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Sample records for lamotrigine extends lifespan

  1. Lamotrigine

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain types of seizures in patients who have epilepsy. All types of lamotrigine tablets (tablets, orally disintegrating ... medications to treat seizures in people who have epilepsy or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (a disorder that causes ...

  2. Mammalian models of extended healthy lifespan.

    PubMed

    Selman, Colin; Withers, Dominic J

    2011-01-12

    Over the last two centuries, there has been a significant increase in average lifespan expectancy in the developed world. One unambiguous clinical implication of getting older is the risk of experiencing age-related diseases including various cancers, dementia, type-2 diabetes, cataracts and osteoporosis. Historically, the ageing process and its consequences were thought to be intractable. However, over the last two decades or so, a wealth of empirical data has been generated which demonstrates that longevity in model organisms can be extended through the manipulation of individual genes. In particular, many pathological conditions associated with the ageing process in model organisms, and importantly conserved from nematodes to humans, are attenuated in long-lived genetic mutants. For example, several long-lived genetic mouse models show attenuation in age-related cognitive decline, adiposity, cancer and glucose intolerance. Therefore, these long-lived mice enjoy a longer period without suffering the various sequelae of ageing. The greatest challenge in the biology of ageing is to now identify the mechanisms underlying increased healthy lifespan in these model organisms. Given that the elderly are making up an increasingly greater proportion of society, this focused approach in model organisms should help identify tractable interventions that can ultimately be translated to humans. PMID:21115536

  3. Mammalian models of extended healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Colin; Withers, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two centuries, there has been a significant increase in average lifespan expectancy in the developed world. One unambiguous clinical implication of getting older is the risk of experiencing age-related diseases including various cancers, dementia, type-2 diabetes, cataracts and osteoporosis. Historically, the ageing process and its consequences were thought to be intractable. However, over the last two decades or so, a wealth of empirical data has been generated which demonstrates that longevity in model organisms can be extended through the manipulation of individual genes. In particular, many pathological conditions associated with the ageing process in model organisms, and importantly conserved from nematodes to humans, are attenuated in long-lived genetic mutants. For example, several long-lived genetic mouse models show attenuation in age-related cognitive decline, adiposity, cancer and glucose intolerance. Therefore, these long-lived mice enjoy a longer period without suffering the various sequelae of ageing. The greatest challenge in the biology of ageing is to now identify the mechanisms underlying increased healthy lifespan in these model organisms. Given that the elderly are making up an increasingly greater proportion of society, this focused approach in model organisms should help identify tractable interventions that can ultimately be translated to humans. PMID:21115536

  4. An Engineering Approach to Extending Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Dror; Kim, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    We have taken an engineering approach to extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Aging stands out as a complex trait, because events that occur in old animals are not under strong natural selection. As a result, lifespan can be lengthened rationally using bioengineering to modulate gene expression or to add exogenous components. Here, we engineered longer lifespan by expressing genes from zebrafish encoding molecular functions not normally present in worms. Additionally, we extended lifespan by increasing the activity of four endogenous worm aging pathways. Next, we used a modular approach to extend lifespan by combining components. Finally, we used cell- and worm-based assays to analyze changes in cell physiology and as a rapid means to evaluate whether multi-component transgenic lines were likely to have extended longevity. Using engineering to add novel functions and to tune endogenous functions provides a new framework for lifespan extension that goes beyond the constraints of the worm genome. PMID:22737090

  5. Enhancing S-adenosyl-methionine catabolism extends Drosophila lifespan.

    PubMed

    Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Methionine restriction extends the lifespan of various model organisms. Limiting S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthesis, the first metabolic reaction of dietary methionine, extends longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans but accelerates pathology in mammals. Here, we show that, as an alternative to inhibiting SAM synthesis, enhancement of SAM catabolism by glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) extends the lifespan in Drosophila. Gnmt strongly buffers systemic SAM levels by producing sarcosine in either high-methionine or low-sams conditions. During ageing, systemic SAM levels in flies are increased. Gnmt is transcriptionally induced in a dFoxO-dependent manner; however, this is insufficient to suppress SAM elevation completely in old flies. Overexpression of gnmt suppresses this age-dependent SAM increase and extends longevity. Pro-longevity regimens, such as dietary restriction or reduced insulin signalling, attenuate the age-dependent SAM increase, and rely at least partially on Gnmt function to exert their lifespan-extending effect in Drosophila. Our study suggests that regulation of SAM levels by Gnmt is a key component of lifespan extension. PMID:26383889

  6. Tanshinones extend chronological lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2014-10-01

    Natural products with anti-aging property have drawn great attention recently but examples of such compounds are exceedingly scarce. By applying a high-throughput assay based on yeast chronological lifespan measurement, we screened the anti-aging activity of 144 botanical materials and found that dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have significant anti-aging activity. Tanshinones isolated from the plant including cryptotanshione, tanshinone I, and tanshinone IIa, are the active components. Among them, cryptotanshinone can greatly extend the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological lifespan (up to 2.5 times) in a dose- and the-time-of-addition-dependent manner at nanomolar concentrations without disruption of cell growth. We demonstrate that cryptotanshinone prolong chronological lifespan via a nutrient-dependent regime, especially essential amino acid sensing, and three conserved protein kinases Tor1, Sch9, and Gcn2 are required for cryptotanshinone-induced lifespan extension. In addition, cryptotanshinone significantly increases the lifespan of SOD2-deleted mutants. Altogether, those data suggest that cryptotanshinone might be involved in the regulation of, Tor1, Sch9, Gcn2, and Sod2, these highly conserved longevity proteins modulated by nutrients from yeast to humans. PMID:24970458

  7. Genistein from Vigna angularis Extends Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Ahn, Dalrae; Kim, Ban Ji; Lee, So Yeon; Seo, Hyun Won; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Cha, Dong Seok; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-01-01

    The seed of Vigna angularis has long been cultivated as a food or a folk medicine in East Asia. Genistein (4′,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), a dietary phytoestrogen present in this plant, has been known to possess various biological properties. In this study, we investigated the possible lifespan-extending effects of genistein using Caenorhabditis elegans model system. We found that the lifespan of nematode was significantly prolonged in the presence of genistein under normal culture condition. In addition, genistein elevated the survival rate of nematode against stressful environment including heat and oxidative conditions. Further studies demonstrated that genistein-mediated increased stress tolerance of nematode could be attributed to enhanced expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). Moreover, we failed to find genistein-induced significant change in aging-related factors including reproduction, food intake, and growth, indicating genistein exerts longevity activity independent of affecting these factors. Genistein treatment also led to an up-regulation of locomotory ability of aged nematode, suggesting genistein affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. Our results represent that genistein has beneficial effects on the lifespan of C. elegans under both of normal and stress condition via elevating expressions of stress resistance proteins. PMID:25593647

  8. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M.; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P.; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging. PMID:27076081

  9. Chemical activation of a food deprivation signal extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Garrett, Theo; Yu, Ivan; Calahorro, Fernando; Asadi Shahmirzadi, Azar; Miller, Aaron; Gill, Matthew S; Hughes, Robert E; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Lithgow, Gordon J

    2016-10-01

    Model organisms subject to dietary restriction (DR) generally live longer. Accompanying this lifespan extension are improvements in overall health, based on multiple metrics. This indicates that pharmacological treatments that mimic the effects of DR could improve health in humans. To find new chemical structures that extend lifespan, we screened 30 000 synthetic, diverse drug-like chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and identified several structurally related compounds that acted through DR mechanisms. The most potent of these NP1 impinges upon a food perception pathway by promoting glutamate signaling in the pharynx. This results in the overriding of a GPCR pathway involved in the perception of food and which normally acts to decrease glutamate signals. Our results describe the activation of a dietary restriction response through the pharmacological masking of a novel sensory pathway that signals the presence of food. This suggests that primary sensory pathways may represent novel targets for human pharmacology. PMID:27220516

  10. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P.; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M.; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M.; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin’s effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin’s longevity effects from effects on aging itself. PMID:23863708

  11. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L; Schmidt, Karen H; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-04-15

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions. PMID:24706810

  12. Crosstalk between cellular compartments protects against proteotoxicity and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Perić, Matea; Dib, Peter Bou; Dennerlein, Sven; Musa, Marina; Rudan, Marina; Lovrić, Anita; Nikolić, Andrea; Šarić, Ana; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mačak, Željka; Raimundo, Nuno; Kriško, Anita

    2016-01-01

    In cells living under optimal conditions, protein folding defects are usually prevented by the action of chaperones. Here, we investigate the cell-wide consequences of loss of chaperone function in cytosol, mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in budding yeast. We find that the decline in chaperone activity in each compartment results in loss of respiration, demonstrating the dependence of mitochondrial activity on cell-wide proteostasis. Furthermore, each chaperone deficiency triggers a response, presumably via the communication among the folding environments of distinct cellular compartments, termed here the cross-organelle stress response (CORE). The proposed CORE pathway encompasses activation of protein conformational maintenance machineries, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic changes simultaneously in the cytosol, mitochondria, and the ER. CORE induction extends replicative and chronological lifespan in budding yeast, highlighting its protective role against moderate proteotoxicity and its consequences such as the decline in respiration. Our findings accentuate that organelles do not function in isolation, but are integrated in a functional crosstalk, while also highlighting the importance of organelle communication in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:27346163

  13. Basic and clinical pharmacology contribution to extend anthelmintic molecules lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-15

    The correct use of pharmacology-based information is critical to design successful strategies for the future of parasite control in livestock animals. Integrated pharmaco-parasitological research approaches have greatly contributed to optimize drug activity. In an attempt to manage drug resistance in helminths of ruminants, combinations of two or more anthelmintics are being used or promoted, based on the fact that individual worms may have a lower degree of resistance to a multiple component formulation, when each chemical has a different mode of action compared to that observed when a single compound is used. However, as emphasized in the current review, the occurrence of potential pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interactions between drug components highlights the need for deeper and integrated research to identify the advantages or disadvantages associated with the use of combined drug preparations. This review article provides integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical pharmacology information pertinent to preserve the traditional and modern active ingredients as practical tools for parasite control. Novel pharmacological data on derquantel and monepantel, as representatives of modern anthelmintics for use in livestock, is summarized here. The article also summarizes the pharmaco-parasitological knowledge considered critical to secure and/or extend the lifespan of the recently available novel molecules. PMID:26220023

  14. Crosstalk between cellular compartments protects against proteotoxicity and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Perić, Matea; Dib, Peter Bou; Dennerlein, Sven; Musa, Marina; Rudan, Marina; Lovrić, Anita; Nikolić, Andrea; Šarić, Ana; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mačak, Željka; Raimundo, Nuno; Kriško, Anita

    2016-01-01

    In cells living under optimal conditions, protein folding defects are usually prevented by the action of chaperones. Here, we investigate the cell-wide consequences of loss of chaperone function in cytosol, mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in budding yeast. We find that the decline in chaperone activity in each compartment results in loss of respiration, demonstrating the dependence of mitochondrial activity on cell-wide proteostasis. Furthermore, each chaperone deficiency triggers a response, presumably via the communication among the folding environments of distinct cellular compartments, termed here the cross-organelle stress response (CORE). The proposed CORE pathway encompasses activation of protein conformational maintenance machineries, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic changes simultaneously in the cytosol, mitochondria, and the ER. CORE induction extends replicative and chronological lifespan in budding yeast, highlighting its protective role against moderate proteotoxicity and its consequences such as the decline in respiration. Our findings accentuate that organelles do not function in isolation, but are integrated in a functional crosstalk, while also highlighting the importance of organelle communication in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:27346163

  15. Reducing sphingolipid synthesis orchestrates global changes to extend yeast lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Xinhe; Withers, Bradley R; Blalock, Eric; Liu, Ke; Dickson, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Studies of aging and longevity are revealing how diseases that shorten life can be controlled to improve the quality of life and lifespan itself. Two strategies under intense study to accomplish these goals are rapamycin treatment and calorie restriction. New strategies are being discovered including one that uses low-dose myriocin treatment. Myriocin inhibits the first enzyme in sphingolipid synthesis in all eukaryotes, and we showed recently that low-dose myriocin treatment increases yeast lifespan at least in part by down-regulating the sphingolipid-controlled Pkh1/2-Sch9 (ortholog of mammalian S6 kinase) signaling pathway. Here we show that myriocin treatment induces global effects and changes expression of approximately forty percent of the yeast genome with 1252 genes up-regulated and 1497 down-regulated (P < 0.05) compared with untreated cells. These changes are due to modulation of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways including activation of the Snf1/AMPK pathway and down-regulation of the protein kinase A (PKA) and target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathways. Many processes that enhance lifespan are regulated by these pathways in response to myriocin treatment including respiration, carbon metabolism, stress resistance, protein synthesis, and autophagy. These extensive effects of myriocin match those of rapamycin and calorie restriction. Our studies in yeast together with other studies in mammals reveal the potential of myriocin or related compounds to lower the incidence of age-related diseases in humans and improve health span. PMID:23725375

