cell-free extracts of Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, Carl; Jenkins, Hazel E.; Hutchison, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    In cell-free extracts of Xenopus eggs that support the assembly of replication-competent nuclei, we found that lamin B3 specifically associates with four polypeptides (termed SLAPs, soluble lamin associated proteins). Here, one SLAP is identified as the nuclear pore complex protein Nup153, one member of the F/GXFG motif-containing nucleoporins. In vitro translated Nup153 and lamin B3 co-immunoprecipitate, and lamin B3 interacts specifically with the C-terminal domain of Nup153. During nuclear envelope assembly, other F/GXFG-containing nucleoporins are incorporated into the nuclear envelope preceding lamina assembly. Incorporation of Nup153 occurs at the same time as lamina assembly. When lamina assembly is prevented using the dominant-negative mutant XlaminB?2+, Nup153 does not appear at the nuclear envelope, while other F/GXFG-containing nucleoporins and Nup93 are recruited normally. When the lamina of pre-assembled nuclei is disrupted using the same dominant-negative mutant, the distribution of other nucleoporins is unaffected. However, Nup153 recruitment at the nuclear envelope is lost. Our results indicate that both the recruitment and maintenance of Nup153 at the pore are dependent upon the integrity of the lamina. PMID:10921874

  12. Proliferation of progeria cells is enhanced by lamina-associated polypeptide 2? (LAP2?) through expression of extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Sandra; Kubben, Nard; Dechat, Thomas; Foisner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 2? (LAP2?) localizes throughout the nucleoplasm and interacts with the fraction of lamins A/C that is not associated with the peripheral nuclear lamina. The LAP2?-lamin A/C complex negatively affects cell proliferation. Lamins A/C are encoded by LMNA, a single heterozygous mutation of which causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). This mutation generates the lamin A variant progerin, which we show here leads to loss of LAP2? and nucleoplasmic lamins A/C, impaired proliferation, and down-regulation of extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly, contrary to wild-type cells, ectopic expression of LAP2? in cells expressing progerin restores proliferation and extracellular matrix expression but not the levels of nucleoplasmic lamins A/C. We conclude that, in addition to its cell cycle-inhibiting function with lamins A/C, LAP2? can also regulate extracellular matrix components independently of lamins A/C, which may help explain the proliferation-promoting function of LAP2? in cells expressing progerin. PMID:26443848

  13. Neurons in the Most Superficial Lamina of the Mouse Superior Colliculus Are Highly Selective for Stimulus Direction

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Samsoon; Barchini, Jad; Chen, Hui; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a layered midbrain structure important for multimodal integration and sensorimotor transformation. Its superficial layers are purely visual and receive depth-specific projections from distinct subtypes of retinal ganglion cells. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging to characterize the response properties of neurons in the most superficial lamina of the mouse SC, an undersampled population with electrophysiology. We find that these neurons have compact receptive fields with primarily overlapping ON and OFF subregions and are highly direction selective. The high selectivity is observed in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These neurons do not cluster according to their direction preference and lack orientation selectivity. In addition, we perform single-unit recordings and show that direction selectivity declines with depth in the SC. Together, our experiments reveal for the first time a highly specialized lamina in the most superficial SC for movement direction, a finding that has important implications for understanding signal transformation in the early visual system. PMID:25995482

  14. Proliferation of progeria cells is enhanced by lamina-associated polypeptide 2? (LAP2?) through expression of extracellular matrix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vidak, Sandra; Kubben, Nard; Dechat, Thomas; Foisner, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Lamina-associated polypeptide 2? (LAP2?) localizes throughout the nucleoplasm and interacts with the fraction of lamins A/C that is not associated with the peripheral nuclear lamina. The LAP2?–lamin A/C complex negatively affects cell proliferation. Lamins A/C are encoded by LMNA, a single heterozygous mutation of which causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). This mutation generates the lamin A variant progerin, which we show here leads to loss of LAP2? and nucleoplasmic lamins A/C, impaired proliferation, and down-regulation of extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly, contrary to wild-type cells, ectopic expression of LAP2? in cells expressing progerin restores proliferation and extracellular matrix expression but not the levels of nucleoplasmic lamins A/C. We conclude that, in addition to its cell cycle-inhibiting function with lamins A/C, LAP2? can also regulate extracellular matrix components independently of lamins A/C, which may help explain the proliferation-promoting function of LAP2? in cells expressing progerin. PMID:26443848

  15. Effectiveness of muscle basal lamina carrying neural stem cells and olfactory ensheathing cells in spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Kang, X W; Hu, J L; Wang, S K; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of muscle basal lamina (MBL) with neural stem cells (NSCs) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) on spinal cord injury repair. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection and divided into 6 groups. In blank control group (group A), the ends of the spinal cord hemisection model were flushed with physiological saline. In NSC transplantation group (B), OEC transplantation group (C), MBL with NSC transplantation group (D), MBL with OEC transplantation group (E), and MBL with NSC and OEC transplantation group (F), NSCs, OECs, MBL with NSCs, MBL with OECs, and MBL with NSCs and OECs were implanted into the ends of the hemisection model. Survival and migration of transplanted cells were detected by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence after 4 and 8 weeks. Hind limb function repair was evaluated by Bundle branch block score at various time points before and after surgery. MBL could promote NSC growth along its lumen and promote host cell advancement in the lumen, reducing local inflammatory responses. Using MBL with NSCs and/or OECs for spinal cord repair shows advantages over simple cell transplantation. Group F contained more nerve cells in muscle basal lamina than group E. This method is useful for forming more axons, synaptic connections, and signal transduction pathways. However, these new axons showed nerve demyelination, which may greatly limit nerve signal conduction. In group F, OECs could induce neural stem cells, axonal growth, and synaptic connection formation, but its role is limited. PMID:26535658

  16. Invasion of the Whiteflies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As invasive alien species spread, they often displace indigenous species, thus altering ecological communities and adversely affecting agricultural pest management, human health and well-being, and biodiversity. Despite the importance of invasive species, the processes enabling them to become estab...

  17. LOUISIANA INVASIVE SPECIES PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identify the species, locations, and effects of invasive species within the state and the effects of these invasive species in Louisiana. Also identify how these species are spread, and the authorities that exist to manage and control them. With this information, create a m...

  18. Minimally invasive pediatric neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Governale, Lance S

    2015-04-01

    Advances in technology have facilitated the development of minimally invasive neurosurgical options for the treatment of pediatric neurological disease. This review seeks to familiarize pediatric neurologists with some of the techniques of minimally invasive pediatric neurosurgery, focusing on treatments for hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, intracranial mass lesions, and craniosynostosis. PMID:25771997

  19. INVASION NOTE Invasive avian malaria as an emerging parasitic disease

    E-print Network

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    Biological invasion Á Blood parasites Á Malaria Á Haemoproteus Á Plasmodium Á South America Introduction Many by biological invasions of parasites that have ``jumped ship'' to novel host species (Hatcher et al. 2012INVASION NOTE Invasive avian malaria as an emerging parasitic disease in native birds of Peru

  20. Repeatability of in vivo 3D lamina cribrosa microarchitecture using adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Zach; Wang, Bo; Wollstein, Gadi; Nevins, Jessica E.; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bilonick, Richard; Kagemann, Larry; Sigal, Ian A.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit; Hammer, Daniel X.; Schuman, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the repeatability of lamina cribrosa (LC) microarchitecture for in vivo 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of healthy, glaucoma suspects, and glaucomatous eyes. Eyes underwent two scans using a prototype adaptive optics spectral domain OCT (AO-SDOCT) device from which LC microarchitecture was semi-automatically segmented. LC segmentations were used to quantify pore and beam structure through several global microarchitecture parameters. Repeatability of LC microarchitecture was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by calculating parameter imprecision. For all but one parameters (pore volume) measurement imprecision was <4.7% of the mean value, indicating good measurement reproducibility. Imprecision ranged between 27.3% and 54.5% of the population standard deviation for each parameter, while there was not a significant effect on imprecision due to disease status, indicating utility in testing for LC structural trends. PMID:24761293

  1. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  2. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-print Network

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  3. Invasive Lionfish Removal

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A scientist from the North Carolina Aquarium removes an invasive red lionfish (Pterois volitans) found in coastal North Carolina's hard bottom habitat, to prevent ecological impacts due to its predation and competition with native fishes....

  4. Superficial Bladder Cancer: An Update on Etiology, Molecular Development, Classification, and Natural History

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Erik; Josephson, David Y; Mitra, Anirban P; Cote, Richard J; Stein, John P

    2008-01-01

    Superficial “non—muscle-invasive” bladder tumors represent a heterogeneous group of cancers, including those that are (1) papillary in nature and limited to the mucosa, (2) high grade and flat and confined to the epithelium, and (3) invasive into the submucosa, or lamina propria. The goal of treatment is 2-fold: (1) to reduce tumor recurrence and the subsequent need for additional therapies and the morbidity associated with these treatments and (2) to prevent tumor progression and the subsequent need for more aggressive therapy. This update reviews important contemporary concepts in the etiology, molecular mechanisms, classification, and natural history of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:18470273

  5. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  6. Minimally invasive procedures.

    PubMed

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small "ports" from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry-meaning only one small incision, like the "uniport" video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional "open" surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  7. The stress-strain relationships in wood and fiber-reinforced plastic laminae of reinforced glued-laminated wood beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Daniel Arthur

    The reinforcement of wood and wood composite structural products to improve their mechanical properties has been in practice for many years. Recently, the use of high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) as a reinforcement in such applications has been commercialized. The reinforcement is manufactured using a standard pultrusion process or alternatively a sheet-forming process commonly referred to as "pulforming". The high-modulus fibers are predominately unidirectional, although off-axis fibers are often used to enhance off-axis properties. The fibers used are either of a single type or multiple types, which are called "hybrids". Unidirectional, single, and hybrid fiber FRP physical properties and characteristics were compared to wood. Full-scale reinforced glulams were tested. Aramid-reinforced plastics (ARP) used as tensile reinforcements were found to be superior in strength applications to other types of FRP made with fiber, such as carbon and fiberglass. Carbon/aramid-reinforced plastic (CARP) was shown to be superior in both modulus and strength design situations. Fiberglass was shown to be suitable only in hybrid situations with another fiber such as aramid or carbon and only in limited use situations where modulus was a design criteria. The testing and analysis showed that the global response of reinforced glulam beams is controlled by localized strength variations in the wood such as slope of grain, knots, finger joints, etc. in the tensile zone. The elemental tensile strains in the extreme wood tensile laminae, due to global applied loads, were found to be well below the strain at failure in clear wood samples recovered from the failure area. Two areas affecting the relationship between the wood and the FRP were investigated: compatibility of the wood and FRP materials and interface characteristics between the wood and FRP. The optimum strain value at yield point for an FRP was assessed to be slightly higher than the clear wood value in tension for a species/grade to be reinforced. The effects of localized strength variations in the tensile wood laminae adjacent to the FRP were found to be the predominate cause of failure in full-scale reinforced glulams with less than 1.5% by cross section reinforcement.

  8. Virus-Induced Tubule: a Vehicle for Rapid Spread of Virions through Basal Lamina from Midgut Epithelium in the Insect Vector

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Aiming; Liu, Yuyan; Wang, Haitao; Xie, Lianhui

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant reoviruses, plant rhabdoviruses, tospoviruses, and tenuiviruses are transmitted by insect vectors in a persistent propagative manner. These viruses induce the formation of viral inclusions to facilitate viral propagation in insect vectors. The intestines of insect vectors are formed by epithelial cells that lie on the noncellular basal lamina surrounded by visceral muscle tissue. Here, we demonstrate that a recently identified plant reovirus, southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), exploits virus-containing tubules composed of virus-encoded nonstructural protein P7-1 to directly cross the basal lamina from the initially infected epithelium toward visceral muscle tissues in the intestine of its vector, the white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera). Furthermore, such tubules spread along visceral muscle tissues through a direct interaction of P7-1 and actin. The destruction of tubule assembly by RNA interference with synthesized double-stranded RNA targeting the P7-1 gene inhibited viral spread in the insect vector in vitro and in vivo. All these results show for the first time that a virus employs virus-induced tubule as a vehicle for viral spread from the initially infected midgut epithelium through the basal lamina, facilitating the rapid dissemination of virus from the intestine of the insect vector. IMPORTANCE Numerous plant viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by sap-sucking insects, including thrips, aphids, planthoppers, and leafhoppers. These viruses, ingested by the insects, establish their primary infection in the intestinal epithelium of the insect vector. Subsequently, the invading virus manages to transverse the basal lamina, a noncellular layer lining the intestine, a barrier that may theoretically hinder viral spread. The mechanism by which plant viruses cross the basal lamina is unknown. Here, we report that a plant virus has evolved to exploit virus-induced tubules to pass through the basal lamina from the initially infected midgut epithelium of the insect vector, thus revealing the previously undescribed pathway adapted by the virus for rapid dissemination of virions from the intestine of the insect vector. PMID:24965461

  9. A bioinformatics analysis of Lamin-A regulatory network: a perspective on epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to premature aging. HGPS is caused by mutation in the Lamin-A (LMNA) gene that leads, in affected young individuals, to the accumulation of the progerin protein, usually present only in aging differentiated cells. Bioinformatics analyses of the network of interactions of the LMNA gene and transcripts are presented. The LMNA gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA ( http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of LMNA transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ceRNA) hypotheses (RNA cross-talk via microRNAs [miRNAs]) and using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest particular relevance of epigenetic modifiers (via acetylase complexes and specifically HTATIP histone acetylase) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodelers (via pBAF, BAF, and SWI/SNF complexes). PMID:22533413

  10. Hyperactive Dental Lamina in a 24-Year-old Female – A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashu; Nagar, Priya; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay Sinai; Munjal, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    An extra tooth to the normal formula of teeth sequence in any region of dental arch is regarded as Supernumerary teeth (ST). The reasons are still not clearly known, one of them being dichotomy of tooth bud, but the more accepted reason is the hyperactivity theory. Supernumerary teeth are present more in permanent dentition than in primary dentition and can present as a single entity or multiple, unilaterally or bilaterally, impacted or erupted, in either or both the dental arches. This article discusses the supernumerary teeth in detail with a case discussion of a non-syndromic 24-year-old girl, with six ST (bicuspids) present in all the four quadrants. In the mandible, ST’s showed a classical clustered flower like presentation. The interesting feature in the presented case was the sequential orthopantomographs taken at various ages of the patient that showed continuous development of STs in all four quadrants, thus pointing to the theory of hyperactive dental lamina or atavism. An electronic search was conceded in PubMed, Cochrane Library and google scholar databases, and articles dated between December 1932 and December 2012 were selected to review the occurrence patterns of supernumerary teeth in non-syndromic cases. PMID:26436066

  11. The nuclear envelope lamina network has elasticity and a compressibility limit suggestive of a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kahn, Samuel M; Wilson, Katherine L; Discher, Dennis E

    2004-09-15

    Mechanical properties of the nuclear envelope have implications for cell and nuclear architecture as well as gene regulation. Using isolated Xenopus oocyte nuclei, we have established swelling conditions that separate the intact nuclear envelope (membranes, pore complexes and underlying lamin filament network) from nucleoplasm and the majority of chromatin. Swelling proves reversible with addition of high molecular mass dextrans. Micropipette aspiration of swollen and unswollen nuclear envelopes is also reversible and yields a network elastic modulus, unaffected by nucleoplasm, that averages 25 mN/m. Compared to plasma membranes of cells, the nuclear envelope is much stiffer and more resilient. Our results suggest that the nuclear lamina forms a compressed network shell of interconnected rods that is extensible but limited in compressibility from the native state, thus acting as a 'molecular shock absorber'. In light of the conservation of B-type lamins in metazoan evolution, the mechanical properties determined in this investigation suggest physical mechanisms by which mutated lamins can either destabilize nuclear architecture or influence nuclear responses to mechanical signals in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, progeria syndromes (premature 'aging') and other laminopathies. PMID:15331638

  12. Ian Duggan: Research Interests Invasion Biology

    E-print Network

    Waikato, University of

    Ian Duggan: Research Interests Invasion Biology My research primarily involves the investigation of trends in the invasion process and the exploration of invasion vectors responsible for transportation, and; 2) predicting species that have a high potential for invasion success Consequently

  13. Invasive Lionfish Removal

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Research divers rest at 20 feet as they ascend with a dive bag containing invasive red lionfish (Pterois volitans). The bag is clipped to a line to prevent them being stung by the lionfish as its bladder fills with air during the ascent. These lionfish were removed from hard bottom habitat, about 10...

  14. Aquatic invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species are plants or animals that are present in an ecosystem beyond their native range. They may have few natural controls in their new environment and proliferate. They can threaten native species and interfere with human activities. The Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has been conducting research to understand how non-native species invade and affect ecosystems, thus aiding management efforts.

  15. Minimally Invasive Adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Carr, Azadeh A; Wang, Tracy S

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive adrenalectomy has become the gold standard for removal of benign adrenal tumors. The imaging characteristics, biochemical evaluation, and patient selection for laparoscopic transabdominal and posterior retroperitoneoscopic approaches are discussed with details of surgical technique for both procedures. PMID:26610779

  16. Early Primary Invasion Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

    2011-01-01

    "We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his classmates had become…

  17. Invasive Spiny Water Flea

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An invasive species, the spiny water flea, is likely a primary driver of changes in Lake Huron's food web over the past decade. Recent USGS research suggests that consumption of prey by invertebrates is outweighing consumption by fish in Lake Huron, and one invertebrate in particular – the in...

  18. CONTROL OF INVASIVE SEAWEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive marine seaweeds have become serious threats to ecosystems along the coasts of many countries, including the United States. The most widespread and notorious have been infestations of Caulerpa taxifolia, which now infests over 15,000 acres of Mediterranean subtidal zones. These non-native...

  19. Specific disruption of intermediate filaments and the nuclear lamina by the 19-kDa product of the adenovirus E1B oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    White, E; Cipriani, R

    1989-01-01

    The 19-kDa protein encoded within the adenovirus E1B gene is essential for transformation by adenovirus and for proper regulation of viral early gene transcription. In order to investigate the biological function of the 19-kDa E1B protein, vectors were constructed to produce the 19-kDa protein in mammalian cells under the direction of heterologous promoters. Surprisingly, during transient expression, the E1B 19-kDa protein specifically associated with and disrupted the organization of intermediate filaments and the nuclear lamina, without disturbing the organization of other cytoskeletal networks. These results directly demonstrate an effect of a viral transforming protein on the cytoskeleton and suggest a role for intermediate filaments and the nuclear lamina in modulation of viral gene expression and the process of oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:2532364

  20. Invasive species and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive species challenge managers in their work of conserving and managing natural areas and are one of the most serious problems these managers face. Because invasive species are likely to spread in response to changes in climate, managers may need to change their approaches to invasive species management accordingly.

  1. Uncorrected Modeling Marine Invasions: Current

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Mark

    been and could be useful in understanding marine biological invasions. Mathematical models have long into biological processes in general, and invasion dynamics in particular. The mathematical tools associated of small populations, and have G. Rilov, J.A. Crooks (eds.) Biological Invasions in Marine Ecosystems. 71

  2. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  3. Lamin A and lamin C form homodimers and coexist in higher complex forms both in the nucleoplasmic fraction and in the lamina of cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Thorsten; Maass, Kendra; Hergt, Michaela; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated and quantified the nuclear A-type lamin pool from human HeLa S3 suspension cells with respect to their distribution to detergent soluble and insoluble fractions. We devised a sequential extraction protocol and found that maximally 10% of A-type lamins are recovered in the soluble fraction. Notably, lamin C is enriched in low detergent fractions and only with 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lamin A and C are recovered in ratios nearly equivalent to those found in whole cell extracts and in the lamina fraction. Authentic nucleoplasmic proteins such as LAP2a, pRB and p53 are co-extracted to a large part together with the A-type lamins in these fractions. By sucrose density centrifugation we revealed that the majority of lamins co-sedimented with human IgG indicating they form rather small complexes in the range of dimers and slightly larger complexes. Some lamin A - but not lamin C - is obtained in addition in a much faster sedimenting fraction. Authentic nuclear proteins such as PCNA, p53 and LAP2a were found both in the light and the heavy sucrose fractions together with lamin A. Last but not least, immunoprecipitation experiments from both soluble fractions and from RIPA lysates of whole cells revealed that lamin A and lamin C do not form heterodimers but segregate practically completely. Correspondingly, immunofluorescence microscopy of formaldehyde-fixed cells clearly demonstrated that lamin A and C are localized at least in part to distinct patches within the lamina. Hence, the structural segregation of lamin A and C is indeed retained in the nuclear envelope to some extent too. PMID:22033280

  4. Four cell types with distinctive membrane properties and morphologies in lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn of the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Steven A; Koninck, Yves De

    2002-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn plays an important role in the processing and relay of nociceptive information. Signal processing depends, in part, on neuronal membrane properties. Intrinsic membrane properties of lamina I neurons were therefore investigated using whole cell patch clamp recordings in a slice preparation of adult rat spinal cord. Based on responses to somatic current injection, four cell types were identified: tonic, which fire comparatively slowly but continuously throughout stimulation; phasic, which fire a high frequency burst of variable duration; delayed onset, which fire irregularly and with a marked delay to the first spike; and single spike, which typically fire only one action potential even when strongly depolarised. Classification by spiking pattern was further refined by identification of characteristic stimulus-response curves and quantification of several response parameters. Objectivity of the classification was confirmed by cluster analysis. Responses to stimulus trains and synaptic input as well as the kinetics of spontaneous synaptic events revealed differences in the signal processing characteristics of the cell types: tonic and delayed onset cells appeared to act predominantly as integrators whereas phasic and single spike cells acted as coincidence detectors. Intracellular labelling revealed a significant correlation between morphological and physiological cell types: tonic cells were typically fusiform, phasic cells were pyramidal, and delayed onset and single spike cells were multipolar. Thus, there are multiple physiological cells types in lamina I with specific morphological correlates and distinctive signal processing characteristics that confer significant differences in the transduction of input into spike trains. PMID:11897852

  5. A novel method of measuring leaf epidermis and mesophyll stiffness shows the ubiquitous nature of the sandwich structure of leaf laminas in broad-leaved angiosperm species.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Yusuke; Schieving, Feike; Anten, Niels P R

    2015-05-01

    Plant leaves commonly exhibit a thin, flat structure that facilitates a high light interception per unit mass, but may increase risks of mechanical failure when subjected to gravity, wind and herbivory as well as other stresses. Leaf laminas are composed of thin epidermis layers and thicker intervening mesophyll layers, which resemble a composite material, i.e. sandwich structure, used in engineering constructions (e.g. airplane wings) where high bending stiffness with minimum weight is important. Yet, to what extent leaf laminas are mechanically designed and behave as a sandwich structure remains unclear. To resolve this issue, we developed and applied a novel method to estimate stiffness of epidermis- and mesophyll layers without separating the layers. Across a phylogenetically diverse range of 36 angiosperm species, the estimated Young's moduli (a measure of stiffness) of mesophyll layers were much lower than those of the epidermis layers, indicating that leaf laminas behaved similarly to efficient sandwich structures. The stiffness of epidermis layers was higher in evergreen species than in deciduous species, and strongly associated with cuticle thickness. The ubiquitous nature of sandwich structures in leaves across studied species suggests that the sandwich structure has evolutionary advantages as it enables leaves to be simultaneously thin and flat, efficiently capturing light and maintaining mechanical stability under various stresses. PMID:25675956

  6. The Effect of Fenestration of Lamina Terminalis on the Vasospasm and Shunt-Dependent Hydrocephalus in Patients Following Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hatefi, Masoud; Azhary, Shirzad; Naebaghaee, Hussein; Mohamadi, Hasan Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: SAH (Sub Arachnoid Haemorrhage) is a life threatening that is associated with complications such as vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of FLT (Fenestration of Lamina Terminalis) on the incidence of vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in ACoA (Anterior Communicating Artery) aneurismal in SAH. Materials and Methods: The data of 50 ruptured ACoA aneurism patients were selected during the year 2001-2009 admitted to Imam Hussein hospital, Tehran, IR. In a randomized double-blind trial patients assigned in two group {with fenestration (FLT, n=25), without fenestration (No FLT, n=25)}. All patients underwent craniotomy by a single neurosurgeon. Patient’s age, sex, Hunt-Hess grade, Fisher grade, vasospasm, presence of hydrocephalus and incidences of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus were compared between groups. Results: There were no significant differences among groups in relation to demographic characteristics, neurological scale scores (Hunt-Hess grade) and the severity of the SAH (Fisher grade) (p>0.05). The rate of hydrocephalus on admission, were 24% and 16% in FLT and no FLT group respectively (p>0.05). The shunt placement postoperatively in FLT and no FLT group were 16% and 12% respectively (p>0.05). The clinical vasospasm was 20% and 24% in FLT and no FLT group respectively (p>0.05). Conclusion: Despite FLT can be a safe method there were not significant differences of FLT on the incidence of vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. A systematic evaluation with multisurgeon, multicentre and with greater sample size to disclose reality is suggested. PMID:26393164

  7. Biogeography of Mediterranean Invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, R. H.; di Castri, F.

    The Mediterranean basin, California, Chile, the western Cape of South Africa, and southern Australia share a Mediterranean climate characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. These five regions have differing patterns of human settlement, but similarities in natural vegetation and some faunal assemblages. These likenesses are enhanced with time by an increasing level of biotic exchange among the regions. An initiative of a subcommittee of SCOPE (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment), which realized that the integrity of many natural ecosystems is being threatened by the ingress of invasive species, this book uniquely documents the introduced floras and faunas, especially plants, buds, and mammals, in these five regions of Mediterranean climate, and aims to increase our understanding of the ecology of biological invasions. In doing so, it points a way to more effectively manage the biota of these regions.

  8. Non invasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, U S; Simonds, A K

    2000-04-01

    Non-invasive ventilation refers to the technique of providing ventilatory support to a patient without an endo/orotracheal airway. It is a promising and rapidly upcoming new technique and is being used as first line therapy in a wide variety of conditions causing respiratory failure. The major indications for its use include respiratory failure due to a variety of causes (chest wall abnormalities, neuromuscular disease, COPD), weaning and stabilization of cardio-respiratory status before and after surgery. Patients who are candidates for this modality usually have a hypercapnic respiratory failure but are able to protect the airway and cooperate with treatment. The biggest advantage of the technique is its simplicity and avoidance of complications of intubation like trauma, infection and delayed complications like tracheal stenosis. Patient comfort is significantly improved and important functions like speech, swallowing and cough are preserved. Several purpose built ventilators are available for use including pressure preset and volume present machines, each of which have their own advantages and disadvantages in clinical practice. A range of patient interfaces is available. The initiation of non-invasive ventilation is much easier as compared to invasive ventilation and can be done for most patients in an intermediary care unit thereby cutting down treatment costs and saving precious intensive care beds. Titration of ventilatory parameters can usually be done using simple tests like oxymetry and blood gases. Several technique related problems like skin pressure sores, nasal symptoms and abdominal distension can be managed with simple measures. Non invasive ventilation has got a special and evolving role in management of COPD, both in acute exacerbations and chronic respiratory failure. In short, the advantages of this form of ventilation are numerous and physicians must familiarize themselves with this new technique, facilities for which should be available in all hospitals admitting patients with respiratory failure. PMID:11273177

  9. USGS invasive species solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Land managers must meet the invasive species challenge every day, starting with identification of problem species, then the collection of best practices for their control, and finally the implementation of a plan to remove the problem. At each step of the process, the availability of reliable information is essential to success. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a suite of resources for early detection and rapid response, along with data management and sharing.

  10. Dietary Flexibility Aids Asian Earthworm Invasion in North American Forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, s...

