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Sample records for laminar airflow tla

  1. Improved asthma control in patients with severe, persistent allergic asthma after 12 months of nightly temperature-controlled laminar airflow: an observational study with retrospective comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Uwe; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Gerstlauer, Michael; Lehmann, Sylvia; Gappa, Monika; Brenneken, Amelie; Schulz, Christian; Ahrens, Peter; Schreiber, Jens; Wittmann, Michael; Hamelmann, Eckard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Continuous or episodic allergen exposure is a major risk factor of frequent symptoms and exacerbations for patients with allergic asthma. It has been shown that temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) significantly reduced allergen exposure and airway inflammation and improved quality of life of patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma. Objective The objective was to evaluate the effects of nighttime TLA when used during real-life conditions for 12 consecutive months in addition to the patients’ regular medication. Methods This multicenter, pre- and postretrospective observational study included patients with inadequately controlled moderate-to-severe allergic asthma who received add-on treatment with TLA for 12 consecutive months. Data on medication use, asthma control, asthma symptoms, lung function, use of hospital resources, and exacerbations were collected after 4 and 12 months and compared with corresponding data collected retrospectively from medical records during the year prior to inclusion in the study. Results Data from 30 patients (mean age 28; range 8–70) completing 4 months and 27 patients completing 12 months of TLA use are presented. The mean number of exacerbations was reduced from 3.6 to 1.3 (p<0.0001), and the ratio of asthma-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations diminished from 72.4 to 23.3% (p=0.001) or from 44.8 to 20.0% (p<0.05), respectively, after 12 months of TLA use. The Asthma Control Test index increased from 14.1 to 18.5 (p<0.0001). After 4 months of TLA use, clear improvements can be shown for most variables in line with the data collected after 12 months. Conclusions The addition of TLA to the patients’ regular medication significantly reduced exacerbations, asthma symptoms, and the utilization of hospital resources. The data support that TLA may be an important new non-pharmacological approach in the management of poorly controlled allergic asthma. PMID:26557252

  2. Effect of a novel temperature-controlled laminar airflow device on personal breathing zone aeroallergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Gore, R B; Boyle, R J; Gore, C; Custovic, A; Hanna, H; Svensson, P; Warner, J O

    2015-02-01

    Temperature-controlled laminar airflow improves symptoms in atopic asthmatics, but its effects on personal allergen exposure are unknown. We aimed to evaluate its effects on personal cat allergen and particulate exposures in a simulated bedroom environment. Five healthy volunteers lay under an active and an inactive temperature-controlled laminar airflow device for 175 min, in a simulated bedroom containing bedding from a cat owner. Total airborne particles (?0.5 - ?10 ?m diameter) were quantified with a laser particle counter. Airborne allergen was sampled with Institute of Occupational Medicine filters. Inhaled exposure was sampled with nasal air samplers. Allergen-containing particles were quantified by immunoassay. Treatment reduced total airborne particles (>0.5 ?m diameter) by >99% (P < 0.001) and reduced airborne allergen concentration within the breathing zone (ratio of median counts = 30, P = 0.043). Treatment reduced inhaled allergen (ratio of median counts = 7, P = 0.043). Treatment was not associated with a change in airborne allergen concentration outside of the breathing zone (P = 0.160). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow treatment of individuals in an allergen-rich experimental environment results in significant reductions in breathing zone allergenic and non-allergenic particle exposure, and in inhaled cat allergen exposure. These findings may explain the clinical benefits of temperature-controlled laminar airflow. PMID:24750266

  3. Microbiological Studies on the Performance of a Laminar Airflow Biological Cabinet

    PubMed Central

    Mcdade, Joseph J.; Sabel, Fred L.; Akers, Ronald L.; Walker, Robert J.

    1968-01-01

    Engineering and microbiological tests indicated that a typical, commercial laminar airflow cabinet was not effective in providing either product protection or agent containment. The cabinet was modified and tested through a series of alternate configurations to establish a set of design criteria. A mock-up cabinet was developed from these design criteria. The mock-up unit was evaluated for efficiency in providing both product protection and agent containment. In these evaluations, challenge methods were developed to simulate normal, in-use laboratory operations. Controlled bacterial or viral aerosol challenges were used at higher than normal levels to provide stringent test conditions. Test results indicated that the mock-up unit was considerably better in preventing agent penetration (0.1 to 0.2 particles per 100 ft3 of air) than the commercial cabinet (5 to 6 particles per 100 ft3 of air) during product protection tests. Similarly, agent containment was considerably better in the new cabinet (particle escape of 2 to 3 per 100 ft3 of air at only one of the five test sites) than in the commercial cabinet (particle escape of 2 to 14 per 100 ft3 of air at three of the five test sites). PMID:4874462

  4. Sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with prosthetic joint infections are not present in the laminar airflow during prosthetic joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Emeli; Hellmark, Bengt; Sundqvist, Martin; Söderquist, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) has demonstrated a predominance of healthcare-associated multi-drug resistant sequence types (ST2 and ST215). How, and when, patients acquire these nosocomial STs is not known. The aim was to investigate if sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs are found in the air during prosthetic joint surgery. Air sampling was undertaken during 17 hip/knee arthroplasties performed in operating theaters equipped with mobile laminar airflow units in a 500-bed hospital in central Sweden. Species identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Isolates identified as S. epidermidis were further characterized by MLST and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Seven hundred and thirty-five isolates were available for species identification. Micrococcus spp. (n = 303) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 217) constituted the majority of the isolates. Thirty-two isolates of S. epidermidis were found. S. epidermidis isolates demonstrated a high level of allelic diversity with 18 different sequence types, but neither ST2 nor ST215 was found. Commensals with low pathogenic potential dominated among the airborne microorganisms in the operating field during prosthetic joint surgery. Nosocomial sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs were not found, and other routes of inoculation are therefore of interest in future studies. PMID:25951935

  5. Timeline Analysis Program (TLA-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Timeline Analysis Program (TLA-1) was described. This program is a crew workload analysis computer program that was developed and expanded from previous workload analysis programs, and is designed to be used on the NASA terminal controlled vehicle program. The following information is described: derivation of the input data, processing of the data, and form of the output data. Eight scenarios that were created, programmed, and analyzed as verification of this model were also described.

  6. Timeline analysis program (TLA-1), appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. H.

    1976-01-01

    Appendices for the Timeline Analysis Program (TLA-1) were given. The appendices contain the Atlanta terminal area scenarios, the task catalog and the control and display configurations for the forward and aft flight decks of the NASA 515 aircraft, and the event/procedure, phase, mission, and subsystem catalogs.

  7. Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution

    E-print Network

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

  8. Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution

    E-print Network

    Merz, Stephan

    Steam boiler control specification problem: A TLA solution Frank Le�ke and Stephan Merz Institut f of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi­ cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

  9. Assessing multizone airflow software

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.M.

    2001-12-01

    Multizone models form the basis of most computer simulations of airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. In order to promote computational efficiency, some multizone simulation programs, such as COMIS and CONTAM, restrict the form that their flow models may take. While these tools allow scientists and engineers to explore a wide range of building airflow problems, increasingly their use has led to new questions not answerable by the current generation of programs. This paper, directed at software developers working on the next generation of building airflow models, identifies structural aspects of COMIS and related programs that prevent them from easily incorporating desirable new airflow models. The paper also suggests criteria for evaluating alternate simulation environments for future modeling efforts.

  10. F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Test Flight - Duration: 29 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    An F-16XL aircraft was used by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a NASA-wide program to improve laminar airflow on aircraft flying at sustained supersonic speeds. It was th...

  11. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  12. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Airflow in Nasopharynx.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Biswadip; Wang, Lian-Ping; Santare, Michael H.; Szeri, Andras Z.; Prasad, Ajay K.; Roberts, David

    1996-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of airflow in nasopharynx (from the soft palate to the epiglottis) was conducted, using anatomically accurate model and finite element method, to study the influence of flow characteristics on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The results showed that the pressure drop in the nasopharynx is in the range 200-500 Pa. Ten different nasopharynx geometries resulting from three OSA treatment therapies (CPAP, mandibular repositioning devices, and surgery) were compared. The results confirmed that the airflow in the nasopharynx lies in the transitional flow regime and thus, a subtle change in the morphology caused by these treatment therapies has a large effect on the airflow. The onset of turbulence can cause as much as 40% of increase in pressure drop. For the transitional flow regime, the k-? turbulence model was found to be the most appropriate model, when compared to the mixing length and the k-? model, as it correctly reproduces the limiting laminar behavior. In addition, the pressure drop increased approximately as the square of the volumetric flow rate. Supported by NIH.

  13. Considerations for efficient airflow design in cleanrooms

    E-print Network

    Xu, Tengfang

    2004-01-01

    of air recirculation, make-up air, and exhaust parameters.air, and sometimes exhaust systems. The types of recirculationrecirculation airflow, but also to the design details of make-up airflow and exhausts. Cleanroom air

  14. LRAD-based airflow monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Caress, R.W.; MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Catlett, M.M.; Garner, S.E.; Johnson, J.D.; Johnson, J.P.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1994-03-01

    Conventional alpha detectors depend upon detecting the alpha particle directly. This is often difficult because typical alpha particles generated by uranium or plutonium travel less than 3 cm in air. In contrast, the long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology relies on detecting the ions generated by alpha particles as they lose their energy in air, rather than detecting the alpha particles themselves. We have designed, built, and used LRAD-based airflow monitors to detect alpha contamination. The airflow monitor is composed of a sample chamber with air and ion filters at one end and an ion detector at the opposite end. A set of small fans is located just outside the ion detector to provide an airflow that transports the ions into the ion detector. Ambient air enters through the particulate and ion filters, passes over and through an object located in the sample chamber, through the ion detector, then leaves the system through the fans. The number of ions present is proportional to the amount of contamination on the object`s surface. This work describes the design, construction, and testing of the LRAD-based airflow monitors.

  15. MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL OF ROTOGRAVURE AIRFLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the technical and economic viability of using micro-processor-based control technology to collect volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a paper coating operation. The microprocessor-based control system monitors and controls both the airflow rate and...

  16. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  17. Aircraft Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft laminar flow control (LFC) from the 1930's through the 1990's is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Examples are provided to demonstrate the benefits of LFC for subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Early studies related to the laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. LFC concept studies in wind-tunnel and flight experiments are the major focus of the paper. LFC design tools are briefly outlined for completeness.

  18. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  19. Development of laminar flow control wing surface porous structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M.; Pearce, W.; Anderson, C.; Thelander, J.; Boronow, W.; Gallimore, F.; Brown, W.; Matsuo, T.; Christensen, J.; Primavera, G.

    1984-01-01

    It was concluded that the chordwise air collection method, which actually combines chordwise and spanwise air collection, is the best of the designs conceived up to this time for full chord laminar flow control (LFC). Its shallower ducting improved structural efficiency of the main wing box resulting in a reduction in wing weight, and it provided continuous support of the chordwise panel joints, better matching of suction and clearing airflow requirements, and simplified duct to suction source minifolding. Laminar flow control on both the upper and lower surfaces was previously reduced to LFC suction on the upper surface only, back to 85 percent chord. The study concludes that, in addition to reduced wing area and other practical advantages, this system would be lighter because of the increase in effective structural wing thickness.

  20. The Airflow Stagnation Zone Effect of Convective Heat Transfer on Adjacent Indoor Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hach, Lubos; Katoh, Yasuo

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of heat loss through buildings envelopes, i.e. outdoor walls and vertical window areas by means of active control of indoor airflow along adjacent surface areas is described in this work. The aim was to cause air layers adjacent to the room-faced glass surface to slow down their movement and partly divert themselves, so they would form an additional stand-still air area. The convective heat transfer occurring within the laminar as well as turbulent air layer adjacent to inner vertical surface would decrease as showed on a computational 2-dimensional model and experimental data.

  1. Airflow resistance of selected biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.C.; Sumner, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure drop created when air was forced through beds of selected biomass materials was determined. Materials tested included peanut hulls, peanut hull pellets, maize cobs, and wood shavings, chips and bark. The data were presented as logarithmic plots and equations of pressure drop versus airflow. The airflow resistances of the biomass materials increased with an increase in bulk density and were found to be in the range between values for ear and shelled maize. 12 references.

  2. Laminar Soot Processes (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering the structure and the soot surface reaction properties of laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames. The study was limited to ground-based measurements of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at pressures of 0.1-1.0 atm. The motivation for the research is that soot formation in flames is a major unresolved problem of combustion science that influences the pollutant emissions, durability and performance of power and propulsion systems, as well as the potential for developing computational combustion. The investigation was divided into two phases considering the structure of laminar soot-containing diffusion flames and the soot surface reaction properties (soot surface growth and oxidation) of these flames, in turn. The first phase of the research addressed flame and soot structure properties of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at various pressures. The measurements showed that H, OH and O radical concentrations were generally in superequilibrium concentrations at atmospheric pressure but tended toward subequilibrium concentrations as pressures decreased. The measurements indicated that the original fuel decomposed into more robust compounds at elevated temperatures, such as acetylene (unless the original fuel was acetylene) and H, which are the major reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. The second phase of the research addressed soot surface reaction properties, e.g., soot surface growth and surface oxidation. It was found that soot surface growth rates in both laminar premixed and diffusion flames were in good agreement, that these rates were relatively independent of fuel type, and that these rates could be correlated by the Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) mechanisms of Colket and Hall (1994), Frenklach et al. (1990,1994), and Kazakov et al. (1995). It was also found that soot surface oxidation rates were relatively independent of fuel type, were not correlated with O2, CO2, H2O and O collision rates but were correlated with the collision rates of OH with a collision efficiency of 0.14, in agreement with the early measurements in premixed flames of Neoh et al. (1980), after allowing for oxidation by O2 via the classical rate expression of Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962).

  3. Measurement of airflow in residential furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.; Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex

    2004-01-24

    In order to have a standard for furnaces that includes electricity consumption or for the efficiency of furnace blowers to be determined, it is necessary to determine the airflow of a furnace or furnace blower. This study focused on airflow testing, in order to determine if an existing test method for measuring blower airflow could be used to measure the airflow of a furnace, under conditions seen in actual installations and to collect data and insights into the operating characteristics of various types of furnace blowers, to use in the analysis of the electricity consumption of furnaces. Results of the measured airflow on furnaces with three types of blower and motor combinations are presented in the report. These included: (1) a forward-curved blower wheel with a typical permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor, (2) a forward-curved blower wheel with an electronically-commutated motor (ECM), and (3) a prototype blower, consisting of a backward-inclined blower wheel matched to an ECM motor prototype, which is being developed as an energy-saving alternative to conventional furnace blowers. The testing provided data on power consumption, static and total pressure, and blower speed.

  4. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  5. A Prototype Flight-Deck Airflow Hazard Visualization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as turbulence, vortices, or low-level wind shear can pose a threat to landing aircraft and are especially dangerous to helicopters. Because pilots usually cannot see airflow, they may be unaware of the extent of the hazard. We have developed a prototype airflow hazard visual display for use in helicopter cockpits to alleviate this problem. We report on the results of a preliminary usability study of our airflow hazard visualization system in helicopter-shipboard operations.

  6. Overview of Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    The history of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) from the 1930s through the 1990s is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Early studies related to the natural laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. Although most of this publication is about slot-, porous-, and perforated-suction LFC concept studies in wind tunnel and flight experiments, some mention is made of thermal LFC. Theoretical and computational tools to describe the LFC aerodynamics are included for completeness.

  7. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates???5.7?L/min and???11.3?L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range?-?10(o) C ? To ?50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory. PMID:24574201

  8. Considerations for efficient airflow design in cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2004-07-29

    A high-performance cleanroom should provide efficient energy performance in addition to effective contamination control. Energy-efficient designs can yield capital and operational cost savings, and can be part of a strategy to improve productivity in the cleanroom industry. Based upon in-situ measurement data from ISO Class 5 clean rooms, this article discusses key factors affecting cleanroom air system performance and benefits of efficient airflow design in clean rooms. Cleanroom HVAC systems used in the semiconductor, pharmaceutical, and healthcare industries are very energy intensive, requiring large volumes of cleaned air to remove or dilute contaminants for satisfactory operations. There is a tendency, however, to design excessive airflow rates into cleanroom HVAC systems, due to factors such as design conservatism, lack of thorough understanding of airflow requirements, concerns about cleanliness reliability, and potential design and operational liabilities. Energy use of cleanroom environmental systems varies with system type and design, cleanroom functions, and the control of critical parameters such as temperature and humidity. In particular, cleanroom cleanliness requirements specified by cleanliness class have an impact on overall energy use. A previous study covering Europe and the US reveals annual cleanroom electricity usage for cooling and fan energy varies significantly depending on cleanliness class, and may account for up to three-quarters of total annual operating costs. A study on a semiconductor cleanroom in Japan found air delivery systems account for more than 30% of total power consumption. It is evident that the main factors dictating cleanroom operation energy include airflow rates and HVAC system efficiency. Improving energy efficiency in clean rooms may potentially contribute to significant savings in the initial costs of the facilities as well as operation and maintenance costs. For example, energy consumption by a typical chip manufacturer can be cut 40% or more, and the associated greenhouse emissions even more. Cleanroom HVAC systems provide huge opportunities for energy savings in the semiconductor industry. In addition to direct cost reductions in cleanroom investment and operation, energy-efficient designs can reduce maintenance costs, increase power reliability, improve time-to-market in cleanroom production, and improve environmental quality. Companies that use energy efficiency to lower costs and increase productivity can gain a competitive advantage and achieve a higher return on investment. In addition, energy-efficient cleanroom systems conserve energy and natural resources, heightening the company's reputation as an environmentally conscious leader in the community and the industry. A significant portion of energy use in cleanroom environmental systems is associated with recirculating air systems. We will review and analyze design factors and operational performance of airflow systems in ISO Class 5 clean rooms. We will also discuss benefits of efficient cleanroom airflow designs in conjunction with effective cleanroom contamination control. We will consider the following common recirculating air system designs: fan-tower (FT) with pressurized-plenum; distributed air handler unit (AHU); and fan-filter unit (FFU).

  9. Hybrid laminar flow control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in which leading edge suction is used in conjunction with wing pressure distribution tailoring to postpone boundary layer transition and reduce friction drag was examined. Airfoil design characteristics required for laminar flow control (LFC) were determined. The aerodynamic design of the HLFC wing for a 178 passenger commercial turbofan transport was developed, and a drag was estimated. Systems changes required to install HLFC were defined, and weights and fuel economy were estimated. The potential for 9% fuel reduction for a 3926-km (2120-nmi) mission is identified.

  10. Supersonic laminar-flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed, up to date systems studies of the application of laminar flow control (LFC) to various supersonic missions and/or vehicles, both civilian and military, are not yet available. However, various first order looks at the benefits are summarized. The bottom line is that laminar flow control may allow development of a viable second generation SST. This follows from a combination of reduced fuel, structure, and insulation weight permitting operation at higher altitudes, thereby lowering sonic boom along with improving performance. The long stage lengths associated with the emerging economic importance of the Pacific Basin are creating a serious and renewed requirement for such a vehicle. Supersonic LFC techniques are discussed.

  11. Airflow elicits a spider's jump towards airborne prey. I. Airflow around a flying blowfly

    PubMed Central

    Klopsch, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.; Barth, Friedrich G.

    2012-01-01

    The hunting spider Cupiennius salei uses airflow generated by flying insects for the guidance of its prey-capture jump. We investigated the velocity field of the airflow generated by a freely flying blowfly close to the flow sensors on the spider's legs. It shows three characteristic phases (I–III). (I) When approaching, the blowfly induces an airflow signal near the spider with only little fluctuation (0.013 ± 0.006 m s?1) and a strength that increases nearly exponentially with time (maximum: 0.164 ± 0.051 m s?1 s.d.). The spider detects this flow while the fly is still 38.4 ± 5.6 mm away. The fluctuation of the airflow above the sensors increases linearly up to 0.037 m s?1 with the fly's altitude. Differences in the time of arrival and intensity of the fly signal at different legs probably inform the spider about the direction to the prey. (II) Phase II abruptly follows phase I with a much higher degree of fluctuation (fluctuation amplitudes: 0.114 ± 0.050 m s?1). It starts when the fly is directly above the sensor and corresponds to the time-dependent flow in the wake below and behind the fly. Its onset indicates to the spider that its prey is now within reach and triggers its jump. The spider derives information on the fly's position from the airflow characteristics, enabling it to properly time its jump. The horizontal velocity of the approaching fly is reflected by the time of arrival differences (ranging from 0.038 to 0.108 s) of the flow at different legs and the exponential velocity growth rate (16–79 s?1) during phase I. (III) The air flow velocity decays again after the fly has passed the spider. PMID:22572032

  12. Laminar-flow flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Richard D.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Bartlett, D. W.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Braslow, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    The flight testing conducted over the past 10 years in the NASA laminar-flow control (LFC) will be reviewed. The LFC program was directed towards the most challenging technology application, the high supersonic speed transport. To place these recent experiences in perspective, earlier important flight tests will first be reviewed to recall the lessons learned at that time.

  13. Efficient airflow design for cleanrooms improves business bottom lines

    E-print Network

    Xu, Tengfang

    2003-01-01

    recirculation air systems and often to a lesser degree, the make-up air and exhaustrecirculation air systems, make-up air systems, and sometimes exhaustrecirculation airflow, but also to the design details of make-up airflow and exhausts. The air

  14. Review on airflow in unsaturated zones induced by natural forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Xingxing; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Li, Hailong

    2013-10-01

    Subsurface airflow in unsaturated zones induced by natural forcings is of importance in many environmental and engineering fields, such as environmental remediation, water infiltration and groundwater recharge, coastal soil aeration, mine and tunnel ventilation, and gas exchange between soil and atmosphere. This review synthesizes the published literature on subsurface airflow driven by natural forcings such as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, topographic effect, water table fluctuations, and water infiltration. The present state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms, analytical and numerical models, and environmental and engineering applications related to the naturally occurring airflow is discussed. Airflow induced by atmospheric pressure fluctuations is studied the most because of the applications to environmental remediation and transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, which are very important in understanding biogeochemical cycling and global change. Airflow induced by infiltration is also an extensively investigated topic because of its implications in rainfall infiltration and groundwater recharge. Airflow induced by water table fluctuations is important in coastal areas because it plays an important role in coastal environmental remediation and ecological systems. Airflow induced by topographic effect is studied the least. However, it has important applications in unsaturated zone gas transport and natural ventilation of mines and tunnels. Finally, the similarities and differences in the characteristics of the air pressure and airflow are compared and future research efforts are recommended.

  15. Operational considerations for laminar flow aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the development of laminar flow technology for commercial transports during the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) laminar flow program. Practical, operational laminar flow control (LFC) systems have been designed, fabricated, and are undergoing flight testing. New materials, fabrication methods, analysis techniques, and design concepts were developed and show much promise. The laminar flow control systems now being flight tested on the NASA Jetstar aircraft are complemented by natural laminar flow flight tests to be accomplished with the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment. An overview of some operational aspects of this exciting program is given.

  16. Airflow patterns in a human nasal model

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, D.E.; Leopold, D.A.; Youngentob, S.L.; Sheehe, P.R.; Gagne, G.M.; Thomas, F.D.; Mozell, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Nasal airflow patterns were studied by using xenon 133 gas to image the course taken by air as it flowed through a plastic model of the human nasal cavity. The model was produced from the head of a human cadaver, and was anatomically correct. A needle catheter was used to infuse the radioactive xenon into a continuous flow of room air maintained through the model by a variable vacuum source connected to the nasopharynx. The radioactive gas was infused at one of five release sites in the nostril, and the distribution of the radioactivity was imaged in the sagittal plane with a scintillation camera. The data were organized to show the activity in six contiguous regions of the midnose. For each catheter, release site activity patterns were determined for three flow rates. The results of this experiment showed that both catheter position and flow rate had significant and reproducible effects on the distribution of radioactivity within the model.

  17. Room airflow studies using sonic anemometry.

    PubMed

    Wasiolek, P T; Whicker, J J; Gong, H; Rodgers, J C

    1999-06-01

    To ensure prompt response by real-time air monitors to an accidental release of toxic aerosols in a workplace, safety professionals should understand airflow patterns. This understanding can be achieved with validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer simulations, or with experimental techniques, such as measurements with smoke, neutrally buoyant markers, trace gases, or trace aerosol particles. As a supplementary technique to quantify airflows, the use of a state-of-the art, three-dimensional sonic anemometer was explored. This instrument allows for the precise measurements of the air-velocity vector components in the range of a few centimeters per second, which is common in many indoor work environments. Measurements of air velocities and directions at selected locations were made for the purpose of providing data for characterizing fundamental aspects of indoor air movement in two ventilated rooms and for comparison to CFD model predictions. One room was a mockup of a plutonium workroom, and the other was an actual functioning plutonium workroom. In the mockup room, air-velocity vector components were measured at 19 locations at three heights (60, 120 and 180 cm) with average velocities varying from 1.4 cm s-1 to 9.7 cm s-1. There were complex flow patterns observed with turbulence intensities from 39% up to 108%. In the plutonium workroom, measurements were made at the breathing-zone height, recording average velocities ranging from 9.9 cm s-1 to 35.5 cm s-1 with turbulence intensities from 33% to 108%. PMID:10390937

  18. Coning phenomena under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Mizuki; Terada, Katsuhide; Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate coning phenomena in the paddle dissolution test under laminar flow (Reynolds number <500). The minimum rotation speed at which the coning phenomena disappear (no coning rpm, NCrpm) was measured in viscous media (23 to 147mPa?s) using various particles. The exponent values of particle size, density, and viscosity parameters in the Zwietering equation were found to be 0.066, 0.38, and 0.22, respectively. NCrpm was appropriately predicted by the Zwietering equation (average error: 8rpm). These values are very different from those for turbulent flow, suggesting that the main physical forces governing the motion of particles can be different between turbulent flow and laminar flow. This point should be taken into account when understanding the dissolution of drug products in viscous fluids representing the fed state. PMID:26296866

  19. Natural laminar flow nacelle for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton; Abeyounis, William K.; Patterson, James C., Jr.; Re, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of laminar flow nacelles for reducing installed engine/nacelle drag was studied. The purpose was twofold: to experimentally verify a method for designing laminar flow nacelles and to determine the effect of installation on the extent of laminar flow on the nacelle and on the nacelle pressure distributions. The results of the isolated nacelle tests illustrated that laminar flow could be maintained over the desired length. Installing the nacelles on wing/pylon did not alter the extent of laminar flow occurring on the nacelles. The results illustrated that a significant drag reduction was achieved with this laminar flow design. Further drag reduction could be obtained with proper nacelle location and pylon contouring.

  20. The Evolution of Unidirectional Pulmonary Airflow.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C G

    2015-07-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that the avian respiratory system is unique because air flows in the same direction through most of the gas-exchange tubules during both phases of ventilation. However, recent studies showing that unidirectional airflow also exists in crocodilians and lizards raise questions about the true phylogenetic distribution of unidirectional airflow, the selective drivers of the trait, the date of origin, and the functional consequences of this phenomenon. These discoveries suggest unidirectional flow was present in the common diapsid ancestor and are inconsistent with the traditional paradigm that unidirectional flow is an adaptation for supporting high rates of gas exchange. Instead, these discoveries suggest it may serve functions such as decreasing the work of breathing, decreasing evaporative respiratory water loss, reducing rates of heat loss, and facilitating crypsis. The divergence in the design of the respiratory system between unidirectionally ventilated lungs and tidally ventilated lungs, such as those found in mammals, is very old, with a minimum date for the divergence in the Permian Period. From this foundation, the avian and mammalian lineages evolved very different respiratory systems. I suggest the difference in design is due to the same selective pressure, expanded aerobic capacity, acting under different environmental conditions. High levels of atmospheric oxygen of the Permian Period relaxed selection for a thin blood-gas barrier and may have resulted in the homogeneous, broncho-alveolar design, whereas the reduced oxygen of the Mesozoic selected for a heterogeneous lung with an extremely thin blood-gas barrier. These differences in lung design may explain the puzzling pattern of ecomorphological diversification of Mesozoic mammals: all were small animals that did not occupy niches requiring a great aerobic capacity. The broncho-alveolar lung and the hypoxia of the Mesozoic may have restricted these mammals from exploiting niches of large body size, where cursorial locomotion can be advantageous, as well as other niches requiring great aerobic capacities, such as those using flapping flight. Furthermore, hypoxia may have exerted positive selection for a parasagittal posture, the diaphragm, and reduced erythrocyte size, innovations that enabled increased rates of ventilation and more rapid rates of diffusion in the lung. PMID:26136540

  1. Experimental evidence of condensation-driven airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P.; Hodnett, M.; Poveda, G.; Burgos Salcedo, J. D.; Peña, C.

    2015-10-01

    The dominant "convection" model of atmospheric circulation is based on the premise that hot air expands and rises, to be replaced by colder air, thereby creating horizontal surface winds. A recent theory put forward by Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007, 2013) maintains that the primary motive force of atmospheric circulation derives from the intense condensation and sharp pressure reduction that is associated with regions where a high rate of evapotranspiration from natural closed-canopy forests provides the "fuel" for cloud formation. The net result of the "biotic pump" theory is that moist air flows from ocean to land, drawn in by the pressure changes associated with a high rate of condensation. To test the physics underpinning the biotic pump theory, namely that condensation of water vapour, at a sufficiently high rate, results in an uni-directional airflow, a 5 m tall experimental apparatus was designed and built, in which a 20 m3 body of atmospheric air is enclosed inside an annular 14 m long space (a "square donut") around which it can circulate freely, allowing for rotary air flows. One vertical side of the apparatus contains some 17 m of copper refrigeration coils, which cause condensation. The apparatus contains a series of sensors measuring temperature, humidity and barometric pressure every five seconds, and air flow every second. The laws of Newtonian physics are used in calculating the rate of condensation inside the apparatus. The results of more than one hundred experiments show a highly significant correlation, with r2 > 0.9, of airflow and the rate of condensation. The rotary air flows created appear to be consistent both in direction and velocity with the biotic pump hypothesis, the critical factor being the rate change in the partial pressure of water vapour in the enclosed body of atmospheric air. Air density changes, in terms of kinetic energy, are found to be orders of magnitude smaller than the kinetic energy of partial pressure change. The consistency of the laboratory experiments, in confirming the physics of the biotic pump, has profound implications for current mathematical climate models, not just in terms of predicting the consequences of widespread deforestation, but also for better understanding the atmospheric processes which lead to air mass convection.

  2. Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems

    E-print Network

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Delp, Woody

    2002-01-01

    dampers for OA, recirculation air, and exhaust air to obtainrecirculation and exhaust dampers, and a precision “reference” airflow meter upstream of the location of airducts Exhaust damper Turning vanes Recirculation air damper,

  3. Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Delp, Woody

    2002-10-01

    During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outside air into HVAC systems. This document describes one particular technology for measuring these airflows, a system and a related protocol developed to evaluate this and similar measurement technologies under conditions without wind, and the results of our evaluations. We conclude that the measurement technology evaluated can provide a reasonably accurate measurement of OA flow rate over a broad range of flow, without significantly increasing airflow resistance.

  4. Dynamics of airflow in a short inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Bates, A. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Cetto, R.; Calmet, H.; Gambaruto, A. M.; Tolley, N. S.; Houzeaux, G.; Schroter, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    During a rapid inhalation, such as a sniff, the flow in the airways accelerates and decays quickly. The consequences for flow development and convective transport of an inhaled gas were investigated in a subject geometry extending from the nose to the bronchi. The progress of flow transition and the advance of an inhaled non-absorbed gas were determined using highly resolved simulations of a sniff 0.5 s long, 1 l s?1 peak flow, 364 ml inhaled volume. In the nose, the distribution of airflow evolved through three phases: (i) an initial transient of about 50 ms, roughly the filling time for a nasal volume, (ii) quasi-equilibrium over the majority of the inhalation, and (iii) a terminating phase. Flow transition commenced in the supraglottic region within 20 ms, resulting in large-amplitude fluctuations persisting throughout the inhalation; in the nose, fluctuations that arose nearer peak flow were of much reduced intensity and diminished in the flow decay phase. Measures of gas concentration showed non-uniform build-up and wash-out of the inhaled gas in the nose. At the carina, the form of the temporal concentration profile reflected both shear dispersion and airway filling defects owing to recirculation regions. PMID:25551147

  5. Dynamics of airflow in a short inhalation.

    PubMed

    Bates, A J; Doorly, D J; Cetto, R; Calmet, H; Gambaruto, A M; Tolley, N S; Houzeaux, G; Schroter, R C

    2015-01-01

    During a rapid inhalation, such as a sniff, the flow in the airways accelerates and decays quickly. The consequences for flow development and convective transport of an inhaled gas were investigated in a subject geometry extending from the nose to the bronchi. The progress of flow transition and the advance of an inhaled non-absorbed gas were determined using highly resolved simulations of a sniff 0.5 s long, 1 l s?¹ peak flow, 364 ml inhaled volume. In the nose, the distribution of airflow evolved through three phases: (i) an initial transient of about 50 ms, roughly the filling time for a nasal volume, (ii) quasi-equilibrium over the majority of the inhalation, and (iii) a terminating phase. Flow transition commenced in the supraglottic region within 20 ms, resulting in large-amplitude fluctuations persisting throughout the inhalation; in the nose, fluctuations that arose nearer peak flow were of much reduced intensity and diminished in the flow decay phase. Measures of gas concentration showed non-uniform build-up and wash-out of the inhaled gas in the nose. At the carina, the form of the temporal concentration profile reflected both shear dispersion and airway filling defects owing to recirculation regions. PMID:25551147

  6. Development of an Ultrasonic Airflow Measurement Device for Ducted Air

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Andrew B.; Aslam, Nauman; Underwood, Christopher P.; Danaher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS) when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a “V” shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC) and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers. PMID:25954952

  7. Soil vapor extraction in sandy soils: influence of airflow rate.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, José Tomás; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria da Conceição M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2008-11-01

    Airflow rate is one of the most important parameters for the soil vapor extraction of contaminated sites, due to its direct influence on the mass transfer occurring during the remediation process. This work reports the study of airflow rate influence on soil vapor extractions, performed in sandy soils contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene. The objectives were: (i) to analyze the influence of airflow rate on the process; (ii) to develop a methodology to predict the remediation time and the remediation efficiency; and (iii) to select the most efficient airflow rate. For dry sandy soils with negligible contents of clay and natural organic matter, containing the contaminants previously cited, it was concluded that: (i) if equilibrium between the pollutants and the different phases present in the soil matrix was reached and if slow diffusion effects did not occur, higher airflow rates exhibited the fastest remediations, (ii) it was possible to predict the remediation time and the efficiency of remediation with errors below 14%; and (iii) the most efficient remediation were reached with airflow rates below 1.2 cm(3)s(-1) standard temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:18804838

  8. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  9. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  10. Laminar-flow wind tunnel experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.; Harris, Charles D.; Sewall, William G.; Stack, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Although most of the laminar flow airfoils recently developed at the NASA Langley Research Center were intended for general aviation applications, low-drag airfoils were designed for transonic speeds and wind tunnel performance tested. The objective was to extend the technology of laminar flow to higher Mach and Reynolds numbers and to swept leading edge wings representative of transport aircraft to achieve lower drag and significantly improved operation costs. This research involves stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (Natural Laminar Flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (Laminar-Flow Control, LFC), either through discrete slots or perforated surface. Results show that extensive regions of laminar flow with large reductions in skin friction drag can be maintained through the application of passive NLF boundary-layer control technologies to unswept transonic wings. At even greater extent of laminar flow and reduction in the total drag level can be obtained on a swept supercritical airfoil with active boundary layer-control.

  11. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  12. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  13. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and applied to actual systems for performance validation. The results of the theoretical analysis, numeric simulations, and experiments show that the optimal control algorithms can automatically identify the minimum rate of heating airflow under actual working conditions. Improved control helps to stabilize room air temperatures. The vertical difference in the room air temperature was lower than the comfort value. Measurements of room CO2 levels indicate that when the minimum airflow set point was reduced it did not adversely affect the indoor air quality. According to the measured energy results, optimal control algorithms give a lower rate of reheating energy consumption than conventional controls.

  14. Development of In-Situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement 

    E-print Network

    Liu, G.; Joo, I. S.; Song, L.; Liu, M.

    2003-01-01

    -situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement Guopeng Liu, Ik-Seong Joo, Li Song, Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska ABSTRACT Fan airflow is the key parameter for air volume tracking control..., it is very important to find an effective way to measure the airflow accurately. An airflow control named VSD volumetric tracking (VSDVT) has been developed by Liu [13] recently. This method uses fan airflow station to control the fan airflow. The fan...

  15. Airflow studies in a forced ventilated chamber with low partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.K.; Tsui, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    A climate chamber was used to study experimentally the airflow characteristics in a ventilated space with low partitions. Two types of commonly used air distribution devices were selected for the study--a ceiling diffuser and side grille systems. A total of 16 tests were performed using the two diffusers with partition heights varying up to 1.8 m (5.91 ft) above floor level. From the measured results, the thermal comfort indices were assessed. A stabilization effect of airflow was found when the partition height reached 1.8 m (5.91 ft). Local draft risk was located in the occupied zone. Also, the modified Archimedes number proposed by Jackman (1990) was used to describe the indoor airflow in the absence of a workable design guide for partitioned spaces.

  16. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  17. Unidirectional pulmonary airflow patterns in the savannah monitor lizard.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Emma R; Cieri, Robert L; Butler, James P; Farmer, C G

    2014-02-20

    The unidirectional airflow patterns in the lungs of birds have long been considered a unique and specialized trait associated with the oxygen demands of flying, their endothermic metabolism and unusual pulmonary architecture. However, the discovery of similar flow patterns in the lungs of crocodilians indicates that this character is probably ancestral for all archosaurs--the group that includes extant birds and crocodilians as well as their extinct relatives, such as pterosaurs and dinosaurs. Unidirectional flow in birds results from aerodynamic valves, rather than from sphincters or other physical mechanisms, and similar aerodynamic valves seem to be present in crocodilians. The anatomical and developmental similarities in the primary and secondary bronchi of birds and crocodilians suggest that these structures and airflow patterns may be homologous. The origin of this pattern is at least as old as the split between crocodilians and birds, which occurred in the Triassic period. Alternatively, this pattern of flow may be even older; this hypothesis can be tested by investigating patterns of airflow in members of the outgroup to birds and crocodilians, the Lepidosauromorpha (tuatara, lizards and snakes). Here we demonstrate region-specific unidirectional airflow in the lungs of the savannah monitor lizard (Varanus exanthematicus). The presence of unidirectional flow in the lungs of V.?exanthematicus thus gives rise to two possible evolutionary scenarios: either unidirectional airflow evolved independently in archosaurs and monitor lizards, or these flow patterns are homologous in archosaurs and V.?exanthematicus, having evolved only once in ancestral diapsids (the clade encompassing snakes, lizards, crocodilians and birds). If unidirectional airflow is plesiomorphic for Diapsida, this respiratory character can be reconstructed for extinct diapsids, and evolved in a small ectothermic tetrapod during the Palaeozoic era at least a hundred million years before the origin of birds. PMID:24336209

  18. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 3 of the Symposium proceedings contains papers addressing advanced airfoil development, flight research experiments, and supersonic transition/laminar flow control research. Specific topics include the design and testing of natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils, NLF wing gloves, and NLF nacelles; laminar boundary-layer stability over fuselage forebodies; the design of low noise supersonic/hypersonic wind tunnels; and boundary layer instability mechanisms on swept leading edges at supersonic speeds.

  19. Airflow induced vibration of the Si-IT prototype

    E-print Network

    Dijkstra, H; De Aguiar, V; Rigo, V

    2014-01-01

    In this note we present the results of air-flow induced vibration tests performed on mechanical prototypes of the Si option of the Inner Tracker upgrade. We made a modal analyze where we observed the eigenfrequency of the Si-ladder structure at ?30 Hz as previously measured at CERN. Flowing dry-air to cool the prototypes we do not observe a lock-in state of the vortex induced vibration (VIV). The maximum observed vibration amplitude is calculated. We conclude that the VIV excites the eigenfrequency almost independently from the air-flow speed, and with an amplitude which does not damage the structure.

  20. A faster 'transition' to laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Waggoner, E. G.; Harvey, W. D.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A discussion is given of the ongoing research related to laminar flow airfoils, nacelles, and wings where the laminar flow is maintained by a favorable pressure gradient, surface suction or a combination of the two. Design methologies for natural laminar flow airfoil sections and wings for both low and high speed applications are outlined. Tests of a 7-foot chord, 23-deg sweep laminar flow-control airfoil at high subsonic Mach numbers are described, along with the associated stability theory used to design the suction system. The state-of-the-art of stability theory is simply stated and a typical calculation illustrated. In addition, recent computer simulations of transition using the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are briefly described. Advances in wind tunnel capabilities and instrumentation will be reviewed, followed by the presentation of a few results from both wind tunnels and flight. Finally, some suggestions for future work will complete the paper.

  1. Laminar Flow Control Flight Experiment Design 

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Aaron 1975-

    2012-11-29

    this envelope, flight conditions are determined which meet evaluation criteria for minimum lift coefficient and crossflow transition location. The angle of attack data band is determined, and the natural laminar flow characteristics are evaluated. Finally, DRE...

  2. Literature Review of Airflow Fluid Characteristics and their Impact on Human Thermal Comfort 

    E-print Network

    Zhao, R.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, N.; Di, H.

    2006-01-01

    Airflow dynamics significantly impact indoor thermal environment and human thermal comfort. Studies on the effects of airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort mainly focus on the effects of turbulence intensity and fluctuation frequency...

  3. Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2

    E-print Network

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2 Mingang Jin1. Introduction33 Whole-building airflow simulations are required in applications such as natural ventilation34 design, coupled building airflow and energy simulation, smoke control, and air quality diagnosis35

  4. Precipitation hydrometeor type relative to the mesoscale airflow in mature

    E-print Network

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Precipitation hydrometeor type relative to the mesoscale airflow in mature oceanic deep convection, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA Abstract Composite analysis of mature near within mature MCSs. In the convective region, moderate rain occurs within the updraft core; the heaviest

  5. Study of Airflow Out of the Mouth During Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catford, J.C.; And Others

    Airflow outside the mouth is diagnostic of articulatory activities in the vocal tract, both total volume-velocity and the distribution of particle velocities over the flow-front being useful for this purpose. A system for recording and displaying both these types of information is described. This consists of a matrix of l6 hot-wire anemometer flow…

  6. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  7. Quantitative measurements of airflow inside a nuclear laboratory.

    PubMed

    Whicker, J J; Baker, G D; Wasiolek, P T

    2000-12-01

    Dispersion dynamics of accidentally released radioactive aerosols or gases through laboratory workrooms are determined primarily by airflow, which impacts the level of human exposure and the response of air monitoring instrumentation. Therefore, applying conclusions derived from measurements of the fundamental aspects of airflow (velocity, direction, and turbulence) can lead to better protection of workers by suggesting appropriate locations for air monitoring and sampling. Historically, it has been very difficult to quantitatively measure these fundamental aspects of indoor airflow because of the low flow rates (often <10 cm s(-1)) and difficulties in quantitative measurement of three-dimensional airflow. Recent advances in sonic anemometry have enabled such measurements. For this study, a sonic anemometer was used that was capable of measuring airflow velocities with a sensitivity of about 0.5 cm s(-1) for each of the three-directional components. A sampling frequency of 1 Hz was selected to measure the fluctuations in the air velocity associated with turbulence and expressed in terms of "turbulence intensity." Point measurements of airflow velocities, directions, and turbulence intensities were made at 69 locations in a mechanically ventilated plutonium laboratory located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the measurements were not made with workers present, all measurements were made at a height of 1.5 m, approximately the height of a worker's breathing zone (BZ). Velocities ranged from 8 cm s(-1) to 41 cm s(-1), with a median velocity of 18 cm s(-1). Percent turbulence intensities ranged from 13% to 57% with a median of 34%. The measured velocities and turbulence intensities in the laboratory showed that forced convective flows and turbulent eddy diffusion drive dispersion of released aerosols or gases. Results show that after an airborne release, mixing within the room can take minutes and may not always be complete. This is contrary to simplifying assumptions made by some risk modeling of accidentally released materials in a room. Our results also suggest that the mixing pattern would not be omnidirectional at most release locations, especially in the early stages of the release. Finally, airflow directions were upwards in breathing zones at most workstations. Because most releases in the plutonium laboratory occur at a height immediately below the BZ, the concentrated aerosol could be lifted into the BZ, followed by dispersal to the air monitor with the initiation of alarm. PMID:11089809

  8. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  9. Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Apurba K.; Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2011-02-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effect of the presence of water vapor on the laminar flame speeds of moist syngas/air mixtures using the counterflow twin-flame configuration. The experimental results presented here are for fuel lean syngas mixtures with molar percentage of hydrogen in the hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture varying from 5% to 100%, for an unburned mixture temperature of 323 K, and under atmospheric pressure. At a given equivalence ratio, the effect of varying amount of water vapor addition on the measured laminar flame speed is demonstrated. The experimental laminar flame speeds are also compared with computed values using chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature. It is found that laminar flame speed varies non-monotonically with addition of water for the carbon monoxide rich mixtures. It first increases with increasing amount of water addition, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. An integrated reaction path analysis is further conducted to understand the controlling mechanism responsible for the non-monotonic variation in laminar flame speed due to water addition. On the other hand, for higher values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio the laminar flame speed monotonically decreases with increasing water addition. It is shown that the competition between the chemical and thermal effects of water addition leads to the observed response. Furthermore, reaction rate sensitivity analysis as well as binary diffusion coefficient sensitivity analysis are conducted to identify the possible sources of discrepancy between the experimental and predicted values. The sensitivity results indicate that the reaction rate constant of H{sub 2}+OH = H{sub 2}O+H is worth revisiting and refinement of binary diffusion coefficient data of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O pairs can be considered. (author)

  10. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  11. Efficient airflow design for cleanrooms improves business bottom lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2003-01-05

    Based on a review of airflow design factors and in-situ energy measurements in ISO Cleanliness Class-5 cleanrooms, this paper addresses the importance of energy efficiency in airflow design and opportunities of cost savings in cleanroom practices. The paper discusses design factors that can long lastingly affect cleanroom system performance, and demonstrates benefits of energy efficient cleanroom design from viewpoints of environmental control and business operations. The paper suggests that a high performance cleanroom should not only be effective in contamination control, but also be efficient in energy and environmental performance. The paper also suggests that energy efficient design practice stands to bring in immediate capital cost savings and operation cost savings, and should be regarded by management as a strategy to improve business bottom lines.