  16. Dairy Propionibacterium extends the mean lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via activation of the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gayeung; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Dairy Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a candidate non-lactic acid probiotic. However, little information is available on the effect of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension and to elucidate the mechanism of P. freudenreichii-dependent lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that P. freudenreichii significantly (p < 0.05) extended the lifespan of C. elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50, a standard food for the worm. Analysis of age-related biomarkers showed that P. freudenreichii retards ageing. Moreover, P. freudenreichii increased resistance against a human pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, through the activation of skn-1, which is involved in pathogen resistance in C. elegans. Furthermore, P. freudenreichii-fed daf-16, jnk-1, skn-1 or daf-7 loss-of-function mutants showed an extended mean lifespan compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. However, the increase in lifespan was not observed in pmk-1, sek-1, mek-1, dbl-1, daf-12 or daf-2 mutants, which suggests potential roles for these genes in P. freudenreichii-induced longevity in C. elegans. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii extends the lifespan of C. elegans via the p38 MAPK pathway involved in stress response and the TGF-β pathways associated with anti-inflammation processes in the immune system. PMID:27531646

  17. Dairy Propionibacterium extends the mean lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via activation of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gayeung; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Dairy Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a candidate non-lactic acid probiotic. However, little information is available on the effect of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension and to elucidate the mechanism of P. freudenreichii-dependent lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that P. freudenreichii significantly (p < 0.05) extended the lifespan of C. elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50, a standard food for the worm. Analysis of age-related biomarkers showed that P. freudenreichii retards ageing. Moreover, P. freudenreichii increased resistance against a human pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, through the activation of skn-1, which is involved in pathogen resistance in C. elegans. Furthermore, P. freudenreichii-fed daf-16, jnk-1, skn-1 or daf-7 loss-of-function mutants showed an extended mean lifespan compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. However, the increase in lifespan was not observed in pmk-1, sek-1, mek-1, dbl-1, daf-12 or daf-2 mutants, which suggests potential roles for these genes in P. freudenreichii-induced longevity in C. elegans. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii extends the lifespan of C. elegans via the p38 MAPK pathway involved in stress response and the TGF-β pathways associated with anti-inflammation processes in the immune system. PMID:27531646

  18. The lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziheng; Lv, Ting; Li, Min; Zhang, Yusi; Xue, Ting; Yang, Linsong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    Nymphaea hybrid, a water lily from the Nymphaeaceae family, has been found to exhibit some in vivo beneficial effects. In the present study we investigated the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that Nymphaea hybrid root extract significantly extended the lifespan of C.elegans and improved its locomotion during aging. Moreover, Nymphaea hybrid root extract increased the resistance of C.elegans to both heat stress and oxidative stress. We found that the ability of Nymphaea hybrid root extract to increase lifespan was independent of its antimicrobial effects and was probably associated with its effects on the reproduction of C.elegans. In addition, the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract were found to be dependent on the insulin/IGF signaling pathway. We also found that total flavones of Nymphaea hybrid could increase survival of C.elegans in both normal and adverse conditions, indicating that total flavones comprise the major fractions with lifespan-extending effects. Therefore, Nymphaea hybrid root extract has lifespan-extending effects in C.elegans and could be developed as a functional food. PMID:25367047

  19. Sorbitol treatment extends lifespan and induces the osmotic stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chandler-Brown, Devon; Choi, Haeri; Park, Shirley; Ocampo, Billie R.; Chen, Shiwen; Le, Anna; Sutphin, George L.; Shamieh, Lara S.; Smith, Erica D.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The response to osmotic stress is a highly conserved process for adapting to changing environmental conditions. Prior studies have shown that hyperosmolarity by addition of sorbitol to the growth medium is sufficient to increase both chronological and replicative lifespan in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a similar phenomenon in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Addition of sorbitol to the nematode growth medium induces an adaptive osmotic response and increases C. elegans lifespan by about 35%. Lifespan extension from 5% sorbitol behaves similarly to dietary restriction in a variety of genetic backgrounds, increasing lifespan additively with mutation of daf-2(e1370) and independently of daf-16(mu86), sir-2.1(ok434), aak-2(ok524), and hif-1(ia04). Dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation or mutation of eat-2(ad1113) fails to further extend lifespan in the presence of 5% sorbitol. Two mutants with constitutive activation of the osmotic response, osm-5(p813) and osm-7(n1515), were found to be long-lived, and lifespan extension from sorbitol required the glycerol biosynthetic enzymes GPDH-1 and GPDH-2. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that exposure to sorbitol at levels sufficient to induce an adaptive osmotic response extends lifespan in worms and define the osmotic stress response pathway as a longevity pathway conserved between yeast and nematodes. PMID:26579191

  20. Green Tea Polyphenols Extend the Lifespan of Male Drosophila melanogaster While Impairing Reproductive Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Terry; Schriner, Samuel E.; Okoro, Michael; Lu, David; Chiang, Beatrice T.; Huey, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Green tea is a popular beverage believed to have many health benefits, including a reduction in the risks of heart disease and cancer. Rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, green tea and its components have been shown to increase the lifespan of various animal models, including Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the gender-specific effects of green tea on the lifespan of fruit flies and observed that green tea extended the lifespan of male flies only. This effect was found to be independent of typical aging interventions, such as dietary restriction, modulation of oxidative energy metabolism, and improved tolerance to environmental stresses. The one exception was that green tea did protect male flies against iron toxicity. Since there is an inverse correlation between lifespan and reproduction, the impact of green tea on male reproductive fitness was also investigated. We found that green tea negatively impacted male fertility as shown by a reduced number of offspring produced and increased mating latency. We further identified that the lifespan extension properties of green tea was only observed in the presence of females which alludes to a reproductive (or mating) dependent mechanism. Our findings suggest that green tea extends the lifespan of male flies by inhibiting reproductive potential, possibly by limiting iron uptake. To our knowledge, our study is the first to report the negative impact of green tea on Drosophila male reproduction. Our results also support previous studies that suggest that green tea might have a negative effect on reproductive fitness in humans. PMID:25058464

  1. Rhodiola rosea extends lifespan and improves stress tolerance in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Song, Jiangbo; Chen, Min; Li, Zhiquan; Tong, Xiaoling; Hu, Hai; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2016-04-01

    The root of Rhodiola rosea is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The extract from R. rosea is reported to extend the lifespan of yeast, nematode, and fruit fly. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we tested whether R. rosea extends the lifespan of the silkworm. An aqueous extract of R. rosea significantly prolonged the lifespan of the silkworm, without affecting its daily food intake, body weight, or fecundity, suggesting that R. rosea did not exhibit obvious side effects. Rhodiola rosea extract also enhanced the stress resistance in the silkworm, against heat stress (37 °C) and starvation. The R. rosea extract increased the activity of the major antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and catalase, and altered the content of glutathione and malondialdehyde. Rhodiola rosea increased the expression of BmFoxO, which is a downstream regulator of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway in the silkworm. Our results showed that R. rosea extends lifespan, in which IIS pathway might be involved, and enhances stress resistance in the silkworm. Thus, the silkworm might be used as a novel animal model for lifespan study and efficacy evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicines. PMID:26497336

  2. The metabolite alpha-ketoglutarate extends lifespan by inhibiting the ATP synthase and TOR

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Randall M.; Fu, Xudong; Pai, Melody Y.; Vergnes, Laurent; Hwang, Heejun; Deng, Gang; Diep, Simon; Lomenick, Brett; Meli, Vijaykumar S.; Monsalve, Gabriela C.; Hu, Eileen; Whelan, Stephen A.; Wang, Jennifer X.; Jung, Gwanghyun; Solis, Gregory M.; Fazlollahi, Farbod; Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Quach, Austin; Nili, Mahta; Krall, Abby S.; Godwin, Hilary A.; Chang, Helena R.; Faull, Kym F.; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Meisheng; Trauger, Sunia A.; Saghatelian, Alan; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.; Clarke, Catherine F.; Teitell, Michael A.; Petrascheck, Michael; Reue, Karen; Jung, Michael E.; Frand, Alison R.; Huang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism and ageing are intimately linked. Compared to ad libitum feeding, dietary restriction (DR) or calorie restriction (CR) consistently extends lifespan and delays age-related diseases in evolutionarily diverse organisms1,2. Similar conditions of nutrient limitation and genetic or pharmacological perturbations of nutrient or energy metabolism also have longevity benefits3,4. Recently, several metabolites have been identified that modulate ageing5,6 with largely undefined molecular mechanisms. Here we show that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) extends the lifespan of adult C. elegans. ATP synthase subunit beta is identified as a novel binding protein of α-KG using a small-molecule target identification strategy called DARTS (drug affinity responsive target stability)7. The ATP synthase, also known as Complex V of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), is the main cellular energy-generating machinery and is highly conserved throughout evolution8,9. Although complete loss of mitochondrial function is detrimental, partial suppression of the ETC has been shown to extend C. elegans lifespan10–13. We show that α-KG inhibits ATP synthase and, similar to ATP synthase knockdown, inhibition by α-KG leads to reduced ATP content, decreased oxygen consumption, and increased autophagy in both C. elegans and mammalian cells. We provide evidence that the lifespan increase by α-KG requires ATP synthase subunit beta and is dependent on the target of rapamycin (TOR) downstream. Endogenous α-KG levels are increased upon starvation and α-KG does not extend the lifespan of DR animals, indicating that α-KG is a key metabolite that mediates longevity by DR. Our analyses uncover new molecular links between a common metabolite, a universal cellular energy generator, and DR in the regulation of organismal lifespan, thus suggesting new strategies for the prevention and treatment of ageing and age-related diseases. PMID:24828042

  3. The Nestor Effect: Extending Evolutionary Developmental Psychology to a Lifespan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Werner; Bjorklund, David F.

    2009-01-01

    We extend an evolutionary perspective of development to the lifespan, proposing that human longevity may be related to the experience, knowledge, and wisdom provided by older members of human groups. In addition to the assistance in childcare provided by grandmothers to their daughters, the experience of wise elders could have served to benefit…

  4. Near-infrared light increases ATP, extends lifespan and improves mobility in aged Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rana; Calaza, Karin; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Salt, Thomas E.; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is an irreversible cellular decline partly driven by failing mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria accumulate DNA mutations and reduce ATP production necessary for cellular metabolism. This is associated with inflammation. Near-infrared exposure increases retinal ATP in old mice via cytochrome c oxidase absorption and reduces inflammation. Here, we expose fruitflies daily to 670 nm radiation, revealing elevated ATP and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100–175% more flies survived into old age following 670 nm exposure and these had significantly improved mobility. This may be a simple route to extending lifespan and improving function in old age. PMID:25788488

  5. Reevaluation of whether a soma-to-germ-line transformation extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Andrew Kekūpa'a; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan

    2016-03-29

    The germ lineage is considered to be immortal. In the quest to extend lifespan, a possible strategy is to drive germ-line traits in somatic cells, to try to confer some of the germ lineage's immortality on the somatic body. Notably, a study in Caenorhabditis elegans suggested that expression of germ-line genes in the somatic cells of long-lived daf-2 mutants confers some of daf-2's long lifespan. Specifically, mRNAs encoding components of C. elegans germ granules (P granules) were up-regulated in daf-2 mutant worms, and knockdown of individual P-granule and other germ-line genes in daf-2 young adults modestly reduced their lifespan. We investigated the contribution of a germ-line program to daf-2's long lifespan and also tested whether other mutants known to express germ-line genes in their somatic cells are long-lived. Our key findings are as follows. (i) We could not detect P-granule proteins in the somatic cells of daf-2 mutants by immunostaining or by expression of a P-granule transgene. (ii) Whole-genome transcript profiling of animals lacking a germ line revealed that germ-line transcripts are not up-regulated in the soma of daf-2 worms compared with the soma of control worms. (iii) Simultaneous removal of multiple P-granule proteins or the entire germ-line program from daf-2 worms did not reduce their lifespan. (iv) Several mutants that robustly express a broad spectrum of germ-line genes in their somatic cells are not long-lived. Together, our findings argue against the hypothesis that acquisition of a germ-cell program in somatic cells increases lifespan and contributes to daf-2's long lifespan. PMID:26976573

  6. Trichostatin A extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster by elevating hsp22 expression.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dan; Lu, Jun; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Yan-Mei; Yuan, Zhi-Gen; Li, Xiao-Xue; Huang, Bai-Qu

    2004-09-01

    The level of acetylation of histones in nucleosomes is related to the longevity of yeast and animals. However, the mechanisms by which acetylation and deacetylation affect longevity remain unclear. In present study, we investigated the influence of histone acetylation modification on the expression of hsp22 gene and the lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA). The results showed that TSA could extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, TSA significantly promoted the hsp22 gene transcription, and affected the chromatin morphology at the locus of hsp22 gene along the polytene chromosome. Present data implicate that TSA may affect the lifespan of Drosophila through changing the level of histone acetylation and influencing the expression of hsp22 gene that is related to aging. PMID:15346199