  11. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on cells cultured from the rat organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and median preoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Simm, B; Ott, D; Pollatzek, E; Murgott, J; Gerstberger, R; Rummel, C; Roth, J

    2016-01-28

    The time course of the induction of enzymes responsible for the formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) after an inflammatory insult, in relation to the concomitant febrile response, suggests that peripherally generated PGE2 is involved in the induction of the early phase of fever, while centrally produced PGE2 exerts pyrogenic capacities during the later stages of fever within the hypothalamic median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). The actions of peripherally derived PGE2 on the brain might occur at the level of the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT), which lacks a tight blood-brain barrier and is implicated in fever, while the effects of PGE2 within the MnPO might interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission within a recently characterized central efferent pathway for the activation of cold-defence reactions. Using the fura-2 ratio imaging technique we, therefore, measured changes of the intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration in primary neuroglial microcultures of rat OVLT and MnPO stimulated with PGE2 and/or glutamate. In cultures from the OVLT, as opposed to those derived from the MnPO, substantial numbers of neurons (8% of 385), astrocytes (19% of 645) and microglial cells (28% of 43) directly responded to PGE2 with a transient increase of intracellular Ca(2+). The most pronounced effect of PGE2 on cells from MnPO microcultures was its modulatory influence on the strength of glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-signals. In 72 out of 512 neurons and in 105 out of 715 astrocytes PGE2 significantly augmented glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-signals. About 30% of these neurons were GABAergic. These observations are in agreement with putative roles of peripheral PGE2 as a directly acting circulating agent at the level of the OVLT, and of central MnPO-intrinsic PGE2 as an enhancer of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which causes disinhibition of thermogenic heat production, a crucial component for the manifestation of fever. In microcultures from both brain sites investigated incubation with PGE2 significantly reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced release of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-6) into the supernatant. PGE2, thus, seems to be involved in a negative feed-back loop to limit the strength of the brain inflammatory process and to play a dual role with pro- as well as anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26608124

  12. Lamina- and cell-specific alterations in cortical somatostatin receptor 2 mRNA expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beneyto, Monica; Morris, Harvey M; Rovensky, Katherine C; Lewis, David A

    2012-03-01

    Disturbed cortical ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in schizophrenia is evident from lamina- and cell type- specific alterations in presynaptic markers. In the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), these alterations include lower transcript expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide expressed in the Martinotti subpopulation of GABA neurons whose axons innervate the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, whether the alterations in SST-containing interneurons are associated with changes in post-synaptic receptors for SST has not been examined. Thus, we used in situ hybridization to quantify the mRNA expression levels of SST receptors subtype 1 (SSTR1) and subtype 2 (SSTR2) in DLPFC area 9 from 23 matched pairs of subjects with schizophrenia and normal comparison subjects. We also assessed the effects of potential confounding variables within the human subjects and in brain specimens from macaque monkeys with long term exposure to antipsychotic drugs. SSTR1 mRNA levels did not differ between subject groups. In contrast, mean cortical SSTR2 mRNA levels were significantly 19% lower in the subjects with schizophrenia. Laminar and cellular level analyses revealed that lower SSTR2 mRNA levels were localized to pyramidal cells in cortical layers 5-6. Expression of SSTR2 mRNA did not differ between monkeys exposed chronically to high doses of haloperidol or olanzapine and control animals, or between subjects with schizophrenia on or off antipsychotic medications at the time of death. However, levels of SSTR2 mRNA were significantly 37.6% lower in monkeys exposed chronically to low dose haloperidol, suggesting that the lower levels of SSTR2 mRNA selectively in pyramidal neurons in DLPFC layers 5-6 in schizophrenia should be interpreted with caution. In concert with prior findings of lower SST mRNA expression in the same subjects, the results of this study suggest the convergence of pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms to reduce inhibitory inputs to pyramidal neurons in the infragranular layers of the DLPFC. PMID:21215273

  13. 3D Evaluation of the Lamina Cribrosa with Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography in Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Omodaka, Kazuko; Horii, Takaaki; Takahashi, Seri; Kikawa, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Shiga, Yukihiro; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although the lamina cribrosa (LC) is the primary site of axonal damage in glaucoma, adequate methods to image and measure it are currently lacking. Here, we describe a noninvasive, in vivo method of evaluating the LC, based on swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), and determine this method’s ability to quantify LC thickness. Methods This study comprised 54 eyes, including normal (n = 18), preperimetric glaucoma (PPG; n = 18), and normal tension glaucoma (NTG; n = 18) eyes. We used SS-OCT to obtain 3 x 3 mm cube scans of an area centered on the optic disc, and then synchronized reconstructed B- and en-face images from this data. We identified the LC in these B-scan images by marking the visible borders of the LC pores. We marked points on the anterior and posterior borders of the LC in 12 B-scan images in order to create a skeleton model of the LC. Finally, we used B-spline interpolation to form a 3D model of the LC, including only reliably measured scan areas. We calculated the average LC thickness (avgLCT) in this model and used Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to compare it with circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT). Results We found that the correlation coefficient of avgLCT and cpRNFLT was 0.64 (p < 0.01). The coefficient of variation for avgLCT was 5.1%. AvgLCT differed significantly in the groups (normal: 282.6 ± 20.6 ?m, PPG: 261.4 ± 15.8 ?m, NTG: 232.6 ± 33.3 ?m). The normal, PPG and NTG groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, refractive error or intraocular pressure (IOP), although the normal and NTG groups differed significantly in cpRNFLT and Humphrey field analyzer measurements of mean deviation. Conclusion Thus, our results indicate that the parameters of our newly developed method of measuring LC thickness with SS-OCT may provide useful and important data for glaucoma diagnosis and research. PMID:25875096

  14. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, Salem I.; Gooi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  15. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, Salem I; Gooi, Zhen; Tufano, Ralph P

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  16. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  17. Global loss of a nuclear lamina component, lamin A/C, and LINC complex components SUN1, SUN2, and nesprin-2 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Hieda, Miki; Yokoyama, Yuhki; Nishioka, Yu; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit a variety of features indicative of atypical nuclei. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain to be elucidated. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, a nuclear envelope protein complex consisting mainly of the SUN and nesprin proteins, connects nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments and helps to regulate the size and shape of the nucleus. Using immunohistology, we found that a nuclear lamina component, lamin A/C and all of the investigated LINC complex components, SUN1, SUN2, and nesprin-2, were downregulated in human breast cancer tissues. In the majority of cases, we observed lower expression levels of these analytes in samples' cancerous regions as compared to their cancer-associated noncancerous regions (in cancerous regions, percentage of tissue samples exhibiting low protein expression: lamin A/C, 85% [n = 73]; SUN1, 88% [n = 43]; SUN2, 74% [n = 43]; and nesprin-2, 79% [n = 53]). Statistical analysis showed that the frequencies of recurrence and HER2 expression were negatively correlated with lamin A/C expression (P < 0.05), and intrinsic subtype and ki-67 level were associated with nesprin-2 expression (P < 0.05). In addition, combinatorial analysis using the above four parameters showed that all patients exhibited reduced expression of at least one of four components despite the tumor's pathological classification. Furthermore, several cultured breast cancer cell lines expressed less SUN1, SUN2, nesprin-2 mRNA, and lamin A/C compared to noncancerous mammary gland cells. Together, these results suggest that the strongly reduced expression of LINC complex and nuclear lamina components may play fundamental pathological functions in breast cancer progression. PMID:26175118

  18. Spatial invasion of cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Philipp; Nowak, Martin A.; Hauert, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary puzzle of cooperation describes situations where cooperators provide a fitness benefit to other individuals at some cost to themselves. Under Darwinian selection, the evolution of cooperation is a conundrum, whereas non-cooperation (or defection) is not. In the absence of supporting mechanisms, cooperators perform poorly and decrease in abundance. Evolutionary game theory provides a powerful mathematical framework to address the problem of cooperation using the prisoner’s dilemma. One well-studied possibility to maintain cooperation is to consider structured populations, where each individual interacts only with a limited subset of the population. This enables cooperators to form clusters such that they are more likely to interact with other cooperators instead of being exploited by defectors. Here we present a detailed analysis of how a few cooperators invade and expand in a world of defectors. If the invasion succeeds, the expansion process takes place in two stages: first, cooperators and defectors quickly establish a local equilibrium and then they uniformly expand in space. The second stage provides good estimates for the global equilibrium frequencies of cooperators and defectors. Under hospitable conditions, cooperators typically form a single, ever growing cluster interspersed with specks of defectors, whereas under more hostile conditions, cooperators form isolated, compact clusters that minimize exploitation by defectors. We provide the first quantitative assessment of the way cooperators arrange in space during invasion and find that the macroscopic properties and the emerging spatial patterns reveal information about the characteristics of the underlying microscopic interactions. PMID:18068731

  19. Managing the invasive species risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida, California and Hawaii are on the front lines when it comes to the war with invasive species. One study documented the Florida invasion at more than one new arthropod species becoming established in the state each month with California estimated to be one every other month. This does not me...

  20. Managing the invasive species risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida, California and Hawaii are on the front lines when it comes to the war with invasive species. One study documented the Florida invasion at more than one new arthropod species becoming established in the state each month with California estimated to be one every other month. This does not mea...

  1. Genetic reconstructions of invasion history.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-05-01

    A diverse array of molecular markers and constantly evolving analytical approaches have been employed to reconstruct the invasion histories of the most notorious invasions. Detailed information on the source(s) of introduction, invasion route, type of vectors, number of independent introductions and pathways of secondary spread has been corroborated for a large number of biological invasions. In this review, I present the promises and limitations of current techniques while discussing future directions. Broad phylogeographic surveys of native and introduced populations have traced back invasion routes with surprising precision. These approaches often further clarify species boundaries and reveal complex patterns of genetic relationships with noninvasive relatives. Moreover, fine-scale analyses of population genetics or genomics allow deep inferences on the colonization dynamics across invaded ranges and can reveal the extent of gene flow among populations across various geographical scales, major demographic events such as genetic bottlenecks as well as other important evolutionary events such as hybridization with native taxa, inbreeding and selective sweeps. Genetic data have been often corroborated successfully with historical, geographical and ecological data to enable a comprehensive reconstruction of the invasion process. The advent of next-generation sequencing, along with the availability of extensive databases of repository sequences generated by barcoding projects opens the opportunity to broadly monitor biodiversity, to identify early invasions and to quantify failed invasions that would otherwise remain inconspicuous to the human eye. PMID:25703061

  2. Integrated assessment of biological invasions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the main annalists of the ecological and economic impacts of invasions on ecosystems around the world, ecologists should be able to provide information that can guide management practices. Managers often want to know about the potential for invasion of specific organisms in the sites under their ...

  3. MEDUSAHEAD INVASION, IMPLICATIONS, AND MANAGEMENT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medusahead invasion of western rangelands is at a cross-road, either an aggressive effort to prevent its invasion of new areas is initiated, or millions of acres will be lost. Medusahead is an aggressive, exotic, annual grass invading rangelands in the western United States. The rapid spread of me...

  4. Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Luketich, James D.; Alvelo-Rivera, Miguel; Buenaventura, Percival O.; Christie, Neil A.; McCaughan, James S.; Litle, Virginia R.; Schauer, Philip R.; Close, John M.; Fernando, Hiran C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess our outcomes after minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE). Summary Background Data: Esophagectomy has traditionally been performed by open methods. Results from most series include mortality rates in excess of 5% and hospital stays frequently greater than 10 days. MIE has the potential to improve these results, but only a few small series have been reported. This report summarizes our experience of 222 cases. Methods: From 1996 to 2002, MIE was performed in 222 patients. Indications for operation included high-grade dysplasia (n = 47) and cancer (n = 175). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used in 78 (35.1%) and radiation in 36 (16.2%). Initially, a laparoscopic transhiatal approach was used (n = 8), but subsequently our approach evolved to include thoracoscopic mobilization (n = 214). Results: There were 186 men and 36 women. Median age was 66.5 years (range, 39–89). Nonemergent conversion to open procedure was required in 16 patients (7.2%). MIE was successfully completed in 206 (92.8%) patients. The median intensive care unit stay was 1 day (range, 1–30); hospital stay was 7 days (range, 3–75). Operative mortality was 1.4% (n = 3). Anastomotic leak rate was 11.7% (n = 26). At a mean follow-up of 19 months (range, 1–68), quality of life scores were similar to preoperative values and population norms. Stage specific survival was similar to open series Conclusions: MIE offers results as good as or better than open operation in our center with extensive minimally invasive and open experience. In this single institution experience, we observed a lower mortality rate (1.4%) and shorter hospital stay (7 days) than most open series. Given these results, we are now developing an intergroup trial (ECOG 2202) to assess MIE in a multicenter setting. PMID:14530720

  5. The role of the extracellular matrix in neoplastic glial invasion of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, C J

    1996-09-01

    Intrinsic tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) are generally derived from the glial cells: the astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and ependymal cells. Although such tumours rarely metastasize to distant organs, they show a marked propensity for local invasion of the surrounding nervous tissue. Sub-populations of neoplastic glia may migrate several millimetres away from main tumour mass into the contiguous CNS parenchyma, resulting in poor demarcation of the tumour. These migratory, so-called "guerrilla" cells give rise to recurrent tumours following surgical debulking and adjuvant radio- and chemo-therapeutic intervention. As in other organs, tumour cell invasion is, in part, facilitated by interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM); however, apart from the vascular basal lamina and the glia limitans externa, the CNS lacks a well-defined ECM. Invading neoplastic cells must, therefore, provide their own ECM, a process which may be stimulated by such agents as gangliosides or growth factors. Glioma cell-derived laminin and hyaluronic acid may provide the most important substrates for invasion, cell adhesion to these substrates being achieved largely through integrin receptors (the function of which may be determined by interaction with cell surface gangliosides) and CD44, respectively. Modulation of these ECM components is facilitated by a variety of proteinases including the matrix metalloproteinases and hyaluronidase, the activity of which is also thought to stimulate angiogenesis. Interference with the mechanisms which promote glioma cell adhesive properties may provide suitable targets for novel anti-invasive therapies. These might include ECM components, growth factors, gangliosides, integrin receptors and proteases and their inhibitors. PMID:9181059

  6. INVASION NOTE Invasion of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in a southern

    E-print Network

    Whitcraft, Christine

    species before they become widely established (Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds 2003). Thus, this letter documents an extensive invasion and modification of coastal salt

  7. Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547

    E-print Network

    Martone, Patrick T.

    1 23 Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547 Volume 14 Number 8 Biol Invasions (2012) 14:1651-1663 DOI 10.1007/s10530-012-0178-0 Adapted for invasion? Comparing attachment, drag and dislodgment of native 12 months after publication. #12;ORIGINAL PAPER Adapted for invasion? Comparing attachment, drag

  8. Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547

    E-print Network

    1 23 Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547 Volume 15 Number 5 Biol Invasions (2013) 15:991-1003 DOI, and community structure (Juliano 1998, 2009; Ellis et al. 2006). From an invasion biology perspective, con 10.1007/s10530-012-0345-3 The rise of the invasives and decline of the natives: insights revealed

  9. Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547

    E-print Network

    1 23 Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547 Biol Invasions DOI 10.1007/s10530-012-0345-3 The rise, and community structure (Juliano 1998, 2009; Ellis et al. 2006). From an invasion biology perspective, con of the invasives and decline of the natives: insights revealed from adult populations of container-inhabiting Aedes

  10. Common Ground for Managing Invasive Annual Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive annual grasses often reach their full biological potential in ecosystems of the western United States. This suggests that crucial ecosystem "checks and balances" are not functioning. In other words, invasion occurs because ecosystems have lost resistance to invasion, and invasive plants a...

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This irregular red nodule is an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers ...

  12. Traits Influencing Mammal Invasion Success

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Data Analysis function for histogram production #12;Case Study: Vulpes vulpes Green- Native Range-2486.2006.01213.x. Global Invasive Species Database: Vulpes vulpes FORSYTH, D. M., DUNCAN, R. P., BOMFORD, M

  13. Cheatgrass invasion and wildlife habitat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction and subsequent invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has altered native plant communities and the wildlife species that depend on these communities. Cheatgrass has truncated secondary succession by outcompeting native plant species for limited resources, thus building persistent...

  14. Invasive cervical resorption: treatment challenges.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yookyung; Lee, Chan-Young; Kim, Euiseong; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2012-11-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption. It is characterized by invasion of cervical region of the root by fibrovascular tissue derived from the periodontal ligament. This case presents an invasive cervical resorption occurring in maxillary lateral incisor, following damage in cervical cementum from avulsion and intracoronal bleaching procedure. Flap reflection, debridement and restoration with glass ionomer cement were performed in an attempt to repair the defect. But after 2 mon, more resorption extended apically. Considering root stability and recurrence potential, we decided to extract the tooth. Invasive cervical resorption in advanced stages may present great challenges for clinicians. Therefore, prevention and early detection must be stressed when dealing with patients presenting history of potential predisposing factors. PMID:23430133

  15. Reproductive characteristics of neophytes in the Czech Republic: traits of invasive and non-invasive species

    E-print Network

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    establishment, terminal velocity Introduction Biological invasions are among the most dynamically developing invasive is an important part of research in biological invasions and still repre- sents an ultimate goalReproductive characteristics of neophytes in the Czech Republic: traits of invasive and non-invasive

  16. Utility of bioassays (lettuce, red clover, red fescue, Microtox, MetSTICK, Hyalella, bait lamina) in ecological risk screening of acid metal (Zn) contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Chapman, E Emily V; Hedrei Helmer, Stephanie; Dave, Göran; Murimboh, John D

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess selected bioassays and ecological screening tools for their suitability in a weight of evidence risk screening process of acidic metal contaminated soil. Intact soil cores were used for the tests, which minimizes changes in pH and metal bioavailability that may result from homogenization and drying of the soil. Soil cores were spiked with ZnCl(2) or CaCl(2). Leachate collected from the soil cores was used to account for the exposure pathways through pore water and groundwater. Tests assessed included MetSTICK in soil cores and Microtox in soil leachate, lettuce (Lactuca sativa), red fescue (Festuca rubra) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) in the soil cores and lettuce and red clover in soil leachate, Hyallella azteca in soil leachate, and an ecological soil function test using Bait Lamina in soil cores. Microtox, H. azteca, lettuce and red fescue showed higher sensitivity to low pH than to Zn concentrations and are therefore not recommended as tests on intact acidic soil cores and soil leachate. The Bait Lamina test appeared sensitive to pH levels below 3.7 but should be investigated further as a screening tool in less acidic soils. Among the bioassays, the MetSTICK and the T. pratense bioassays in soil cores were the most sensitive to Zn, with the lowest nominal NOEC of 200 and 400mg Zn/kg d.w., respectively. These bioassays were also tolerant of low pH, which make them suitable for assessing hazards of metal contaminated acid soils. PMID:22444727

  17. Trace element distribution in annual stalagmite laminae mapped by micrometer-resolution X-ray fluorescence: Implications for incorporation of environmentally significant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Andrea; Frisia, Silvia; Fairchild, Ian J.; Somogyi, Andrea; Susini, Jean

    2007-03-01

    Stalagmite ER78, from Grotta di Ernesto cave in NE Italy displays clear annual lamination consistent with its shallow depth below a forest ecosystem subject to autumnal peaking of water infiltration. Synchrotron radiation scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence analyses of heavy elements at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamline ID22, and light elements at ID21, with 1-3 ?m resolution has been combined with data from ion microprobe analyses to reveal chemical variability across the visible layers of these annual laminae. A series of elements display a symmetrical peak, centered around the thin, dark layer at the top of each lamina. The peak concentration is ordered Y > Zn, Cu and Pb > P and Br. This hierarchy is thought to reflect the selectivity of transport of these elements, possibly by organic colloids flushed from the soil zone during autumn infiltration. Ion microprobe analysis indicates Na and F also increase, as does H, the latter reflecting increased microporosity. Sr displays a trough around the dark and thin autumn layer implying that its incorporation may be limited by competition with other elements. Mg and S show a different pattern of annual variation and Fe displays none. The trace metals, Br and Y display peak abundance in the early 20th century, which appears to reflect a period of tree-felling rather than a climatic anomaly. The results demonstrate the power of the high spatial resolution and low detection limits of the synchrotron technique, and its ability to produce quantitative maps that allow distinction of layered structure from that of isolated particles, or irregular inhomogeneities.

  18. Hydrogen bonding motifs, spectral characterization, theoretical computations and anticancer studies on chloride salt of 6-mercaptopurine: An assembly of corrugated lamina shows enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.; Athimoolam, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2015-10-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (an anti cancer drug), is coming under the class II Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). In order to enhance the solubility with retained physiochemical/pharmaceutical properties, the present work was attempted with its salt form. The single crystals of 6-mercaptopurinium chloride (6MPCl) were successfully grown by slow evaporation technique under ambient temperature. The X-ray diffraction study shows that the crystal packing is dominated by N-H⋯Cl classical hydrogen bonds leading to corrugated laminar network. The hydrogen bonds present in the lamina can be dismantled as three chain C21(6), C21(7) and C21(8) motifs running along ab-diagonal of the unit cell. These primary chain motifs are interlinked to each other forming ring R63(21) motifs. These chain and ring motifs are aggregated like a dendrimer structure leading to the above said corrugated lamina. This low dimensional molecular architecture differs from the ladder like arrays in pure drug though it possess lattice water molecule in lieu of the chloride anion in the present compound. Geometrical optimizations of 6MPCl were done by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP function with two different basis sets. The optimized molecular geometries and computed vibrational spectra are compared with their experimental counterparts. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to interpret hyperconjugative interaction and Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT). The chemical hardness, electronegativity, chemical potential and electrophilicity index of 6MPCl were found along with the HOMO-LUMO plot. The lower band gap value obtained from the Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) analysis reiterates the pharmaceutical activity of the compound. The anticancer studies show that 6MPCl retains its activity against human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Hence, this anticancer efficacy and improved solubility demands 6MPCl towards the further pharmaceutical applications.

  19. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. We found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings. PMID:26545120

  20. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chiao-Fan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Kuo-You; Chiu, Wei-Che; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, no prior population-based study has been published wherein the primary aim was to evaluate whether an association between psychotropic drug prescription and cervical cancer exists. Herein we have conducted the first study that primarily aimed to determine the association between antidepressants use and risk of invasive cervical cancer in the general population. This is a population-based study utilizing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 26,262 cases with invasive cervical cancer and 129,490 controls. We adopted the conditional logistic regression model as the statistical method and adjusted for potential confounding factors. The prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (adjusted OR?=?0.93, 95% CI?=?0.84–1.04), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), mirtazapine and bupropion, adjusting for cumulative dose, was not associated with an increased, or decreased, risk for invasive cervical cancer. An association between trazodone prescription and invasive cervical cancer was observed (adjusted OR?=?1.22, 95% CI?=?1.03–1.43). An association between the major classes of antidepressants and invasive cervical cancer was not observed herein. Our preliminary finding regarding a possible association between trazodone and cervical cancer requires replication. PMID:26496343

  1. 75 FR 69698 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...species. The full ISAC will also consider a white paper entitled, Invasive Species and Climate Change, as drafted by the ISAC Task Team on Climate Change. DATES: Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee: Tuesday, December 7,...

  2. In this issue: Florida Invasive Species Partnership

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    in Florida, you`ve been hearing more and more about partnerships, and perhaps something about a really cool and prevent biological invasions. Cogongrass, photo by Dr. Richard Williams Invasive exotic plants

  3. 75 FR 29359 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ...challenges faced by NISC agencies elsewhere in the nation. ISAC will also address the complex relationship between climate change and invasive species, opportunities for green jobs creation within invasive species efforts, ballast water...

  4. LOUISIANA EXOTIC INVASIVE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM MX964256

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana Exotic Invasive Species Symposium will provide a multi-state collaboration among agency representatives, scientists, and the affected public to address the problem of exotic invasive species and to improve coastal environmental conditions in Louisiana.

  5. Biological Warfare in Invasive Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is an invasive species in temperate forests throughout North America that has led to a decrease in species diversity and alterations in nutrient cycling. Garlic mustard produces an arsenal of secondary chemicals in the glucosinolate family that have strong biocid...

  6. Invasion Percolation and Global Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabási, Albert-László

    1996-05-01

    Invasion bond percolation (IBP) is mapped exactly into Prim's algorithm for finding the shortest spanning tree of a weighted random graph. Exploring this mapping, which is valid for arbitrary dimensions and lattices, we introduce a new IBP model that belongs to the same universality class as IBP and generates the minimal energy tree spanning the IBP cluster.

  7. Invasive Species Impacts Wilcove Quiz

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    , explain why plants in Hawaii are likely to be more imperiled by non-native species than plants.g., taxonomic groups) do you think might have the greatest impact on birds, and why? #12;Red-eared slider turtle of the beholder #12;Plant competition experiments #12;Invasive plants are good competitors Based on a meta

  8. Sea Lamprey, an Invasive Fish

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Invasive sea lamprey prey on commercially important fish species such as lake trout, living off of the blood and body fluids of adult fish.  It is one of many fish species that USGS scientists study from the USGS Research Vessel Muskie. These lamprey belong to the Great Lakes Fisheries Com...

  9. Sea Lamprey, an Invasive Fish

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Invasive sea lamprey prey on commercially important fish species such as lake trout, living off of the blood and body fluids of adult fish. It is one of many fish species that USGS scientists study from the USGS Research Vessel Muskie. These lamprey belong to the Great Lakes Fisheries Commissio...

  10. RANGELAND MONITORING AND INVASIVE WEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the serious biological obstacles that must be addressed in any comprehensive revision of rangeland ecological condition assessment is what to do with sites dominated by exotic self invasive species. In certain cases such species have truncated succession so that with a bare minimum of distur...

  11. Minimally Invasive Penile Implant Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    MINIMALLY INVASIVE PENILE IMPLANT SURGERY CORAL GABLES HOSPITAL CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA March 26, 2007 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: Over the next hour you’ll see a live ... from sunny Florida. We are live in the Coral Gables Hospital in beautiful Coral Gables, Florida. My ...

  12. CONSERVATION PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive plant species are degrading the structure and function of ecosystems throughout the world. Although most state and federal conservation agencies in the U.S. attempt to reduce the impact of invasive species, some agency activities can contribute to the spread of invasive...

  13. 78 FR 70317 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting (via Teleconference) of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to...

  14. 78 FR 11899 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The document contained incorrect dates. This document corrects those.... Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (OPEN): Thursday, March 7, 2013 through Friday, March...

  15. 76 FR 68776 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive...

  16. 77 FR 23740 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive...

  17. A proposed unified framework for biological invasions

    E-print Network

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    A proposed unified framework for biological invasions Tim M. Blackburn1,2 , Petr Pysek3,4 , Sven for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 propose a unified framework for biologi- cal invasions that reconciles and integrates the key features

  18. 75 FR 69698 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  19. Evolution and Current Dimensions of Invasion Ecology

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Part 2 Evolution and Current Dimensions of Invasion Ecology 49 Fifty Y ears of Invasion Ecology ears of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton Edited by David M. Richardson © 2011 Blackwell earlier than plants. Rationale: animals tend to have effects that are more conspicuous, thus

  20. Invasive Plants on Rangelands: a Global Threat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant species are spreading and invading rangelands at an unprecedented rate costing ranchers billions of dollars to control invasive plants each year. In its simplest form, the invasion process has four primary stages, including introduction, establishment, spread and colonization. Th...

  1. 75 FR 29359 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  2. Minimally Invasive Approach to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ninh T.; Weigel, Tracey; Ferson, Peter; Keenan, Robert; Schauer, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery have made it possible to perform esophagectomy using minimally invasive techniques. The aim of this report was to present our preliminary experience with minimally invasive esophagectomy. Methods: We reviewed our experience on eight patients who underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy using either laparoscopic and/or thoracoscopic techniques from June 1996 to May 1997. Indications for esophagectomy included stage I carcinoma (5), palliative resection (1), Barrett's with high grade dysplasia (1) and end stage achalasia (1). Results: The average age was 68 years (54-82). The surgical approach to esophagectomy included laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis (n=4), thoracoscopic and laparoscopic esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis (n=1), and laparoscopic mobilization with right mini-thoracotomy and intra-thoracic anastomosis (n=3). Conversion to mini-laparotomy was required in two patients (25%) to complete esophageal dissection and facilitate gastric pull-up. The mean operative time was 460 minutes. The mean intensive care stay was 1.9 days (range of 0-7 days) with a mean hospital stay of 13-8 days. Minor complications included atrial fibrillation (n=1), pleural effusion (n=2) and persistent air leak (n=1). Major complications included cervical anastomotic leak (n=1), and delayed gastric emptying requiring pyloroplasty (n=1). There was no perioperative mortality. Conclusions: This preliminary experience suggests that minimally invasive esophagectomy is safe and feasible in centers with experience in advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures. Further studies are necessary to determine advantages over open esophagectomy. PMID:9876747

  3. Biological Invasions: Paradox Lost and Paradise Gained A new study shows how an invasive snail species accrues elevated genetic

    E-print Network

    Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    Dispatches Biological Invasions: Paradox Lost and Paradise Gained A new study shows how an invasive human interference in animal and plant dispersal, biological invasions are wreaking havoc that can become economically and ecologically threatening. Recent studies of biological invasions, however

  4. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  5. Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Teemu O; Aires, Lina; Herzog, Florian A; Schwartlander, Ruth; Moeller, Jens; Vogel, Viola

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear lamins play central roles at the intersection between cytoplasmic signalling and nuclear events. Here, we show that at least two N- and C-terminal lamin epitopes are not accessible at the basal side of the nuclear envelope under environmental conditions known to upregulate cell contractility. The conformational epitope on the Ig-domain of A-type lamins is more buried in the basal than apical nuclear envelope of human mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenesis (but not adipogenesis), and in fibroblasts adhering to rigid (but not soft) polyacrylamide hydrogels. This structural polarization of the lamina is promoted by compressive forces, emerges during cell spreading, and requires lamin A/C multimerization, intact nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linkages (LINC), and apical-actin stress-fibre assembly. Notably, the identified Ig-epitope overlaps with emerin, DNA and histone binding sites, and comprises various laminopathy mutation sites. Our findings should help decipher how the physical properties of cellular microenvironments regulate nuclear events. PMID:26301768

  6. Descending inhibitory influences exerted by the brain stem upon the activities of dorsal horn lamina V cells induced by intra-arterial injection of bradykinin into the limbs.

    PubMed Central

    Besson, J M; Guilbaud, G; Le Bars, D

    1975-01-01

    1. In order to study descending influences of the brain stem upon the transmission of nociceptive messages at the spinal level, the activities of lumbar lamina V dorsal horn cells, induced by intra-arterial injection of brandykinin into the limbs, were recorded in unanaesthetized cats in both decerebrate and temporary spinal states (reversible cold block applied at the thoracic level). 2. In the decerebrate state, the intra-arterial injection of bradykinin had little or no effect. 3. During the reversible spinalization, the effects of bradykinin were revealed or considerably enhanced. As described in a previous study, in the C1-transected cat, three types of effects were encountered: excitatory, inhibiitory and mixed (inhibitory-excitatory). 4. These modifications observed after spinalization were generally associated with a large increase of the spontaneous firing rate. 5. These results emphasize, in the decerebrate cat, the importance of descending inhibitory controls exerted by the brain stem upon the transmission of nonciceptive messages at the spinal cord level. Images Plate 1 PMID:1151845

  7. A study of the damage tolerance enhancement of carbon/epoxy laminates by utilizing an outer lamina of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Lance, David G.

    1991-01-01

    The damage tolerance of carbon/epoxy was examined when an outer layer of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (Spectra) material was utilized on the specimen. Four types of 16 ply quasi-isotropic panels, (0,+45,90,-45)s2 were tested. The first contained no Spectra, while the others had one lamina of Spectra placed on either the top (impacted side), bottom or both surfaces of the composite plate. A range of impact energies up to approximately 8.5 Joules (6.3 ft-lbs) was used to inflict damage upon these specimens. Glass/Phenolic honeycomb beams with a core density of 314 N/m3 (2.0 lb/ft3) and 8 ply quasi-isotropic facesheets were also tested for compression-after-impact strength with and without Spectra at impact energies of 1,2,3 and 4 Joules (.74, 1.47, 2.21 and 2.95 ft-lbs). It was observed that the composite plates had little change in damage tolerance due to the Spectra, while the honeycomb panels demonstrated a slight increase in damage tolerance when Spectra was added, the damage tolerance level being more improved at higher impact energies.