  12. Severe airflow obstruction in vertically acquired HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Calligaro, Gregory L; Esmail, Aliasgar; Gray, Diane M

    2014-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, either independently or in concert with opportunistic infections like pulmonary tuberculosis, is a risk factor for the development of chronic airflow limitation. In the majority of patients the etiology of this obstructive ventilatory defect is multifactorial. Post-infectious obliterative bronchiolitis, post-tuberculous lung damage (including bronchiectasis), immune reconstitution and the direct effects of HIV viral infection may all play a role. With increases in life expectancy and decreases in infectious complications in patients taking antiretroviral medications, the importance of HIV-associated chronic lung disease as a cause of pulmonary disability is likely to increase. This is particularly relevant in regions like sub-Saharan Africa, where both HIV infection and tuberculosis are highly prevalent. Here, to illustrate the complexity of this interaction, we present the case of a 15-year-old girl with vertically acquired HIV infection, multiple episodes of pulmonary infection, and severe airflow obstruction. PMID:25530862

  13. Computational Investigation of Dynamic Glottal Aperture Effects on Respiratory Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yan, Hong; Dong, Haibo

    2008-11-01

    The periodic movement of the glottal aperture (vocal folds) during tidal breathing has been long recognized as a factor in altering the airflow dynamics in the tracheobrnchial region. The potential influence from these altered flow structures on the transport and deposition of inhaled particles is not known. However, studies devoted to this dynamic physiological feature are scarce due to the complex anatomy in of the larynx and numerical challenges in simulating dynamic geometries. In this study, a high-fidelity immersed boundary solver is used to investigate this problem. A 3D human oral-larynx-lung model is firstly reconstructed from MRI data. The role of the vocal fold movement and associated airflow characteristics such as vortex shedding, Coanda effect etc. during inhalation and exhalation are then numerically studied.

  14. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  15. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  16. Airflow calibration of a bellmouth inlet for measurement of compressor airflow in turbine-powered propulsion simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The development of turbine-powered propulsion simulators for high-speed wind tunnel models requires a bellmouth inlet which can accurately measure compressor-inlet airflow. A bellmouth inlet was instrumented with total pressure probes, static pressure probes, and thermocouples for airflow measurement. The bellmouth flowmeter against a critical venturi flowmeter was calibrated. The calibration was done at four inlet pressures ranging from 58 to 114 kPa. The bellmouth discharge coefficient varied as a function of bellmouth-throat Mach number. Over the range of Reynolds number and Mach number tested the Reynolds number was not a significant influence on the discharge coefficient. The overall accuracy of the bellmouth inlet as a flowmeter was estimated to be + or - 0.5% of the flowmeter reading.

  17. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, NASA, industry, and universities have worked together to conduct important research focused at developing laminar flow technology that could reduce fuel consumption for general aviation, commuter, and transport aircraft by as much as 40 to 50 percent. The symposium was planned in view of the recent accomplishments within the areas of laminar flow control and natural laminar flow, and the potential benefits of laminar flow technology to the civil and military aircraft communities in the United States. Included were technical sessions on advanced theory and design tool development; wind tunnel and flight research; transition measurement and detection techniques; low and high Reynolds number research; and subsonic and supersonic research.

  18. Spiral Laminar Flow: A revolution in understanding?

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    Blood Flow Spiral laminar flow #12;Spiral flow in the Aorta (MRI) Computational Fluid Dynamics 0 10 20 = Stent failure Turbulence associated with: - Altered wall shear stress - Damage lining artery - Cellular downstream intimal thickening Results -Downstream Disease Progression #12;Summary Spiral Stent Turbulence

  19. Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (LEFR) is a modular, lab scale, single-user reactor for the study of catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP). This system can be employed to study a variety of reactor conditions for both in situ and ex situ CFP.

  20. Real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field by use of digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianglei; Wu, Bingjing; Chen, Xin; Liu, Junjiang; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin

    2013-04-01

    The measurement and analysis of airflow field is very important in fluid dynamics. For airflow, smoke particles can be added to visually observe the turbulence phenomena by particle tracking technology, but the effect of smoke particles to follow the high speed airflow will reduce the measurement accuracy. In recent years, with the advantage of non-contact, nondestructive, fast and full-field measurement, digital holography has been widely applied in many fields, such as deformation and vibration analysis, particle characterization, refractive index measurement, and so on. In this paper, we present a method to measure the airflow field by use of digital holography. A small wind tunnel model made of acrylic glass is built to control the velocity and direction of airflow. Different shapes of samples such as aircraft wing and cylinder are placed in the wind tunnel model to produce different forms of flow field. With a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup, a series of digital holograms carrying the information of airflow filed distributions in different states are recorded by CCD camera and corresponding holographic images are numerically reconstructed from the holograms by computer. Then we can conveniently obtain the velocity or pressure information of the airflow deduced from the quantitative phase information of holographic images and visually display the airflow filed and its evolution in the form of a movie. The theory and experiment results show that digital holography is a robust and feasible approach for real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field.

  1. Optimal determination of respiratory airflow patterns using a nonlinear multicompartment model for a lung mechanics system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hancao; Haddad, Wassim M

    2012-01-01

    We develop optimal respiratory airflow patterns using a nonlinear multicompartment model for a lung mechanics system. Specifically, we use classical calculus of variations minimization techniques to derive an optimal airflow pattern for inspiratory and expiratory breathing cycles. The physiological interpretation of the optimality criteria used involves the minimization of work of breathing and lung volume acceleration for the inspiratory phase, and the minimization of the elastic potential energy and rapid airflow rate changes for the expiratory phase. Finally, we numerically integrate the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value problems to determine the optimal airflow patterns over the inspiratory and expiratory breathing cycles. PMID:22719793

  2. Evaluation of different airflow sensors at the WIPP facility

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, K.; Duckworth, I.J.; Prosser, B.S.

    1999-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an US Department of Energy underground disposal facility designed to permanently and safely isolate US defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste. The underground ventilation system is engineered to minimize the release of radioactive contamination to the environment in the event of an accident. During 1994 an extensive ventilation remote monitoring and control system was installed. It consists of fifteen air velocity sensors, eight differential pressure stations, automated control features on key underground air regulators, and eight psychrometric stations. The airflow monitoring component of the system has been a problem since the original installation. Due to the WIPP's variable airflow capabilities, the air velocity sensors required extensive and time-consuming re-calibration to make the sensors read out volumetric flow, rather than the point or line values, which they were factory calibrated for. Problems with the hardware made the process difficult. Furthermore, once re-calibrated the durability and reliability of the units were inconsistent, and often unacceptable. Two new types of airflow sensors were tested; one or both of which will ultimately replace the old units. The tested sensors were an ultrasonic-type device (FloSonic), and a warm body, mass flow unit (Airboss*200W) (a re-engineered version of the previous units). Recommendations were made regarding which type of sensor to install at specific locations. These decisions were based on the conditions at each sensor location and the relative strengths of the two sensor types. Installation, field calibration methodology, test procedures, main results and recommendations are discussed.

  3. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P; Wilk, Jemma B; Wain, Louise V; Brody, Jennifer A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M; Strachan, David P; Deary, Ian J; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F; North, Kari E; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R; Jarvis, Deborah L; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Hall, Ian P; Parks, William C; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease. PMID:26395457

  4. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K T; Monticello, T M

    1990-01-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:2200663

  5. Masks for influenza patients: measurement of airflow from the mouth.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Sakae; Matsudaira, Yasuaki; Sugihara, Yoshibumi

    2006-06-01

    In case of a new influenza pandemic, provision of masks to coughing patients could be used to slow expansion of the epidemic. To quantitatively assess the efficacy of different masks, we used an ultrasonic anemometer to measure the velocity of airflow from the mouth in coughing. We found that even the cheapest paper masks reduced the air speed to less than 1/10, implicating their effectiveness in decreasing viral spread. We therefore propose that governments provide free masks to coughing patients in the general population upon the emergence of a new human influenza virus. PMID:16785699

  6. Evaluation of airflow patterns in 2706-T and 2706-TA

    SciTech Connect

    DEROSA, D.C.

    1999-08-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the current placement of fixed head air samplers and continuous air monitors (CAMs) in the 2706-T and 2706-TA Complex. The airflow study consisted of 6 configurations of facility HVAC and HEPA filtration equipment to determine impacts on CAM location. The results of this study provide recommendations based on guidance in DOE G 411.1-8 and NUREG-1400 for placement of fixed head air samplers or CAMS within 2706-T and 2706-TA.

  7. Determining compressor-inlet airflow in the compact multimission aircraft propulsion simulators in wind-tunnel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    Test techniques are being developed to use the Compact Multimission Aircraft Propulsion Simulator (CMAPS) in wind-tunnel tests. The CMAPS allows simultaneous simulation of inlet and exhaust flow fields. Static tests have been conducted to acquire CMAPS performance data and to evaluate four methods of determining compressor inlet airflow during wind-tunnel tests. The first method measures airflow at the compressor face; the second measures airflow in the compressor discharge duct; the third deduces the compressor airflow from the calibrated nozzle, turbine supply, and turbine bleed airflows; and the fourth correlates compressor airflow with the mixer pressure. Test results and the advantages, disadvantages, and expected accuracy of each method are discussed.

  8. Microfluidic fuel cell based on laminar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choban, Eric R.; Markoski, Larry J.; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    This paper discusses a novel microfluidic fuel cell concept that utilizes the occurrence of multi-stream laminar flow at the microscale to keep the fuel and oxidant streams separated yet in diffusional contact. The system consists of a Y-shaped microfluidic channel in which two liquid streams containing fuel and oxidant merge and continue to flow laminarly in parallel between two catalyst-covered electrodes on opposing walls without turbulent mixing. Preliminary results indicate that this novel fuel cell concept may lead to the development of efficient room temperature power sources of microscopic dimensions that are comparable or better in performance than conventional polymer-electrolyte-membrane based microfuel cells that typically operate between 60 and 80 °C.

  9. Insect contamination protection for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, Cynthia C.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of modern aircraft surfaces to achieve laminar flow was well-accepted in recent years. Obtaining the maximum benefit of laminar flow for aircraft drag reduction requires maintaining minimum leading-edge contamination. Previously proposed insect contamination prevention methods have proved impractical due to cost, weight, or inconvenience. Past work has shown that insects will not adhere to water-wetted surfaces, but the large volumes of water required for protection rendered such a system impractical. The results of a flight experiment conducted by NASA to evaluate the performance of a porous leading-edge fluid discharge ice protection system operated as an insect contamination protections system are presented. In addition, these flights explored the environmental and atmospheric conditions most suitable for insect accumulation.

  10. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S.; Smith, B. L.; Martin, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  11. Natural laminar flow hits smoother air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Natural laminar flow (NLF) may be attained in aircraft with lower cost, weight, and maintenance penalties than active flow laminarization by means of a slot suction system. A high performance general aviation jet aircraft possessing a moderate degree of NLF over wing, fuselage, empennage and engine nacelles will accrue a 24 percent reduction in total aircraft drag in the cruise regime. NASA-Langley has conducted NLF research centered on the use of novel airfoil profiles as well as composite and milled aluminum alloy construction methods which minimize three-dimensional aerodynamic surface roughness and waviness. It is noted that higher flight altitudes intrinsically reduce unit Reynolds numbers, thereby minimizing turbulence for a given cruise speed.

  12. Flight research on natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Obara, C. J.; Vandam, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    Five decades of flight experiences with natural laminar flow (NLF) have provided a basis of understanding how this technology can be used for reduction of viscous drag on modern practical aircraft. The effects of cruise unit Reynolds number on NLF achievability and maintainability; compressibility effects on Tollmein-Schlichting growth; flight experiment on the Cessna Citation III business jet; flight instrumentation on Lear 28/29; OV-I NLF engine nacelle experiments; and viscous drag reduction are examined.

  13. Flight research on natural laminar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Obara, C. J.; Vandam, C. P.

    1986-12-01

    Five decades of flight experiences with natural laminar flow (NLF) have provided a basis of understanding how this technology can be used for reduction of viscous drag on modern practical aircraft. The effects of cruise unit Reynolds number on NLF achievability and maintainability; compressibility effects on Tollmein-Schlichting growth; flight experiment on the Cessna Citation III business jet; flight instrumentation on Lear 28/29; OV-I NLF engine nacelle experiments; and viscous drag reduction are examined.

  14. Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinders, Mark; Dickinson, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a 'trans-laminar' fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in 'stitched laminates', or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in 'Z-Fiber(TM) materials. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode 1 (double cantilever beam) and mode 2 (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. TLR directly supports the 'Achilles heel' of laminated composites, that is delamination. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models of 'unit cells', or representative volumes, were used to study the effects of adding TLR on the elastic constants; the in-plane strength; and the initiation of delamination. Parameters investigated included TLR material, TLR volume fraction, TLR diameter, TLR through-thickness angle, ply stacking sequence, and the microstructural features of pure resin regions and curved in-plane fibers. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. An inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest, a flanged skin in bending, was also modeled.

  15. Airflow control by non-thermal plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Active flow control is a topic in full expansion due to associated industrial applications of huge importance, particularly for aeronautics. Among all flow control methods, such as the use of mechanical flaps, wall synthetic jets or MEMS, plasma-based devices are very promising. The main advantages of such systems are their robustness, simplicity, low power consumption and ability for real-time control at high frequency. This paper is a review of the worldwide works on this topic, from its origin to the present. It is divided into two main parts. The first one is dedicated to the recent knowledge concerning the electric wind induced by surface non-thermal plasma actuators, acting in air at atmospheric pressure. Typically, it can reach 8 m s-1 at a distance of 0.5 mm from the wall. In the second part, works concerning active airflow control by these plasma actuators are presented. Very efficient results have been obtained for low-velocity subsonic airflows (typically U? <= 30 m s-1 and Reynolds number of a few 105), and promising results at higher velocities indicate that plasma actuators could be used in aeronautics.

  16. Forced-air patient warming blankets disrupt unidirectional airflow.

    PubMed

    Legg, A J; Hamer, A J

    2013-03-01

    We have recently shown that waste heat from forced-air warming blankets can increase the temperature and concentration of airborne particles over the surgical site. The mechanism for the increased concentration of particles and their site of origin remained unclear. We therefore attempted to visualise the airflow in theatre over a simulated total knee replacement using neutral-buoyancy helium bubbles. Particles were created using a Rocket PS23 smoke machine positioned below the operating table, a potential area of contamination. The same theatre set-up, warming devices and controls were used as in our previous study. This demonstrated that waste heat from the poorly insulated forced-air warming blanket increased the air temperature on the surgical side of the drape by > 5°C. This created convection currents that rose against the downward unidirectional airflow, causing turbulence over the patient. The convection currents increased the particle concentration 1000-fold (2 174 000 particles/m(3) for forced-air warming vs 1000 particles/m(3) for radiant warming and 2000 particles/m(3) for the control) by drawing potentially contaminated particles from below the operating table into the surgical site. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:407-10. PMID:23450029

  17. Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect Haipeng Guo,1

    E-print Network

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect Haipeng Guo,1 Jiu J. Jiao,1 and Edwin P. Weeks2 by airflow induced by an advancing wetting front during highly intensive rains. The rainwater, which may no relationship to groundwater recharge, can be induced when various factors such as soil properties and the rain

  18. Simplified Models for Exhaled Airflow from a Cough with the Mouth Covered

    E-print Network

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simplified Models for Exhaled Airflow from a Cough with the Mouth Covered Chun Chen1 , Chao: (765) 496-0539, Email: yanchen@purdue.edu Abstract Covering a cough can be useful in reducing for predicting the exhaled airflow from a cough with the mouth covered. This investigation used smoke

  19. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  3. Performance of Supply Airflow Entrainment for Particles in an Underfloor Air Distribution System 

    E-print Network

    Li, C.; Li, N.

    2006-01-01

    to be studied, because airflow can bring theses particle to the human breathing zone. In this paper, the performance of the airflow field in a UFAD system and the characteristics of supply air entrainment for particles are studied. A physical and numerical...

  4. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  5. One-dimensional airflow in unsaturated zone induced by periodic water table fluctuation

    E-print Network

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    One-dimensional airflow in unsaturated zone induced by periodic water table fluctuation Hailong Li1 zone induced by periodic water table fluctuation, Water Resour. Res., 41, W04007, doi:10.1029/2004WR airflow driven by fluctuating water table within the lower layer of a coastal two-layered system

  6. Laminar flame speed of methane- air mixtures at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altag Yousif, Alaeldeen; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study on spherically expanding flames propagation of methane- air mixtures was conducted at constant pressure to measure unstretched laminar flame speeds, laminar burning velocity and flame stretch. The mixtures were ignited at equivalence ratios of 0.7, 0.9 and 1.0, under ambient pressure and temperature. It was found that the unstretched laminar burning velocity increased with the equivalence ratio. The flame propagation speed showed different trends at different equivalence ratio for tested mixtures.

  7. Differently patterned airflows induced by 1-kHz femtosecond laser filaments in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liang, Hong; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Wei, Yingxia; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-11-01

    Airflow induced by femtosecond laser (800 nm/1 kHz/25 fs) filamentation with different lengths was investigated in a laboratory cloud chamber. Various filament lengths were generated by adjusting laser energy and lens focal length. It was found that airflow patterns are closely related to filament intensity and length. Intense and long filaments are beneficial in updraft generation with large vortices above the filament, while intense and short filaments tend to promote the formation of well-contacted vortices below the filament. Differently patterned airflows induced elliptical snow piles with different masses. We simulated airflow in a cloud chamber numerically taking laser filaments as heat sources. The mechanisms of differently patterned airflow and snow formation induced by filaments were discussed.

  8. Differently patterned airflows induced by 1-kHz femtosecond laser filaments in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liang, Hong; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Wei, Yingxia; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-09-01

    Airflow induced by femtosecond laser (800 nm/1 kHz/25 fs) filamentation with different lengths was investigated in a laboratory cloud chamber. Various filament lengths were generated by adjusting laser energy and lens focal length. It was found that airflow patterns are closely related to filament intensity and length. Intense and long filaments are beneficial in updraft generation with large vortices above the filament, while intense and short filaments tend to promote the formation of well-contacted vortices below the filament. Differently patterned airflows induced elliptical snow piles with different masses. We simulated airflow in a cloud chamber numerically taking laser filaments as heat sources. The mechanisms of differently patterned airflow and snow formation induced by filaments were discussed.

  9. Flame Structure and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, D. A.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Recent results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop tower are reported. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in a microgravity laminar ethylene/air flame. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported experiments including the Flight Project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this paper.

  10. Slip-boundary equations for multicomponent nonequilibrium airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface-slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low Reynolds number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations by using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent airflow, includes the finite-rare surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent and binary mixtures and single-species gas. An expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in the absence of slip.

  11. Nonlinear piezoelectric devices for broadband air-flow energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Havránek, Z.; Tofel, P.; Meggs, C.; Hughes, H.; Button, T. W.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents preliminary work on an investigation of a nonlinear air-flow energy harvester integrating magnets and a piezoelectric cantilever array. Two individual piezoelectric cantilevers with the structure of free-standing multi-layer thick-films have been fabricated and assembled with a free-spinning fan. The cantilevers were attached with different tip masses thereby achieving separated resonant frequencies. Also, permanent magnets were fixed onto the blades of the fan as well as the tips of the cantilevers, in order to create nonlinear coupling and transfer fluidic movement into mechanical oscillation. The device has been tested in a wind tunnel. Bifurcations in the spectra of the blade rotation speed of the fan as a function of output voltage have been observed, and a bandwidth (blade rotation speed range) widening effect has been achieved.

  12. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 2 of the Symposium proceedings includes papers addressing various topics in basic wind tunnel research/techniques and computational transitional research. Specific topics include: advanced measurement techniques; laminar flow control; Tollmien-Schlichting wave characteristics; boundary layer transition; flow visualization; wind tunnel tests; flight tests; boundary layer equations; swept wings; and skin friction.

  13. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  14. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect. PMID:16354777

  15. Thermal laminarization of a stratified pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The present work constitutes a new program that grew out of a scoping assessment by ANL to determine the propensity for pipe stratification to occur in the reactor outlet nozzles and hot-leg piping of a generic LMFBR during events producing reverse pipe flow. This paper focuses on the role that thermal buoyancy plays relative to being able to laminarize a turbulent stratified shear zone in a horizontal pipe. The preceeding can influence the behavior of a pipe stratified-backflow-recirculation zone (cold plenum water down into the hot pipe flow) which developes as the result of a temperature difference between the pipe flow and the plenum.

  16. Velocity profiles in laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Margle, Janice M.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity profiles in vertical laminar diffusion flames were measured by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Four fuels were used: n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, and ethyl alcohol. The velocity profiles were similar for all the fuels, although there were some differences in the peak velocities. The data compared favorably with the theoretical velocity predictions. The differences could be attributed to errors in experimental positioning and in the prediction of temperature profiles. Error in the predicted temperature profiles are probably due to the difficulty in predicting the radiative heat losses from the flame.

  17. Geometries for roughness shapes in laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (inventor); Martin, Glenn L. (inventor); Domack, Christopher S. (inventor); Obara, Clifford J. (inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A passive interface mechanism between upper and lower skin structures, and a leading edge structure of a laminar flow airfoil is described. The interface mechanism takes many shapes. All are designed to be different than the sharp orthogonal arrangement prevalent in the prior art. The shapes of the interface structures are generally of two types: steps away from the centerline of the airfoil with a sloping surface directed toward the trailing edge and, the other design has a gap before the sloping surface. By properly shaping the step, the critical step height is increased by more than 50% over the orthogonal edged step.

  18. NASA Flight Tests Explore Supersonic Laminar Flow - Duration: 55 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    In partnership with Aerion Corporation of Reno, Nevada, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Centerâ??s tested supersonic airflow over a small experimental airfoil design on its F-15B Test Bed aircraft du...

  19. Fault tolerant attitude control for small unmanned aircraft systems equipped with an airflow sensor array.

    PubMed

    Shen, H; Xu, Y; Dickinson, B T

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by sensing strategies observed in birds and bats, a new attitude control concept of directly using real-time pressure and shear stresses has recently been studied. It was shown that with an array of onboard airflow sensors, small unmanned aircraft systems can promptly respond to airflow changes and improve flight performances. In this paper, a mapping function is proposed to compute aerodynamic moments from the real-time pressure and shear data in a practical and computationally tractable formulation. Since many microscale airflow sensors are embedded on the small unmanned aircraft system surface, it is highly possible that certain sensors may fail. Here, an adaptive control system is developed that is robust to sensor failure as well as other numerical mismatches in calculating real-time aerodynamic moments. The advantages of the proposed method are shown in the following simulation cases: (i) feedback pressure and wall shear data from a distributed array of 45 airflow sensors; (ii) 50% failure of the symmetrically distributed airflow sensor array; and (iii) failure of all the airflow sensors on one wing. It is shown that even if 50% of the airflow sensors have failures, the aircraft is still stable and able to track the attitude commands. PMID:25405953

  20. Laboratory study of the structure of the airflow and separation above surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Buckley, Marc

    2012-11-01

    The effects of the surface waves on the airflow dynamics greatly influence the flux of momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. While we know that most the surface stress is supported by the wave-coherent stress carried in large part by the small gravity-capillary wind waves, the role of the airflow separation above these small waves is not well understood. We present experimental results on the details of the airflow above surface gravity waves for a several wind speeds, wave ages and slopes. The bulk of the results presented were obtained from a series of laboratory experiments that took place at the University of Delaware's Air-sea interaction facility. Airflow velocities were obtained using high resolution concatenated PIV, and wave profiles and spectra were measured by dual-beam laser-induced fluorescence. We observe direct evidence of intermittent airflow separation past the crest of the wind waves. The separation leads to dramatic along-wave variability in the surface viscous tangential stress which in turn may affect wave growth and the air-water momentum balance. Despite the intermittent aspect of this phenomenon, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the wave phase-locked velocity products suggests that airflow separation generates intense mixing and transport of surface generated vorticity within the airflow. These results hold for wind speeds that would normally be considered low to moderate.

  1. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n?=?3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  2. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n?=?3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  3. Preconditioned Multigrid Simulation of an Axisymmetric Laminar Diffusion Flame \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jun

    the growth of the Krylov iterations. Key words ­ laminar diffusion flame, vorticity­velocity formulationPreconditioned Multigrid Simulation of an Axisymmetric Laminar Diffusion Flame \\Lambda Samir Karaa of an elliptic flame sheet problem. By selecting the generalized minimum residual method as the linear smoother

  4. Orientation Selectivity in Macaque V1: Diversity and Laminar Dependence

    E-print Network

    McLaughlin, David

    Orientation Selectivity in Macaque V1: Diversity and Laminar Dependence Dario L. Ringach,1 Robert M-state orientation selectivity of single neurons in macaque primary visual cortex (V1). To analyze the data, two., 1976; DeValois et al., 1982) and its laminar distribution (Schiller et al., 1976) in macaque V1

  5. Effect of airflow limitation on acute exacerbations in patients with destroyed lungs by tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2015-06-01

    History of treatment for tuberculosis (TB) is a risk factor for obstructive lung disease. However, it has been unclear whether the clinical characteristics of patients with destroyed lung by TB differ according to the presence or absence of airflow limitation. The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in acute exacerbations and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) decline in patients with destroyed lung by TB according to the presence or absence of airflow limitation. We performed a retrospective cohort study and enrolled patients with destroyed lung by TB. The presence of airflow limitation was defined as FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) < 0.7. One hundred and fifty-nine patients were enrolled, and 128 (80.5%) had airflow limitation. The proportion of patients who experienced acute exacerbation was higher in patients with airflow limitation compared to those without (89.1 vs. 67.7%, respectively; P = 0.009). The rate of acute exacerbation was higher in patients with airflow limitation (IRR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.11-1.27). Low body mass index (X vs. X + 1; HR, 0.944; 95% CI, 0.895-0.996) in addition to airflow limitation (HR, 1.634; 95% CI, 1.012-2.638), was an independent risk factor for acute exacerbation. The annual decline of FEV1 was 2 mL in patients with airflow limitation and 36 mL in those without (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the presence of airflow limitation is an independent risk factor for acute exacerbation in patients with the destroyed lung by TB. PMID:26028926

  6. Modified Laminar Flow Biological Safety Cabinet

    PubMed Central

    Mcgarrity, Gerard J.; Coriell, Lewis L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests are reported on a modified laminar flow biological safety cabinet in which the return air plenum that conducts air from the work area to the high efficiency particulate air filters is under negative pressure. Freon gas released inside the cabinet could not be detected outside by a freon gas detection method capable of detecting 10-6 cc/s. When T3 bacteriophage was aerosolized 5 cm outside the front opening in 11 tests, no phage could be detected inside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation. An average of 2.8 × 105 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ft3 (ca. 0.028 m3) were detected with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.0%. Aerosolization 5 cm inside the cabinet yielded an average of 10 PFU/ft3 outside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation and an average of 4.1 × 105 PFU/ft3 with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.002%. These values are the same order of effectiveness as the positive-pressure laminar flow biological safety cabinets previously tested. The advantages of the negative-pressure return plenum design include: (i) assurance that if cracks or leaks develop in the plenum it will not lead to discharge of contaminated air into the laboratory; and (ii) the price is lower due to reduced manufacturing costs. Images PMID:4420479

  7. Series of Laminar Soot Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1350 x 1517 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300183.html.

  8. A Series of Laminar Jet Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (249KB JPEG, 1350 x 1524 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300185.html.

  9. Contact Strength and Cracking of Laminar Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heged?sov'a, Lucia; Ceniga, Ladislav

    2012-04-01

    The paper deals with the determination of strength of laminar ceramics by mechanical tests in bending and contact modes. The bending and contact modes are simulated by the four-point bending test, and by single-cycle contact test using rollers or spheres, respectively. In general, the determination of strength of ceramic materials results from statistical methods which are usually represented by the Weibull analysis. The Weibull analysis comprises the determination of the characteristic strength ?0 and Weibull modulus m. The characteristic strength ?0,bend and ?0,cont as well as the Weibull moduli mbend and mcont, which are related to the four-point bending test and the single-cycle contact test using rollers, are thus determined, respectively. The comparison of numerical results of ?0,bend/?0,cont, mbend/mcont confirms the validity of the Fett's theory. Along with this verification, a microstructural analysis of strength-degrading defects which represent fraction origins is performed for both modes. The determination of the mechanical loading which causes material failure along with an analysis of parameters of cracks are also presented. The contact test using the spheres is also performed at a multi-cycle mode. The mechanical tests were applied to Al2O3-ZTA laminar ceramics (ZTA=60%Al2O3 + 40%ZrO2).

  10. Study on the premixed laminar flames of iso-octane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Hong, Yan-ji; Xu, Qing-yao; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Qi-sheng; Ding, Xiao-yu

    2015-04-01

    Propagation characteristics of premixed laminar iso-octane flames at atmosphere and equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 1.4 are studied in a constant combustion bomb using a schlieren technique, the laminar burning velocity at different initial pressure, temperature, equivalence ratio are calculated through CHEMKIN program. The experimental and calculation results show that the laminar burning velocity of iso-octane rise with the decreasing of initial pressure and rise with the rising of initial temperature . Only changing the initial temperature or pressure ,the maximum laminar burning velocity of iso-octane were both obtained at equivalence ratio 1.1. Flame stability become weak ,when increased the equivalence ratio. The problem of the chemistry reaction mechanism to predict the laminar burning velocity were analysed.

  11. Laminar Premixed and Diffusion Flames (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based studies of soot processes in laminar flames proceeded in two phases, considering laminar premixed flames and laminar diffusion flames, in turn. The test arrangement for laminar premixed flames involved round flat flame burners directed vertically upward at atmospheric pressure. The test arrangement for laminar jet diffusion flames involved a round fuel port directed vertically upward with various hydrocarbon fuels burning at atmospheric pressure in air. In both cases, coflow was used to prevent flame oscillations and measurements were limited to the flame axes. The measurements were sufficient to resolve soot nucleation, growth and oxidation rates, as well as the properties of the environment needed to evaluate mechanisms of these processes. The experimental methods used were also designed to maintain capabilities for experimental methods used in corresponding space-based experiments. This section of the report will be limited to consideration of flame structure for both premixed and diffusion flames.

  12. Data Visualization of Invisible Airflow Hazards During Helicopter Takeoff and Landing Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with unseen airflow hazards near the ground such as vortices, downdrafts, wind shear, microbursts, or other turbulence. While such hazards frequently pose problems to fixed-wing airplanes, they are especially dangerous to helicopters, which often have to operate in confined spaces and under operationally stressful conditions. We are developing flight-deck visualizations of airflow hazards during helicopter takeoff and landing operations, and are evaluating their effectiveness with usability studies. Our hope is.that this work will lead to the production of an airflow hazard detection system for pilots that will save lives.

  13. Systemic leukopenia, evaluation of laminar leukocyte infiltration and laminar lesions in horses with naturally occurring colic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Luciane Maria; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo; Deconto, Ivan; Gonçalves, Kamila Alcala; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano; Brum, Juliana Sperotto; de Brito, Harald Fernando Vicente; de Sousa, Renato Silva

    2015-08-01

    The present study was aimed at identifying laminar lesions and leukocyte infiltration in hoof laminar tissue of horses with colic syndrome and its correlation with the total leukocyte count before death. Six healthy horses were used as control group (CG), and eighteen horses with lethal gastrointestinal disease were divided into two groups: leukopenic group (LG) with seven leukopenic horses, and non-leukopenic group (NLG) with 11 horses with total leukocyte count within reference range for the species. Leukocyte infiltration was examined by immunohistochemistry. Laminar lesions were observed in both LG and NLG, with no differences in severity between them. LG showed increase of the leukocyte infiltration in the hoof laminar tissue, when compared to CG and NLG. Horses with severe colic syndrome (LG and NLG) developed intense laminar lesions without clinical signs of laminitis, with increased leukocyte infiltration. However, the LG demonstrated an even higher increase of leukocyte infiltration compared to both CG and NLG. PMID:26267083

  14. Laminar flow control flight experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Aaron Alexander

    Demonstration of spanwise-periodic discrete roughness element laminar flow control (DRE LFC) technology at operationally relevant flight regimes requires extremely stable flow conditions in flight. A balance must be struck between the capabilities of the host aircraft and the scientific apparatus. A safe, effective, and efficient flight experiment is described to meet the test objectives, a flight test technique is designed to gather research-quality data, flight characteristics are analyzed for data compatibility, and an experiment is designed for data collection and analysis. The objective is to demonstrate DRE effects in a flight environment relevant to transport-category aircraft: [0.67 -- 0.75] Mach number and [17.0M -- 27.5M] Reynolds number. Within this envelope, flight conditions are determined which meet evaluation criteria for minimum lift coefficient and crossflow transition location. The angle of attack data band is determined, and the natural laminar flow characteristics are evaluated. Finally, DRE LFC technology is demonstrated in the angle of attack data band at the specified flight conditions. Within the angle of attack data band, a test angle of attack must be maintained with a tolerance of +/- 0.1° for 15 seconds. A flight test technique is developed that precisely controls angle of attack. Lateral-directional stability characteristics of the host aircraft are exploited to manipulate the position of flight controls near the wing glove. Directional control inputs are applied in conjunction with lateral control inputs to achieve the desired flow conditions. The data are statistically analyzed in a split-plot factorial that produces a system response model in six variables: angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, DRE height, DRE spacing, and the surface roughness of the leading edge. Predictions on aircraft performance are modeled to enable planning tools for efficient flight research while still producing statistically rigorous flight data. The Gulfstream IIB aircraft is determined to be suitable for a laminar flow control wing glove experiment using a low-bank-angle-turn flight test technique to enable precise, repeatable data collection at stabilized flight conditions. Analytical angle of attack models and an experimental design were generated to ensure efficient and effective flight research.

  15. Airflow and nanoparticle deposition in a 16-generation tracheobronchial airway model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to achieve both manageable simulation and local accuracy of airflow and nanoparticle deposition in a representative human tracheobronchial (TB) region, the complex airway network was decomposed into adjustable triple-bifurcation units, spreading axially and laterally. Gi...

  16. Variable Speed Drive Volumetric Tracking (VSDVT) for Airflow Control in Variable Air Volume (VAV) Systems 

    E-print Network

    Liu, M.

    2002-01-01

    drives (VSD) instead of the flow stations. Its performance is studied and compared with the fan tracking (FT) method using model simulations. The VSDVT maintains a constant building pressure and the required outside airflow under all load conditions...

  17. Evaluation of circumferential airflow uniformity entering combustors from compressors. Volume 1: Discussion of data and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shadowen, J. H.; Egan, W. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The compressor discharge airflow uniformity of two compressors from advanced engines, the J58 and F100/F401, was studied. Compressor discharge pressures and temperatures at up to 33 circumferential rake locations allowed the airflow distribution to be ascertained and computer plotted. Several flight conditions and compressor variables, i.e., inlet distortion, modified seals, etc., were analyzed. An unexpectedly high nonuniform airflow was found for both compressors. Circumferential airflow deviation differences of up to 52% from maximum to minimum were found for the J58, and up to 40% for the F100/F401. The effects of aerodynamic and thermal distortion were found to be additive. The data were analyzed for influence of exit guide vane wakes and found free of any effect. Data system errors were small in relation to the measured pressure and temperature variations.

  18. Building ventilation: A pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation

    E-print Network

    Boyer, H; Adelard, L; Mara, T A

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of airflows is of great importance for detailed building thermal simulation computer codes, these airflows most frequently constituting an important thermal coupling between the building and the outside on one hand, and the different thermal zones on the other. The driving effects of air movement, which are the wind and the thermal buoyancy, are briefly outlined and we look closely at their coupling in the case of buildings, by exploring the difficulties associated with large openings. Some numerical problems tied to the resolving of the non-linear system established are also covered. Part of a detailled simulation software (CODYRUN), the numerical implementation of this airflow model is explained, insisting on data organization and processing allowing the calculation of the airflows. Comparisons are then made between the model results and in one hand analytical expressions and in another and experimental measurements in case of a collective dwelling.

  19. Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis

    E-print Network

    Gao, Yang, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

  20. Possible coseismic laminar and non-laminar flow along subduction megathrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Noguchi, K.; Saito, T.; Tsutsumi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coseismic deformation mechanisms during subduction earthquakes remained unclear other than frictional melting recorded in pseudotachylytes. However, the recent mineralogical studies in the shallow plate-boundary thrust in the Nankai subduction zone and the underplating-related duplex-fault zone in the Shimanto accretionary complex exhumed from 4-6 km depth have identified increased heating along the 2 mm-thick, clay-rich fault gouge and the few-centimeters-thick, basalt-derived ultracataclasite, respectively. The microstructures of the fault gouge are characterized by strong preferred orientation of clay particles along the gouge, while those of the ultracataclasite show the random fabric. High-velocity friction experiments were conducted on the disaggregated fault rocks under wet (water-saturated) conditions at different normal stresses, using the rotary shear frictional testing apparatus. The results show the rapid slip weakening with low peak and steady-state shear stress, and a very small slip weakening distance and fracture energy, suggesting the ease of earthquake rupture propagation through the fault materials. The steady-state shear stress is almost independent of normal stress, indicating that the gouge behaved like a fluid during high-velocity shearing. The microstructures after the experiments are marked by the development of foliated zone in the gouge layer, but the random fabric develops in the outermost region of the circular gouge layer. Given the nearly independence of steady-state shear stress on normal stress and the increase in the rotation velocity from the center of the rotation axis during the rotary shear, the change from foliated zone to non-foliated, random fabric in the circular gouge layer could represent the change from laminar to non-laminar (or turbulent) flow associated with the increase in the Reynolds number. The implications for the fault rocks are that the development of foliated and non-foliated zones may represent coseismic laminar and non-laminar flow, during which earthquake rupture can propagate easily due to fault lubrication.

  1. Bioinspired carbon nanotube fuzzy fiber hair sensor for air-flow detection.

    PubMed

    Maschmann, Matthew R; Ehlert, Gregory J; Dickinson, Benjamin T; Phillips, David M; Ray, Cody W; Reich, Greg W; Baur, Jeffery W

    2014-05-28

    Artificial hair sensors consisting of a piezoresistive carbon-nanotube-coated glass fiber embedded in a microcapillary are assembled and characterized. Individual sensors resemble a hair plug that may be integrated in a wide range of host materials. The sensors demonstrate an air-flow detection threshold of less than 1 m/s with a piezoresistive sensitivity of 1.3% per m/s air-flow change. PMID:24665067

  2. Effects of airflow on body temperatures and sleep stages in a warm humid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Kazuyo; Okamoto-Mizuno, Kazue; Mizuno, Koh; Iwaki, Tatsuya

    2008-03-01

    Airflow is an effective way to increase heat loss—an ongoing process during sleep and wakefulness in daily life. However, it is unclear whether airflow stimulates cutaneous sensation and disturbs sleep or reduces the heat load and facilitates sleep. In this study, 17 male subjects wearing short pyjamas slept on a bed with a cotton blanket under two of the following conditions: (1) air temperature (Ta) 26°C, relative humidity (RH) 50%, and air velocity (V) 0.2 m s-1; (2) Ta 32°C, RH 80%, V 1.7 m s-1; (3) Ta 32°C; RH 80%, V 0.2 m s-1 (hereafter referred to as 26/50, 32/80 with airflow, and 32/80 with still air, respectively). Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, and mental electromyograms were obtained for all subjects. Rectal (Tre) and skin (Ts) temperatures were recorded continuously during the sleep session, and body-mass was measured before and after the sleep session. No significant differences were observed in the duration of sleep stages between subjects under the 26/50 and 32/80 with airflow conditions; however, the total duration of wakefulness decreased significantly in subjects under the 32/80 with airflow condition compared to that in subjects under the 32/80 with still air condition ( P < 0.05). Tre, Tsk, Ts, and body-mass loss under the 32/80 with airflow condition were significantly higher compared to those under the 26/50 condition, and significantly lower than those under the 32/80 with still air condition ( P < 0.05). An alleviated heat load due to increased airflow was considered to exist between the 32/80 with still air and the 26/50 conditions. Airflow reduces the duration of wakefulness by decreasing Tre, Tsk, Ts, and body-mass loss in a warm humid condition.

  3. F-111 TACT natural laminar flow glove flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.; Trujillo, B.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in cruise efficiency on the order of 15 to 40% are obtained by increasing the extent of laminar flow over lifting surfaces. Two methods of achieving laminar flow are being considered, natural laminar flow and laminar flow control. Natural laminar flow (NLF) relies primarily on airfoil shape while laminar flow control involves boundary layer suction or blowing with mechanical devices. The extent of natural laminar flow that could be achieved with consistency in a real flight environment at chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 30 x 10(6) power was evaluated. Nineteen flights were conducted on the F-111 TACT airplane having a NLF airfoil glove section. The section consists of a supercritical airfoil providing favorable pressure gradients over extensive portions of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing. Boundary layer measurements were obtained over a range of wing leading edge sweep angles at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85. Data were obtained for natural transition and for a range of forced transition locations over the test airfoil.

  4. Laminar flow control SPF/08 feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, R. C.; Williams, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of applying superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) technology to laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts was demonstrated. Procedures were developed to produce smooth, flat titanium panels, using thin -0.016 inch sheets, meeting LFC surface smoothness requirements. Two large panels 28 x 28 inches were fabricated as final demonstration articles. The first was flat on the top and bottom sides demonstrating the capability of the tooling and the forming and diffusion bonding procedures to produce flat, defect free surfaces. The second panel was configurated for LFC porous panel treatment by forming channels with dimpled projections on the top side. The projections were machined away leaving holes extending into the panel. A perforated titanium sheet was adhesively bonded over this surface to complete the LFC demonstration panel. The final surface was considered flat enough to meet LFC requirements for a jet transport aircraft in cruising flight.

  5. Progress in natural laminar flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    For decades, since the earliest attempts to obtain natural laminar flow (NLF) on airplanes, three classical objections to its practicality have been held in the aeronautical community. These objectives concerned first, the capability to manufacture practical airframe surfaces smooth enough for NLF; second, the apparent inherent instability and sensitivity of NLF; and third, the accumulation of contamination such as insect debris in flight. This paper explains recent progress in our understanding of the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on modern airframe surfaces. This discussion explains why previous attempts to use NLF failed and what has changed regarding the three classical objections to NLF practicality. Future NASA research plans are described concerning exploring the limits of NLF usefulness, production tolerances, operational considerations, transition behavior and measurement methods, and NLF design applications.

  6. Toward a laminar-flow-control transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses were conducted to define a practical design for an advanced technology laminar flow control (LRC) transport for initial passenger operation in the early 1990's. Mission requirements, appropriate design criteria, and level of technology for the study aircraft were defined. The characteristics of the selected configuration were established, aircraft and LFC subsystems compatible with the mission requirements were defined, and the aircraft was evaluated in terms of fuel efficiency. A wing design integrating the LFC ducting and metering system into advanced composite wing structure was developed, manufacturing procedures for the surface panel design were established, and environmental and structural testing of surface panel components were conducted. Test results revealed a requirement for relatively minor changes in the manufacturing procedures employed, but have shown the general compatibility of both the selected design and the use of composite materials with the requirements of LFC wing surface panels.

  7. On the combustion of a laminar spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Yeshayahou; Bulzan, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A spray combustor, with flow velocities in the laminar range, exhibits a unique operating mode where large amplitude, self-induced oscillations of the flame shape occur. The phenomenon, not previously encountered, only occurs when fuel is supplied in the form of fine liquid droplets and does not occur when fuel is supplied in gaseous form. Several flow mechanisms are coupled in such a fashion as to trigger and maintain the oscillatory motion of the flame. These mechanisms include heat transfer and evaporation processes, dynamics of two-phase flows, and effects of gravity (buoyancy forces). An interface volume, lying above the fuel nozzle and below the flame was found to be the most susceptible to gravity effects and postulated to be responsible for inducing the oscillatory motion. Heptane fuel was used in the majority of the tests. Tests performed with iso-octane also showed similar results.

  8. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2006-07-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's NUREG-1400 addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present two detailed examples of the implementation of qualitative air flow studies at different scales using guidelines established by NUREG-1400. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within the transfer area of the 105 KE Basin, located on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The purpose of the study was to determine appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment in support of sludge water pumping activities. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an air flow study, the stagnant layer would not have been identified, and could have resulted in locating samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test.

  9. A miniature airflow energy harvester from piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Zhu, D.; White, N. M.; Beeby, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes design, simulation, fabrication, and testing of a miniature wind energy harvester based on a flapping cantilevered piezoelectric beam. The wind generator is based on oscillations of a cantilever that faces the direction of the airflow. The oscillation is amplified by interactions between an aerofoil attached on the cantilever and a bluff body placed in front of the aerofoil. A piezoelectric transducer with screen printed PZT materials is used to extract electrical energy. To achieve the optimum design of the harvester, both computational simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the structure. A prototype of the wind harvester, with the volume of 37.5 cm3 in total, was fabricated by thick-film screen printing technique. Wind tunnel test results are presented to determine the optimum structure and to characterize the performance of the harvester. The optimized device finally achieved a working wind speed range from 1.5 m/s to 8 m/s. The power output was ranging from 0.1 to 0.86 ?W and the open-circuit output voltage was from 0.5 V to 1.32 V.