  7. Lifespan Extending and Stress Resistant Properties of Vitexin from Vigna angularis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Kim, Jun Hyeong; Cha, Youn-Soo; Kim, Mina; Song, Seuk Bo; Cha, Dong Seok; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Han, Sooncheon; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-01-01

    Several theories emphasize that aging is closely related to oxidative stress and disease. The formation of excess ROS can lead to DNA damage and the acceleration of aging. Vigna angularis is one of the important medicinal plants in Korea. We isolated vitexin from V. angularis and elucidated the lifespan-extending effect of vitexin using the Caenorhabditis elegans model system. Vitexin showed potent lifespan extensive activity and it elevated the survival rates of nematodes against the stressful environments including heat and oxidative conditions. In addition, our results showed that vitexin was able to elevate antioxidant enzyme activities of worms and reduce intracellular ROS accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrated that the increased stress tolerance of vitexin-mediated nematode could be attributed to increased expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). In this work, we also studied whether vitexin-mediated longevity activity was associated with aging-related factors such as progeny, food intake, growth and movement. The data revealed that these factors were not affected by vitexin treatment except movement. Vitexin treatment improved the body movement of aged nematode, suggesting vitexin affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. These results suggest that vitexin might be a probable candidate which could extend the human lifespan. PMID:26535084

  8. Lifespan Extending and Stress Resistant Properties of Vitexin from Vigna angularis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Kim, Jun Hyeong; Cha, Youn-Soo; Kim, Mina; Song, Seuk Bo; Cha, Dong Seok; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Han, Sooncheon; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-11-01

    Several theories emphasize that aging is closely related to oxidative stress and disease. The formation of excess ROS can lead to DNA damage and the acceleration of aging. Vigna angularis is one of the important medicinal plants in Korea. We isolated vitexin from V. angularis and elucidated the lifespan-extending effect of vitexin using the Caenorhabditis elegans model system. Vitexin showed potent lifespan extensive activity and it elevated the survival rates of nematodes against the stressful environments including heat and oxidative conditions. In addition, our results showed that vitexin was able to elevate antioxidant enzyme activities of worms and reduce intracellular ROS accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrated that the increased stress tolerance of vitexin-mediated nematode could be attributed to increased expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). In this work, we also studied whether vitexin-mediated longevity activity was associated with aging-related factors such as progeny, food intake, growth and movement. The data revealed that these factors were not affected by vitexin treatment except movement. Vitexin treatment improved the body movement of aged nematode, suggesting vitexin affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. These results suggest that vitexin might be a probable candidate which could extend the human lifespan. PMID:26535084

  9. New genes that extend Caenorhabditis elegans' lifespan in response to reproductive signals.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Mark; Chen, Kan; Ramaswamy, Priya; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2012-04-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, removing germline stem cells increases lifespan. In C. elegans, this lifespan extension requires DAF-16, a FOXO transcription factor, and DAF-12, a nuclear hormone receptor. To better understand the regulatory relationships between DAF-16 and DAF-12, we used microarray analysis to identify downstream genes. We found that these two transcription factors influence the expression of distinct but overlapping sets of genes in response to loss of the germline. In addition, we identified several new genes that are required for loss of the germline to increase lifespan. One, phi-62, encodes a conserved, predicted RNA-binding protein. PHI-62 influences DAF-16-dependent transcription, possibly by collaborating with TCER-1, a putative transcription elongation factor, and FTT-2, a 14-3-3 protein known to bind DAF-16. Three other genes encode proteins involved in lipid metabolism; one is a triacylglycerol lipase, and another is an acyl-CoA reductase. These genes do not noticeably affect bulk fat storage levels; therefore, we propose a model in which they may influence production of a lifespan-extending signal or metabolite. PMID:22081913

  10. Sex differences in the genetic architecture of lifespan in a seed beetle: extreme inbreeding extends male lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Bilde, Trine; Maklakov, Alexei A; Meisner, Katrine; la Guardia, Lucia; Friberg, Urban

    2009-01-01

    Background Sex differences in lifespan are ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom but the causes underlying this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Several explanations based on asymmetrical inheritance patterns (sex chromosomes or mitochondrial DNA) have been proposed, but these ideas have rarely been tested experimentally. Alternatively, sexual dimorphism in lifespan could result from sex-specific selection, caused by fundamental differences in how males and females optimize their fitness by allocating resources into current and future reproduction. Results Here we used sex-specific responses to inbreeding to study the genetic architecture of lifespan and mortality rates in Callosobruchus maculatus, a seed beetle that shows sexual dimorphism in lifespan. Two independent assays revealed opposing sex-specific responses to inbreeding. The combined data set showed that inbred males live longer than outbred males, while females show the opposite pattern. Both sexes suffered reduced fitness measured as lifetime reproductive success as a result of inbreeding. Conclusion No model based on asymmetrical inheritance can explain increased male lifespan in response to inbreeding. Our results are however compatible with models based on sex-specific selection on reproductive strategies. We therefore suggest that sex-specific differences in lifespan in this species primarily result from sexually divergent selection. PMID:19200350

  11. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  12. rBTI extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan by mimicking calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Yuying

    2015-07-01

    Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (BTI) is a low molecular weight polypeptide extracted from buckwheat. This study examined the effects of BTI on the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and investigated the mechanism involved. Our results showed that recombinant BTI (rBTI) extended life expectancy by mimicking calorie restriction (CR) in C. elegans. rBTI promoted formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via increasing respiration, induced activities of ROS defense enzymes by activating DAF-16, and increased oxidative stress resistance and survival rates. The inhibition of ROS signal by antioxidants reduced rBTI-mediated longevity by up to 65%. Moreover, it was shown that the disruption of daf-2 abolished the extension of the lifespan and the increased ROS. Taken together, these data indicate that rBTI-mediated longevity mimics CR by down-regulating insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway, implying that BTI has the potential to be a novel anti-aging drug. PMID:25959406

  13. Suppression of transcriptional drift extends C. elegans lifespan by postponing the onset of mortality.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, Sunitha; Solis, Gregory M; Thompson, Ryan C; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Kurian, Leo; Encalada, Sandra E; Niculescu, Alexander B; Salomon, Daniel R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Longevity mechanisms increase lifespan by counteracting the effects of aging. However, whether longevity mechanisms counteract the effects of aging continually throughout life, or whether they act during specific periods of life, preventing changes that precede mortality is unclear. Here, we uncover transcriptional drift, a phenomenon that describes how aging causes genes within functional groups to change expression in opposing directions. These changes cause a transcriptome-wide loss in mRNA stoichiometry and loss of co-expression patterns in aging animals, as compared to young adults. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we show that extending lifespan by inhibiting serotonergic signals by the antidepressant mianserin attenuates transcriptional drift, allowing the preservation of a younger transcriptome into an older age. Our data are consistent with a model in which inhibition of serotonergic signals slows age-dependent physiological decline and the associated rise in mortality levels exclusively in young adults, thereby postponing the onset of major mortality. PMID:26623667

  14. PGRP-SC2 promotes gut immune homeostasis to limit commensal dysbiosis and extend lifespan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Linlin; Karpac, Jason; Tran, Susan L; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-01-16

    Interactions between commensals and the host impact the metabolic and immune status of metazoans. Their deregulation is associated with age-related pathologies like chronic inflammation and cancer, especially in barrier epithelia. Maintaining a healthy commensal population by preserving innate immune homeostasis in such epithelia thus promises to promote health and longevity. Here, we show that, in the aging intestine of Drosophila, chronic activation of the transcription factor Foxo reduces expression of peptidoglycan recognition protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2), a negative regulator of IMD/Relish innate immune signaling, and homolog of the anti-inflammatory molecules PGLYRP1-4. This repression causes deregulation of Rel/NFkB activity, resulting in commensal dysbiosis, stem cell hyperproliferation, and epithelial dysplasia. Restoring PGRP-SC2 expression in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium, in turn, prevents dysbiosis, promotes tissue homeostasis, and extends lifespan. Our results highlight the importance of commensal control for lifespan of metazoans and identify SC-class PGRPs as longevity-promoting factors. PMID:24439372

  15. Suppression of transcriptional drift extends C. elegans lifespan by postponing the onset of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Sunitha; Solis, Gregory M; Thompson, Ryan C; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Kurian, Leo; Encalada, Sandra E; Niculescu, Alexander B; Salomon, Daniel R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Longevity mechanisms increase lifespan by counteracting the effects of aging. However, whether longevity mechanisms counteract the effects of aging continually throughout life, or whether they act during specific periods of life, preventing changes that precede mortality is unclear. Here, we uncover transcriptional drift, a phenomenon that describes how aging causes genes within functional groups to change expression in opposing directions. These changes cause a transcriptome-wide loss in mRNA stoichiometry and loss of co-expression patterns in aging animals, as compared to young adults. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we show that extending lifespan by inhibiting serotonergic signals by the antidepressant mianserin attenuates transcriptional drift, allowing the preservation of a younger transcriptome into an older age. Our data are consistent with a model in which inhibition of serotonergic signals slows age-dependent physiological decline and the associated rise in mortality levels exclusively in young adults, thereby postponing the onset of major mortality. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08833.001 PMID:26623667

  16. The absence of a mitochondrial genome in rho0 yeast cells extends lifespan independently of retrograde regulation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Kyun; Poyton, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    The absence of mtDNA in rho0 yeast cells affects both respiration and mitochondrial-nuclear communication (e.g., retrograde regulation, intergenomic signaling, or pleiotropic drug resistance). Previously, it has been reported that some rho0 strains have increased replicative lifespans, attributable to the lack of respiration and retrograde regulation. Here, we have been able to confirm that rho0 cells exhibit increased replicative lifespans but have found that this is not associated with the lack of respiration or reduced oxidative stress but instead, is related to the lack of mtDNA per se in rho0 cells. Also, we find no correlation between the strength of retrograde regulation and lifespan. Furthermore, we find that pdr3- or rtg2- mutations are not responsible for lifespan extension in rho0 cells, ruling out a specific role for PDR3-pleiotropic drug resistance or RGT2-retrograde regulation pathways in the extended lifespans of rho0 cells. Surprisingly, Rtg3p, which acts downstream of Rtg2p, is required for lifespan increase in rho0 cells. Together, these findings indicate that the loss of mtDNA per se and not the lack of respiration lead to extended longevity in rho0 cells. They also suggest that Rtg3p, acting independently of retrograde regulation, mediates this effect, possibly via intergenomic signaling. PMID:19285548

  17. Debris-covered glaciers extend the lifespan of water supplies in the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeux, Pierre; Glasser, Neil; Holt, Tom; Hubbard, Bryn

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers have a slower melting rate than clean-ice glaciers due to the insulating effect of their debris layer. In the European Alps, debris-covered glaciers have received little attention due to their small contribution to sea-level rise. However, glaciers provide water supplies for the five main watersheds draining the European Alps (Danube, Rhine, Rhone, Po and Adige, in order of size), an area inhabited by more than 145 million people (20% of Europe's population). It is unclear what volume of ice (and so quantity of potential meltwater) is affected by a debris layer, and what the effect of this layer is for water resources in the Alps. Combining the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) and online imagery services, we calculated that more than 40% of ice volume in the Alps is influenced by debris cover. In this presentation, we will show the different elements leading to this number, including our evaluation of the RGI, the volume calculation method and what percentage of ice is actually covered (0.6 to 99% of glacier surface area). Our analysis has allowed a comprehensive understanding of the debris-covered glaciers in each watershed by revealing their distribution (i.e. where they will extend water supply lifespan), and hypsometry and equilibrium line altitude (how sensitive they are to climate change). The prolonged lifespan of water supply is visible at the scale of an individual debris-covered glacier: comparing the evolution of Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc (France) over the last 150 years indicates that Glacier Noir (debris covered) has retained 2.5 times more ice than Glacier Blanc (clean-ice) under the same climatic conditions. The number of debris-covered glaciers will increase as the >1°C rise in temperature in the European Alps since the start of the 20th Century increases the instability of rock faces and scree slopes. The evolution of these glaciers is therefore likely to have a major impact on human populations. This work shows that

  18. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies–A review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8+ T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits. PMID:26155387

  19. Enhanced proteasome degradation extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and alleviates aggregation-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos Efstathios, S

    2014-10-01

    Collapse of proteostasis and accumulation of damaged macromolecules have been recognized as hallmarks of aging and age-related diseases. The proteasome is the major cellular protease responsible for intracellular protein degradation, having an impaired function during aging. We have previously shown that proteasome activation through overexpression of β5 proteasome subunit delays replicative senescence and confers resistance to oxidative stress in primary fibroblasts. Herein, we have investigated the impact of enhanced proteasome function on organismal longevity and aggregation-related pathologies by employing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. We have found that overexpression of a core 20S proteasome subunit in wild type worms extends lifespan, healthspan and survival under proteotoxic conditions. The longevity prolonging effect of the proteasome subunit overexpression was found to depend on the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and was associated with its elevated transcriptional activity. We have also uncovered a major role of enhanced proteasome activity in aggregation-related pathologies underlying neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic activation of the proteasome minimized the detrimental effect of polyglutamine-induced toxicity mimicking Huntington's disease, whereas knock-down of the proteasome component exaggerated the disease phenotypes. Similar results were obtained by using a C.elegans model of Amyloid beta (Αβ) -induced toxicity mimicking Alzheimer's disease. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that enhanced proteasome function alleviates proteotoxicity and promotes longevity in synergy with other nodes of lifespan regulation in C.elegans. Understanding the mechanism by which preservation of proteostasis via enhancement of proteasome function, decelerates the aging process and alleviates age-related pathologies may assist in the rational design of therapeutic and anti-aging interventions. PMID:26461298