  8. Invasive cervical resorption following trauma.

    PubMed

    Heithersay, G S

    1999-08-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is an insidious and often aggressively destructive form of external root resorption which may occur as a late complication following dental trauma particularly where it involves damage to cementum and supporting tissues. While this resorption may be evident clinically as a pink coronal discolouration, later with cavitation of the enamel, often there are no obvious external signs and the condition is only detected radiographically. It is characterised by the invasion of the cervical region of the root by fibrovascular tissue which progressively resorbs dentine, enamel and cementum. The dental pulp remains protected by an intact layer of dentine and predentine until late in the process. Ectopic calcifications can be observed in advanced lesions both within the invading fibrous tissue and deposited directly onto the resorbed dentine surface. The aetiology of invasive cervical resorption is unknown but trauma has been documented as a potential predisposing factor. A recent study by the author of 222 patients with a total of 257 teeth which displayed varying degrees of invasive cervical resorption showed that trauma alone was a potential predisposing sole factor in 14% of patients and 15.1% of teeth. Trauma in combination with bleaching, orthodontics or delayed eruption was found in an additional 11.2% of patients or 10.6% of teeth and of these a combination of trauma and bleaching occurred in a relatively high proportion of 7.7% of patients or 7.4% of teeth. This study also revealed that of other potential predisposing factors orthodontics was the most common sole factor constituting 21.2% of patients and 24.1% of teeth examined. Successful treatment of invasive cervical resorption is dependent on the extent of the resorptive process. Teeth with invasive cervical resorption have been divided into four classes. Whilst several treatment modalities are possible, a clinical evaluation of the treatment of this condition by the topical application of a 90% aqueous solution of trichloracetic acid, curettage, endodontic therapy where necessary and restoration with a glass ionomer cement has been evaluated on 94 patients with a total of 101 teeth with a minimum follow-up period of three years. Results indicate a satisfactory treatment outcome can be anticipated in Class 1, 2 and 3 cases. In Class 4 resorption no treatment or alternative therapy is recommended. Diagnosis of lesions at an early stage of development is highly desirable and therefore the patients who have a potential for the development of this condition by virtue of a history such as trauma should be monitored radiographically at intervals throughout life. PMID:11411085

  9. Will climate change promote future invasions?

    PubMed Central

    Bellard, C.; Thuiller, W.; Leroy, B.; Genovesi, P.; Bakkenes, M.; Courchamp, F.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasion is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Using ensemble forecasts from species distribution models to project future suitable areas of the “100 of the world’s worst invasive species” defined by the IUCN, we show that both climate and land use changes will likely cause drastic species range shifts. Looking at potential spatial aggregation of invasive species, we identify three future hotspots of invasion in Europe, northeastern North America, and Oceania. We also emphasize that some regions could lose a significant number of invasive alien species, creating opportunities for ecosystem restoration. From the list of 100, scenarios of potential range distributions show a consistent shrinking for invasive amphibians and birds, while for aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates distributions are projected to substantially increase in most cases. Given the harmful impacts these invasive species currently have on ecosystems, these species will likely dramatically influence the future of biodiversity. PMID:23913552

  10. TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine J. Exp. Med. The Rockefeller University Press 0022-1007/2003/05/1233/12 $8.00

    E-print Network

    by plasma cells acts as a first line of defense when the antigen reenters the body, not only by neutralizing, 10). Second, long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow and gut lamina propria produce antibodies

  11. Curriculum Vitae Cavan Reilly, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    Reilly, Cavan

    replication in resting memory CD4+ T cells depletes gut lamina propria CD4+ T cells", Nature, 435. 12. Vlasova infection of resting and activated CD4+ T cells in transmission and acute SIV infection", Proceedings

  12. Three-Dimensional Hydrogel Model Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Vocal Fold Augmentation

    E-print Network

    Park, Hyoungshin

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may provide a clinical option for rebuilding damaged superficial lamina propria of the vocal fold. We investigated the effects of five hydrogels (hyaluronic acid [HA], collagen, fibrin, ...

  13. Human mobility and epidemic invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-03-01

    The current H1N1 influenza pandemic is just the latest example of how human mobility helps drive infectious diseases. Travel has grown explosively in the last decades, contributing to an emerging complex pattern of traffic flows that unfolds at different scales, shaping the spread of epidemics. Restrictions on people's mobility are thus investigated to design possible containment measures. By considering a theoretical framework in terms of reaction-diffusion processes, it is possible to study the invasion dynamics of epidemics in a metapopulation system with heterogeneous mobility patterns. The system is found to exhibit a global invasion threshold that sets the critical mobility rate below which the epidemic is contained. The results provide a general framework for the understanding of the numerical evidence from detailed data-driven simulations that show the limited benefit provided by travel flows reduction in slowing down or containing an emerging epidemic.

  14. Invasive Salmonellosis in Kilifi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muthumbi, Esther; Morpeth, Susan C.; Ooko, Michael; Mwanzu, Alfred; Mwarumba, Salim; Mturi, Neema; Etyang, Anthony O.; Berkley, James A.; Williams, Thomas N.; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Invasive salmonelloses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, but the incidence and case fatality of each disease vary markedly by region. We aimed to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of invasive salmonelloses among children and adults in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods.?We analyzed integrated clinical and laboratory records for patients presenting to the Kilifi County Hospital between 1998 and 2014. We calculated incidence, and summarized clinical features and multidrug resistance. Results.?Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) accounted for 10.8% and 5.8% of bacteremia cases in children and adults, respectively, while Salmonella Typhi accounted for 0.5% and 2.1%, respectively. Among 351 NTS isolates serotyped, 160 (45.6%) were Salmonella Enteritidis and 152 (43.3%) were Salmonella Typhimurium. The incidence of NTS in children aged <5 years was 36.6 per 100 000 person-years, being highest in infants aged <7 days (174/100 000 person-years). The overall incidence of NTS in children varied markedly by location and declined significantly during the study period; the pattern of dominance of the NTS serotypes also shifted from Salmonella Enteritidis to Salmonella Typhimurium. Risk factors for invasive NTS disease were human immunodeficiency virus infection, malaria, and malnutrition; the case fatality ratio was 22.1% (71/321) in children aged <5 years and 36.7% (11/30) in adults. Multidrug resistance was present in 23.9% (84/351) of NTS isolates and 46.2% (12/26) of Salmonella Typhi isolates. Conclusions.?In Kilifi, the incidence of invasive NTS was high, especially among newborn infants, but typhoid fever was uncommon. NTS remains an important cause of bacteremia in children <5 years of age. PMID:26449944

  15. Minimally invasive paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Emile; Kalfa, David

    2014-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive surgery for congenital heart disease in paediatric patients is broad, and has the aim of reducing the trauma of the operation at each stage of management. Firstly, in the operating room using minimally invasive incisions, video-assisted thoracoscopic and robotically assisted surgery, hybrid procedures, image-guided intracardiac surgery, and minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass strategies. Secondly, in the intensive-care unit with neuroprotection and 'fast-tracking' strategies that involve early extubation, early hospital discharge, and less exposure to transfused blood products. Thirdly, during postoperative mid-term and long-term follow-up by providing the children and their families with adequate support after hospital discharge. Improvement of these strategies relies on the development of new devices, real-time multimodality imaging, aids to instrument navigation, miniaturized and specialized instrumentation, robotic technology, and computer-assisted modelling of flow dynamics and tissue mechanics. In addition, dedicated multidisciplinary co-ordinated teams involving congenital cardiac surgeons, perfusionists, intensivists, anaesthesiologists, cardiologists, nurses, psychologists, and counsellors are needed before, during, and after surgery to go beyond apparent technological and medical limitations with the goal to 'treat more while hurting less'. PMID:24189403

  16. Cardiotoxicity during invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Armand O; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Quint, Jennifer K; Orihuela, Carlos J

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis, with adult hospitalization linked to approximately 19% incidence of an adverse cardiac event (e.g., heart failure, arrhythmia, infarction). Herein, we review the specific host-pathogen interactions that contribute to cardiac dysfunction during invasive pneumococcal disease: (1) cell wall-mediated inhibition of cardiomyocyte contractility; (2) the new observation that S. pneumoniae is capable of translocation into the myocardium and within the heart, forming discrete, nonpurulent, microscopic lesions that are filled with pneumococci; and (3) the bacterial virulence determinants, pneumolysin and hydrogen peroxide, that are most likely responsible for cardiomyocyte cell death. Pneumococcal invasion of heart tissue is dependent on the bacterial adhesin choline-binding protein A that binds to laminin receptor on vascular endothelial cells and binding of phosphorylcholine residues on pneumococcal cell wall to platelet-activating factor receptor. These are the same interactions responsible for pneumococcal translocation across the blood-brain barrier during the development of meningitis. We discuss these interactions and how their neutralization, either with antibody or therapeutic agents that modulate platelet-activating factor receptor expression, may confer protection against cardiac damage and meningitis. Considerable collagen deposition was observed in hearts of mice that had recovered from invasive pneumococcal disease. We discuss the possibility that cardiac scar formation after severe pneumococcal infection may explain why individuals who are hospitalized for pneumonia are at greater risk for sudden death up to 1 year after infection. PMID:25629643

  17. The population biology of fungal invasions.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, P; Feurtey, A; Hood, M E; Snirc, A; Clavel, J; Dutech, C; Roy, M; Giraud, T

    2015-05-01

    Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal invasions. We examine the biological features underlying invasion success of certain fungal species. We review population structure analyses, revealing native source populations and strengths of bottlenecks. We highlight the documented ecological and evolutionary changes in invaded regions, including adaptation to temperature, increased virulence, hybridization, shifts to clonality and association with novel hosts. We discuss how the huge census size of most fungi allows adaptation even in bottlenecked, clonal invaders. We also present new analyses of the invasion of the anther-smut pathogen on white campion in North America, as a case study illustrating how an accurate knowledge of species limits and phylogeography of fungal populations can be used to decipher the origin of invasions. This case study shows that successful invasions can occur even when life history traits are particularly unfavourable to long-distance dispersal and even with a strong bottleneck. We conclude that fungal invasions are valuable models to contribute to our view of biological invasions, in particular by providing insights into the traits as well as ecological and evolutionary processes allowing successful introductions. PMID:25469955

  18. Laminae development in opal-A precipitates associated with seasonal growth of the form-genus Calothrix (Cyanobacteria), Rehai geothermal area, Tengchong, Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2015-04-01

    The western discharge apron at Meinuquan (Rehai geothermal area, Yunnan Province, China), which incorporates the upper terrace, terrace front, and lower terrace, is covered with laminated opal-A precipitates that have formed from the spring waters that flow across its surface. Laminae are formed of silicified Calothrix mats or featureless opal-A that contains no microbes, scattered spherical and rod-shaped microbes, and/or rare Calothrix. Rapid silicification of the Calothrix led to preservation of their basal heterocysts, vegetative cells, trichomes, tapering filaments, and laminated and splayed sheaths. The Calothrix mats grew during the dry season when there was maximum sunlight because of low cloud cover. During this time, the mats grew under stable conditions because the water that flowed across the discharge apron was sourced from the springs, and temperature and water geochemistry was more or less constant. Growth of the Calothrix mats decreased during the wet season (April to late September) when sunlight is reduced due to the extensive cloud cover associated with the monsoonal rains. During the wet season, water flowing over the discharge apron is a mixture of rainwater, runoff from the surrounding hillsides, and spring water. Such variable flow conditions, water temperatures, and water geochemistry curtailed microbe growth and impacted silica precipitation. The precipitates at Meinuquan are like those associated with some Icelandic hot springs. Although growth of Calothrix is controlled by sunlight in both settings, the periods of maximum sunlight in China (October-March) and Iceland (June-August) are at different times of the year because of their geographic locations.

  19. Diurnal pattern of stomatal conductance in the large-leaved temperate liana Aristolochia macrophylla depends on spatial position within the leaf lamina

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Tatiana; Ebner, Martin; Traiser, Christopher; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The large distance between peripheral leaf regions and the petiole in large leaves is expected to cause stronger negative water potentials at the leaf apex and marginal zones compared with more central or basal leaf regions. Leaf zone-specific differences in water supply and/or gas exchange may therefore be anticipated. In this study, an investigation was made to see whether zonal differences in gas exchange regulation can be detected in large leaves. Methods The diurnal course of stomatal conductance, gs, was monitored at defined lamina zones during two consecutive vegetation periods in the liana Aristolochia macrophylla that has large leaves. Local climate and stem water potential were also monitored to include parameters involved in stomatal response. Additionally, leaf zonal vein densities were measured to assess possible trends in local hydraulic supply. Key Results It was found that the diurnal pattern of gs depends on the position within a leaf in A. macrophylla. The highest values during the early morning were shown by the apical region, with subsequent decline later in the morning and a further gradual decline towards the evening. The diurnal pattern of gs at the marginal regions was similar to that of the leaf tip but showed a time lag of about 1 h. At the leaf base, the diurnal pattern of gs was similar to that of the margins but with lower maximum gs. At the the leaf centre regions, gs tended to show quite constant moderate values during most of the day. Densities of minor veins were lower at the margin and tip compared with the centre and base. Conclusions Gas exchange regulation appears to be zone specific in A. macrophylla leaves. It is suggested that the spatial–diurnal pattern of gs expressed by A. macrophylla leaves represents a strategy to prevent leaf zonal water stress and subsequent vein embolism. PMID:23606681

  20. Coupled molecular and 14C studies of microbial carbonate laminae formation and growth rates in dolomite stromatolites from Lagoa Salgada, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Montluçon, D.; Eglinton, T. I.; Matsuda, N.; França, A.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the application of radiocarbon (14C) measurements for age determination of the growth rate of modern dolomite stromalites from Lagoa Salgada, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Improved estimation of growth rates related with microbial processes during stromatolite formation may provide insights into ancient microbial carbonate sedimentation processes. Radiocarbon dating is frequently used to determine the age of carbonate materials, however, lagoonal carbonates often contain significant 14C content anomalies due to the "hard water effect." Lagoonal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) may sometimes achieve isotopic equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, and, in such cases, a coherent 14C chronology for paleo-carbonate precipitates may be established. However, more frequently, DIC does not show complete equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 due to major inputs of groundwater carbon. As a consequence, paleo-lagoonal carbonates often yield 14C ages which, after isotopic normalization, are older than those obtained, for instance, for time-equivalent terrestrial organic matter. Located on the Rio de Janeiro coastline, Lagoa Salgada is a unique environment, which has been studied for its particular carbonate sedimentation and development of dolomite stromatolites. This milieu provides an opportunity to test how Earth surface processes can change from normal carbonate sedimentation to the formation of microbialite structures (e.g., stromatolites, oncolites). In Lagoa Salgada, the formation of laminated structures involves diverse groups of microorganisms, which leads to the trapping of distinctive biomarkers or organic molecules as intracrystalline organic matter within the stromatolite laminae. We report on our research into the characterization of this trapped organic matter and the potential to utilize it to radiometrically determine the growth rate of these modern stromatolites. We also report 14C measurements of DIC from Lagoa Salgada.

  1. Annual-Resolution Precipitation Record of Lake Suigetsu Based on Lamina Thickness and Its Chemical Composition during the Last 350 Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Tada, R.; Irino, T.; Yamada, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Suigetsu sediment has distinct lamination since ca. 1664 A.D. when Urami trench was cut to lower the lake level that increased because of the closure of the outlet due to the 1660 A.D. earthquake. Approximately 3 m deep Urami Trench allowed intrusion of brackish water that caused density stratification within the lake and development euxinic bottom water. This distinct parallel lamination is considered as varves, but previous "varve"counting fails to prove its annual origin. In this study, we sampled top several tens of centimeter of the Lake Suigetsu sediment using Limnos Sediment Sampler. A high-resolution age-depth model based on radioisotopes 137Cs and 210Pb profiles and 14C dating are compared with the age-depth model based on varve counting. The two curves agreed within the error that is less than 10 years at the bottom. Thus, the lamination is proved to be varves. This age model allows us to examine annual-resolution record of river discharge, eolian dust flux, and seismic events. Lamination is generally from 1 to 2 mm thick, dark gray in color and rich in diatom. In addition, there are a few thicker (>2mm) lamina characterized with sharp and slightly erosional at the bottom and gradational at the top. Based on these characteristics, we call them "Event layers". Light gray Event layers are common in the Suigetsu sediments, and interpreted as representing flood events although supporting evidence is insufficient. We correlated them to contemporary observational precipitation record. These light gray Event layers are well correlated to the historical record of the flood disasters in Lake Suigetsu within +/_ 3 years during the past 70 years. Assuming these light gray event layers represents flood events, we fine-tuned the age-depth model and examined the correlation between precipitation record and flux of detrital materials estimated from the sedimentary record. The result will be presented and implication will be discussed.

  2. COOH-Terminal Collagen Q (COLQ) Mutants Causing Human Deficiency of Endplate Acetylcholinesterase Impair the Interaction of ColQ with Proteins of the Basal Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Ng, Fiona; Gochez, Danielle A.; Lee, Diana C.; Logia, Stephanie P.; Nguyen, Joanna; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen Q (ColQ) is a key multidomain functional protein of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), crucial for anchoring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to the basal lamina (BL) and accumulating AChE at the NMJ. The attachment of AChE to the BL is primarily accomplished by the binding of the ColQ collagen domain to the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan and the COOH-terminus to the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), which in turn plays a fundamental role in the development and maintenance of the NMJ. Yet, the precise mechanism by which ColQ anchors AChE at the NMJ remains unknown. We identified five novel mutations at the COOH-terminus of ColQ in seven patients from five families affected with endplate (EP) AChE deficiency. We found that the mutations do not affect the assembly of ColQ with AChE to form asymmetric forms of AChE or impair the interaction of ColQ with perlecan. By contrast, all mutations impair in varied degree the interaction of ColQ to MuSK as well as basement membrane extract (BME) that have no detectable MuSK. Our data confirm that the interaction of ColQ to perlecan and MuSK is crucial for anchoring AChE to the NMJ. In addition, the identified COOH-terminal mutants not only reduce the interaction of ColQ with MuSK, but also diminish the interaction of ColQ with BME. These findings suggest that the impaired attachment of COOH-terminal mutants causing EP AChE deficiency is in part independent of MuSK, and that the COOH-terminus of ColQ may interact with other proteins at the BL. PMID:24281389

  3. Fort Collins Science Center: Invasive Species Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Invasive, non-native species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like "biological wildfires," they can quickly spread, and they affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become the greatest environmental challenge of the 21st century in terms of economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated impact in the U.S. of over $138 billion per year. Managers of Department of the Interior and other public and private lands and waters rank invasive species as their top resource management problem. The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) provides research and technical assistance relating to invasive species management concerns, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. To disseminate this information, FORT scientists are developing the Invasive Species Information Node of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII), a comprehensive, Web-accessible database of invasive plant and animal species and disease agents. From these data, and in partnership with Colorado State University, the National Aeronautic Space Administration (NASA), and others, FORT scientists are constructing models to understand and predict invasive species behavior for more effective management. FORT is also the administrative home of the National Institute of Invasive Species Science, a growing consortium of partnerships between government and private organizations established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its many cooperators. The Institute was formed to develop cooperative approaches for invasive species science that meet the urgent needs of land managers and the public. Its mission is to work with others to coordinate data and research from many sources to predict and reduce the effects of harmful nonnative plants, animals, and diseases in natural areas and throughout the United States, with a strategic approach to information management, research, modeling, technical assistance, and outreach. The Institute research team will develop local-, regional-, and national- scale maps of invasive species and identify priority invasive species, vulnerable habitats, and pathways of invasion. County-level and point data on occurrence will be linked to plot-level and site-level information on species abundance and spread. FORT scientists and Institute partners are working to integrate remote sensing data and GIS-based predictive models to track the spread of invasive species across the country. This information will be linked to control and restoration efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Understanding both successes and failures will advance the science of invasive species containment and control as well as restoration of habitats and native biodiversity.

  4. [UPDATE ON MINIMALLY INVASIVE CARDIAC SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2015-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is an attractive choice for patients undergoing major cardiac procedures. This paper focuses on minimally invasive mitral valve repair and robotic surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System. Minimally invasive mitral valve repair is usually performed through a right minithoracotomy with direct vision. The techniques used in this procedure are similar to those in open surgery. The outcome of minimally invasive mitral valve repair is also equivalent to that of open surgery, with high levels of patient satisfaction. On the other hand, minimally invasive cardiac surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System has not been approved in Japan except for internal mammary artery harvesting. A Japanese clinical trial of da Vinci surgery for mitral valve repair and atrial septal defect closure has been completed and approval is awaited. Although da Vinci surgery is technically demanding, this less-invasive technique may provide another choice for patients in the near future. PMID:26630738

  5. Biological Invasions: A Challenge In Ecological Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Smith, J. A.; Stohlgren, T. J.; Graves, S.; Trees, C.; Rood, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The spread of invasive species is one of the most daunting environmental, economic, and human-health problems facing the United States and the World today. It is one of several grand challenge environmental problems being considered by NASA's Earth Science Vision for 2025. The invasive species problem is complex and presents many challenges. Developing an invasive species predictive capability could significantly advance the science and technology of ecological forecasting.

  6. Predicting invasion success in complex ecological networks

    PubMed Central

    Romanuk, Tamara N.; Zhou, Yun; Brose, Ulrich; Berlow, Eric L.; Williams, Richard J.; Martinez, Neo D.

    2009-01-01

    A central and perhaps insurmountable challenge of invasion ecology is to predict which combinations of species and habitats most effectively promote and prevent biological invasions. Here, we integrate models of network structure and nonlinear population dynamics to search for potential generalities among trophic factors that may drive invasion success and failure. We simulate invasions where 100 different species attempt to invade 150 different food webs with 15–26 species and a wide range (0.06–0.32) of connectance. These simulations yield 11?438 invasion attempts by non-basal species, 47 per cent of which are successful. At the time of introduction, whether or not the invader is a generalist best predicts final invasion success; however, once the invader establishes itself, it is best distinguished from unsuccessful invaders by occupying a lower trophic position and being relatively invulnerable to predation. In general, variables that reflect the interaction between an invading species and its new community, such as generality and trophic position, best predict invasion success; however, for some trophic categories of invaders, fundamental species traits, such as having the centre of the feeding range low on the theoretical niche axis (for non-omnivorous and omnivorous herbivores), or the topology of the food web (for tertiary carnivores), best predict invasion success. Across all invasion scenarios, a discriminant analysis model predicted successful and failed invasions with 76.5 per cent accuracy for properties at the time of introduction or 100 per cent accuracy for properties at the time of establishment. More generally, our results suggest that tackling the challenge of predicting the properties of species and habitats that promote or inhibit invasions from food web perspective may aid ecologists in identifying rules that govern invasions in natural ecosystems. PMID:19451125

  7. ORD INVASIVE SPECIES INITIATIVE: POTENTIAL AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES IN THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research and presentation represents one aspect of ORD's efforts through the ORD Invasive Species Initiative in the Great Lakes. Of prominent concern is the potential introduction and spread of additional invasive species.

  8. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the “invasion hypothesis”. PMID:23843974

  9. The Invasive Species Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, John; Most, Neal; Gill, Roger; Ma, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Invasive Species Forecasting System (ISFS) provides computational support for the generic work processes found in many regional-scale ecosystem modeling applications. Decision support tools built using ISFS allow a user to load point occurrence field sample data for a plant species of interest and quickly generate habitat suitability maps for geographic regions of management concern, such as a national park, monument, forest, or refuge. This type of decision product helps resource managers plan invasive species protection, monitoring, and control strategies for the lands they manage. Until now, scientists and resource managers have lacked the data-assembly and computing capabilities to produce these maps quickly and cost efficiently. ISFS focuses on regional-scale habitat suitability modeling for invasive terrestrial plants. ISFS s component architecture emphasizes simplicity and adaptability. Its core services can be easily adapted to produce model-based decision support tools tailored to particular parks, monuments, forests, refuges, and related management units. ISFS can be used to build standalone run-time tools that require no connection to the Internet, as well as fully Internet-based decision support applications. ISFS provides the core data structures, operating system interfaces, network interfaces, and inter-component constraints comprising the canonical workflow for habitat suitability modeling. The predictors, analysis methods, and geographic extents involved in any particular model run are elements of the user space and arbitrarily configurable by the user. ISFS provides small, lightweight, readily hardened core components of general utility. These components can be adapted to unanticipated uses, are tailorable, and require at most a loosely coupled, nonproprietary connection to the Web. Users can invoke capabilities from a command line; programmers can integrate ISFS's core components into more complex systems and services. Taken together, these features enable a degree of decentralization and distributed ownership that have helped other types of scientific information services succeed in recent years.

  10. 76 FR 36896 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Forestwide Invasive Plant Treatment Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... an aggressive invasive plant management program, the number, density, and distribution of invasive... invasive species laws and policies requires aggressive invasive plant management. This analysis...

  11. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Isabella; Nunn, Charles L.; Barton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Placental invasiveness—the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood—is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness. PMID:26168031

  12. Public Awareness and Attitudes toward Invasive Lionfish

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Public Awareness and Attitudes toward Invasive Lionfish: Preliminary Results from Baseline Survey.................................................................................................................................. 1 Lionfish Awareness and Knowledge........................................................................................................................ 2 Lionfish Sighting and Reporting

  13. National Institute of Invasive Species Science (NIISS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Invasive Species Science (www.NIISS.org) is a consortium of governmental and nongovernmental partners, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), whose aim is to provide reliable information and advanced decision support tools for documenting, understanding, predicting, assessing, and addressing the threat of invasive species in the United States. The Institute coordinates the National Aeronautical and Space Administrationa??s (NASAa??s) Invasive Species National Application activities for the Department of the Interior and has al lead role in developing NASA-derived remote sensing and landscape-scale predictive modeling capabilities for the invasive species communitya?|

  14. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Isabella; Nunn, Charles L; Barton, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Placental invasiveness-the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood-is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness. PMID:26168031

  15. Risk prediction for invasive candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Marak, K. Rungmei S. K.; Gurjar, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Over past few years, treatment of invasive candidiasis (IC) has evolved from targeted therapy to prophylaxis, pre-emptive and empirical therapy. Numerous predisposing factors for IC have been grouped together in various combinations to design risk prediction models. These models in general have shown good negative predictive value, but poor positive predictive value. They are useful in selecting the population which is less likely to benefit from empirical antifungal therapy and thus prevent overuse of antifungal agents. Current article deals with various risk prediction models for IC and their external validation studies. PMID:25316979

  16. Invasive plants and their ecological strategies: Prediction and explanation of woody plant invasion in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herron, P.M.; Martine, C.T.; Latimer, A.M.; Leicht-Young, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective management of introduced species requires the early identification of species that pose a significant threat of becoming invasive. To better understand the invasive ecology of species in New England, USA, we compiled a character data set with which to compare non-native species that are known invaders to non-native species that are not currently known to be invasive. In contrast to previous biological trait-based models, we employed a Bayesian hierarchical analysis to identify sets of plant traits associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms (vines, shrubs, and trees). The resulting models identify a suite of 'invasive traits' highlighting the ecology associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms. The most effective predictors of invasiveness that emerged from our model were 'invasive elsewhere', 'fast growth rate', 'native latitudinal range', and 'growth form'. The contrast among growth forms was pronounced. For example, 'wind dispersal' was positively correlated with invasiveness in trees, but negatively correlated in shrubs and vines. The predictive model was able to correctly classify invasive plants 67% of the time (22/33), and non-invasive plants 95% of the time (204/215). A number of potential future invasive species in New England that deserve management consideration were identified. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  17. Establishment risks for invasive species.

    PubMed

    Bartell, Steven M; Nair, Shyam K

    2004-08-01

    This article presents a quantitative methodology for evaluating the probability of invasive pest species establishing persistent populations. The estimation of pest establishment relies on data and information describing the biology and ecology of the pest and its interactions with potential host species and the regional environment. This information is developed using a model construct borrowed from theoretical population ecology. The methodology for estimating the probability of pest establishment is part of an overall framework that explores the implications of reductions in pest invasions on subsequent establishment. The risk reduction framework integrates the engineering aspects of different technologies for reducing pest entry, the biology and ecology of pest species, the suitability of potentially susceptible hosts, and the quality of available habitats. The methodology for estimating the risk of establishment is presented using an example pest, the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis), which has been introduced into the United States via solid wood packing materials (SWPM) used in international commerce. Uncertainties inherent to the estimation of model parameters that determine the risk of establishment are defined, quantified, and propagated through the population model. Advantages and limitations of the proposed methodology are discussed along with recommendations to make the approach more useful in the management of risks posed by the establishment of pest populations. PMID:15357803

  18. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  19. Invasive cervical resorption: a review.

    PubMed

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-12-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  20. A functional trait perspective on plant invasion

    PubMed Central

    Drenovsky, Rebecca E.; Grewell, Brenda J.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Funk, Jennifer L.; James, Jeremy J.; Molinari, Nicole; Parker, Ingrid M.; Richards, Christina L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Global environmental change will affect non-native plant invasions, with profound potential impacts on native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, we review plant functional traits, particularly those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness) and impacts, as well as the integration of these traits across multiple ecological scales, and as a basis for restoration and management. Scope We review the concepts and terminology surrounding functional traits and how functional traits influence processes at the individual level. We explore how phenotypic plasticity may lead to rapid evolution of novel traits facilitating invasiveness in changing environments and then ‘scale up’ to evaluate the relative importance of demographic traits and their links to invasion rates. We then suggest a functional trait framework for assessing per capita effects and, ultimately, impacts of invasive plants on plant communities and ecosystems. Lastly, we focus on the role of functional trait-based approaches in invasive species management and restoration in the context of rapid, global environmental change. Conclusions To understand how the abundance and impacts of invasive plants will respond to rapid environmental changes it is essential to link trait-based responses of invaders to changes in community and ecosystem properties. To do so requires a comprehensive effort that considers dynamic environmental controls and a targeted approach to understand key functional traits driving both invader abundance and impacts. If we are to predict future invasions, manage those at hand and use restoration technology to mitigate invasive species impacts, future research must focus on functional traits that promote invasiveness and invader impacts under changing conditions, and integrate major factors driving invasions from individual to ecosystem levels. PMID:22589328

  1. Clinical significance of wall invasion pattern of subserosa-invasive gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ken-ichi; Kijima, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Toshihide; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Matsuyama, Masahiro; Yazawa, Naoki; Dowaki, Shoichi; Tobita, Kosuke; Ohtani, Yasuo; Tanaka, Makiko; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2012-11-01

    We have previously classified wall invasion patterns of gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) cases into two groups, i.e., the infiltrative growth type (IG type) and destructive growth type (DG type). The DG type was significantly associated with poor differentiation, aggressive infiltration and decreased postoperative survival in terms of its histological differentiation, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, lymph node status, neural invasion and mode of subserosal infiltration. In the present study, we analyzed 42 surgically-resected subserosal invasive gallbladder adenocarcinomas, invading the perimuscular connective tissue (pT2). The cumulative 5-year survival rate in the series was 48.7%. Lymphatic invasion (p=0.021), venous invasion (p=0.020), mode of subserosal infiltration (p<0.001), histological differentiation (p=0.030) and biliary infiltration (p=0.007) were noted, respectively, at a significantly higher incidence in more aggressive infiltration or poor differentiation in the DG type. The cumulative 5-year survival rate of curative resection cases was lower in patients with the DG type than in those with the IG type (68.9 versus 20.2%, respectively, p=0.006, log-rank test). On Cox's proportional hazard regression modeling, the low degree of venous/perineural invasion and IG type of wall invasion pattern were associated with a significant improvement in overall survival. Our data suggest that the wall invasion pattern is an independent predictor of survival in subserosal invasive GBC. Regarding the clinical application of our concept, on the classification of patients with subserosal invasive GBC based on a combination of the wall invasion pattern and lymph node status, the overall survival rate in patients with the DG type and/or N2 metastasis (n=21) was lower than in patients with the IG type and N0, 1 metastasis (n=21) (p=0.0023, log-rank test). The wall invasion pattern could contribute to decision-making concerning curative resection for subserosal invasive GBC. PMID:22895597

  2. TCGA study identifies genomic features of invasive lobular breast carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified molecular characteristics of a type of breast cancer, invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), that distinguishes it from invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), the most common invasive breast cancer subtype.