  10. Soot growth in laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang

    The objectives of the present investigation were to study soot processes in laminar premixed flames. Both experimental and computational methods were used: the experiments involved observations of the flame and soot properties of laminar premixed flames stabilized on flat-flame burners at atmospheric pressure, the computations involved predictions of flame structure using detailed mechanisms of transport and chemical kinetics as well as predictions of soot surface growth rate using existing mechanisms in the literature. The experiments considered soot-containing ethylene/air flames having fuel-equivalence ratios of 2.34--2.94 and soot-containing methane/oxygen flames having fuel-equivalence ratios of 2.20--2.60. The following properties were measured along the axes of the test flames: soot volume fractions, soot primary particle diameters, soot and gas temperatures, concentrations of major gas species, H atom concentrations, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbon species and gas velocities. Flame structure was predicted using the detailed chemical mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers (1992) and Leung and Lindstedt (1995). Predictions of flame structure in the soot growth region were in good agreement with measurements. Prediction of H atom concentrations were also in good agreement with the measurements and showed that H atom was in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Present measurements were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. These results were used to evaluate the Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers (1995) and Colket and Hall (1994). The agreement between measured and predicted soot growth rates was excellent for both HACA mechanisms. These results imply that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease from radiative heat losses; therefore, temperature reductions due to radiative heat losses from soot itself ultimately controls maximum soot concentrations in these flames.

  11. Compressible laminar streaks with wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Pierre; Shah, Daniel; Hicks, Peter D.

    2013-05-01

    The response of a compressible laminar boundary layer subject to free-stream vortical disturbances and steady mean-flow wall suction is studied. The theoretical frameworks of Leib et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 380, 169-203 (1999), 10.1017/S0022112098003504] and Ricco and Wu [J. Fluid Mech. 587, 97-138 (2007), 10.1017/S0022112007007070], based on the linearized unsteady boundary-region equations, are adopted to study the influence of suction on the kinematic and thermal streaks arising through the interaction between the free-stream vortical perturbations and the boundary layer. In the asymptotic limit of small spanwise wavelength compared with the boundary layer thickness, i.e., when the disturbance flow is conveniently described by the steady compressible boundary region equations, the effect of suction is mild on the velocity fluctuations and negligible on the temperature fluctuations. When the spanwise wavelength is comparable with the boundary layer thickness, small suction values intensify the supersonic streaks, while higher transpiration levels always stabilize the disturbances at all Mach numbers. At larger spanwise wavelengths, very small amplitudes of wall transpiration have a dramatic stabilizing effect on all boundary layer fluctuations, which can take the form of transiently growing thermal streaks, large amplitude streamwise oscillations, or oblique exponentially growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves, depending on the Mach number and the wavelengths. The range of wavenumbers for which the exponential growth occurs becomes narrower and the location of instability is significantly shifted downstream by mild suction, indicating that wall transpiration can be a suitable vehicle for delaying transition when the laminar breakdown is promoted by these unstable disturbances. The typical streamwise wavelength of these disturbances is instead not influenced by suction, and asymptotic triple deck theory predicts the strong changes in growth rate and the very mild modifications in streamwise wavenumber in the limit of larger downstream distance and small spanwise wavenumber.

  12. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  13. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D. (Las Cruces, NM); Shen, Yang (Las Cruces, NM)

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  14. Testing limits to airflow perturbation device (APD) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lopresti, Erika R; Johnson, Arthur T; Koh, Frank C; Scott, William H; Jamshidi, Shaya; Silverman, Nischom K

    2008-01-01

    Background The Airflow Perturbation Device (APD) is a lightweight, portable device that can be used to measure total respiratory resistance as well as inhalation and exhalation resistances. There is a need to determine limits to the accuracy of APD measurements for different conditions likely to occur: leaks around the mouthpiece, use of an oronasal mask, and the addition of resistance in the respiratory system. Also, there is a need for resistance measurements in patients who are ventilated. Method Ten subjects between the ages of 18 and 35 were tested for each station in the experiment. The first station involved testing the effects of leaks of known sizes on APD measurements. The second station tested the use of an oronasal mask used in conjunction with the APD during nose and mouth breathing. The third station tested the effects of two different resistances added in series with the APD mouthpiece. The fourth station tested the usage of a flexible ventilator tube in conjunction with the APD. Results All leaks reduced APD resistance measurement values. Leaks represented by two 3.2 mm diameter tubes reduced measured resistance by about 10% (4.2 cmH2O·sec/L for control and 3.9 cm H2O·sec/L for the leak). This was not statistically significant. Larger leaks given by 4.8 and 6.4 mm tubes reduced measurements significantly (3.4 and 3.0 cm cmH2O·sec/L, respectively). Mouth resistance measured with a cardboard mouthpiece gave an APD measurement of 4.2 cm H2O·sec/L and mouth resistance measured with an oronasal mask was 4.5 cm H2O·sec/L; the two were not significantly different. Nose resistance measured with the oronasal mask was 7.6 cm H2O·sec/L. Adding airflow resistances of 1.12 and 2.10 cm H2O·sec/L to the breathing circuit between the mouth and APD yielded respiratory resistance values higher than the control by 0.7 and 2.0 cm H2O·sec/L. Although breathing through a 52 cm length of flexible ventilator tubing reduced the APD measurement from 4.0 cm H2O·sec/L for the control to 3.6 cm H2O·sec/L for the tube, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion The APD can be adapted for use in ventilated, unconscious, and uncooperative patients with use of a ventilator tube and an oronasal mask without significantly affecting measurements. Adding a resistance in series with the APD mouthpiece has an additive effect on resistance measurements, and can be used for qualitative calibration. A leak size of at least the equivalent of two 3.2 mm diameter tubes can be tolerated without significantly affecting APD measurements. PMID:18976487

  15. Studies of premixed laminar and turbulent flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    A two and one-half year experimental and theoretical research program on the properties of laminar and turbulent premixed gas flames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  16. Selected experiments in laminar flow: An annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Since the 1930s, there have been attempts to reduce drag on airplanes by delaying laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition. Experiments conducted during the 1940's, while successful in delaying transition, were discouraging because of the careful surface preparation necessary to meet roughness and waviness requirements. The resulting lull in research lasted nearly 30 years. By the late 1970s, airframe construction techniques had advanced sufficiently that the high surface quality required for natural laminar flow (NLF) and laminar flow control (LFC) appeared possible on production aircraft. As a result, NLF and LFC research became widespread. This report is an overview of that research. The experiments summarized herein were selected for their applicability to small transonic aircraft. Both flight and wind tunnel tests are included. The description of each experiment is followed by corresponding references. Part One summarizes NLF experiments; Part Two deals with LFC and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) experiments.

  17. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  18. Flight research on natural laminar flow nacelles - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Schoenster, J. A.; Obara, C. J.; Dodbele, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a progress report on an ongoing flight experiment for natural laminar flow nacelles. The results given herein were obtained during the first phase of the experiment, in which an instrumented natural laminar flow nacelle fairing was flight tested in the presence of turbofan engine noise and a controlled noise source. The results indicate that with the controlled noise source off, natural laminar flow was measured as far aft as 37 percent of the fairing length. The transition front was irregular in contour, and the extent of natural laminar flow was significantly affected by the relative flow angle for the fairing. In addition to these test results, the paper discusses the results of some recent computational analyses to predict pressure distributions and transition location, and to explain some of the data trends. Comparisons between measured and predicted data indicate that the analytical methods successfully predicted trends for the baseline (no controlled noise source) studies.

  19. Conceptual design for a laminar-flying-wing aircraft

    E-print Network

    Saeed, Tariq Issam

    2012-06-12

    as requirements. Subject to these constraints, this research aims to: provide insight into the parameters affecting practical laminar-flow-control suction power requirements; identify a viable basic design specification; and, on the basis of this, an assessment...

  20. Advanced stability theory analyses for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments of the SALLY computer code for stability analysis of laminar flow control wings are summarized. Extensions of SALLY to study three dimensional compressible flows, nonparallel and nonlinear effects are discussed.

  1. Natural laminar flow airfoil analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of an airfoil for a large commercial transport cruising at Mach 0.8 and the use of advanced computer techniques to perform the analysis are described. Incorporation of the airfoil into a natural laminar flow transport configuration is addressed and a comparison of fuel requirements and operating costs between the natural laminar flow transport and an equivalent turbulent flow transport is addressed.

  2. Ignition in laminar and turbulent nonpremixed counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouch, John Dewey

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into nonpremixed ignition were conducted to examine the influence of complex chemistry and flow turbulence as found in practical combustion systems. The counterflow configuration, where a hot air jet ignited a cold (298K) fuel jet, was adopted in experiments and calculations. The study of the ignition of large alkane hydrocarbons focused on the effects of fuel structure by investigating the reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. The ignition response of these fuels was similar to smaller fuels with similar molecular structures. This conclusion was reinforced by showing that the ignition temperature became nearly insensitive to fuel molecule size above C4, but continued to depend on whether the structure was linear or branched. The effects of turbulence were studied by adding perforated plates to the burner to generate controlled levels of turbulence. This configuration was examined in detail experimentally and computationally without reaction, and subsequently the effects of turbulence on ignition were studied with hydrogen as the fuel. The results indicated that at low turbulence intensities, ignition is enhanced relative to laminar ignition, but as the turbulence intensity increases the ignition temperature also increases, demonstrating that optimal conditions for ignition exist at low turbulence intensities. At high pressures, where HO2 chemistry is important, all turbulent ignition temperatures were higher than laminar ones, and the increasing temperature trend with turbulence intensity was still observed. At low fuel concentrations, a different ignition mode was observed where the transition from a weakly reacting state to a flame occurred over a range of temperatures where the flame was repeatedly ignited and extinguished. Turbulent ignition was modeled by solving a joint scalar PDF equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The absence of significant heat release prior to ignition enabled the use of a frozen flow solution, solved separately, in the scalar calculation. The results did not reproduce the qualitative trends noted in the experiments and the influence of turbulence intensity was not apparent in the calculated results. These discrepancies were attributed to shortcomings in the molecular mixing models in low turbulent Reynolds number flows and where reaction rates are much lower than in a flame.

  3. Particle-Image Velocimetry in Microgravity Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Greenberg, P. S.; Urban, D. L.; Wernet, M. P.; Yanis, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses planned velocity measurements in microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames. These measurements will be conducted using Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower. The observations are of fundamental interest and may ultimately lead to improved efficiency and decreased emissions from practical combustors. The velocity measurements will support the evaluation of analytical and numerical combustion models. There is strong motivation for the proposed microgravity flame configuration. Laminar jet flames are fundamental to combustion and their study has contributed to myriad advances in combustion science, including the development of theoretical, computational and diagnostic combustion tools. Nonbuoyant laminar jet flames are pertinent to the turbulent flames of more practical interest via the laminar flamelet concept. The influence of gravity on these flames is deleterious: it complicates theoretical and numerical modeling, introduces hydrodynamic instabilities, decreases length scales and spatial resolution, and limits the variability of residence time. Whereas many normal-gravity laminar jet diffusion flames have been thoroughly examined (including measurements of velocities, temperatures, compositions, sooting behavior and emissive and absorptive properties), measurements in microgravity gas-jet flames have been less complete and, notably, have included only cursory velocity measurements. It is envisioned that our velocity measurements will fill an important gap in the understanding of nonbuoyant laminar jet flames.

  4. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  5. Radiative interactions in laminar duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, P. A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented for infrared radiative energy transfer in gases when other modes of energy transfer occur simultaneously. Two types of geometries are considered, a parallel plate duct and a circular duct. Fully developed laminar incompressible flows of absorbing-emitting species in black surfaced ducts are considered under the conditions of uniform wall heat flux. The participating species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O. Nongray as well as gray formulations are developed for both geometries. Appropriate limiting solutions of the governing equations are obtained and conduction-radiation interaction parameters are evaluated. Tien and Lowder's wide band model correlation was used in nongray formulation. Numerical procedures are presented to solve the integro-differential equations for both geometries. The range of physical variables considered are 300 to 2000 K for temperature, 0.1 to 100.0 atm for pressure, and 0.1 to 100 cm spacings between plates/radius of the tube. An extensive parametric study based on nongray formulation is presented. Results obtained for different flow conditions indicate that the radiative interactions can be quite significant in fully developed incompressible flows.

  6. Tuberculosis associates with both airflow obstruction and low lung function: BOLD results.

    PubMed

    Amaral, André F S; Coton, Sonia; Kato, Bernet; Tan, Wan C; Studnicka, Michael; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn; Mannino, David; Bateman, Eric D; Buist, Sonia; Burney, Peter G J

    2015-10-01

    In small studies and cases series, a history of tuberculosis has been associated with both airflow obstruction, which is characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and restrictive patterns on spirometry. The objective of the present study was to assess the association between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric abnormalities in adults.The study was performed in adults, aged 40 years and above, who took part in the multicentre, cross-sectional, general population-based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study, and had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on a history of tuberculosis. The associations between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction were assessed within each participating centre, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. These estimates were stratified by high- and low/middle-income countries, according to gross national income.A self-reported history of tuberculosis was associated with airflow obstruction (adjusted odds ratio 2.51, 95% CI 1.83-3.42) and spirometric restriction (adjusted odds ratio 2.13, 95% CI 1.42-3.19).A history of tuberculosis was associated with both airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction, and should be considered as a potentially important cause of obstructive disease and low lung function, particularly where tuberculosis is common. PMID:26113680

  7. Predictive models and airflow distribution associated with the zone of influence (ZOI) during air sparging remediation.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinglong; Zhao, Yongsheng; Wang, Hefei; Qin, Chuanyu

    2015-12-15

    Laboratory two-dimensional airflow visualisation model tests were conducted to assess the effect of particle size and air injection pressure on airflow patterns, physical characteristics of the zone of influence (ZOI) and the airflow rate distribution within the ZOI. The results indicate that the pattern transitions from chamber flow to channelized flow and then to bubbly flow occurred at effective particle sizes (D10) in the ranges 0.22-0.42 mm and 1.42-2.1mm, respectively. The ZOI is shaped like a conical frustum, and there exists a "stable ZOI" for each type of porous medium in channelised and bubbly flow during sparging tests. A formula for calculating the size of the ZOI radius was established based on the conical frustum-shaped results and the "stable ZOI", and comparing the calculated results with field data demonstrated that the formula has application value, except in large-scale heterogeneous aquifers. The distribution of the airflow rate within the ZOI, which is quite uneven, varies from the maximum rate (which occurred just above the sparger) to zero with the increase of the lateral distance from the sparger. Moreover, the airflow distribution can be fitted using a unified dimensionless Gaussian function under different sparging pressures for a given porous medium. All of the results described above provide valuable information for the design and theoretical modelling of air sparging for groundwater remediation. PMID:26278372

  8. Laminar Diffusion Flame Studies (Ground- and Space-Based Studies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. Certainly, understanding flame processes within laminar diffusion flames must precede understanding these processes in more complex turbulent diffusion flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Laminar jet diffusion flame shapes (luminous flame boundaries) have been of particular interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they are a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame structure predictions. Thus, consideration of laminar flame shapes is undertaken in the following, emphasizing conditions where effects of gravity are small, due to the importance of such conditions to practical applications. Another class of interesting properties of laminar diffusion flames are their laminar soot and smoke point properties (i.e., the flame length, fuel flow rate, characteristic residence time, etc., at the onset of soot appearance in the flame (the soot point) and the onset of soot emissions from the flame (the smoke point)). These are useful observable soot properties of nonpremixed flames because they provide a convenient means to rate several aspects of flame sooting properties: the relative propensity of various fuels to produce soot in flames; the relative effects of fuel structure, fuel dilution, flame temperature and ambient pressure on the soot appearance and emission properties of flames; the relative levels of continuum radiation from soot in flames; and effects of the intrusion of gravity (or buoyant motion) on emissions of soot from flames. An important motivation to define conditions for soot emissions is that observations of laminar jet diffusion flames in critical environments, e.g., space shuttle and space station facilities, cannot involve soot emitting flames in order to ensure that test chamber windows used for experimental observations are not blocked by soot deposits, thereby compromising unusually valuable experimental results. Another important motivation to define conditions where soot is present in diffusion flames is that flame chemistry, transport and radiation properties are vastly simplified when soot is absent, making such flames far more tractable for detailed numerical simulations than corresponding soot-containing flames. Motivated by these observations, the objectives of this phase of the investigation were as follows: (1) Observe flame-sheet shapes (the location of the reaction zone near phi=1) of nonluminous (soot free) laminar jet diffusion flames in both still and coflowing air and use these results to develop simplified models of flame-sheet shapes for these conditions; (2) Observe luminous flame boundaries of luminous (soot-containing) laminar jet diffusion flames in both still and coflowing air and use these results to develop simplified models of luminous flame boundaries for these conditions. In order to fix ideas here, maximum luminous flame boundaries at the laminar smoke point conditions were sought, i.e., luminous flame boundaries at the laminar smoke point; (3) Observe effects of coflow on laminar soot- and smoke-point conditions because coflow has been proposed as a means to control soot emissions and minimize the presence of soot in diffusion flames.

  9. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S.; Frey, J.; Tropea, C.

    2014-05-15

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p?=?0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ?}=0?100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  10. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  11. Analyzing airflow in static ice caves by using the calcFLOW method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, C.; Meyer, U.; Pflitsch, A.; Maggi, V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a method to detect airflow through ice caves and to quantify the corresponding airflow speeds by the use of temperature loggers. The time series of temperature observations at different loggers are cross-correlated. The time shift of best correlation corresponds to the travel time of the air and is used to derive the airflow speed between the loggers. We apply the method to test data observed inside Schellenberger Eishöhle (ice cave). The successful determination of airflow speeds depends on the existence of distinct temperature variations during the time span of interest. Moreover the airflow speed is assumed to be constant during the period used for the correlation analysis. Both requirements limit the applicability of the correlation analysis to determine instantaneous airflow speeds. Nevertheless the method is very helpful to characterize the general patterns of air movement and their slow temporal variations. The correlation analysis assumes a linear dependency between the correlated data. The good correlation we found for our test data confirms this assumption. We therefore in a second step estimate temperature biases and scale factors for the observed temperature variations by a least squares adjustment. The observed phenomena, a warming and a damping of temperature variations depending on the distance the air traveled inside the cave, are explained by a mixing of the inflowing air with the air inside the cave. Furthermore we test the significance of the determined parameters by a standard F test and study the sensitivity of the procedure to common manipulations of the original observations like smoothing. In the end we will give an outlook on possible applications and further development of this method.

  12. Tide-induced airflow in a two-layered coastal land with atmospheric pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zhan, Hongbin; Huang, Guanhua; You, Kehua

    2011-05-01

    Tide-induced airflow is commonly seen in coastal lands and affects ground stability especially with a less permeable pavement on the ground surface. A tide-induced airflow model in a two-layered unsaturated zone consisting of a highly permeable layer underneath a less permeable layer was established by Li and Jiao [Li HL, JJ Jiao. One-dimensional airflow in unsaturated zone induced by periodic water table fluctuation. Water Resour Res 2005;41:W04007. doi:10.1029/2004WR003916] to describe the one-dimensional airflow with constant atmospheric pressure at the ground surface. In this study, we expand the Li and Jiao model by considering the realistic atmospheric pressure fluctuations and the initial condition. A new transient solution to the airflow model is developed for an initial boundary value problem (IBVP). The transient solution can be used not only to calculate the subsurface air pressure at a future time with a known initial condition, but also to evaluate the asymptotic air pressure variations when time becomes long. The amplitude ratio and phase lag of the subsurface air pressure relative to the tide-induced hydraulic head variations inside the unconfined aquifer below the unsaturated zone are investigated. The results reveal that effect on the subsurface pressure due to changes of atmospheric pressure amplitude depends on the configurations of air resistance in the less permeable layer and the air-filled porosity difference in the two layers. The introduction of atmospheric pressure fluctuations into the airflow model leads to insignificant influence on water table level. A field application of the new solution at Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong, China is demonstrated. It indicates that the new transient solution can be conveniently used to evaluate the subsurface air pressure with discrete atmospheric pressure data at the ground surface.

  13. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  14. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune's symmetry axis - that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  15. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected.

  16. A Comparative Study of Airflow and Odorant Deposition in the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Joseph; Rumple, Christopher; Ranslow, Allison; Quigley, Andrew; Pang, Benison; Neuberger, Thomas; Krane, Michael; van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The complex structure of the mammalian nasal cavity provides a tortuous airflow path and a large surface area for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. Due to the small and contorted structure of the nasal turbinals, nasal anatomy and function remains poorly understood in most mammals. Here, we utilize high-resolution MRI scans to reconstruct anatomically-accurate models of the mammalian nasal cavity. These data are used to compare the form and function of the mammalian nose. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of nasal airflow and odorant deposition are presented and used to compare olfactory function across species (primate, rodent, canine, feline, ungulate).

  17. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  18. Aerodynamic-wave break-up of liquid sheets in swirling airflows and combustor modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental mean drop diameter data were obtained for the atomization of liquid sheets injected axially downstream in high velocity swirling and nonswirling airflow. Conventional simplex pressure atomizing fuel nozzles and splash type fuel injectors were studied under simulated combustor inlet airflow conditions. A general empirical expression relating recirprocal mean drop diameter to airstream mass velocity was obtained and is presented. The finest degree of atomization, i.e., the highest value of the coefficient C, was obtained with swirl can combustor modules (C = 15) as compared with pressure atomizing nozzles (C = 12).

  19. Terminal Box Airflow Reset: An Effective Operation and Control Strategy for Comfort Improvement and Energy Conservation 

    E-print Network

    Liu, M.; Abbas, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    to comfortable levels before the office hours. The length of the pre-cool or the pre- (75° F), respectively. Terminal Box Airflow Reset: An Effective Operation and Control Strategy for Comfort Improvement and Energy Conservation M. Liu Ph.D. P. E. M. Abbas... volume terminal boxes during unoccupied hours. Authors have implemented the airflow reset in dual duct variable air volume terminal boxes [Abbas and Liu, 1996], in dual duct constant air volume terminal boxes [Liu and Zhu, 1998], and in single duct...

  20. Brief history of laminar flow clean room systems

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, W J

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and evolution of laminar flow clean rooms and hoods and describes the underlying principles and rationales associated with development of this type of clean room system and Federal Standard No. 209. By the mid 1970's, over a thousand hospitals in the US had installed laminar flow equipment in operating rooms. During the past several years a great deal of attention has been focused on conserving energy in clean rooms. Some gains in energy conservation have been achieved by improved design, off hours shutdown, and closer evaluation of requirements for clean rooms. By the early 1970's, the laminar flow principle had been carried from the Laboratory and applied to production hardware to create a mature industry producing and marketing a variety of laminar flow equipment in less than 10 years time. This achievement was made possible by literally dozens of persons in industry, government, military, and private individuals who developed hardware, added numerous innovations, and had the foresight to apply the technology to many fields other than industrial clean rooms. Now, with laminar flow devices available, class 100 levels are readily achievable and maintained, and at the same time require fewer operating restrictions than previously possible.

  1. Computational Analysis of the G-III Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Liao, Wei; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project, flight experiments are planned with the primary objective of demonstrating the Discrete Roughness Elements (DRE) technology for passive laminar flow control at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. In this paper, we present a preliminary computational assessment of the Gulfstream-III (G-III) aircraft wing-glove designed to attain natural laminar flow for the leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg. Analysis for a flight Mach number of 0.75 shows that it should be possible to achieve natural laminar flow for twice the transition Reynolds number ever achieved at this sweep angle. However, the wing-glove needs to be redesigned to effectively demonstrate passive laminar flow control using DREs. As a by-product of the computational assessment, effect of surface curvature on stationary crossflow disturbances is found to be strongly stabilizing for the current design, and it is suggested that convex surface curvature could be used as a control parameter for natural laminar flow design, provided transition occurs via stationary crossflow disturbances.

  2. Laminar flow integration: Flight tests status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Fisher, D. F.; Fischer, M. C.; Bartlett, D. W.; Meyer, R. R., Jr.

    1986-12-01

    Under the Aircraft Energy Efficiency - Laminar Flow Control Program, there are currently three flight test programs under way to address critical issues concerning laminar flow technology application to commercial transports. The Leading-Edge Flight Test (LEFT) with a JetStar aircraft is a cooperative effort with the Ames/Dryden Flight Research Facility to provide operational experience with candidate leading-edge systems representative of those that might be used on a future transport. In the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE), also a cooperative effort between Langley and Ames/Dryden, basic transition data on an F-14 wing with variable sweep will be obtained to provide a data base for laminar flow wing design. Finally, under contract to the Boeing Company, the acoustic environment on the wing of a 757 aircraft will be measured and the influence of engine noise on laminar flow determined with a natural laminar flow glove on the wing. The status and plans for these programs are reported.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Island-Scale Airflow over Maui and the Maui Vortex under Summer Trade Wind Conditions

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yi-Leng

    Numerical Simulations of Island-Scale Airflow over Maui and the Maui Vortex under Summer Trade Wind) coupled with the Noah land surface model (LSM) is employed to simulate island-scale airflow. Unlike the lee vortices off the leeside coast of the island of Hawaii, the Maui vortex and the westerly

  4. Building and Environment 42 (2007) 203217 Model-based analysis and simulation of airflow control systems of

    E-print Network

    Melnik, Roderick

    2007-01-01

    to simulate such airflow control systems. The model is implemented and a systematic analysis of the system increasingly on simulation techniques. Such techniques together with model-based analysis of HVAC systemsBuilding and Environment 42 (2007) 203­217 Model-based analysis and simulation of airflow control

  5. Design of a hybrid laminar flow control nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun; Collier, Fayette S., Jr.; Wagner, Richard D.; Viken, Jeffery K.; Pfenninger, Werner

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the potential application of hybrid-laminar-flow control to the external surface of a modern, high-bypass-ratio (HBR) turbofan engine nacelle. With the advent of advanced ultra-HBR fans (with bypass ratios of 10-15), the wetted areas of these nacelles approach 10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies on an advanced twin-engine transport configuration are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  6. Laminar and Turbulent Gaseous Diffusion Flames. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent measurements and predictions of the properties of homogeneous (gaseous) laminar and turbulent non-premixed (diffusion) flames are discussed, emphasizing results from both ground- and space-based studies at microgravity conditions. Initial considerations show that effects of buoyancy not only complicate the interpretation of observations of diffusion flames but at times mislead when such results are applied to the non-buoyant diffusion flame conditions of greatest practical interest. This behavior motivates consideration of experiments where effects of buoyancy are minimized; therefore, methods of controlling the intrusion of buoyancy during observations of non-premixed flames are described, considering approaches suitable for both normal laboratory conditions as well as classical microgravity techniques. Studies of laminar flames at low-gravity and microgravity conditions are emphasized in view of the computational tractability of such flames for developing methods of predicting flame structure as well as the relevance of such flames to more practical turbulent flames by exploiting laminar flamelet concepts.

  7. Lockheed laminar-flow control systems development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Roy H.

    1987-01-01

    Progress is summarized from 1974 to the present in the practical application of laminar-flow control (LFC) to subsonic transport aircraft. Those efforts included preliminary design system studies of commercial and military transports and experimental investigations leading to the development of the leading-edge flight test article installed on the NASA JetStar flight test aircraft. The benefits of LFC on drag, fuel efficiency, lift-to-drag ratio, and operating costs are compared with those for turbulent flow aircraft. The current activities in the NASA Industry Laminar-Flow Enabling Technologies Development contract include summaries of activities in the Task 1 development of a slotted-surface structural concept using advanced aluminum materials and the Task 2 preliminary conceptual design study of global-range military hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) to obtain data at high Reynolds numbers and at Mach numbers representative of long-range subsonic transport aircraft operation.

  8. Laminar flow control, 1976 - 1982: A selected annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    Laminar Flow Control technology development has undergone tremendous progress in recent years as focused research efforts in materials, aerodynamics, systems, and structures have begun to pay off. A virtual explosion in the number of research papers published on this subject has occurred since interest was first stimulated by the 1976 introduction of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Laminar Flow Control Program. The purpose of this selected bibliography is to list available, unclassified laminar flow (both controlled and natural) research completed from about 1975 to mid 1982. Some earlier pertinent reports are included but listed separately in the Appendix. Reports listed herein emphasize aerodynamics and systems studies, but some structures work is also summarized. Aerodynamic work is mainly limited to the subsonic and transonic sped regimes. Because wind-tunnel flow qualities, such as free stream disturbance level, play such an important role in boundary-layer transition, much recent research has been done in this area and it is also included.

  9. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Due to 2-D Excrescences at 1% Chord on a Swept Wing 

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Brian Keith

    2015-01-22

    Laminar flow has the potential to dramatically reduce fuel consumption and/or extend the range of modern aircraft. However, before laminar-flow aircraft can be made practical, the effect of surface imperfections must be ...

  10. CFD Investigations of a Transonic Swept-Wing Laminar Flow Control Flight Experiment 

    E-print Network

    Neale, Tyler P.

    2011-08-08

    Laminar flow control has been studied for several decades in an effort to achieve higher efficiencies for aircraft. Successful implementation of laminar flow control technology on transport aircraft could significantly reduce drag and increase...

  11. Computational Evaluation of a Transonic Laminar-Flow Wing Glove Design 

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Matthew William

    2012-07-16

    The aerodynamic benefits of laminar flow have long made it a sought-after attribute in aircraft design. By laminarizing portions of an aircraft, such as the wing or empennage, significant reductions in drag could be achieved, reducing fuel burn...

  12. Stereopsis and 3D Surface Perception by Spiking Neurons in Laminar Cortical Circuits

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    , USA Running title: Spiking laminar cortical model of depth perception Neural Networks, in press to minimize heat production. Running Title: Spiking laminar cortical model of depth perception Keywords: visual cortex; stereopsis; depth perception; binocular vision; perceptual grouping; surface perception

  13. Roughness and waviness requirements for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    Many modern metal and composite airframe manufacturing techniques can provide surface smoothness which is compatible with natural laminar flow (NLF) requirements. An important consideration is manufacturing roughness of the surface in the form of steps and gaps perpendicular to the freestream. The principal challenge to the design and manufacture of laminar flow surfaces today appears to be in the installation of leading-edge panels on wing, nacelle, and empennage surfaces. A similar challenge is in the installation of access panels, doors, windows, fuselage noses, and engine nacelles. Past work on roughness and waviness manufacturing tolerances and comparisons with more recent experiments are reviewed.

  14. Roughness and waviness requirements for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-12-01

    Many modern metal and composite airframe manufacturing techniques can provide surface smoothness which is compatible with natural laminar flow (NLF) requirements. An important consideration is manufacturing roughness of the surface in the form of steps and gaps perpendicular to the freestream. The principal challenge to the design and manufacture of laminar flow surfaces today appears to be in the installation of leading-edge panels on wing, nacelle, and empennage surfaces. A similar challenge is in the installation of access panels, doors, windows, fuselage noses, and engine nacelles. Past work on roughness and waviness manufacturing tolerances and comparisons with more recent experiments are reviewed.

  15. Laminar and intermittent flow in a tilted heat pipe.

    PubMed

    Rusaouen, E; Riedinger, X; Tisserand, J-C; Seychelles, F; Salort, J; Castaing, B; Chillà, F

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements performed by Riedinger et al. (Phys. Fluids, 25, 015117 (2013)) showed that in an inclined channel, heated from below and cooled from above with adiabatic walls, the flow is laminar or intermittent (local bursts can occur in the laminar flow) when the inclination angle is sufficiently high and the applied power sufficiently low. In this case, gravity plays a crucial role in the characteristics of the flow. In this paper, we present velocity measurements, and their derived tensors, obtained with Particle Image Velocimetry inside the channel. We, also, propose a model derived from a jet interpretation of the flow. Comparison between experiment and model shows a fair agreement. PMID:24464137

  16. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS, AIRFLOW PRODUCTS AFP30

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the AFP30 air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Airflow Products. The pressure drop across the filter was 62 Pa clean and 247 Pa dust loaded. The filtration effici...

  18. Improving Aviation Safety with Information Visualization: Airflow Hazard Display for Helicopter Pilots

    E-print Network

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    Improving Aviation Safety with Information Visualization: Airflow Hazard Display for Helicopter-Chair Professor Ruzena Bajcsy Professor Paul Wright Fall 2004 #12;Abstract Improving Aviation Safety advances in aviation sensor technology offer the potential for aircraft- based sensors that can gather

  19. Test-Retest Reliability of Respiratory Resistance Measured with the Airflow Perturbation Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallena, Sally K.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Johnson, Arthur T.; Vossoughi, Jafar; Tian, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to determine reliability of the airflow perturbation device (APD) to measure respiratory resistance within and across sessions during resting tidal (RTB) and postexercise breathing in healthy athletes, and during RTB across trials within a session in athletes with paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM)…

  20. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  1. Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning 

    E-print Network

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    , mean air speed of the occupied zone and the percentage of people dissatisfied with the air draught in an environment (PD) are proposed by Chow and Fung [2]. 4. RESULTS AND ANALYSIS Numerical simulation of indoor airflow is carried out with those...

  2. THE EFFECT OF FLOOR OPEN AREA ON AIRFLOW DISTRIBUTION IN PEANUT DRYING TRAILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut curing wagons have typically been constructed using perforated metal floor with 23% open area (O.A.). Recent designs for larger peanut drying trailers have used perforated metal with 40% O.A. However, no data has been collected to determine the effect of the different O.A. on total airflow ...

  3. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigation of impacts of an obstruction on airflow in underground mines

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L.; Goodman, G.; Martikainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous airflow monitoring can improve the safety of the underground work force by ensuring the uninterrupted and controlled distribution of mine ventilation to all working areas. Air velocity measurements vary significantly and can change rapidly depending on the exact measurement location and, in particular, due to the presence of obstructions in the air stream. Air velocity must be measured at locations away from obstructions to avoid the vortices and eddies that can produce inaccurate readings. Further, an uninterrupted measurement path cannot always be guaranteed when using continuous airflow monitors due to the presence of nearby equipment, personnel, roof falls and rib rolls. Effective use of these devices requires selection of a minimum distance from an obstacle, such that an air velocity measurement can be made but not affected by the presence of that obstacle. This paper investigates the impacts of an obstruction on the behavior of downstream airflow using a numerical CFD model calibrated with experimental test results from underground testing. Factors including entry size, obstruction size and the inlet or incident velocity are examined for their effects on the distributions of airflow around an obstruction. A relationship is developed between the minimum measurement distance and the hydraulic diameters of the entry and the obstruction. A final analysis considers the impacts of continuous monitor location on the accuracy of velocity measurements and on the application of minimum measurement distance guidelines. PMID:26388684

  4. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-15

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1 mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2 mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., with single-use filter 30 50 20 Dust, fume, and mist, with reusable filter 20 40 20 Radon daughter 18 1... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying...

  6. Physical Modeling of Airflow-Walls Interactions to Understand the Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    E-print Network

    Payan, Yohan

    , suffer from sleep apnea. In addition to a strong daily fatigue, several chronic cardiovascularPhysical Modeling of Airflow-Walls Interactions to Understand the Sleep Apnea Syndrome Yohan Payan1, France {pelorson,perrier}@icp.inpg.fr Abstract. Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) is defined as a partial

  7. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow Using a Discrete-Adjoint Approach

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow Using a Discrete-Adjoint Approach Ramy Rashad and David W. Zingg University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T6, Canada The design of natural-laminar-flow-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver has been extended to incorporate an iterative laminar

  8. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John R.; Farmer, CG

    2013-01-01

    The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT) and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria. PMID:23638399

  9. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, C.; Wilson, S. K.; Duffy, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  10. Usability Evaluation of a Flight-Deck Airflow Hazard Visualization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with unseen airflow hazards near the ground, such as vortices, downdrafts, low level wind shear, microbursts, or turbulence from surrounding vegetation or structures near the landing site. These hazards can be dangerous even to airliners; there have been hundreds of fatalities in the United States in the last two decades attributable to airliner encounters with microbursts and low level wind shear alone. However, helicopters are especially vulnerable to airflow hazards because they often have to operate in confined spaces and under operationally stressful conditions (such as emergency search and rescue, military or shipboard operations). Providing helicopter pilots with an augmented-reality display visualizing local airflow hazards may be of significant benefit. However, the form such a visualization might take, and whether it does indeed provide a benefit, had not been studied before our experiment. We recruited experienced military and civilian helicopter pilots for a preliminary usability study to evaluate a prototype augmented-reality visualization system. The study had two goals: first, to assess the efficacy of presenting airflow data in flight; and second, to obtain expert feedback on sample presentations of hazard indicators to refine our design choices. The study addressed the optimal way to provide critical safety information to the pilot, what level of detail to provide, whether to display specific aerodynamic causes or potential effects only, and how to safely and effectively shift the locus of attention during a high-workload task. Three-dimensional visual cues, with varying shape, color, transparency, texture, depth cueing, and use of motion, depicting regions of hazardous airflow, were developed and presented to the pilots. The study results indicated that such a visualization system could be of significant value in improving safety during critical takeoff and landing operations, and also gave clear indications of the best design choices in producing the hazard visual cues.

  11. Estimation of Laminar Burning Velocities by Direct Digital Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uske, J.; Barat, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Bunsen burner flame, which is the most common flame in the laboratory, can be easily studied for its dynamics because of modern, economical digital technology available to student laboratories. Direct digital photography of Bunsen flames is used to obtain laminar burning velocities of selected gaseous hydrocarbon/air flames.

  12. Numerical Aerodynamic Optimization Incorporating Laminar-Turbulent Transition Prediction

    E-print Network

    Zingg, David W.

    Numerical Aerodynamic Optimization Incorporating Laminar-Turbulent Transition Prediction J. Driver-dimensional Newton­Krylov aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm is applied to several optimization problems a striking demonstration of the capability of the Newton­ Krylov aerodynamic optimization algorithm to design

  13. Flame Radiation, Structure, and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, Douglas; Lim, Jongmook; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2007-01-01

    Results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Research Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop facility are reported. The results quantify flame radiation, structure, and scalar properties during the early phase of a microgravity fire. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in microgravity laminar methane/air, ethylene/nitrogen/air and ethylene/air jet flames. The measured peak mole fractions for water vapor and carbon dioxide are found to be in agreement with state relationship predictions for hydrocarbon/air combustion. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported results including those from the flight project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long-duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this report.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Laminar Reacting Flows with Complex Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    Numerical Simulation of Laminar Reacting Flows with Complex Chemistry M S Day and J B Bell Lawrence number reacting ows with complex chemistry. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations represents a generalization of the Pember et al methodology to incorporate complex chemistry and the e#11

  15. Numerical Simulation of Laminar Reacting Flows with Complex Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    Numerical Simulation of Laminar Reacting Flows with Complex Chemistry M S Day and J B Bell Lawrence number reacting flows with complex chemistry. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations represents a generalization of the Pember et al methodology to incorporate complex chemistry and the effects

  16. Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames 

    E-print Network

    Siwatch, Vivek

    2007-04-25

    Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from combustion devices is a topic of tremendous current importance. The bulk of the review of NOx emissions has been in the field of turbulent jet flames. However laminar jet flames have provided much insight...

  17. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80?inch (203?cm) chord and 40?inch (102?cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  18. Dynamics of Laminar Premixed Flames Forced by Harmonic Velocity Disturbances

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    Dynamics of Laminar Premixed Flames Forced by Harmonic Velocity Disturbances Preetham GE Global premixed flames responding to harmonic velocity disturbances. Results are derived from analytical/wedge flame-area velocity transfer function K = convection parameter ( uo=uc) k = convective wave number ( !o

  19. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  20. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  1. Application of laminar flow control to supersonic transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Nagel, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility and impact of implementing a laminar flow control system on a supersonic transport configuration were investigated. A hybrid laminar flow control scheme consisting of suction controlled and natural laminar flow was developed for a double-delta type wing planform. The required suction flow rates were determined from boundary layer stability analyses using representative wing pressure distributions. A preliminary design of structural modifications needed to accommodate suction through a perforated titanium skin was carried out together with the ducting and systems needed to collect, compress and discharge the suction air. The benefits of reduced aerodynamic drag were weighed against the weight, volume and power requirement penalties of suction system installation in a mission performance and sizing program to assess the net benefits. The study showed a feasibility of achieving significant laminarization of the wing surface by use of a hybrid scheme, leading to an 8.2 percent reduction in the cruise drag. This resulted in an 8.5 percent reduction in the maximum takeoff weight and a 12 percent reduction in the fuel burn after the inclusion of the LFC system installation penalties. Several research needs were identified for a resolution of aerodynamics, structural and systems issues before these potential benefits could be realized in a practical system.

  2. Turbulent-laminar patterns in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2005-11-01

    We study turbulent-laminar patterns in large-aspect-ratio plane Couette flow. These states consist of regular alternations of turbulent and laminar flow over large length scales. We simulate these patterns by extending the minimal-flow-unit methodology to computational domains with one long dimension that can be tilted at any prescribed angle to the streamwise direction. At a tilt of 24 degrees, we reproduce experimentally observed oblique patterns. As Re is decreased from 420, uniform turbulence is succeeded by intermittency at Re=410 and then by three well-defined bands at Re=390 which persist to Re=320 and are replaced by two bands at Re=310. Surprisingly, during this entire evolution, the temporally averaged total kinetic energy remains constant. Thus, the turbulence in the bands (which occupy only a portion of the domain) is more intense than the uniform turbulence, in such a way as to compensate for the laminar regions. In a geometry with a long streamwise and a short spanwise direction, turbulent patches repeatedly disappear abruptly and then re-nucleate gradually, for Reynolds numbers as low as 220. When the spanwise direction is long and the streamwise direction short, transition occurs abruptly from uniform turbulence to laminar Couette flow at Re=400.

  3. DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE High Pressure Laminar Burning

    E-print Network

    of : Temperature gradient in burned gas Change in gas properties e.g. cp Effects of residuals Normally use 10 zones Laminar Burning Velocity Measurements October 27, 2008 Page 9 #12;Schlieren Video C4H10 p0 = 1 bar, = 1

  4. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  5. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  6. Laminar epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis in an equine hoof

    PubMed Central

    Tatarniuk, Dane M.; Bracamonte, Joe L.; Wilson, David G.; Sharma, Ajay; Perry, Al W.

    2013-01-01

    A 6-year-old Canadian Warmblood gelding was presented for suspicion of keratoma growth, based on a history of recurring abscesses in the right front foot. Radiographic examination and computed tomography identified 2 bilaterally symmetrical, laminar epidermal ingrowths adhered to the hoof wall at the level of the lateral and medial heels. PMID:24155488

  7. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  8. Numerical Simulation of an Enclosed Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame in Microgravity Environment: Comparison with ELF Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Kezhong; Venuturumilli, Rajasekhar; Ryan, Brandon J.; Chen, Lea-Der

    2001-01-01

    Enclosed diffusion flames are commonly found in practical combustion systems, such as the power-plant combustor, gas turbine combustor, and jet engine after-burner. In these systems, fuel is injected into a duct with a co-flowing or cross-flowing air stream. The diffusion flame is found at the surface where the fuel jet and oxygen meet, react, and consume each other. In combustors, this flame is anchored at the burner (i.e., fuel jet inlet) unless adverse conditions cause the flame to lift off or blow out. Investigations of burner stability study the lift off, reattachment, and blow out of the flame. Flame stability is strongly dependent on the fuel jet velocity. When the fuel jet velocity is sufficiently low, the diffusion flame anchors at the burner rim. When the fuel jet velocity is increased, the flame base gradually moves downstream. However, when the fuel jet velocity increases beyond a critical value, the flame base abruptly jumps downstream. When this "jump" occurs, the flame is said to have reached its lift-off condition and the critical fuel jet velocity is called the lift-off velocity. While lifted, the flame is not attached to the burner and it appears to float in mid-air. Flow conditions are such that the flame cannot be maintained at the burner rim despite the presence of both fuel and oxygen. When the fuel jet velocity is further increased, the flame will eventually extinguish at its blowout condition. In contrast, if the fuel jet velocity of a lifted flame is reduced, the flame base moves upstream and abruptly returns to anchor at the burner rim. The fuel jet velocity at reattachment can be much lower than that at lift off, illustrating the hysteresis effect present in flame stability. Although there have been numerous studies of flame stability, the controlling mechanisms are not well understood. This uncertainty is described by Pitts in his review of various competing theories of lift off and blow out in turbulent jet diffusion flames. There has been some research on the stability of laminar flames, but most studies have focused on turbulent flames. It is also well known that the airflow around the fuel jet can significantly alter the lift off, reattachment and blow out of the jet diffusion flame. Buoyant convection is sufficiently strong in 1-g flames that it can dominate the flow-field, even at the burner rim. In normal-gravity testing, it is very difficult to delineate the effects of the forced airflow from those of the buoyancy-induced flow. Comparison of normal-gravity and microgravity flames provides clear indication of the influence of forced and buoyant flows on the flame stability. The overall goal of the Enclosed Laminar Flames (ELF) investigation (STS-87/USMP-4 Space Shuttle mission, November to December 1997) is to improve our understanding of the effects of buoyant convection on the structure and stability of co-flow diffusion flame, e.g., see http://zeta.lerc.nasa.gov/expr/elf.htm. The ELF hardware meets the experiment hardware limit of the 35-liter interior volume of the glovebox working area, and the 180x220-mm dimensions of the main door. The ELF experiment module is a miniature, fan-driven wind tunnel, equipped with a gas supply system. A 1.5-mm diameter nozzle is located on the duct's flow axis. The cross section of the duct is nominally a 76-mm square with rounded corners. The forced air velocity can be varied from about 0.2 to 0.9 m/s. The fuel flow can be set as high as 3 std. cubic centimeter (cc) per second, which corresponds to a nozzle exit velocity of up to 1.70 m/s. The ELF hardware and experimental procedure are discussed in detail in Brooker et al. The 1-g test results are repeated in several experiments following the STS-87 Mission. The ELF study is also relevant to practical systems because the momentum-dominated behavior of turbulent flames can be achieved in laminar flames in microgravity. The specific objectives of this paper are to evaluate the use reduced model for simulation of flame lift-off and blowout.