  20. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): Thermodynamics or gene regulation?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rachel K; Snell, Terry W

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature decrease from 22°C to 16°C extends the lifespan of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas by up to 163%. Thermodynamic effects on metabolism contribute to this increase in longevity, but are not the only cause. When rotifers are exposed to 16°C for four days and then transfered to 22°C, they survive until day 13 at nearly identical rates as rotifers maintained at 16°C continuously. This persistence of the higher survival for nine days after transfer to 22°C suggests that low temperature exposure alters the expression of genes that affect the rate of aging. The relative persistence of the gene regulation effect suggests that it may play an even larger role in slowing aging than the thermodynamic effects. The life extending effects of these short-term low temperature treatments are largest when the exposure happens early in the life cycle, demonstrating the importance of early development. There is no advantage to lowering the temperature below 16°C to 11° or 5°C. Rotifers exposed to 16°C also displayed increased resistance to heat, starvation, oxidative and osmotic stress. Reproductive rates at 16°C were lower than those at 22°C, but because they reproduce longer, there is no significant change in the lifetime fecundity of females. To investigate which genes contribute to these effects, the expression of specific temperature sensing genes was knocked down using RNAi. Of 12 genes tested, RNAi knockdown of four eliminated the survival enhancing effects of the four-day cold treatment: TRP7, forkhead box C, Y-box factor, and ribosomal protein S6. This demonstrates that active gene regulation is an important factor in temperature mediated life extension, and that these particular genes play an integral role in these pathways. As a thermoresponsive sensor, TRP7 may be

  1. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species: Do they extend or shorten animal lifespan?

    PubMed

    Sanz, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Testing the predictions of the Mitochondrial Free Radical Theory of Ageing (MFRTA) has provided a deep understanding of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in the aging process. However those data, which support MFRTA are in the majority correlative (e.g. increasing oxidative damage with age). In contrast the majority of direct experimental data contradict MFRTA (e.g. changes in ROS levels do not alter longevity as expected). Unfortunately, in the past, ROS measurements have mainly been performed using isolated mitochondria, a method which is prone to experimental artifacts and does not reflect the complexity of the in vivo process. New technology to study different ROS (e.g. superoxide or hydrogen peroxide) in vivo is now available; these new methods combined with state-of-the-art genetic engineering technology will allow a deeper interrogation of, where, when and how free radicals affect aging and pathological processes. In fact data that combine these new approaches, indicate that boosting mitochondrial ROS in lower animals is a way to extend both healthy and maximum lifespan. In this review, I discuss the latest literature focused on the role of mitochondrial ROS in aging, and how these new discoveries are helping to better understand the role of mitochondria in health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997500

  2. Idebenone and Resveratrol Extend Lifespan and Improve Motor Function of HtrA2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szegő, Éva M.; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Martins, L. Miguel; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Kermer, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutation of the human gene for the mitochondrial protease HtrA2 has been associated with increased risk to develop mitochondrial dysfunction, a process known to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Knockout of HtrA2 in mice also leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and to phenotypes that resemble those found in neurodegenerative disorders and, ultimately, lead to death of animals around postnatal day 30. Here, we show that Idebenone, a synthetic antioxidant of the coenzyme Q family, and Resveratrol, a bioactive compound extracted from grapes, are both able to ameliorate this phenotype. Feeding HtrA2 knockout mice with either compound extends lifespan and delays worsening of the motor phenotype. Experiments conducted in cell culture and on brain tissue of mice revealed that each compound has a different mechanism of action. While Idebenone acts by downregulating the integrated stress response, Resveratrol acts by attenuating apoptosis at the level of Bax. These activities can account for the delay in neuronal degeneration in the striata of these mice and illustrate the potential of these compounds as effective therapeutic approaches against neurodegenerative disorders such as HD or PD. PMID:22205977

  3. Mechanosensory Neuron Aging: Differential Trajectories with Lifespan-Extending Alaskan Berry and Fungal Treatments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Scerbak, Courtney; Vayndorf, Elena M; Hernandez, Alicia; McGill, Colin; Taylor, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Many nutritional interventions that increase lifespan are also proposed to postpone age-related declines in motor and cognitive function. Potential sources of anti-aging compounds are the plants and fungi that have adapted to extreme environments. We studied the effects of four commonly consumed and culturally relevant Interior Alaska berry and fungus species (bog blueberry, lowbush cranberry, crowberry, and chaga) on the decline in overall health and neuron function and changes in touch receptor neuron morphology associated with aging. We observed increased wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and improved markers of healthspan upon treatment with Alaskan blueberry, lowbush cranberry, and chaga extracts. Interestingly, although all three treatments increased lifespan, they differentially affected the development of aberrant morphologies in touch receptor neurons. Blueberry treatments decreased anterior mechanosensory neuron (ALM) aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths and abnormal cell bodies) while lowbush cranberry treatment increased posterior mechanosensory neuron (PLM) aberrations, namely process branching. Chaga treatment both decreased ALM aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths) and increased PLM aberrations (i.e., process branching and loops). These results support the large body of knowledge positing that there are multiple cellular strategies and mechanisms for promoting health with age. Importantly, these results also demonstrate that although an accumulation of abnormal neuron morphologies is associated with aging and decreased health, not all of these morphologies are detrimental to neuronal and organismal health. PMID:27486399

  4. Mechanosensory Neuron Aging: Differential Trajectories with Lifespan-Extending Alaskan Berry and Fungal Treatments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Scerbak, Courtney; Vayndorf, Elena M.; Hernandez, Alicia; McGill, Colin; Taylor, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Many nutritional interventions that increase lifespan are also proposed to postpone age-related declines in motor and cognitive function. Potential sources of anti-aging compounds are the plants and fungi that have adapted to extreme environments. We studied the effects of four commonly consumed and culturally relevant Interior Alaska berry and fungus species (bog blueberry, lowbush cranberry, crowberry, and chaga) on the decline in overall health and neuron function and changes in touch receptor neuron morphology associated with aging. We observed increased wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and improved markers of healthspan upon treatment with Alaskan blueberry, lowbush cranberry, and chaga extracts. Interestingly, although all three treatments increased lifespan, they differentially affected the development of aberrant morphologies in touch receptor neurons. Blueberry treatments decreased anterior mechanosensory neuron (ALM) aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths and abnormal cell bodies) while lowbush cranberry treatment increased posterior mechanosensory neuron (PLM) aberrations, namely process branching. Chaga treatment both decreased ALM aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths) and increased PLM aberrations (i.e., process branching and loops). These results support the large body of knowledge positing that there are multiple cellular strategies and mechanisms for promoting health with age. Importantly, these results also demonstrate that although an accumulation of abnormal neuron morphologies is associated with aging and decreased health, not all of these morphologies are detrimental to neuronal and organismal health. PMID:27486399

  5. Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael; Bokov, Alex; Ikeno, Yuji; Jang, Young C.; Perez, Viviana I.; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to shortened lifespan with a dramatic increase in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerated aging phenotypes, including early onset sarcopenia. To study the tissue specific effects of oxidative stress in the Sod1−/− mice, we generated mice that only express the human SOD1 gene specifically in the liver of Sod1−/− mice (Sod1−/−/hSOD1alb mice). Expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1−/− mice improved liver function, reduced oxidative damage in liver, and partially restored the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis, which are abnormally expressed in the livers of the Sod1−/− mice. However, liver specific expression of hSOD1 did not prevent the loss of body weight and muscle mass and alterations in the structure of neuromuscular junctions. The expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1−/− mice significantly improved the lifespan of Sod1−/− mice; however, the lifespan of the Sod1−/−/hSOD1alb mice was still significantly shorter than wild type mice. PMID:26839948

  6. Extended lifespan and reduced adiposity in mice lacking the FAT10 gene

    PubMed Central

    Canaan, Allon; DeFuria, Jason; Perelman, Eddie; Schultz, Vincent; Seay, Montrell; Tuck, David; Flavell, Richard A.; Snyder, Michael P.; Obin, Martin S.; Weissman, Sherman M.

    2014-01-01

    The HLA-F adjacent transcript 10 (FAT10) is a member of the ubiquitin-like gene family that alters protein function/stability through covalent ligation. Although FAT10 is induced by inflammatory mediators and implicated in immunity, the physiological functions of FAT10 are poorly defined. We report the discovery that FAT10 regulates lifespan through pleiotropic actions on metabolism and inflammation. Median and overall lifespan are increased 20% in FAT10ko mice, coincident with elevated metabolic rate, preferential use of fat as fuel, and dramatically reduced adiposity. This phenotype is associated with metabolic reprogramming of skeletal muscle (i.e., increased AMP kinase activity, β-oxidation and -uncoupling, and decreased triglyceride content). Moreover, knockout mice have reduced circulating glucose and insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues, consistent with elevated IL-10 in skeletal muscle and serum. These observations suggest novel roles of FAT10 in immune metabolic regulation that impact aging and chronic disease. PMID:24706839

  7. Chlorophyll enhances oxidative stress tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans and extends its lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    Green vegetables are thought to be responsible for several beneficial properties such as antioxidant, anti-mutagenic, and detoxification activities. It is not known whether these effects are due to chlorophyll which exists in large amounts in many foods or result from other secondary metabolites. In this study, we used the model system Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects of chlorophyll in vivo. We found that chlorophyll significantly improves resistance to oxidative stress. It also enhances the lifespan of C. elegans by up to 25% via activation of the DAF-16/FOXO-dependent pathway. The results indicate that chlorophyll is absorbed by the worms and is thus bioavailable, constituting an important prerequisite for antioxidant and longevity-promoting activities inside the body. Our study thereby supports the view that green vegetables may also be beneficial for humans. PMID:27077003

  8. Parishin from Gastrodia elata Extends the Lifespan of Yeast via Regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanfei; Sun, Yujuan; Weng, Yufang; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Parishin is a phenolic glucoside isolated from Gastrodia elata, which is an important traditional Chinese medicine; this glucoside significantly extended the replicative lifespan of K6001 yeast at 3, 10, and 30 μM. To clarify its mechanism of action, assessment of oxidative stress resistance, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 yeast mutants, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) analysis were conducted. The significant increase of cell survival rate in oxidative stress condition was observed in parishin-treated groups. Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) gene expression and SOD activity were significantly increased after treating parishin in normal condition. Meanwhile, the levels of ROS and MDA in yeast were significantly decreased. The replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 mutants of K6001 yeast were not affected by parishin. We also found that parishin could decrease the gene expression of TORC1, ribosomal protein S26A (RPS26A), and ribosomal protein L9A (RPL9A) in the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway. Gene expression levels of RPS26A and RPL9A in uth1, as well as in uth1, sir2 double mutants, were significantly lower than those of the control group. Besides, TORC1 gene expression in uth1 mutant of K6001 yeast was inhibited significantly. These results suggested that parishin exhibited antiaging effects via regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR signaling pathway. PMID:27429709

  9. Parishin from Gastrodia elata Extends the Lifespan of Yeast via Regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanfei; Sun, Yujuan; Weng, Yufang; Matsuura, Akira; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Parishin is a phenolic glucoside isolated from Gastrodia elata, which is an important traditional Chinese medicine; this glucoside significantly extended the replicative lifespan of K6001 yeast at 3, 10, and 30 μM. To clarify its mechanism of action, assessment of oxidative stress resistance, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 yeast mutants, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) analysis were conducted. The significant increase of cell survival rate in oxidative stress condition was observed in parishin-treated groups. Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) gene expression and SOD activity were significantly increased after treating parishin in normal condition. Meanwhile, the levels of ROS and MDA in yeast were significantly decreased. The replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 mutants of K6001 yeast were not affected by parishin. We also found that parishin could decrease the gene expression of TORC1, ribosomal protein S26A (RPS26A), and ribosomal protein L9A (RPL9A) in the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway. Gene expression levels of RPS26A and RPL9A in uth1, as well as in uth1, sir2 double mutants, were significantly lower than those of the control group. Besides, TORC1 gene expression in uth1 mutant of K6001 yeast was inhibited significantly. These results suggested that parishin exhibited antiaging effects via regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR signaling pathway. PMID:27429709