  3. Biological invasions: deriving the regions at risk from partial measurements

    E-print Network

    Christofol, Michel

    Biological invasions: deriving the regions at risk from partial measurements Michel Cristofol: reaction-diffusion, biological invasions, inverse problem, habitat configuration, Carleman estimates of trade globalization, a substantial increase in biological invasions has been observed over the last

  4. REGULAR ARTICLE The invasive Sorghum halepense harbors endophytic

    E-print Network

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    REGULAR ARTICLE The invasive Sorghum halepense harbors endophytic N2-fixing bacteria and alters frequently initiate broad changes in ecosystem functioning. Sorghum halepense is an invasive grass capable . Invasive plants . Soil biogeochemistry. Sorghum halepense Abbreviations PBS phosphate buffered saline ARA

  5. Successful approaches for battling invasive species in developed countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological invasions increasingly threaten natural resources and reduce biological diversity worldwide. To curtail biological invasions, developed countries have adopted multitire approaches that systematically address the process of invasion, encompassing introduction, establishment, spread and nat...

  6. 77 FR 23494 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ...Request for Nominations for the Invasive Species Advisory Committee...the interdepartmental National Invasive Species Council, proposes to appoint new members to the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). The...

  7. Plant Invasions in China – Challenges and Chances

    PubMed Central

    Axmacher, Jan C.; Sang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species cause serious environmental and economic harm and threaten global biodiversity. We set out to investigate how quickly invasive plant species are currently spreading in China and how their resulting distribution patterns are linked to socio-economic and environmental conditions. A comparison of the invasive plant species density (log species/log area) reported in 2008 with current data shows that invasive species were originally highly concentrated in the wealthy, southeastern coastal provinces of China, but they are currently rapidly spreading inland. Linear regression models based on the species density and turnover of invasive plants as dependent parameters and principal components representing key socio-economic and environmental parameters as predictors indicate strong positive links between invasive plant density and the overall phytodiversity and associated climatic parameters. Principal components representing socio-economic factors and endemic plant density also show significant positive links with invasive plant density. Urgent control and eradication measures are needed in China's coastal provinces to counteract the rapid inland spread of invasive plants. Strict controls of imports through seaports need to be accompanied by similarly strict controls of the developing horticultural trade and underpinned by awareness campaigns for China's increasingly affluent population to limit the arrival of new invaders. Furthermore, China needs to fully utilize its substantial native phytodiversity, rather than relying on exotics, in current large-scale afforestation projects and in the creation of urban green spaces. PMID:23691164

  8. Applying Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing a guideline to assist land managers in making better decisions when they are faced with invasive annual grasses is critical to gaining greater adoption of ecologically-based invasive plant management. This manual guides users through the EBIPM decision process to assist in restoration of...

  9. Alien invasive species and international trade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emergency control measures for invasive species often rely on use of pesticides and other destructive practices. Public concern about pesticide contamination of the ground water and the environment has lead to increased restrictions on the use of pesticides for control of many destructive invasive ...

  10. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  11. Anesthesia in ambulatory minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Jones, S B

    2000-12-01

    The increasing popularity of minimally invasive surgery has grown concurrently with the demand for ambulatory surgery. Standard outpatient procedures such as tubal ligation are now being joined by ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In order for ambulatory minimally invasive surgery to succeed, patient selection must be appropriate, careful attention paid to the physiologic changes of pneumoperitoneum, and pain and nausea treated pre-emptively. PMID:17016368

  12. Mapping invasive weeds using airborne hyperspectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant species present a serious problem to the natural environment and have adverse ecological and economic impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems they invade. This article provides a brief overview on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive plant species in both terrestr...

  13. Immobilizing nitrogen to control plant invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Increased soil nitrogen (N) availability may often facilitate plant invasions. Therefore, lowering N availability might be expected to reduce those invasions and favor native species. Numerous studies have examined effects of low N availability on specific invaders, but a synthesis of these stu...

  14. ECOLOGICALLY BASED INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript describes the characteristics that make a plant invasive, and some of the existing theories of "invasions". It compares non-relational approaches (identifying characteristics that make something a weed) to relational approaches (drawing on relationships between a species and an ecos...

  15. Influence of Tamarisk Invasion on Bird Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effects of exotic species invasion on native plant and animal communities is of great value for land and wildlife managers. With limited resources always a concern, defining the greatest threat of an invasion is important. In desert environments of the Great Basin, riparian wood...

  16. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    van Ingen, Jakko; Morrissey, Anne B.; Boeree, Martin J.; Mavura, Daudi R.; Swai, Britta; Thielman, Nathan M.; Bartlett, John A.; Grossman, Henning; Maro, Venance P.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Data on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. During 2006–2008, we identified 3 HIV-infected patients in northern Tanzania who had invasive NTM; 2 were infected with “Mycobacterium sherrisii” and 1 with M. avium complex sequevar MAC-D. Invasive NTM disease is present in HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:19116050

  17. Foam invasion through a single pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbos, Aline; Pitois, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    We investigate experimentally the behavior of liquid foams pumped at a given flow rate through a single pore, in the situation where the pore diameter is smaller than the bubble diameter. Results reveal that foam invasion can be observed only within a restricted range of values for the dimensionless flow rate and the foam liquid fraction. Within this foam invasion regime, the liquid content of invading foams is measured to be three times higher than the initial liquid content. Outside this regime, both gas alone and liquid alone invasion regimes can be observed. The gas invasion regime results from the rupture of foam films during local T1, during bubble rearrangements events induced by foam flow, whereas the liquid invasion regime is allowed by the formation of a stable cluster of jammed bubbles at the pore's opening.

  18. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity. PMID:20545732

  19. Invasive plants may promote predator-mediated feedback that inhibits further invasion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impacts of invasive species requires placing invasion within a full community context. Plant invaders are often considered in the context of herbivores that may drive invasion by avoiding invaders while consuming natives (enemy escape), or inhibit invasion by consuming invaders (biotic resistance). However, predators that attack those herbivores are rarely considered as major players in invasion. Invasive plants often promote predators, generally by providing improved habitat. Here, we show that predator-promoting invaders may initiate a negative feedback loop that inhibits invasion. By enabling top-down control of herbivores, predator-promoting invaders lose any advantage gained through enemy escape, indirectly favoring natives. In cases where palatable invaders encounter biotic resistance, predator promotion may allow an invader to persist, but not dominate. Overall, results indicate that placing invaders in a full community context may reveal reduced impacts of invaders compared to expectations based on simple plant-plant or plant-herbivore subsystems. PMID:26120430

  20. Invasive plants may promote predator-mediated feedback that inhibits further invasion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lauren M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of invasive species requires placing invasion within a full community context. Plant invaders are often considered in the context of herbivores that may drive invasion by avoiding invaders while consuming natives (enemy escape), or inhibit invasion by consuming invaders (biotic resistance). However, predators that attack those herbivores are rarely considered as major players in invasion. Invasive plants often promote predators, generally by providing improved habitat. Here, we show that predator-promoting invaders may initiate a negative feedback loop that inhibits invasion. By enabling top-down control of herbivores, predator-promoting invaders lose any advantage gained through enemy escape, indirectly favoring natives. In cases where palatable invaders encounter biotic resistance, predator promotion may allow an invader to persist, but not dominate. Overall, results indicate that placing invaders in a full community context may reveal reduced impacts of invaders compared to expectations based on simple plant–plant or plant–herbivore subsystems. PMID:26120430

  1. Quantifying levels of biological invasion: towards the objective classification of invaded and invasible ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Catford, Jane A; Vesk, Peter A; Richardson, David M; Pyšek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions are a global phenomenon that threatens biodiversity, and few, if any, ecosystems are free from alien species. The outcome of human-mediated introductions is affected by the invasiveness of species and invasibility of ecosystems, but research has primarily focused on defining, characterizing and identifying invasive species; ecosystem invasibility has received much less attention. A prerequisite for characterizing invasibility is the ability to compare levels of invasion across ecosystems. In this paper, we aim to identify the best way to quantify the level of invasion by nonnative animals and plants by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of different metrics. We explore how interpretation and choice of these measures can depend on the objective of a study or management intervention. Based on our review, we recommend two invasion indices and illustrate their use by applying them to two case studies. Relative alien species richness and relative alien species abundance indicate the contribution that alien species make to a community. They are easy to measure, can be applied to various taxa, are independent of scale and are comparable across regions and ecosystems, and historical data are often available. The relationship between relative alien richness and abundance can indicate the presence of dominant alien species and the trajectory of invasion over time, and can highlight ecosystems and sites that are heavily invaded or especially susceptible to invasion. Splitting species into functional groups and examining invasion patterns of transformer species may be particularly instructive for gauging effects of alien invasion on ecosystem structure and function. Establishing standard, transparent ways to define and quantify invasion level will facilitate meaningful comparisons among studies, ecosystem types and regions. It is essential for progress in ecology and will help guide ecosystem restoration and management.

  2. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  3. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ganley, Robert P; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C; Boyle, Kieran A; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda; Riddell, John S; Todd, Andrew J

    2015-05-13

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to "unclassified" cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  4. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Robert P.; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C.; Boyle, Kieran A.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to “unclassified” cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  5. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  6. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as sti

  7. Excluding access to invasion hubs can contain the spread of an invasive vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Florance, Daniel; Webb, Jonathan K.; Dempster, Tim; Kearney, Michael R.; Worthing, Alex; Letnic, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Many biological invasions do not occur as a gradual expansion along a continuous front, but result from the expansion of satellite populations that become established at ‘invasion hubs’. Although theoretical studies indicate that targeting control efforts at invasion hubs can effectively contain the spread of invasions, few studies have demonstrated this in practice. In arid landscapes worldwide, humans have increased the availability of surface water by creating artificial water points (AWPs) such as troughs and dams for livestock. By experimentally excluding invasive cane toads (Bufo marinus) from AWP, we show that AWP provide a resource subsidy for non-arid-adapted toads and serve as dry season refuges and thus invasion hubs for cane toads in arid Australia. Using data on the distribution of permanent water in arid Australia and the dispersal potential of toads, we predict that systematically excluding toads from AWP would reduce the area of arid Australia across which toads are predicted to disperse and colonize under average climatic conditions by 38 per cent from 2 242 000 to 1 385 000 km2. Our study shows how human modification of hydrological regimes can create a network of invasion hubs that facilitates a biological invasion, and confirms that targeted control at invasion hubs can reduce landscape connectivity to contain the spread of an invasive vertebrate. PMID:21345870

  8. Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Buddenhagen, Christopher Evan; Chimera, Charles; Clifford, Patti

    2009-01-01

    Background There is widespread interest in biofuel crops as a solution to the world's energy needs, particularly in light of concerns over greenhouse-gas emissions. Despite reservations about their adverse environmental impacts, no attempt has been made to quantify actual, relative or potential invasiveness of terrestrial biofuel crops at an appropriate regional or international scale, and their planting continues to be largely unregulated. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a widely accepted weed risk assessment system, we analyzed a comprehensive list of regionally suitable biofuel crops to show that seventy percent have a high risk of becoming invasive versus one-quarter of non-biofuel plant species and are two to four times more likely to establish wild populations locally or be invasive in Hawaii or in other locations with a similar climate. Conclusions/Significance Because of climatic and ecological similarities, predictions of biofuel crop invasiveness in Hawaii are applicable to other vulnerable island and subtropical ecosystems worldwide. We demonstrate the utility of an accessible and scientifically proven risk assessment protocol that allows users to predict if introduced species will become invasive in their region of interest. Other evidence supports the contention that propagule pressure created by extensive plantings will exacerbate invasions, a scenario expected with large-scale biofuel crop cultivation. Proactive measures, such as risk assessments, should be employed to predict invasion risks, which could then be mitigated via implementation of appropriate planting policies and adoption of the “polluter-pays” principle. PMID:19384412

  9. Eating the competition speeds up invasions

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Many introduced species engage in intraguild predation (IGP), the consumption of species with which they compete for shared resources. While the factors influencing local persistence of IG predator and prey species are well-understood, using these factors to predict the invasion speed of an introduced IG predator has received less attention. Existing theory predicts that native competitors slow invasions via depletion of shared resources, but this fails to account for additional resources acquired when an invader consumes competitors. Here, I outline a general framework for understanding the effect of IGP on invasion speeds. I find that invaders that consume native competitors may be able to spread where invasion by pure competitors would fail, and that invasion speed increases with increasing levels of IGP. Notably, if the benefit from consuming competitors outweighs the loss of shared resources to competitors, invasion proceeds faster than invasion in the absence of competitors. This may explain empirical observations of rapid spread rates of invaders that feed at multiple trophic levels. PMID:20961884

  10. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  11. Dynamics of an experimental microbial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Francisco; Zamor, Richard M.; Najar, Fares Z.; Roe, Bruce A.; Hambright, K. David

    2015-01-01

    The ecological dynamics underlying species invasions have been a major focus of research in macroorganisms for the last five decades. However, we still know little about the processes behind invasion by unicellular organisms. To expand our knowledge of microbial invasions, we studied the roles of propagule pressure, nutrient supply, and biotic resistance in the invasion success of a freshwater invasive alga, Prymnesium parvum, using microcosms containing natural freshwater microbial assemblages. Microcosms were subjected to a factorial design with two levels of nutrient-induced diversity and three levels of propagule pressure, and incubated for 7 d, during which P. parvum densities and microbial community composition were tracked. Successful invasion occurred in microcosms receiving high propagule pressure whereas nutrients or community diversity played no role in invasion success. Invaded communities experienced distinctive changes in composition compared with communities where the invasion was unsuccessful. Successfully invaded microbial communities had an increased abundance of fungi and ciliates, and decreased abundances of diatoms and cercozoans. Many of these changes mirrored the microbial community changes detected during a natural P. parvum bloom in the source system. This role of propagule pressure is particularly relevant for P. parvum in the reservoir-dominated southern United States because this species can form large, sustained blooms that can generate intense propagule pressures for downstream sites. Human impact and global climate change are currently causing widespread environmental changes in most southern US freshwater systems that may facilitate P. parvum establishment and, when coupled with strong propagule pressure, could put many more systems at risk for invasion. PMID:26324928

  12. Dynamics of an experimental microbial invasion.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco; Zamor, Richard M; Najar, Fares Z; Roe, Bruce A; Hambright, K David

    2015-09-15

    The ecological dynamics underlying species invasions have been a major focus of research in macroorganisms for the last five decades. However, we still know little about the processes behind invasion by unicellular organisms. To expand our knowledge of microbial invasions, we studied the roles of propagule pressure, nutrient supply, and biotic resistance in the invasion success of a freshwater invasive alga, Prymnesium parvum, using microcosms containing natural freshwater microbial assemblages. Microcosms were subjected to a factorial design with two levels of nutrient-induced diversity and three levels of propagule pressure, and incubated for 7 d, during which P. parvum densities and microbial community composition were tracked. Successful invasion occurred in microcosms receiving high propagule pressure whereas nutrients or community diversity played no role in invasion success. Invaded communities experienced distinctive changes in composition compared with communities where the invasion was unsuccessful. Successfully invaded microbial communities had an increased abundance of fungi and ciliates, and decreased abundances of diatoms and cercozoans. Many of these changes mirrored the microbial community changes detected during a natural P. parvum bloom in the source system. This role of propagule pressure is particularly relevant for P. parvum in the reservoir-dominated southern United States because this species can form large, sustained blooms that can generate intense propagule pressures for downstream sites. Human impact and global climate change are currently causing widespread environmental changes in most southern US freshwater systems that may facilitate P. parvum establishment and, when coupled with strong propagule pressure, could put many more systems at risk for invasion. PMID:26324928

  13. Evolution Arrests Invasions of Cooperative Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill S.

    2015-11-01

    Population expansions trigger many biomedical and ecological transitions, from tumor growth to invasions of non-native species. Although population spreading often selects for more invasive phenotypes, we show that this outcome is far from inevitable. In cooperative populations, mutations reducing dispersal have a competitive advantage. Such mutations then steadily accumulate at the expansion front, bringing invasion to a halt. Our findings are a rare example of evolution driving the population into an unfavorable state, and they could lead to new strategies to combat unwelcome invaders.

  14. Evolution arrests invasions of cooperative populations

    E-print Network

    Korolev, Kirill S

    2015-01-01

    Population expansions trigger many biomedical and ecological transitions, from tumor growth to invasions of non-native species. Although population spreading often selects for more invasive phenotypes, we show that this outcome is far from inevitable. In cooperative populations, mutations reducing dispersal have a competitive advantage. Such mutations then steadily accumulate at the expansion front bringing invasion to a halt. Our findings are a rare example of evolution driving the population into an unfavorable state and could lead to new strategies to combat unwelcome invaders. In addition, we obtain an exact analytical expression for the fitness advantage of mutants with different dispersal rates.

  15. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion. PMID:25629807

  16. Invasive aspergillosis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chatterjee, Shiv Sekhar; Das, Ashim; Shivaprakash, M R

    2011-04-01

    To review invasive aspergillosis (IA) in developing countries, we included those countries, which are mentioned in the document of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), called the Emerging and Developing Economies List, 2009. A PubMed/Medline literature search was performed for studies concerning IA reported during 1970 through March 2010 from these countries. IA is an important cause of morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients of developing countries, though the exact frequency of the disease is not known due to inadequate reporting and facilities to diagnose. Only a handful of centers from India, China, Thailand, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Sudan, South Africa, Turkey, Hungary, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Argentina had reported case series of IA. As sub-optimum hospital care practice, hospital renovation work in the vicinity of immunocompromised patients, overuse or misuse of steroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, use of contaminated infusion sets/fluid, and increase in intravenous drug abusers have been reported from those countries, it is expected to find a high rate of IA among patients with high risk, though hard data is missing in most situations. Besides classical risk factors for IA, liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and tuberculosis are the newly recognized underlying diseases associated with IA. In Asia, Africa and Middle East sino-orbital or cerebral aspergillosis, and Aspergillus endophthalmitis are emerging diseases and Aspergillus flavus is the predominant species isolated from these infections. The high frequency of A. flavus isolation from these patients may be due to higher prevalence of the fungus in the environment. Cerebral aspergillosis cases are largely due to an extension of the lesion from invasive Aspergillus sinusitis. The majority of the centers rely on conventional techniques including direct microscopy, histopathology, and culture to diagnose IA. Galactomannan, ?-D glucan test, and DNA detection in IA are available only in a few centers. Mortality of the patients with IA is very high due to delays in diagnosis and therapy. Antifungal use is largely restricted to amphotericin B deoxycholate and itraconazole, though other anti-Aspergillus antifungal agents are available in those countries. Clinicians are aware of good outcome after use of voriconazole/liposomal amphotericin B/caspofungin, but they are forced to use amphotericin B deoxycholate or itraconazole in public-sector hospitals due to economic reasons. PMID:20718613

  17. Soil modification by invasive plants: Effects on native and invasive species of mixed-grass prairies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, N.R.; Larson, D.L.; Huerd, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plants are capable of modifying attributes of soil to facilitate further invasion by conspecifics and other invasive species. We assessed this capability in three important plant invaders of grasslands in the Great Plains region of North America: leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). In a glasshouse, these three invasives or a group of native species were grown separately through three cycles of growth and soil conditioning in both steam-pasteurized and non-pasteurized soils, after which we assessed seedling growth in these soils. Two of the three invasive species, Bromus and Agropyron, exhibited significant self-facilitation via soil modification. Bromus and Agropyron also had significant facilitative effects on other invasives via soil modification, while Euphorbia had significant antagonistic effects on the other invasives. Both Agropyron and Euphorbia consistently suppressed growth of two of three native forbs, while three native grasses were generally less affected. Almost all intra- and interspecific effects of invasive soil conditioning were dependent upon presence of soil biota from field sites where these species were successful invaders. Overall, these results suggest that that invasive modification of soil microbiota can facilitate plant invasion directly or via 'cross-facilitation' of other invasive species, and moreover has potential to impede restoration of native communities after removal of an invasive species. However, certain native species that are relatively insensitive to altered soil biota (as we observed in the case of the forb Linum lewisii and the native grasses), may be valuable as 'nurse'species in restoration efforts. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. INVASION GENETICS: THE BAKER AND STEBBINS LEGACY INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    INVASION GENETICS: THE BAKER AND STEBBINS LEGACY INTRODUCTION Foundations of invasion genetics, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2 Abstract Invasion genetics is a relatively new discipline that investigates patterns of genetic variation in populations of invasive species

  19. Are Modern Biological Invasions an Unprecedented Form of Global Change?

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Are Modern Biological Invasions an Unprecedented Form of Global Change? ANTHONY RICCIARDI Redpath-1739.2006.00615.x #12;330 Human-Assisted Invasions Ricciardi Introduction Are modern biological invasions.ricciardi@mcgill.ca Abstract: The uniqueness of the current, global mass invasion by nonindigenous species has been challenged

  20. Environmental modeling framework invasiveness: analysis and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental modeling frameworks support scientific model development by providing an Application Programming Interface (API) which model developers use to implement models. This paper presents results of an investigation on the framework invasiveness of environmental modeling frameworks. Invasiv...

  1. Microbial Invasions: The Process, Patterns, and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mallon, Cyrus Alexander; Elsas, Jan Dirk van; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2015-11-01

    There has recently been a surge of literature examining microbial invasions into a variety of environments. These studies often include a component of biological diversity as a major factor determining an invader's fate, yet common results are rarely cross-compared. Since many studies only present a snapshot of the entire invasion process, a bird's eye view is required to piece together the entire continuum, which we find consists of introduction, establishment, spread, and impact phases. We further examine the patterns and mechanisms associated with invasion resistance and create a mechanistic synthesis governed by the species richness, species evenness, and resource availability of resident communities. We conclude by exploring the advantages of using a theoretical invasion framework across different fields. PMID:26439296

  2. Ecological and evolutionary insights from species invasions

    E-print Network

    Holt, Robert D.

    from exotic species are pervasive and integral components of our global economy. For example, food discuss a nascent hypothesis that might provide a more general, predictive understanding of invasions

  3. Will extreme climatic events facilitate biological invasions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme climatic events, such as intense heat waves, hurricanes, floods and droughts, can dramatically affect ecological and evolutionary processes, and more extreme events are projected with ongoing climate change. However, the implications of these events for biological invasions, which themselves...

  4. Environmental modeling framework invasiveness: analysis and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental modeling frameworks support scientific model development by providing an Application Programming Interface (API) which model developers use to implement models. This paper presents results of an investigation on the framework invasiveness of environmental modeling frameworks. Invasiven...

  5. Minimally invasive robotic mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Atluri, Pavan; Woo, Y Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, significant advances have been made in mitral valve surgery. Cardiac surgeons have successfully repaired degenerative and ischemic regurgitant mitral valves via a traditional midline sternotomy. In recent years, alternate incisions have yielded minimally invasive approaches to the mitral valve. Technological advances have made robotically assisted minimally invasive mitral valve surgery feasible. Decreased pain, more rapid return to work, diminished blood loss and reduced length of hospitalization have been witnessed following robotic mitral valve surgery when compared with a traditional sternotomy. Equivalent long-term mortality and freedom from recurrent mitral regurgitation are evident between mitral valve repair performed via a traditional sternotomy and minimally invasive and robotic techniques. As a result, an increasing number of patients and referring cardiologists are seeking minimally invasive approaches to mitral valve surgery. PMID:21158546

  6. Territorial Invasion in the Classroom: Invadee Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Gilda Moss

    1980-01-01

    Reported are the results of a study testing dominance and subordination among the spatially central and peripheral in 14 college classrooms. Differences in the defense of territory, upon invasion, between spatially central and spatially peripheral humans were investigated. (BT)

  7. Isolated Uterine Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Deniz; Tural, Deniz; Tatl?, Ali Murat; Akar, Emre; Uysal, Mükremin; Erdo?an, Gülgün

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Most common metastasis sites of breast cancer are the lungs, bones, liver, and brain, whereas uterine involvement by metastatic breast disease is rare. Metastatic carcinoma of the uterus usually originates from other genital sites, most commonly being from the ovaries. Invasive lobular carcinoma spreads to gynecologic organs more frequently than invasive ductal carcinoma. Case Report. A 57-year-old postmenopausal woman was diagnosed with breast carcinoma 2 years ago and modified radical mastectomy was performed. Pathological examination of tumor revealed invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IIIc. She presented with abdominal pain and distension. Diagnostic workup and gynecologic examination revealed lesions that caused diffuse thickening of the uterus wall. Endometrial sampling was performed for confirmation of the diagnosis. She underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Breast carcinoma metastases in endometrium and myometrium were confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Conclusion. We herein report the first case of isolated uterine patient who had invasive ductal carcinoma of breast. PMID:23573438

  8. The ethics of surgically invasive neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Ford, Paul J; Deshpande, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of distinctions and definitions is necessary before determining which types of surgically invasive neuroscience research should be permitted and how the experimental protocols can properly be undertaken. A failure to clarify the ethical distinctions in invasive neuroscience research hinders attempts at ethical analysis and guidance. At least four main distinctions need to be addressed: "invasiveness" as an important moral characteristic; special brain-mind-related risks; research participant selection; and ideologic interpretation of human function. Harm and not invasiveness is the metric by which to measure the ethical permissibility of research. Because of a class of harms to minds and selves, special attention should be paid to value considerations. These considerations need to be addressed by researchers, funders, and review boards to create proper safeguards from conception of research through final application of results. PMID:24182388

  9. Mechanobiology of tumor invasion: engineering meets oncology

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Shawn P.; D’Alfonso, Timothy M.; Shin, Sandra J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    The physical sciences and engineering have introduced novel perspectives into the study of cancer through model systems, tools, and metrics that enable integration of basic science observations with clinical data. These methods have contributed to the identification of several overarching mechanisms that drive processes during cancer progression including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. During tumor cell invasion – the first clinically observable step of metastasis – cells demonstrate diverse and evolving physical phenotypes that cannot typically be defined by any single molecular mechanism, and mechanobiology has been used to study the physical cell behaviors that comprise the “invasive phenotype”. In this review, we discuss the continually evolving pathological characterization and in vitro mechanobiological characterization of tumor invasion, with emphasis on emerging physical biology and mechanobiology strategies that have contributed to a more robust mechanistic understanding of tumor cell invasion. These physical approaches may ultimately help to better predict and identify tumor metastasis. PMID:22178415

  10. 76 FR 30955 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...management of invasive species in the vast Rocky Mountain/High Plains region in order to gain new understanding of landscape ecology, climate change, land development, introduction pathways, and new invaders. ISAC will also consult with...

  11. Invasive Species Science Branch: research and management tools for controlling invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Robert N.; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive, nonnative species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like “biological wildfires,” they can quickly spread and affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become one of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century in economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated effect in the United States of more than $120 billion per year. Managers of the Department of the Interior and other public and private lands often rank invasive species as their top resource management problem. The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center provides research and technical assistance relating to management concerns for invasive species, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. To disseminate this information, branch scientists are developing platforms to share invasive species information with DOI cooperators, other agency partners, and the public. From these and other data, branch scientists are constructing models to understand and predict invasive species distributions for more effective management. The branch also has extensive herpetological and population biology expertise that is applied to harmful reptile invaders such as the Brown Treesnake on Guam and Burmese Python in Florida.

  12. Coevolution between native and invasive plant competitors: implications for invasive species management

    PubMed Central

    Leger, Elizabeth A; Espeland, Erin K

    2010-01-01

    Invasive species may establish in communities because they are better competitors than natives, but in order to remain community dominants, the competitive advantage of invasive species must be persistent. Native species that are not extirpated when highly invasive species are introduced are likely to compete with invaders. When population sizes and genetic diversity of native species are large enough, natives may be able to evolve traits that allow them to co-occur with invasive species. Native species may also evolve to become significant competitors with invasive species, and thus affect the fitness of invaders. Invasive species may respond in turn, creating either transient or continuing coevolution between competing species. In addition to demographic factors such as population size and growth rates, a number of factors including gene flow, genetic drift, the number of selection agents, encounter rates, and genetic diversity may affect the ability of native and invasive species to evolve competitive ability against one another. We discuss how these factors may differ between populations of native and invasive plants, and how this might affect their ability to respond to selection. Management actions that maintain genetic diversity in native species while reducing population sizes and genetic diversity in invasive species could promote the ability of natives to evolve improved competitive ability. PMID:25567917

  13. Invasive Insects Differ from Non-Invasive in Their Thermal Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Kenis, Marc; Hon?k, Alois; Skuhrovec, Ji?í; Pyšek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether two basic thermal requirements for insect development, lower developmental thresholds, i.e. temperatures at which development ceases, and sums of effective temperatures, i.e. numbers of day degrees above the lower developmental thresholds necessary to complete development, differ among insect species that proved to be successful invaders in regions outside their native range and those that did not. Focusing on species traits underlying invasiveness that are related to temperature provides insights into the mechanisms of insect invasions. The screening of thermal requirements thus could improve risk-assessment schemes by incorporating these traits in predictions of potentially invasive insect species. We compared 100 pairs of taxonomically-related species originating from the same continent, one invasive and the other not reported as invasive. Invasive species have higher lower developmental thresholds than those never recorded outside their native ranges. Invasive species also have a lower sum of effective temperatures, though not significantly. However, the differences between invasive and non-invasive species in the two physiological measures were significantly inversely correlated. This result suggests that many species are currently prevented from invading by low temperatures in some parts of the world. Those species that will overcome current climatic constraints in regions outside their native distribution due to climate change could become even more serious future invaders than present-day species, due to their potentially faster development. PMID:26090826

  14. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, W?odzimierz; S?odkowski, Maciej; Krasnod?bski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  15. Facts About Invasive Bighead and Silver Carps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), Columbia, Missouri, carry out basic and applied research on the ecology of invasive fishes in the Missouri and Mississippi river basins. Emphasis is placed on improving understanding of the life cycles of bighead and silver carp to provide information needed to manage these aggressively invasive species. USGS scientists collaborate with Federal and State management agencies and universities, nationally and internationally, to fill critical science information gaps.