  9. Genome-wide linkage analysis of severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Edwin K; Mosley, Jonathan D; Palmer, Lyle J; Barth, Matthew; Senter, Jody M; Brown, Alison; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Kwiatkowski, David J; Chapman, Harold A; Campbell, Edward J; Province, Michael A; Rao, D C; Reilly, John J; Ginns, Leo C; Speizer, Frank E; Weiss, Scott T

    2002-03-15

    Familial aggregation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been demonstrated, but linkage analysis of COPD-related phenotypes has not been reported previously. An autosomal 10 cM genome-wide scan of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic markers was analyzed for linkage to COPD-related phenotypes in 585 members of 72 pedigrees ascertained through severe, early-onset COPD probands without severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. Multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis (using the ALLEGRO program) was performed for qualitative phenotypes including moderate airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV(1)) < 60% predicted, FEV(1)/FVC < 90% predicted], mild airflow obstruction (FEV(1) < 80% predicted, FEV(1)/FVC < 90% predicted) and chronic bronchitis. The strongest evidence for linkage in all subjects was observed at chromosomes 12 (LOD = 1.70) and 19 (LOD = 1.54) for moderate airflow obstruction, chromosomes 8 (LOD = 1.36) and 19 (LOD = 1.09) for mild airflow obstruction and chromosomes 19 (LOD = 1.21) and 22 (LOD = 1.37) for chronic bronchitis. Restricting analysis to cigarette smokers only provided increased evidence for linkage of mild airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis to several genomic regions; for mild airflow obstruction in smokers only, the maximum LOD was 1.64 at chromosome 19, whereas for chronic bronchitis in smokers only, the maximum LOD was 2.08 at chromosome 22. On chromosome 12p, 12 additional STR markers were genotyped, which provided additional support for an airflow obstruction locus in that region with a non-parametric multipoint approach for moderate airflow obstruction (LOD = 2.13) and mild airflow obstruction (LOD = 1.43). Using a dominant model with the STR markers on 12p, two point parametric linkage analysis of all subjects demonstrated a maximum LOD score of 2.09 for moderate airflow obstruction and 2.61 for mild airflow obstruction. In smokers only, the maximum two point LOD score for mild airflow obstruction was 3.14. These observations provide suggestive evidence that there is a locus on chromosome 12p which contributes to susceptibility to early-onset COPD. PMID:11912177

  10. A real-time restoring method for infrared images degraded by high-speed airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Qiang; Fei, Jindong; Chen, Chen

    2011-08-01

    Restoring images degraded by low speed airflow such as atmospheric turbulence was studied by many researchers a long time ago, and many methods were proposed. However, those methods proposed for low speed airflow generally can't meet this urgency mainly in two aspects: first, those methods are usually time-consuming, which fail time requisition; second, those deconvolution models designed for low speed airflow may not suit the case of high speed airflow, which leads to bad restoring effect. Because existent blind deconvolution methods are not competent for real-time restoring infrared images degraded by high speed airflow, a fast restoring method for that application is researched in this paper. Both the PSF estimation and the object estimation processes are constructed to improve the algorithm's efficiency. The simplified Weiner filter is adopted to fast estimate objects given PSF. For traditional methods, many computation methods, including iterative and non-iterative ones, can be used to resolve that problem. But we are more interested in non-iterative methods because of application background of our work, in which the speed of restoring algorithms is also an important factor that we must be concerned about. Therefore we choose here inverse-filtering method to estimate the object and use FFT to accelerate the computation. Gaussian-like function is used to approximate the PSF of degradation of high speed airflow. There are many papers on blur identification and was summarized well. However, those methods are either iterative, leading to slow estimation, or not feasible for Gaussian-like PSF. Therefore We figure out a new a frequency domain scheme to estimate the parameter of PSF quickly, and use both simulation and wind tunnel experiment infrared images to test its validation. Finally we compare our algorithm with other three blind algorithms, that is the Rechardson-Lucy method (RL), the maximum likelihood method (ML) and the primary component analysis method (PCA), and the results show that our algorithm not only gives much better result, but also consumes much less time.

  11. UNCERTAINTIES IN FAN PRESSURIZATION MEASUREMENTS:April 13, 1995 Submitted to ASTM: Airflow Performance Conference 10/93 LBL-32115

    E-print Network

    UNCERTAINTIES IN FAN PRESSURIZATION MEASUREMENTS:April 13, 1995 Submitted to ASTM: Airflow of California Larry Palmiter Ecotope Inc. ASTM Standard E779 is a test method for measuring the air tightness.

  12. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the facepiece shall not fall below atmospheric at inhalation airflows less than 115 liters (4 cubic feet) per minute. (c) The exhalation resistance to a flow of air at a rate of 85 liters (3 cubic...

  13. Unique Airflow Visualization Techniques for the Design and Validation of Above-Plenum Data Center CFD Models

    E-print Network

    Lloyd, Michael

    One cause for the substantial amount of energy used for data center cooling is poor airflow effects such as hot-aisle to cold-aisle air recirculation. To correct these and to investigate innovative designs that will notably ...

  14. Effects of feedstock, airflow rate, and recirculation ratio on performance of composting systems with air recirculation.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, K; Keener, H M; Akbolat, D

    2006-05-01

    The thermodynamics, kinetics, and energy use of composting systems with air recirculation were determined for feedstocks comprising paper mill sludge and biosolids. Results were developed by simulating the composting system using a two-dimensional finite difference numerical model. Incorporated into the simulation model was independent regulation of temperature and oxygen using a closed loop feedback control system with a two-stage fan setting. Results showed that at low airflows and high recirculation ratios, heat removal by the exhaust gas was insufficient to maintain set point temperatures with the result that process temperatures increased and eventually limited the reaction rate. Types of feedstock, magnitude of airflow and recirculation ratio all affected the energy use of the system. Although recirculation leads to high energy use, it can produce high quality compost by having a temperature gradient of less than 2 degrees C across the bed. PMID:15963715

  15. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  16. The coupling influence of airflow and temperature on the wall-wetted fuel film distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yong-sheng; Deng, Kangyao; Li, Tao

    2010-02-15

    The coupling influence of airflow and temperature on the two-dimensional distribution of the film resulted from fuel spray impinging on a horizontal flat wall was studied with experiments. The horizontal airflow direction was perpendicular to the vertical axis of the injection spray. The results show that, as air velocity increases, the film shape turns from a circle to an oblong. As wall temperature increases, the film area shrinks. Film thickness decreases as wall temperature or air velocity increases. The boiling point of the fuel is an important temperature to affect the film area and the film thickness. Film center moves more far away in the downstream direction as air velocity increases. For a certain air velocity, film center moves less far away as wall temperature increases. (author)

  17. Stabilization of liquid hydrocarbon fuel combustion by using a programmable microwave discharge in a subsonic airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyl, P. V.; Surkont, O. S.; Shibkov, V. M.; Shibkova, L. V.

    2012-06-15

    Under conditions of a programmable discharge (a surface microwave discharge combined with a dc discharge), plasma-enhanced combustion of alcohol injected into a subsonic (M = 0.3-0.9) airflow in the drop (spray) phase is stabilized. It is shown that the appearance of the discharge, its current-voltage characteristic, the emission spectrum, the total emission intensity, the heat flux, the electron density, the hydroxyl emission intensity, and the time dependences of the discharge current and especially discharge voltage change substantially during the transition from the airflow discharge to stabilized combustion of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel. After combustion stabilization, more than 80% of liquid alcohol can burn out, depending on the input power, and the flame temperature reaches {approx}2000 K.

  18. Influence of airflow rate and substrate nature on heterogeneous struvite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Saidou, H; Ben Moussa, S; Ben Amor, M

    2009-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants a hard scale consisting of struvite crystals can be formed, in pipes and recirculation pumps, during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of airflow rate and substrate nature on nucleation type, induction period and supersaturation coefficient during struvite precipitation. A crystallization reactor similar to that designed for calcium carbonate precipitation was used. The pH of synthetic wastewater solution was increased by air bubbling. Experimental results indicated that the airflow increased heterogeneous precipitation of struvite. The susceptibility to scale formation was more important on polyamide and polyvinyl chloride than on stainless steel. In all cases, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy showed that the precipitated solid phase was solely struvite. No difference in crystal morphology was observed. However, at similar experimental conditions, the particle size of struvite was higher for stainless-steel material than that for plastic materials. PMID:19213469

  19. Airflow elicits a spider's jump towards airborne prey. II. Flow characteristics guiding behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Klopsch, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.; Barth, Friedrich G.

    2013-01-01

    When hungry, the wandering spider Cupiennius salei is frequently seen to catch flying insect prey. The success of its remarkable prey-capture jump from its sitting plant into the air obviously depends on proper timing and sensory guidance. In this study, it is shown that particular features of the airflow generated by the insect suffice to guide the spider. Vision and the reception of substrate vibrations and airborne sound are not needed. The behavioural reactions of blinded spiders were examined by exposing them to natural and synthetic flows imitating the fly-generated flow or particular features of it. Thus, the different roles of the three phases previously identified in the fly-generated flow and described in the companion paper could be demonstrated. When exposing the spider to phase I flow only (exponentially increasing flow velocity with very little fluctuation and typical of the fly's approach), an orienting behaviour could be observed but a prey-capture jump never be elicited. Remarkably, the spider reacted to the onset of phase II (highly fluctuating flow) of a synthetically generated flow field with a jump as frequently as it did when exposed to natural fly-generated flows. In all cases using either natural or artificial flows, the spider's jump was triggered before its flow sensors were hit by phase III flow (steadily decreasing airflow velocity). Phase III may tell the spider that the prey has passed by already in case of no prey-capture reaction. Our study underlines the relevance of airflow in spider behaviour. It also reflects the sophisticated workings of their flow sensors (trichobothria) previously studied in detail. Presumably, the information contained in prey-generated airflows plays a similar role in many other arthropods. PMID:23427092

  20. Payload bay atmospheric vent airflow testing at the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several concerns related to venting the Space Shuttle Orbiter payload bay during launch led to laboratory experiments with a flight-type vent box installed in the wall of a subsonic wind tunnel. This report describes the test setups and procedures used to acquire data for characterization of airflow through the vent box and acoustic tones radiated from the vent-box cavity. A flexible boundary-layer spoiler which reduced the vent-tone amplitude is described.

  1. Coolant pressure and airflow distribution in a strut-supported transpiration-cooled vane for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Poferl, D. J.; Richards, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis to predict pressure and flow distribution in a strut-supported wire-cloth vane was developed. Results were compared with experimental data obtained from room-temperature airflow tests conducted over a range of vane inlet airflow rates from 10.7 to 40.4 g/sec (0.0235 to 0.0890 lb/sec). The analytical method yielded reasonably accurate predictions of vane coolant flow rate and pressure distribution.

  2. Airflow influence on the discharge performance of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Tropea, C.; Grundmann, S.

    2012-07-15

    In the present work, the effect of the airflow on the performance of dielectric barrier discharge plasma-actuators is investigated experimentally. In order to analyze the actuator's performance, luminosity measurements have been carried out simultaneously with the recording of the relevant electrical parameters. A performance drop of about 10% is observed for the entire measured parameter range at a flow speed of M = 0.145 (U{sub {infinity}}=50 m/s). This insight is of particular importance, since the plasma-actuator control authority is already significantly reduced at this modest speed level. The results at higher Mach numbers (0.4airflow velocities. Two non-dimensional scaling numbers are proposed to characterize and quantify the airflow influence. It is demonstrated that these numbers span a universal performance drop diagram for the entire range of investigated operating parameters.

  3. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 M? and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 k?, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 ?F to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks. PMID:25844537

  4. Chronic endotoxin exposure produces airflow obstruction and lung dendritic cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peggy S; Fresco, Jennifer M; Pinilla, Miguel A; Macias, Alvaro A; Brown, Ronald D; Englert, Joshua A; Hofmann, Oliver; Lederer, James A; Hide, Winston; Christiani, David C; Cernadas, Manuela; Baron, Rebecca M

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of persistent airflow obstruction that result from chronic occupational endotoxin exposure. We sought to analyze the inflammatory response underlying persistent airflow obstruction as a result of chronic occupational endotoxin exposure. We developed a murine model of daily inhaled endotoxin for periods of 5 days to 8 weeks. We analyzed physiologic lung dysfunction, lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and total lung homogenate inflammatory cell and cytokine profiles, and pulmonary gene expression profiles. We observed an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness as a result of chronic endotoxin exposure. After 8 weeks, the mice exhibited an increase in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung neutrophils that correlated with an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. Detailed analyses of inflammatory cell subsets revealed an expansion of dendritic cells (DCs), and in particular, proinflammatory DCs, with a reduced percentage of macrophages. Gene expression profiling revealed the up-regulation of a panel of genes that was consistent with DC recruitment, and lung histology revealed an accumulation of DCs in inflammatory aggregates around the airways in 8-week-exposed animals. Repeated, low-dose LPS inhalation, which mirrors occupational exposure, resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness, associated with a failure to resolve the proinflammatory response, an inverted macrophage to DC ratio, and a significant rise in the inflammatory DC population. These findings point to a novel underlying mechanism of airflow obstruction as a result of occupational LPS exposure, and suggest molecular and cellular targets for therapeutic development. PMID:22517795

  5. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 M?. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor. PMID:26343789

  6. Influence of room geometry and ventilation rate on airflow and aerosol dispersion: implications for worker protection.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Wasiolek, Piotr T; Tavani, Rebecca A

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of dispersion rates and patterns of radioactive aerosols and gases through workrooms is critical for understanding human exposure and for developing strategies for worker protection. The dispersion within rooms can be influenced by complex interactions between numerous variables, but especially ventilation design and room furnishings. For this study, dependence of airflow and aerosol dispersion on workroom geometry (furnishings) and ventilation rate were studied in an experimental room that was designed to approximate a plutonium laboratory. Three different configurations of simulated gloveboxes and two ventilation rates (approximately 6 and 12 air exchanges per hour) were studied. A sonic anemometer was used to measure airflow parameters including all three components of air velocity vectors and turbulence intensity distributions at multiple locations and heights. Aerosol dispersion rates and patterns were measured by releasing aerosols multiple times from six different locations. Aerosol particle concentrations resolved in time and space were measured using 16 multiplexed laser particle counters. Comparisons were made of air velocities, turbulence, and aerosol transport across different ventilation rates and room configurations. A strong influence of ventilation rate on aerosol dispersion rates and air velocity was found, and changes in room geometry had significant effects on aerosol dispersion rates and patterns. These results are important with regards to constant evaluation of placement of air sampling equipment, benchmarking numerical models of room airflow, and design of ventilation and room layouts with consideration of worker safety. PMID:11768799

  7. Human-Mediated Dispersal of Seeds by the Airflow of Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    von der Lippe, Moritz; Bullock, James M.; Kowarik, Ingo; Knopp, Tatjana; Wichmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Human-mediated dispersal is known as an important driver of long-distance dispersal for plants but underlying mechanisms have rarely been assessed. Road corridors function as routes of secondary dispersal for many plant species but the extent to which vehicles support this process remains unclear. In this paper we quantify dispersal distances and seed deposition of plant species moved over the ground by the slipstream of passing cars. We exposed marked seeds of four species on a section of road and drove a car along the road at a speed of 48 km/h. By tracking seeds we quantified movement parallel as well as lateral to the road, resulting dispersal kernels, and the effect of repeated vehicle passes. Median distances travelled by seeds along the road were about eight meters for species with wind dispersal morphologies and one meter for species without such adaptations. Airflow created by the car lifted seeds and resulted in longitudinal dispersal. Single seeds reached our maximum measuring distance of 45 m and for some species exceeded distances under primary dispersal. Mathematical models were fit to dispersal kernels. The incremental effect of passing vehicles on longitudinal dispersal decreased with increasing number of passes as seeds accumulated at road verges. We conclude that dispersal by vehicle airflow facilitates seed movement along roads and accumulation of seeds in roadside habitats. Dispersal by vehicle airflow can aid the spread of plant species and thus has wide implications for roadside ecology, invasion biology and nature conservation. PMID:23320077

  8. Study on airflow and inhaled particle deposition within realistic human upper respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Hu, G. L.; Fan, J. R.; Pan, D.

    2009-02-01

    Based on the CT (Computerized Tomography) scanned images of a 19-years-old healthy boy, a realistic geometric model of URT from nasal cavity to the upper six-generation bronchial is rebuilt. To investigate airflow and particle deposition in the obtained realistic human upper respiratory tract, RNG k-epsilon turbulence model was used to describe the primary flow and particle deposition under three breathing intensity such as 15 L/min, 30 L/min and 60 L/min. The particle is tracked and analyzed in the Lagrangian frame. The velocity fields of airflow under different airflow rates were computed and discussed. The trapping of particles with diameter 1?m on the wall surfaces was monitored, and the locations of trapping in different region were visualized. In order to study the characteristics of particles movement and the effect of particles diameter on the deposition pattern, eleven kinds of sphere particles with different diameters are selected as research object. The diameters of selected particles as follows: 0.1?m, 0.5?m, 1?m, 2.5?m, 3?m, 3.5?m, 4?m, 4.5?m, 5?m, 6.5?m and 8?m. The variation of inhalable particles deposition in realistic human upper respiratory tract with respiratory intensity and particle size was researched and compared.

  9. Childhood-Onset Asthma in Smokers. Association between CT Measures of Airway Size, Lung Function, and Chronic Airflow Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Megan E.; Come, Carolyn E.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Ross, James C.; Kurugol, Sila; Okajima, Yuka; Han, MeiLan K.; Kim, Victor; Ramsdell, Joe; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.; Make, Barry; Barr, R. Graham; Hersh, Craig P.; Washko, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Asthma is associated with chronic airflow obstruction. Our goal was to assess the association of computed tomographic measures of airway wall volume and lumen volume with the FEV1 and chronic airflow obstruction in smokers with childhood-onset asthma. Methods: We analyzed clinical, lung function, and volumetric computed tomographic airway volume data from 7,266 smokers, including 590 with childhood-onset asthma. Small wall volume and small lumen volume of segmental airways were defined as measures 1 SD below the mean. We assessed the association between small wall volume, small lumen volume, FEV1, and chronic airflow obstruction (post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio < 0.7) using linear and logistic models. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with subjects without childhood-onset asthma, those with childhood-onset asthma had smaller wall volume and lumen volume (P < 0.0001) of segmental airways. Among subjects with childhood-onset asthma, those with the smallest wall volume and lumen volume had the lowest FEV1 and greatest odds of chronic airflow obstruction. A similar tendency was seen in those without childhood-onset asthma. When comparing these two groups, both small wall volume and small lumen volume were more strongly associated with FEV1 and chronic airflow obstruction among subjects with childhood-asthma in multivariate models. Conclusion: In smokers with childhood-onset asthma, smaller airways are associated with reduced lung function and chronic airflow obstruction. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764). PMID:25296268

  10. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  11. An approximate analytical solution of the laminar boundary layer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi-Wu

    1993-01-01

    Using the pressure gradient as the new variable instead of the ordinary longitudinal coordinate x, Liu (1981) transformed the ordinary laminar boundary equations into a new form. On this basis, Liu obtained the frictional stress factor by using the graphical method. In this paper the same variable replacement is used, and an approximate analytical solution of the laminar boundary layer equations is obtained by the series method. Also obtained is a formula for the frictional stress factor. For the case of the main function without the term of the constant, a further simplification is made. The error of the frictional stress factor obtained is still less than 10 percent, compared with that of Liu.

  12. Natural laminar flow and airplane stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1986-01-01

    Location and mode of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer flow have a dominant effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil section. The influences of these parameters on the sectional lift and drag characteristics of three airfoils are examined. Both analytical and experimental results demonstrate that when the boundary layer transitions near the leading edge as a result of surface roughness, extensive trailing-edge separation of the turbulent boundary layer may occur. If the airfoil has a relatively sharp leading-edge, leading-edge stall due to laminar separation can occur after the leading-edge suction peak is formed. These two-dimensional results are used to examine the effects of boundary layer transition behavior on airplane longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control.

  13. Aerodynamic Design for Swept-wing Laminar Flow 

    E-print Network

    Belisle, Michael Joseph

    2013-11-08

    Improvement (AFRL/NGC) AFRL Air Force Research Laboratory ATTAS Advanced Technologies Testing Aircraft System (German Aerospace Center) BL Wing buttock line, measured in inches from aircraft centerline CAD Computer-aided design CC Complex conjugate CFD... PSE Parabolized stability equations xi RMS Root-mean-square SARGE Subsonic Aircraft Roughness Glove Experiment SCRAT Subsonic Research Aircraft Testbed SWIFT Swept-Wing In-Flight Testing (AFRL/TAMU) SWLFC Swept-wing laminar flow control TAMU Texas A...

  14. On stability of free laminar boundary layer between parallel streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessen, Martin

    1950-01-01

    An analysis and calculations on the stability of the free laminar boundary layer between parallel streams were made for an incompressible fluid using the Tollmien-Schlichting theory of small disturbances. Because the boundary conditions are at infinity, two solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld stability equations need not be considered, and the remaining two solutions are exponential in character at the infinite boundaries. The calculations show that the flow is unstable except for very low Reynolds numbers.

  15. Development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, Walter

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction slot that is assumed to cut off part of the boundary layer without exerting any sink effect. The development, which is approximate, is based on the heat conduction equation. The heat conduction equation enters the analysis through a linearization of the Prandtl-Mises form of the boundary-layer equation.

  16. Membraneless vanadium redox fuel cell using laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Rosaria; Stroock, Abraham D; Clark, Thomas D; Mayer, Michael; Whitesides, George M

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a small, membraneless redox fuel cell. The smallest channel dimensions of the cell were 2 mm x 50 mum or x 200 mum; the cell was fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) using soft lithography. This all-vanadium fuel cell took advantage of laminar flow to obviate the need for a membrane to separate the solutions of oxidizing and reducing components. PMID:12405803

  17. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  18. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  19. Laminar shocks in high power laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Trines, R.

    2014-02-15

    We propose a theory to describe laminar ion sound structures in a collisionless plasma. Reflection of a small fraction of the upstream ions converts the well known ion acoustic soliton into a structure with a steep potential gradient upstream and with downstream oscillations. The theory provides a simple interpretation of results dating back more than forty years but, more importantly, is shown to provide an explanation for recent observations on laser produced plasmas relevant to inertial fusion and to ion acceleration.

  20. The Effects of Gravity on Wrinkled Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Larry W.; Zhou, Liming; Cheng, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of gravity are significant to the dynamics of idealized unconfined open premixed flames. Moderate to low turbulence Reynolds number flames, i.e., wrinkled laminar flames, of various unconfined geometries have been used extensively for investigating fundamental processes of turbulent flame propagation and to validate theoretical models. Without the wall constraints, the flames are free to expand and interact with surrounding ambient air. The flow field in which the flame exists is determined by a coupling of burner geometry, flame orientation and the gravity field. These complex interactions raise serious questions regarding the validity of comparing the experimental data of open flames with current theoretical and numerical models that do not include the effects of gravity nor effects of the larger aerodynamic flowfield. Therefore, studies of wrinkled laminar flame in microgravity are needed for a better understanding of the role of gravity on flame characteristics such as the orientation, mean aerodynamics stretch, flame wrinkle size and burning rate. Our approach to characterize and quantify turbulent flame structures under microgravity is to exploit qualitative and quantitative flow visualization techniques coupled with video recording and computer controlled image analysis technologies. The experiments will be carried out in the 2.2 second drop tower at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The longest time scales of typical wrinkled laminar flames in the geometries considered here are in the order of 10 msec. Hence, the duration of the drop is sufficient to obtain the amount of statistical data necessary for characterize turbulent flame structures.

  1. The effects of gravity on wrinkled laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Zhou, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    Laminar and turbulent conical Bunsen type flames were used. The study compares results from normal gravity with the burner in an up-right orientation (+g), the burner inverted (-g), and in microgravity ([mu]g) by using the NASA Lewis drop tower facility. The primary diagnostic is a laser schlieren system and some LDA measurements were taken for the +g condition to measure the flow field. The +g laminar flame experiences a large amount of instabilities and results in an unsteady flame tip; cause is torroidal vortex rolling up between products and stagnate surrounding air. Comparison between LDA measurements in reactants and schlieren images shows that velocity fluctuation are induced at the same frequency as the roll up vortices are formed. This pumping of the reactant stream by the product/air interface instability in the +g case is also observed in the turbulent flames. In the -g arrangement the product/air interface is stable so there is no large pumping of the flame tip. At low flow rates the -g flames have flattened tips, but at higher flow rates they become conical in shape. When both flames. appear conical, the -g flames are longer for the same flow rate. In [mu]g the larger instabilities in the flame no longer exist as the product/air interface is believed to become stable. The laminar flames in [mu]g still show small instabilities over the entire flame.

  2. The effects of gravity on wrinkled laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Zhou, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    Laminar and turbulent conical Bunsen type flames were used. The study compares results from normal gravity with the burner in an up-right orientation (+g), the burner inverted (-g), and in microgravity ({mu}g) by using the NASA Lewis drop tower facility. The primary diagnostic is a laser schlieren system and some LDA measurements were taken for the +g condition to measure the flow field. The +g laminar flame experiences a large amount of instabilities and results in an unsteady flame tip; cause is torroidal vortex rolling up between products and stagnate surrounding air. Comparison between LDA measurements in reactants and schlieren images shows that velocity fluctuation are induced at the same frequency as the roll up vortices are formed. This pumping of the reactant stream by the product/air interface instability in the +g case is also observed in the turbulent flames. In the -g arrangement the product/air interface is stable so there is no large pumping of the flame tip. At low flow rates the -g flames have flattened tips, but at higher flow rates they become conical in shape. When both flames. appear conical, the -g flames are longer for the same flow rate. In {mu}g the larger instabilities in the flame no longer exist as the product/air interface is believed to become stable. The laminar flames in {mu}g still show small instabilities over the entire flame.

  3. Natural laminar flow experiments on modern airplane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Obara, C. J.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    Flight and wind-tunnel natural laminar flow experiments have been conducted on various lifting and nonlifting surfaces of several airplanes at unit Reynolds numbers between 0.63 x 10 to the 6th power/ft and 3.08 x 10 to the 6th power/ft, at Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7, and at lifting surface leading-edge sweep angles from 0 deg to 63 deg. The airplanes tested were selected to provide relatively stiff skin conditions, free from significant roughness and waviness, on smooth modern production-type airframes. The observed transition locations typically occurred downstream of the measured or calculated pressure peak locations for the test conditions involved. No discernible effects on transition due to surface waviness were observed on any of the surfaces tested. None of the measured heights of surface waviness exceeded the empirically predicted allowable surface waviness. Experimental results consistent with spanwise contamination criteria were observed. Large changes in flight-measured performance and stability and control resulted from loss of laminar flow by forced transition. Rain effects on the laminar boundary layer caused stick-fixed nose-down pitch-trim changes in two of the airplanes tested. No effect on transition was observed for flight through low-altitude liquid-phase clouds. These observations indicate the importance of fixed-transition tests as a standard flight testing procedure for modern smooth airframes.

  4. Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, S H; Lin, D

    2008-01-01

    We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  5. The effect of debris accumulation on and filter resistance to airflow for four commercially available vacuum cleaners.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Santalla-Elias, Javier

    2009-06-01

    Mortar removal with right-angle grinders can cause excessive exposure to respirable crystalline silica. To control this dust exposure, vacuum cleaners need to exhaust 2.3 m(3)/min (80 cubic feet per minute) from the grinder's exhaust hood. Maintaining this airflow while collecting as much as 15.9 kg (35 lb) of debris in the vacuum cleaner has been problematic. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate how mortar debris affects vacuum cleaner airflow and filter pressure loss. Four vacuum cleaners were tested. Two of the vacuum cleaners used vacuum cleaner bags as a prefilter; the other two vacuum cleaners used cyclones to reduce the amount of debris that reaches the filter. Test debris was collected by a masonry restoration contractor during actual mortar removal using a grinder fitted with a hood. The hood is attached to a vacuum cleaner with cyclonic pre-separation. The vacuum cleaner fan curves were obtained experimentally to learn how pressure loss affects vacuum cleaner airflows. Then, 15.9 kg (35 lb) of mortar removal debris was sucked into the vacuum cleaner in 2.27-kg (5-lb) increments. Before and after adding each 2.27-kg (5-lb) increment of debris, vacuum cleaner airflows were measured with a venturi meter, and vacuum cleaner static pressures were measured at the inlet to the vacuum cleaner motor, and before and after each filter. The vacuum cleaners equipped with cyclonic pre-separation were unaffected by the mass of debris collected in the vacuum cleaner and were able to maintain airflows in excess of 1.98 m(3)/min (70 cfm) throughout the testing program. As debris accumulated in the vacuum cleaners that used bags, airflow decreased from 2.3 m(3)/min (80 cfm) to as little as 0.85 m(3)/min (30 cfm). This airflow loss is caused by the increased airflow resistance of the bags that increased from less 0.03 kPa/m(3)/min (0.1 inches of water per cfm) to 16.7 kPa/m(3)/min (1.9 inches of water/cfm). Apparently, vacuum cleaners using bags should be used in applications where adequate dust control can be achieved at airflows less than 0.85 m(3)/min (30 cfm). Vacuum cleaners with cyclonic pre-separators provided superior and cost-effective dust control compared with vacuums with bags when dust loading was high and when more than 30 cfm of airflow is needed for dust control. PMID:19360515

  6. Flight-measured laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena including stability theory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, C. J.; Holmes, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a single-engine turboprop aircraft fitted with a 92-in-chord, 3-ft-span natural laminar flow glove at glove section lift coefficients from 0.15 to 1.10. The boundary-layer transition measurement methods used included sublimating chemicals and surface hot-film sensors. Transition occurred downstream of the minimum pressure point. Hot-film sensors provided a well-defined indication of laminar, laminar-separation, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Theoretical calculations of the boundary-layer parameters provided close agreement between the predicted laminar-separation point and the measured transition location. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave growth n-factors between 15 and 17 were calculated at the predicted point of laminar separation. These results suggest that for many practical airplane cruise conditions, laminar separation (as opposed to T-S instability) is the major cause of transition in predominantly two-dimensional flows.

  7. A Joint Numerical-Experimental Study on Impact Induced Intra-laminar and Inter-laminar Damage in Laminated Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Caputo, F.; Di Felice, G.; Saputo, S.; Toscano, C.; Lopresto, V.

    2015-07-01

    The investigation of the mechanical response of fibre-reinforced composite laminates under impact loads can be very difficult due to the occurrence of simultaneous failure phenomena. Indeed, as a consequence of low velocity impacts, intra-laminar damages, like fibre and matrix cracking, and inter-laminar damages, such as delaminations, can take place simultaneously. These damage mechanisms can lead to significant reductions in strength and stability of the composite structure. In this paper a joint numerical-experimental study is proposed which, by means of non-destructive testing techniques (Ultra-sound and thermography) and non-linear explicit FEM analyses, aims to completely characterise the impact induced damage in composite laminates under low velocity impacts. Indeed the proposed numerical tool has been used to improve the understanding of the experimental data obtained by Non-Destructive Techniques. Applications on samples tested according to the AECMA (European Association of Aerospace Manufacturers) prEn6038 standard at three different impact energies are presented. The interaction between numerical and experimental investigation allowed to obtain an exhaustive insight on the different phases of the impact event considering the inter-laminar damage formation and evolution.

  8. Experimental and numerical analyses of laminar boundary-layer flow stability over an aircraft fuselage forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1987-01-01

    Fuelled by a need to reduce viscous drag of airframes, significant advances have been made in the last decade to design lifting surface geometries with considerable amounts of laminar flow. In contrast to the present understanding of practical limits for natural laminar flow over lifting surfaces, limited experimental results are available examining applicability of natural laminar flow over axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric fuselage shapes at relevantly high length Reynolds numbers. The drag benefits attainable by realizing laminar flow over nonlifting aircraft components such as fuselages and nacelles are shown. A flight experiment to investigate transition location and transition mode over the forward fuselage of a light twin engine propeller driven airplane is examined.

  9. Interactions of bluff-body obstacles with turbulent airflows affecting evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-11-01

    Bluff-body obstacles interacting with turbulent airflows are common in many natural and engineering applications (from desert pavement and shrubs over natural surfaces to cylindrical elements in compact heat exchangers). Even with obstacles of simple geometry, their interactions within turbulent airflows result in a complex and unsteady flow field that affects surface drag partitioning and transport of scalars from adjacent evaporating surfaces. Observations of spatio-temporal thermal patterns on evaporating porous surfaces adjacent to bluff-body obstacles depict well-defined and persistent zonation of evaporation rates that were used to construct a simple mechanistic model for surface-turbulence interactions. Results from evaporative drying of sand surfaces with isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies) subjected to constant turbulent airflows were in good agreement with model predictions for localized exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces relative to smooth flat surfaces under similar conditions. The enhancement is attributed to formation of vortices that induce a thinner boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. For a practical range of air velocities (0.5-4.0 m/s), low-aspect ratio cylindrical bluff elements placed on evaporating sand surfaces enhanced evaporative mass losses (relative to a flat surface) by up to 300% for high density of elements and high wind velocity, similar to observations reported in the literature. Concepts from drag partitioning were used to generalize the model and upscale predictions to evaporation from surfaces with multiple obstacles for potential applications to natural bluff-rough surfaces.

  10. Epithelial mesenchymal transition in smokers: large versus small airways and relation to airflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Malik Quasir; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Shukla, Shakti Dhar; Ward, Chris; Hardikar, Ashutosh; Noor, Wan Danial; Muller, Hans Konrad; Knight, Darryl A; Walters, Eugene Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Background Small airway fibrosis is the main contributor in airflow obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been implicated in this process, and in large airways, is associated with angiogenesis, ie, Type-3, which is classically promalignant. Objective In this study we have investigated whether EMT biomarkers are expressed in small airways compared to large airways in subjects with chronic airflow limitation (CAL) and what type of EMT is present on the basis of vascularity. Methods We evaluated epithelial activation, reticular basement membrane fragmentation (core structural EMT marker) and EMT-related mesenchymal biomarkers in small and large airways from resected lung tissue from 18 lung cancer patients with CAL and 9 normal controls. Tissues were immunostained for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR; epithelial activation marker), vimentin (mesenchymal marker), and S100A4 (fibroblast epitope). Type-IV collagen was stained to demonstrate vessels. Results There was increased expression of EMT-related markers in CAL small airways compared to controls: EGFR (P<0.001), vimentin (P<0.001), S100A4 (P<0.001), and fragmentation (P<0.001), but this was less than that in large airways. Notably, there was no hypervascularity in small airway reticular basement membrane as in large airways. Epithelial activation and S100A4 expression were related to airflow obstruction. Conclusion EMT is active in small airways, but less so than in large airways in CAL, and may be relevant to the key pathologies of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, small airway fibrosis, and airway cancers. PMID:26346976

  11. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min(-1), which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response. PMID:26451714

  12. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min-1, which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  13. Respiratory kinematic and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Brandimore, Alexandra E.; Troche, Michelle S.; Huber, Jessica E.; Hegland, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cough is a defensive behavior that can be initiated in response to a stimulus in the airway (reflexively), or on command (voluntarily). There is evidence to suggest that physiological differences exist between reflex and voluntary cough; however, the output (mechanistic and airflow) differences between the cough types are not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the lung volume, respiratory kinematic, and airflow differences between reflex and voluntary cough in healthy young adults. Methods: Twenty-five participants (14 female; 18–29 years) were recruited for this study. Participants were evaluated using respiratory inductance plethysmography calibrated with spirometry. Experimental procedures included: (1) respiratory calibration, (2) three voluntary sequential cough trials, and (3) three reflex cough trials induced with 200 ?M capsaicin. Results: Lung volume initiation (LVI; p = 0.003) and lung volume excursion (LVE; p < 0.001) were significantly greater for voluntary cough compared to reflex cough. The rib cage and abdomen significantly influenced LVI for voluntary cough (p < 0.001); however, only the rib cage significantly impacted LVI for reflex cough (p < 0.001). LVI significantly influenced peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) for voluntary cough (p = 0.029), but not reflex cough (p = 0.610). Discussion: Production of a reflex cough results in significant mechanistic and airflow differences compared to voluntary cough. These findings suggest that detection of a tussigenic stimulus modifies motor aspects of the reflex cough behavior. Further understanding of the differences between reflex and voluntary cough in older adults and in persons with dystussia (cough dysfunction) will be essential to facilitate the development of successful cough treatment paradigms. PMID:26500560

  14. Automatic non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas with nasal airflow compared to esophageal pressure.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, C; Schwaibold, M; Randerath, W; Bolz, A; Jane, R

    2010-01-01

    The differentiation of obstructive and central respiratory events is a major challenge in the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing. Esophageal pressure (Pes) measurement is the gold-standard method to identify these events but its invasiveness deters its usage in clinical routine. Flattening patterns appear in the airflow signal during episodes of inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) and have been shown with invasive techniques to be useful to differentiate between central and obstructive hypopneas. In this study we present a new method for the automatic non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas solely with nasal airflow. An overall of 36 patients underwent full night polysomnography with systematic Pes recording and a total of 1069 hypopneas were manually scored by human experts to create a gold-standard annotation set. Features were automatically extracted from the nasal airflow signal to train and test our automatic classifier (Discriminant Analysis). Flattening patterns were non-invasively assessed in the airflow signal using spectral and time analysis. The automatic non-invasive classifier obtained a sensitivity of 0.71 and an accuracy of 0.69, similar to the results obtained with a manual non-invasive classification algorithm. Hence, flattening airflow patterns seem promising for the non-invasive differentiation of obstructive and central hypopneas. PMID:21097144

  15. Gas crossflow effects on airflow through a wire-form transpiration cooling material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. S.; Russell, L. M.; Poferl, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental analysis was conducted to determine the effects of gas stream flow parallel to the discharging surface on the flow characteristics of a wire-form porous material. Flow data were obtained over a range of transpiration airflow rates from 0.129 to 0.695/grams per second-centimeter squared and external gas stream Mach numbers from 0 to 0.46. The conclusion was drawn that the flow characteristics of the wire cloth were not significantly affected by the external gas flows.

  16. Single-stage electrohydraulic servosystem for actuating on airflow valve with frequencies to 500 hertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Mehmed, O.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    An airflow valve and its electrohydraulic actuation servosystem are described. The servosystem uses a high-power, single-stage servovalve to obtain a dynamic response beyond that of systems designed with conventional two-stage servovalves. The electrohydraulic servosystem is analyzed and the limitations imposed on system performance by such nonlinearities as signal saturations and power limitations are discussed. Descriptions of the mechanical design concepts and developmental considerations are included. Dynamic data, in the form of sweep-frequency test results, are presented and comparison with analytical results obtained with an analog computer model is made.

  17. Hypochondriacal concerns and somatic symptoms in patients with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kellner, R; Samet, J M; Pathak, D

    1987-01-01

    In order to explore hypochondriacal concerns in patients with Chronic Airflow Obstruction (CAO) the authors administered the Illness Attitude Scales and the somatization, anxiety, depression and anger-hostility scales of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist to 50 patients with CAO and to matched family practice patients. Somatic symptoms were significantly correlated with fears of disease and hypochondriacal concerns in family practice patients, but were unrelated in CAO. Patients with CAO, although more anxious, depressed and with more severe somatic symptoms than family practice patients, had fewer hypochondriacal concerns. In this respect patients with CAO were unlike any other group previously studied. PMID:3430420

  18. Relation of pulmonary vessel size to transfer factor in subjects with airflow obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.

    1983-11-01

    In a group of 61 consecutive patients undergoing assessment of airflow obstruction, a significant linear relation was demonstrated between measurements of the diameter of the midzonal pulmonary vessels on the plain chest radiographs and transfer factor (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide) (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Since reduction in transfer factor has been shown to relate to structural emphysema, reduction in midzone vessel caliber implies the same. However, in the individual patient neither the transfer factor nor structural emphysema can be reliably predicted from midzone vessel diameters alone.

  19. Quality improvement of melt extruded laminar systems using mixture design.

    PubMed

    Hasa, D; Perissutti, B; Campisi, B; Grassi, M; Grabnar, I; Golob, S; Mian, M; Voinovich, D

    2015-07-30

    This study investigates the application of melt extrusion for the development of an oral retard formulation with a precise drug release over time. Since adjusting the formulation appears to be of the utmost importance in achieving the desired drug release patterns, different formulations of laminar extrudates were prepared according to the principles of Experimental Design, using a design for mixtures to assess the influence of formulation composition on the in vitro drug release from the extrudates after 1h and after 8h. The effect of each component on the two response variables was also studied. Ternary mixtures of theophylline (model drug), monohydrate lactose and microcrystalline wax (as thermoplastic binder) were extruded in a lab scale vertical ram extruder in absence of solvents at a temperature below the melting point of the binder (so that the crystalline state of the drug could be maintained), through a rectangular die to obtain suitable laminar systems. Thanks to the desirability approach and a reliability study for ensuring the quality of the formulation, a very restricted optimal zone was defined within the experimental domain. Among the mixture components, the variation of microcrystalline wax content played the most significant role in overall influence on the in vitro drug release. The formulation theophylline:lactose:wax, 57:14:29 (by weight), selected based on the desirability zone, was subsequently used for in vivo studies. The plasma profile, obtained after oral administration of the laminar extruded system in hard gelatine capsules, revealed the typical trend of an oral retard formulation. The application of the mixture experimental design associated to a desirability function permitted to optimize the extruded system and to determine the composition space that ensures final product quality. PMID:25912827

  20. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  1. Two-dimensional laminar incompressible separated flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, A.

    1973-01-01

    A method is proposed to treat the problem of steady, two-dimensional, laminar, incompressible high Reynolds number separated flow past thin airfoils. An integral form of the boundary layer equations with interaction is used and the interaction between the inviscid and viscous flow fields is provided for by use of a thin-airfoil integral. Documentation of the attempts at obtaining a solution is presented. A survey of the current state-of-the-art of problems involving viscous-inviscid interactions in flow fields with separation is given.

  2. Hybrid laminar flow control applied to advanced turbofan engine nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, F. S., Jr.; Arcara, P. C., Jr.; Wie, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    The potential application of hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) to the external surface of an advanced, high bypass ratio turbofan engine nacelle with a wetted area that approaches 15 percent of the wing total wetted area of future commercial transports is presented. A pressure distribution compatible with HLFC is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed employing a predictor/corrector design technique. Performance evaluations on an advanced twin-engine transport configuration are discussed to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  3. Polymer Effects on Heat Transport in Laminar Boundary Layer Flow

    E-print Network

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-27

    We consider a laminar Blasius boundary-layer flow above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study the effect of polymer additives on the heat transport. We show that the action of the polymers can be understood as a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value then decreases exponentially back to the zero-shear value as one moves away from the boundary. We find that with such an effective viscosity, both the horizontal and vertical velocities near the plate are decreased thus leading to an increase in the friction drag and a decrease in the heat transport in the flow.

  4. Unsteady Laminar CFD Simulation of Undulatory Rainbow Trout Swimming Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Patrick; Hotchkiss, Rollin; Stock, David

    2004-11-01

    The propulsion mechanism of an undulatory swimming 10 cm rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss) is studied using a laminar 2-D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes computational model with a moving adaptive mesh (Fluent 6.1). The wake mechanism is dominated by a reverse von Karman vortex street and compares well to previous experimental data. Thrust and drag forces are quantified and the equilibrium condition is satisfied within 5%. A method is developed to calculate hydrodynamic power using work, which results in a swimming efficiency of 62%. An investigation of the boundary layer shows incipient separation and highly unsteady velocity profiles.

  5. Laminar flow control leading edge systems in simulated airline service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of two candidate leading-edge flow laminarization systems applicable to airline service was tested using representative airline operational conditions with respect to air traffic, weather, and airport insect infestation. One of the systems involved a perforated Ti alloy suction surface with about 1 million 0.0025-in. diameter holes drilled by electron beam, as well as a Krueger-type flap that offered protective shielding against insect impingement; the other supplied surface suction through a slotted Ti alloy skin with 27 spanwise slots on the upper and lower surface.

  6. Analytical Study of Gravity Effects on Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R. B.; Fortune, O.; Weilerstein, G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the description of axisymmetric laminar-jet diffusion flames. The analysis includes the effects of inertia, viscosity, diffusion, gravity and combustion. These mechanisms are coupled in a boundary layer type formulation and solutions are obtained by an explicit finite difference technique. A dimensional analysis shows that the maximum flame width radius, velocity and thermodynamic state characterize the flame structure. Comparisons with experimental data showed excellent agreement for normal gravity flames and fair agreement for steady state low Reynolds number zero gravity flames. Kinetics effects and radiation are shown to be the primary mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Additional factors are discussed including elipticity and transient effects.

  7. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control wing design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.; Fernald, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering design study was performed in which laminar flow control (LFC) was integrated into the wing of a commercial passenger transport aircraft. A baseline aircraft configuration was selected and the wing geometry was defined. The LFC system, with suction slots, ducting, and suction pumps was integrated with the wing structure. The use of standard aluminum technology and advanced superplastic formed diffusion bonded titanium technology was evaluated. The results of the design study show that the LFC system can be integrated with the wing structure to provide a structurally and aerodynamically efficient wing for a commercial transport aircraft.

  8. Unsteady laminar flow and convective heat transfer in a sharp 180 bend

    E-print Network

    Chung, Yongmann M.