  10. Availability of Amino Acids Extends Chronological Lifespan by Suppressing Hyper-Acidification of the Environment in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The chronological lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents the duration of cell survival in the postdiauxic and stationary phases. Using a prototrophic strain derived from the standard auxotrophic laboratory strain BY4742, we showed that supplementation of non-essential amino acids to a synthetic defined (SD) medium increases maximal cell growth and extends the chronological lifespan. The positive effects of amino acids can be reproduced by modulating the medium pH, indicating that amino acids contribute to chronological longevity in a cell-extrinsic manner by alleviating medium acidification. In addition, we showed that the amino acid-mediated effects on extension of chronological longevity are independent of those achieved through a reduction in the TORC1 pathway, which is mediated in a cell-intrinsic manner. Since previous studies showed that extracellular acidification causes mitochondrial dysfunction and leads to cell death, our results provide a path to premature chronological aging caused by differences in available nitrogen sources. Moreover, acidification of culture medium is generally associated with culture duration and cell density; thus, further studies are required on cell physiology of auxotrophic yeast strains during the stationary phase because an insufficient supply of essential amino acids may cause alterations in environmental conditions. PMID:26991662

  11. Lamotrigine in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, P.B.; Peng, L.; Newport, D.J.; Ritchie, J.C.; Koganti, A.; Holley, D.K.; Newman, M.; Stowe, Z.N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the magnitude and course of alterations in total and free lamotrigine (LTG) clearance (Cl) during pregnancy and the postpartum period, to assess the impact of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) on seizure frequency, to determine the ratio to individual target LTG concentration that is associated with increased seizure risk, and to evaluate maternal postpartum toxicity. Methods A cohort of women were enrolled before conception or during pregnancy in this prospective, observational study. Visits occurred every 1 to 3 months with review of seizure and medication diaries, examination, and blood sampling. Total and free LTG Cls were calculated. Individualized target concentrations were used for TDM. The ratio to target concentration (RTC) was compared between patients with and without increased seizures. A receiver operating characteristic curve determined the threshold RTC that best predicts increased seizure frequency. Results Analysis of 305 samples in 53 pregnancies demonstrated increased total and free LTG Cl in all trimesters above nonpregnant baseline (p < 0.001), with peak increases of 94% and 89% in the third trimester. Free LTG Cl was higher in white compared with black women (p < 0.05). Increased seizure frequency (n = 36 women with epilepsy) in the second trimester was associated with a lower RTC (p < 0.001), and RTC < 0.65 was a significant predictor of seizure worsening. An empiric postpartum taper reduced the likelihood of maternal LTG toxicity (p < 0.05) (n = 27). Newborn outcomes were similar to the general population (n = 52). Conclusions These novel data contribute to a rational treatment plan and dosing paradigm for lamotrigine use during pregnancy, parturition, and the postpartum period. PMID:18046009

  12. Glucose restriction induces transient G2 cell cycle arrest extending cellular chronological lifespan.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Fumie; Ishii, Mahiro; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Kojiro; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    While glucose is the fundamental source of energy in most eukaryotes, it is not always abundantly available in natural environments, including within the human body. Eukaryotic cells are therefore thought to possess adaptive mechanisms to survive glucose-limited conditions, which remain unclear. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating cell cycle progression in response to abrupt changes in extracellular glucose concentration. Upon reduction of glucose in the medium, wild-type fission yeast cells undergo transient arrest specifically at G2 phase. This cell cycle arrest is dependent on the Wee1 tyrosine kinase inhibiting the key cell cycle regulator, CDK1/Cdc2. Mutant cells lacking Wee1 are not arrested at G2 upon glucose limitation and lose viability faster than the wild-type cells under glucose-depleted quiescent conditions, suggesting that this cell cycle arrest is required for extension of chronological lifespan. Our findings indicate the presence of a novel cell cycle checkpoint monitoring glucose availability, which may be a good molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26804466

  13. Management of bipolar depression with lamotrigine: an antiepileptic mood stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavalkar, Kedar S.; Poovanpallil, Nimmy B.; Bhatt, Lokesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of lamotrigine in the treatment of focal epilepsies have already been reported in several case reports and open studies, which is thought to act by inhibiting glutamate release through voltage-sensitive sodium channels blockade and neuronal membrane stabilization. However, recent findings have also illustrated the importance of lamotrigine in alleviating the depressive symptoms of bipolar disorder, without causing mood destabilization or precipitating mania. Currently, no mood stabilizers are available having equal efficacy in the treatment of both mania and depression, two of which forms the extreme sides of the bipolar disorder. Lamotrigine, a well established anticonvulsant has received regulatory approval for the treatment and prevention of bipolar depression in more than 30 countries worldwide. Lamotrigine, acts through several molecular targets and overcomes the major limitation of other conventional antidepressants by stabilizing mood from “below baseline” thereby preventing switches to mania or episode acceleration, thus being effective for bipolar I disorder. Recent studies have also suggested that these observations could also be extended to patients with bipolar II disorder. Thus, lamotrigine may supposedly fulfill the unmet requirement for an effective depression mood stabilizer. PMID:26557090

  14. Nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2 silencing and extends lifespan via Nrk and Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Racette, Frances G; Bogan, Katrina L; McClure, Julie M; Smith, Jeffrey S; Brenner, Charles

    2007-05-01

    Although NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for Sir2 functions and replicative lifespan in yeast, alterations in NAD(+) precursors have been reported to accelerate aging but not to extend lifespan. In eukaryotes, nicotinamide riboside is a newly discovered NAD(+) precursor that is converted to nicotinamide mononucleotide by specific nicotinamide riboside kinases, Nrk1 and Nrk2. In this study, we discovered that exogenous nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2-dependent repression of recombination, improves gene silencing, and extends lifespan without calorie restriction. The mechanism of action of nicotinamide riboside is totally dependent on increased net NAD(+) synthesis through two pathways, the Nrk1 pathway and the Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathway, which is Nrk1 independent. Additionally, the two nicotinamide riboside salvage pathways contribute to NAD(+) metabolism in the absence of nicotinamide-riboside supplementation. Thus, like calorie restriction in the mouse, nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD(+) and increases Sir2 function. PMID:17482543

  15. Identification of a Lifespan Extending Mutation in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cyclin Gene clg1+ by Direct Selection of Long-Lived Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Ruei; Li, Yanhui; Eisenstatt, Jessica R.; Runge, Kurt W.

    2013-01-01

    Model organisms such as budding yeast, worms and flies have proven instrumental in the discovery of genetic determinants of aging, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a promising new system for these studies. We devised an approach to directly select for long-lived S. pombe mutants from a random DNA insertion library. Each insertion mutation bears a unique sequence tag called a bar code that allows one to determine the proportion of an individual mutant in a culture containing thousands of different mutants. Aging these mutants in culture allowed identification of a long-lived mutant bearing an insertion mutation in the cyclin gene clg1+. Clg1p, like Pas1p, physically associates with the cyclin-dependent kinase Pef1p. We identified a third Pef1p cyclin, Psl1p, and found that only loss of Clg1p or Pef1p extended lifespan. Genetic and co-immunoprecipitation results indicate that Pef1p controls lifespan through the downstream protein kinase Cek1p. While Pef1p is conserved as Pho85p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and as cdk5 in humans, genome-wide searches for lifespan regulators in S. cerevisiae have never identified Pho85p. Thus, the S. pombe system can be used to identify novel, evolutionarily conserved lifespan extending mutations, and our results suggest a potential role for mammalian cdk5 as a lifespan regulator. PMID:23874875

  16. PAK1-deficiency/down-regulation reduces brood size, activates HSP16.2 gene and extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yanase, S; Luo, Y; Maruta, H

    2013-02-01

    There is an increasing evidence that the oncogenic kinase PAK1 is responsible not only for malignant transformation, but also for several other diseases such as inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), infectious diseases including malaria, AIDS, and flu, as well as a series of neuronal diseases/disorders (neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, epilepsy, depression, learning deficit, etc.) which often cause premature death. Interestingly, a few natural PAK1-blockers such as curcumin, caffeic acid (CA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) extend the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans or fruit flies. Here, to explore the possibility that C. elegans could provide us with a quick and inexpensive in vivo screening system for a series of more potent but safe (non-toxic) PAK1-blocking therapeutics, we examined the effects of PAK1-deficiency or down-regulation on a few selected functions of this worm, including reproduction, expression of HSP16.2 gene, and lifespan. In short, we found that PAK1 promotes reproduction, whereas it inactivates HSP16.2 gene and shortens lifespan, as do PI-3 kinase (AGE-1), TOR, and insulin-like signalling /ILS (Daf-2) in this worm. These findings not only support the "trade-off" theory on reproduction versus lifespan, but also suggest the possibility that the reduced reproduction (or HSP16.2 gene activation) of this worm could be used as the first indicator of extended lifespan for a quick in vivo screening for PAK1-blockers. PMID:23524941

  17. The NOXA-MCL1-BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Haschka, Manuel D; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  18. The NOXA–MCL1–BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  19. Depleting the methyltransferase Suv39h1 improves DNA repair and extends lifespan in a progeria mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Zimei; Zhang, Le; Ghosh, Shrestha; Zheng, Huiling; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2013-01-01

    A de novo G608G mutation in LMNA gene leads to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Mice lacking the prelamin A-processing metalloprotease, Zmpste24, recapitulate many of the progeroid features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Here we show that A-type lamins interact with SUV39H1, and prelamin A/progerin exhibits enhanced binding capacity to SUV39H1, protecting it from proteasomal degradation and, consequently, increasing H3K9me3 levels. Depletion of Suv39h1 reduces H3K9me3 levels, restores DNA repair capacity and delays senescence in progeroid cells. Remarkably, loss of Suv39h1 in Zmpste24(-/-) mice delays body weight loss, increases bone mineral density and extends lifespan by ∼60%. Thus, increased H3K9me3 levels, possibly mediated by enhanced Suv39h1 stability in the presence of prelamin A/progerin, compromise genome maintenance, which in turn contributes to accelerated senescence in laminopathy-based premature aging. Our study provides an explanation for epigenetic alterations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a potential strategy for intervention by targeting SUV39H1-mediated heterochromatin remodelling. PMID:23695662

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Extends the Lifespan of Drosophila and Mice, Increases Mortality-Related Tumors and Hemorrhagic Diathesis, and Alters Energy Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Stephen R.; Mote, Patricia L.; Lublin, Alex L.; Flegal, James M.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Li, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Mesonordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) extends murine lifespan. The studies reported here describe its dose dependence, effects on body weight, toxicity-related clinical chemistries, and mortality-related pathologies. In flies, we characterized its effects on lifespan, food consumption, body weight, and locomotion. B6C3F1 mice were fed AIN-93M diet supplemented with 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, or 4.5g NDGA/kg diet (1.59, 2.65, 3.71 and 4.77mg/kg body weight/day) beginning at 12 months of age. Only the 3.5mg/kg diet produced a highly significant increase in lifespan, as judged by either the Mantel–Cox log-rank test (p = .008) or the Gehan–Breslow–Wilcoxon test (p = .009). NDGA did not alter food intake, but dose-responsively reduced weight, suggesting it decreased the absorption or increased the utilization of calories. NDGA significantly increased the incidence of liver, lung, and thymus tumors, and peritoneal hemorrhagic diathesis found at necropsy. However, clinical chemistries found little evidence for overt toxicity. While NDGA was not overtly toxic at its therapeutic dosage, its association with severe end of life pathologies does not support the idea that NDGA consumption will increase human lifespan or health-span. The less toxic derivatives of NDGA which are under development should be explored as anti-aging therapeutics. PMID:25380600

  1. Stevens Johnson Syndrome associated with Lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Shama; Javed, M. Afzal

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome (SJS) is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction and has been linked as an adverse side effects to many drugs. Lamotrigine, an anticonvulsive medication and also a commonly used mood stabiliser, can be associated with this adverse reaction. Although this has not been reported very commonly , SJS has high mortality and morbidity and requires careful attention as the use of Lamotrigine is increasing in clinical practice. We present a case where the patient developed Stevens - Johnson Syndrome three weeks after being started on Lamotrigine. The case is discussed for its relevance to the use of Lamotrigine which is currently prescribed very commonly in psychiatric practices. PMID:24550973

  2. Stevens Johnson Syndrome associated with Lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Shama; Javed, M Afzal

    2013-11-01

    Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome (SJS) is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction and has been linked as an adverse side effects to many drugs. Lamotrigine, an anticonvulsive medication and also a commonly used mood stabiliser, can be associated with this adverse reaction. Although this has not been reported very commonly , SJS has high mortality and morbidity and requires careful attention as the use of Lamotrigine is increasing in clinical practice. We present a case where the patient developed Stevens - Johnson Syndrome three weeks after being started on Lamotrigine. The case is discussed for its relevance to the use of Lamotrigine which is currently prescribed very commonly in psychiatric practices. PMID:24550973

  3. Pyrroloquinoline quinone enhances the resistance to oxidative stress and extends lifespan upon DAF-16 and SKN-1 activities in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Huang, J H; Khanabdali, R; Kalionis, B; Xia, S J; Cai, W J

    2016-07-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is linked to fundamental biological processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid metabolism. PQQ may also function as an essential micronutrient during animal development. Recent studies have shown the therapeutic potential of PQQ for several age-related diseases due to its antioxidant capacity. However, whether PQQ can promote longevity is unknown. Here, we investigate the effects of PQQ on oxidative stress resistance as well as lifespan modulation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that PQQ enhances resistance to oxidative stress and extends the lifespan of C. elegans at optimal doses. The underlying molecular mechanism involves the increased activities of the primary lifespan extension transcriptional factors DAF-16/FOXO, the conserved oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2, and upregulation of daf-16, skn-1 downstream targets including sod-3, hsp16.2, gst-1 and gst-10. Our findings uncover a novel role of PQQ in longevity, supporting PQQ as a possible dietary supplement for overall health improvement. PMID:27090484

  4. Lamotrigine

    MedlinePlus

    ... move it around in your mouth. Wait a short time for the tablet to dissolve, and then ... hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, injections, implants, or intrauterine devices), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT). ...