  16. Effects of invasive plants on arthropods.

    PubMed

    Litt, Andrea R; Cord, Erin E; Fulbright, Timothy E; Schuster, Greta L

    2014-12-01

    Non-native plants have invaded nearly all ecosystems and represent a major component of global ecological change. Plant invasions frequently change the composition and structure of vegetation communities, which can alter animal communities and ecosystem processes. We reviewed 87 articles published in the peer-reviewed literature to evaluate responses of arthropod communities and functional groups to non-native invasive plants. Total abundance of arthropods decreased in 62% of studies and increased in 15%. Taxonomic richness decreased in 48% of studies and increased in 13%. Herbivorous arthropods decreased in response to plant invasions in 48% of studies and increased in 17%, likely due to direct effects of decreased plant diversity. Predaceous arthropods decreased in response to invasive plants in 44% of studies, which may reflect indirect effects due to reductions in prey. Twenty-two percent of studies documented increases in predators, which may reflect changes in vegetation structure that improved mobility, survival, or web-building for these species. Detritivores increased in 67% of studies, likely in response to increased litter and decaying vegetation; no studies documented decreased abundance in this functional group. Although many researchers have examined effects of plant invasions on arthropods, sizeable information gaps remain, specifically regarding how invasive plants influence habitat and dietary requirements. Beyond this, the ability to predict changes in arthropod populations and communities associated with plant invasions could be improved by adopting a more functional and mechanistic approach. Understanding responses of arthropods to invasive plants will critically inform conservation of virtually all biodiversity and ecological processes because so many organisms depend on arthropods as prey or for their functional roles, including pollination, seed dispersal, and decomposition. Given their short generation times and ability to respond rapidly to ecological change, arthropods may be ideal targets for restoration and conservation activities. PMID:25065640

  17. Invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; McCreary, Brome; Adams, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species directly threaten freshwater biodiversity, particularly in regions of high aquatic richness like the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Crayfish are among the most impactful of aquatic invasive species. Invasive crayfish are considered ecosystem engineers due to their ability to alter basic wetland properties, such as reducing vegetation and bank integrity and increasing turbidity. In areas where invasion is advanced, crayfish pose major economic and ecological problems. Crayfish have been widely introduced for aquaculture and can become established in a wide range of habitat conditions. They also may be spread by anglers who use them as bait. Several non-native crayfish are established in the PNW, but the extent of their invasion is not well known. At least two groups are known from scattered sites in the PNW, and both have proven problematic for native species in other parts of the world: Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and several members of the genus Orconectes. Both groups are native to areas of the eastern United States. Both are identified globally as invasives of high concern and appear on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's "10 Most Unwanted" and the U.S. Forest Service's "Primary Species of Concern" lists for stream systems in the PNW. Despite the presence of introduced crayfish in the PNW and their high potential for negative effects, the scope of their invasion and effects on aquatic systems are not well known. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), along with local groups and state agencies, is working to clarify crayfish distribution and to outline which basins may not yet be invaded. Other goals are to improve understanding of habitat associations of invasive crayfish and their potential effects on native crayfish.

  18. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  19. Rapid evolution of an invasive weed.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kathryn G; Hufbauer, Ruth A; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-04-01

    Trade-offs between performance and the ability to tolerate abiotic and biotic stress have been suggested to explain both the success of invasive species and phenotypic differentiation between native and invasive populations. It is critical to sample broadly across both ranges and to account for latitudinal clines and maternal effects when testing this premise. Wild-collected Centaurea diffusa seeds were grown in benign and stressful conditions (drought, flooding, nutrient stress and simulated herbivory), to evaluate whether native and introduced individuals differ in performance or life history phenotypes. A second experiment used glasshouse-grown seeds to evaluate whether patterns remain comparable when maternal environment is consistent. Many traits differed between ranges, and in all cases but one, invasive individuals grew larger, performed better, or matured later. No trade-off in performance with herbivore defense was evident. Invasive populations may have been released from a trade-off between growth and drought tolerance apparent in the native range. Larger individuals with delayed maturity and greater reproductive potential have evolved in invasive populations, a pattern evident across broad population sampling, and after latitude and maternal environment were considered. Release from abiotic stress tolerance trade-offs may be important for the invasion success of Centaurea diffusa. PMID:24320555

  20. Perspectives on trans-Pacific biological invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2002-01-01

    Trans-Pacific biological invasion is one of the most striking and influential biological phenomena occurring in modern times and the process is still accelerating, and the associated invasives form neo-disjuncts (cf. many well-known paleo-disjuncts) between eastern Asia and North America. To better understand this phenomenon and the related taxa, I address the following questions: 1) what types of species (e.g., life/growth form) have been, or are likely to be, associated with trans-Pacific (eastern Asia, North America) invasions; 2) what has happened or may happen to these species after their remote geographic separation, and 3) what aspects of these species and their native and non-native habitats should be better understood for improved control. To answer these questions, comparisons of the invasive species' characteristics in their native and invaded habitats need to be examined, including: l) genetics, 2) life history/morphology (e.g., plant size, seed size, etc.), 3) ecology (e.g., life/growth forms, pollinators, competitors), 4) distributions (e.g., range size, shape, latitude) in their native (source) and introduced (target) ranges or habitats, and 5) physical factors such as soil, water, and climate. The purpose of these studies is 1) to identify the limiting factors that restrict the distributions of exotic species in native ranges, 2) to understand why invasive species are successful in the introduced ranges, 3) to predict possible future invasions, and, ultimately, 4) to provide information for more efficient and effective management.

  1. An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China

    E-print Network

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China of invasive alien species in China. NeoBiota 15: 1­26. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 Abstract Invasive alien: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 www.pensoft.net/journals/neobiota review ArtiCle Advancing research on alien

  2. Global phylogenetics of Diuraphis noxia (Hemiptera: Aphididae), an invasive aphid species: Evidence for multiple invasions into North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Critical to the study of an invasive species is understanding the number and origin of invasions that have occurred, as well as the rate or potential of post-invasion adaptation and geographic range expansion. One virulent, invasive insect species that has caused much damage in the United States is...

  3. [Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy (MIP)].

    PubMed

    Nagele, U; Schilling, D; Anastasiadis, A G; Walcher, U; Sievert, K D; Merseburger, A S; Kuczyk, M; Stenzl, A

    2008-09-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithopaxy (MIP) was developed to combine the excellent stone-free rates of the conventional percutaneous nephrolithopaxy (PCNL) technique with the low morbidity of the miniaturized PCNL (Mini-Perc) and, at the same time, achieve a high level of patient comfort. The procedure is characterized not only by the diameter of the miniaturized 18-Fr Amplatz sheath that was adopted from the Mini-Perc but also by the following features: ultrasound-guided puncture of the kidney; single-step dilatation of the access tract; ballistic lithotripsy; a low-pressure irrigation system together with stone retraction by irrigation with a specially designed nephroscope sheath, for the so-called vacuum cleaner effect; and a sealed and tubeless access tract with primary closure of the channel independent of hemorrhage and without a second-look procedure.The results of the first 57 patients demonstrate primary stone-free rates of 92.9% with operating times averaging 62 (25-123) min. Severe complications, such as sepsis or bleeding requiring blood transfusion, did not occur. The high and predictable stone-free rate and a low morbidity comparable to that of ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy make MIP an attractive option for patients and urologists. The "vacuum cleaner effect" with quick removal of stone fragments reduces operating time and prevents new stone formation by avoiding residual fragments. The direct and primary closure of the access tract increases patient comfort and is justified by the reintervention rate of less than 8% in the presented cohort.The lack of a need for second-look nephroscopies, the vacuum cleaner effect, improved patient comfort without nephrostomy tubes, as well as surgery times comparable to that of traditional PCNL demonstrate a consequent evolution of the Mini-Perc. MIP therefore represents a promising and future-oriented module in modern stone therapy. PMID:18709351

  4. Preimplantation factor (PIF) promotes human trophoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Moindjie, Hadia; Santos, Esther Dos; Loeuillet, Laurence; Gronier, Héloise; de Mazancourt, Philippe; Barnea, Eytan R; Vialard, François; Dieudonne, Marie-Noëlle

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation factor (PIF) is a peptide secreted by viable mammalian embryos. Moreover, it can be detected in the circulation of pregnant women. Recently, it was shown that PIF promotes invasion in trophoblast cell lines in vitro. Successful human embryo implantation depends on a deep and highly controlled invasion of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) in the maternal endometrium. Trophoblast invasion is regulated in part by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and integrin expression. The present study demonstrates the presence of PIF in early pregnancy and characterizes its effects on primary human trophoblast invasion. At the fetomaternal interface, intense PIF labeling by immunohistochemistry was present during early gestation in villous trophoblasts and EVTs. A decrease of labeling was observed at term. Furthermore, PIF significantly promoted invasion of human EVT isolated from first-trimester placenta. The proinvasive regulatory effect of PIF in EVT was associated with 1) increased MMP9 activity and 2) reduced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP1) mRNA expression. PIF also regulated alpha v and alpha 1 integrin mRNA expressions. Last, the proinvasive effect of PIF appeared to be mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), and Janus-kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathways. In summary, this work describes the direct, positive effect of PIF on the control of human trophoblastic cell invasion by modulation of MMP/TIMP balance and integrin expression. Moreover, these results suggest that PIF is involved in pathological pregnancies characterized by insufficient or excessive trophoblast invasion. PMID:25232018

  5. The Invasive Species Forecasting System: A Space-Based Decision Support Infrastructure for Managing Biological Invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, N. N.; Kendig, D.; Wichman, K.; Pollack, N.; Ilagan, A.; Morisette, J. T.; Pedelty, J. A.; Tilmes, C.; Smith, J. A.; Pfister, R.; Schnase, J. L.; Stohgren, T. J.; Crosier, C.; Graham, J.; Newman, G.; Kalkhan, M. A.; Reich, R.

    2004-12-01

    The spread of invasive species is one of the most daunting environmental, economic, and human-health problems facing the United States and the World today. It is one of several grand challenge environmental problems being addressed by NASA's Science Mission Directorate through a national application partnership with the US Geological Survey. NASA and USGS are working together to develop a National Invasive Species Forecasting System (ISFS) for the management and control of invasive species on Department of Interior and adjacent lands. As part of this effort, we are using NASA's EOS Clearing House (ECHO) framework to create an Invasive Species Data Service (ISDS). The ISDS will be a networked service that integrates a suite of NASA remote sensing data providers with the ecological field data resources of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII). Aggregated ISDS data will feed directly into ISFS analysis routines to produce landscape-scale predictive maps of species distributions. ISDS and the ECHO framework thus provide an efficient interface between existing NASA data systems and decision support systems that are the province of federal agencies and other national organizations. The effort significantly broadens the use of NASA data in managing the Nation's invasive species threat. In this talk, we will describe the NASA/USGS invasive species partnership, provide an overview of the Invasive Species Forecasting System, and show how we are using ECHO technologies as the middle-ware framework for a comprehensive Invasive Species Data Service.

  6. INVASION NOTE Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico

    E-print Network

    Revell, Liam

    Boidae (Boa constrictor) using mtDNA and microsatellite data. Over 150 individual B. constrictor have as well as providing a basis for comparison to other on-going studies of invasive snakes. Keywords Boa Introduction Recently, much attention has been given to the impact and spread of invasive snakes; and the Boa

  7. Abstract Studying historic invasions can provide insight into the ongoing invasions that threaten

    E-print Network

    Donahue, Megan

    on the rocky intertidal community of the Gulf of Maine. Past research using invader- removal experiments of competition from and preda- tion by invasive species. Keywords Carcinus maenas Æ Competition Æ Gulf of Maine Æ Trophic interactions Abbreviations GOM Gulf of Maine Introduction Invasive species are a growing threat

  8. Admixture between native and invasive populations may increase invasiveness of Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    van Kleunen, Mark; Röckle, Michael; Stift, Marc

    2015-09-22

    Self-fertilization and admixture of genotypes from different populations can have major fitness consequences in native species. However, few studies have addressed their potential roles in invasive species. Here, we used plants of Mimulus guttatus from seven native North American, three invasive Scottish and four invasive New Zealand populations to address this. We created seeds from self-fertilization, within-population outcrossing, between-population outcrossing within the same range, and outcrossing between the native and invasive ranges. A greenhouse experiment showed that native and invasive plants of M. guttatus suffered to similar degrees from inbreeding depression, in terms of asexual reproduction and biomass production. After outcrossing with plants from other populations, M. guttatus benefited from heterosis, in terms of asexual and sexual reproduction, and biomass production, particularly when plants from native and invasive populations were crossed. This suggests that, when novel genotypes of M. guttatus from the native North American range will be introduced to the invasive ranges, subsequent outcrossing with M. guttatus plants that are already there might further boost invasiveness of this species. PMID:26354937

  9. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Wikle, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing.

  10. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Wikle, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing. ?? 2006, The International Biometric Society.

  11. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Ortensi, Barbara; Setti, Matteo; Osti, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression. PMID:23510696

  12. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression. PMID:23510696

  13. Biological invasions, climate change and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chown, Steven L; Hodgins, Kathryn A; Griffin, Philippa C; Oakeshott, John G; Byrne, Margaret; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-01-01

    The rate of biological invasions is expected to increase as the effects of climate change on biological communities become widespread. Climate change enhances habitat disturbance which facilitates the establishment of invasive species, which in turn provides opportunities for hybridization and introgression. These effects influence local biodiversity that can be tracked through genetic and genomic approaches. Metabarcoding and metagenomic approaches provide a way of monitoring some types of communities under climate change for the appearance of invasives. Introgression and hybridization can be followed by the analysis of entire genomes so that rapidly changing areas of the genome are identified and instances of genetic pollution monitored. Genomic markers enable accurate tracking of invasive species’ geographic origin well beyond what was previously possible. New genomic tools are promoting fresh insights into classic questions about invading organisms under climate change, such as the role of genetic variation, local adaptation and climate pre-adaptation in successful invasions. These tools are providing managers with often more effective means to identify potential threats, improve surveillance and assess impacts on communities. We provide a framework for the application of genomic techniques within a management context and also indicate some important limitations in what can be achieved. PMID:25667601

  14. Invasive aspergillosis in a "healthy" patient.

    PubMed Central

    Ascah, K J; Hyland, R H; Hutcheon, M A; Urbanski, S J; Pruzanski, W; St Louis, E L; Jones, D P; Keystone, E C

    1984-01-01

    A case of invasive aspergillosis complicated by the formation of an aspergilloma is described. The patient, a 48-year-old man, was apparently healthy except for mild alcoholic steatosis of the liver. A review of the literature revealed that 5 of the 14 previously reported cases of invasive aspergillosis in seemingly immunocompetent hosts were associated with liver disease. Immunologic investigation in this case revealed transient cutaneous anergy during the acute illness and normal lymphocyte function. Assessment of polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, however, showed abnormalities of phagocytosis as well as impairment of intracellular bactericidal activity. These abnormalities may have contributed to a relative immunodeficiency. Impairment of immune function may play a role in the pathogenesis of invasive aspergillosis in some apparently healthy patients. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6378350

  15. Two populations of neurokinin 1 receptor-expressing projection neurons in lamina I of the rat spinal cord that differ in AMPA receptor subunit composition and density of excitatory synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, E.; Al Ghamdi, K.S.; Todd, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal cord contains many projection neurons that express the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). It has been reported that these cells can undergo long-term potentiation (LTP), which may result from insertion of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPArs) containing GluA1 or GluA4 subunits. We therefore investigated synaptic AMPAr expression on these cells with immunocytochemistry following antigen-retrieval. We also examined their density of glutamatergic input (by analysing AMPAr synaptic puncta and contacts from glutamatergic boutons), and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERKs) following noxious stimulation. Our results indicate that there are two populations of NK1r-expressing projection neurons: large GluA4+/GluA1? cells with a high density of glutamatergic input and small GluA1+/GluA4? cells with a much lower input density. Results from pERK experiments suggested that the two groups may not differ in the types of noxious stimulus that activate them. Glutamatergic synapses on distal dendrites of the large cells were significantly longer than those on proximal dendrites, which presumably compensates for the greater attenuation of distally-generated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Both types of cell received contacts from peptidergic primary afferents, however, on the large cells these appeared to constitute over half of the glutamatergic synapses, and were often associated with elongated AMPAr puncta. This suggests that these afferents, which probably contain substance P, provide a powerful, secure synaptic input to large NK1r-expressing projection neurons. These results demonstrate the importance of GluA4-containing AMPArs in nociceptive transmission and raise the possibility that different forms of LTP in lamina I projection neurons may be related to differential expression of GluA1/GluA4. PMID:20303396

  16. Riparian invasive alters stream nitrogen dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineau, M.; Baxter, C.; Marcarelli, A.; Minshall, G.

    2008-12-01

    Invasive species may be most likely to have strong effects on the ecosystem they invade when they contribute a new function such as nitrogen (N) fixation. Russian olive (Eleagnus angustifolia) is a non-native invasive tree which is rapidly spreading along riparian corridors in the American West. Russian olive is a nitrogen fixing plant due to a symbiotic relationship with Actinomycetes and is invading systems that frequently lack a strong native N fixer. The contribution of reactive N by these invasive riparian plants to soils may also be altering N cycling and processing in the adjacent streams. We measured nutrient limitation via periphyton growth on nutrient diffusing substrates and nitrate uptake using short term nitrate additions in Deep Creek, ID. Measurements were made in three reaches along a Russian olive invasion gradient, with an upstream reference reach that has no Russian olive and two downstream invaded reaches, one with moderate density and one with high density. Periphyton growth in Deep Creek was significantly N limited in the reference reach while the moderately invaded reach showed no significant limitation and the highly invaded reach was significantly P limited. The nitrate uptake velocity (Vf) for both of the invaded reaches was an order of magnitude less than the reference reach, implying that biological demand for nitrate is significantly less in the invaded reaches than the reference. Considering the current extent of Russian olive invasion and its continued rapid spread, possible alteration of N cycling in waterways may have important implications for the management of both this invasive species and management of nutrient pollution in waters of the western U.S.

  17. Invasive species information networks: Collaboration at multiple scales for prevention, early detection, and rapid response to invasive alien species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, A.; Jarnevich, C.; Madsen, J.; Westbrooks, R.; Fournier, C.; Mehrhoff, L.; Browne, M.; Graham, J.; Sellers, E.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate analysis of present distributions and effective modeling of future distributions of invasive alien species (IAS) are both highly dependent on the availability and accessibility of occurrence data and natural history information about the species. Invasive alien species monitoring and detection networks (such as the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth) generate occurrence data at local and regional levels within the United States, which are shared through the US National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network's Invasives Information Network (I3N), facilitates cooperation on sharing invasive species occurrence data throughout the Western Hemisphere. The I3N and other national and regional networks expose their data globally via the Global Invasive Species Information Network (GISIN). International and interdisciplinary cooperation on data sharing strengthens cooperation on strategies and responses to invasions. However, limitations to effective collaboration among invasive species networks leading to successful early detection and rapid response to invasive species include: lack of interoperability; data accessibility; funding; and technical expertise. This paper proposes various solutions to these obstacles at different geographic levels and briefly describes success stories from the invasive species information networks mentioned above. Using biological informatics to facilitate global information sharing is especially critical in invasive species science, as research has shown that one of the best indicators of the invasiveness of a species is whether it has been invasive elsewhere. Data must also be shared across disciplines because natural history information (e.g. diet, predators, habitat requirements, etc.) about a species in its native range is vital for effective prevention, detection, and rapid response to an invasion. Finally, it has been our experience that sharing information, including invasive species dispersal mechanisms and rates, impacts, and prevention and control strategies, enables resource managers and decision-makers to mount a more effective response to biological invasions.

  18. Minimally invasive reoperative aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Mikus, Elisa; Calvi, Simone; Tripodi, Alberto; Dozza, Luca; Lamarra, Mauro; Del Giglio, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The operative mortality associated with repeat heart valve surgery is supposedly higher than the mortality associated with the primary operation. However, controversy still surrounds the risk factors and optimal surgical approach for patients requiring repeat cardiac surgery, particularly for those requiring aortic valve replacements (AVR). While the standard approach generally utilizes full sternotomy and peripheral cannulation, alternative approaches such as minimally invasive sternotomy may play an increasingly important role in this field. This study compares the advantages and disadvantages of a minimally invasive approach in redo AVR with the standard approach, highlighting difficulties and potential solutions. PMID:25694980

  19. Minimally invasive reoperative aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Calvi, Simone; Tripodi, Alberto; Dozza, Luca; Lamarra, Mauro; Del Giglio, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The operative mortality associated with repeat heart valve surgery is supposedly higher than the mortality associated with the primary operation. However, controversy still surrounds the risk factors and optimal surgical approach for patients requiring repeat cardiac surgery, particularly for those requiring aortic valve replacements (AVR). While the standard approach generally utilizes full sternotomy and peripheral cannulation, alternative approaches such as minimally invasive sternotomy may play an increasingly important role in this field. This study compares the advantages and disadvantages of a minimally invasive approach in redo AVR with the standard approach, highlighting difficulties and potential solutions. PMID:25694980

  20. Robotic and minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Vernick, William; Atluri, Pavan

    2013-06-01

    The transition of mitral valve surgery away from the traditional sternotomy approach toward more minimally invasive strategies continues to evolve. The use of telemanipulative robotic arms with near 3-dimensional valve visualization has allowed for near complete endoscopic robotic-assisted mitral valve surgery, providing increased patient satisfaction and cosmesis. Studies have shown rapid recovery times without sacrificing perioperative safety or the durability of surgical repair. Although a steep learning curve exists as well as high fixed and disposable costs, continued technological development fueled by increasing patient demand may allow for further expansion in the use of robotic-assisted minimal invasive surgery. PMID:23711646

  1. Intestinal CD169+ macrophages initiate mucosal inflammation by secreting CCL8 that recruits inflammatory monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Kenichi; Takahashi, Naomichi; Ushiki, Mikiko; Monya, Misa; Aihara, Fumiaki; Kuboki, Erika; Moriyama, Shigetaka; Iida, Mayumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Qiu, Chun-Hong; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) macrophages are constantly exposed to commensal bacteria, and are refractory to those antigens in an interleukin (IL)-10-dependent fashion. However, the mechanisms that discriminate hazardous invasion by bacteria from peaceful co-existence with them remain elusive. Here we show that CD169+ macrophages reside not at the villus tip, but at the bottom-end of the LP microenvironment. Following mucosal injury, the CD169+ macrophages recruit inflammatory monocytes by secreting CCL8. Selective depletion of CD169+ macrophages or administration of neutralizing anti-CCL8 antibody ameliorates the symptoms of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Collectively, we identify an LP-resident macrophage subset that links mucosal damage and inflammatory monocyte recruitment. Our results suggest that CD169+ macrophage-derived CCL8 serves as an emergency alert for the collapse of barrier defence, and is a promising target for the suppression of mucosal injury. PMID:26193821

  2. TGF-ß Signaling Pathway in Lung Adenocarcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Toonkel, Rebecca L.; Borczuk, Alain C.; Powell, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    The histological distinction between bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and other adenocarcinomas is tissue invasion. The clinical importance of lung adenocarcinoma invasion is supported by several recent studies indicating that the risk of death in non-mucinous BAC is significantly lower than that of pure invasive tumors and in tumors with greater than 0.6 cm of fibrosis or linear invasion. Using microarray gene expression profiling of human tumors, dysregulation of transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) signaling was identified as an important mediator of tumor invasion. Subsequent studies showed that the CC chemokine RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed, and presumably Secreted) was upregulated in invasive tumors and was required for invasion in cells with repressed levels of the TGF-ß type II receptor. Taken together, these studies illustrate how information gained from global expression profiling of tumors can be used to identify key pathways and genes mediating tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. PMID:20101143

  3. Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and

    E-print Network

    Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production: Master of Resource Management Report Number: 529 Title of Research Project: Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production in British Columbia Supervisory

  4. Do invasive species perform better in their new ranges?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fundamental assumption in invasion biology is that successful invaders exhibit enhanced vigor following introductions to new ranges, including larger size, greater fecundity, and denser populations. This assumption of ‘increased vigour’ underlies most empirical and theoretical studies of invasion ...

  5. INVASIVE SPECIES: PREDICTING GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS USING ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Present approaches to species invasions are reactive in nature. This scenario results in management that perpetually lags behind the most recent invasion and makes control much more difficult. In contrast, spatially explicit ecological niche modeling provides an effective solut...

  6. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  7. Mapping cryptic invaders and invasibility of tropical forest ecosystems: Chromolaena odorata in

    E-print Network

    ...............................................................................................................2 1.1 Consequences of biological invasions ....................................................... 2 1.2 Invasive species and biological invasion ................................................... 2 1 ....................................................................................14 2.2 Application of RS and GIS techniques in mapping biological invasions 15 2.3 Mapping actual

  8. Invasive mechanism and control strategy of Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel).

    PubMed

    Wan, FangHao; Liu, WanXue; Guo, JianYing; Qiang, Sheng; Li, BaoPing; Wang, JinJun; Yang, GuoQing; Niu, HongBang; Gui, FuRong; Huang, WenKun; Jiang, ZhiLin; Wang, WenQi

    2010-11-01

    In order to ascertain the invasive mechanism and control strategy of the invasive Crofton weed, Ageratina adenophora, its ecological adaptability and population differentiation, the formation of single dominant population, displacement of native plants and sustainable management strategies were investigated. The present results helped to clarify and explain such issues as the adaptability post invasion, interaction and competition between inter- and intra-species and community resistance, thereby providing important references to researches on other invasive alien species. PMID:21046320

  9. The Technological Development of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Laura A.; O'Toole, John; Eichholz, Kurt M.; Perez-Cruet, Mick J.; Fessler, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery has its roots in the mid-twentieth century with a few surgeons and a few techniques, but it has now developed into a large field of progressive spinal surgery. A wide range of techniques are now called “minimally invasive,” and case reports are submitted constantly with new “minimally invasive” approaches to spinal pathology. As minimally invasive spine surgery has become more mainstream over the past ten years, in this paper we discuss its history and development. PMID:24967347

  10. Developing Pupils' Performance in Team Invasion Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: To develop pupils' team invasion games (TIG) performance within physical education (PE), practitioners have traditionally adopted teacher-centred, skill-focused approaches. Teaching Games for Understanding and the Tactical approach are alternative approaches to TIG teaching that aim to develop overall game performance, including…

  11. Seed bank dynamics of invasive swallowworts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pale swallowwort (SW) (Vincetoxicum rossicum) and black swallowwort (V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are European viny milkweeds that have become invasive in many habitats in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada. A multi-year seed bank study was initiated in fall 2011 t...

  12. Invasive Pathogens By: Kelly Moffett, Ryan Crawford,

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    as well Potential for fast spread and total destruction #12;Foot and Mouth Disease Aphtae epizooticae;Literature Review Invasion Pathways of Terrestrial Plant-Inhabiting Fungi (Mary E. Palm and Amy Y Rossman) Propagative Plant Material (Seeds, Nursery Stock) Nonpropagative Plant Material (Fruits, Wood) Soil (Plant

  13. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  14. Invasive Weed Outreach in Earl Creech

    E-print Network

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 Invasive Weed Outreach in Nevada Earl Creech Extension Weed Specialist Cache Valley, Utah at Purdue What does the Extension Weed Specialist do? Control Nevada's weeds What does the Extension Weed Specialist do? Control Nevada's weeds Enforce weed control laws What does the Extension Weed Specialist do

  15. An invasive plantfungal mutualism reduces arthropod diversity

    E-print Network

    Rudgers, Jennifer

    and carnivores in the ecosystem may respond directly to the presence of plant mutualisms or may be influencedLETTER An invasive plant­fungal mutualism reduces arthropod diversity Jennifer A. Rudgers1 the mutualism between a dominant plant (Lolium arundinaceum) and symbiotic fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium

  16. Two If by Sea: Marine Biological Invasions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimowitz, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses alien species on the west coast, efforts to combat invasions, methods of transport, and educational projects developed to aid prevention efforts. Includes a list of marine invaders in the Pacific Northwest, plus threats from California and the Great Lakes. (PVD)

  17. Control Effort Exacerbates Invasive Species Problem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic invasive species are depleting the World’s native biota. Managers face a difficult dilemma after exotic species invade. They can use aggressive practices to reduce invader abundances, thereby reducing invaders’ competitive impacts on native species. But it is often difficult or impossible ...

  18. BIODIVERSITY Invasive plants as drivers of regime

    E-print Network

    Molofsky, Jane

    BIODIVERSITY REVIEW Invasive plants as drivers of regime shifts: identifying high-priority invaders with a reinforcement of feed- back processes. For the meta-analysis, we calculated the effect size ratio between reinforcing feedbacks involve impacts on soil-nutrient cycling by shrub and tree invaders in forests

  19. CREATING INVASION RESISTANT SOILS VIA NITROGEN MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion by annual grasses, such as cheatgrass, into the western USA sagebrush steppe and the associated increase in fire frequency are major concerns of ecologists and resource managers. Maintaining or improving ecosystem health depends on our ability to protect or re-establish functioning, desire...

  20. BROMUS TECTORUM INVASION IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromus tectorum is an exotic, self invasive weed that was accidentally introduced to the formerly Artemisia/bunchgrass rangelands of the Intermountain Area of western North America. This annual grass has changed the aspect of vast expanses of rangelands by increasing the chance of ignition and rate...

  1. Postmortem Diagnosis of Invasive Meningococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Halse, Tanya A.; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Wroblewski, Danielle; Paddock, Christopher D.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Scordi-Bello, Irini; Del Rosso, Paula E.; Weiss, Don

    2014-01-01

    We diagnosed invasive meningococcal disease by using immunohistochemical staining of embalmed tissue and PCR of vitreous humor from 2 men in New York City. Because vitreous humor is less subject than other body fluids to putrefaction, it is a good material for postmortem analysis. PMID:24565379

  2. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery – a review

    PubMed Central

    Damoli, Isacco; Ramera, Marco; Paiella, Salvatore; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Bassi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years the application of a minimally invasive approach to pancreatic surgery has progressively increased. Distal pancreatectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, because of the absence of a reconstructive phase. However, middle pancreatectomy and pancreatoduodenectomy have been demonstrated to be safe and feasible as well. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is recognized as the gold standard treatment for small tumors of the pancreatic body-tail, with several advantages over the traditional open approach in terms of patient recovery. The surgical treatment of lesions of the pancreatic head via a minimally invasive approach is still limited to a few highly experienced surgeons, due to the very challenging resection and complex anastomoses. Middle pancreatectomy and enucleation are indicated for small and benign tumors and offer the maximum preservation of the parenchyma. The introduction of a robotic platform more than ten years ago increased the interest of many surgeons in minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic diseases. This new technology overcomes all the limitations of laparoscopic surgery, but actual benefits for the patients are still under investigation. The increased costs associated with robotic surgery are under debate too. This article presents the state of the art of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. PMID:26240612

  3. Invasive Species Taxonomic Name: Elaeagnus umbellata

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Invasive Species Taxonomic Name: Elaeagnus umbellata Common Name: Autumn-olive or Japanese: The leaves are 1 ½ inches wide with an alternate arrangement. The leaf color is green with tiny silvery clustered in leaf axils. They are bisexual and fragrant. They are about 7mm long on average. #12;Fruit

  4. Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547

    E-print Network

    Tiegs, Scott

    exclusively by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall and Asia have invaded previously earthworm-free areas of North America where they consume leaf litter, mix. Hydrochory would allow invasive earth- worms to spread at rates (tens of km d-1 ) that are much greater than

  5. [Invasive sinusal mycosis due to Chrysosporium tropicum].