    Unsteady laminar flow and convective heat transfer in a sharp 180° bend Yongmann M. Chung a , Paul Unsteady laminar flow and heat transfer in a sharp 180° bend is studied numerically to investigate a convective heat transfer regime of especial relevance to electronic systems. Due to the high geometrical

  9. AIR-BREATHING LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROFLUIDIC FUEL CELL Ranga S. Jayashree1

    E-print Network

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    AIR-BREATHING LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROFLUIDIC FUEL CELL Ranga S. Jayashree1 , Lajos Gancs2 , Eric R of the laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell. A 5-mm thick graphite plate (anode, fuel cell grade graphite bipolar plate purchased from Fuel Cell Stores.com) was cleaned by sonication in large portions of Milli

  10. CONTROL AND SUPPRESSION OF LAMINAR VORTEX SHEDDING OFF TWO-DIMENSIONAL BLUFF BODIES

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    CONTROL AND SUPPRESSION OF LAMINAR VORTEX SHEDDING OFF TWO-DIMENSIONAL BLUFF BODIES A DISSERTATION #12;Abstract The focus of this research is on the control and suppression of vortex shedding of flow instabilities in the laminar shedding regime. Both bounded and unbounded flow conditions are examined

  11. Error estimation and anisotropic mesh refinement for 3d laminar aerodynamic flow simulations

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and anisotropic mesh refinement for 3d laminar aerodynamic flow simulations Tobias Leichta,b , Ralf Hartmann,a,b aInstitute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, DLR (German Aerospace Center-dimensional laminar aerodynamic flow simulations. The optimal order symmetric interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin

  12. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Effects of Surface Roughness on Laminar Separation Bubble over a

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    Engineering and CFD Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 Laminar separation bubbles (LSBs) are often Separation Bubble over a Wing at a Low-Reynolds Number Ying Zhou1 and Z.J. Wang2 Department of Aerospace of surface roughness on laminar separation and turbulent transition can provide insights into the design

  13. A Flamelet Description of Premixed Laminar Flames and the Relation with Flame Stretch

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    known that flame stretch, caused for instance by local velocity gradients near the flame front, may have1 A Flamelet Description of Premixed Laminar Flames and the Relation with Flame Stretch L.P.H. de description is derived for premixed laminar flames. The full set of 3D instationary combustion equations

  14. Near-limit laminar burning velocities of microgravity premixed hydrogen flames

    E-print Network

    Qiao, Li

    Near-limit laminar burning velocities of microgravity premixed hydrogen flames with chemically as suppressants. Burning velocities were also computed using the steady, one-dimensional laminar premixed flame velocities was good, but for near-limit flames the computed velocities were significantly lower than measured

  15. Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-print Network

    Poonen, Bjorn

    Membraneless Hydrogen Bromine Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage by William Allan Laminar Flow Battery for Large-Scale Energy Storage by William Allan Braff Submitted to the Department of Doctor of Philosophy Abstract Electrochemical energy storage systems have been considered for a range

  16. Detailed predictions of particle aspiration affected by respiratory inhalation and airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inthavong, Kiao; Ge, Qin Jiang; Li, Xiang Dong; Tu, Ji Yuan

    2012-12-01

    The effects of air pollution found in the atmosphere and exposure to airborne particles are an important problem in the interest of public health. Exposure to contaminated air under different flow conditions is studied using the latest computational fluid dynamics models. For the first time the upper respiratory airway is integrated into a human body and placed inside a room, facing different airflow speeds (0.05-0.35 m s-1). It was found that the airflow streamlines diverged as it approached the human body, at the torso and accelerated upwards past the face and head before separating at the rear of the head, forming recirculating regions in the wake behind the body. Inhaled particles were tracked backwards to determine its origins. At a plane upstream from the face the locations of particles inhaled form a region known as the critical area, which is presented. This study establishes a better understanding of particle inhalability and provides a step towards a more holistic approach in determining inhalation toxicology effects of exposure to atmospheric particles.

  17. Comparison of upper airway respiratory resistance measurements with the esophageal pressure/airflow relationship during sleep.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, C; Schwaibold, M; Randerath, W; Bolz, A; Jané, R

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of upper airway resistance is of interest in sleep disordered breathing to estimate upper airway patency. Resistance is calculated with the airflow and respiratory effort signals. However, there is no consensus on a standard for upper airway resistance measurement. This study proposes a new benchmarking method to objectively compare different upper airway resistance measurement methods by objectively differentiating between breaths with inspiratory flow limitation (high resistance) and non-limited breaths (low resistance). Resistance was measured at peak-Pes, at peak-flow, at the linear portion of a polynomial equation, as an area comparative and as average resistance for an inspiration. A total of 20 patients with systematic, gold-standard esophageal pressure and nasal airflow acquisition were analyzed and 109,955 breaths were automatically extracted and evaluated. Relative resistance values in relationship to a reference resistance value obtained during wakefulness were also analyzed. The peak-Pes measurement method obtained the highest separation index with significant (p < 0.001) differences to the other methods, followed by the area comparative and the peak-flow methods. As expected, average resistances were significantly (p < 0.001) lower for the non-IFL than for the IFL group. Hence, we recommend employing the peak-Pes for accurate upper airway resistance estimation. PMID:22255021

  18. A Numerical Model of Viscoelastic Layer Entrainment by Airflow in Cough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin M.

    2008-07-01

    Coughing is an alternative mode of ensuring mucus clearance in the lung when normal cilia induced flow breaks down. A numerical model of this process is presented with the following aspects. (1) A portion of the airway comprising the first three bronchus generations is modeled as radially reinforced elastic tubes. Elasticity equations are solved to predict airway deformation under effect of airway pressure. (2) The compressible, turbulent flow induced by rapid lung contraction is modeled by direct numerical simulation for Reynolds numbers in the range 5,000-10,000 and by Large Eddy Simulation for Reynolds numbers in the range 5,000-40,000. (3) A two-layer model of the airway surface liquid (ASL) covering the airway epithelial layer is used. The periciliary liquid (PCL) in direct contact with the epithelial layer is considered to be a Newtonian fluid. Forces modeling cilia beating can act upon this layer. The mucus layer between the PCL and the interior airflow is modeled as an Oldroyd-B fluid. The overall computation is a fluid-structure interaction simulation that tracks changes in ASL thickness and airway diameters that result from impulsive airflow boundary conditions imposed at bronchi ends. In particular, the amount of mucus that is evacuated from the system is computed as a function of cough intensity and mucus rheological properties.

  19. Synthesis of Fluorophore-Doped Polystyrene Microspheres: Seed Material for Airflow Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Christopher J; Kiefer, Jacob M; Petrosky, Brian J; Tiemsin, Pacita I; Lowe, K Todd; Maisto, Pietro M F; Danehy, Paul M

    2015-09-23

    Kiton red 620 (KR620) doped polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) were synthesized via soap-free emulsion polymerization to be utilized as a relatively nontoxic, fluorescent seed material for airflow characterization experiments. Poly(styrene-co-styrenesulfonate) was used as the PSL matrix to promote KR620 incorporation. Additionally, a bicarbonate buffer and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), polyD, cationic polymer were added to the reaction solution to stabilize the pH and potentially influence the electrostatic interactions between the PSLs and dye molecules. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to efficiently investigate the variation of these materials. Using a 4-factor, 2-level response surface design with a center point, a series of experiments were performed to determine the dependence of these factors on particle diameter, diameter size distribution, fluorescent emission intensity, and KR620 retention. Using statistical analysis, the factors and factor interactions that most significantly affect the outputs were identified. These particles enabled velocity measurements to be made much closer to walls and surfaces than previously. Based on these results, KR620-doped PSLs may be utilized to simultaneously measure the velocity and mixing concentration, among other airflow parameters, in complex flows. PMID:26322378

  20. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2010-01-01

    The Rake Airflow Gage Experiment involves a flow-field survey rake that was flown on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the Dryden F-15B research test bed airplane. The objective of this flight test was to ascertain the flow-field angularity, local Mach number profile, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment. This new mixed-compression, supersonic inlet is planned for flight test in the near term. Knowledge of the flow-field characteristics at this location underneath the airplane is essential to flight test planning and computational modeling of the new inlet, and it is also applicable for future propulsion systems research that may use the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. This report describes the flight test preparation and execution, and the local flowfield properties calculated from pressure measurements of the rake. Data from the two Rake Airflow Gage Experiment research flights demonstrate that the F-15B airplane, flying at a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 and a pressure altitude of 40,000 ft, would achieve the desired local Mach number for the future inlet flight test. Interface plane distortion levels of 2 percent and a local angle of attack of 2 were observed at this condition. Alternative flight conditions for future testing and an exploration of certain anomalous data also are provided.

  1. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rake Airflow Gage Experiment involves a flow-field survey rake that was flown on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the Dryden F-15B research test bed airplane. The objective of this flight test was to ascertain the flow-field angularity, local Mach number profile, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment. This new mixed-compression, supersonic inlet is planned for flight test in the near term. Knowledge of the flow-field characteristics at this location underneath the airplane is essential to flight test planning and computational modeling of the new inlet, an< it is also applicable for future propulsion systems research that may use the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. This report describes the flight test preparation and execution, and the local flow-field properties calculated from pressure measurements of the rake. Data from the two Rake Airflow Gage Experiment research flights demonstrate that the F-15B airplane, flying at a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 and a pressure altitude of 40,000 ft, would achieve the desired local Mach number for the future inlet flight test. Interface plane distortion levels of 2 percent and a local angle of attack of -2 deg were observed at this condition. Alternative flight conditions for future testing and an exploration of certain anomalous data also are provided.

  2. An experimental relationship between airflow and carbon dioxide concentrations at a rural site.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Isidro A; Sánchez, M Luisa; García, M Ángeles; Pardo, Nuria

    2015-11-15

    The influence of airflow on CO2 concentrations is considered. Two years of measurements recorded with a Picarro G1301 analyser during the night at a rural site were used. Three concentration groups were formed and were related to wind speed. Yearly, directional, and hourly evolution indicated that the isolated contribution of factors affecting CO2 concentrations proves hard to evaluate. Two approaches to airflow based on average wind and a rotating residual were considered. Around two thirds of observations corresponded to anticyclonic rotations. Firstly, circular hodographs of rotating residuals indicated that wavelengths were in the mesoscale range. The greatest concentrations were linked to the lowest wind speeds and no prevailing directions were revealed by the roundness calculation in a spatial analysis using hexagonal cells. Secondly, composite hodographs for anticyclonic turnings were calculated, the greatest concentrations being associated to hodographs with a pronounced curvature. Moreover, these were successfully parameterised using two models. A harmonic function was first used, which satisfactorily fitted hodographs linked to low and intermediate concentrations. The second model initially described the wind direction of residuals with the error function since its change was slow in early and late night-time. Residuals were later parameterised with a second order logarithmic spiral. This procedure successfully fitted the most curved hodographs of low and high concentrations. PMID:26179780

  3. Collective Odor Source Estimation and Search in Time-Variant Airflow Environments Using Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qing-Hao; Yang, Wei-Xing; Wang, Yang; Zeng, Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the collective odor source localization (OSL) problem in a time-varying airflow environment using mobile robots. A novel OSL methodology which combines odor-source probability estimation and multiple robots’ search is proposed. The estimation phase consists of two steps: firstly, the separate probability-distribution map of odor source is estimated via Bayesian rules and fuzzy inference based on a single robot’s detection events; secondly, the separate maps estimated by different robots at different times are fused into a combined map by way of distance based superposition. The multi-robot search behaviors are coordinated via a particle swarm optimization algorithm, where the estimated odor-source probability distribution is used to express the fitness functions. In the process of OSL, the estimation phase provides the prior knowledge for the searching while the searching verifies the estimation results, and both phases are implemented iteratively. The results of simulations for large-scale advection–diffusion plume environments and experiments using real robots in an indoor airflow environment validate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed OSL method. PMID:22346650

  4. Calibration for Thrust and Airflow Measurements in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Roger A.; Wolter, John D.

    2010-01-01

    CE-22 facility procedures and measurements for thrust and airflow calibration obtained with choked-flow ASME nozzles are presented. Six calibration nozzles are used at an inlet total pressure from 20 to 48 psia. Throat areas are from 9.9986 to 39.986 sq. in.. Throat Reynolds number varies from 1.8 to 7.9 million. Nozzle gross thrust coefficient (CFG) uncertainty is 0.25 to 0.75 percent, with smaller uncertainly generally for larger nozzles and higher inlet total pressure. Nozzle discharge coefficient (CDN) uncertainty is 0.15 percent or less for all the data. ASME nozzle calibrations need to be done before and after research model testing to achieve these uncertainties. In addition, facility capability in terms of nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and nozzle airflow are determined. Nozzle pressure ratio of 50 or more is obtainable at 40 psia for throat areas between 20 and 30 sq. in.. Also presented are results for two of the ASME nozzles vectored at 10deg, a dead-weight check of the vertical (perpendicular to the jet axis) force measurement, a calibration of load cell forces for the effects of facility tank deflection with tank pressure, and the calibration of the metric-break labyrinth seal.

  5. Airflow reduction during cold weather operation of residential heat recovery ventilators

    SciTech Connect

    McGugan, C.A.; Edwards, P.F.; Riley, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory measurements of the performance of residential heat recovery ventilators have been carried out for the R-2000 Energy Efficient Home Program. This work was based on a preliminary test procedure developed by the Canadian Standards Association, part of which calls for testing the HRV under cold weather conditions. An environmental chamber was used to simulate outdoor conditions. Initial tests were carried out with an outdoor temperature of -20/sup 0/C; subsequent tests were carried out at a temperature of -25/sup 0/C. During the tests, airflows, temperatures, and relative humidities of airstreams entering and leaving the HRV, along with electric power inputs, were monitored. Frost buildup in the heat exchangers and defrost mechanisms, such as fan shutoff or recirculation, led to reductions in airflows. The magnitude of the reductions is dependent on the design of the heat exchanger and the defrost mechanism used. This paper presents the results of tests performed on a number of HRVs commercially available in Canada at the time of the testing. The flow reductions for the various defrost mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xenofos, George; Forbes, John; Farrow, John; Williams, Robert; Tyler, Tom; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2003-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a fill-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrUmentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors. The test rig provided steady and unsteady pressure data necessary to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The rig also helped characterize the turbine blade loading conditions. Test and CFD analysis results are to be presented in another JANNAF paper.

  7. An experimental study of a plasma actuator in absence of free airflow: Ionic wind velocity profile

    SciTech Connect

    Mestiri, R.; Hadaji, R.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we are interested in the direct current electrical corona discharge created between two wire electrodes. The experimental results are related to some electroaerodynamic actuators based on the direct current corona discharge at the surface of a dielectric material. Several geometrical forms are selected for the dielectric surface, such as a plate, a cylinder, and a NACA 0015 aircraft wing. The current density-electric field characteristics are presented for different cases in order to determine the discharge regimes. The corona discharge produces nonthermal plasma, so it is called plasma discharge. Plasma discharge creates a tangential ionic wind above the surface at the vicinity of the wall. The ionic wind induced by the corona discharge is measured in absence of free external airflow. The ionic wind velocity profiles and the maximum induced tangential force are given for different surface forms, so it is possible to compare the actuators effect based on the span of the ionic wind velocity and thrust values. The higher ionic wind velocity is obtained with the NACA profile, which shows the effectiveness of this actuator for the airflow control.

  8. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  9. Air-breathing laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, Ranga S; Gancs, Lajos; Choban, Eric R; Primak, Alex; Natarajan, Dilip; Markoski, Larry J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2005-12-01

    This communication reports the design and characterization of an air-breathing laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell (LFFC). The performance of previous LFFC designs was cathode-limited due to the poor solubility and slow transport of oxygen in aqueous media. Introduction of an air-breathing gas diffusion electrode as the cathode addresses these mass transfer issues. With this design change, the cathode is exposed to a higher oxygen concentration, and more importantly, the rate of oxygen replenishment in the depletion boundary layer on the cathode is greatly enhanced as a result of the 4 orders of magnitude higher diffusion coefficient of oxygen in air as opposed to that in aqueous media. The power densities of the present air-breathing LFFCs are 5 times higher (26 mW/cm2) than those for LFFCs operated using formic acid solutions as the fuel stream and an oxygen-saturated aqueous stream at the cathode ( approximately 5 mW/cm2). With the performance-limiting issues at the cathode mitigated, these air-breathing LFFCs can now be further developed to fully exploit their advantages of direct control over fuel crossover and the ability to individually tailor the chemical composition of the cathode and anode media to enhance electrode performance and fuel utilization, thus increasing the potential of laminar flow-based fuel cells. PMID:16316201

  10. Laminar-flow torch for helium inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Chan, S.K.; Montaser, A.

    1988-11-15

    Helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) operated at atmospheric pressure, possess two advantages compared to Ar ICPs for atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). First, for the elements tested so far, the detection powers for the He ICPs are superior to those for an Ar discharge. Second, the emission background spectra of the He ICPs are quite simple in the red and the near-infrared regions, thus reducing the spectral interference problems encountered with the determination of halogens and other nonmetals. Relatedly, certain mass spectral interferences noted in the detection of monoisotopic elements are eliminated when helium is used as the plasma gas instead of argon. For the most recent studies of He ICPs, the authors used a tangential-flow torch to form an annular plasma at forward power of 1500 W with a total helium gas flow of 8 L/min. The present study is concerned with the formation and preliminary characterization of a He ICP using a laminar-flow torch. The total helium gas flow for this torch is less than 2 L/min. Studies of plasmas formed in laminar-flow torches are important because of the possibility to reduce one major source of noise resulting from the rotation of the plasma gas in tangential-flow torches.

  11. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier-Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir-pipe-valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems.

  12. Development of Micro Rotary Reactor Causing Spiral Laminar Flow Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Hiroaki; Suzumori, Koichi; Kanda, Takefumi; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Sakata, Yusaku; Muto, Akinori

    Recently, research and development of the micro-fluidic systems such as ?TAS and Lab-on-chip have been activated in the field of chemical technology and biotechnology. Micro-fluidic systems are realized by micromachine technology and MEMS technology. These are essential elements for miniaturization of chemical analysis reaction systems. Furthermore, micro-fluidic systems can be applied to home medical care system. Micro mixing device is an essential element for a realization of these systems. Normally, mixing of different fluids depends on turbulent flow and diffusion. But it is difficult to generate turbulent flow in minute space. Micro mixer is important to improve reaction efficiency. The aim of this research is a development of a micro rotary reactor which will be built into micro-fluidic systems. The full length and the diameter of this reactor are 59mm and 15mm, respectively. This reactor is driven by an electromagnetic actuator. Therefore, the structure of this reactor becomes very simple and it is easy to miniaturize this reactor. This reactor aims at combing two liquids and forming spiral laminar flow interfaces. Forming spiral laminar flow interfaces increase reaction surface area and reaction distance of two liquids. This paper shows the structure and the characteristics of this reactor.

  13. Streamwise Vorticity Generation in Laminar and Turbulent Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, Aodeji O.; Wilson, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Complex streamwise vorticity fields are observed in the evolution of non-circular jets. Generation mechanisms are investigated via Reynolds-averaged (RANS), large-eddy (LES) and direct numerical (DNS) simulations of laminar and turbulent rectangular jets. Complex vortex interactions are found in DNS of laminar jets, but axis-switching is observed only when a single instability mode is present in the incoming mixing layer. With several modes present, the structures are not coherent and no axis-switching occurs, RANS computations also produce no axis-switching. On the other hand, LES of high Reynolds number turbulent jets produce axis-switching even for cases with several instability modes in the mixing layer. Analysis of the source terms of the mean streamwise vorticity equation through post-processing of the instantaneous results shows that, complex interactions of gradients of the normal and shear Reynolds stresses are responsible for the generation of streamwise vorticity which leads to axis-switching. RANS computations confirm these results. k - epsilon turbulence model computations fail to reproduce the phenomenon, whereas algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM) computations, in which the secondary normal and shear stresses are computed explicitly, succeeded in reproducing the phenomenon accurately.

  14. Experimental investigation of flow instabilities in a laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, D.; Ubaldi, M.; Zunino, P.

    2014-06-01

    The present paper reports the results of a detailed experimental study aimed at investigating the dynamics of a laminar separation bubble, from the origin of separation up to the breakdown to turbulence of the large scale coherent structures generated as a consequence of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability process. Measurements have been performed along a flat plate installed within a double contoured test section, designed to produce an adverse pressure gradient typical of Ultra-High-Lift turbine blade profiles, which induces the formation of a laminar separation bubble at low Reynolds number condition. Measurements have been carried out by means of complementary techniques: hot-wire (HW) anemometry, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The high accuracy 2-dimensional LDV results allow investigating reverse flow magnitude and both Reynolds normal and shear stress distributions along the separated flow region, while the high frequency response of the HW anemometer allows analyzing the amplification process of flow oscillations induced by instability mechanisms. PIV results complement the flow field analysis providing information on the generation and evolution of the large scale coherent structures shed as a consequence of the separated shear layer roll-up, through instantaneous velocity vector maps. The simultaneous analysis of the data obtained by means of the different measuring techniques allows an in depth view of the instability mechanisms involved in the transition/reattachment processes of the separated shear layer.

  15. Application of laminar flow control to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Y. S.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept of the application of hybrid laminar flow to modern commercial transport aircraft was successfully flight tested on a Boeing 757 aircraft. In this limited demonstration, in which only part of the upper surface of the swept wing was designed for the attainment of laminar flow, significant local drag reduction was measured. This paper addresses the potential application of this technology to laminarize the external surface of large, modern turbofan engine nacelles which may comprise as much as 5-10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control (HLFC) pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  16. Application of laminar flow control to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine nacelles

    SciTech Connect

    Wie, Y.S.; Collier, F.S. Jr.; Wagner, R.D. NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA )

    1991-09-01

    Recently, the concept of the application of hybrid laminar flow to modern commercial transport aircraft was successfully flight tested on a Boeing 757 aircraft. In this limited demonstration, in which only part of the upper surface of the swept wing was designed for the attainment of laminar flow, significant local drag reduction was measured. This paper addresses the potential application of this technology to laminarize the external surface of large, modern turbofan engine nacelles which may comprise as much as 5-10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control (HLFC) pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption. 13 refs.

  17. Estimation of the site of wheezes in pulmonary emphysema: airflow simulation study by the use of A 4D lung model.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Hiroko; Cok, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Adventitious lung sounds in pulmonary emphysema, wheezes, are continuous musical sounds during expiration with 400 Hz or more. The textbook tells that expiratory airflow limitation in emphysema occurs at the peripheral airways and that wheezes are generated there. We have recently proposed a novel hypothesis based on image analysis and theoretical consideration that expiratory airflow limitation in emphysema occurs at the intra-mediastinal airway (trachea, main bronchi, and right lobar bronchi) due to compression by overinflated lungs. We performed expiratory airflow simulation by the use of a 4D finite element lung model, and found periodical vortex release with 300-900 Hz at the end of protrusion of the the tracheal posterior wall. Relationship between the peak frequency of pressure fluctuation and airflow velocity was in agreement with Strahal's law either in normal or emphysematous condition. Contrarily, airflow simulation in a small bronchus (1.5 mm in diameter) indicated no apparent periodic vortex release. PMID:24109720

  18. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Chi; Wang, Yuefang; Liu, Yingxi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate movement attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper airway cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original configuration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  19. Airflow calibration and exhaust pressure/temperature survey of an F404, S/N 215-109, turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Maureen E.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    A General Electric F-404 turbofan engine was calibrated for thrust and airflow at the NASA Lewis Propulsion System Laboratory in support of future flight tests of the X-29 aircraft. Tests were conducted with and without augmentation, over a range of flight conditions, including the two design points of the airplane. Data obtained during the altitude tests will be used to correct two independent gross thrust calculation routines which will be installed and operated on the airplane to determine in-flight gross thrust. Corrected airflow data as a function of corrected fan speed collapsed onto a single curve. Similarly, trends were observed and defined for both augmented and dry thrust. Overall agreement between measured data and F-404 Engine Spec Deck data was within 2 percent for airflow and 6 percent for thrust. The results of an uncertainty analysis for thrust and airflow is presented. In addition to the thrust calibration, the exhaust gas boundary layer pressure and temperatures were surveyed at selected condition and engine power levels to obtain data for another NASA F-404 program. Test data for these surveys are presented.

  20. Experimental study of Markstein number effects on laminar flamelet velocity in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.; Zarzalis, N.; Suntz, R.

    2008-09-15

    Effects of turbulent flame stretch on mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}, were investigated experimentally in an explosion vessel at normal temperature and pressure. In this context, the wrinkling, A{sub t}/A{sub l}, and the burning velocity, u{sub t}, of turbulent flames were measured simultaneously. With the flamelet assumption the mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}=u{sub t} x (A{sub t}/A{sub l}){sup -1}, was calculated for different turbulence intensities. The results were compared to the influence of stretch on spherically expanding laminar flames. For spherically expanding laminar flames the stretched laminar burning velocity, u{sub n}, varied linearly with the Karlovitz stretch factor, yielding Markstein numbers that depend on the mixture composition. Six different mixtures with positive and negative Markstein numbers were investigated. The measurements of the mean local laminar burning velocity of turbulent flamelets were used to derive an efficiency parameter, I, which reflects the impact of the Markstein number and turbulent flame stretch - expressed by the turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor - on the local laminar burning velocity of flamelets. The results showed that the efficiency is reduced with increasing turbulence intensity and the reduction can be correlated to unsteady effects. (author)

  1. Predicting Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajnarayan, Dev (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A prediction of whether a point on a computer-generated surface is adjacent to laminar or turbulent flow is made using a transition prediction technique. A plurality of boundary-layer properties at the point are obtained from a steady-state solution of a fluid flow in a region adjacent to the point. A plurality of instability modes are obtained, each defined by one or more mode parameters. A vector of regressor weights is obtained for the known instability growth rates in a training dataset. For each instability mode in the plurality of instability modes, a covariance vector is determined, which is the covariance of a predicted local growth rate with the known instability growth rates. Each covariance vector is used with the vector of regressor weights to determine a predicted local growth rate at the point. Based on the predicted local growth rates, an n-factor envelope at the point is determined.

  2. The simulation of coherent structures in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, Kenny; Landahl, Marten T.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent structures in turbulent shear flows were studied extensively by several techniques, including the VITA technique which selects rapidly accelerating or decelerating regions in the flow. The evolution of a localized disturbance in a laminar boundary layer shows strong similarity to the evolution of coherent structures in a turbulent-wall bounded flow. Starting from a liftup-sweep motion, a strong shear layer develops which shares many of the features seen in conditionally-sampled turbulent velocity fields. The structure of the shear layer, Reynolds stress distribution, and wall pressure footprint are qualitatively the same, indicating that the dynamics responsible for the structure's evolution are simple mechanisms dependent only on the presence of a high mean shear and a wall and independent of the effects of local random fluctuations and outer flow effects. As the disturbance progressed, the development of streak-like-high- and low-speed regions associated with the three-dimensionality.

  3. Postfragmentation density function for bacterial aggregates in laminar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Erin; Bortz, David M.; Dzul, Steve; Solomon, Michael; Younger, John

    2011-04-01

    The postfragmentation probability density of daughter flocs is one of the least well-understood aspects of modeling flocculation. We use three-dimensional positional data of Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterial flocs in suspension and the knowledge of hydrodynamic properties of a laminar flow field to construct a probability density function of floc volumes after a fragmentation event. We provide computational results which predict that the primary fragmentation mechanism for large flocs is erosion. The postfragmentation probability density function has a strong dependence on the size of the original floc and indicates that most fragmentation events result in clumps of one to three bacteria eroding from the original floc. We also provide numerical evidence that exhaustive fragmentation yields a limiting density inconsistent with the log-normal density predicted in the literature, most likely due to the heterogeneous nature of K. pneumoniae flocs. To support our conclusions, artificial flocs were generated and display similar postfragmentation density and exhaustive fragmentation.

  4. Micropolarity Effects on the Bickley-Plane-Laminar-Jet

    E-print Network

    Siddiqui, Abuzar Abid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was formulated the boundary-value-problem (BVP), comprising partial differential equations (PDEs), of steady flow for plane, laminar jet of a micropolar fluid. A new similarity transformation/solution was derived which is valid not only for the Newtonian fluids but also for the micropolar fluids. Obviously, this transformation will be transformed the PDEs into the ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These ODEs were solved numerically by the finite difference method. The obtained results were compared with existing results [1, 12] for the Newtonian fluids. The comparison was favourable. As the aciculate particles in a micropolar fluid can rotate without translation, the micropolarity effects must have influence on fluid-speed, microrotation, stresses, couple stresses and discharge. This influence was highlighted in the present study. If viscosity coupling parameter K1 (being the measure of micropolarity) increases then microrotation, fluid-flux, stresses and couple stresses intensify in t...

  5. A theoretical study of ignition in the laminar mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.; Law, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the weakly-reactive states leading to ignition in the laminar mixing layer flow is studied both analytically and numerically. It is shown that the flow consists of a reactive region and a self-similar frozen region separated by a transitional, non-similar frozen region that the reactive region is intrinsically non-similar because of its excessively slow diffusion rate and that the ignition characteristics are primarily governed by the velocity of the hot stream and therefore minimally dependent on the velocity distribution. Fundamental functional groups are identified and an explicit prescription is presented, for large activation energy reactions, for the evaluation of the minimum streamwise distance to achieve ignition.

  6. Stability theory applications to laminar-flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1987-01-01

    In order to design Laminar Flow Control (LFC) configurations, reliable methods are needed for boundary-layer transition predictions. Among the available methods, there are correlations based upon R sub e, shape factors, Goertler number and crossflow Reynolds number. The most advanced transition prediction method is based upon linear stability theory in the form of the e sup N method which has proven to be successful in predicting transition in two- and three-dimensional boundary layers. When transition occurs in a low disturbance environment, the e sup N method provides a viable design tool for transition prediction and LFC in both 2-D and 3-D subsonic/supersonic flows. This is true for transition dominated by either TS, crossflow, or Goertler instability. If Goertler/TS or crossflow/TS interaction is present, the e sup N will fail to predict transition. However, there is no evidence of such interaction at low amplitudes of Goertler and crossflow vortices.

  7. Metal-metal laminar composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study was conducted to obtain indications of the potentialities of laminar metal-metal composites for elevated temperature use. Most of the composites consisted of multiple layers or laminae of tungsten alternated with laminae of Nichrome V, a ductile, weaker but oxidation-resistant alloy. Composites with 50 volume percent of each phase were tested in tension and stress rupture at temperatures of 871 and 1093 C (1600 and 2000 F) and in impact at 23 and 524 C (73 and 975 F). A tension and a short time stress-rupture test was conducted on specimens of 77 v/o W-Re-Hf-C/23 v/o Inconel alloy 600 at 1093 C (2000 F).

  8. Enhanced photocatalysis in a pilot laminar falling film slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Puma, G.L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-09-01

    Laminar falling film slurry (LFFS) photocatalytic reactors are one of the most efficient reactor configurations for conducting heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions, particularly for wastewater treatment. This paper presents a study on the oxidation of an aqueous salicylic acid waste in a pilot continuous flow LFFS photocatalytic reactor which has an optimum design for light absorption. In conducting the oxidation reaction, heterogeneous photocatalysis was supplemented with other photon-assisted processes. The effect of light intensity, radiation wavelength, oxidizing-enhancing agents, substrate and photocatalyst concentration, and exposure time were studied. A comparison of six different photon-based processes showed that higher oxidation rates of salicylic acid were obtained when there was concomitant photocatalysis, photolysis, and UV peroxidation. The oxidation rates of salicylic acid with this combined process were at least 1 order of magnitude higher in comparison with those for UVA photocatalysis and 3-fold higher in comparison with homogeneous UVC photolysis/UVC peroxidation.

  9. A theoretical study of a laminar diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frair, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of an axisymmetric laminar diffusion flame are discussed, with an emphasis on the behavior of such flames at increasing pressures. The flame-sheet or Burke-Schumann model (in terms of Bessel functions) and various boundary layer numerical solutions are presented and their results compared with experimental data. The most promising theoretical model combines the numerical flow field solution of the Patankar-Spalding computer code with the Pratt-Wormeck chemical reaction subroutine. The flame shapes for pressures of 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 atmospheres were computed and agree remarkably well with experimental data. There is a noticeable shape change with pressure, believed to be a result of buoyancy effects. The chemical concentration profiles do not exhibit much dependence on pressure, a reflection of the fact that only one chemical mechanism was utilized at all pressures.

  10. Investigation B: Laminar confined coaxial entrance flow with heat generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobba, G. K. M.; Weinstein, H.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a parametric study on the entrance flow region in a gas core nuclear reactor are presented. The physical system is modeled as laminar confined, coaxial flow with heat generation in the inner fluid. The governing equations include the boundary layer approximations and the assumptions of only radial radiative transport of energy represented as an energy diffusion term. The Von Mises transformation and a zeta transformation are used to transform the equations into nonlinear nonhomogeneous convective-diffusion equations. A unique combination of forward and backward difference equations which yields accurate results at moderate computational times, is used in the numerical method. Results show that the rapidly accelerating, heat generating inner stream actually shrinks in radius as it expands axially.

  11. Metal-metal laminar composites for high-temperature applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to obtain indications of the potentialities of laminar metal-metal composites for elevated-temperature use. Most of the composites consisted of multiple layers or laminae of tungsten alternated with laminae of Nichrome V, a ductile, weaker, but oxidation-resistant alloy. Composites with 50 vol % of each phase made from 0.0025 cm, 0.0125 cm, or 0.050 cm laminae, were tested in tension and stress rupture at temperatures of 871 and 1093 C and in impact at 23 and 524 C. A tension and a short-time stress-rupture test was conducted on specimens of 77 vol % W-Re-Hf-C/23 vol % Inconel Alloy 600 at 1093 C.

  12. Analysis of laminar forced convection condensation within thin porous coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Renken, K.J.; Carneiro, M.J.; Meechan, K. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of laminar forced convection on enhanced filmwise condensation within thin inclined porous coatings is numerically investigated. The model simulates two-dimensional condensation within very permeable and highly conductive porous substrates. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model is utilized to describe the flowfield within the porous layer while classical boundary-layer equations are employed in the pure condensate region. The numerical results document the dependence of the temperature field and the heat transfer rate on the governing parameters such as the Reynolds number, the Rayleigh number, the Darcy number, the Jakob number, the Prandtl number, as well as the porous coating thickness and effective thermal conductivity. The results of this study provide valuable fundamental predictions of enhanced film condensation that can be used in a number of practical thermal engineering applications. 28 refs.

  13. Airflow Dynamics of Coughing in Healthy Human Volunteers by Shadowgraph Imaging: An Aid to Aerosol Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre; Pantelic, Jovan; Koh, Gerald C.; Wang, Liang De; Amin, Muhammad; Klettner, Christian A.; Cheong, David K. W.; Sekhar, Chandra; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2012-01-01

    Cough airflow dynamics have been previously studied using a variety of experimental methods. In this study, real-time, non-invasive shadowgraph imaging was applied to obtain additional analyses of cough airflows produced by healthy volunteers. Twenty healthy volunteers (10 women, mean age 32.2±12.9 years; 10 men, mean age 25.3±2.5 years) were asked to cough freely, then into their sleeves (as per current US CDC recommendations) in this study to analyze cough airflow dynamics. For the 10 females (cases 1–10), their maximum detectable cough propagation distances ranged from 0.16–0.55 m, with maximum derived velocities of 2.2–5.0 m/s, and their maximum detectable 2-D projected areas ranged from 0.010–0.11 m2, with maximum derived expansion rates of 0.15–0.55 m2/s. For the 10 males (cases 11–20), their maximum detectable cough propagation distances ranged from 0.31–0.64 m, with maximum derived velocities of 3.2–14 m/s, and their maximum detectable 2-D projected areas ranged from 0.04–0.14 m2, with maximum derived expansion rates of 0.25–1.4 m2/s. These peak velocities were measured when the visibility of the exhaled airflows was optimal and compare favorably with those reported previously using other methods, and may be seen as a validation of these previous approaches in a more natural setting. However, the propagation distances can only represent a lower limit due to the inability of the shadowgraph method to visualize these cough airflows once their temperature cools to that of the ambient air, which is an important limitation of this methodology. The qualitative high-speed video footage of these volunteers coughing into their sleeves demonstrates that although this method rarely completely blocks the cough airflow, it decelerates, splits and redirects the airflow, eventually reducing its propagation. The effectiveness of this intervention depends on optimum positioning of the arm over the nose and mouth during coughing, though unsightly stains on sleeves may make it unacceptable to some. PMID:22536332

  14. Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergthorson, Jeffrey M.; Sone, Kazuo; Mattner, Trent W.; Dimotakis, Paul E.; Goodwin, David G.; Meiron, Dan I.

    2005-12-01

    An experimental and numerical study of impinging, incompressible, axisymmetric, laminar jets is described, where the jet axis of symmetry is aligned normal to the wall. Particle streak velocimetry (PSV) is used to measure axial velocities along the centerline of the flow field. The jet-nozzle pressure drop is measured simultaneously and determines the Bernoulli velocity. The flow field is simulated numerically by an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes spectral-element code, an axisymmetric potential-flow model, and an axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function approximation. The axisymmetric viscous and potential-flow simulations include the nozzle in the solution domain, allowing nozzle-wall proximity effects to be investigated. Scaling the centerline axial velocity by the Bernoulli velocity collapses the experimental velocity profiles onto a single curve that is independent of the nozzle-to-plate separation distance. Axisymmetric direct numerical simulations yield good agreement with experiment and confirm the velocity profile scaling. Potential-flow simulations reproduce the collapse of the data; however, viscous effects result in disagreement with experiment. Axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function simulations can predict the flow in the stagnation region if the boundary conditions are correctly specified. The scaled axial velocity profiles are well characterized by an error function with one Reynolds-number-dependent parameter. Rescaling the wall-normal distance by the boundary-layer displacement-thickness-corrected diameter yields a collapse of the data onto a single curve that is independent of the Reynolds number. These scalings allow the specification of an analytical expression for the velocity profile of an impinging laminar jet over the Reynolds number range investigated of 200?Re?1400 .

  15. Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances.

    PubMed

    Bergthorson, Jeffrey M; Sone, Kazuo; Mattner, Trent W; Dimotakis, Paul E; Goodwin, David G; Meiron, Dan I

    2005-12-01

    An experimental and numerical study of impinging, incompressible, axisymmetric, laminar jets is described, where the jet axis of symmetry is aligned normal to the wall. Particle streak velocimetry (PSV) is used to measure axial velocities along the centerline of the flow field. The jet-nozzle pressure drop is measured simultaneously and determines the Bernoulli velocity. The flow field is simulated numerically by an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes spectral-element code, an axisymmetric potential-flow model, and an axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function approximation. The axisymmetric viscous and potential-flow simulations include the nozzle in the solution domain, allowing nozzle-wall proximity effects to be investigated. Scaling the centerline axial velocity by the Bernoulli velocity collapses the experimental velocity profiles onto a single curve that is independent of the nozzle-to-plate separation distance. Axisymmetric direct numerical simulations yield good agreement with experiment and confirm the velocity profile scaling. Potential-flow simulations reproduce the collapse of the data; however, viscous effects result in disagreement with experiment. Axisymmetric one-dimensional stream-function simulations can predict the flow in the stagnation region if the boundary conditions are correctly specified. The scaled axial velocity profiles are well characterized by an error function with one Reynolds-number-dependent parameter. Rescaling the wall-normal distance by the boundary-layer displacement-thickness-corrected diameter yields a collapse of the data onto a single curve that is independent of the Reynolds number. These scalings allow the specification of an analytical expression for the velocity profile of an impinging laminar jet over the Reynolds number range investigated of . PMID:16486059

  16. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  17. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Mike; Banks, Dan; Garzon, Andres; Matisheck, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IR thermography was used to characterize the transition front on a S-NLF test article at chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million Changes in transition due to Mach number, Reynolds number, and surface roughness were investigated - Regions of laminar flow in excess of 80% chord at chord Reynolds numbers greater than 14 million IR thermography clearly showed the transition front and other flow features such as shock waves impinging upon the surface A series of parallel oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, were found to cause premature transition at higher Reynolds numbers. NASA has a current goal to eliminate barriers to the development of practical supersonic transport aircraft Drag reduction through the use of supersonic natural laminar flow (S-NLF) is currently being explored as a means of increasing aerodynamic efficiency - Tradeoffs work best for business jet class at M<2 Conventional high-speed designs minimize inviscid drag at the expense of viscous drag - Existence of strong spanwise pressure gradient leads to crossflow (CF) while adverse chordwise pressure gradients amplifies and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities Aerion Corporation has patented a S-NLF wing design (US Patent No. 5322242) - Low sweep to control CF - dp/dx < 0 on both wing surfaces to stabilize TS - Thin wing with sharp leading edge to minimize wave drag increase due to reduction in sweep NASA and Aerion have partnered to study S-NLF since 1999 Series of S-NLF experiments flown on the NASA F-15B research test bed airplane Infrared (IR) thermography used to characterize transition - Non-intrusive, global, good spatial resolution - Captures significant flow features well

  18. Numerical Prediction of Laminar Instability Noise for NACA 0012 Aerofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gennaro, Michele; Hueppe, Andreas; Kuehnelt, Helmut; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2011-09-01

    Aerofoil self-generated noise is recognized to be of fundamental importance in the frame of applied aeroacoustics and the use of computational methods to assess the acoustic behaviour of airframe components challenges an even larger community of engineers and scientists. Several noise generation mechanisms can be found which are mainly related to the physical development of turbulence over the boundary layer. They can be classified in 3 main categories: the Turbulent Boundary Layer—Trailing Edge noise (TBL-TE), the Laminar Boundary Layer—Vortex Shedding (LBL-VS) noise and the Separation Stall (S-S) noise. The TBL-TE is mainly related to the noise generated by turbulent eddies which develop into the boundary layer and usually exhibits a broadband spectrum. The LBL-VS is related to laminar instabilities that can occur within the boundary layer which are responsible for a very late transition and generate a typical peaked tonal noise, while the S-S noise mainly results from the development of large vortices after the separation point. In this paper we propose a numerical analysis targeted to the simulation the LBL-VS noise mechanisms on a NACA 0012 aerofoil, tested at a Reynolds number of 1.1 M and Mach number of 0.2. The aerodynamic simulation is performed with a 2D transient RANS approach using the k-? transitional turbulence model, while the acoustic computations are performed with the FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy and with a Finite Element (FE) approach solving Lighthill's wave equation. Computed noise spectra are compared with experimental data published by NASA showing a good agreement both for peak location as well as for the predicted noise level.

  19. Field measurements of mean and turbulent airflow over a barchan sand dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Corinne M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.

    2011-05-01

    Advances in our knowledge of the aeolian processes governing sand dune dynamics have been restricted by a reliance on measures of time-averaged airflow, such as shear velocity ( u*). It has become clear that such measures are incapable of explaining the complete dynamics of sediment transport across dune surfaces. Past evidence from wind tunnel and modelling studies has suggested that in some regions on a dune's surface the sediment transport might be better explained through investigations of the turbulent nature of the airflow. However, to date there have been no field studies providing data on the turbulent characteristics of the airflow around dunes with which to support or refute such hypotheses. The field investigation presented here provides mean and turbulent airflow measurements across the centre-line of a barchan sand dune in Namibia. Data were collected using arrays of sonic anemometers and were compared with sand flux data measured using wedge-shaped traps. Results support previously published data derived from wind tunnels and numerical models. The decline in mean wind velocity at the upwind toe of the dune is shown to coincide with a rise in turbulence, whilst mean velocity acceleration on the upper slope corresponds with a general decline in measured turbulence. Analysis of the components of Reynold shear stress ( -u'¯w'¯) and normal stresses ( u¯ and w2 ¯) supports the notion that the development of flow turbulence along the dune centre-line is likely to be associated with the interplay between streamline curvature and mean flow deceleration/acceleration. It is suggested that, due to the nature of its calculation, turbulence intensity is a measure of less practical use than direct assessments of the individual components of Reynolds stress, particularly the instantaneous horizontal streamwise component ( u2 ¯) and shear stress ( -uw¯). Whilst, increases in Reynolds shear stress and the horizontal streamwise component of stress in the toe region of the dune may effectively explain the maintenance of sand flux in a region of declining mean velocity, they have much less explanatory power for sand flux on the upper windward slope and in the crestal region of the dune. Here, it is suggested that mean flow acceleration is likely to provide the most significant driving force on sand flux, possibly augmented by a rise in the horizontal streamwise component of Reynolds stress ( u2 ¯) in the crest/brink region. Therefore, although wind turbulence is considered to be of fundamental importance in explaining the sediment transport dynamics across the dune's surface it is recognised that the interaction between mean flow deceleration/acceleration, streamline curvature and individual components of Reynolds stress is complex and the identification of a single element of flow that offers a panacea for accounting for sand flux and dune dynamics is difficult to find.

  20. Real-time monitoring for alpha emitters in high-airflow environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Bounds, J.A.; Conaway, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Key problems in detecting alpha contamination for site characterization and decontamination and decommissioning that remain to be solved include measurement of airborne contamination, material holdup within pipes, and leakage of material containers. These problems are very difficult using traditional alpha detectors and systems. The ionization detection method (long-range alpha detection or LRAD) offers a number of specific advantages for these environmental measurements. An LRAD system detects the air molecules ionized by alpha-emitting contamination rather than the alpha particles. Thus, LRAD-based detectors are not limited by the short range of alpha particles and can be used to detect contamination anywhere that air can penetrate. Extending this technology to large enclosures or long pipes requires a system optimized for large airflows. In this paper the authors present designs and preliminary results for high-volume flow-through air monitors based on the LRAD technique. In addition, they discuss the behavior of the monitors and their potential applications.