  5. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to extend yeast lifespan via a dual-phase mode: a conclusion drawn from global transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, DaTing; Wu, Ming; Li, SiMing; Gao, Qian; Zeng, QingPing

    2015-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) promotes longevity among distinct organisms from yeast to mammals. Although CR-prolonged lifespan is believed to associate with enhanced respiratory activity, it is apparently controversial for accelerated energy consumption regardless of insufficient nutrient intake. In reconciling the contradiction of less food supply versus much metabolite dispense, we revealed a CR-based mode of dual-phase responses that encompass a phase of mitochondrial enhancement (ME) and a phase of post-mitochondrial enhancement (PME), which can be distinguished by the expression patterns and activity dynamics of mitochondrial signatures. ME is characterized by global antioxidative activation, and PME is denoted by systemic metabolic modulation. CR-mediated aging-delaying effects are replicated by artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivative of the antimalarial artemisinin that can alkylate heme-containing proteins, suggesting artesunate-heme conjugation functionally resembles nitric oxide-heme interaction. A correlation of artesunate-heme conjugation with cytochrome c oxidase activation has been established from adduct formation and activity alteration. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide also mimics CR to trigger antioxidant responses, affect signaling cascades, and alter respiratory rhythms, implying hydrogen peroxide is engaged in lifespan extension. Conclusively, artesunate mimics CR-triggered nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide to induce antioxidative networks for scavenging reactive oxygen species and mitigating oxidative stress, thereby directing metabolic conversion from anabolism to catabolism, maintaining essential metabolic functionality, and extending life expectancy in yeast. PMID:25682392

  6. Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy T; Caito, Samuel W; Zackert, William E; West, James D; Zhu, Shijun; Aschner, Michael; Fessel, Joshua P; Roberts, L Jackson

    2016-08-01

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension. PMID:27514077

  7. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  8. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  9. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  10. Glucose restriction can extend normal cell lifespan and impair precancerous cell growth through epigenetic control of hTERT and p16 expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Liang; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer cells metabolize glucose at elevated rates and have a higher sensitivity to glucose reduction. However, the precise molecular mechanisms leading to different responses to glucose restriction between normal and cancer cells are not fully understood. We analyzed normal WI-38 and immortalized WI-38/S fetal lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in WI-38/S cells, whereas it induced lifespan extension in WI-38 cells. Moreover, in WI-38/S cells glucose restriction decreased expression of hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and increased expression of p16INK4a. Opposite effects were found in the gene expression of hTERT and p16 in WI-38 cells in response to glucose restriction. The altered gene expression was partly due to glucose restriction-induced DNA methylation changes and chromatin remodeling of the hTERT and p16 promoters in normal and immortalized WI-38 cells. Furthermore, glucose restriction resulted in altered hTERT and p16 expression in response to epigenetic regulators in WI-38 rather than WI-38/S cells, suggesting that energy stress-induced differential epigenetic regulation may lead to different cellular fates in normal and precancerous cells. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the epigenetic mechanisms of a nutrient control strategy that may contribute to cancer therapy as well as antiaging approaches.—Li, Y., Liu, L., Tollefsbol, T. O. Glucose restriction can extend normal cell lifespan and impair precancerous cell growth through epigenetic control of hTERT and p16 expression. PMID:20019239

  11. Evolution of lifespan.

    PubMed

    Neill, David

    2014-10-01

    Present-day evolutionary theory, modern synthesis and evo-devo, appear to explain evolution. There remain however several points of contention. These include: biological time, direction, macroevolution verses microevolution, ageing and the extent of internal as opposed to external mediation. A new theoretical model for the control of biological time in vertebrates/bilaterians is introduced. Rather than biological time being controlled solely by a molecular cascade domino effect, it is suggested there is also an intracellular oscillatory clock. This clock (life's timekeeper) is synchronised across all cells in an organism and runs at a constant frequency throughout life. Slower frequencies extend lifespan, increase body/brain size and advance behaviour. They also create a time void which could aid additional evolutionary change. Faster frequencies shorten lifespan, reduce body/brain size and diminish behaviour. They are therefore less likely to mediate evolution in vertebrates/mammals. It is concluded that in vertebrates, especially mammals, there is a direction in evolution towards longer lifespan/advanced behaviour. Lifespan extension could equate with macroevolution and subsequent modifications with microevolution. As life's timekeeper controls the rate of ageing it constitutes a new genetic theory of ageing. Finally, as lifespan extension is internally mediated, this suggests a major role for internal mediation in evolution. PMID:24992233

  12. Lamotrigine for acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. Some antiepileptic medicines have a place in the treatment of neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage). This updated review adds five new additional studies looking at evidence for Lamotrigine as an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine in acute and chronic pain. Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of lamotrigine in acute, and chronic pain (including cancer pain) were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL up to January 2011. Additional studies were sought from the reference list of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria RCTs investigating the use of lamotrigine (any dose, by any route, and for any study duration) for the treatment of acute or chronic pain. Assessment of pain intensity or pain relief, or both, using validated scales. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. Only full journal publication articles were included. Data collection and analysis Dichotomous data (ideally for the outcome of at least 50% pain relief) were used to calculate relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed-effect model. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTs) were calculated as the reciprocal of the absolute risk reduction. For unwanted effects, the NNT becomes the number needed to harm (NNH) and was calculated. Main results Twelve included studies in 11 publications (1511 participants), all with chronic neuropathic pain: central post stroke pain (1), chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain (1), diabetic neuropathy (4), HIV related neuropathy (2), mixed neuropathic pain (2), spinal cord injury related pain (1), and trigeminal neuralgia (1); none investigated lamotrigine in acute pain. The update had five additional studies (1111 additional participants). Participants were aged between 26 and 77 years. Study duration

  13. Three Cases of Reversible Agranulocytosis after Treatment with Lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Kunjong

    2008-01-01

    Several psychotropic drugs, including clozapine, are known to cause agranulocytosis and this may lead to a fatal condition. Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved for the depression of bipolar disorder. A few cases of lamotrigine-induced agranulocytosis have been previously reported on, but the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations are not yet known. This case series reports on 3 patients with different medical conditions who experienced agranulocytosis during treatment with lamotrigine. In these cases, the agranulocytosis occurred a few weeks after initiation of lamotrigine and it rapidly disappeared after discontinuation. We also discuss several characteristics of lamotrigine-induced agranulocytosis. PMID:20046355

  14. Animal lifespan and human influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Yang, S.

    2002-01-01

    Lifespan differs radically among organisms ever lived on earth, even among those roughly similar in size, shape, form, and physiology; Yet, in general, there exists a strong positive relationship between lifespan and body size. Although lifespans of humans and human-related (domestic) animals are becoming increasingly longer than that of other animals of similar sizes, the slope of the regression (lifespan-body size) line and the intercepts have been surprisingly stable over the course of the dramatic human population growth, indicating substantial depression in lifespans of many other animals probably due to shrunk and fragmented natural habitats. This article addresses two questions related to the lifespan-size relationship: (1) what caused the exceptions (e.g., a few remote human-related animals are also located above the regression line with great residuals) and why (e.g., could brain size or intelligence be a covariate in addition to body size in predicting lifespan?), and (2) whether continued human activities can eventually alter the ' natural' regression line in the future, and if so, how much. We also suggest similar research efforts to be extended to the plant world as well.

  15. Biopharmaceutic Risk Assessment of Brand and Generic Lamotrigine Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Soundarya; Raman, Siddarth; Jiang, Wenlei; Ting, Tricia Y; Kane, Maureen A; Polli, James E

    2015-07-01

    The therapeutic equivalence of generic and brand name antiepileptic drugs has been questioned by neurologists and the epilepsy community. A potential contributor to such concerns is pharmaceutical quality. The objective was to assess the biopharmaceutic risk of brand name Lamictal 100 mg tablets and generic lamotrigine 100 mg tablets from several manufacturers. Lamotrigine was characterized in terms of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), including aqueous solubility and Caco-2 permeability. A panel of pharmaceutical quality tests was also performed on three batches of Lamictal, three batches of Teva generic, and one batch of each of four other generics: appearance, identity, assay, impurity, uniformity of dosage units, disintegration, dissolution, friability, and loss on drying. These market surveillance results indicate that all brand name and generic lamotrigine 100 mg tablets passed all tests and showed acceptable pharmaceutical quality and low biopharmaceutic risk. Lamotrigine was classified as a BCS class IIb drug, exhibiting pH-dependent aqueous solubility and dissolution. At pH 1.2 and 4.5, lamotrigine exhibited high solubility, whereas lamotrigine exhibited low solubility at pH 6.8, including non-sink dissolution. Lamotrigine showed high Caco-2 permeability. The apparent permeability (Papp) of lamotrigine was (73.7 ± 8.7) × 10(-6) cm/s in the apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) direction and (41.4 ± 1.6) × 10(-6) cm/s in the BL-AP direction, which were higher than metoprolol's AP-BL Papp of (21.2 ± 0.9) × 10(-6) cm/s and BL-AP Papp of (34.6 ± 4.6) × 10(-6) cm/s. Overall, lamotrigine's favorable biopharmaceutics from a drug substance perspective and favorable quality characteristics from a tablet formulation perspective suggest that multisource lamotrigine tablets exhibit a low biopharmaceutic risk. PMID:26001027

  16. Bimodal Gastroretentive Drug Delivery Systems of Lamotrigine: Formulation and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Poonuru, R. R.; Gonugunta, C. S. R

    2014-01-01

    Gastroretentive bimodal drug delivery systems of lamotrigine were developed using immediate release and extended release segments incorporated in a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose capsule and in vitro and in vivo evaluations were conducted. In vivo radiographic studies were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers with replacement of drug polymer complex by barium sulphate and the floating time was noted. Here the immediate release segment worked as loading dose and extended release segment as maintenance dose. The results of release studies of formulations with hydrophillic matrix to formulations with dual matrix hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate shown that as the percentage of polymer increased, the release decreased. Selected formulation F2 having F-Melt has successfully released the drug within one hour and hydrophillic matrix composing polyethylene oxide with 5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate showed a lag time of one hour and then extended its release up to 12th hour with 99.59% drug release following zero order kinetics with R2 value of 0.989. The Korsmeyer-Peppas equation showed the R2 value to be 0.941 and n value was 1.606 following non-Fickian diffusion pattern with supercase II relaxation mechanism. Here from extended release tablet the drug released slowly from the matrix while floating. PMID:25593380

  17. Does Longer Lifespan Mean Longer Healthspan?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malene; Kennedy, Brian K

    2016-08-01

    Once thought to be impossible, it is now clear that changing the activity of several conserved genetic pathways can lead to lifespan extension in experimental organisms. In humans, however, the goal is to extend healthspan, the functional and disease-free period of life. Are the current pathways to lifespan extension also improving healthspan? PMID:27238421

  18. Reduced neuronal expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase enhances tolerance to oxidative stress, extends lifespan, and attenuates polyglutamine toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Tzu; Chen, Yi-Chun; Wang, Yi-Yun; Huang, Ming-Hao; Yen, Tzu-Li; Li, Hsun; Liang, Cyong-Jhih; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cho, Si-Chih; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Wang, Chao-Yung; Brummel, Theodore J.; Wang, Horng-Dar

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aging and age-related diseases can be viewed as the result of the lifelong accumulation of stress insults. The identification of mutant strains and genes which are responsive to stress and can alter longevity profiles provides new therapeutic targets for age-related diseases. Here we reported that a Drosophila strain with reduced expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (rpi), EP2456, exhibits increased resistance to oxidative stress and enhanced lifespan. In addition, the strain also displays higher levels of NADPH. The knockdown of rpi in neurons by double-stranded RNA interference recapitulated the lifespan extension and oxidative stress resistance in Drosophila. This manipulation was also found to ameliorate the effects of genetic manipulations aimed at creating a model for studying Huntington’s disease by overexpression of polyglutamine in the eye, suggesting that modulating rpi levels could serve as a treatment for normal aging as well as for polyglutamine neurotoxicity. PMID:22040003

  19. Troubling Implications of Doubling the Human Lifespan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackler, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Looks at the reasons that lifespan extension may be forthcoming. Examines social issues including access to life-extending technology; effects on marriage, family, and work; and global concerns. (Author/JOW)