    PubMed

    Guerrero Palma, Miguel Angel; Avila Espín, Luis; Fernández Pérez, Antonio; Moreno León, Javier Angel

    2007-04-01

    An invasive sinusal mycosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency is reported. The clinical course and causal agent (Chrysosporium tropicum) were both rather atypical. This fungus has been seldom isolated as a cause of nasosinusal infections. Just one more case like this is found when literature is reviewed. We emphasize importance of early diagnosis and treatment to reduce morbi-mortality. PMID:17428413

  6. LettersForum512 Can biological invasions

    E-print Network

    D'Odorico, Paolo

    and the acceleration of soil erosion as a result of the loss of grass cover (Archer, 1989; Schlesinger et al., 1990 change, namely biological invasions and climate change, may act in concert and amplify each other and soil-erosion rates. The conversion of native perennial grasslands into shrublands increases soil

  7. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased surgical morbidity in this high-risk population. However, to reduce the physical trauma of surgery, technologic advances and worldwide experience with minimally invasive surgery have allowed laparoscopic management of patients to become standard of care, with significant short- and long-term patient benefits compared with the open approach. In this review, we will describe the current state-of the-art for minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease and the caveats inherent with this practice in this complex patient population. Also, we will review the applicability of current and future trends in minimally invasive surgical technique, such as laparoscopic “incisionless,” single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), robotic-assisted, and other techniques for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. There can be no doubt that minimally invasive surgery has been proven to decrease the short- and long-term burden of surgery of these chronic illnesses and represents high-value care for both patient and society. PMID:25989341

  8. THE INVASIVE BIVALVES DREISSENA POLYMORPHA AND LIMNOPERNA FORTUNEI: PARALLELS, CONTRASTS, POTENTIAL SPREAD AND INVASION IMPACTS

    E-print Network

    Padilla, Dianna

    THE INVASIVE BIVALVES DREISSENA POLYMORPHA AND LIMNOPERNA FORTUNEI: PARALLELS, CONTRASTS, POTENTIAL, byssate bivalves with a planktonic larval stage and extremely high reproductive capacity. For both species impacts. Both are sessile, byssate bivalves with a planktonic larval stage, high reproductive capacity

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE First Record of Invasive Lionfish (Pterois

    E-print Network

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    RESEARCH ARTICLE First Record of Invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans) for the Brazilian Coast@calacademy.org Abstract The invasion of the northwestern Atlantic by the Indo-Pacific lionfish has developed extraor invasions. In less than 30 years, lionfish have dramatically expanded their distri- bution range to an area

  10. 78 FR 9724 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 31 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Models of lake invasibility by Bythotrephes longimanus,

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Mark

    Statistical model selection Á Habitat suitability Introduction Biological invasions are increasing, mainly dueORIGINAL PAPER Models of lake invasibility by Bythotrephes longimanus, a non-indigenous zooplankton Abstract We built a family of hierarchical risk models for the spread of invasions by the spiny waterflea

  12. Biological invasions as disruptors of plant reproductive mutualisms

    E-print Network

    Traveset, Anna

    Biological invasions as disruptors of plant reproductive mutualisms Anna Traveset1 and David M, Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain 2 Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, University Biological invasions threaten global biodiversity by altering the structure and functioning of ecosystems [1

  13. INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of

    E-print Network

    White, Andrew

    INVASIONS AND INFECTIONS Invading with biological weapons: the importance of disease-mediated invasions Alex Strauss1 , Andy White2 and Mike Boots*,3 1 Department of Biology, Indiana University and ecosystem functioning. 2. Typically, when parasites are considered in invasion biology, it is in the context

  14. "Species Invasions and Climate Change: Triage in Conservation"

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Charles W.

    is recognized as one of the top ten most productive scientists in the world in the field of biological invasions exuberant teaching style and expertise on biological invasions, he is invited around the globe to lecture"Species Invasions and Climate Change: Triage in Conservation" October 17, 2012 3:00-4:00 p

  15. http://summer.oregonstate.edu AQUATIC BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    http://summer.oregonstate.edu AQUATIC BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS (BI/FW 421/521) CRN-0235; John.Chapman@OregonState.Edu BI/FW 421/521 ­ Aquatic Biological Invasions 4 major topics and events in invasion ecology through literature, discussions

  16. REVIEWS AND SYNTHESES Ecology of invasive mosquitoes: effects on resident

    E-print Network

    Juliano, Steven A.

    *Correspondence: E-mail: sajulian@ilstu.edu Abstract Investigations of biological invasions focus on patterns: 558­574 I N T R O DU C T I O N Invasion biology focuses on patterns and processes relatedREVIEWS AND SYNTHESES Ecology of invasive mosquitoes: effects on resident species and on human

  17. Invasion speeds in uctuating environments Michael G. Neubert1*

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Mark

    -1300, USA 3Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Biological invasions species is our ability to predict their rates of spread. Traditional models of biological invasions assume spate of volumes on biological invasions suggests that Elton's dire predictions are coming to pass

  18. Impacts of biological invasions: what's what and the way forward

    E-print Network

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Impacts of biological invasions: what's what and the way forward Daniel Simberloff1 , Jean of the impacts of biological invasions, a pervasive component of global change, has generated remarkable of biological invasions, elucidation of their consequences, and knowledge about mitigation are growing rapidly

  19. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-print Network

    strengths due to phenotypic plasticity into invasion biology and ecological theory on competition it resistant or prone to invasion [9]. Whereas there will certainly be biological details unique to eachPhenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1

  20. Remote identification of the invasive tunicate Didemnum vexillum using

    E-print Network

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Remote identification of the invasive tunicate Didemnum vexillum using reflectance spectroscopy 15 February 2013 (Doc. ID 180921); published 8 March 2013 Benthic coverage of the invasive tunicate.4450, 240.6645. 1. Introduction Reports of an invasive tunicate, Didemnum sp., in coastal areas of New

  1. THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL

    E-print Network

    THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL PURPOSES IN NORTH: The Introduction of Potentially Invasive Alien Plant Species for Horticultural Purposes in North America: Assessing/Approved: ________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Invasive alien plant species are known to cause significant economic and ecological

  2. Development of a Scale for Measuring Invasive Plant Environmentalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Dozier, Hallie

    2000-01-01

    Developed an instrument to measure invasive plant environmentalism (knowledge and attitudes concerning non-native plant invasions). Scaled responses of 237 plant nursery customers to a 17-item standardized interview using the partial credit model. Results indicate that the instrument measured the construct of invasive plant environmentalism…

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Leaf litter variation influences invasion dynamics

    E-print Network

    Molofsky, Jane

    ORIGINAL PAPER Leaf litter variation influences invasion dynamics in the invasive wetland grass 2013 Abstract High litter mass is hypothesized to pro- duce an invader-directed invasion by changing species that stimulates litter accumulation may induce a positive feedback when it benefits from high

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple

    E-print Network

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple via a mutualism with an endemic / Published online: 16 October 2009 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract Many invasive ant the natural enemies of the Hemiptera. Invasive ant species like the Argentine ant have often been associated

  5. Plant community associations of two invasive thistles

    PubMed Central

    Rauschert, Emily S.J.; Shea, Katriona; Goslee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In order to combat the growing problems associated with biological invasions, many researchers have focused on identifying which communities are most vulnerable to invasion by exotic species. However, once established, invasive species can significantly change the composition of the communities that they invade. The first step to disentangling the direction of causality is to discern whether a relationship with other vegetation exists at all. Carduus nutans and C. acanthoides are similar invasive thistles, which have caused substantial economic damage worldwide. We assessed the associations between the thistles and the standing flora in four sites in central Pennsylvania in which they co-occur. After sampling nearly 2000 plots of 1 m2, we used partial Mantel tests to assess the differences in vegetation between thistle and non-thistle plots after accounting for location, and non-metric multidimensional scaling to visualize differences among plots and sites. We found significant differences in community composition in plots with and without Carduus thistles. The non-native species Sisymbrium officinale and Coronilla varia were consistently associated with the presence of Carduus thistles. Several species were associated with areas that were free of Carduus thistles, including an important non-native pasture species (Trifolium repens). We found no evidence for differences in composition between plots with C. nutans versus C. acanthoides, suggesting that they have similar associations with the vegetation community. We conclude that even at the within-field scale, areas invaded by Carduus thistles have different vegetation associations than uninvaded areas, allowing us to target future research about the role of vegetation structure in resisting and responding to invasion. PMID:26038126

  6. Plant community associations of two invasive thistles.

    PubMed

    Rauschert, Emily S J; Shea, Katriona; Goslee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In order to combat the growing problems associated with biological invasions, many researchers have focused on identifying which communities are most vulnerable to invasion by exotic species. However, once established, invasive species can significantly change the composition of the communities that they invade. The first step to disentangling the direction of causality is to discern whether a relationship with other vegetation exists at all. Carduus nutans and C. acanthoides are similar invasive thistles, which have caused substantial economic damage worldwide. We assessed the associations between the thistles and the standing flora in four sites in central Pennsylvania in which they co-occur. After sampling nearly 2000 plots of 1 m(2), we used partial Mantel tests to assess the differences in vegetation between thistle and non-thistle plots after accounting for location, and non-metric multidimensional scaling to visualize differences among plots and sites. We found significant differences in community composition in plots with and without Carduus thistles. The non-native species Sisymbrium officinale and Coronilla varia were consistently associated with the presence of Carduus thistles. Several species were associated with areas that were free of Carduus thistles, including an important non-native pasture species (Trifolium repens). We found no evidence for differences in composition between plots with C. nutans versus C. acanthoides, suggesting that they have similar associations with the vegetation community. We conclude that even at the within-field scale, areas invaded by Carduus thistles have different vegetation associations than uninvaded areas, allowing us to target future research about the role of vegetation structure in resisting and responding to invasion. PMID:26038126

  7. Minimally invasive therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Blute, M L; Larson, T

    2001-12-01

    Currently, 3 categories of treatment are available for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): (1) medicine, such as alpha-blockers and finasteride; (2) minimally invasive treatment, such as transurethral microwave thermotherapy and interstitial ablation using either radiofrequency or laser; and (3) surgical therapy. The 1990s have seen an explosion of transurethral technology to treat symptoms caused by bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH. Unlike surgical debulking procedures, the minimally invasive therapies attempt to treat patients without general or regional anesthesia, and even ambulatory procedures are performed in the office. Because of the demographics of patients with BPH, it is hoped that these minimally invasive options will relieve symptoms without any surgical complications and the side effects and compliance issues associated with medical therapy. It is important that urologists have a clear understanding of the clinical usefulness of these devices, so that the overall role of such treatment may be determined by science rather than marketing. Clinically, the degree of symptom score, peak flow, and quality-of-life improvement seen with all the minimally invasive techniques are similar. The techniques may differ in their ability to reach the maximum number of responders and achieve an acceptable duration of response, and the need for analgesia/sedation associated with each technique. This study will define the minimally invasive therapies and present the differences in catheter design and technique. The pathologic basis for these therapeutic options and the advantages and disadvantages of each will be discussed. Urologists must decide which therapy can be used in their office practice. The maximum numbers of responders and enhanced durability of the treatment can be achieved based on realistic expectations, proper selection of patients, and complete information on the potential of these devices. PMID:11750248

  8. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    PubMed Central

    Moissidou, Despina; Day, Jasmine; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification). Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry), although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts. PMID:26345295

  9. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species. PMID:26230513

  10. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species. PMID:26230513

  11. Identification of the proteomic variations of invasive relative to non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianquan; Desiderio, Dominic M; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhan, Xiaohan; Guo, Tianyao; Li, Maoyu; Peng, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Xuejun; Chen, Zhuchu

    2014-08-01

    The incomplete surgery section of invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) carries the increased risks of complications and requires adjuvant radiotherapy and medications. It is necessary to clarify the molecular mechanisms and markers of invasiveness to guide the management of NFPA patients. The study aimed to proteomic variations of invasive and non-invasive NFPAs and sought the protein markers for invasive NFPAs. Invasive (n = 4) and non-invasive (n = 4) NFPA tissues were analyzed (n = 3-5/each tissue) with 2DE and PDQuest software. Twenty-four high-resolution 2DE gels were quantitatively compared to determine differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) between invasive and non-invasive NFPAs. Approximately 1200 protein spots were detected in each 2DE map, and 103 differential spots (64 upregulated and 39 downregulated) were identified. Among those 103 differential spots, 57 DEPs (30 upregulated and 27 downregulated) were characterized with peptide mass fingerprint and MS/MS. Gene-ontology (GO) and ingenuity pathway analyses of those DEPs revealed pathway networks including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling abnormality, TR/RXR activation, proteolysis abnormality, ketogenesis and ketolysis, cyclin-dependent kinase C signaling abnormality, and amyloid processing that were significantly associated with invasive characteristics of invasive NFPA. Those data demonstrate that proteomic variations exist between invasive and non-invasive NFPAs. 2DE-based comparative proteomics is an effective approach to identify proteomic variations and pathway network variations. Those findings will serve as a basis to understand the molecular mechanisms of invasive NFPAs and to discover protein markers to effectively manage patients with invasive NFPAs. PMID:24729304

  12. Invasive epiglottic aspergillosis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Mizuta, Keisuke; Kuze, Bunya; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Yatsuji

    2015-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised hosts and occurs most frequently in the lungs. Invasive laryngeal aspergillosis is extremely rare. Due to the potential progression of invasive aspergillosis, antifungal therapy must be started immediately in cases involving clinical suspicion of the disease. A 65-year-old male with agranulocytosis complained of sore throat and dysphagia. His epiglottis was covered with caseating granulomatous lesions and the tissue was easily disrupted. A histopathological examination showed an aggressive invasion of Aspergillus species and cartilage destruction. Therefore, we made a diagnosis of primary invasive epiglottic aspergillosis. The invasive aspergillosis resolved with antifungal therapy and an increase in neutrophils. It is therefore necessary to include invasive laryngeal aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis when encountering immunocompromised patients presenting with laryngeal granulomatous lesions and laryngitis-like symptoms. PMID:26025177

  13. Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes Strains Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in Strain Competition

    PubMed Central

    Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Listeria monocytogenes strains can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes strain can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of strain competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor strains, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other strains and two weak competitor strains, which were outcompeted by other strains. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor strains showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive strain was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive strain. In all tested combinations, the less invasive strain was outcompeted by the higher invasive strain. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by strains of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes strain in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential. PMID:26529510

  14. Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes Strains Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in Strain Competition.

    PubMed

    Zilelidou, Evangelia A; Rychli, Kathrin; Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Listeria monocytogenes strains can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes strain can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of strain competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor strains, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other strains and two weak competitor strains, which were outcompeted by other strains. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor strains showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive strain was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive strain. In all tested combinations, the less invasive strain was outcompeted by the higher invasive strain. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by strains of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes strain in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential. PMID:26529510

  15. Analysis of the Transcriptional Differences between Indigenous and Invasive Whiteflies Reveals Possible Mechanisms of Whitefly Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Yu-Jun; Luan, Jun-Bo; Yan, Gen-Hong; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisa tabaci is a species complex of more than 31 cryptic species which include some of the most destructive invasive pests of crops worldwide. Among them, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean have invaded many countries and displaced the native whitefly species. The successful invasion of the two species is largely due to their wide range of host plants, high resistance to insecticides and remarkable tolerance to environmental stresses. However, the molecular differences between invasive and indigenous whiteflies remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here the global transcriptional difference between the two invasive whitefly species (MEAM1, MED) and one indigenous whitefly species (Asia II 3) were analyzed using the Illumina sequencing. Our analysis indicated that 2,422 genes between MEAM1 and MED; 3,073 genes between MEAM1 and Asia II 3; and 3,644 genes between MED and Asia II 3 were differentially expressed. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the differently expressed genes between the invasive and indigenous whiteflies were significantly enriched in the term of ‘oxidoreductase activity’. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that carbohydrate, amino acid and glycerolipid metabolisms were more active in MEAM1 and MED than in Asia II 3, which may contribute to their differences in biological characteristics. Our analysis also illustrated that the majority of genes involved in ‘drug metabolic pathway’ were expressed at a higher level in MEAM1 and MED than in Asia II 3. Taken together, these results revealed that the genes related to basic metabolism and detoxification were expressed at an elevated level in the invasive whiteflies, which might be responsible for their higher resistance to insecticides and environmental stresses. Conclusions/Significance The extensive comparison of MEAM1, MED and Asia II 3 gene expression may serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological differences and the whitefly invasion. PMID:23667457

  16. Validated prediction of pro-invasive growth factors using a transcriptome-wide invasion signature derived from a complex 3D invasion assay.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, Bettina; Burgstaller, Gerald; Irmler, Martin; Dehmel, Stefan; Grün, Jessica; Hwang, Tiffany; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; Beckers, Johannes; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of activated fibroblasts represents a key pathomechanism in fibrotic diseases, carcinogenesis and metastasis. Invading fibroblasts contribute to fibrotic extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and the initiation, progression, or resistance of cancer. To construct transcriptome-wide signatures of fibroblast invasion, we used a multiplex phenotypic 3D invasion assay using lung fibroblasts. Microarray-based gene expression profiles of invading and non-invading fibroblasts demonstrated that 1,049 genes were differentially regulated (>1.5-fold). Unbiased pathway analysis (Ingenuity) identified significant enrichment for the functional clusters 'invasion of cells', 'idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis', and 'metastasis'. Matrix metalloprotease 13 (MMP13), transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1, Caveolin (Cav) 1, Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (Pten), and secreted frizzled-related protein (Sfrp) 1 were among the highest regulated genes, confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western Blotting. We next performed in silico analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) to predict mediators that induced fibroblast invasion. Of these, TGF?1, epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB were tested in our 3D invasion assay and found to significantly induce invasion, thus validating the transcriptome profile. Accordingly, our transcriptomic invasion signature describes the invading fibroblast phenotype in unprecedented detail and provides a tool for future functional studies of cell invasion and therapeutic modulation thereof using complex phenotypic assays. PMID:26243655

  17. Paradigm of plant invasion: multifaceted review on sustainable management.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar

    2015-12-01

    A cascade of reviews and growing body of literature exists on forest invasion ecology, its mechanism or causes; however, no review addressed the sustainable management of invasive plants of forest in totality. Henceforth, the present paper aims to provide a critical review on the management of invasive species particularly in the context of forest plants. Plant invasion in forest is now increasingly being recognized as a global problem, and various continents are adversely affected, although to a differential scale. Quest for the ecological mechanism lying behind the success of invasive species over native species of forest has drawn the attention of researches worldwide particularly in the context of diversity-stability relationship. Transport, colonization, establishment, and landscape spread may be different steps in success of invasive plants in forest, and each and every step is checked through several ecological attributes. Further, several ecological attribute and hypothesis (enemy release, novel weapon, empty niche, evolution of increased competitive ability, etc.) were proposed pertaining to success of invasive plant species in forest ecosystems. However, a single theory will not be able to account for invasion success among all environments as it may vary spatially and temporally. Therefore, in order to formulate a sustainable management plan for invasive plants of forest, it is necessary to develop a synoptic view of the dynamic processes involved in the invasion process. Moreover, invasive species of forest can act synergistically with other elements of global change, including land-use change, climate change, increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and nitrogen deposition. Henceforth, a unified framework for biological invasions that reconciles and integrates the key features of the most commonly used invasion frameworks into a single conceptual model that can be applied to all human-mediated invasions. PMID:26581605

  18. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Robertson, Mark P.; Wilson, John R.U.; Richardson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion—in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their native range. These results suggest fairly robust correlates of invasiveness that can be used for proactive management and risk assessments. PMID:25471679

  19. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Robertson, Mark P; Wilson, John R U; Richardson, David M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion-in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their native range. These results suggest fairly robust correlates of invasiveness that can be used for proactive management and risk assessments. PMID:25471679

  20. Robotically assisted minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kaushik; Alwair, Hazaim; Nifong, Wiley L; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-11-01

    Increased recognition of advantages, over the last decade, of minimizing surgical trauma by operating through smaller incisions and its direct impact on reduced postoperative pain, quicker recovery, improved cosmesis and earlier return to work has spurred the minimally invasive cardiac surgical revolution. This transition began in the early 1990s with advancements in endoscopic instruments, video & fiberoptic technology and improvements in perfusion systems for establishing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) via peripheral cannulation. Society of Thoracic Surgeons data documents that 20% of all mitral valve surgeries are performed using minimally invasive techniques, with half being robotically assisted. This article reviews the current status of robotically assisted mitral valve surgery, its advantages and technical modifications for optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:24251030

  1. [Mini-invasive mechanical cardiac support].

    PubMed

    Krüger, Andreas; Ostadal, Petr; Neuzil, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cardiac support systems represent rapidly developing segment of current cardiology. Several support systems have been recently introduced into the clinical practice for the therapy of cardiogenic shock or refractory non-tolerated ventricular tachycardia, for the support of high-risk catheter interventions, and even for the support of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These new technologies enable quick set-up and introduction even in emergency situations and may be used not only as a ventricular assist device but also as a replacement of seriously damaged heart function. At the present time, number of centers have several different mini-invasive cardiac support systems at disposal in specific patients. This paper is a brief overview of the currently available mini-invasive mechanical cardiac support systems and describes their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:22329282

  2. Minimal invasive treatments for liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Franco; Varano, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    Minimal invasive therapies have proved useful in the management of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. The most relevant aspects of all these therapies are their minimal toxicity profiles and highly effective tumor responses without affecting the normal hepatic parenchyma. These unique characteristics coupled with their minimally invasive nature provide an attractive therapeutic option for patients who previously may have had few alternatives. Combination of these therapies might extend indications to bring curative treatment to a wider selected population. The results of various ongoing combination trials of intraarterial therapies with targeted therapies are awaited to further improve survival in this patient group. This review focuses on the application of ablative and intra-arterial therapies in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal metastasis. PMID:26050603

  3. Screening and Invasive Testing in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Giovanni; Iuculano, Ambra; Zoppi, Maria Angelica

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal screening and testing for trisomy 21 in twin pregnancies poses a number of challenges: the exact estimate of the a priori risk of trisomy 21, the choice of prenatal screening test and/or invasive techniques to employ for the diagnosis and the impact of the result on the options of treatment in case of discordant results within a twin pair or among multiples. These different aspects are discussed below while recognizing that many issues remain unresolved. PMID:26237482

  4. Screening and Invasive Testing in Twins.

    PubMed

    Monni, Giovanni; Iuculano, Ambra; Zoppi, Maria Angelica

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal screening and testing for trisomy 21 in twin pregnancies poses a number of challenges: the exact estimate of the a priori risk of trisomy 21, the choice of prenatal screening test and/or invasive techniques to employ for the diagnosis and the impact of the result on the options of treatment in case of discordant results within a twin pair or among multiples. These different aspects are discussed below while recognizing that many issues remain unresolved. PMID:26237482

  5. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic soils, and conservation of surrounding sand dune areas.

  6. A first step in understanding an invasive weed through its genes: an EST analysis of invasive Centaurea maculosa

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Amanda K; Broeckling, Corey D; He, Ji; Dai, Xinbin; Zhao, Patrick X; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    Background The economic and biological implications of plant invasion are overwhelming; however, the processes by which plants become successful invaders are not well understood. Limited genetic resources are available for most invasive and weedy species, making it difficult to study molecular and genetic aspects that may be associated with invasion. Results As an initial step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms by which plants become invasive, we have generated a normalized Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) library comprising seven invasive populations of Centaurea maculosa, an invasive aster in North America. Seventy-seven percent of the 4423 unique transcripts showed significant similarity to existing proteins in the NCBI database and could be grouped based on gene ontology assignments. Conclusion The C. maculosa EST library represents an initial step towards looking at gene-specific expression in this species, and will pave the way for creation of other resources such as microarray chips that can help provide a view of global gene expression in invasive C. maculosa and its native counterparts. To our knowledge, this is the first published set of ESTs derived from an invasive weed that will be targeted to study invasive behavior. Understanding the genetic basis of evolution for increased invasiveness in exotic plants is critical to understanding the mechanisms through which exotic invasions occur. PMID:17524143

  7. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability. PMID:25352979

  8. The theoretical basis of minimally-invasive and non-invasive medicine: Treatments--Minimize harm to patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-11-01

    This perspective, for the first time, proposed the theoretical basis for the minimally-invasive and non-invasive medicine. It sets the goal of medical treatment that is to minimize harm to patients and to maximize the natural self-healing power for fighting against the disease. It took a historical review on the technological developments shaped by the minimally-invasive and non-invasive ideology with a focus on the course of research, development and clinical deployment of the high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation therapy by the Chinese research team. It also summarized the highlights of the "1st Yangtze International Summit of Minimally-invasive and Non-invasive Medicine 2013" and the mandate of the newly inaugurated International Society of the Minimally-invasive and Noninvasive Medicine (ISMINIM). It provides a perspective on the future development of this emerging field and its impact on human civilization. PMID:26074209

  9. Genetic perspectives on marine biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Geller, Jonathan B; Darling, John A; Carlton, James T

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which the geographic distributions of marine organisms have been reshaped by human activities remains underappreciated, and so does, consequently, the impact of invasive species on marine ecosystems. The application of molecular genetic data in fields such as population genetics, phylogeography, and evolutionary biology have improved our ability to make inferences regarding invasion histories. Genetic methods have helped to resolve longstanding questions regarding the cryptogenic status of marine species, facilitated recognition of cryptic marine biodiversity, and provided means to determine the sources of introduced marine populations and to begin to recover the patterns of anthropogenic reshuffling of the ocean's biota. These approaches stand to aid materially in the development of effective management strategies and sustainable science-based policies. Continued advancements in the statistical analysis of genetic data promise to overcome some existing limitations of current approaches. Still other limitations will be best addressed by concerted collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts that recognize the important synergy between understanding the extent of biological invasions and coming to a more complete picture of both modern-day and historical marine biogeography. PMID:21141669

  10. Genetic Perspectives on Marine Biological Invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Jonathan B.; Darling, John A.; Carlton, James T.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which the geographic distributions of marine organisms have been reshaped by human activities remains underappreciated, and so does, consequently, the impact of invasive species on marine ecosystems. The application of molecular genetic data in fields such as population genetics, phylogeography, and evolutionary biology have improved our ability to make inferences regarding invasion histories. Genetic methods have helped to resolve longstanding questions regarding the cryptogenic status of marine species, facilitated recognition of cryptic marine biodiversity, and provided means to determine the sources of introduced marine populations and to begin to recover the patterns of anthropogenic reshuffling of the ocean's biota. These approaches stand to aid materially in the development of effective management strategies and sustainable science-based policies. Continued advancements in the statistical analysis of genetic data promise to overcome some existing limitations of current approaches. Still other limitations will be best addressed by concerted collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts that recognize the important synergy between understanding the extent of biological invasions and coming to a more complete picture of both modern-day and historical marine biogeography.

  11. Method of determining drilling fluid invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H. J.; Wellington, S. L.

    1985-09-10

    A method of determining the invasion of drilling fluid into a core sample taken from a borehole. A first material is added to the drilling fluid to obtain a first fluid that has an effective atomic number that is different than the effective atomic number of the connate fluids in the rock formation surrounding the borehole. A preserved core sample is collected from the borehole for scanning by a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CAT) to determine the attenuation coefficients at a plurality of points in a cross section of the core sample. The preserved core sample is scanned with a CAT at first and second energies, and the determined attenuation coefficients for the plurality of points in the cross section at each energy are used to determine an atomic number image for the cross section of the core sample. The depth of invasion of the first fluid is then determined from the atomic number image, as an indication of the depth of invasion of the drilling fluid into the core sample.

  12. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Golas, Benjamin J.; Yeung, Vincent W.; Madoff, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed. PMID:25610708

  13. Invasive aquarium fish transform ecosystem nutrient dynamics.

    PubMed

    Capps, Krista A; Flecker, Alexander S

    2013-10-22

    Trade of ornamental aquatic species is a multi-billion dollar industry responsible for the introduction of myriad fishes into novel ecosystems. Although aquarium invaders have the potential to alter ecosystem function, regulation of the trade is minimal and little is known about the ecosystem-level consequences of invasion for all but a small number of aquarium species. Here, we demonstrate how ecological stoichiometry can be used as a framework to identify aquarium invaders with the potential to modify ecosystem processes. We show that explosive growth of an introduced population of stoichiometrically unique, phosphorus (P)-rich catfish in a river in southern Mexico significantly transformed stream nutrient dynamics by altering nutrient storage and remineralization rates. Notably, changes varied between elements; the P-rich fish acted as net sinks of P and net remineralizers of nitrogen. Results from this study suggest species-specific stoichiometry may be insightful for understanding how invasive species modify nutrient dynamics when their population densities and elemental composition differ substantially from native organisms. Risk analysis for potential aquarium imports should consider species traits such as body stoichiometry, which may increase the likelihood that an invasion will alter the structure and function of ecosystems. PMID:23966642

  14. Invasive earthworms interact with abiotic conditions to influence the invasion of common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica).