  1. Real-time monitoring for alpha emitters in high-airflow environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M; Whitley, C.R.; Conaway, J.G.; Steadman, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    Key problems in detecting alpha contamination for site characterization and decontamination and decommissioning that remain to be solved include measurement of airborne contamination, material holdup within pipes, and leakage of material containers. These problems are very difficult using traditional alpha detectors and systems. The ionization detection method (long-range alpha detection of LRAD) offers a number of specific advantages for these environmental measurements. An LRAD system detects the air molecules ionized by alpha-emitting contamination rather than the alpha particles. Thus, LRAD-based detectors are not limited by the short range of alpha particles and can be used to detect contamination anywhere that air can penetrate. Extending this technology to large enclosures of long pipes requires a system optimized for large airflows. In this paper we will present designs and preliminary results for high-volume flow-through air monitors based on the LRAD technique. In addition, we will discuss the behavior of the monitors and their potential applications.

  2. Contam airflow models of three large buildings: Model descriptions and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.

    2009-09-30

    Airflow and pollutant transport models are useful for several reasons, including protection from or response to biological terrorism. In recent years they have been used for deciding how many biological agent samplers are needed in a given building to detect the release of an agent; to figure out where those samplers should be located; to predict the number of people at risk in the event of a release of a given size and location; to devise response strategies in the event of a release; to determine optimal trade-offs between sampler characteristics (such as detection limit and response time); and so on. For some of these purposes it is necessary to model a specific building of interest: if you are trying to determine optimal sampling locations, you must have a model of your building and not some different building. But for many purposes generic or 'prototypical' building models would suffice. For example, for determining trade-offs between sampler characteristics, results from one building will carry over other, similar buildings. Prototypical building models are also useful for comparing or testing different algorithms or computational pproaches: different researchers can use the same models, thus allowing direct comparison of results in a way that is not otherwise possible. This document discusses prototypical building models developed by the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The models are implemented in the Contam v2.4c modeling program, available from the National Institutes for Standards and Technology. We present Contam airflow models of three virtual buildings: a convention center, an airport terminal, and a multi-story office building. All of the models are based to some extent on specific real buildings. Our goal is to produce models that are realistic, in terms of approximate magnitudes, directions, and speeds of airflow and pollutant transport. The three models vary substantially in detail. The airport model is the simplest; the onvention center model is more detailed; and the large office building model is quite complicated. We give several simplified floor plans in this document, to explain basic features of the buildings. The actual models are somewhat more complicated; for instance, spaces that are represented as rectangles in this document sometimes have more complicated shapes in the models. (However, note that the shape of a zone is irrelevant in Contam). Consult the Contam models themselves for detailed floor plans. Each building model is provided with three ventilation conditions, representing mechanical systems in which 20%, 50%, or 80% of the building air is recirculated and the rest is provided from outdoors. Please see the section on 'Use of the models' for important information about issues to consider if you wish to modify the models to provide no mechanical ventilation or eliminate provision of outdoor air.

  3. Peripheral resistance: a link between global airflow obstruction and regional ventilation distribution

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R. S.; Greenblatt, E.; Winkler, T.; Venegas, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Airflow obstruction and heterogeneities in airway constriction and ventilation distribution are well-described prominent features of asthma. However, the mechanistic link between these global and regional features has not been well defined. We speculate that peripheral airway resistance (Rp) may provide such a link. Structural and functional parameters are estimated from PET and HRCT images of asthmatic (AS) and nonasthmatic (NA) subjects measured at baseline (BASE) and post-methacholine challenge (POST). Conductances of 35 anatomically defined proximal airways are estimated from airway geometry obtained from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images. Compliances of sublobar regions subtended by 19 most distal airways are estimated from changes in regional gas volume between two lung volumes. Specific ventilations (sV?) of these sublobar regions are evaluated from 13NN-washout PET scans. For each pathway connecting the trachea to sublobar region, values of Rp required to explain the sV? distribution and global airflow obstruction are computed. Results show that Rp is highly heterogeneous within each subject, but has average values consistent with global values in the literature. The contribution of Rp to total pathway resistance (RT) increased substantially for POST (P < 0.0001). The fraction Rp/RT was higher in AS than NA at POST (P < 0.0001) but similar at BASE (range: 0.960–0.997, median: 0.990). For POST, Rp/RT range was 0.979–0.999 (NA) and 0.981–0.995 (AS). This approach allows for estimations of peripheral airway resistance within anatomically defined sublobar regions in vivo human lungs and may be used to evaluate peripheral effects of therapy in a subject specific manner. PMID:23123354

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of airflow obstruction in an elderly Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ko, F W S; Woo, J; Tam, W; Lai, C K W; Ngai, J; Kwok, T; Hui, D S C

    2008-12-01

    It is common practice to use a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1))/ forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio of <70% as evidence of airflow obstruction. As the FEV(1)/FVC ratio falls with age, the lower limit of normal range (LLN), defined as the bottom 5% in a health reference population, of FEV(1)/FVC ratio has been suggested as a better index to reduce over-diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly in the elderly. However, there are no large scale studies that focus on the diagnosis of COPD in the elderly based on these definitions. The present prospective epidemiological study involved 1,149 elderly subjects aged > or =60 yrs in the community. Detailed questionnaires, pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry were performed. In total, 1,008 subjects (mean age 74.2+/-6.4 yrs; 271 males) completed satisfactory spirometry testing. Airflow obstruction was present in 25.9% as defined by the post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC ratio of <70% and in 12.4% defined by the LLN of FEV(1)/FVC ratio. Moderate COPD, at least, was found in 14.0% of patients according to the post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC ratio of <70% and in 8.5% of patients according to LLN of FEV(1)/FVC ratio. In the present elderly Chinese population (mostly females, with low education level and previous exposure to biomass during formative years), the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease varied markedly depending on definitions adopted. Further longitudinal studies are needed to determine the precise definition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:18684847

  5. IL10 polymorphisms are associated with airflow obstruction in severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Demeo, Dawn L; Campbell, Edward J; Barker, Alan F; Brantly, Mark L; Eden, Edward; McElvaney, N Gerard; Rennard, Stephen I; Sandhaus, Robert A; Stocks, James M; Stoller, James K; Strange, Charlie; Turino, Gerard; Silverman, Edwin K

    2008-01-01

    Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in individuals who smoke. There is marked variability in the development of lung disease in individuals homozygous (PI ZZ) for this autosomal recessive condition, suggesting that modifier genes could be important. We hypothesized that genetic determinants of obstructive lung disease may be modifiers of airflow obstruction in individuals with severe AAT deficiency. To identify modifier genes, we performed family-based association analyses for 10 genes previously associated with asthma and/or COPD, including IL10, TNF, GSTP1, NOS1, NOS3, SERPINA3, SERPINE2, SFTPB, TGFB1, and EPHX1. All analyses were performed in a cohort of 378 PI ZZ individuals from 167 families. Quantitative spirometric phenotypes included forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) and the ratio of FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC). A qualitative phenotype of moderate-to-severe COPD was defined for individuals with FEV(1) airflow obstruction was independent of an association with asthma. Haplotype analysis of IL10 SNPs suggested the strongest association with IL10 promoter SNPs. IL10 is likely an important modifier gene for the development of COPD in individuals with severe AAT deficiency. PMID:17690329

  6. Control of supersonic wind-tunnel noise by laminarization of nozzle-wall boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, I. E.; Harvey, W. D.; Harris, J. E.; Holley, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    One of the principal design requirements for a quiet supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is to maintain laminar boundary layers on the nozzle walls and thereby reduce disturbance levels in the test flow. The conditions and apparent reasons for laminar boundary layers which have been observed during previous investigations on the walls of several nozzles for exit Mach numbers from 2 to 20 are reviewed. Based on these results, an analysis and an assessment of nozzle design requirements for laminar boundary layers including low Reynolds numbers, high acceleration, suction slots, wall temperature control, wall roughness, and area suction are presented.

  7. Calculation of laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1977-01-01

    A general method for computing laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows is presented. The method uses an eddy-viscosity formulation to model the Reynolds shear-stress term and a very efficient numerical method to solve the governing equations. The model was applied to steady two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows and was shown to give good results. A discussion of the numerical method and the results obtained by the present method for both laminar and turbulent flows are discussed. Based on these results, the method is efficient and suitable for solving time-dependent laminar and turbulent boundary layers.

  8. Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow and experimental program for resilient leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of natural laminar flow for significant drag reduction and improved efficiency for aircraft is assessed. Past experience with natural laminar flow as reported in published and unpublished data and personal observations of various researchers is summarized. Aspects discussed include surface contour, waviness, and smoothness requirements; noise and vibration effects on boundary layer transition, boundary layer stability criteria; flight experience with natural laminar flow and suction stabilized boundary layers; and propeller slipstream, rain, frost, ice and insect contamination effects on boundary layer transition. The resilient leading edge appears to be a very promising method to prevent leading edge insect contamination.

  9. A Study of Laminar Separation Bubble in the Concave Region of an Airfoil Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan; Meyers, James F.; Dagenhart, John R.; Harvey, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) was used to study the nature of laminar separation bubbles in the concave region of a 1.83-meter airfoil model which was tested in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Three component, coincident data from LV measurements including histograms of particle velocity, mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stresses within the shear layer were used to determine the locations of laminar separation, transition, and turbulent reattachment. Boundary-layer parameters determined from velocity profiles were used to compare the results with existing empirical relations for describing the laminar separation bubble.

  10. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control glove flight conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    A laminar flow control glove applied to the wing of a short to medium range jet transport with aft mounted engines was designed. A slotted aluminum glove concept and a woven stainless steel mesh porous glove concept suction surfaces were studied. The laminar flow control glove and a dummy glove with a modified supercritical airfoil, ducting, modified wing leading and trailing edges, modified flaps, and an LFC trim tab were applied to the wing after slot spacing suction parameters, and compression power were determined. The results show that a laminar flow control glove can be applied to the wing of a jet transport with an appropriate suction system installed.

  11. A perspective of laminar-flow control. [aircraft energy efficiency program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, A. L.; Muraca, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A historical review of the development of laminar flow control technology is presented with reference to active laminar boundary-layer control through suction, the use of multiple suction slots, wind-tunnel tests, continuous suction, and spanwise contamination. The ACEE laminar flow control program is outlined noting the development of three-dimensional boundary-layer codes, cruise-noise prediction techniques, airfoil development, and leading-edge region cleaning. Attention is given to glove flight tests and the fabrication and testing of wing box designs.

  12. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, B T

    2010-03-01

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application. PMID:20157224

  13. Dynamics on the Laminar-Turbulent Boundary and the Origin of the Maximum Drag Reduction Asymptote

    E-print Network

    Graham, Michael D.

    Dynamical trajectories on the boundary in state space between laminar and turbulent plane channel flow—edge states—are computed for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. Viscoelasticity has a negligible effect on the properties ...

  14. Laminar drag reduction in microchannels using ultrahydrophobic surfaces Jia Ou, Blair Perot, and Jonathan P. Rothstein

    E-print Network

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Laminar drag reduction in microchannels using ultrahydrophobic surfaces Jia Ou, Blair Perot November 2004) A series of experiments is presented which demonstrate significant drag reduction are obtained using ultrahydrophobic surfaces. No drag reduction is observed for smooth hydrophobic surfaces

  15. Sooting Behaviour Dynamics of a Non-Bouyant Laminar Diffusion Flame 

    E-print Network

    Fuentes, Andres; Legros, Guillaume; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Joulain, Pierre; Vantelon, Jean-Pierre; Torero, Jose L; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Local soot concentrations in non-buoyant laminar diffusion flames have been demonstrated to be the outcome of two competitive processes, soot formation and soot oxidation. It was first believed that soot formation was the ...

  16. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  17. An investigation of the effects of the propeller slipstream of a laminar wing boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. M.; Miley, S. J.; Holmes, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A research program is in progress to study the effects of the propeller slipstream on natural laminar flow. Flight and wind tunnel measurements of the wing boundary layer have been made using hot-film velocity sensor probes. The results show the boundary layer, at any given point, to alternate between laminar and turbulent states. This cyclic behavior is due to periodic external flow turbulence originating from the viscous wake of the propeller blades. Analytic studies show the cyclic laminar/turbulent boundary layer to result in a significantly lower wing section drag than a fully turbulent boundary layer. The application of natural laminar flow design philosophy yields drag reduction benefits in the slipstream affected regions of the airframe, as well as the unaffected regions.

  18. Natural laminar flow flight experiments on a turbine engine nacelle fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, C. J.; Hastings, E. C.; Schoenster, J. A.; Parrott, T. L.; Holmes, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments are being conducted with the objective to investigate the interactions between acoustic disturbances and laminar flow in the flight environment. In the experiments, the laminar boundary layer on the nacelles will be exposed to discrete and broadband external noises, and the effect of varying noise levels and frequencies on the stability of the laminar flow will be studied. The present paper provides an overview of the complete project and a status report on the results which have been obtained. The flight experiment is conducted with the aid of a modified research aircraft. The phase I flight tests are concerned with a quick and simple determination of natural laminar flow (NLF) behavior on an engine nacelle. Attention is given to instrumentation, the acoustic noise source, flow visualization, and the test results.

  19. Measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a curved duct with thin inlet boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the laminar and turbulent flow in a 90 deg square bend of strong curvature. The boundary layers at the inlet to the bend were approximately 25 percent and 15 percent of the hydraulic diameter for the laminar and turbulent flows, respectively. The development of the pressure driven secondary motion is more rapid for laminar flow: the maximum cross stream component measured was 60 percent of the bulk velocity in contrast to 40 percent for turbulent flow. The streamwise isotachs show that, for laminar flow, large velocities are found progressively nearer to the outer radius of the bend and along the sidewalls. For turbulent flow, the isotachs move towards the inner radius until about 60 deg around the bend where strong secondary motion results in a similar redistribution. Turbulence level and shear stress measurements are also presented.

  20. IS THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE HELIOSHEATH LAMINAR OR A TURBULENT SEA OF BUBBLES?

    E-print Network

    Opher, M.

    All current global models of the heliosphere are based on the assumption that the magnetic field in the heliosheath, in the region close to the heliopause (HP), is laminar. We argue that in that region the heliospheric ...

  1. Current Evidence for the Use of Laminar Flow in Reducing Infection Rates in Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    James, M; Khan, W.S; Nannaparaju, M.R; Bhamra, J.S; Morgan-Jones, R

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of laminar air flow in orthopaedic theatres by Sir John Charnley, it has widely become accepted as the standard during orthopaedic procedures such as joint arthroplasty. We present a review of available current literature for the use of laminar flow operating theatre ventilation during total joint arthroplasty and examines the effectiveness of laminar flow ventilated operating theatres in preventing post-operative wound infection. Results of our findings suggest that while bacterial and air particulate is reduced by laminar air flow systems, there is no conclusive effect on the reduction of post-operative wound infections following total joint arthroplasty. We conclude that a combination of strict aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics and good anaesthetic control during surgery remains crucial to reduce post-operative surgical infections. PMID:26587068

  2. Laminar boundary layer in conditions of natural transition to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyakov, N. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental study of regularities of a natural transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent layer at low subsonic air flow velocities are presented, analyzed and compared with theory and model experiments.

  3. Cloud particle effects on laminar flow and instrumentation for their measurement aboard a NASA LFC aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Fischer, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel costs account now for approximately 60 percent of the direct operating costs of airlines and future commercial transport will utilize advanced technologies for saving fuel on the basis of drag reduction. Laminar flow control (LFC) represents such an advanced technology. A new laminar flow wing on a reconfigured WB-66 aircraft was tested in the X-21 flight program. The tests confirmed that extensive laminar flow could be achieved at subsonic transport cruise conditions. Factors affecting adversely the maintenance of laminar flow were found to be related to ice particles encountered during the penetration of cirrus clouds or haze. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of ice particles on LFC, taking into account the results obtained in the Leading Edge Flight Test (LEFT) being conducted by NASA. Attention is given to ice particle measurements in the LEFT program.

  4. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation related to the paper of the same name describing Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of low speed stall aerodynamics of a swept wing with a laminar flow wing glove.

  5. A flight test of laminar flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's program for development of a laminar flow technology base for application to commercial transports has made significant progress since its inception in 1976. Current efforts are focused on development of practical reliable systems for the leading-edge region where the most difficult problems in applying laminar flow exist. Practical solutions to these problems will remove many concerns about the ultimate practicality of laminar flow. To address these issues, two contractors performed studies, conducted development tests, and designed and fabricated fully functional leading-edge test articles for installation on the NASA JetStar aircraft. Systems evaluation and performance testing will be conducted to thoroughly evaluate all system capabilities and characteristics. A simulated airline service flight test program will be performed to obtain the operational sensitivity, maintenance, and reliability data needed to establish that practical solutions exist for the difficult leading-edge area of a future commercial transport employing laminar flow control.

  6. Soot Volume Fraction Measurements in a Three-Dimensional Laminar Diffusion Flame established in Microgravity 

    E-print Network

    Legros, Guillaume; Joulain, Pierre; Jean-Pierre, Vantelon; Fuentes, Andres; Bertheau, Denis; Torero, Jose L

    2005-05-03

    A methodology for the estimation of the soot volume fraction in a three-dimensional laminar diffusion flame is presented. All experiments are conducted in microgravity and have as objective producing quantitative data ...

  7. Distributed porous throat stability bypass to increase the stable airflow range of a Mach 2.5 inlet with 60 percent internal contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, R. J.; Mitchell, G. A.; Sanders, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation to increase the stable airflow operating range of a supersonic, mixed-compression inlet with 60-percent internal contraction are presented. Various distributed-porous, throat stability-bypass entrance configurations were tested. In terms of diffuser-exit corrected airflow, a large inlet stable airflow range of about 25 percent was obtained with the optimum configuration if a constant pressure was maintained in the by-pass plenum. The location of the centerbody bleed region had a decided effect on the overall inlet performance. Limited unstart angle-of-attack data are presented.

  8. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect on flame instability is observed for the isomers of butanol. Critical flame radii are the same for the isomers of butanol. Peclet number decreases with the increase in equivalence ratio. (author)

  9. Measured and predicted properties of laminar premixed methane/air flames at various pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.I.; Aung, K.T.; Faeth, G.M.

    1998-12-01

    Effects of positive flame stretch on the laminar burning velocities of methane/air flames were studied both experimentally and computationally, considering freely (outwardly) propagating spherical laminar premixed flames. Measurements based on motion picture shadowgraphs, and numerical simulations based on typical contemporary chemical reaction mechanisms, were used to find the sensitivities of the laminar burning velocities to flame stretch, characterized as Markstein numbers, and the fundamental laminar burning velocities of unstretched flames. Reactant conditions included methane/air mixtures having fuel-equivalence ratios of 0.60--1.35 and pressures of 0.5--4.0 atm, at normal temperatures. Both measured and predicted ratios of unstretched-to-stretched laminar burning velocities varied significantly from unity (in the range 0.6--2.3) even though present stretch levels did not approach quenching conditions. Absolute values of Markstein numbers increased with increasing pressure, while the transition from unstable to stable preferential-diffusion conditions with increasing fuel-equivalence ratio shifted from an equivalence ratio of 0.6 at 0.5 atm to 1.2 at 4.0 atm, suggesting increased unstable flame behavior due to preferential-diffusion effects at the elevated pressures of interest for many practical applications. Finally, predictions using two contemporary chemical reaction mechanisms were in reasonably good agreement with present measurements of both Markstein numbers and unstretched laminar burning velocities.

  10. Bone laminarity in the avian forelimb skeleton and its relationship to flight mode: testing functional interpretations.

    PubMed

    Simons, Erin L R; O'connor, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    Wing bone histology in three species of birds was characterized in order to test hypotheses related to the relationship between skeletal microstructure and inferred wing loading during flight. Data on the degree of laminarity (the proportion of circular vascular canals) and the occurrence of secondary osteons were obtained from three species that utilize different primary flight modes: the Double-crested cormorant, a continuous flapper; the Brown pelican, a static soarer; and the Laysan albatross, a dynamic soarer. Laminarity indices were calculated for four quadrants for each of the three main wing elements. Ulnae and carpometacarpi were predicted to exhibit quadrant specific patterns of laminarity due to hypothesized differences in locally applied loads related to the attachment of flight feathers. However, few differences among the quadrants were identified. No significant differences were identified among the three elements, which is notable as different bones are likely experiencing different loading conditions. These results do not support the concept of bone functional adaptation in the primary structure of the wing elements. Significant differences in laminarity were found among the three primary flight modes. The dynamic soaring birds exhibited significantly lower laminarity than the flapping and static soaring birds. These results support the proposed hypothesis that laminarity is an adaptation for resisting torsional loading. This may be explained by overall wing shape: whereas dynamic soaring birds have long slender wings, flappers and static soaring birds have broader wings with a larger wing chord that would necessarily impart a higher torsional moment on the feather-bearing bones. PMID:22241723

  11. Cooperative phenomena in laminar fluids: Observation of streamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Martin A.; Kretschmer, M.; Hoefner, H.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.E.; Ratynskaia, S.; Fortov, V.; Petrov, O.; Usachev, A.; Zobnin, A.

    2005-10-31

    Complex plasmas are an ideal model system to investigate laminar fluids as they allow to study fluids at the kinetic level. At this level we are able to identify streamlines particle by particle. This gives us the ability to research the behaviour of these streamlines as well as the behaviour of each individual particle of the streamline.We carried out our experiments in a modified GEC-RF-Reference cell. We trapped the particles within two glass rings and forced them to form a circular flow by using several stripe electrodes. In this flow the particles behave like an ideal fluid and form streamlines. By putting an obstacle into the flow we reduce the cross-section. To pass through this constricted cross-section some streamlines have to reconnect. After the obstacle the streamlines split up again. An analysis how streamlines split up and reconnect as result of external pressure on the fluid in our system is presented here.Streamlines also occur if two clouds of particles penetrate each other. We call this 'Lane formation'. Results from our PK-4 experiment are presented here also.

  12. Design optimization of natural laminar flow bodies in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The new design method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary-layer. In order to reduce the computer time, Granville's transition criterion is used to predict boundary-layer transition and to calculate the gradients of the objective function, and linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method is used to calculate the objective function at the end of each design iteration. Use of a method to design an axisymmetric body with extensive natural laminar flow is illustrated through the design of a tiptank of a business jet. For the original tiptank, boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10(exp 6). For the designed body shape, a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10(exp 6) is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method.

  13. Homogeneous water nucleation in a laminar flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Alexandra A.; Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Lihavainen, Heikki; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard

    2010-06-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of water at temperatures between 240 and 270 K were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at ambient pressure and helium as carrier gas. Being in the range of 102-106 cm-3 s-1, the experimental results extend the nucleation rate data from literature consistently and fill a pre-existing gap. Using the macroscopic vapor pressure, density, and surface tension for water we calculate the nucleation rates predicted by classic nucleation theory (CNT) and by the empirical correction function of CNT by Wölk and Strey [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)]. As in the case of other systems (e.g., alcohols), CNT predicts a stronger temperature dependence than experimentally observed, whereas the agreement with the empirical correction function is good for all data sets. Furthermore, the isothermal nucleation rate curves allow us to determine the experimental critical cluster sizes by use of the nucleation theorem. A comparison with the critical cluster sizes calculated by use of the Gibbs-Thomson equation is remarkably good for small cluster sizes, for bigger ones the Gibbs-Thomson equation overestimates the cluster sizes.

  14. Development of laminar flow control wing surface composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. This report documents the Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments under NAS1-16235 LFC Laminar-Flow-Control Wing Panel Structural Design And Development (WSSD); Design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joints were demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. Cost of the baseline LFC aircraft was estimated and compared to the turbulent aircraft. The mission fuel weight was 21.7 percent lower for the LFC aircraft. The calculation shows that the lower fuel costs for LFC offset the higher incremental costs of LFC in less than six months.

  15. Heat transfer for a semi-confined impinging laminar jet

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.P.; Neti, S.

    1999-07-01

    Jets are used for a multitude of applications such as annealing, drying, and cooling. Here, heat transfer and fluid flow aspects of a steady-state two-dimensional impinging semi-confined laminar jet are numerically analyzed for various conditions using a finite control volume method. Jet Reynolds numbers in the range {le} Re{sub w} {le} 500 are considered for non-dimensional distances from jet inlet to target plate, H/W, of 1 to 4. The effect of changing thermal boundary conditions is examined. A self-adjusting noding scheme was developed and used to increase resolution in regions where thermal conditions were changing rapidly in the direction of flow. Jet Nusselt numbers are calculated to be between 0.8 and 0.9 times the square root of jet Reynolds number at the stagnation point. The Nusselt number profile along the impingement surface is influenced by the development of a secondary vortex for larger H/W values. This vortex suppresses the heat transfer at this surface as the cooler jet fluid is redirected over the vortex. A third vortex, adjacent to the confining wall near the jet inlet, was observed for higher Re{sub w} values at H/W = 4.

  16. Deformation of Laminar Round Liquid Jets in Uniform Fluid Crossflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalburg, Christian; Faeth, Gerard M.; van Leer, Bram

    2000-11-01

    The deformation and drag properties of laminar round liquid jets in uniform crossflows of fluids having smaller densities were studied computationally. Effects of liquid-jet/ambient-fluid density ratio (in the range 2-64), liquid-viscous/surface-tension force ratio (Ohnesorge range of 0.001-10) and crossflow Reynolds numbers (up to 100) were emphasized in order to address conditions relevant to high-pressure combusting sprays. Predictions of deformation and drag properties were in good agreement with recent measurements. It was found that increased effects of liquid viscosity (increased Ohnesorge numbers) inhibited deformation and required progressively larger drag disturbances (larger Weber numbers) to initiate breakup, very similar to the secondary breakup properties of drops. The liquid-jet/ambient-fluid density ratio, and the presence of attached recirculation regions in the wake of the liquid jet (or Reynolds number) had surprisingly little effect on liquid jet deformation and breakup properties. Similar to drops, the liquid jets oscillated at small Ohnesorge numbers but this motion was damped as Ohnesorge numbers increased.

  17. Dynamic pitching effect on a laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nati, A.; de Kat, R.; Scarano, F.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2015-09-01

    The unsteady effect of a periodic pitching motion on the characteristic of a laminar separation bubble on the suction side of a SD7003 aerofoil is investigated by means of time-resolved planar and tomographic particle image velocimetry. The measurements provide information on the separation, transition and vortex roll-up onset as well as the spanwise distribution of vortical structures, for both the dynamic pitching between 4° and 8° and corresponding cases at a static pitch angle. During pitching, a clear hysteresis behaviour is observed for the vortex roll-up position and shedding frequency, showing a strongly delayed recovery of the shear layer with respect to the steady aerofoil case. The development of the shear layer transition exhibits initially 2D Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers that are interrupted, forming ?-shaped rollers, which eventually evolve into 3D arch-shaped hairpin structures. The 3D analysis of undulated rollers allowed the determination of the rollers streamwise spatial separation for both static and pitching aerofoil cases.

  18. Design of laminar flow bodies in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1990-01-01

    An optimization method was developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions, and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary-layer. Boundary-layer transition is predicted by a 'hybrid' transition criterion based on Granville's transition criterion and a criterion using linear stability theory coupled with the e(sup n)-method. A tiptank of a business jet is used as an example to illustrate that the method can be utilized to design an axisymmetric body shape with extensive natural laminar flow. On the original tiptank boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10(exp 6) on the original tiptank. On the designed body shape a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10(exp 6) is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with e(exp n)-method.

  19. Design optimization of natural laminar flow fuselages in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1990-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The new design method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions, and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary layer. Boundary-layer transition is predicted by a 'hybrid' transition criterion based on Granville's transition criterion and a criterion using linear stability theory coupled with the e(n)-method. A tiptank of a business-jet is used as an example to illustrate that the method can be utilized to design an axisymmetric body shape with extensive natural laminar flow. Boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10 to the 6th on the original tiptank. On the designed body shape, a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10 to the 6th is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with e(n)-method.

  20. Cortical Membrane Potential Dynamics and Laminar Firing during Object Motion

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Michael A.; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2009-01-01

    When an object is introduced moving in the visual field of view, the object maps with different delays in each of the six cortical layers in many visual areas by mechanisms that are poorly understood. We combined voltage sensitive dye (VSD) recordings with laminar recordings of action potentials in visual areas 17, 18, 19 and 21 in ferrets exposed to stationary and moving bars. At the area 17/18 border a moving bar first elicited an ON response in layer 4 and then ON responses in supragranular and infragranular layers, identical to a stationary bar. Shortly after, the moving bar mapped as moving synchronous peak firing across layers. Complex dynamics evolved including feedback from areas 19/21, the computation of a spatially restricted pre-depolarization (SRP), and firing in the direction of cortical motion prior to the mapping of the bar. After 350?ms, the representations of the bar (peak firing and peak VSD signal) in areas 19/21 and 17/18 moved over the cortex in phase. The dynamics comprise putative mechanisms for automatic saliency of novel moving objects, coherent mapping of moving objects across layers and areas, and planning of catch-up saccades. PMID:19753323

  1. Laminar specificity of intrinsic connections in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Eric; Probst, Alphonse; Clarke, Stephanie

    2007-12-01

    Broca's area and its right hemisphere homologue comprise 2 cytoarchitectonic subdivisions, FDgamma and FCBm of von Economo C and Koskinas GN (1925, Die Cytoarchitektonik der Hirnrinde des erwachsenen Menschen. Vienna/Berlin [Germany]: Springer). We report here on intrinsic connections within these areas, as revealed with biotinylated dextran amine and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate tracing in postmortem human brains. Injections limited to supragranular layers revealed a complex intrinsic network of horizontal connections within layers II and III spreading over several millimeters and to a lesser extent within layers IV, V, and VI. Ninety percent of the retrogradely labeled neurons (n = 734) were in supragranular layers, 4% in layer IV, and 6% in infragranular layers; most were pyramids and tended to be grouped into clusters of approximately 500 microm in diameter. Injections involving layer IV revealed extended horizontal connections within layers I-IV (up to 3.7 mm) and to a lesser extent in layers V and VI. Injections limited to the infragranular layers revealed horizontal connections mainly limited to these layers. Thus, intrinsic connections within Broca's area display a strong laminar specificity. This pattern is very similar in areas FDgamma and FCBm and in the 2 hemispheres. PMID:17395607

  2. Rheology of sediment transported by a laminar flow

    E-print Network

    M. Houssais; C. P. Ortiz; D. J. Durian; D. J. Jerolmack

    2015-09-28

    Understanding the dynamics of fluid-driven sediment transport remains challenging, as it is an intermediate region between a granular material and a fluid flow. Boyer \\textit{et al.}\\citep{Boyer2011} proposed a local rheology unifying dense dry-granular and viscous-suspension flows, but it has been validated only for neutrally-buoyant particles in a confined system. Here we generalize the Boyer \\textit{et al.}\\citep{Boyer2011} model to account for the weight of a particle by addition of a pressure $P_0$, and test the ability of this model to describe sediment transport in an idealized laboratory river. We subject a bed of settling plastic particles to a laminar-shear flow from above, and use Refractive-Index-Matching to track particles' motion and determine local rheology --- from the fluid-granular interface to deep in the granular bed. Data from all experiments collapse onto a single curve of friction $\\mu$ as a function of the viscous number $I_v$ over the range $10^{-5} \\leq I_v \\leq 1$, validating the local rheology model. For $I_v friction coefficient $\\mu \\leq \\mu_s$ as $I_v$ decreases. The rheology of this creep regime cannot be described by the local model, and more work is needed to determine whether a non-local rheology model can be modified to account for our findings.

  3. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer for pulsating laminar flow in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    The problem about laminar pulsating flow and heat transfer with high pulsation amplitudes of average cross-section velocity in a round tube and in a flat channel is solved using the finite element method. The difference scheme's optimal parameters are determined. Data on the pulsation amplitude and phase are obtained for the hydraulic friction coefficient, tangential stress on the wall, liquid temperature, heat flux on the wall q w (at ?w = const), and wall temperature ?w (at q w = const) are obtained. Two characteristic modes, namely, quasi steady-state and high-frequency ones are separated based on the value of dimensionless pulsation frequency. During operation in the quasi steady-state mode, the values of all hydrodynamic and thermal quantities correspond to the values of time-average velocity at the given time instant. For operation in the high-frequency mode, it is shown that the dependences of the pulsating components of hydrodynamic and thermal quantities on the dimensionless pulsation frequency have the same pattern for rectilinear channels having different shapes of their cross section. It is found that certain nodal points exist on the distribution of thermal characteristics along the tube (liquid temperature, heat flux density on the wall at ?w = const, and wall temperature at q w = const) in which the values of these quantities remain unchanged. The distances between the nodal points decrease with increasing the pulsation frequency. The pulsations of thermal quantities decay over the tube length.

  4. Correlation of Preston-tube data with laminar skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Abu-Mostafa, A.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Preston-tube data have been obtained on a sharp ten-degree cone in the NASA Ames Eleven-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.95 and unit Reynolds numbers of 9.84, 13.1, and 16.4 million per meter. The portions of these data, that were obtained within laminar boundary layers, have been correlated with the corresponding values of theoretical skin friction. The rms scatter of skin-friction coefficient about the correlation is of the order of one percent, which is comparable to the reported accuracy for calibrations of Preston-tubes in incompressible pipe-flows. In contrast to previous works on Preston-tube/skin-friction correlations, which are based on the physical height of the probe's face, this very satisfactory correlation for compressible boundary-layer flows is achieved by accounting for the effects of a variable 'effective' height of the probe. The coefficients, which appear in the correlation, are dependent on the particular tunnel environment. The general procedure can be used to define correlations for other wind tunnels.

  5. On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH; Millikan, C

    1934-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex potential flows can be fairly easily carried out by using the explicit formulae given in the paper. (author)

  6. Premixed laminar flame propagation in a rotating vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Teresa; Gorczakowski, Andrzej; Chomiak, Jerzy; Jarosinski, Jozef

    2008-11-01

    Combustion in a swirling flow is devoted to burn lean mixture in spark ignition engines since it provides fuel economy and exhaust emission reduction. Therefore it is important to know the flame behavior under centrifugal forces. The flame in a rotating gas is modified by an aerodynamic mechanism due to action of centrifugal forces instead the laminar burning velocity due to chemical kinetics. The paper deals with important characteristics of eddy combustion mechanism such as: flame shape and propagation as a function of the rotation rate. Therefore pictures captured by a video camera are treated with the image processing toolbox from Matlab in order to establish the main characteristics of the flame kernel of a mixture propane -- air at different rotation rates ranging from 500 to 4000 rpm. It is observed that the flame propagates along the rotation axis and that the extinguishing of the flame is involved with the heat losses as soon the flame reaches the wall of the chamber. In addition, the flame shape is quite similar to the intrusion head of a light fluid penetrating into a stagnated heavy fluid.

  7. Structure of confined laminar spray diffusion flames: Numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Bulzan, D. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of confined laminar spray diffusion flames is investigated numerically by solving the gas-phase conservation equations for mass species, continuity, momentum, and energy and the liquid-phase equations for droplet position, velocity, size, and temperature. A one-step global reaction scheme along with six equilibrium reactions are employed to model the flame chemistry. Monodisperse as well as polydisperse sprays are considered. The numerical results demonstrate that liquid spray flames substantially differ from gaseous flames in their structure, i.e., temperature, concentration, and velocity fields, shape, and dimensions under the same conditions. Spray flames are predicted to be taller and narrower than their counterpart gaseous ones and their shapes are almost cylindrical. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The numerical computations also show that the use of the equilibrium reactions with the one-step reaction scheme decreases the flame temperature compared to the one-step reaction scheme without the equilibrium reactions and more importantly increases the surface area of the flame zone due to a phenomenon termed 'equilibrium broadening.' The spray flames also possess a finite thickness with minimal overlap of the fuel and oxygen species. A case for which a fuel-mixture consisting of 20 to 80 percent gas-liquid by mass is introduced into the combustor is also investigated and compared with predictions using only gaseous or liquid fuel.

  8. The effect of mako sharkskin on laminar flow separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Lang, Amy; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria; Hueter, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Many animals possess effective performance enhancing mechanisms, such as the denticles found on the skin of the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus). The shortfin mako, one of the fastest sharks on the planet, is covered by small, tooth-like scales that vary in flexibility over the body. Previous biological findings have shown that the scales increase in flexibility from the leading to trailing edge over the pectoral fin as well as on various sections of the body. It is believed that the scale bristling may provide a mechanism for flow separation control that leads to decreased drag and increased maneuverability. This study involved testing a left pectoral fin of a shortfin mako shark as well as a cylinder with a sharkskin specimen applied circumferentially in a water tunnel facility under static, laminar conditions. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to characterize the flow over the surfaces. Various Reynolds numbers were tested for both configurations, as well as several AOAs for the pectoral fin. The flow over the fin and cylinder were compared to a painted fin and a smooth PVC cylinder, respectively. The study found that the shark scales do, in fact, help to control flow separation. However, in order for the scales to bristle and trap the reversing flow, a certain magnitude of reversed flow and shear is required. This phenomenon seems to be most effective at near stall conditions and at higher Reynolds numbers. Support from REU grant 1062611 is greatfully acknowledged.

  9. Frost Growth and Densification in Laminar Flow Over Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional frost growth and densification in laminar flow over flat surfaces has been theoretically investigated. Improved representations of frost density and effective thermal conductivity applicable to a wide range of frost circumstances have been incorporated. The validity of the proposed model considering heat and mass diffusion in the frost layer is tested by a comparison of the predictions with data from various investigators for frost parameters including frost thickness, frost surface temperature, frost density and heat flux. The test conditions cover a range of wall temperature, air humidity ratio, air velocity, and air temperature, and the effect of these variables on the frost parameters has been exemplified. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the model predictions and the various test data considered. The prevailing uncertainties concerning the role air velocity and air temperature on frost development have been elucidated. It is concluded that that for flat surfaces increases in air velocity have no appreciable effect on frost thickness but contribute to significant frost densification, while increase in air temperatures results in a slight increase the frost thickness and appreciable frost densification.

  10. Progress Toward Efficient Laminar Flow Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Campbell, Matthew L.; Streit, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A multi-fidelity system of computer codes for the analysis and design of vehicles having extensive areas of laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The overall approach consists of the loose coupling of a flow solver, a transition prediction method and a design module using shell scripts, along with interface modules to prepare the input for each method. This approach allows the user to select the flow solver and transition prediction module, as well as run mode for each code, based on the fidelity most compatible with the problem and available resources. The design module can be any method that designs to a specified target pressure distribution. In addition to the interface modules, two new components have been developed: 1) an efficient, empirical transition prediction module (MATTC) that provides n-factor growth distributions without requiring boundary layer information; and 2) an automated target pressure generation code (ATPG) that develops a target pressure distribution that meets a variety of flow and geometry constraints. The ATPG code also includes empirical estimates of several drag components to allow the optimization of the target pressure distribution. The current system has been developed for the design of subsonic and transonic airfoils and wings, but may be extendable to other speed ranges and components. Several analysis and design examples are included to demonstrate the current capabilities of the system.

  11. Investigation of Hypersonic Laminar Heating Augmentation in the Stagnation Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marineau, Eric C.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Smith, Michael S.; Lafferty, John F.; White, Molly E.; Amar, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Laminar stagnation region heating augmentation is investigated in the AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 by performing high frequency surface pressure and heat transfer measurements on the Orion CEV capsule at zero degree angle-of-attack for unit Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 15 million per foot. Heating augmentation increases with Reynolds number, but is also model size dependent as it is absent on a 1.25-inch diameter model at Reynolds numbers where it reaches up to 15% on a 7-inch model. Heat transfer space-time correlations on the 7-inch model show that disturbances convect at the boundary layer edge velocity and that the streamwise integral scale increases with distance. Therefore, vorticity amplification due to stretching and piling-up in the stagnation region appears to be responsible for the stagnation point heating augmentation on the larger model. This assumption is reinforced by the f(exp -11/3) dependence of the surface pressure spectrum compared to the f(exp -1) dependence in the free stream. Vorticity amplification does not occur on the 1.25- inch model because the disturbances are too large. Improved free stream fluctuation measurements will be required to determine if significant vorticity is present upstream or mostly generated behind the bow shock.

  12. Erosion of a granular bed driven by laminar fluid flow

    E-print Network

    A. E. Lobkovsky; A. V. Orpe; R. Molloy; A. Kudrolli; D. H. Rothman

    2008-05-01

    Motivated by examples of erosive incision of channels in sand, we investigate the motion of individual grains in a granular bed driven by a laminar fluid to give us new insights into the relationship between hydrodynamic stress and surface granular flow. A closed cell of rectangular cross-section is partially filled with glass beads and a constant fluid flux $Q$ flows through the cell. The refractive indices of the fluid and the glass beads are matched and the cell is illuminated with a laser sheet, allowing us to image individual beads. The bed erodes to a rest height $h_r$ which depends on $Q$. The Shields threshold criterion assumes that the non-dimensional ratio $\\theta$ of the viscous stress on the bed to the hydrostatic pressure difference across a grain is sufficient to predict the granular flux. Furthermore, the Shields criterion states that the granular flux is non-zero only for $\\theta >\\theta_c$. We find that the Shields criterion describes the observed relationship $h_r \\propto Q^{1/2}$ when the bed height is offset by approximately half a grain diameter. Introducing this offset in the estimation of $\\theta$ yields a collapse of the measured Einstein number $q^*$ to a power-law function of $\\theta - \\theta_c$ with exponent $1.75 \\pm 0.25$. The dynamics of the bed height relaxation are well described by the power law relationship between the granular flux and the bed stress.

  13. Torricelli's curtain: morphology of horizontal laminar jets under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Paternoster, Gabriel; Rabaud, Marc

    2012-11-01

    It has been ``known'' since the seventeenth century that a jet of water issuing horizontally from a hole in the side of a bucket describes a parabolic trajectory. However, this bit of canonical fluid mechanical lore is wrong in many cases. Our recent experiments performed on laminar jets issuing from a horizontal tube show that the initially round jet typically evolves into a thin vertical curtain bounded by bulbous rims at its upper and lower extremities. Moreover, injected dye reveals the presence of a recirculating flow with helical streamlines around the jet's axis. To understand this behavior, we formulate an analytical model for the near-orifice structure of the jet in the limit of large Froude number Fr ??-1 >> 1 . We find that a recirculating flow is generated by the sinusoidal variation of the nonhydrostatic pressure around cross-sections of the jet at order ?, and that deformation of the cross-section occurs at order ?2. We also use the volume-of-fluid code Gerris to study numerically the evolution of the jet's morphology as a function of the Reynolds, Froude and Ohnesorge numbers, and compare the results with our analytical theory and with laboratory experiments.

  14. Airflow assisted printhead for high-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing onto non-conductive and tilted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Leo; Barton, Kira

    2015-08-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet printing (e-jet printing) is a growing high resolution (<20 ?m) printing technology. It is cost effective for small scale and highly customized feature production and it is compatible with a large range of materials. Conventional e-jet is generally restricted to surfaces with high flatness, therefore limiting the application of e-jet in research and industry. This paper will present an airflow assisted e-jet printhead that incorporates the use of airflow within the printhead to direct electrohydrodynamically generated ink droplets onto non-conductive and tilted surfaces. The printhead runs in open loop yet achieves consistent printing performance across large changes in standoff height (800 ?m) between the printhead and printing surface. The printhead is able to print <20 ?m droplets, which surpasses traditional inkjet technology. In conclusion, this printhead design has the potential to enable e-jet printing to be applied in unprecedented application areas.

  15. Experimental study of the effects of airflow and vocal fold stiffness on male and female voice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Elizabeth; Michael, Mcphail; Michael, Krane

    2011-11-01

    The effect of airflow in voice production is not fully understood, leading to difficulties when clinically diagnosing voice disorders. Many existing studies in this this area focus primarily on the male physiology. This study incorporates 2-layer, molded silicone vocal fold models whose geometry mimics the shape and dimensions of both male and female vocal folds. Measured quantities include subglottal and transglottal pressure, volume flow rate, and radiated sound. The results are used to clarify the relationship between glottal airflow and sound production. The Implications of the measurements for similarities and differences between male and phonation are discussed. Acknowledge support of NIH grant 5R01DC005642 and ARL E&F program.

  16. Effects of alcohol-partitioning type and airflow on cosolvent flooding to benzene-LNAPL saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Ju, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Byung-Jin

    2009-07-30

    This study fundamentally investigated the swelling and distribution of benzene-light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) in porous media while cosolvent was flushed to the benzene-partially saturated system. Furthermore, the effects of simultaneous injection of cosolvent and air on the LNAPL behavior were visualized and thus quantified within a two-dimensional transparent porous medium. Partitioning types of alcohols affected dissolution of benzene entrapped in porous media. Tert-butanol (TBA) and 1-propanol floods apparently increased the LNAPL area, while a 70% ethanol flood reduced the LNAPL area by dissolution. Airflow facilitates mobilization of the swollen LNAPL by TBA and 1-propanol, while it facilitates dissolution of non-swollen LNAPL by ethanol. Therefore, LNAPL behavior during cosolvent flooding would be determined by partitioning type of alcohols and the presence of airflow. PMID:19131164

  17. F-15B in flight showing Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment attached vertically to t

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In-flight photo of the F-15B equipped with the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment. During four research flights, laminar flow was achieved over 80 percent of the test wing at speeds approaching Mach 2. This was accomplished as the sole result of the shape of the wing, without the use of suction gloves, such as on the F-16XL. Laminar flow is a condition in which air passes over a wing in smooth layers, rather than being turbulent The greater the area of laminar flow, the lower the amount of friction drag on the wing, thus increasing an aircraft's range and fuel economy. Increasing the area of laminar flow on a wing has been the subject of research by engineers since the late 1940s, but substantial success has proven elusive. The SS-NLF experiment was intended to provide engineers with the data by which to design natural laminar flow wings.