  20. Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to lamotrigine in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Barvaliya, Manish J.; Patel, Mahendra K.; Patel, Tejas K.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    A 12-year-male child developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) probably due to lamotrigine. The patient was on antiepileptic therapy (sodium valproate and clonazepam) since 6–7 months, and lamotrigine was added in the regimen 1–2 months back. A serious cutaneous reaction is more likely to occur during the first 2 months of starting lamotrigine. The use of lamotrigine as an add-on to valproate may have precipitated the reaction. Other drugs were ruled out based on the incubation period of TEN. Drug interactions should be kept in mind with multiple antiepileptic therapies. The patient died because of the severity of reactions and delay in starting the treatment with steroids. One must be vigilant in early detection of the reaction. PMID:23326109

  1. N-acetylaspartate normalization in bipolar depression after lamotrigine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Croarkin, Paul E; Thomas, M Albert; Port, John D; Baruth, Joshua M; Choi, Doo-Sup; Abulseoud, Osama A; Frye, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a general marker of neuronal viability, and total NAA (tNAA), the combined signal of NAA and N-acetylaspartylglutamate, in bipolar depression before and after lamotrigine treatment. Given that NAA is synthesized through direct acetylation of aspartate by acetyl-coenzyme A-L-aspartate-N-acetyltransferase, we hypothesized that treatment with lamotrigine would be associated with an increase in NAA level. Methods Patients with bipolar depression underwent two-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the anterior cingulate at baseline (n = 15) and after 12 weeks of lamotrigine treatment (n = 10). A group of age-matched healthy controls (n = 9) underwent scanning at baseline for comparison. Results At baseline, patients with bipolar depression had significantly lower NAA [mean standard deviation (SD) = 1.13 (0.21); p = 0.02] than controls [mean (SD) = 1.37 (0.27)]. Significant increases in NAA [mean (SD) = 1.39 (0.21); p = 0.01] and tNAA [mean (SD) = 1.61 (0.25); p = 0.02] levels were found after 12 weeks of lamotrigine treatment. Conclusions These data suggest an NAA deficit in bipolar depression that is normalized after lamotrigine treatment. Future research is warranted to evaluate whether baseline NAA level is a potential biomarker for identifying lamotrigine response patterns and whether this functional brain change has an associated clinical response. PMID:25495884

  2. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  3. A high-fat jelly diet restores bioenergetic balance and extends lifespan in the presence of motor dysfunction and lumbar spinal cord motor neuron loss in TDP-43A315T mutant C57BL6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Karen S; Halang, Luise; Woods, Ina; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) mice expressing the A315T mutation under control of the murine prion promoter progressively develop motor function deficits and are considered a new model for the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, premature sudden death resulting from intestinal obstruction halts disease phenotype progression in 100% of C57BL6/J congenic TDP-43(A315T) mice. Similar to our recent results in SOD1(G93A) mice, TDP-43(A315T) mice fed a standard pellet diet showed increased 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation at postnatal day (P)80, indicating elevated energetic stress during disease progression. We therefore investigated the effects of a high-fat jelly diet on bioenergetic status and lifespan in TDP-43(A315T) mice. In contrast to standard pellet-fed mice, mice fed high-fat jelly showed no difference in AMPK activation up to P120 and decreased phosphorylation of acetly-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at early-stage time points. Exposure to a high-fat jelly diet prevented sudden death and extended survival, allowing development of a motor neuron disease phenotype with significantly decreased body weight from P80 onward that was characterised by deficits in Rotarod abilities and stride length measurements. Development of this phenotype was associated with a significant motor neuron loss as assessed by Nissl staining in the lumbar spinal cord. Our work suggests that a high-fat jelly diet improves the pre-clinical utility of the TDP-43(A315T) model by extending lifespan and allowing the motor neuron disease phenotype to progress, and indicates the potential benefit of this diet in TDP-43-associated ALS. PMID:27491077

  4. Pharmacological Lifespan Extension of Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lucanic, Mark; Lithgow, Gordon J.; Alavez, Silvestre

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying small, drug-like compounds that slow aging in multiple species, particularly in mammals. Such compounds may prove to be useful in treating and retarding age-related disease in humans. Just as invertebrate models have been essential in helping us understand the genetic pathways that control aging, these model organisms are also proving valuable in discovering chemical compounds that influence longevity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has numerous advantages for such studies including its short lifespan and has been exploited by a number of investigators to find compounds that impact aging. Here, we summarize the progress being made in identifying compounds that extend the lifespan of invertebrates, and introduce the challenges we face in translating this research into human therapies. PMID:22771382

  5. Lifespan modification by glucose and methionine in Drosophila melanogaster fed a chemically defined diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimentally restricting dietary calories, while maintaining adequate dietary nutrient content, extends lifespan in phylogenetically diverse species; thus suggesting the existence of conserved pathways which can modify lifespan in response to energy intake. However, in some cases the impact on lon...

  6. Potential benefit of lamotrigine in managing ketamine use disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Lian-Yu; Chen, Chih-Ken; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-02-01

    Ketamine is an anesthetic derivative of phencyclidine (PCP; 'Angel dust') with dissociative, analgesic and psychedelic properties. Ketamine has become a popular recreational drug of abuse in many parts of the world in recent years. The preclinical studies demonstrate the reinforcing effects of ketamine and long-term ketamine abuse induces a delayed and persistent upregulation of dopamine system. In humans, there have been concerns about its liability to development of addiction. The dilemma of mental professionals in managing the treatment-seeking ketamine abusers comes from a lack of effective pharmacotherapy. Limiting evidence showed that lamotrigine, which inhibits glutamate release, is effective to reduce cocaine craving. We propose that lamotrigine might be beneficial for managing ketamine use disorder clinically. We also reported one case of ketamine use disorder who experienced a great reduction in craving and ketamine use after taking lamotrigine. Although the mechanisms underlying neuroadaptation and reward related to ketamine are not entirely clear, future clinical trials are needed to advance our understanding of the benefit yielded by lamotrigine to treat ketamine use disorder. PMID:26632202

  7. Ethosuximide, Valproic Acid, and Lamotrigine in Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Tracy A.; Cnaan, Avital; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hirtz, Deborah G.; Dlugos, Dennis; Masur, David; Clark, Peggy O.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood absence epilepsy, the most common pediatric epilepsy syndrome, is usually treated with ethosuximide, valproic acid, or lamotrigine. The most efficacious and tolerable initial empirical treatment has not been defined. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial, we compared the efficacy, tolerability, and neuropsychological effects of ethosuximide, valproic acid, and lamotrigine in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy. Drug doses were incrementally increased until the child was free of seizures, the maximal allowable or highest tolerable dose was reached, or a criterion indicating treatment failure was met. The primary outcome was freedom from treatment failure after 16 weeks of therapy; the secondary outcome was attentional dysfunction. Differential drug effects were determined by means of pairwise comparisons. RESULTS The 453 children who were randomly assigned to treatment with ethosuximide (156), lamotrigine (149), or valproic acid (148) were similar with respect to their demographic characteristics. After 16 weeks of therapy, the freedom-from-failure rates for ethosuximide and valproic acid were similar (53% and 58%, respectively; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. ethosuximide, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 1.98; P = 0.35) and were higher than the rate for lamotrigine (29%; odds ratio with ethosuximide vs. lamotrigine, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.65 to 4.28; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. lamotrigine, 3.34; 95% CI, 2.06 to 5.42; P<0.001 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences among the three drugs with regard to discontinuation because of adverse events. Attentional dysfunction was more common with valproic acid than with ethosuximide (in 49% of the children vs. 33%; odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.12 to 3.41; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Ethosuximide and valproic acid are more effective than lamotrigine in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy. Ethosuximide is associated with

  8. Evolving Electrocardiographic Changes in Lamotrigine Overdose: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Patricia; Casso Dominguez, Abel; Herzog, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Lamotrigine overdose usually follows a benign pattern, and the majority of cases reported involve a co-ingestant. Prior reports have suggested the possible use of intravenous lipid emulsion in cases of severe sodium channel blockade. We describe the electrocardiographic changes in a massive lamotrigine overdose treated with intravenous lipid emulsion. A 36-year-old male with bipolar disorder ingested 13.5 g of lamotrigine in a suicidal attempt. The lamotrigine level was 78.0 μg/mL. Comprehensive drug screen was negative for all screened compounds. The electrocardiogram demonstrated a prolonged QRS complex and signs suggestive of sodium channel blockade. Refractory to treatment with sodium bicarbonate was treated with intravenous lipid emulsion, with immediate resolution of the electrocardiographic changes. Lamotrigine inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel opening, attenuating the release of excitatory neurotransmitters. Cardiac intraventricular conduction could be delayed in cases of lamotrigine overdose resulting in QRS and QTc prolongation and R waves >3 mm in leads I and aVR. A potential role for intravenous lipid emulsion therapy has been described in patients with toxic levels of lamotrigine and electrocardiographic changes refractory to the treatment with sodium bicarbonate. Intravenous lipid emulsion has been successfully used in the treatment of lamotrigine cardiac toxicity. PMID:25448877

  9. Distributed transit compartments for arbitrary lifespan distributions in aging populations.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Schropp, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Transit compartment models (TCM) are often used to describe aging populations where every individual has its own lifespan. However, in the TCM approach these lifespans are gamma-distributed which is a serious limitation because often the Weibull or more complex distributions are realistic. Therefore, we extend the TCM concept to approximately describe any lifespan distribution and call this generalized concept distributed transit compartment models (DTCMs). The validity of DTCMs is obtained by convergence investigations. From the mechanistic perspective the transit rates are directly controlled by the lifespan distribution. Further, DTCMs could be used to approximate the convolution of a signal with a probability density function. As example a stimulatory effect of a drug in an aging population with a Weibull-distributed lifespan is presented where distribution and model parameters are estimated based on simulated data. PMID:26100181

  10. Report of Severe Menorrhagia Following the Maximum Amount of Lamotrigine Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Hajiali, Farid; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug used as a treatment for partial and generalised seizures as well as for bipolar disorder type I. Till date, very few cases of lamotrigine overdose have been reported. The spectra of clinical effects of lamotrigine in acute overdose are not well established. In severe cases of poisoning, serious effects such as coma, respiratory depression, recurrent seizures and intraventricular conduction disturbances have been noted. Here, we report a case of lamotrigine overdose in a 26-year-old divorcee with paradoxical seizure activity and coma. On admission, the patient had a reduced level of consciousness. Serum evaluation revealed high lamotrigine levels without any other aetiology for mental dysfunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe a patient overdosed with 40 g of lamotrigine alone, which is the highest amount of lamotrigine overdose reported so far. During hospitalisation, the patient’s haemoglobin level reduced from 12.9 to 7.7 g/dl and potassium level decreased repeatedly. More importantly, severe menorrhagia was noted. Following prompt supportive treatment with early intubation, along with the use of potassium chloride for hypokalaemia and administration of sodium bicarbonate, the patient’s conditions improved and she was discharged from the hospital after 13 days. PMID:26664399

  11. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  12. The African Turquoise Killifish Genome Provides Insights into Evolution and Genetic Architecture of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Dario Riccardo; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Singh, Param Priya; Zhang, Elisa; Etter, Paul D; Hu, Chi-Kuo; Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Willemsen, David; Cui, Rongfeng; Harel, Itamar; Machado, Ben E; Yee, Muh-Ching; Sharp, Sabrina C; Bustamante, Carlos D; Beyer, Andreas; Johnson, Eric A; Brunet, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Lifespan is a remarkably diverse trait ranging from a few days to several hundred years in nature, but the mechanisms underlying the evolution of lifespan differences remain elusive. Here we de novo assemble a reference genome for the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish, providing a unique resource for comparative and experimental genomics. The identification of genes under positive selection in this fish reveals potential candidates to explain its compressed lifespan. Several aging genes are under positive selection in this short-lived fish and long-lived species, raising the intriguing possibility that the same gene could underlie evolution of both compressed and extended lifespans. Comparative genomics and linkage analysis identify candidate genes associated with lifespan differences between various turquoise killifish strains. Remarkably, these genes are clustered on the sex chromosome, suggesting that short lifespan might have co-evolved with sex determination. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary forces that shape lifespan in nature. PMID:26638078

  13. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  14. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Maximina H.