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexander M; Whitfeld, Timothy J S; Lodge, Alexandra G; Eisenhauer, Nico; Frelich, Lee E; Reich, Peter B

    2015-05-01

    Common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.) is one of the most abundant and ecologically harmful non-native plants in forests of the Upper Midwest United States. At the same time, European earthworms are invading previously glaciated areas in this region, with largely anecdotal evidence suggesting they compound the negative effects of buckthorn and influence the invasibility of these forests. Germination and seedling establishment are important control points for colonization by any species, and manipulation of the conditions influencing these life history stages may provide insight into why invasive species are successful in some environments and not others. Using a greenhouse microcosm experiment, we examined the effects of important biotic and abiotic factors on the germination and seedling establishment of common buckthorn. We manipulated light levels, leaf litter depth and earthworm presence to investigate the independent and interactive effects of these treatments on buckthorn establishment. We found that light and leaf litter depth were significant predictors of buckthorn germination but that the presence of earthworms was the most important factor; earthworms interacted with light and leaf litter to increase the number and biomass of buckthorn across all treatments. Path analysis suggested both direct and moisture-mediated indirect mechanisms controlled these processes. The results suggest that the action of earthworms may provide a pathway through which buckthorn invades forests of the Upper Midwest United States. Hence, researchers and managers should consider co-invasion of plants and earthworms when investigating invasibility and creating preemptive or post-invasion management plans. PMID:25481818

  15. Interacting impacts of invasive plants and invasive toads on native lizards.

    PubMed

    Price-Rees, Samantha J; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The ecological impacts of an invasive species may be reduced by prior invasions if selective pressures imposed by earlier events preadapt the native biota to deal with the newer arrival. In northwestern Australia, invasion of the cane toad (Rhinella marina) kills many native predators if they ingest the highly toxic toads. Remarkably, the toads' defensive toxins (bufadienolides) are chemically similar to those of another invasive species: an ornamental plant from Madagascar, Bryophyllum spp. (Crassulaceae, mother-of-millions). Omnivorous lizards (bluetongue skinks, Tiliqua scincoides) are imperiled by the invasion of toads in northwestern Australia, but conspecifics from other areas of the continent (those where exotic plants were introduced and including areas where toads have yet to invade) are less affected because they exhibit higher physiological tolerance of toad toxins (and also of plant toxins). The willingness of captive bluetongues to consume both toads and these plants and the high correlation in the lizards' sensitivity to toad toxins versus plant toxins suggest that exotic plants may have imposed strong selection on the lizards' physiological tolerance of bufadienolides. As a result, populations of lizards from areas previously exposed to these alien plants may be preadapted to deal with the toxins of the more recent anuran invader. PMID:22322228

  16. An assessment of invasion risk from assisted migration.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jillian M; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2008-06-01

    To reduce the risk of extinction due to climate change, some ecologists have suggested human-aided translocation of species, or assisted migration (AM), to areas where climate is projected to become suitable. Such intentional movement, however, may create new invasive species if successful introductions grow out of control and cause ecologic or economic damage. We assessed this risk by surveying invasive species in the United States and categorizing invaders based on origin. Because AM will involve moving species on a regional scale within continents (i.e., range shifts), we used invasive species with an intracontinental origin as a proxy for species that would be moved through AM. We then determined whether intracontinental invasions were more prevalent or harmful than intercontinental invasions. Intracontinental invasions occurred far less frequently than invasions from other continents, but they were just as likely to have had severe effects. Fish and crustaceans pose a particularly high threat of intracontinental invasion. We conclude that the risk of AM to create novel invasive species is small, but assisted species that do become invasive could have large effects. Past experience with species reintroductions may help inform policy regarding AM. PMID:18577085

  17. An Analytical Approach Differentiates Between Individual and Collective Cancer Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Elad; Verleyen, Wim; Blackmore, Colin G.; Edward, Michael; Smith, V. Anne; Harrison, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells employ a variety of mechanisms to invade their environment and to form metastases. An important property is the ability of tumour cells to transition between individual cell invasive mode and collective mode. The switch from collective to individual cell invasion in the breast was shown recently to determine site of subsequent metastasis. Previous studies have suggested a range of invasion modes from single cells to large clusters. Here, we use a novel image analysis method to quantify and categorise invasion. We have developed a process using automated imaging for data collection, unsupervised morphological examination of breast cancer invasion using cognition network technology (CNT) to determine how many patterns of invasion can be reliably discriminated. We used Bayesian network analysis to probabilistically connect morphological variables and therefore determine that two categories of invasion are clearly distinct from one another. The Bayesian network separated individual and collective invading cell groups based on the morphological measurements, with the level of cell-cell contact the most discriminating morphological feature. Smaller invading groups were typified by smoother cellular surfaces than those invading collectively in larger groups. Interestingly, elongation was evident in all invading cell groups and was not a specific feature of single cell invasion as a surrogate of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, the combination of cognition network technology and Bayesian network analysis provides an insight into morphological variables associated with transition of cancer cells between invasion modes. We show that only two morphologically distinct modes of invasion exist. PMID:21483102

  18. Granivory of invasive, naturalized, and native plants in communities differentially susceptible to invasion.

    PubMed

    Connolly, B M; Pearson, D E; Mack, R N

    2014-07-01

    Seed predation is an important biotic filter that can influence abundance and spatial distributions of native species through differential effects on recruitment. This filter may also influence the relative abundance of nonnative plants within habitats and the communities' susceptibility to invasion via differences in granivore identity, abundance, and food preference. We evaluated the effect of postdispersal seed predators on the establishment of invasive, naturalized, and native species within and between adjacent forest and steppe communities of eastern Washington, USA that differ in severity of plant invasion. Seed removal from trays placed within guild-specific exclosures revealed that small mammals were the dominant seed predators in both forest and steppe. Seeds of invasive species (Bromus tectorum, Cirsium arvense) were removed significantly less than the seeds of native (Pseudoroegneria spicata, Balsamorhiza sagittata) and naturalized (Secale cereale, Centaurea cyanus) species. Seed predation limited seedling emergence and establishment in both communities in the absence of competition in a pattern reflecting natural plant abundance: S. cereale was most suppressed, B. tectorum was least suppressed, and P. spicata was suppressed at an intermediate level. Furthermore, seed predation reduced the residual seed bank for all species. Seed mass correlated with seed removal rates in the forest and their subsequent effects on plant recruitment; larger seeds were removed at higher rates than smaller seeds. Our vegetation surveys indicate higher densities and canopy cover of nonnative species occur in the steppe compared with the forest understory, suggesting the steppe may be more susceptible to invasion. Seed predation alone, however, did not result in significant differences in establishment for any species between these communities, presumably due to similar total small-mammal abundance between communities. Consequently, preferential seed predation by small mammals predicts plant establishment for our test species within these communities but not between them. Accumulating evidence suggests that seed predation can be an important biotic filter affecting plant establishment via differences in consumer preferences and abundance with important ramifications for plant invasions and in situ community assembly. PMID:25163110

  19. Biological invasions: recommendations for U.S. policy and management.

    PubMed

    Lodge, David M; Williams, Susan; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Hayes, Keith R; Leung, Brian; Reichard, Sarah; Mack, Richard N; Moyle, Peter B; Smith, Maggie; Andow, David A; Carlton, James T; McMichael, Anthony

    2006-12-01

    The Ecological Society of America has evaluated current U.S. national policies and practices on biological invasions in light of current scientific knowledge. Invasions by harmful nonnative species are increasing in number and area affected; the damages to ecosystems, economic activity, and human welfare are accumulating. Without improved strategies based on recent scientific advances and increased investments to counter invasions, harm from invasive species is likely to accelerate. Federal leadership, with the cooperation of state and local governments, is required to increase the effectiveness of prevention of invasions, detect and respond quickly to new potentially harmful invasions, control and slow the spread of existing invasions, and provide a national center to ensure that these efforts are coordinated and cost effective. Specifically, the Ecological Society of America recommends that the federal government take the following six actions: (1) Use new information and practices to better manage commercial and other pathways to reduce the transport and release of potentially harmful species; (2) Adopt more quantitative procedures for risk analysis and apply them to every species proposed for importation into the country; (3) Use new cost-effective diagnostic technologies to increase active surveillance and sharing of information about invasive species so that responses to new invasions can be more rapid and effective; (4) Create new legal authority and provide emergency funding to support rapid responses to emerging invasions; (5) Provide funding and incentives for cost-effective programs to slow the spread of existing invasive species in order to protect still uninvaded ecosystems, social and industrial infrastructure, and human welfare; and (6) Establish a National Center for Invasive Species Management (under the existing National Invasive Species Council) to coordinate and lead improvements in federal, state, and international policies on invasive species. Recent scientific and technical advances provide a sound basis for more cost-effective national responses to invasive species. Greater investments in improved technology and management practices would be more than repaid by reduced damages from current and future invasive species. The Ecological Society of America is committed to assist all levels of government and provide scientific advice to improve all aspects of invasive-species management. PMID:17205888

  20. Response of native insect communities to invasive plants.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, T Martijn; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants can disrupt a range of trophic interactions in native communities. As a novel resource they can affect the performance of native insect herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids and predators, and this can lead to host shifts of these herbivores and natural enemies. Through the release of volatile compounds, and by changing the chemical complexity of the habitat, invasive plants can also affect the behavior of native insects such as herbivores, parasitoids, and pollinators. Studies that compare insects on related native and invasive plants in invaded habitats show that the abundance of insect herbivores is often lower on invasive plants, but that damage levels are similar. The impact of invasive plants on the population dynamics of resident insect species has been rarely examined, but invasive plants can influence the spatial and temporal dynamics of native insect (meta)populations and communities, ultimately leading to changes at the landscape level. PMID:24160425

  1. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells. PMID:26329158

  2. Noninvasive and minimally invasive techniques in body contouring.

    PubMed

    Afrooz, Paul N; Pozner, Jason N; DiBernardo, Barry E

    2014-10-01

    Major surgical body contouring procedures have several inherent drawbacks, including hospitalization, anesthetic use, pain, swelling, and prolonged recovery. It is for these reasons that body contouring through noninvasive and minimally invasive methods has become one of the most alluring areas in aesthetic surgery. Patient expectations and demands have driven the field toward safer, less-invasive procedures with less discomfort, fewer complications, and a shorter recovery. In this article, the current minimally invasive and noninvasive modalities for body contouring are reviewed. PMID:25283463

  3. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    PubMed Central

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID:25324851

  4. Seasonal variation in penicillin susceptibility and invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Madoff, Lawrence C; O'Connell, Michael; Pelton, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated prospectively laboratory surveillance data from Massachusetts to investigate whether seasonal variation in invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with the proportion of penicillin-susceptible isolates. The proportion of penicillin-susceptible isolates associated with invasive pneumococcal disease varied by season, with proportions highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, and rates of invasive disease were highest in the autumn and winter seasons and lowest in the summer. PMID:25379834

  5. Minimally invasive surgery for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Suwalski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) remains the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting nearly 2% of the general population worldwide. Minimally invasive surgical ablation remains one of the most dynamically evolving fields of modern cardiac surgery. While there are more than a dozen issues driving this development, two seem to play the most important role: first, there is lack of evidence supporting percutaneous catheter based approach to treat patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Paucity of this data offers surgical community unparalleled opportunity to challenge guidelines and change indications for surgical intervention. Large, multicenter prospective clinical studies are therefore of utmost importance, as well as honest, clear data reporting. Second, a collaborative methodology started a long-awaited debate on a Heart Team approach to AF, similar to the debate on coronary artery disease and transcatheter valves. Appropriate patient selection and tailored treatment options will most certainly result in better outcomes and patient satisfaction, coupled with appropriate use of always-limited institutional resources. The aim of this review, unlike other reviews of minimally invasive surgical ablation, is to present medical professionals with two distinctly different, approaches. The first one is purely surgical, Standalone surgical isolation of the pulmonary veins using bipolar energy source with concomitant amputation of the left atrial appendage—a method of choice in one of the most important clinical trials on AF—The Atrial Fibrillation Catheter Ablation Versus Surgical Ablation Treatment (FAST) Trial. The second one represents the most complex approach to this problem: a multidisciplinary, combined effort of a cardiac surgeon and electrophysiologist. The Convergent Procedure, which includes both endocardial and epicardial unipolar ablation bonds together minimally invasive endoscopic surgery with electroanatomical mapping, to deliver best of the two worlds. One goal remains: to help those in urgent need for everlasting relief. PMID:24251031

  6. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Jill M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Maine, Erin A.; Dang, Tuyen T.; Esparza, Matthew A.; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these “trailblazer” cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis. PMID:25844900

  7. Time Directed Avalanches in Invasion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S. Department of Physics, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 )

    1995-01-23

    We define forward and backward time-directed avalanches for a broad class of self-organized critical models including invasion percolation, interface depinning, and a simple model of evolution. Although the geometrical properties of the avalanches do not change under time reversal, their stationary state statistical distribution does. The overall distribution of forward avalanches [ital P]([ital s])[similar to][ital s][sup [minus]2] is superuniversal in this class of models. The power-law exponent [pi] for the distribution of distances between subsequent active sites is derived from the properties of backward avalanches.

  8. Ganglion affection in the invasive vulvar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López García, N; Recio Sánchez, S; Sánchez Clemente, C; García Gallego, A

    1987-01-01

    This is a study of 150 cases of epidermal carcinoma of the vulva, treated in the Service of Gynecology of the National Institute on Oncology, of which inguinal lymphoadenectomy was practised in 126 cases. The histopathological study of the ganglions removed shows an incidence of 42% of total metastasis. Ganglionic metastasis was analyzed side by side with the clinical state and that of the localization of the tumor. The results of the metastasis of the "Cloquet ganglions" are also presented plus the invasion of the regional pelvic-ganglions with the existence or non-existence in the above mentioned ganglions. PMID:3569318

  9. Landscape determinants of nonindigenous fish invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Lellis, W.A.; Bennett, R.M.; Johnson, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    Much has been written about the influence of exotic or nonindigenous species on natural habitats and communities of organisms, but little is known of the physical or biological conditions that lead to successful invasion of native habitats and communities by exotics. We studied invasivity factors in headwater streams of the Susquehanna River West Branch, which drains portions of the northern Appalachian Plateau. A replicated (two major tributaries) 3 ?? 3 factorial design was used to determine landscape effects of size (stream order) and quality (land use) on abiotic (physical and chemical) and biotic (fish community structure and function) stream attributes. Seven (21%) of thirty-four fish species (brown trout, common carp, mimic shiner, bluegill, smallmouth bass, fantail darter, and banded darter) collected in the eighteen streams sampled were nonindigenous to the basin. Watershed size (stream orders 1, 3, and 5) significantly affected stream geomorphologic and habitat variables (gradient, width, depth, current velocity, diel water temperature, bank overhang, canopy cover, and woody debris density) but not water-quality variables, while land use in watersheds (conservation, mining, and agriculture) significantly affected measured water-quality variables (alkalinity and concentrations of manganese, calcium, chloride, nitrate, and total dissolved solids) but not stream physical or habitat quality. Both watershed size and land use affected fish-community variables such as presence of particular species, species density, species diversity, tolerance diversity, and mean fish size, but in both cases the effect was transparent to native-origin status of fish species. No relationships were found between occurrence of nonindigenous species in watersheds and trophic structure or functional diversity. Therefore, the hypothesis that reduced species diversity increases vulnerability to nonindigenous species was not supported. However, the spatial variation associated with both water-quality and habitat-quality factors was greater in streams with mixed (those with nonindigenous species) than with exclusively native assemblages. These findings suggest that the mechanism for successful invasion by nonindigenous or exotic species is through change in water or habitat quality associated with human or natural disturbances, such as agriculture and mining activities in watersheds. Biotic factors appear to play no or a lesser role in the invasibility of northern Appalachian lotic systems.

  10. Emerging phytochemicals for prevention of melanoma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin diseases due to its propensity to metastasize. Once diagnosed with metastatic melanoma, most patients will die of their disease within 2 years. As suppression of metastases requires long-term interventions, potential anti-metastatic agents must not only be efficacious but also have low toxicity. Many phytochemicals used in traditional medicine have low toxicity and recent studies suggest that some are promising candidates for the prevention or treatment of metastatic melanoma. Here, we review the recent literature regarding phytochemicals that have shown inhibitory effects on melanoma cell migration or invasion. PMID:23474498

  11. Evaluating major invasion hypotheses 1 Support for major hypotheses in invasion biology is

    E-print Network

    , enemy release) are better supported by empirical evidence than other hypotheses (biotic resistanceSeARCh ARtiCle Advancing research on alien species and biological invasions A peer-reviewed open understanding is built on hard evidence rather than as- sumptions, or on theories that have equivocal empirical

  12. Clear and Present Danger: Invasive Species Threats toInvasive Species Threats to

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    , gypsy moth, cogongrass ­ Emerald ash borer, thousand cankers disease Invasive Species Impacts trees in timberland (urban and suburban quantity is unknown) The Invaders · Emerald ash borer Borer #12;11/10/2010 6 Emerald Ash Borer · First discovered in 2002 in MI · Likely carried on corrugated

  13. Timedependent traction force microscopy for cancer cells as a measure of invasiveness

    E-print Network

    Preziosi, Luigi

    Time­dependent traction force microscopy for cancer cells as a measure of invasiveness Valentina to differentiate different cancer cell lines which are more or less invasive. Here we tested two different epithelial bladder cancer cell lines, one invasive (T24), and a less invasive one (RT112). Invasive cancer

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Contrasting effects of an invasive ant on a native

    E-print Network

    Suarez, Andrew V.

    how invasive ant mutualisms affect two common plants, one native and one invasive, on a sub- tropicalORIGINAL PAPER Contrasting effects of an invasive ant on a native and an invasive plant Lori Lach visitor to the plants. T. albipes were attracted to extrafloral nectaries on the invasive tree (Leucaena

  15. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Devendra; Ave, Patrick; Kerneis, Sophie; Frileux, Pascal; Boché, Olivier; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Dubost, Geneviève; Leguern, Anne-Sophie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year) is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase) and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor) were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon) was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5), which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus) and mucus degradation, respectively) were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. PMID:19936071

  16. Distribution of beta 7 integrins in human intestinal mucosa and organized gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Farstad, I N; Halstensen, T S; Lien, B; Kilshaw, P J; Lazarovits, A I; Brandtzaeg, P; Lazarovitz, A I

    1996-01-01

    Two alternative integrins involved in mucosal homing (alpha 4 beta 7) or epithelial retention (alpha E beta 7) of lymphocytes were examined in the human gut. The distribution of the beta 7 subunit [monoclonal antibody (mAb) M301] was bimodal in that it was strongly expressed by alpha E beta 7 + cells but weakly by alpha 4 beta 7 + cells. More than 90% of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), including the minor subsets of CD4+, T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta +, and CD3- cells, expressed alpha E beta 7 as did most lamina propria CD8+ (88%) and a fraction (36%) of CD4+ lymphocytes. Conversely, B-lineage cells (CD19+) and macrophages (CD68+) were negative. In gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT: Peyer's patches and appendix) only a few (< 5%) cells were positive for alpha E beta 7 (confined to CD8+ lymphocytes and CD11c+ putative dendritic cells). A relatively small fraction of IEL (30-50%) expressed alpha 4 beta 7 (mAb Act-1), while most (70%) lamina propria T and B lymphocytes, blasts, plasma cells and macrophages were positive. In GALT, T lymphocytes expressed similar levels of alpha 4 beta 7 as in the lamina propria whereas relatively few B lymphocytes (< 50%) were positive. Isolated lamina propria CD8+, CD4+, CD19+, and CD38+ cells contained mRNA for alpha 4 and the former three subsets as well as appendix CD8+ cells also for beta 7 while only lamina propria CD8+ cells had mRNA for alpha E. Together, the results suggested that alpha E beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 7 are differentially regulated in inductive sites and effector sites of the human gut. Because lymphoid cells at both sites expressed mainly alpha 4 beta 7, this integrin may be a homing receptor on memory and effector cells bound for lamina propria as well as on naive lymphocytes extravasating in GALT. Conversely, because alpha E beta 7 was mainly expressed by CD8+ cells in epithelium and lamina propria, it was probably induced after extravasation, in agreement with the observation that IEL and a fraction of lamina propria T lymphocytes (mainly CD8+ cells) generally expressed higher levels of beta 7 than most CD4+ and B cells. Also a subset of putative dendritic cells located near the follicle-associated epithelium of GALT expressed alpha E beta 7, perhaps reflecting epithelial interaction during primary immune responses. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8943719

  17. Ancestral origins and invasion pathways in a globally invasive bird correlate with climate and influences from bird trade.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hazel; Strubbe, Diederik; Tollington, Simon; Prys-Jones, Robert; Matthysen, Erik; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-08-01

    Invasive species present a major threat to global biodiversity. Understanding genetic patterns and evolutionary processes that reinforce successful establishment is paramount for elucidating mechanisms underlying biological invasions. Among birds, the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri) is one of the most successful invasive species, established in over 35 countries. However, little is known about the evolutionary genetic origins of this species and what population genetic signatures tell us about patterns of invasion. We reveal the ancestral origins of populations across the invasive range and explore the potential influence of climate and propagule pressure from the pet trade on observed genetic patterns. Ring-necked parakeet samples representing the ancestral native range (n = 96) were collected from museum specimens, and modern samples from the invasive range (n = 855) were gathered from across Europe, Mauritius and Seychelles, and sequenced for two mitochondrial DNA markers comprising 868 bp of cytochrome b and control region, and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci. Invasive populations comprise birds that originate predominantly from Pakistan and northern areas of India. Haplotypes associated with more northerly distribution limits in the ancestral native range were more prevalent in invasive populations in Europe, and the predominance of Asian haplotypes in Europe is consistent with the higher number of Asian birds transported by the pet trade outside the native range. Successful establishment of invasive species is likely to be underpinned by a combination of environmental and anthropogenic influences. PMID:26172573

  18. State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Spain: Invasive and Non-Invasive Techniques for Monitoring Respiratory Variables

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Christian; Blanch, Lluis; Murias, Gaston; Luján, Manel

    2010-01-01

    The interest in measuring physiological parameters (especially arterial blood gases) has grown progressively in parallel to the development of new technologies. Physiological parameters were first measured invasively and at discrete time points; however, it was clearly desirable to measure them continuously and non-invasively. The development of intensive care units promoted the use of ventilators via oral intubation ventilators via oral intubation and mechanical respiratory variables were progressively studied. Later, the knowledge gained in the hospital was applied to out-of-hospital management. In the present paper we review the invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables. PMID:22399898

  19. Ancestral origins and invasion pathways in a globally invasive bird correlate with climate and influences from bird trade

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Hazel; Strubbe, Diederik; Tollington, Simon; Prys-Jones, Robert; Matthysen, Erik; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species present a major threat to global biodiversity. Understanding genetic patterns and evolutionary processes that reinforce successful establishment is paramount for elucidating mechanisms underlying biological invasions. Among birds, the ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri) is one of the most successful invasive species, established in over 35 countries. However, little is known about the evolutionary genetic origins of this species and what population genetic signatures tell us about patterns of invasion. We reveal the ancestral origins of populations across the invasive range and explore the potential influence of climate and propagule pressure from the pet trade on observed genetic patterns. Ring-necked parakeet samples representing the ancestral native range (n = 96) were collected from museum specimens, and modern samples from the invasive range (n = 855) were gathered from across Europe, Mauritius and Seychelles, and sequenced for two mitochondrial DNA markers comprising 868 bp of cytochrome b and control region, and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci. Invasive populations comprise birds that originate predominantly from Pakistan and northern areas of India. Haplotypes associated with more northerly distribution limits in the ancestral native range were more prevalent in invasive populations in Europe, and the predominance of Asian haplotypes in Europe is consistent with the higher number of Asian birds transported by the pet trade outside the native range. Successful establishment of invasive species is likely to be underpinned by a combination of environmental and anthropogenic influences. PMID:26172573

  20. Be vigilant for invasive meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Hague, Rosie

    2014-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an encapsulated Gram-negative diplococcus which colonises the upper respiratory tract without causing symptoms in up to 25% of the population. At least 13 different serogroups cause invasive meningococcal disease (IND). In the UK serogroup B causes more than 80% of cases of invasive disease. More than 75% of cases occur in the under 5s, reflecting the lack of ability of the immature immune system to mount an effective response to the polysaccharide capsule of the organism. There is also a peak around adolescence. Meningococcal disease can present with features of septicaemia, fever, purpura, and rapidly progressive shock, or with meningitis which can occur without a rash. Many cases have a mixed picture. Young infants with meningitis may not display the classical signs, but appear unwell, lethargic and floppy Petechiae which start to spread, become purpuric, occur in association with signs of shock or meningitis, or in any child who appears ill should always be treated as IMD until proven otherwise. Any child with symptoms and signs suggestive of IMD and a non-blanching rash should be transferred to hospital as an emergency immediately. IM (or IV) benzylpenicillin (or ceftriaxone) should be given at the earliest opportunity, but treatment should not delay transfer. if the child does not have features suggestive of IMD at the time of initial assessment it is important to give parents advice regarding symptoms and signs which may suggest deterioration. PMID:25102572

  1. [Recommendations for invasive home mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Randerath, W J; Kamps, N; Brambring, J; Gerhard, F; Lorenz, J; Rudolf, F; Rosseau, S; Scheumann, A; Vollmer, V; Windisch, W

    2011-02-01

    Due to chronic respiratory failure, a proportion of patients require long-term home ventilation therapy. The treating doctors, nurses and therapists, as well as employees of the health insurance provider, all require specialized knowledge in order to establish and monitor home ventilation. The following document represents a consensus formed by the participating specialist societies, the health insurers and their medical advisory services. The recommendations for accomplishing home mechanical ventilation are based on the "S2 Guidelines for Non-Invasive and Invasive Mechanical Ventilation for Treatment of Chronic Respiratory Failure", and provide advice about the necessary qualifications of medical and nursing practitioners working in specialised ventilation centres or in the home setting. Management of transfer, which comprises the medical, technical and organisational requirements for releasing the patient from hospital care, is of paramount importance. In outpatient care, the requirements for the recruitment of resources, monitoring of procedures, adjustment of ventilation, and frequency of check-ups are each addressed. The recommendations are supplemented by appendices which include patient transfer forms, checklists for the supply of basic resources for home ventilation, as well as a template for the letter of discharge from hospital. PMID:21294061

  2. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  3. [Treatment of patients with invasive bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Varlamov, S A; Lazarev, A F; Ne?mark, A I; Tat'ianin, V Iu; Ganov, D I; P'iankova, N Iu

    2002-01-01

    Radical surgery was made in 85 patients with invasive cancer of the bladder. 89.4% patients had the tumor of stage T2-T3. After the operation all 85 patients received 3 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy M-VAC in modification of the Cancer Research Center. The interval between the courses was 3 weeks. The patients were divided into two groups. The test group (n = 43) received surgical treatment, M-VAC chemotherapy and immunocorrection (general magnetotherapy, phytotherapy = cyclopheron). The control group (n = 42) received only surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. It was found that the above immunocorrection reduces the number of postoperative complications 3.8 times, side effects by chemotherapy by 1.4 times. Absolute count of T lymphocytes and their active forms elevated by 42.8 and 35.7%, respectively, while CIC diminished by 48.8%. The addition of immunocorrection to combined treatment of patients with invasive cancer of the bladder decreased the number of recurrences for 2 years twice. 3-year survival was 1.5 times longer. PMID:12577575

  4. Ensemble habitat mapping of invasive plant species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Ma, P.; Kumar, S.; Rocca, M.; Morisette, J.T.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Benson, N.

    2010-01-01

    Ensemble species distribution models combine the strengths of several species environmental matching models, while minimizing the weakness of any one model. Ensemble models may be particularly useful in risk analysis of recently arrived, harmful invasive species because species may not yet have spread to all suitable habitats, leaving species-environment relationships difficult to determine. We tested five individual models (logistic regression, boosted regression trees, random forest, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), and maximum entropy model or Maxent) and ensemble modeling for selected nonnative plant species in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, Wyoming; Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and areas of interior Alaska. The models are based on field data provided by the park staffs, combined with topographic, climatic, and vegetation predictors derived from satellite data. For the four invasive plant species tested, ensemble models were the only models that ranked in the top three models for both field validation and test data. Ensemble models may be more robust than individual species-environment matching models for risk analysis. ?? 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. HDACIs and the inhibition of invasive potential

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A major problem in the treatment of cancer and prolongation of patient survival is the dissemination of cells from a defined tumor site into a loco-regional disease and ultimately to full metastatic spread into distant organs. In the manuscript by Ierano et al. multiple chemically diverse histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in tumor cell types of many diverse origins were shown to increase expression of the receptor CXCR4; a receptor whose expression promotes metastatic spread of tumor cells and that is correlated with a stage independent poor prognosis.1,2 The ligand of CXCR4, CXCL12, also called stromal cell-derived factor (SDF1), stimulates signaling through multiple pathways downstream of the CXCR4 receptor including SRC kinases, ERK1/2, and STAT3. Inhibition of SRC, ERK, or STAT3 can all suppress tumor cell migration and reduce the threshold at which tumor cells undergo apoptosis.3-8 The authors noted that despite increased CXCR4 expression following HDACI treatment, exogenous CXCL12 ligand had a reduced ability to stimulate cell signaling processes, with the phosphorylation of both SRC and STAT3 at activating sites declining. This resulted in less induced migration of HDACI-treated tumor cells. No studies were undertaken to determine whether HDACI-treated cells transduced to express activated forms of SRC or STAT3 or retained their invasive phenotype; however a loss of SRC and STAT3 signaling would predict for a less invasive phenotype. PMID:23974427

  6. Transdermal Photopolymerization for Minimally Invasive Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisseeff, J.; Anseth, K.; Sims, D.; McIntosh, W.; Randolph, M.; Langer, R.

    1999-03-01

    Photopolymerizations are widely used in medicine to create polymer networks for use in applications such as bone restorations and coatings for artificial implants. These photopolymerizations occur by directly exposing materials to light in "open" environments such as the oral cavity or during invasive procedures such as surgery. We hypothesized that light, which penetrates tissue including skin, could cause a photopolymerization indirectly. Liquid materials then could be injected s.c. and solidified by exposing the exterior surface of the skin to light. To test this hypothesis, the penetration of UVA and visible light through skin was studied. Modeling predicted the feasibility of transdermal polymerization with only 2 min of light exposure required to photopolymerize an implant underneath human skin. To establish the validity of these modeling studies, transdermal photopolymerization first was applied to tissue engineering by using "injectable" cartilage as a model system. Polymer/chondrocyte constructs were injected s.c. and transdermally photopolymerized. Implants harvested at 2, 4, and 7 weeks demonstrated collagen and proteoglycan production and histology with tissue structure comparable to native neocartilage. To further examine this phenomenon and test the applicability of transdermal photopolymerization for drug release devices, albumin, a model protein, was released for 1 week from photopolymerized hydrogels. With further study, transdermal photpolymerization potentially could be used to create a variety of new, minimally invasive surgical procedures in applications ranging from plastic and orthopedic surgery to tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  7. Ensemble habitat mapping of invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Stohlgren, Thomas J; Ma, Peter; Kumar, Sunil; Rocca, Monique; Morisette, Jeffrey T; Jarnevich, Catherine S; Benson, Nate

    2010-02-01

    Ensemble species distribution models combine the strengths of several species environmental matching models, while minimizing the weakness of any one model. Ensemble models may be particularly useful in risk analysis of recently arrived, harmful invasive species because species may not yet have spread to all suitable habitats, leaving species-environment relationships difficult to determine. We tested five individual models (logistic regression, boosted regression trees, random forest, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), and maximum entropy model or Maxent) and ensemble modeling for selected nonnative plant species in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, Wyoming; Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and areas of interior Alaska. The models are based on field data provided by the park staffs, combined with topographic, climatic, and vegetation predictors derived from satellite data. For the four invasive plant species tested, ensemble models were the only models that ranked in the top three models for both field validation and test data. Ensemble models may be more robust than individual species-environment matching models for risk analysis. PMID:20136746

  8. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  9. 76 FR 36896 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Forestwide Invasive Plant Treatment Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ...the Salmon-Challis National Forest. In the absence of an aggressive invasive plant management program, the number, density...Implementing invasive species laws and policies requires aggressive invasive plant management. This analysis would identify...