  18. Effects of Airflow and Changing Humidity on the Aerosolization of Respirable Fungal Fragments and Conidia of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerosolization of particles (micro- and macroconidia and fragments) from Botrytis cinerea cultures in relation to potential human inhalation in indoor environments. The influence of the following factors on the aerosolization of B. cinerea particles was studied: exposure to airflow, relative humidity (rh), changing rh, and plant or building materials. The aerodynamic diameter (da) and the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles were determined. Conidia and fragments of B. cinerea were not aerosolized as a response to a decrease in the rh. In contrast, both micro- and macroconidia and fungal fragments were aerosolized when exposed to an airflow of 1.5 m s?1 or 0.5 m s?1. Significantly more particles of microconidial size and fragment size were aerosolized at a low rh (18 to 40% rh) than at a higher rh (60 to 80% rh) when cultures were exposed to airflow. The size of the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles was dependent on the rh but not on the growth material. At high rh, about 30% of the aerosolized particles were of respirable size, while at low rh, about 70% were of respirable size. During low rh, more fungal (1?3)-?-d-glucan and chitinase were aerosolized than during high rh. In conclusion, exposure to external physical forces such as airflow is necessary for the aerosolization of particles from B. cinerea. The amount and size distribution are highly affected by the rh, and more particles of respirable sizes were aerosolized at low rh than at high rh. PMID:22447608

  19. Exploratory investigation of the use of area suction to eliminate air-flow separation in diffusers having large expansion angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzhauser, Curt A; Hall, Leo P

    1956-01-01

    Tests were made at a mean inlet Mach number of 0.2 with area suction applied to conical diffusers with expansion angles of 30 degrees and 50 degrees and exit to inlet area ratios of 2. Air-flow separation was eliminated with suction mass flows of 3 and 4 percent of the inlet mass flows for the 30 degrees and 50 degrees diffusers, respectively.

  20. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  1. Large eddy simulation of the pharyngeal airflow associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome at pre and post-surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Mihaescu, Mihai; Mylavarapu, Goutham; Gutmark, Ephraim J; Powell, Nelson B

    2011-08-11

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is the most common sleep-disordered breathing medical condition and a potentially life-threatening affliction. Not all the surgical or non-surgical OSAS therapies are successful for each patient, also in part because the primary factors involved in the etiology of this disorder are not completely understood. Thus, there is a need for improving both diagnostic and treatment modalities associated with OSAS. A verified and validated (in terms of mean velocity and pressure fields) Large Eddy Simulation approach is used to characterize the abnormal pharyngeal airflow associated with severe OSAS and its interaction with the airway wall in a subject who underwent surgical treatment. The analysis of the unsteady flow at pre- and post-treatment is used to illustrate the airflow dynamics in the airway associated with OSAS and to reveal as well, the changes in the flow variables after the treatment. At pre-treatment, large airflow velocity and wall shear stress values were found at the obstruction site in all cases. Downstream of obstruction, flow separation generated flow recirculation regions and enhanced the turbulence production in the jet-like shear layers. The interaction between the generated vortical structures and the pharyngeal airway wall induced large fluctuations in the pressure forces acting on the pharyngeal wall. After the surgery, the flow field instabilities vanished and both airway resistance and wall shear stress values were significantly reduced. PMID:21700289

  2. Air-Flow Navigated Crystal Growth for TIPS Pentacene-Based Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Chen, Jihua; Sun, Zhenzhong; Szulczewski, Greg; Li, Dawen

    2012-01-01

    6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS pentacene) is a promising active channel material of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) due to its solubility, stability, and high mobility. However, the growth of TIPS pentacene crystals is intrinsically anisotropic and thus leads to significant variation in the performance of OTFTs. In this paper, air flow is utilized to effectively reduce the TIPS pentacene crystal anisotropy and enhance performance consistency in OTFTs, and the resulted films are examined with optical microscopy, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and thin-film transistor measurements. Under air-flow navigation (AFN), TIPS pentacene drop-cast from toluene solution has been observed to form thin films with improved crystal orientation and increased areal coverage on substrates, which subsequently lead to a four-fold increase of average hole mobility and one order of magnitude enhancement in performance consistency defined by the ratio of average mobility to the standard deviation of the field-effect mobilities.

  3. Ventilation Rates and Airflow Pathways in Patient Rooms: A Case Study of Bioaerosol Containment and Removal.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Ehsan S; Grosskopf, Kevin R

    2015-11-01

    Most studies on the transmission of infectious airborne disease have focused on patient room air changes per hour (ACH) and how ACH provides pathogen dilution and removal. The logical but mostly unproven premise is that greater air change rates reduce the concentration of infectious particles and thus, the probability of airborne disease transmission. Recently, a growing body of research suggests pathways between pathogenic source (patient) and control (exhaust) may be the dominant environmental factor. While increases in airborne disease transmission have been associated with ventilation rates below 2 ACH, comparatively less data are available to quantify the benefits of higher air change rates in clinical spaces. As a result, a series of tests were conducted in an actual hospital to observe the containment and removal of respirable aerosols (0.5-10 µm) with respect to ventilation rate and directional airflow in a general patient room, and, an airborne infectious isolation room. Higher ventilation rates were not found to be proportionately effective in reducing aerosol concentrations. Specifically, increasing mechanical ventilation from 2.5 to 5.5 ACH reduced aerosol concentrations only 30% on average. However, particle concentrations were more than 40% higher in pathways between the source and exhaust as was the suspension and migration of larger particles (3-10 µm) throughout the patient room(s). Computational analyses were used to validate the experimental results, and, to further quantify the effect of ventilation rate on exhaust and deposition removal in patient rooms as well as other particle transport phenomena. PMID:26187326

  4. Changes in airflow dynamics after creation of pharyngeal flaps in nonsyndromic children.

    PubMed

    Griner, Devan; Sargent, Larry A; Overmeyer, Claire Lee

    2013-05-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency is a common problem in the cleft palate population that may require a pharyngeal flap. Sleep disordered breathing is a common complication of this surgery and a baseline sleep study is often performed before undergoing the procedure. Few postoperative sleep studies are ever done and little is known about the effects that pharyngeal flaps have on airflow dynamics.Preoperative and postoperative nasometry and polysomnographic data were reviewed and compared from nonsyndromic children requiring pharyngeal flap since 2009. Eighteen children having undergone pharyngeal flap were identified. Of those 18, Nadir oxygen saturations were worsened in 10, improved in 7, and remained the same in 1. Snoring was caused or made worse in 8. Sleep efficiency was worse in 11, improved in 6, and remained the same in 1. Apnea/hypopnea events increased in 9 and decreased in the other 9. Hypernasality was improved in varying degrees in 17 patients, but all required additional speech therapy. Diagnosed preoperative sleep apnea remained in 1 patient. No patient's postpharyngeal flap had any significant sleep disturbance that would warrant continuous positive airway pressure. No flaps required division or takedown.This preliminary study suggests that pharyngeal flaps may increase snoring and apnea/hypopnea events without causing diagnosable sleep disordered breathing and the resultant clinical sequelae. Nasometry shows evidence of nasal airway diversion without complete obstruction. Speech improves more subjectively than nasometry would predict after pharyngeal flap. PMID:23542857

  5. Airflow in a Multiscale Subject-Specific Breathing Human Lung Model

    E-print Network

    Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-01-01

    The airflow in a subject-specific breathing human lung is simulated with a multiscale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) lung model. The three-dimensional (3D) airway geometry beginning from the mouth to about 7 generations of airways is reconstructed from the multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) image at the total lung capacity (TLC). Along with the segmented lobe surfaces, we can build an anatomically-consistent one-dimensional (1D) airway tree spanning over more than 20 generations down to the terminal bronchioles, which is specific to the CT resolved airways and lobes (J Biomech 43(11): 2159-2163, 2010). We then register two lung images at TLC and the functional residual capacity (FRC) to specify subject-specific CFD flow boundary conditions and deform the airway surface mesh for a breathing lung simulation (J Comput Phys 244:168-192, 2013). The 1D airway tree bridges the 3D CT-resolved airways and the registration-derived regional ventilation in the lung parenchyma, thus a multiscale model. Larg...

  6. Some observations of airflow over a large hill of moderate slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Hill, M. K.

    1988-02-01

    Measurements are presented of mean windspeed and turbulence over Great Dun Fell, which is rather larger than hills investigated in the past, viz., 847 m high, which is comparable to the boundary-layer depth. The Fell is well suited for study, being covered by rough grass with no trees and few other obstructions. It was found that the speed-up of the wind is dominated by the elevated stratification and generally agrees closely with the predictions of the model of Carruthers and Choularton (1982) except when the flow is blocked. On the hill summit, the turbulence is approximately in local equilibrium in at least the lowest 10 m and the turbulence measurements are similar to those obtained within the inner layer at other sites. The transverse and longitudinal components show spectral lags at wavelengths greater than 30 m. This suggests an inner-layer depth of about 1/3 that predicted by Jackson and Hunt (1975). At reduced frequencies (>0.1), a recovery in spectral energy is observed due to gravity wave activity. A large variation in the streamline tilt at the summit is observed depending on whether the airflow regime is supercritical or subcritical.

  7. Design and development of desiccant seed dryer with airflow inversion and recirculation.

    PubMed

    Gill, R S; Singh, Sukhmeet; Singh, Parm Pal

    2014-11-01

    A desiccant seed dryer has been developed to dry seed in deep bed at safe temperatures for good shelf life and germination. The dryer consists of two chambers viz., air conditioning control unit and seed drying chamber. It operates in seed drying mode and desiccant regeneration mode. It has provision for recirculation of the drying air to minimise the moisture removal from drying air. Also, it has provision of airflow inversion through deep seed bed for uniform drying. Moisture removal from drying air has been done using silica gel desiccant. Chilly 'Punjab Surakh', Chilly 'Punjab Guchhedaar', Paddy, Coriander, Fenugreek and Radish seeds was dried with hot air at 38 °C from initial moisture content of 26.9 to 5 % (wb) in 2 h, 46.52 to 4.19 % (wb) in 4.25 h, 13.3 to 2.61 % (wb) in 4 h, 13.4 to 10.08 % (wb) in 3 h, 12.4 to 8.22 % (wb) in 4¼?h and 10.6 to 6.08 % (wb) in 4 h respectively. The statistical analysis based on paired t-test showed that seed drying in this dryer has no adverse effect on seed germination. PMID:26396340

  8. Free DNA in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Fluids Correlates with Airflow Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Veronica; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Önder Yildirim, Ali; Bohla, Alexander; Hector, Andreas; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Stoiber, Walter; Griese, Matthias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A.; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease determines morbidity and mortality of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF airways are characterized by a nonresolving neutrophilic inflammation. After pathogen contact or prolonged activation, neutrophils release DNA fibres decorated with antimicrobial proteins, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs have been described to act in a beneficial way for innate host defense by bactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal actions. On the other hand, excessive NET formation has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disease conditions. We quantified free DNA structures characteristic of NETs in airway fluids of CF patients and a mouse model with CF-like lung disease. Free DNA levels correlated with airflow obstruction, fungal colonization, and CXC chemokine levels in CF patients and CF-like mice. When viewed in combination, our results demonstrate that neutrophilic inflammation in CF airways is associated with abundant free DNA characteristic for NETosis, and suggest that free DNA may be implicated in lung function decline in patients with CF. PMID:25918476

  9. Investigation on oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma in supersonic airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jian; Li Yinghong; Xing Fei

    2009-10-01

    Wedge oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma in supersonic airflow was investigated theoretically, experimentally, and numerically in this paper. Using thermal choking model, the change in oblique shock wave was deduced, which refer that the start point of shock wave shifts upstream, the shock wave angle decreases, and its intensity weakens. Then the theoretical results were validated experimentally in a Mach 2.2 wind tunnel. On the test conditions of arc discharge power of approx1 kW and arc plasma temperature of approx3000 K, schlieren photography and gas pressure measurements indicated that the start point of shock wave shifted upstream of approx4 mm, the shock wave angle decreased 8.6%, and its intensity weakened 8.8%. The deduced theoretical results match the test results qualitatively, so thermal mechanism and thermal choking model are rational to explain the problem of oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma. Finally, numerical simulation was developed. Based on thermal mechanism, the arc discharge plasma was simplified as a thermal source term that added to the Navier-Stokes equations. The simulation results of the change in oblique shock wave were consistent with the test results, so the thermal mechanism indeed dominates the oblique shock wave control process.

  10. Multiscale Airflow Model and Aerosol Deposition in Healthy and Emphysematous Rat Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica; Marsden, Alison; Grandmont, Celine; Darquenne, Chantal; Vignon-Clementel, Irene

    2012-11-01

    The fate of aerosol particles in healthy and emphysematic lungs is needed to determine the toxic or therapeutic effects of inhalable particles. In this study we used a multiscale numerical model that couples a 0D resistance and capacitance model to 3D airways generated from MR images. Airflow simulations were performed using an in-house 3D finite element solver (SimVascular, simtk.org). Seven simulations were performed; 1 healthy, 1 uniform emphysema and 5 different cases of heterogeneous emphysema. In the heterogeneous emphysema cases the disease was confined to a single lobe. As a post processing step, 1 micron diameter particles were tracked in the flow field using Lagrangian particle tracking. The simulation results showed that the inhaled flow distribution was equal for the healthy and uniform emphysema cases. However, in the heterogeneous emphysema cases the delivery of inhaled air was larger in the diseased lobe. Additionally, there was an increase in delivery of aerosol particles to the diseased lobe. This suggests that as the therapeutic particles would reach the diseased areas of the lung, while toxic particles would increasingly harm the lung. The 3D-0D model described here is the first of its kind to be used to study healthy and emphysematic lungs. NSF Graduate Fellowship (Oakes), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (Marsden, Oakes) 1R21HL087805-02 from NHLBI at NIH, INRIA Team Grant.

  11. Observations of convective cell-to-roll transition in evaporating liquid blown off by airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. P.; Chernov, V. V.; Ezersky, A. B.; Gromov, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of laboratory studies of convective structures in a thin (5 mm) ethyl-alcohol layer blown off by airflow in a wind tunnel. The formation of structures in the working part of the alcoholfilled cuvette are determined by the destabilizing (inversion-type) temperature profile arising due to the evaporation of liquid. The design of the experimental setup ensures the unidirectional character of the current in the working part of the cuvette where structures are formed. We singled out three stages through which structures successively evolve with increasing the wind velocity: polygonal cells (no blowing), along-flow elongated cells, and along-flow aligned convective roll structures. The profiles of the average and pulsation velocities in the boundary layer over the cuvette are determined together with the drift flow velocity of the liquid at different transition stages from convective cells to rolls. The dimensionless flow parameters are estimated and the comparison of the experimental data with known theoretical results is fulfilled.

  12. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed. PMID:23609636

  13. An Elevated Body Mass Index Increases Lung Volume but Reduces Airflow in Italian Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Cibella, Fabio; Bruno, Andreina; Cuttitta, Giuseppina; Bucchieri, Salvatore; Melis, Mario Raphael; De Cantis, Stefano; La Grutta, Stefania; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma and obesity are important and growing health issues worldwide. Obesity is considered a risk factor for asthma, due to the induction of changes in airway mechanics and altered airway inflammation. Methods We cross-sectionally investigated the effect of increased weight on pulmonary function in a large population sample of healthy children, aged 10–17 yrs living in Palermo, Italy. Explanatory effect of weight on lung function variables were evaluated by multiple linear regression models, taking into account height, gender, and age-class. Results Among the 2,393 subjects, FVC and FEV1 were positively correlated to weight. Multiple regression models showed that the weight beta coefficient for FEV1 was significantly lower with respect to that for FVC (0.005 and 0.009 l/kg, respectively), indicating a different magnitude in explanatory effect of weight on FVC and FEV1. Both FEV1/FVC and FEF25–75%/FVC ratios were negatively correlated to weight, while FEF25–75% was not significantly correlated. Similar results were obtained also when 807 symptomatic subjects were introduced in the model through a sensitivity analysis. Conclusion In healthy children, the disproportionate increase of FEV1 and FVC with weight produces airflow decrease and consequently apparent poorer lung function independently from respiratory disease status. PMID:25970463

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    PubMed Central

    Corley, R. A.; Minard, K. R.; Kabilan, S.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, J. S.; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflow calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry. PMID:19519151

  15. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li'an; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (Jm), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm2 (Jm), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (Ra 1.01 ± 0.09 ?m) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of <1 1 1>, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  16. History of Suction-Type Laminar-Flow Control with Emphasis on Flight Resrearch: Monographs in Aerospace History Number 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The paper contains the following sections: Foreword; Preface; Laminar-Flow Control Concepts and Scope of Monograph; Early Research on Suction-Type Laminar-Flow Control (Research from the 1930s through the War Years; Research from after World War II to the Mid-1960s); Post X-21 Research on Suction-Type Laminar-Flow Control; Status of Laminar-Flow Control Technology in the Mid-1990s; Glossary; Document 1-Aeronautics Panel, AACB, R&D Review, Report of the Subpanel on Aeronautic Energy Conservation/Fuels; Document 2-Report of Review Group on X-21A Laminar Flow Control Program; Document 3-Langley Research Center Announcement, Establishment of Laminar Flow Control Working Group; Document 4-Intercenter Agreement for Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Glove Flights, LaRC and DFRC; Document 5-Flight Report NLF-144, of AFTIF-111 Aircraft with the TACT Wing Modified by a Natural Laminar Flow Glove; Document 6-Flight Record, F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Aircraft; Index; and About the Author.

  17. Dynamics and structure of unsteady, strained, laminar premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Egolfopoulos, F.N.

    1994-12-31

    The influence of unsteadiness on the structure and dynamics of counterflowing, strained, premixed methane/air flames was investigated by conducting a detailed numerical study. The unsteady conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species were solved along the stagnation streamline of the counterflow, in a opposed-jet, finite-domain configuration, by using detailed description of chemistry and transport. The unsteadiness was introduced by imposing sinusoidal variations of the reactant velocity at the exit of the nozzles. Results demonstrate that the flame response is quasi-steady at low frequencies, while at high frequencies it fails to respond to the imposed velocity oscillations. The flame frequency response was physically explained by analyzing the instantaneous flame structure and realizing that the velocity oscillations in the hydrodynamic zone cause reactant concentration oscillations in the diffusion zone. The diffusion processes attenuate these oscillations in a manner analogous to the Stokes` second problem, and the angular frequency at which substantial attenuation commences was found to be of the order of [2(S{degree}{sub u}){sup 2}/a], where S{degree}{sub u} is the laminar flame speed and a an average heat diffusivity of the mixture. The validity of the analogy was confirmed by examining flames at a wide range of unsteadiness. The effect of unsteadiness on extinction was also assessed, and the phenomena of partial extinction, reignition, and extinction delay were identified. These phenomena were found to be controlled by the relative magnitudes of the time scales of the imposed oscillations and the time required for permanent extinction.

  18. Boundary-Layer Transition Results from the F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Laurie A.

    1999-01-01

    A variable-porosity suction glove has been flown on the F-16XL-2 aircraft to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology for the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Boundary-layer transition data have been obtained on the titanium glove primarily at Mach 2.0 and altitudes of 53,000-55,000 ft. The objectives of this supersonic laminar flow control flight experiment have been to achieve 50- to 60-percent-chord laminar flow on a highly swept wing at supersonic speeds and to provide data to validate codes and suction design. The most successful laminar flow results have not been obtained at the glove design point (Mach 1.9 at an altitude of 50,000 ft). At Mach 2.0 and an altitude of 53,000 ft, which corresponds to a Reynolds number of 22.7 X 10(exp 6), optimum suction levels have allowed long runs of a minimum of 46-percent-chord laminar flow to be achieved. This paper discusses research variables that directly impact the ability to obtain laminar flow and techniques to correct for these variables.

  19. Mixing with herringbone-inspired microstructures: overcoming the diffusion limit in co-laminar microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Marschewski, Julian; Jung, Stefan; Ruch, Patrick; Prasad, Nishant; Mazzotti, Sergio; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-04-21

    Enhancing mixing is of uttermost importance in many laminar microfluidic devices, aiming at overcoming the severe performance limitation of species transport by diffusion alone. Here we focus on the significant category of microscale co-laminar flows encountered in membraneless redox flow cells for power delivery. The grand challenge is to achieve simultaneously convective mixing within each individual reactant, to thin the reaction depletion boundary layers, while maintaining separation of the co-flowing reactants, despite the absence of a membrane. The concept presented here achieves this goal with the help of optimized herringbone flow promoting microstructures with an integrated separation zone. Our electrochemical experiments using a model redox couple show that symmetric flow promoter designs exhibit laminar to turbulent flow behavior, the latter at elevated flow rates. This change in flow regime is accompanied by a significant change in scaling of the Sherwood number with respect to the Reynolds number from Sh ~ Re(0.29) to Sh ~ Re(0.58). The stabilized continuous laminar flow zone along the centerline of the channel allows operation in a co-laminar flow regime up to Re ~325 as we demonstrate by micro laser-induced fluorescence (?LIF) measurements. Micro particle image velocimetry (?PIV) proves the maintenance of a stratified flow along the centerline, mitigating reactant cross-over effectively. The present work paves the way toward improved performance in membraneless microfluidic flow cells for electrochemical energy conversion. PMID:25737365

  20. Summary of Transition Results From the F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Laurie A.

    2000-01-01

    A variable-porosity suction glove has been flown on the F-16XL-2 aircraft to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology for the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport. Boundary-layer transition data on the titanium glove primarily have been obtained at speeds of Mach 2.0 and altitudes of 15,240-16,764 m (50,000-55,000 ft). The objectives of this flight experiment have been to achieve 0.50-0.60 chord laminar flow on a highly swept wing at supersonic speeds and to provide data to validate codes and suction design. The most successful laminar flow results have not been obtained at the glove design point, a speed of Mach 1.9 at an altitude of 15,240 m (50,000 ft); but rather at a speed of Mach 2.0 and an altitude of 16,154 m (53,000 ft). Laminar flow has been obtained to more than 0.46 wing chord at a Reynolds number of 22.7 x 10(exp 6). A turbulence diverter has been used to initially obtain a laminar boundary layer at the attachment line. A lower-surface shock fence was required to block an inlet shock from the wing leading edge. This paper discusses research variables that directly impact the ability to obtain laminar flow and techniques to correct for these variables.

  1. A History of Suction-Type Laminar Flow Control with Emphasis on Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, Albert L.

    1999-01-01

    Laminar-flow control is an area of aeronautical research that has a long history at NASA's Langley Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Center, their predecessor organizations, and elsewhere. In this monograph, the author, who spent much of his career at Langley working with this research, presents a history of that portion of laminar-flow technology known as active laminar-flow control, which employs suction of a small quantity of air through airplane surfaces. This important technique offers the potential for significant reduction in drag and, thereby, for large increases in range or reductions in fuel usage for aircraft. For transport aircraft, the reductions in fuel consumed as a result of laminar-flow control may equal 30 percent of present consumption. Given such potential, it is obvious that active laminar-flow control with suction is an important technology. In this study, the author covers the early history of the subject and brings the story all the way to the mid-1990s with an emphasis on flight research, much of which has occurred at Dryden. This is an important monograph that not only encapsulates a lot of history in a brief compass but also does so in language that is accessible to non-technical readers. NASA is publishing it in a format that will enable it to reach the wide audience the subject deserves.

  2. PHENOTYPIC AND GENETIC HETEROGENEITY AMONG SUBJECTS WITH MILD AIRFLOW OBSTRUCTION IN COPDGENE

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Michael H.; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Hersh, Craig P.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Crapo, James D.; Wan, Emily S.; Dy, Jennifer G.; Chang, Yale; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Hardin, Megan; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by marked phenotypic heterogeneity. Most previous studies have focused on COPD subjects with FEV1 < 80% predicted. We investigated the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in subjects with mild airflow limitation in spirometry grade 1 defined by the Global Initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD 1). Methods Data from current and former smokers participating in the COPDGene Study (NCT00608764) were analyzed. K-means clustering was performed to explore subtypes within 794 GOLD 1 subjects. For all subjects with GOLD 1 and with each cluster, a genome-wide association study and candidate gene testing were performed using smokers with normal lung function as a control group. Combinations of COPD genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with FEV1 (% predicted) in GOLD 1 and in a combined group of GOLD1 and smoking control subjects. Results K-means clustering of GOLD 1 subjects identified putative “near-normal”, “airway-predominant”, “emphysema-predominant” and “lowest FEV1 % predicted” subtypes. In non-Hispanic whites, the only SNP nominally associated with GOLD 1 status relative to smoking controls was rs7671167 (FAM13A) in logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, pack-years of smoking, and genetic ancestry. The emphysema-predominant GOLD 1 cluster was nominally associated with rs7671167 (FAM13A) and rs161976 (BICD1). The lowest FEV1 % predicted cluster was nominally associated with rs1980057 (HHIP) and rs1051730 (CHRNA3). Combinations of COPD genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with FEV1 (% predicted) in a combined group of GOLD 1 and smoking control subjects. Conclusions Our results indicate that GOLD 1 subjects show substantial clinical heterogeneity, which is at least partially related to genetic heterogeneity. PMID:25154699

  3. Airflow effects on amplitude and spectral content of normal breath sounds.

    PubMed

    Gavriely, N; Cugell, D W

    1996-01-01

    Even though it is well known that breath-sound amplitude (BSA) increases with airflow, the exact quantitative relationships and their distribution within the relevant frequency range have not yet been determined. To evaluate these relationships, the spectral content of tracheal and chest wall breath sounds was measured during breath hold, inspiration, and expiration in six normal men. Average spectra were measured at six flow rates from 0.5 to 3.0 l/s. The areas under the spectral curves of the breath sounds minus the corresponding areas under the breath-hold spectra (BSA) were found to have power relationships with flow (F), best modeled as BSA = k.F alpha, where k and alpha are constants. The overall mean +/- SD value of the power (alpha) was 1.66 +/- 0.35, significantly less than the previously reported second power. Isoflow inspiratory chest wall sound amplitudes were 1.99 +/- 0.70- to 2.43 +/- 0.65-fold larger than the amplitudes of the corresponding expiratory sounds, whereas tracheal sound amplitudes were not dependent on respiratory phase. Isoflow breath sounds from the left posterior base were 32% louder than those from the right lung base (P < 0.01). BSA-F relationships were not frequency dependent during expiration but were significantly stronger in higher than in lower frequencies during inspiration over both posterior bases. These data are compatible with sound generation by turbulent flow in a bifurcating network with 1) flow separation, 2) downstream movement of eddies, and 3) collision of fast-moving cores of the inflowing air with carinas, all occurring during inspiration but not during expiration. PMID:8847331

  4. Mechanims of aerosol particle deposition in the Oro-pharynx under non-steady airflow.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Tomasz R; Moskal, Arkadiusz; Gradon, Leon

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of experimental and computational results of aerosol deposition in the oro-pharyngeal cast of human published recently (Sosnowski TR, Moskal A, Grado? L. (2006) Inhal Toxicol; 18: 773-780) demonstrated the applicability and relevance of considering realistic breathing patterns in analysis of aerosol flow and deposition within the human head airways. This issue is extended in the current paper, focused on a detailed analysis of spatial and temporal distribution of particle deposition in the oro-pharynx during inspiration. CFD modeling was used to determine both the 3D airflow structure and the local particle deposition fluxes at two different inspiratory patterns. Behavior of aerosol (particle size: 0.3-10 micro m, material density: 2200 kg m(-3)) was analyzed applying Lagrangian approach and considering Brownian effects for submicron particles. Results indicate that particles of different sizes are deposited in different parts of the oro-pharynx, depending on the point in the inspiration cycle. Larger particles (3-10 micro m) are separated efficiently in the naso-pharyngeal bend due to inertia, which predominate in the middle phase of inspiration. Submicron particles are deposited more uniformly in the oro-pharyngeal space, and their separation from the air is enhanced in a short transition period between inspiration and expiration. It suggests the importance of mixing of inspired and expired air streams for particle deposition pattern. Comparison of our computational results of deposition to the approximation derived from the in vivo data (Stahlhofen W, Rudolf G, James AC. (1989) J Aerosol Med; 2: 285-308) shows a good agreement for particles, for which the inertia is a predominant mechanism of deposition. The results of this work lead to a more detailed description of the dynamics of oro-pharyngeal aerosol deposition during inspiratory part of the breathing cycle. The recognition of that problem is essential for prediction of toxic or pharmacological local effects of inhaled aerosols. PMID:17041242

  5. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael; Ratnayake, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    The results are described of the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment (RAGE), which was designed and fabricated to support the flight test of a new supersonic inlet design using Dryden's Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) and F-15B testbed airplane (see figure). The PFTF is a unique pylon that was developed for flight-testing propulsion-related experiments such as inlets, nozzles, and combustors over a range of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. The objective of the RAGE program was to quantify the local flowfield at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE). The CCIE is a fixed representation of a conceptual mixed-compression supersonic inlet with a translating biconic centerbody. The primary goal of RAGE was to identify the relationship between free-stream and local Mach number in the low supersonic regime, with emphasis on the identification of the particular free-stream Mach number that produced a local Mach number of 1.5. Measurements of the local flow angularity, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure over the interface plane were also desired. The experimental data for the RAGE program were obtained during two separate research flights. During both flights, local flowfield data were obtained during straight and level acceleration segments out to steady-state test points. The data obtained from the two flights showed small variations in Mach number, flow angularity, and dynamic pressure across the interface plane at all flight conditions. The data show that a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 will produce the desired local Mach number of 1.5 for CCIE. The local total pressure distortion over the interface plane at this condition was approximately 1.5%. At this condition, there was an average of nearly 2 of downwash over the interface plane. This small amount of downwash is not expected to adversely affect the performance of the CCIE inlet.

  6. Accounting for Laminar Run & Trip Drag in Supersonic Cruise Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodsell, Aga M.; Kennelly, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    An improved laminar run and trip drag correction methodology for supersonic cruise performance testing was derived. This method required more careful analysis of the flow visualization images which revealed delayed transition particularly on the inboard upper surface, even for the largest trip disks. In addition, a new code was developed to estimate the laminar run correction. Once the data were corrected for laminar run, the correct approach to the analysis of the trip drag became evident. Although the data originally appeared confusing, the corrected data are consistent with previous results. Furthermore, the modified approach, which was described in this presentation, extends prior historical work by taking into account the delayed transition caused by the blunt leading edges.

  7. Natural laminar flow wing for supersonic conditions: Wind tunnel experiments, flight test and stability computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Olivier; Yoshida, Kenji; Ueda, Yoshine; Arnal, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of next supersonic transport airplane generation, the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) has developed a new natural laminar flow highly swept wing. The design has been experimentally validated firstly in a supersonic wind tunnel and secondly accomplishing flight test. These experimental data were then analyzed and completed by numerical stability analyses in a joint research program between Onera and JAXA. At the design condition, for a Mach number M=2 at an altitude of h=18 km, results have confirmed the laminar design of the wing due to a strong attenuation of cross-flow instabilities ensuring an extended laminar zone. As the amplification of disturbances inside the boundary layer and transition process is very sensitive to external parameters, the impact of wall roughness of the models and the influence of Reynolds number on transition process have been carefully analyzed.

  8. Boundary layer stability analysis of a natural laminar flow glove on the F-111 TACT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Steers, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    A natural laminar flow airfoil has been developed as a part of the aircraft energy efficiency program. A NASA flight program incorporating this airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane was scheduled to start in May, 1980. In support of this research effort, an extensive boundary layer stability analysis of the partial glove has been conducted. The results of that analysis show the expected effects of wing leading-edge sweep angle, Reynolds number, and compressibility on boundary layer stability and transition. These results indicate that it should be possible to attain on the order of 60% laminar flow on the upper surface and 50% laminar flow on the lower surface for sweep angles of at least 20 deg, chord Reynolds numbers of 25 x 10 to the 6th and Mach numbers from 0.81 to 0.85.

  9. Application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded aluminum to a laminar flow control leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. Laminar flow control was one such technology. Two approaches for achieving laminar flow were designed and manufactured under NASA sponsored programs: the perforated skin concept used at McDonnell Douglas and the slotted design used at Lockheed-Georgia. Both achieved laminar flow, with the slotted design to a lesser degree (JetStar flight test program). The latter design had several fabrication problems concerning springback and adhesive flow clogging the air flow passages. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments is documented in designing and fabricating a small section of a leading edge article addressing a simpler fabrication method to overcome the previous program's manufacturing problems, i.e., design and fabrication using advanced technologies such as diffusion bonding of aluminum, which has not been used on aerospace structures to date, and the superplastic forming of aluminum.

  10. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  11. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, ?, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, ??, less than 5%.

  12. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, {alpha}, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, {Delta}{alpha}, less than 5%.

  13. Parametric study on laminar flow for finite wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Joseph Avila

    1994-01-01

    Laminar flow control has been identified as a key element in the development of the next generation of High Speed Transports. Extending the amount of laminar flow over an aircraft will increase range, payload, and altitude capabilities as well as lower fuel requirements, skin temperature, and therefore the overall cost. A parametric study to predict the extent of laminar flow for finite wings at supersonic speeds was conducted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code coupled with a boundary layer stability code. The parameters investigated in this study were Reynolds number, angle of attack, and sweep. The results showed that an increase in angle of attack for specific Reynolds numbers can actually delay transition. Therefore, higher lift capability, caused by the increased angle of attack, as well as a reduction in viscous drag, due to the delay in transition, can be expected simultaneously. This results in larger payload and range.

  14. Feasibility and benefits of laminar flow control on supersonic cruise airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. G.; Agrawal, S.; Lacey, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the applicability and benefits of laminar flow control (LFC) technology to supersonic cruise airplanes. Ancillary objectives were to identify the technical issues critical to supersonic LFC application, and to determine how those issues can be addressed through flight and wind-tunnel testing. Vehicle types studied include a Mach 2.2 supersonic transport configuration, a Mach 4.0 transport, and two Mach 2-class fighter concepts. Laminar flow control methodologies developed for subsonic and transonic wing laminarization were extended and applied. No intractible aerodynamic problems were found in applying LFC to airplanes of the Mach 2 class, even ones of large size. Improvements of 12 to 17 percent in lift-drag ratios were found. Several key technical issues, such as contamination avoidance and excresence criteria were identified. Recommendations are made for their resolution. A need for an inverse supersonic wing design methodology is indicated.

  15. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  16. An experimental and numerical study on the stability and propagation of laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagelopoulos, Christina Maria

    The laminar flame speed is a very important property of laminar premixed flames, especially for the validation of chemical kinetics and modeling of turbulent combustion. The counterflow technique is one of the best approaches for the experimental determination of this property because it allows for the establishment of planar, nearly adiabatic, steady, quasi-one dimensional flames that are subjected to well-defined aerodynamic strain rate. However non-linear effects as the strain rate goes to zero lead to overprediction of the laminar flame speed. In the present study these non-linear effects were investigated experimentally and numerically and significant overprediction was verified, particularly for weakly-burning hydrogen/air flames. Subsequently effort was made to establish and study flame properties at a very-low strain rate regime and qualitative and quantitative conclusions were drawn for the stability of the flame surface subjected to very low aerodynamic strain rate, coupled with the effect of gravity and preferential diffusion. A new experimental technique was developed, based on the observation that if a laminar premixed flame undergoes a transition from planar to Bunsen the strain rate changes from positive to negative values and a near-zero strain-rate regime is established. Flame speed measurements were conducted by using LDV for this regime; the flame speed measured is the true laminar flame speed and this is the first time that this property is directly and experimentally measured. Particle Streak velocimetry was developed to evaluate the strain-rates for near-zero strain-rate regime. The laminar flame speed was measured for atmospheric methane/air, ethane/air and propane/air mixtures for the whole range of equivalence ratios; the new data are lower when compared to previous ones and the overprediction is at the order of 15%.

  17. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  18. Digital data acquisition and preliminary instrumentation study for the F-16 laminar flow control vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostowari, Cyrus

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that maintenance of laminar flow through active boundary-layer control is viable. Current research activity at NASA Langley and NASA Dryden is utilizing the F-16XL-1 research vehicle fitted with a laminar-flow suction glove that is connected to a vacuum manifold in order to create and control laminar flow at supersonic flight speeds. This experimental program has been designed to establish the feasibility of obtaining laminar flow at supersonic speeds with highly swept wing and to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code calibration. Flight experiments conducted as supersonic speeds have indicated that it is possible to achieve laminar flow under controlled suction at flight Mach numbers greater than 1. Currently this glove is fitted with a series of pressure belts and flush mounted hot film sensors for the purpose of determining the pressure distributions and the extent of laminar flow region past the stagnation point. The present mode of data acquisition relies on out-dated on board multi-channel FM analogue tape recorder system. At the end of each flight, the analogue data is digitized through a long laborious process and then analyzed. It is proposed to replace this outdated system with an on board state-of-the-art digital data acquisition system capable of a through put rate of up to 1 MegaHertz. The purpose of this study was three-fold: (1) to develop a simple algorithm for acquiring data via 2 analogue-to-digital convertor boards simultaneously (total of 32 channels); (2) to interface hot-film/wire anemometry instrumentation with a PCAT type computer; and (3) to characterize the frequency response of a flush mounted film sensor. A brief description of each of the above tasks along with recommendations are given.

  19. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  20. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  1. Wing bone laminarity is not an adaptation for torsional resistance in bats

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Erin L.R.

    2015-01-01

    Torsional loading is a common feature of skeletal biomechanics during vertebrate flight. The importance of resisting torsional loads is best illustrated by the convergence of wing bone structure (e.g., long with thin walls) across extant bats and birds. Whether or not such a convergence occurs at the microstructural level is less clear. In volant birds, the humeri and ulnae often contain abundant laminar bony tissue in which primary circumferential vascular canals course concentrically about the long axis of the bone. These circumferential canals and the matrix surrounding them presumably function to resist the tissue-level shear stress caused by flight-induced torsion. Here, we assess whether or not laminar bone is a general adaptive feature in extant flying vertebrates using a histological analysis of bat bones. We sampled the humeri from six adult taxa representing a broad phylogenetic and body size range (6–1,000 g). Transverse thick sections were prepared from the midshaft of each humerus. Bone tissue was classified based on the predominant orientation of primary vascular canals. Our results show that humeri from bats across a wide phylogenetic and body size range do not contain any laminar bone. Instead, humeri are essentially avascular in bats below about 100 g and are poorly vascularized with occasional longitudinal to slightly radial canals in large bats. In contrast, humeri from birds across a comparable size range (40–1,000 g) are highly vascularized with a wide range in bone laminarity. Phylogenetically-informed scaling analyses reveal that the difference in vascularity between birds and bats is best explained by higher somatic relative growth rates in birds. The presence of wing bone laminarity in birds and its absence in bats suggests that laminar bone is not a necessary biomechanical feature in flying vertebrates and may be apomorphic to birds. PMID:25780775

  2. Manufacturing all-polymer laminar flow-based fuel cells A.S. Hollinger, P.J.A. Kenis*

    E-print Network

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    April 2013 Keywords: Manufacturing Polymer Laminar flow Microfluidic Fuel cell Stack a b s t r a c of magnitude thinner than most microfluidic fuel cells. To identify performance changes associatedManufacturing all-polymer laminar flow-based fuel cells A.S. Hollinger, P.J.A. Kenis* Department

  3. The stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lees, Lester

    1947-01-01

    Report is a continuation of a theoretical investigation of the stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid. An approximate estimate for the minimum critical Reynolds number, or stability limit, is obtained in terms of the distribution of the kinematic viscosity and the product of the mean density and mean vorticity across the boundary layer. The extension of the results of the stability analysis to laminar boundary-layer gas flows with a pressure gradient in the direction of the free stream is discussed. (author)

  4. Theoretical investigation of maintaining the boundary layer of revolution laminar using suction slits in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiede, P.

    1978-01-01

    The transition of the laminar boundary layer into the turbulent state, which results in an increased drag, can be avoided by sucking of the boundary layer particles near the wall. The technically-interesting case of sucking the particles using individual slits is investigated for bodies of revolution in incompressible flow. The results of the variational calculations show that there is an optimum suction height, where the slot separations are maximum. Combined with favorable shaping of the body, it is possible to keep the boundary layer over bodies of revolution laminar at high Reynolds numbers using relatively few suction slits and small amounts of suction flow.

  5. Start of fluidization of a bulk granular material in laminar flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskii, O.I.; Bednyakov, G.E.; Zayats, E.I.; Kirillov, I.N.; Serebryakova, T.V.

    1982-04-20

    This report examines the usage and transformation of an equation of the form Re/sub cr/=Ar(1400+5.22/Ar) which is used in design calculations for determination of the velocity of the start of fluidization of a granular material bearing initial voidage e/sub o/=0.4. Variations of the Reynold's number corresponding to the Critical Fluidization velocity at various voidages of the granular bed and different values of the Archimedes number in laminar flow are presented. Results indicate that the equation cannot be recommended for use even for rough estimates of the bulk materials in laminar flow.

  6. Smoke-Point Properties of Non-Buoyant Round Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The laminar smoke-point properties of non-buoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied emphasizing results from long-duration (100-230 s) experiments at microgravity carried out in orbit aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, pressures of 35-130 kPa, jet exit diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, jet exit velocities of 170-690 mm/s, jet exit Reynolds numbers of 46-172, characteristic flame residence times of 40-302 ms, and luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. Contrary to the normal-gravity laminar smoke point, in microgravity, the onset of laminar smoke-point conditions involved two flame configurations: closed-tip flames with soot emissions along the flame axis and open-tip flames with soot emissions from an annular ring about the flame axis. Open-tip flames were observed at large characteristic flame residence times with the onset of soot emissions associated with radiative quenching near the flame tip: nevertheless, unified correlations of laminar smoke-point properties were obtained that included both flame configurations. Flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were well correlated in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate suggested by a simplified analysis of flame shape. The present steady and non-buoyant flames emitted soot more readily than non-buoyant flames in earlier tests using ground-based microgravity facilities and than buoyant flames at normal gravity, as a result of reduced effects of unsteadiness, flame disturbances, and buoyant motion. For example, present measurements of laminar smoke-point flame lengths at comparable conditions were up to 2.3 times shorter than ground-based microgravity measurements and up to 6.4 times shorter than buoyant flame measurements. Finally, present laminar smoke-point flame lengths were roughly inversely proportional to pressure to a degree that is a somewhat smaller than observed during earlier tests both at microgravity (using ground-based facilities) and at normal gravity.

  7. Integral method for the calculation of three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    The method for turbulent flows is a further development of an existing method; profile families with two parameters and a lag entrainment method replace the simple entrainment method and power profiles with one parameter. The method for laminar flows is a new development. Moment of momentum equations were used for the solution of the problem, the profile families were derived from similar solutions of boundary layer equations. Laminar and turbulent flows at the wings were calculated. The influence of wing tapering on the boundary layer development was shown. The turbulent boundary layer for a revolution ellipsoid is calculated for 0 deg and 10 deg incidence angles.

  8. Dynamic evaluation of airflow rates for a variable air volume system serving an open-plan office.

    PubMed

    Mai, Horace K W; Chan, Daniel W T; Burnett, John

    2003-09-01

    In a typical air-conditioned office, the thermal comfort and indoor air quality are sustained by delivering the amount of supply air with the correct proportion of outdoor air to the breathing zone. However, in a real office, it is not easy to measure these airflow rates supplied to space, especially when the space is served by a variable air volume (VAV) system. The most accurate method depends on what is being measured, the details of the building and types of ventilation system. The constant concentration tracer gas method as a means to determine ventilation system performance, however, this method becomes more complicated when the air, including the tracer gas is allowed to recirculate. An accurate measurement requires significant resource support in terms of instrumentation set up and also professional interpretation. This method deters regular monitoring of the performance of an airside systems by building managers, and hence the indoor environmental quality, in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality, may never be satisfactory. This paper proposes a space zone model for the calculation of all the airflow parameters based on tracer gas measurements, including flow rates of outdoor air, VAV supply, return space, return and exfiltration. Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are used as tracer gases. After using both SF6 and CO2, the corresponding results provide a reference to justify the acceptability of using CO2 as the tracer gas. The validity of using CO2 has the significance that metabolic carbon dioxide can be used as a means to evaluate real time airflow rates. This approach provides a practical protocol for building managers to evaluate the performance of airside systems. PMID:12950595

  9. Procedure and Application for Determining the Cold Deck and Hot Deck Airflow in a Dual-Duct System 

    E-print Network

    Liu, G.; Mingsheng, L.

    2006-01-01

    , Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-1 Procedure and Application for Determining the Cold Deck and Hot Deck Airflow in a Dual-Duct System Guopeng Liu Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E. University of Nebraska Omaha, NE 68182... Commissioning (CC) has been one of the most prominent energy conservation processes for over a decade. CC has been developed to help building owners achieve energy savings, improve thermal comfort and reduce maintenance costs (Liu et al. 1999...

  10. Dynamics of a supersonic inlet-engine combination subjected to disturbances in fuel flow and inlet overboard bypass airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallhagen, R. E.; Paulovich, F. J.; Geyser, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    An axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet and a single-spool turbojet engine were dynamically tested at Mach 2.5. The propulsion system was subjected to sweep-frequency sinusoidal disturbances of either inlet overboard bypass airflow. The disturbances were at a logarithmic sweep rate of 1 decade per minute. Dynamic responses were taken of signals throughout the propulsion system. Selected signals were reduced relative to the prime propulsion system parameters. The experimental data are presented in Bode plots. Most of the plots are for a frequency range of 1.0 to 50 hertz.

  11. Airflow Dynamics of Human Jets: Sneezing and Breathing - Potential Sources of Infectious Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre D.; Klettner, Christian A.; Pantelic, Jovan; Wang, Liangde; Suhaimi, Amin Bin; Tan, Ashlynn Y. L.; Ong, Garrett W. X.; Su, Ruikun; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David D. W.; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2013-01-01

    Natural human exhalation flows such as coughing, sneezing and breathing can be considered as ‘jet-like’ airflows in the sense that they are produced from a single source in a single exhalation effort, with a relatively symmetrical, conical geometry. Although coughing and sneezing have garnered much attention as potential, explosive sources of infectious aerosols, these are relatively rare events during daily life, whereas breathing is necessary for life and is performed continuously. Real-time shadowgraph imaging was used to visualise and capture high-speed images of healthy volunteers sneezing and breathing (through the nose – nasally, and through the mouth - orally). Six volunteers, who were able to respond to the pepper sneeze stimulus, were recruited for the sneezing experiments (2 women: 27.5±6.36 years; 4 men: 29.25±10.53 years). The maximum visible distance over which the sneeze plumes (or puffs) travelled was 0.6 m, the maximum sneeze velocity derived from these measured distances was 4.5 m/s. The maximum 2-dimensional (2-D) area of dissemination of these sneezes was 0.2 m2. The corresponding derived parameter, the maximum 2-D area expansion rate of these sneezes was 2 m2/s. For nasal breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.6 m and 1.4 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.11 m2 and 0.16 m2/s, respectively. Similarly, for mouth breathing, the maximum propagation distance and derived velocity were 0.8 m and 1.3 m/s, respectively. The maximum 2-D area of dissemination and derived expansion rate were 0.18 m2 and 0.17 m2/s, respectively. Surprisingly, a comparison of the maximum exit velocities of sneezing reported here with those obtained from coughing (published previously) demonstrated that they are relatively similar, and not extremely high. This is in contrast with some earlier estimates of sneeze velocities, and some reasons for this difference are discussed. PMID:23560060

  12. Effect of swirl on the choking criteria, shock structure, and mixing in underexpanded supersonic nozzle airflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhafez, Ahmed

    Swirling flow in nozzles occurs in a number of important propulsion applications, including turbofans and turbojet engines, spin-stabilized rockets, and integral rocket/ramjets. This study examines the effect of imparting swirl to underexpanded supersonic nozzle airflow on the choking criteria, shock structure, and mixing. Fuel is injected coaxially along centerline at the nozzle throat. The nanosecond Schlieren and condensate-seeded Mie-scattering diagnostic techniques are utilized to visualize the shock structure and mixing within the free supersonic part of flowfield, while CFD numerical simulations are used to quantify the subsonic region inside nozzle. Thrust is measured experimentally to validate the numerical findings and assess the effect of swirl on nozzle choking criteria, primarily thrust and specific impulse. It is found that the throat velocity itself (not any of its components) is choked in a swirling flowfield. Therefore, the limiting tangential Mach number is unity. Moreover, the application of swirl always results in a reduction in axial Mach number component. The mass flow rate through nozzle is found to be primarily a function of throat static pressure and axial Mach number. The reduction in the latter with swirl explains the observed reduction in mass flow. Greater reservoir pressures, on the other hand, result in higher throat static pressures, which compensates for the reduced axial Mach number, and the mass flow rate can be kept constant at its non-swirling value. It is also found that the distribution of subsonic Mach number in a non-swirling flow is almost not affected with the application of swirl, i.e., non-swirling and swirling flows have the same subsonic Mach number profile. In terms of thrust and specific impulse, the application of swirl at matched nozzle reservoir pressure results in the expected reductions in discharge coefficient, thrust, and specific impulse. At matched mass flow, however, the application of swirl results in the enhancement of both thrust and specific impulse. This is attributed to the considerable degree of underexpansion associated with the swirling flow as a result of the higher nozzle reservoir pressure with swirl. In terms of shock strength, the application of swirl at matched reservoir pressure weakens the shock structure. Matching the mass flow, on the other hand, results in a stronger structure. Swirl is found to enhance supersonic mixing significantly, where swirl-induced vortices stir up and mix different regions of flowfield. High relative Mach numbers between air and fuel, combined with subsonic injection, are found to induce a negative-angled air/fuel shear layer, which results in mixing enhancement and a weaker shock structure.

  13. Airflows and turbulent flux measurements in mountainous terrain: Part 2: Mesoscale effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, A.A.; Anderson, D.E.; Burns, S.; Blanken, P.D.; Monson, Russell K.

    2004-01-01

    The location of the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site within the rocky mountains subjects it to airflows which are common in mountainous terrain. In this study, we examine the effects of some of these mesoscale features on local turbulent flux measurements; most notably, the formation of valley/mountain flows and mountain lee-side waves. The valley/mountain flows created local non-stationarities in the wind flow caused by the passage of a lee-side convergence zone (LCZ) in which upslope and downslope flows met in the vicinity of the measurement tower. During June-August, 2001, possible lee-side convergences were flagged for ???26% of all half-hour daytime flux measurement periods. However, there was no apparent loss of flux during these periods. On some relatively stable, summer nights, turbulence (designated via ??w), and scalar fluctuations (temperature and CO2, for example) exhibited periodicities that appeared congruent with passage of low frequency gravity waves (?? ??? 20 min). Spectral peaks at 0.0008 Hz (20 min) in both vertical velocity and scalar spectra were observed and indicated that 25-50% of the total scalar covariances were accounted for by the low frequency waves. During some periods of strong westerly winds (predominantly in winter), large mountain gravity waves were observed to form. Typically, the flux tower resided within a region of downslope "shooting flow", which created high turbulence, but had no detrimental effect on local flux measurements based on valid turbulence statistics and nearly complete energy budget closure. Periodically, we found evidence for re-circulating, rotor winds in the simultaneous time series of wind data from the Ameriflux tower site and a second meteorological site situated 8 km upslope and to the West. Only 14% of the half-hour time periods that we examined for a 4 month period in the winter of 2000-2001 indicated the possible existence of rotor winds. On average, energy budget closure was ???20% less during periods with rotor occurrence compared to those without. Results from this study demonstrate that the potential exists for relatively rare, yet significant influences of mesoscale wind flow patterns on the local half-hour flux measurements at this site. Occurrence of these events could be detected through examination of normal turbulence statistical parameters. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport characteristics of expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei in indoor environments with different ventilation airflow patterns.

    PubMed

    Wan, M P; Chao, C Y H

    2007-06-01

    Expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei can be pathogen carriers for airborne diseases. Their transport characteristics were studied in detail in two idealized floor-supply-type ventilation flow patterns: Unidirectional-upward and single-side-floor, using a multiphase numerical model. The model was validated by running interferometric Mie imaging experiments using test droplets with nonvolatile content, which formed droplet nuclei, ultimately, in a class-100 clean-room chamber. By comparing the droplet dispersion and removal characteristics with data of two other ceiling-supply ventilation systems collected from a previous work, deviations from the perfectly mixed ventilation condition were found to exist in various cases to different extent. The unidirectional-upward system was found to be more efficient in removing the smallest droplet nuclei (formed from 1.5 mum droplets) by air extraction, but it became less effective for larger droplets and droplet nuclei. Instead, the single-side-floor system was shown to be more favorable in removing these large droplets and droplet nuclei. In the single-side-floor system, the lateral overall dispersion coefficients for the small droplets and nuclei (initial size airflow transport in the single-side-floor system was much stronger than the lateral dispersion mechanism induced mainly by air turbulence in the unidirectional-upward system. The time required for the droplets and droplet nuclei to be transported to the exhaust vent or deposition surfaces for removal varied with different ventilation flow patterns. Possible underestimation of exposure level existed if the perfectly mixed condition was assumed. For example, the weak lateral dispersion in the unidirectional ventilation systems made expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei stay at close distance to the source leading to highly nonuniform spatial distributions. The distance between the source and susceptible patients became an additional concern in exposure analysis. Relative significance of the air-extraction removal mechanism was studied. This can have impact to the performance evaluation of filtration and disinfection systems installed in the indoor environment. These findings revealed the need for further development in a risk-assessment model incorporating the effect of different ventilation systems on distributing expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei nonuniformly in various indoor spaces, such as buildings, aircraft cabins, trains, etc. PMID:17536901

  15. Laminar and neurochemical organization of the dorsal cochlear nucleus of the human, monkey, cat, and rodents.

    PubMed

    Baizer, Joan S; Wong, Keit Men; Paolone, Nicholas A; Weinstock, Nadav; Salvi, Richard J; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Witelson, Sandra F; Baker, James F; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2014-10-01

    The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is a brainstem structure that receives input from the auditory nerve. Many studies in a diversity of species have shown that the DCN has a laminar organization and identifiable neuron types with predictable synaptic relations to each other. In contrast, studies on the human DCN have found a less distinct laminar organization and fewer cell types, although there has been disagreement among studies in how to characterize laminar organization and which of the cell types identified in other animals are also present in humans. We have reexamined DCN organization in the human using immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of several proteins that have been useful in delineating the neurochemical organization of other brainstem structures in humans: nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (NPNFP), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and three calcium-binding proteins. The results for humans suggest a laminar organization with only two layers, and the presence of large projection neurons that are enriched in NPNFP. We did not observe evidence in humans of the inhibitory interneurons that have been described in the cat and rodent DCN. To compare humans and other animals directly we used immunohistochemistry to examine the DCN in the macaque monkey, the cat, and three rodents. We found similarities between macaque monkey and human in the expression of NPNFP and nNOS, and unexpected differences among species in the patterns of expression of the calcium-binding proteins. PMID:25132345

  16. Drag force in the open-loop control of the cylinder wake in the laminar regime

    E-print Network

    Protas, Bartosz

    Drag force in the open-loop control of the cylinder wake in the laminar regime B. Protasa are interested in identifying the physical mechanisms that accompany mean drag modifications in the cylinder wake, which in the paper is outlined and benchmarked. We confirm the earlier findings concerning mean drag

  17. Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Surface Perception: Stratification, Transparency, and Neon Color Spreading

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Surface Perception: Stratification, Transparency, and Neon Color, transparency, and neon color spreading in response to 2D pictures and 3D scenes. Such percepts are sensitive, Neon Color Spreading #12;2 1. Introduction 1.1 Depthful grouping of 2D cues. Refinement of the 3D

  18. Measurement of laminar burning speeds and Markstein lengths using a novel methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Tahtouh, Toni; Halter, Fabien; Mounaim-Rousselle, Christine

    2009-09-15

    Three different methodologies used for the extraction of laminar information are compared and discussed. Starting from an asymptotic analysis assuming a linear relation between the propagation speed and the stretch acting on the flame front, temporal radius evolutions of spherically expanding laminar flames are postprocessed to obtain laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths. The first methodology fits the temporal radius evolution with a polynomial function, while the new methodology proposed uses the exact solution of the linear relation linking the flame speed and the stretch as a fit. The last methodology consists in an analytical resolution of the problem. To test the different methodologies, experiments were carried out in a stainless steel combustion chamber with methane/air mixtures at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The equivalence ratio was varied from 0.55 to 1.3. The classical shadowgraph technique was used to detect the reaction zone. The new methodology has proven to be the most robust and provides the most accurate results, while the polynomial methodology induces some errors due to the differentiation process. As original radii are used in the analytical methodology, it is more affected by the experimental radius determination. Finally, laminar burning velocity and Markstein length values determined with the new methodology are compared with results reported in the literature. (author)

  19. LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RESIDENCE TIME DISTRIBUTION OF FLUIDS IN LAMINAR FLOW STIRRED ANNULAR PHOTOREACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and Numerical Investigations of Residence Time Distribution of Fluids in Laminar Flow Stirred Annular Photoreactor

    E. Sahle-Demessie1, Siefu Bekele2, U. R. Pillai1

    1U.S. EPA, National Risk Management Research Laboratory
    Sustainable Technology Division,...

  20. Laminar and neurochemical organization of the dorsal cochlear nucleus of the human, monkey, cat, and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Baizer, Joan S.; Wong, Keit Men; Paolone, Nicholas A.; Weinstock, Nadav; Salvi, Richard J.; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Witelson, Sandra F.; Baker, James F.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is a brainstem structure that receives input from the auditory nerve. Many studies in a diversity of species have shown that the DCN has a laminar organization and identifiable neuron types with predictable synaptic relations to each other. In contrast, studies on the human DCN have found a less distinct laminar organization and fewer cell types, although there has been disagreement among studies in how to characterize laminar organization and which of the cell types identified in other animals are also present in humans. We have reexamined DCN organization in the human using immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of several proteins that have been useful in delineating the neurochemical organization of other brainstem structures in humans: nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (NPNFP), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and three calcium-binding proteins. The results for humans suggest a laminar organization with only two layers, and the presence of large projection neurons that are enriched in NPNFP. We did not observe evidence in humans of the inhibitory interneurons that have been described in the cat and rodent DCN. To compare humans and other animals directly we used immunohistochemistry to examine the DCN in the macaque monkey, the cat, and three rodents. We found similarities between macaque monkey and human in the expression of NPNFP and nNOS, and unexpected differences among species in the patterns of expression of the calcium-binding proteins. PMID:25132345

  1. Single collector attachment efficiency of colloid capture by a cylindrical collector in laminar overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little research has been conducted to investigate fate and transport of colloids in surface vegetation in overland flow under unfavorable chemical conditions. In this work, single collector attachment efficiency (a) of colloid capture by a simulated plant stem (i.e. cylindrical collector) in laminar...

  2. Laminar-turbulent boundary-layer transition over a rough rotating disk F. Zoueshtiagha)

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Peter J.

    , such as flat plates and pipes. See Floryan1 for a review of the effect of surface roughness on the stability of flow over flat plates and in channels. Here, we investigate the effects of roughness on laminar field given by the similarity solution derived by Ka´rma´n,2 has long been the classic paradigm

  3. Absolute linear instability in laminar and turbulent gas/liquid two-layer channel flow

    E-print Network

    Naraigh, Lennon O; Shaw, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    We study two-phase stratified flow where the bottom layer is a thin laminar liquid and the upper layer is a fully-developed gas flow. The gas flow can be laminar or turbulent. To determine the boundary between convective and absolute instability, we use Orr--Sommerfeld stability theory, and a combination of linear modal analysis and ray analysis. For turbulent gas flow, and for the density ratio r=1000, we find large regions of parameter space that produce absolute instability. These parameter regimes involve viscosity ratios of direct relevance to oil/gas flows. If, instead, the gas layer is laminar, absolute instability persists for the density ratio r=1000, although the convective/absolute stability boundary occurs at a viscosity ratio that is an order of magnitude smaller than in the turbulent case. Two further unstable temporal modes exist in both the laminar and the turbulent cases, one of which can exclude absolute instability. We compare our results with an experimentally-determined flow-regime map, a...

  4. Comparison of structures of laminar methaneoxygen and methaneair diffusion flames from atmospheric to 60 atm

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    atmospheric. The presence of the two- zone structure in the methane­oxygen flames was attributedComparison of structures of laminar methane­oxygen and methane­air diffusion flames from atmospheric to 60 atm Peter H. Joo, Marc R.J. Charest, Clinton P.T. Groth, Ömer L. Gülder University

  5. An integral method for unsteady laminar boundary layers. [impulsive start for flow past circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M.; Chan, W.-K.

    1975-01-01

    The Method of Integral Relations is extended to apply to the calculation of Unsteady Flow in a Laminar Boundary Layer. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated in an application to uniform flow past a circular cylinder, resulting from an impulsive start. Both first and second approximations are worked out, the latter showing good agreement with results of previous calculations.

  6. MAGNETIC TRANSPORT ON THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY LAMINAR AND TURBULENT AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Y.; Krishan, V.; Masuda, S.

    2010-09-10

    The lower solar atmosphere consists of partially ionized turbulent plasmas harboring velocity field, magnetic field, and current density fluctuations. The correlations among these small-scale fluctuations give rise to large-scale flows and magnetic fields which decisively affect all transport processes. The three-fluid system consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral particles supports nonideal effects such as the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion. Here, we study magnetic transport by the laminar- and turbulent-scale ambipolar diffusion processes using a simple model of the magnetic induction equation. Based on a linear analysis of the induction equation, we perform a one-dimensional numerical simulation to study the laminar ambipolar effect on medium-scale magnetic field structures. The nonlinearity of the laminar ambipolar diffusion creates magnetic structures with sharp gradients in the scale of hundreds of kilometers. We expect that these can be amenable to processes such as magnetic reconnection and energy release therefrom for heating and flaring of the solar plasma. Analyzing the characteristic timescales of these processes, we find that the turbulent diffusion timescale is smaller by several orders of magnitude than the laminar diffusion timescale. The effect of the modeled turbulent ambipolar diffusion on the obtained field structures is briefly discussed.

  7. Performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles in cloud encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive data bank of concurrent measurements of laminar flow (LF), particle concentration, and aircraft charging state was gathered for the first time. From this data bank, 13 flights in the simulated airline service (SAS) portion were analyzed to date. A total of 6.86 hours of data at one-second resolution were analyzed. An extensive statistical analysis, for both leading-edge test articles, shows that there is a significant effect of cloud and haze particles on the extent of laminar flow obtained. Approximately 93 percent of data points simulating LFC flight were obtained in clear air conditions; approximately 7 percent were obtained in cloud and haze. These percentages are consistent with earlier USAF and NASA estimates and results. The Hall laminar flow loss criteria was verified qualitatively. Larger particles and higher particle concentrations have a more marked effect on LF than do small particles. A particle spectrometer of a charging patch are both acceptable as diagnostic indicators of the presence of particles detrimental to laminar flow.

  8. Linear Response of Laminar Premixed Flames to Flow Oscillations: Unsteady Stretch Effects

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    the linear response of a laminar premixed flame to harmonic velocity disturbances. It generalizes previous burning velocity along the wrinkled flame front. Results are derived from analytical solutions of the G=R. " = fluctuating (axial) velocity amplitude, defined in Eq. (16) = instantaneous flame position o, 1, 0

  9. On the extraction of laminar flame speed and Markstein length from outwardly propagating spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng

    2011-02-15

    Large discrepancies among the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths of methane/air mixtures measured by different researchers using the same constant-pressure spherical flame method are observed. As an effort to reduce these discrepancies, one linear model (LM, the stretched flame speed changes linearly with the stretch rate) and two non-linear models (NM I and NM II, the stretched flame speed changes non-linearly with the stretch rate) for extracting the laminar flame speed and Markstein length from propagating spherical flames are investigated. The accuracy and performance of the LM, NM I, and NM II are found to strongly depend on the Lewis number. It is demonstrated that NM I is the most accurate for mixtures with large Lewis number (positive Markstein length) while NM II is the most accurate for mixtures with small Lewis number (negative Markstein length). Therefore, in order to get accurate laminar flame speed and Markstein length from spherical flame experiments, different non-linear models should be used for different mixtures. The validity of the theoretical results is further demonstrated by numerical and experimental studies. The results of this study can be used directly in spherical flame experiments measuring the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. (author)

  10. Spikes, synchrony, and attentive learning by laminar thalamocortical circuits Stephen Grossberg and Massimiliano Versace1

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    Boston, MA 02215 Phone: 617-353-7858 Fax: 617-353-7755 Email:steve@bu.edu Keywords: attention; learning processing properties that regulate fast learning and stable memory of brain representations: single cell1 Spikes, synchrony, and attentive learning by laminar thalamocortical circuits Stephen Grossberg

  11. LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROREACTOR FOR EFFICIENT REGENERATION OF NICOTINAMIDE COFACTORS FOR BIOCATALYIS

    E-print Network

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    LAMINAR FLOW BASED MICROREACTOR FOR EFFICIENT REGENERATION OF NICOTINAMIDE COFACTORS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France Supporting Information Chemicals. All chemicals and solvents were, were deposited via sputtering of an adhesion layer of 50-100 Å of titanium or chromium followed

  12. Design of a Slotted, Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil for Business-Jet Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A 14-percent-thick, slotted, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S204, for light business-jet applications has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The drag-divergence Mach number is predicted to be greater than 0.70.

  13. Heat Transfer at the Reattachment Zone of Separated Laminar Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Paul M.; Viegas, John R.

    1961-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer are analyzed at the reattachment zone of two-dimensional separated laminar boundary layers. The fluid is considered to be flowing normal to the wall at reattachment. An approximate expression is derived for the heat transfer in the reattachment region and a calculated value is compared with an experimental measurement.

  14. A Laminar Cortical Model of Stereopsis and 3D Surface Perception

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    A Laminar Cortical Model of Stereopsis and 3D Surface Perception: Closure and da Vinci Stereopsis illusion, stereopsis with polarity-reversed stereograms, and da Vinci stereopsis. It also explains psychophysical data about perceptual closure and variations of da Vinci stereopsis that previous models cannot

  15. NRP1-mediated Sema3A signals coordinate laminar formation in the developing chick optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuji; Sakuma, Chie; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    The optic tectum comprises multiple layers, which are formed by radial and tangential migration during development. Here, we report that Neuropilin 1 (NRP1)-mediated Sema3A signals are involved in the process of tectal laminar formation, which is elaborated by tangential migration. In the developing chick tectum, NRP1, a receptor for Sema3A, is expressed in microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive intermediate layers IV and V. Sema3A itself is a diffusible guidance factor and is expressed in the overlying layer VI. Using stable fluorescent labeling of tectal cells, we show that MAP2-positive intermediate layers are formed by the neurons that have been dispersed by tangential migration along the tectal efferent axons. When Sema3A was mis-expressed during laminar formation, local Sema3A repelled the tangential migrants, thus eliminating MAP2-positive neurons that expressed NRP1. Furthermore, in the absence of the MAP2-positive neurons, tectal layers were disorganized into an undulated form, indicating that MAP2-positive intermediate layers are required for proper laminar formation. These results suggest that NRP1-mediated Sema3A signals provide repulsive signals for MAP2-positive neurons to segregate tectal layers, which is important in order to coordinate laminar organization of the optic tectum. PMID:25183873

  16. A Power-Law Formulation of Laminar Flow in Short Pipes Max Sherman

    E-print Network

    A Power-Law Formulation of Laminar Flow in Short Pipes Max Sherman Indoor Environment Program ABSTRACT This report develops a theoretical description of the hydrodynamic relationship based on a power pipes can be described with a simple power law dependence on pressure, but that the exponent

  17. Nacelle/pylon/wing integration on a transport model with a natural laminar flow nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, M.; Aabeyounis, W. K.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.82 and angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 4.0 deg to determine if nacelle/pylon/wing integration affects the achievement of natural laminar flow on a long-duct flow-through nacelle for a high-wing transonic transport configuration. In order to fully assess the integration effect on a nacelle designed to achieve laminar flow, the effects of fixed and free nacelle transitions as well as nacelle longitudinal position and pylon contouring were obtained. The results indicate that the ability to achieve laminar flow on the nacelle is not significantly altered by nacelle/pylon/wing integration. The increment in installed drag between free and fixed transition for the nacelles on symmetrical pylons is essentially the calculated differences between turbulent and laminar flow on the nacelles. The installed drag of the contoured pylon is less than that of the symmetrical pylon. The installed drag for the nacelles in a rearward position is greater than that for the nacelles in a forward position.

  18. Journal of Power Sources 128 (2004) 5460 Microfluidic fuel cell based on laminar flow

    E-print Network

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 128 (2004) 54­60 Microfluidic fuel cell based on laminar flow Eric R of efficient room temperature power sources of microscopic dimensions that are comparable or better in the development of micro power sources [1­3]. These portable applications include not only common appliances

  19. The antiinflammatory effect of laminar flow: The role of PPAR , epoxyeicosatrienoic acids,

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    The antiinflammatory effect of laminar flow: The role of PPAR , epoxyeicosatrienoic acids peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR ) in vascular endothelial cells in a ligand-dependent manner epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), the catalytic products of cytochrome P450 epoxygenases, are PPAR ligands

  20. Nonlinear effects in the extraction of laminar flame speeds from expanding spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, A.P.; Law, C.K.

    2009-09-15

    Various factors affecting the determination of laminar flames speeds from outwardly propagating spherical flames in a constant-pressure combustion chamber were considered, with emphasis on the nonlinear variation of the stretched flame speed to the flame stretch rate, and the associated need to nonlinearly extrapolate the stretched flame speed to yield an accurate determination of the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Experiments were conducted for lean and rich n-butane/air flames at 1atm initial pressure, demonstrating the complex and nonlinear nature of the dynamics of flame evolution, and the strong influences of the ignition transient and chamber confinement during the initial and final periods of the flame propagation, respectively. These experimental data were analyzed using the nonlinear relation between the stretched flame speed and stretch rate, yielding laminar flame speeds that agree well with data determined from alternate flame configurations. It is further suggested that the fidelity in the extraction of the laminar flame speed from expanding spherical flames can be facilitated by using small ignition energy and a large combustion chamber. (author)

  1. INERTIAL RANGE SCALING OF LAMINAR SHEAR FLOW AS A MODEL OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT

    E-print Network

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    of tracer flow in heterogeneous porous media, ground water ecology, and fully developed turbulenceINERTIAL RANGE SCALING OF LAMINAR SHEAR FLOW AS A MODEL OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT Qiang Zhang.1) can be traced from [2,3,5,6]. The relation of our work to the fractal analysis of ground water data [8

  2. Predictive capabilities of series solutions for laminar free convection boundary layer heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Chao, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    Various types of series solutions for predicting laminar, free-convection boundary-layer heat transfer over both isothermal and nonisothermal boundaries are reviewed. The methods include finite difference, Merk series, Blasius series, and Goertler series. Comparative results are presented for heat transfer over an isothermal, horizontal, elliptical cylinder in both slender and blunt configurations.

  3. Smoke-Point Properties of Nonbuoyant Round Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, R. B.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The laminar smoke-point properties of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied emphasizing results from long duration (100-230 s) experiments at microgravity carried -out on- orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, initial jet exit diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, jet exit velocities of 170-1630 mm/s, jet exit Reynolds numbers of 46-172, characteristic flame residence times of 40-302 ms, and luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The onset of laminar smoke-point conditions involved two flame configurations: closed-tip flames with first soot emissions along the flame axis and open-tip flames with first soot emissions from an annular ring about the flame axis. Open-tip flames were observed at large characteristic flame residence times with the onset of soot emissions associated with radiative quenching near the flame tip; nevertheless, unified correlations of laminar smoke-point properties were obtained that included both flame configurations. Flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were well-correlated in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate suggested by a simplified analysis of flame shape. The present steady and nonbuoyant flames emitted soot more readily than earlier tests of nonbuoyant flames at microgravity using ground-based facilities and of buoyant flames at normal gravity due to reduced effects of unsteadiness, flame disturbances and buoyant motion. For example, laminar smoke-point flame lengths from ground-based microgravity measurements were up to 2.3 times longer and from buoyant flame measurements were up to 6.4 times longer than the present measurements at comparable conditions. Finally, present laminar smoke-point flame lengths were roughly inversely proportional to pressure, which is a somewhat slower variation than observed during earlier tests both at microgravity using ground-based facilities and at normal gravity.

  4. Characteristics of an optimized catheter-type thermal flow sensor for measuring reciprocating airflows in bronchial pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, M.; Yokota, T.; Kawabe, T.; Funaki, T.; Matsushima, M.; Iwai, S.; Matsunaga, N.; Sato, K.

    2010-12-01

    We optimized a catheter-type thermal flow sensor to measure the reciprocating airflows in bronchial pathways. The electrical wiring in the outer tube was extracted to keep the symmetry of the temperature distribution on the heaters. First, a flexible sensor was fabricated on polyimide film with photolithography, and then the enameled wires were bonded to the contact pads on the film with anisotropic conductive film. The film sensor was finally assembled with a catheter configuration that had a diameter of 1.8 mm by applying a heat shrinkable tube. We experimentally confirmed that the sensor outputs under both forward and reverse flow conditions had the same output characteristics when a design with symmetrical heating elements was applied. The sensor outputs we obtained at a reciprocating flow frequency ranging from 1 to 3 Hz almost coincided, and they also fit that obtained under unidirectional airflow conditions. Finally, the aspirated- and inspired-air characteristics in the air passages of small laboratory animals (rats and mice) were measured. Due to our development of a flexible method of electrical wiring, we could try a new approach to intubation measurements in which the sensor was inserted into the air passage from the mouth with a fiberscope, and we confirmed that the sensor we developed was able to directly measure the breathing characteristics in air passages. Implanted measurements were also attempted in this study.

  5. New insight into the evolution of the vertebrate respiratory system and the discovery of unidirectional airflow in iguana lungs

    PubMed Central

    Cieri, Robert L.; Craven, Brent A.; Schachner, Emma R.; Farmer, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    The generally accepted framework for the evolution of a key feature of the avian respiratory system, unidirectional airflow, is that it is an adaptation for efficiency of gas exchange and expanded aerobic capacities, and therefore it has historically been viewed as important to the ability of birds to fly and to maintain an endothermic metabolism. This pattern of flow has been presumed to arise from specific features of the respiratory system, such as an enclosed intrapulmonary bronchus and parabronchi. Here we show unidirectional airflow in the green iguana, a lizard with a strikingly different natural history from that of birds and lacking these anatomical features. This discovery indicates a paradigm shift is needed. The selective drivers of the trait, its date of origin, and the fundamental aerodynamic mechanisms by which unidirectional flow arises must be reassessed to be congruent with the natural history of this lineage. Unidirectional flow may serve functions other than expanded aerobic capacity; it may have been present in the ancestral diapsid; and it can occur in structurally simple lungs. PMID:25404314

  6. Numerical simulation of airflow and micro-particle deposition in human nasal airway pre- and post-virtual sphenoidotomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahmanzadeh, Hojat; Abouali, Omid; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of endoscopic sphenoidotomy surgery on the flow patterns and deposition of micro-particles in the human nasal airway and sphenoid sinus were investigated. A realistic model of a human nasal passage including nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses was constructed using a series of CT scan images of a healthy subject. Then, a virtual sphenoidotomy by endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the left nasal passage and sphenoid sinus. Transient airflow patterns pre- and post-surgery during a full breathing cycle (inhalation and exhalation) were simulated numerically under cyclic flow condition. The Lagrangian approach was used for evaluating the transport and deposition of inhaled micro-particles. An unsteady particle tracking was performed for the inhalation phase of the breathing cycle for the case that particles were continuously entering into the nasal airway. The total deposition pattern and sphenoid deposition fraction of micro-particles were evaluated and compared for pre- and post-surgery cases. The presented results show that sphenoidotomy increased the airflow into the sphenoid sinus, which led to increased deposition of micro-particles in this region. Particles up to 25 ?m were able to penetrate into the sphenoid in the post-operation case, and the highest deposition in the sphenoid for the resting breathing rate occurred for 10 ?m particles at about 1.5%. PMID:25862997

  7. New insight into the evolution of the vertebrate respiratory system and the discovery of unidirectional airflow in iguana lungs.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Robert L; Craven, Brent A; Schachner, Emma R; Farmer, C G

    2014-12-01

    The generally accepted framework for the evolution of a key feature of the avian respiratory system, unidirectional airflow, is that it is an adaptation for efficiency of gas exchange and expanded aerobic capacities, and therefore it has historically been viewed as important to the ability of birds to fly and to maintain an endothermic metabolism. This pattern of flow has been presumed to arise from specific features of the respiratory system, such as an enclosed intrapulmonary bronchus and parabronchi. Here we show unidirectional airflow in the green iguana, a lizard with a strikingly different natural history from that of birds and lacking these anatomical features. This discovery indicates a paradigm shift is needed. The selective drivers of the trait, its date of origin, and the fundamental aerodynamic mechanisms by which unidirectional flow arises must be reassessed to be congruent with the natural history of this lineage. Unidirectional flow may serve functions other than expanded aerobic capacity; it may have been present in the ancestral diapsid; and it can occur in structurally simple lungs. PMID:25404314

  8. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  9. Airflow and Particle Deposition Simulations in Health and Emphysema: From In-Vivo to In-Silico Animal Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Marsden, Alison L.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Darquenne, Chantal; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-01-01

    Image-based in-silico modeling tools provide detailed velocity and particle deposition data. However, care must be taken when prescribing boundary conditions to model lung physiology in health or disease, such as in emphysema. In this study, the respiratory resistance and compliance were obtained by solving an inverse problem; a 0D global model based on healthy and emphysematous rat experimental data. Multi-scale CFD simulations were performed by solving the 3D Navier Stokes equations in an MRI-derived rat geometry coupled to a 0D model. Particles with 0.95 ?m diameter were tracked and their distribution in the lung was assessed. Seven 3D-0D simulations were performed: healthy, homogeneous, and five heterogeneous emphysema cases. Compliance (C) was significantly higher (p = 0.04) in the emphysematous rats (C=0.37±0.14cm3cmH2O) compared to the healthy rats (C=0.25±0.04cm3cmH2O), while the resistance remained unchanged (p=0.83). There were increases in airflow, particle deposition in the 3D model, and particle delivery to the diseased regions for the heterogeneous cases compared to the homogeneous cases. The results highlight the importance of multi-scale numerical simulations to study airflow and particle distribution in healthy and diseased lungs. The effect of particle size and gravity were studied. Once available, these in-silico predictions may be compared to experimental deposition data. PMID:24318192

  10. Chronic air-flow limitation does not increase respiratory epithelial permeability assessed by aerosolized solute, but smoking does

    SciTech Connect

    Huchon, G.J.; Russell, J.A.; Barritault, L.G.; Lipavsky, A.; Murray, J.F.

    1984-09-01

    To determine the separate influences of smoking and severe air-flow limitation on aerosol deposition and respiratory epithelial permeability, we studied 26 normal nonsmokers, 12 smokers without airway obstruction, 12 nonsmokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 11 smokers with COPD. We aerosolized 99mTc-labeled diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid to particles approximately 1 micron activity median aerodynamic diameter. Levels of radioactivity were plotted semilogarithmically against time to calculate clearance as percent per minute. The distribution of radioactivity was homogeneous in control subjects and in smokers, but patchy in both groups with COPD. No difference was found between clearances of the control group (1.18 +/- 0.31% min-1), and nonsmoker COPD group (1.37 +/- 0.82% min-1), whereas values in smokers without COPD (4.00 +/- 1.70% min-1) and smokers with COPD (3.62 +/- 2.88% min-1) were significantly greater than in both nonsmoking groups. We conclude that (1) small particles appear to deposit peripherally, even with severe COPD; (2) respiratory epithelial permeability is normal in nonsmokers with COPD; (3) smoking increases permeability by a mechanism unrelated to air-flow limitation.

  11. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  12. Influence of liquid-volume and airflow rates on spray application quality and homogeneity in super-intensive olive tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio; Gil, Emilio; Agüera-Vega, J; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A

    2015-12-15

    Olive is a key crop in Europe, especially in countries around the Mediterranean Basin. Optimising the parameters of a spray is essential for sustainable pesticide use, especially in high-input systems, such as the super-intensive hedgerow system. Parameters may be optimised by adjusting the applied volume and airflow rate of sprays, in addition to the liquid to air proportion and the relationship between air velocity and airflow rate. Two spray experiments using a commercial airblast sprayer were conducted in a super-intensive orchard to study how varying the liquid volume rate (testing volumes of 182, 619, and 1603 l ha(-1)) and volumetric airflow rate (with flow rates of 11.93, 8.90, and 6.15 m(3) s(-1)) influences the coverage parameters and the amount and distribution of deposits in different zones of the canopy.. Our results showed that an increase in the application volume raised the mean deposit and percentage coverage, but decreased the application efficiency, spray penetration, and deposit homogeneity. Furthermore, we found that the volumetric airflow rate had a lower influence on the studied parameters than the liquid volume; however, an increase in the airflow rate improved the application efficiency and homogeneity to a certain threshold, after which the spray quality decreased. This decrease was observed in the high-flow treatment. Our results demonstrate that intermediate liquid volume rates and volumetric airflow rates are required for the optimal spraying of pesticides on super-intensive olive crops, and would reduce current pollution levels. PMID:26282759

  13. Towards a unified theory of neocortex: laminar cortical circuits for vision and cognition.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A key goal of computational neuroscience is to link brain mechanisms to behavioral functions. The present article describes recent progress towards explaining how laminar neocortical circuits give rise to biological intelligence. These circuits embody two new and revolutionary computational paradigms: Complementary Computing and Laminar Computing. Circuit properties include a novel synthesis of feedforward and feedback processing, of digital and analog processing, and of preattentive and attentive processing. This synthesis clarifies the appeal of Bayesian approaches but has a far greater predictive range that naturally extends to self-organizing processes. Examples from vision and cognition are summarized. A LAMINART architecture unifies properties of visual development, learning, perceptual grouping, attention, and 3D vision. A key modeling theme is that the mechanisms which enable development and learning to occur in a stable way imply properties of adult behavior. It is noted how higher-order attentional constraints can influence multiple cortical regions, and how spatial and object attention work together to learn view-invariant object categories. In particular, a form-fitting spatial attentional shroud can allow an emerging view-invariant object category to remain active while multiple view categories are associated with it during sequences of saccadic eye movements. Finally, the chapter summarizes recent work on the LIST PARSE model of cognitive information processing by the laminar circuits of prefrontal cortex. LIST PARSE models the short-term storage of event sequences in working memory, their unitization through learning into sequence, or list, chunks, and their read-out in planned sequential performance that is under volitional control. LIST PARSE provides a laminar embodiment of Item and Order working memories, also called Competitive Queuing models, that have been supported by both psychophysical and neurobiological data. These examples show how variations of a common laminar cortical design can embody properties of visual and cognitive intelligence that seem, at least on the surface, to be mechanistically unrelated. PMID:17925241

  14. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers of hydrocarbon/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, L.K.; Ismail, M.A.; Faeth, G.M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Effects of positive flame stretch on the laminar burning velocities of hydrocarbon/air mixtures were studied experimentally using outwardly propagating spherical flames. The test conditions included propane, methane, ethane, and ethylene -- air flames at various fuel-equivalence ratios and normal temperature and pressure. Karlovitz numbers generally were less than 0.3 so that the flames were remote from quenching conditions. Within this range, the ratio of the unstretched (plane flames) to stretched laminar burning velocities varied linearly with Karlovitz numbers, yielding Markstein numbers that were independent of Karlovitz numbers for a particular reactant mixture. In addition, Markstein numbers varied in a roughly linear manner with fuel-equivalence ratios over the range of the measurements, which were somewhat removed from flammability limits where behavior might differ. Effects of stretch were substantial: Markstein numbers varied from [minus]2.5 to 7.2 yielding corresponding laminar burning velocity variations of 0.4--2.7 times the value for an unstretched (plane) flame over the test range. The ranges of fuel-equivalence ratios for unstable preferential-diffusion conditions (negative Markstein numbers) were as follows: propane, greater than 1.44; methane, less than 0.74; ethane, greater than 1.68; and ethylene, greater than 1.95. Fuel-equivalence ratios for maximum flame temperatures and laminar burning velocities are near unity for the present flames; therefore, neutral preferential-diffusion conditions are shifted toward fuel-equivalence ratios on the unstable side of unity, in qualitative agreement with recent approximate theories treating the effects of stretch on laminar premixed flames.

  15. Laminar Dust Flames: A Program of Microgravity and Ground Based Studies at McGill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goroshin, Sam; Lee, John

    1999-01-01

    Fundamental knowledge of heterogeneous combustion mechanisms is required to improve utilization of solid fuels (e.g. coal), safe handling of combustible dusts in industry, and solid propulsion systems. The objective of the McGill University research program on dust combustion is to obtain a reliable set of data on basic combustion parameters for dust suspensions (i.e. laminar burning velocity, flame structure, quenching distance, flammability limits, etc.) over a range of particle sizes, dust concentrations, and types of fuel. This set of data then permits theoretical models to be validated and, when necessary, new models to be developed to describe the detailed reaction mechanisms and transport processes. Microgravity is essential to the generation of a uniform dust suspension of arbitrary particle size and concentration. When particles with a characteristic size on the order of tens of microns are suspended, they rapidly settle in a gravitational field. To maintain a particulate in suspension for time duration adequate to carry out combustion experiments invariably requires continuous convective flow in excess of the gravitational settling velocity (which is comparable with and can even exceed the dust laminar burning velocity). This makes the experiments turbulent in nature and thus renders it impossible to study laminar dust flames. Even for small particle sizes on the order of microns, a stable laminar dust flow can be maintained only for relatively low dust concentrations at normal gravity conditions. High dust loading leads to gravitational instability of the dust cloud and to the formation of recirculation cells in the dust suspension in a confined volume, or to the rapid sedimentation of the dense dust cloud, as a whole, in an unconfined volume. Many important solid fuels such as carbon and boron also have low laminar flame speeds (of the order of several centimeters per second). Convection that occurs in combustion products due to buoyancy disrupts the low speed dust flames and makes observation of such flames at normal gravity difficult.

  16. Operating Room Environment Control. Part A: a Valve Cannister System for Anesthetic Gas Adsorption. Part B: a State-of-the-art Survey of Laminar Flow Operating Rooms. Part C: Three Laminar Flow Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. S.; Kosovich, J.

    1973-01-01

    An anesthetic gas flow pop-off valve canister is described that is airtight and permits the patient to breath freely. Once its release mechanism is activated, the exhaust gases are collected at a hose adapter and passed through activated coal for adsorption. A survey of laminar air flow clean rooms is presented and the installation of laminar cross flow air systems in operating rooms is recommended. Laminar flow ventilation experiments determine drying period evaporation rates for chicken intestines, sponges, and sections of pig stomach.

  17. Investigations into the causes and methods of reducing airflow induced buffeting over vehicle rear windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaton, Larry

    Rear Window Buffeting (RWB) is the low-frequency, high amplitude, helicopter-type sound that results in many 4-door vehicles when driven 30-70 mph with one rear window lowered. This event is a cause for concern among the occupants of an affected vehicle, and may result in great discomfort to the occupants if actions are not taken to reduce the magnitude of the event. In this dissertation, a comparison is made between moon roof buffeting and rear window buffeting, and data are presented where Sound Pressure Levels approaching 130 dB have been measured. This level may actually be causing ear pain in some people. Various explanations are presented in the literature for the root causes of rear window buffeting. This dissertation presents the results of an investigation to determine the root cause of rear window buffeting in a compact Sport Utility Vehicle. A brief synopsis of the types of flow-induced noises is provided, and three types of wind noises are described. Comparison between the classic spring-mass-damper system is made to the Helmholtz resonator, and the application of the Helmholtz resonator system to a vehicle cabin is discussed. A comprehensive explanation is provided to explain the mechanism resulting in the closely related moon roof buffeting problem. The presence of frequency lock-on is discussed, and data are provided demonstrating lock-on. Data are presented showing how rear window buffeting also exhibits lock-on, and three regions of differing air flow patterns along the side of the test vehicle are described. Data are presented supporting the three region concept and how the various attachments and geometries of the vehicle interact that make some vehicles more susceptible to the rear window buffeting problem. A comparison between the relative magnitudes of Moon Roof Buffeting and Rear Window Buffeting is made and an explanation is provided. Previously published computational fluid dynamics (CFD) work advocating that the root cause of rear window buffeting is rear mirror vortex shedding is disputed, and an alternate theory for the cause of rear window buffeting is proposed. Evidence obtained from CFD modeling, wind tunnel smoke visualization utilizing still and high-speed photography, as well as on-track testing confirm that the mirror wake is not the cause of the response. Indeed, airflow interference from the mirror wake actually reduces the magnitude of the response. Mechanical systems experiencing a vibration response to a forcing function can be passively addressed in only three fundamental ways: changing system resonance frequency on, changing the frequency of the forcing function of, and changing the system damping ratio zeta. Data are presented where each of these parameters are modified and the effect on rear window buffeting is quantified. Based on the results of this work, conclusions are developed to recommend engineering design modifications that are both economically and practically viable and may result in the reduction of rear window buffeting. Finally, recommendations are made proposing further areas of research into addressing and gaining a more thorough understanding of the rear window buffeting problem.

  18. Simulated-airline-service flight tests of laminar-flow control with perforated-surface suction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Braslow, Albert L.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness and practicality of candidate leading edge systems for suction laminar flow control transport airplanes were investigated in a flight test program utilizing a modified JetStar airplane. The leading edge region imposes the most severe conditions on systems required for any type of laminar flow control. Tests of the leading edge systems, therefore, provided definitive results as to the feasibility of active laminar flow control on airplanes. The test airplane was operated under commercial transport operating procedures from various commercial airports and at various seasons of the year.

  19. IN VITRO STUDY OF THE AIRFLOW IN ORAL CAVITY DURING SPEECH PACS : 43.70.-h, 43.70.Aj, 43.70.Bk, 43.70.Jt

    E-print Network

    Payan, Yohan

    production. All these results incitate us to exploit further on our experimental setup. INTRODUCTION of an airflow interaction. Sleeping apnea or snoring is another spectacular example of such an interaction a quasy-steady assumption can be made which greatly simplifies the problem. Further, when snoring

  20. Experimental study of airflow characteristics of stratum ventilation in a multi-occupant room with comparison to mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Lin, Z

    2015-12-01

    The motivation of this study is stimulated by a lack of knowledge about the difference of airflow characteristics between a novel air distribution method [i.e., stratum ventilation (SV)] and conventional air distribution methods [i.e., mixing ventilation (MV) and displacement ventilation (DV)]. Detailed air velocity and temperature measurements were conducted in the occupied zone of a classroom with dimensions of 8.8 m (L) × 6.1 m (W) × 2.4 m (H). Turbulence intensity and power spectrum of velocity fluctuation were calculated using the measured data. Thermal comfort and cooling efficiency were also compared. The results show that in the occupied zone, the airflow characteristics among MV, DV, and SV are different. The turbulent airflow fluctuation is enhanced in this classroom with multiple thermal manikins due to thermal buoyancy and airflow mixing effect. Thermal comfort evaluations indicate that in comparison with MV and DV, a higher supply air temperature should be adopted for SV to achieve general thermal comfort with low draft risk. Comparison of the mean air temperatures in the occupied zone reveals that SV is of highest cooling efficiency, followed by DV and then MV. PMID:25626596