  10. Boats, pathways, and aquatic biological invasions: estimating dispersal potential with gravity models

    E-print Network

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    Boats, pathways, and aquatic biological invasions: estimating dispersal potential with gravity, invasive species, gravity model, non-indigenous, risk Abstract Biological invaders can have dramatic focus on pathways. While analy- ses of specific single species are important and Biological Invasions

  11. Stochasticity and Invasions Mark Kot, Jan Medlock, Timothy Reluga, and D. Brian Walton

    E-print Network

    Reluga, Tim

    , integrodifference equations, fat-tailed kernels, dispersal, biological invasions Running Head: StochasticityStochasticity and Invasions Mark Kot, Jan Medlock, Timothy Reluga, and D. Brian Walton Department relate the behavior of some simple, deterministic models for invasions to stochastic, individual

  12. Two invasive plants alter soil microbial community composition in serpentine Katharine M. Batten1,

    E-print Network

    Davies, Kendi

    Two invasive plants alter soil microbial community composition in serpentine grasslands Katharine M Key words: Aegilops triuncialis, Centaurea solstitialis, plant invasion, PLFA, serpentine, soil in serpentine soils. We compared rhizosphere microbial communities, of two invasive species, Centaurea

  13. 77 FR 37064 - Request for Nominations for the Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Extension of Submission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...interdepartmental National Invasive Species Council, proposes to appoint new members to the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC...will actively solicit new nominees and appoint members...interests affected by invasive species such as:...

  14. Good Forestry in the Granite State Page 103 5.2 INVASIVE PLANTS

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Good Forestry in the Granite State Page 103 5.2 INVASIVE PLANTS BACKGROUND Invasive plants can pose in the Granite State OBJECTIVE Prevent the dispersal and establishment of invasive plants and mitigate

  15. Red shiner invasion and hybridization with blacktail shiner in the upper Coosa River, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human disturbance increases the invasibility of lotic ecosystems and the likelihood of hybridization between invasive and native species. We investigated whether disturbance has contributed to the invasion of red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis) and their hybridization with native b...

  16. Design of a Hydraulic Dexterous Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    Design of a Hydraulic Dexterous Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Surgery A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED and motivation. iii #12;Design of a Hydraulic Dexterous Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Surgery by Devin- cal platforms, which include the balance between the scale of the robot and its manipulability

  17. USING REMOTE SENSING TO DETECT AND MAP INVASIVE PLANT SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive exotic plant species present a serious problem to natural resource managers in the United States. This paper presents an overview on the application of aerial photography and airborne videography for detecting invasive plant species in terrestrial and aquatic environments in the United Sta...

  18. Grazing invasive annual grasses: the green and brown guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion of rangeland by annual grasses has become one of the most serious and catastrophic problems in the western United States. Annual grasses displace desired plants and create monocultures that do not provide adequate plant cover for the entire year. Using the ecologically-based invasive plant ...

  19. ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACT Non-Invasive Method For Hand Prostheses

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACT Non-Invasive Method For Hand Prostheses by Christopher Kidd Electrical and Biomedical Engineering The Non-Invasive Bionic Hand was a prosthetic developed for those who are unfortunate enough to have lost a hand. The purpose of the design was to create a robotic hand that could be easily

  20. A Tactile Enhancement Instrument for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    A Tactile Enhancement Instrument for Minimally Invasive Surgery Hsin-Yun Yao, Vincent Hayward orthopedic surgery 1 Computer Aided Surgery, Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 233-239. #12;1 Objective Minimally invasive surgery benefits patients because of smaller incisions, less pain, less trauma and shorter healing periods

  1. Increased snow facilitates plant invasion in mixedgrass prairie.

    PubMed

    Blumenthlal, D; Chimner, R A; Welker, J M; Morgan, J A

    2008-07-01

    Although global change is known to influence plant invasion, little is known about interactions between altered precipitation and invasion. In the North American mixedgrass prairie, invasive species are often abundant in wet and nitrogen (N)-rich areas, suggesting that predicted changes in precipitation and N deposition could exacerbate invasion. Here, this possibility was tested by seeding six invasive species into experimental plots of mixedgrass prairie treated with a factorial combination of increased snow, summer irrigation, and N addition. Without added snow, seeded invasive species were rarely observed. Snow addition increased average above-ground biomass of Centaurea diffusa from 0.026 to 66 g m(-2), of Gypsophila paniculata from 0.1 to 7.3 g m(-2), and of Linaria dalmatica from 5 to 101 g m(-2). Given added snow, summer irrigation increased the density of G. paniculata, and N addition increased the density and biomass of L. dalmatica. Plant density responses mirrored those of plant biomass, indicating that increases in biomass resulted, in part, from increases in recruitment. In contrast to seeded invasive species, resident species did not respond to snow addition. These results suggest that increases in snowfall or variability of snowfall may exacerbate forb invasion in the mixedgrass prairie. PMID:19086291

  2. 78 FR 14351 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting cancellation. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Invasive Species... this meeting was published in the February 11, 2013 issue of the Federal Register (78 FR 9724)....

  3. Fast economic development accelerates biological invasions in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Zhou, Guofa; Cheng, Xinyue; Xu, Rumei

    2007-01-01

    Increasing levels of global trade and intercontinental travel have been cited as the major causes of biological invasion. However, indirect factors such as economic development that affect the intensity of invasion have not been quantitatively explored. Herein, using principal factor analysis, we investigated the relationship between biological invasion and economic development together with climatic information for China from the 1970s to present. We demonstrate that the increase in biological invasion is coincident with the rapid economic development that has occurred in China over the past three decades. The results indicate that the geographic prevalence of invasive species varies substantially on the provincial scale, but can be surprisingly well predicted using the combination of economic development (R(2) = 0.378) and climatic factors (R(2) = 0.347). Economic factors are proven to be at least equal to if not more determinant of the occurrence of invasive species than climatic factors. International travel and trade are shown to have played a less significant role in accounting for the intensity of biological invasion in China. Our results demonstrate that more attention should be paid to economic factors to improve the understanding, prediction and management of biological invasions. PMID:18030342

  4. The Ants Go Marching Millions by Millions: Invasive Ant Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive ants are a worldwide problem that is expanding both geographically and in intensity. Population explosions of invasive ants can overrun landscapes and inundate structures. Pest management professionals are often the first responders to complaints about invading ants. This session will fo...

  5. The ants go marching millions by millions: invasive ant research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive ants are a worldwide problem that is expanding both geographically and in intensity. Population explosions of invasive ants can overrun landscapes and inundate structures. Pest management professionals are often the first responders to complaints about invading ants. This session will fo...

  6. Optimal management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer – a review

    PubMed Central

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Morgans, Alicia K; Moses, Kelvin A

    2015-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a complex disease requiring aggressive management. Patients are often older with comorbid conditions that impact treatment options. This review describes the available therapies for invasive urothelial carcinoma, including chemotherapy, radical extirpative surgery, and bladder-preserving strategies. PMID:26380230

  7. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN RESOURCES AND ENEMY RELEASE IN PLANT INVASION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding why some exotic species become invasive is essential to controlling their populations. This review discusses the possibility that two causes of invasion, release from natural enemies and increased resource availability, may interact. When plants invade new continents, they leave many h...

  8. Synergy Between Pathogen Release and Resource Availability in Plant Invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Why do some exotic plant species become invasive? Two common hypotheses, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor the same species, and therefore act in concert. This would be expected if plant species adapted to high levels of available ...

  9. Evaluating plant invasions from both habitat and species perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chong, G.W.; Otsuki, Y.; Stohlgren, T.J.; Guenther, D.; Evangelista, P.; Villa, C.; Waters, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach to quantitatively assess nonnative plant invasions at landscape scales from both habitat and species perspectives. Our case study included 34 nonnative species found in 142 plots (0.1 ha) in 14 vegetation types within the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. A plot invasion index, based on nonnative species richness and cover, showed that only 16 of 142 plots were heavily invaded. A species invasive index, based on frequency, cover, and number of vegetation types invaded, showed that only 7 of 34 plant species were highly invasive. Multiple regressions using habitat characteristics (moisture index, elevation, soil P, native species richness, maximum crust development class, bare ground, and rock) explained 60% of variation in nonnative species richness and 46% of variation in nonnative species cover. Three mesic habitats (aspen, wet meadow, and perennial riparian types) were particularly invaded (31 of 34 nonnative species studied were found in these types). Species-specific logistic regression models for the 7 most invasive species correctly predicted occurrence 89% of the time on average (from 80% for Bromus tectorum, a habitat generalist, to 93% for Tamarix spp., a habitat specialist). Even with such a modest sampling intensity (<0.1% of the landscape), this multiscale sampling scheme was effective at evaluating habitat vulnerability to invasion and the occurrence of the 7 most invasive nonnative species. This approach could be applied in other natural areas to develop strategies to document invasive species and invaded habitats.

  10. Functional Analysis of Rhomboid Proteases during Toxoplasma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bang; Buguliskis, Jeffrey S.; Lee, Tobie D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites requires transmembrane adhesins that mediate binding to receptors on the substrate and host cell to facilitate motility and invasion. Rhomboid proteases (ROMs) are thought to cleave adhesins within their transmembrane segments, thus allowing the parasite to disengage from receptors and completely enter the host cell. To examine the specific roles of individual ROMs during invasion, we generated single, double, and triple knockouts for the three ROMs expressed in T. gondii tachyzoites. Analysis of these mutants demonstrated that ROM4 is the primary protease involved in adhesin processing and host cell invasion, whereas ROM1 or ROM5 plays negligible roles in these processes. Deletion of ROM4 blocked the shedding of adhesins such as MIC2 (microneme protein 2), causing them to accumulate on the surface of extracellular parasites. Increased surface adhesins led to nonproductive attachment, altered gliding motility, impaired moving junction formation, and reduced invasion efficiency. Despite the importance of ROM4 for efficient invasion, mutants lacking all three ROMs were viable and MIC2 was still efficiently removed from the surface of invaded mutant parasites, implying the existence of ROM-independent mechanisms for adhesin removal during invasion. Collectively, these results suggest that although ROM processing of adhesins is not absolutely essential, it is important for efficient host cell invasion by T. gondii. PMID:25336455

  11. An Exploratory Investigation on the Invasiveness of Environmental Modeling Frameworks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper provides initial results of an exploratory investigation on the invasiveness of environmental modeling frameworks. Invasiveness is defined as the coupling between application (i.e., model) and framework code used to implement the model. By comparing the implementation of an environmenta...

  12. SHORT COMMUNICATION Attraction of ants by an invasive Acacia

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Attraction of ants by an invasive Acacia MARKUS P. EICHHORN, LOUISE C. RATLIFFE be deprived of their co-evolved mutualists. In southern Portugal Acacia dealbata has become naturalised induction, extra-floral nectaries, invasive species, Linepithema humile, Portugal. Introduction Acacia trees

  13. The Invasion of Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians in Florida

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    The Invasion of Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians in Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural of reptiles and amphibians are strikingly out of balance as a result of nonnative invasions. The state has more introduced species of reptiles and amphibians living and breeding in the wild than anywhere else

  14. Controls on Plant Species Invasions During Early Secondary Succession

    E-print Network

    Franklin, Jerry

    Controls on Plant Species Invasions During Early Secondary Succession: The Roles of Plant Origin.S. Copyright Law. Any other reproduction for any purposes or by any means shall not be allowed without my of Washington Abstract Controls On Plant Species Invasions During Early Secondary Succession: The Roles Of Plant

  15. Fast Economic Development Accelerates Biological Invasions in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen; Zhou, Guofa; Cheng, Xinyue; Xu, Rumei

    2007-01-01

    Increasing levels of global trade and intercontinental travel have been cited as the major causes of biological invasion. However, indirect factors such as economic development that affect the intensity of invasion have not been quantitatively explored. Herein, using principal factor analysis, we investigated the relationship between biological invasion and economic development together with climatic information for China from the 1970s to present. We demonstrate that the increase in biological invasion is coincident with the rapid economic development that has occurred in China over the past three decades. The results indicate that the geographic prevalence of invasive species varies substantially on the provincial scale, but can be surprisingly well predicted using the combination of economic development (R2?=?0.378) and climatic factors (R2?=?0.347). Economic factors are proven to be at least equal to if not more determinant of the occurrence of invasive species than climatic factors. International travel and trade are shown to have played a less significant role in accounting for the intensity of biological invasion in China. Our results demonstrate that more attention should be paid to economic factors to improve the understanding, prediction and management of biological invasions. PMID:18030342

  16. WHAT MAKES GREAT BASIN SAGEBRUSH ECOSYSTEMS INVASIBLE BY BROMUS TECTORUM?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The factors that influence ecosystem susceptibility to invasion by nonnative species are poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence that spatial and temporal variability in resource availability can have both large-scale and long-term effects on invasion processes. We conducted a study in ...

  17. Invasive Perennial Grasses in Quercus garryana Meadows of Southwestern British

    E-print Network

    Invasive Perennial Grasses in Quercus garryana Meadows of Southwestern British Columbia: Prospects. Two of the invasives--Kentucky blue grass and orchard grass--were dominant, averaging a combined 80 significant decreases in total percent cover of the exotic dominant grasses, and significant increases

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Tree rings detect earthworm invasions and their effects

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    floor thickness in deciduous forests of northern Minnesota that were eventually linked to the invasionORIGINAL PAPER Tree rings detect earthworm invasions and their effects in northern Hardwood forests of European earthworms into the forests of northern North America are causing dramatic changes in forest floor

  19. Nitrogen uptake: invasive annual vs. native perennial rangeland grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incursion into perennial dominated rangelands of the Intermountain West by two winter exotic annual grasses, cheatgrass and medusahead, is one of the most serious plant invasion in North America. The invasions have decreased productivity and biological diversity and increased the frequency of range...

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Worldwide ant invasions under climate change

    E-print Network

    Courchamp, Franck

    and with predicted climate change (in 2080), globally, regionally and within the world's 34 biodiversity hotspots correspond with biodiversity hotspots. Contrary to general expectations, cli- mate change and invasive ant global problem, especially where invasion hotspots coincide with biodiversity hotspots. Keywords

  1. The impact of invasive fungi on agricultural ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive fungi and other non-indigenous plant pathogens have had a significant effect on American agriculture for hundreds of years. At present crop loss due to invasive plant pathogens especially fungi is estimated at $21 billion per year in the U.S., greater than that caused by non-indigenous ins...

  2. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Celeste M.

    tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development of a Chemical and Biological Engineering and b Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544

  3. Invasive species and climate change: an agronomic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in the introduction of new, invasive pests (pathogens, fungi, weeds and insects) represents a significant challenge to USDA in maintaining a secure, safe and adequate food supply. Although invasive biology has become the focus of a number of research efforts, no systematic evaluation o...

  4. Developing effective invasive cardiology services. Guideline report.

    PubMed

    Ronning, P L; Franc, C W; Lewis, S J

    1988-01-01

    Diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death and the major reason for days stayed in the hospital and discharges from the hospital. Nearly 1 million Americans died last year from cardiac disease, and over 60 million suffer from some form of cardiac disease. Conservatively stated, 300,000 cardiac surgeries and 600,000 cardiac catheterizations are performed annually, and the number is rising. Therefore, heart disease is understandably big business for hospitals and physicians. The organization of cardiac delivery systems is changing dramatically, primarily as the result of advancements made in the nonsurgical treatment of cardiac disease. The balance of power is shifting from cardiac surgery to cardiology, resulting in political and economic consequences for hospitals. Cardiac diagnosis is also undergoing a transformation, as less invasive procedures increase in sophistication. As hospitals consider their options in this market and observe physicians, medical groups, and alternative delivery systems providing competing services, the strategic alternatives become confusing and decidedly difficult. This report is written as a guide to assist hospitals in understanding the technological forces underlying the changing market and the effect these changes will have on the ownership, organization, and structure of delivery systems and, most specifically, on the delivery of cardiovascular services. Because of the tremendous interest in invasive cardiology services and the significance of the financial, organizational, and quality commitment involved in the delivery of invasive cardiology services, this guideline report addresses primarily those services. Noninvasive technologies also are addressed because of their importance to a cardiology program, the magnitude of the technological changes taking place, and their potential impact on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease. The report begins with a discussion of the general planning issues that provide the foundation for the development of an effective cardiology program and details the methodologies and practices necessary to implement the planning process. Included are market assessment and financial planning models, which contain sample reports and provide conceptual and factual starting points for market-specific planning in such areas as demographic and market research, equipment costs, staffing considerations, and pricing alternatives. In addition to strategic, financial, and market planning issues, the report addresses the clinical factors involved in the operation of a cardiology department.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:10318127

  5. Lianas as invasive species in North America: Chapter 28

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2015-01-01

    Liana diversity is typically low in the temperate zones; however, the influx of non-native invasive liana species in North America has increased local diversity at the expense of native habitats and species. Some of the most illustrative studies of invasive lianas in temperate North America compared the biological traits of invasive lianas with native congeners or ecological analogs. The majority of these studies focused on two species, Celastrus orbiculatus (oriental bittersweet) and Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle). Temperate zone lianas generally have higher photosynthetic rates than other early successional species and their host trees. Invasive lianas are having an increasing impact on the dynamics and trajectories of North American plant communities. They often exhibit superior growth and survival compared to their native counterparts, and in some cases, invasive lianas may directly contribute to the decline of their native correlates.

  6. Genomic admixture increases fitness during a biological invasion.

    PubMed

    Keller, S R; Taylor, D R

    2010-08-01

    During biological invasions, multiple introductions can provide opportunities for admixture among genetically distinct lineages. Admixture is predicted to contribute to invasion success by directly increasing fitness through hybrid vigour or by enhancing evolutionary potential within populations. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide admixture during an invasion that substantially boosted fitness in the cosmopolitan weed, Silene vulgaris. We identified three divergent demes in the native European range that expanded from glacial refugia and experienced historical admixture in a well-known suture zone. During recent invasion of North America, multiple introductions created additional opportunities for admixture. In common garden experiments, recombinant genotypes from North America experienced a two-fold increase in fitness relative to nonrecombinants, whereas recombinant genotypes from Europe showed no lasting fitness benefits. This contrast implicates hybrid vigour behind the boost in fitness and supports the hypothesis that admixture can lead to fitness increases that may catapult invasion into a new range. PMID:20626546

  7. The role of life history traits in mammalian invasion success.

    PubMed

    Capellini, Isabella; Baker, Joanna; Allen, William L; Street, Sally E; Venditti, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Why some organisms become invasive when introduced into novel regions while others fail to even establish is a fundamental question in ecology. Barriers to success are expected to filter species at each stage along the invasion pathway. No study to date, however, has investigated how species traits associate with success from introduction to spread at a large spatial scale in any group. Using the largest data set of mammalian introductions at the global scale and recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, we show that human-mediated introductions considerably bias which species have the opportunity to become invasive, as highly productive mammals with longer reproductive lifespans are far more likely to be introduced. Subsequently, greater reproductive output and higher introduction effort are associated with success at both the establishment and spread stages. High productivity thus supports population growth and invasion success, with barriers at each invasion stage filtering species with progressively greater fecundity. PMID:26293900

  8. Invasive Plant Management in the United States National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusk, Michael; Ericson, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species pose a significant challenge to the National Wildlife Refuge System and have been identified as the single most important threat to habitat management on refuges. At present, it is estimated that over 2 million acres of refuge lands are invaded by invasive plants. The current and potential costs of controlling invasive plants, as well as monitoring and restoring refuge lands, are significant both financially and ecologically. Budgetary expenditures for invasive species projects in FY 2009 totaled $18.4 million. A number of strategies are used to confront this threat and have resulted in success on a variety of levels. The Refuge System utilizes key partnerships, invasive species strike teams, and a dedicated cadre of volunteers to implement projects that incorporate mechanical, chemical and biological control methods.

  9. -INVASION OF PIPER ADUNCUM IN RAIN FORESTS IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA -255 Abstract. Piper aduncum is a neotropical invasive species

    E-print Network

    Correspondence Analysis; PG = Papua New Guinea; RDA = Redundancy Analysis. Successful invasion of the neotropical do not only have important practical consequences, but are also of theoretical interest (e.g. Elton practical problems; however, it does not provide a mechanistic insight into invasion processes. From

  10. [The road to modern esophageal surgery - from maximally invasive to minimally invasive].

    PubMed

    von Holzen, Urs

    2014-08-01

    520 new cases of esophageal carcinoma are diagnosed in Switzerland per year. 80% of these patients eventually die from their disease despite recent advances in surgical technique and systemic treatment. The first successful thoracic esophageal resection for carcinoma was performed in 1913, but only the introduction of modern anesthesia with oral intubation and positive pressure ventilation made thoracic operations routinely feasible. Esophageal resection can be performed open or minimally invasive. The minimally invasive esophageal resection has been proven to be safe with comparable mortality to open resection. Also, there is no difference in terms of radicality of the operation. Overall survival seems to be equal in published series, but results of prospective trials are still pending. PMID:25097164

  11. Trends in Stage-Specific Incidence Rates for Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder in the United States: 1988 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Matthew E.; Smith, Angela B.; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Tyree, Seth; Kim, William Y.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bladder cancer is notable for a striking heterogeneity of disease-specific risks. Among the approximately 75% of incident cases found to be superficial to the muscularis propria at the time of presentation (non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer), the risk of progression to the lethal phenotype of muscle-invasive disease is strongly associated with stage and grade of disease. Given the suggestion of an increasing percentage of low-risk cases in hospital-based registry data in recent years, the authors hypothesized that population-based data may reveal changes in the stage distribution of early-stage cases. METHODS: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data were used to examine trends for the stage-specific incidence of bladder cancer between 1988 and 2006, adjusted for age, race, and sex, using Joinpoint and nonparametric tests. RESULTS: The adjusted incidence rate of papillary noninvasive (Ta) predominantly low grade (77%) disease was found to increase from 5.52 to 9.09 per 100,000 population (P <.0001), with an average annual percentage change of +3.3. Over the same period, concomitant, albeit smaller, decreases were observed for flat in situ (Tis) and lamina propria-invasive (T1) disease (2.57 to 1.19 and 6.65 to 4.61 per 100,000 population [both P <.0001]; average annual percent change of ?5.0 and ?1.6, respectively). The trend was most dramatic among patients in the oldest age strata, suggesting a previously unappreciated cohort phenomenon. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current study should motivate further epidemiological investigations of differential associations of genetic and environmental factors with different bladder cancer phenotypes as well as further scrutiny of clinical practice guideline recommendations for the growing subgroup of predominantly older patients with lower-risk disease. PMID:24122346

  12. Endoscopic navigation for minimally invasive suturing.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Christian; Bossard, Lukas; Häberling, Armin; Baur, Charles; Székely, Gábor; Cattin, Philippe C

    2007-01-01

    Manipulating small objects such as needles, screws or plates inside the human body during minimally invasive surgery can be very difficult for less experienced surgeons, due to the loss of 3D depth perception. This paper presents an approach for tracking a suturing needle using a standard endoscope. The resulting pose information of the needle is then used to generate artificial 3D cues on the 2D screen to optimally support surgeons during tissue suturing. Additionally, if an external tracking device is provided to report the endoscope's position, the suturing needle can be tracked in a hybrid fashion with sub-millimeter accuracy. Finally, a visual navigation aid can be incorporated, if a 3D surface is intraoperatively reconstructed from video or registered from preoperative imaging. PMID:18044620

  13. Sublethal irradiation promotes invasiveness of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigerer, Lothar; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hecht, Monica . E-mail: monica.hecht@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2005-05-13

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Despite multiple clinical efforts, clinical outcome has remained poor. Neuroblastoma is considered to be radiosensitive, but some clinical studies including the German trial NB90 failed to show a clinical benefit of radiation therapy. The mechanisms underlying this apparent discrepancy are still unclear. We have therefore investigated the effects of radiation on neuroblastoma cell behaviour in vitro. We show that sublethal doses of irradiation up-regulated the expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met in some neuroblastoma cell lines. The increase in HGF/c-Met expression was correlated with enhanced invasiveness and activation of proteases degrading the extracellular matrix. Thus, irradiation at sublethal doses may promote the metastatic dissemination of neuroblastoma cells through activating the HGF/c-Met pathway and triggering matrix degradation.

  14. Fungal invasion of the rhizosphere microbiome.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Emilie; Mendes, Rodrigo; Bakker, Peter A Hm; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2016-01-01

    The rhizosphere is the infection court where soil-borne pathogens establish a parasitic relationship with the plant. To infect root tissue, pathogens have to compete with members of the rhizosphere microbiome for available nutrients and microsites. In disease-suppressive soils, pathogens are strongly restricted in growth by the activities of specific rhizosphere microorganisms. Here, we sequenced metagenomic DNA and RNA of the rhizosphere microbiome of sugar beet seedlings grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. rRNA-based analyses showed that Oxalobacteraceae, Burkholderiaceae, Sphingobacteriaceae and Sphingomonadaceae were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere upon fungal invasion. Metatranscriptomics revealed that stress-related genes (ppGpp metabolism and oxidative stress) were upregulated in these bacterial families. We postulate that the invading pathogenic fungus induces, directly or via the plant, stress responses in the rhizobacterial community that lead to shifts in microbiome composition and to activation of antagonistic traits that restrict pathogen infection. PMID:26023875

  15. The evolutionary impact of invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, H. A.; Cleland, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Since the Age of Exploration began, there has been a drastic breaching of biogeographic barriers that previously had isolated the continental biotas for millions of years. We explore the nature of these recent biotic exchanges and their consequences on evolutionary processes. The direct evidence of evolutionary consequences of the biotic rearrangements is of variable quality, but the results of trajectories are becoming clear as the number of studies increases. There are examples of invasive species altering the evolutionary pathway of native species by competitive exclusion, niche displacement, hybridization, introgression, predation, and ultimately extinction. Invaders themselves evolve in response to their interactions with natives, as well as in response to the new abiotic environment. Flexibility in behavior, and mutualistic interactions, can aid in the success of invaders in their new environment. PMID:11344292

  16. Management of invasive group A streptococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Claire S; Snelling, Thomas L; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease in children includes deep soft tissue infection, bacteraemia, bacteraemic pneumonia, meningitis and osteomyelitis. The expression of toxins and super antigens by GAS can complicate infection by triggering an overwhelming systemic inflammatory response, referred to as streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). The onset and progression of GAS disease can be rapid, and the associated mortality high. Prompt antibiotics therapy and early surgical debridement of infected tissue are essential. Adjunctive therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin and hyperbaric therapy may improve outcomes in severe disease. Nosocomial outbreaks and secondary cases in close personal contacts are not uncommon; infection control measures and consideration of prophylactic antibiotics to those at high risk are important aspects of disease control. To reduce a substantial part of the global burden of GAS disease, an affordable GAS vaccine with efficacy against a broad number of strains is needed. PMID:25307276

  17. Seasonal Variation in Photosynthetic Rates Influences Success of an Invasive Plant, Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Roger C.

    Seasonal Variation in Photosynthetic Rates Influences Success of an Invasive Plant, Garlic Mustard Influences Success of an Invasive Plant, Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) CAROLINE V, MYERS ,LYD ROGER

  18. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable. PMID:15190556

  19. Intravesical immunotherapy in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jokisch, Jan-Friedrich; Karl, Alexander; Stief, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonmuscle invasive urothelial cell carcinoma is the most frequent malignancy of the urinary bladder. The high recurrence rate (up to 80%) and risk of progression (up to 30%) reflect the need for long-term follow-up and sometimes multiple interventions. To reduce the rate of recurrences and tumor progression, intravesical immunotherapy, especially the use of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), represents the gold standard adjuvant treatment of high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). This article reviews the role of BCG therapy and several promising new immunotherapeutic approaches such as mycobacterium phlei cell wall-nucleic acid complex, interleukin-10 (IL-10) antibody, vaccine-based therapy, alpha-emitter therapy, and photodynamic therapy checkpoint inhibitors. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed using the terms (immunotherapy, NMIBC, BCG, and intravesical) using PubMed and Cochrane databases. Results: BCG represents the most common intravesical immunotherapeutic agent for the adjuvant treatment of high-risk NMIBC. Its use is associated with a significant reduction of recurrence and progression. Patients with NMIBC of intermediate and high-risk benefit the most from BCG therapy. To achieve maximal efficacy, an induction therapy followed by a maintenance schedule should be used. Full-dose BCG is recommended to obtain ideal antitumoral activity and there is no evidence of a reduction of side effects in patients treated with a reduced dose. There are multiple new approaches and agents in immunotherapy with potential and promising antineoplastic effects. Conclusions: The beneficial effect of BCG is well documented and established. To reduce the tumor specific mortality, it is essential to follow guideline-based treatment. In patients with BCG-failure, there are new promising alternatives other than BCG but BCG remains the gold standard at this stage. PMID:26604441

  20. Minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver; Hauser, Goran; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Kunosi?, Suad; Jovanovi?, Predrag; Crnki?, Dino

    2015-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is typically a complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis, trauma or pancreatic duct obstruction. The diagnosis of PPC can be made if an acute fluid collection persists for 4 to 6 wk and is enveloped by a distinct wall. Most PPCs regress spontaneously and require no treatment, whereas some may persist and progress until complications occur. The decision whether to treat a patient who has a PPC, as well as when and with what treatment modalities, is a difficult one. PPCs can be treated with a variety of methods: percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD), endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, laparoscopic surgery, or open pseudocystoenterostomy. The recent trend in the management of symptomatic PPC has moved toward less invasive approaches such as endoscopic- and image-guided PCD. The endoscopic approach is suitable because most PPCs lie adjacent to the stomach. The major advantage of the endoscopic approach is that it creates a permanent pseudocysto-gastric track with no spillage of pancreatic enzymes. However, given the drainage problems, the monitoring, catheter manipulation and the analysis of cystic content are very difficult or impossible to perform endoscopically, unlike in the PCD approach. Several conditions must be met to achieve the complete obliteration of the cyst cavity. Pancreatic duct anatomy is an important factor in the prognosis of the treatment outcome, and the recovery of disrupted pancreatic ducts is the main prognostic factor for successful treatment of PPC, regardless of the treatment method used. In this article, we review and evaluate the minimally invasive approaches in the management of PPCs. PMID:26078561