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  15. Rash in Psychiatric and Nonpsychiatric Adolescent Patients Receiving Lamotrigine in Korea: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Hee-Jong; Ahn, Joon-Ho; Kim, Kun-Woo; Kim, Yeni; Choi, Sam-Wook; Lee, Kyung-Yeon; Park, Eun Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Lamotrigine is a widely used medication for psychiatric disorders and epilepsy, but the adverse effects of this drug in adolescent Korean patients have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we sought to compare the incidence and impact of lamotrigine-induced skin rashes and different pattern of adverse events in psychiatric and nonpsychiatric adolescent patients. Methods Using a retrospective cohort design, all of the charts were reviewed for adolescents (13 to 20 years old), treated with lamotrigine during the previous 2 years in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic and Pediatric Neurologic Clinic of the Ulsan University Hospital in South Korea. Results Of the 102 subjects, 23 patients developed a skin rash. All of these rashes were observed within 7 weeks of the initiation of the lamotrigine therapy. Only one subject developed a serious rash, which was diagnosed as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Although the psychiatric subjects were administered statistically lower doses of lamotrigine during weeks 1 through 5 and at week 12, the likelihood of developing a rash was not significantly different between the psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients. Conclusion Careful dose escalation and close observation of side effects for the first 7 weeks of treatment is important. The present study reveals the tolerability of lamotrigine in an adolescent population, although a double-blind, controlled trial is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:22707969

  16. A Drosophila ABC transporter regulates lifespan.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Lu-Bo, Ying; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-12-01

    MRP4 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 4) is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are essential for many cellular processes requiring the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Although MRP4 has been implicated as a detoxification protein by transport of structurally diverse endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including antivirus and anticancer drugs, that usually induce oxidative stress in cells, its in vivo biological function remains unknown. In this study, we investigate the biological functions of a Drosophila homolog of human MRP4, dMRP4. We show that dMRP4 expression is elevated in response to oxidative stress (paraquat, hydrogen peroxide and hyperoxia) in Drosophila. Flies lacking dMRP4 have a shortened lifespan under both oxidative and normal conditions. Overexpression of dMRP4, on the other hand, is sufficient to increase oxidative stress resistance and extend lifespan. By genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that dMRP4 is required for JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation during paraquat challenge and for basal transcription of some JNK target genes under normal condition. We show that impaired JNK signaling is an important cause for major defects associated with dMRP4 mutations, suggesting that dMRP4 regulates lifespan by modulating the expression of a set of genes related to both oxidative resistance and aging, at least in part, through JNK signaling. PMID:25474322

  17. Lamotrigine does not prolong QTc in a thorough QT/QTc study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Ruth; Job, Sarah; Oliver, Ruth; Tompson, Debra; Wright, John G; Maltby, Kay; Lorch, Ulrike; Taubel, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    AIM To characterize the effects of lamotrigine on QT interval in healthy subjects. METHODS Healthy subjects received a single oral dose of moxifloxacin (400 mg) or placebo in crossover design, followed by a dose-escalating regimen of lamotrigine (n = 76) over a 77-day period, or matched placebo (n = 76). Blood samples were taken for determination of moxifloxacin and lamotrigine concentrations and digital 12-lead ECGs were recorded. The relationships between individual QT values and respective individual moxifloxacin or lamotrigine concentrations were explored using population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PK–PD) modelling. RESULTS Moxifloxacin was associated with a maximum mean increase from baseline in QTcF of 14.81 ms [90% confidence interval (CI) 13.50, 16.11] 2.5 h after dosing. Steady-state exposure to lamotrigine (50, 150 or 200 mg b.d.) was not associated with an increase in QTc interval. Small reductions in QTcF (maximum mean difference from placebo −7.48 ms, 90% CI −10.49, −4.46) and small increases in heart rate (maximum mean difference from placebo 5.94 bpm, 90% CI 3.81, 8.06) were observed with lamotrigine 200 mg b.d. vs. placebo. No effect of lamotrigine on QRS duration or blood pressure was observed. No outliers with QTcF > 450 ms, or with an increase from baseline of >60 ms were observed in the lamotrigine group. PK–PD modelling indicated statistically significant decreases in individually corrected QT intervals for lamotrigine and statistically significant increases in individually corrected QT intervals for moxifloxacin over the concentration ranges studied. CONCLUSIONS Therapeutic doses of lamotrigine (50–200 mg b.d.) were not associated with QT prolongation in healthy subjects. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Drugs that inhibit the human cardiac delayed rectifier potassium current may lead to prolongation of the cardiac QT interval and are associated with a fatal, polymorphic, ventricular tachycardia known as torsades de

  18. Fish oil changes the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Soko; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Kijima, Ryo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we administered fish oil containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to senescence-accelerated mice P8 (SAMP8), in order to investigate the effects on lifespan. Surprisingly, the lifespan of SAMP8 that were fed fish oil was shortened significantly, through a mechanism that likely involved lipid peroxidation. In this study, we investigated this phenomenon in further detail. To examine whether this phenomenon occurs only in SAMP8, we investigated the effect of fish oil on the lifespan of another organism species, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). C. elegans fed fish oil were cultured and the lifespan monitored. As a consequence of the provision of large amounts of fish oil the lifespan of C. elegans was shortened significantly, whereas an appropriate amount of fish oil extended their lifespan significantly. Lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans that were fed fish oil increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans were inhibited by the addition of fish oil and an antioxidant, α-tocopherol, and completely abrogated the changes in the lifespan. To further confirm whether the oxidation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in fish oil would change the lifespan of C. elegans, the effect of oxidized DHA was examined. Large amounts of oxidized DHA were found to shorten their lifespan significantly. Thus, fish oil changes the lifespan of C. elegans through lipid peroxidation. PMID:23526170

  19. Uncoupling lifespan and healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity mutants

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Zhu, Lihua J.; Yen, Kelvin; Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging research has been very successful at identifying signaling pathways and evolutionarily conserved genes that extend lifespan with the assumption that an increase in lifespan will also increase healthspan. However, it is largely unknown whether we are extending the healthy time of life or simply prolonging a period of frailty with increased incidence of age-associated diseases. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the premiere systems for lifespan studies, to determine whether lifespan and healthspan are intrinsically correlated. We conducted multiple cellular and organismal assays on wild type as well as four long-lived mutants (insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1, dietary restriction, protein translation, mitochondrial signaling) in a longitudinal manner to determine the health of the animals as they age. We find that some long-lived mutants performed better than wild type when measured chronologically (number of days). However, all long-lived mutants increased the proportion of time spent in a frail state. Together, these data suggest that lifespan can no longer be the sole parameter of interest and reveal the importance of evaluating multiple healthspan parameters for future studies on antiaging interventions. PMID:25561524

  20. An Open-Label Study of Lamotrigine Adjunct or Monotherapy for the Treatment of Adolescents with Bipolar Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Kiki; Saxena, Kirti; Howe, Meghan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of pediatric bipolar depression has not been well studied. The authors wished to prospectively study the efficacy of lamotrigine as adjunctive or monotherapy in adolescents with bipolar disorder who were experiencing a depressive episode. Method: This was an 8-week open-label trial of lamotrigine with 20 adolescents ages…

  1. Lamotrigine Induced Whole Body Tics: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Centorino, Michael B; Catalano, Glenn; Catalano, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant medication that also has utility in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been associated with many side effects, including rashes that can progress to Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. It has also been associated with the development of motor tics, most commonly in the head, neck, and shoulders. We will now present the case of a 45-year-old woman who developed tics that involved the entire left side of her body after her dose of lamotrigine was increased from 200 mg daily (2.0 mg/kg/day) to 225 mg daily (2.3 mg/kg/day). We will review the prior cases of lamotrigine induced tics, and compare them to the circumstances surrounding our patient. We will also discuss the neurobiology of tics and make suggestions to improve the tics, based on the reported cases. PMID:26537524

  2. The pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine (BW430C) in healthy subjects with unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia (Gilbert's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Posner, J; Cohen, A F; Land, G; Winton, C; Peck, A W

    1989-01-01

    A single oral dose of lamotrigine was administered to seven volunteers with Gilbert's Syndrome (unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia). Plasma samples were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) and pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with those of a group of nine normal volunteers. In the subjects with Gilbert's Syndrome mean oral clearance (CLpo) was 32% lower (P less than 0.01) and the plasma elimination half-life (t1/2) was 37% lower (P less than 0.02) than in the normal controls. The amount of unchanged lamotrigine excreted in the urine was 30% greater in the Gilbert's subjects (P less than 0.01) although this only amounted to 9.5% of the administered dose. Subjects with Gilbert's Syndrome have some impairment of lamotrigine elimination but this is unlikely to be clinically important. PMID:2775610

  3. Lamotrigine use in pregnancy and risk of orofacial cleft and other congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Loane, Maria; Morris, Joan; Garne, Ester; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bakker, Marian; Barisic, Ingeborg; Doray, Berenice; Gatt, Miriam; Kallen, Karin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lahesmaa-Korpinen, Anna-Maria; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mejnartowicz, Jan P.; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rißmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test previous signals of a risk of orofacial cleft (OC) and clubfoot with exposure to the antiepileptic lamotrigine, and to investigate risk of other congenital anomalies (CA). Methods: This was a population-based case–malformed control study based on 21 EUROCAT CA registries covering 10.1 million births (1995–2011), including births to 2005 in which the clubfoot signal was generated and a subsequent independent study population of 6.3 million births. A total of 226,806 babies with CA included livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis. First-trimester lamotrigine monotherapy exposure in OC cases and clubfoot cases was compared to other nonchromosomal CA (controls). Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted for registry. An exploratory analysis compared the proportion of each standard EUROCAT CA subgroup among all babies with nonchromosomal CA exposed to lamotrigine monotherapy with non-AED exposed pregnancies. Results: There were 147 lamotrigine monotherapy-exposed babies with nonchromosomal CA. For all OC, ORadj was 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73–2.33), isolated OC 1.45 (95% CI 0.80–2.63), isolated cleft palate 1.69 (95% CI 0.69–4.15). Overall ORadj for clubfoot was 1.83 (95% CI 1.01–3.31) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.66–3.08) in the independent study population. No other specific CA were significantly associated with lamotrigine monotherapy. Conclusions: The risk of OC was not significantly raised and we estimate the excess risk of OC to be less than 1 in every 550 exposed babies. We have not found strong independent evidence of a risk of clubfoot subsequent to our original signal. Our study cannot assess the general malformation risk among lamotrigine-exposed pregnancies. PMID:27053714

  4. Inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol by ezetimibe or bile acids by SC-435 alters lipoprotein metabolism and extends the lifespan of SR-BI/apoE double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Braun, Anne; Yesilaltay, Ayce; Acton, Susan; Broschat, Kay O; Krul, Elaine S; Napawan, Nida; Stagliano, Nancy; Krieger, Monty

    2008-05-01

    SR-BI/apoE double knockout (dKO) mice exhibit many features of human coronary heart disease (CHD), including hypercholesterolemia, occlusive coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial infarctions, cardiac dysfunction and premature death. Ezetimibe is a FDA-approved, intestinal cholesterol absorption inhibitor that lowers plasma LDL cholesterol in humans and animals and inhibits aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice, but has not been proven to reduce CHD. Three-week-ezetimibe treatment of dKO mice (0.005% (w/w) in standard chow administered from weaning) resulted in a 35% decrease in cholesterol in IDL/LDL-size lipoproteins, but not in VLDL- and HDL-size lipoproteins. Ezetimibe treatment significantly reduced aortic root (57%) and coronary arterial (68%) atherosclerosis, cardiomegaly (24%) and cardiac fibrosis (57%), and prolonged the lives of the mice (27%). This represents the first demonstration of beneficial effects of ezetimibe treatment on CHD. The dKO mice were similarly treated with SC-435 (0.01% (w/w)), an apical sodium codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitor, that blocks intestinal absorption of bile acids, lowers plasma cholesterol in animals, and reduces aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice. The effects of SC-435 treatment were similar to those of ezetimibe: 37% decrease in ILD/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol and 57% prolongation in median lifespan. Thus, inhibition of intestinal absorption of either cholesterol (ezetimibe) or bile acids (SC-435) significantly reduced plasma IDL/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improved survival of SR-BI/apoE dKO mice. The SR-BI/apoE dKO murine model of atherosclerotic occlusive, arterial CHD appears to provide a useful system to evaluate compounds that modulate cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis. PMID:18054357

  5. Revisiting the Lamotrigine-Mediated Effect on Hippocampal GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Yin; Liu, Yu-Chao; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Yen-Chu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chang, Kaung-Yi; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is generally considered as a voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel blocker. However, recent studies suggest that LTG can also serve as a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel enhancer and can increase the excitability of GABAergic interneurons (INs). Perisomatic inhibitory INs, predominantly fast-spiking basket cells (BCs), powerfully inhibit granule cells (GCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Notably, BCs express abundant Nav channels and HCN channels, both of which are able to support sustained action potential generation. Using whole-cell recording in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the net LTG effect on BC output. We showed that bath application of LTG significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked compound inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs. In contrast, simultaneous paired recordings from BCs to GCs showed that LTG had no effect on both the amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of the unitary IPSCs, suggesting that LTG did not affect GABA release, though it suppressed cell excitability. In line with this, LTG decreased spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC) frequency, but not miniature IPSC frequency. When re-examining the LTG effect on GABAergic transmission in the cornus ammonis region 1 (CA1) area, we found that LTG markedly inhibits both the excitability of dendrite-targeting INs in the stratum oriens and the concurrent sIPSCs recorded on their targeting pyramidal cells (PCs) without significant hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) enhancement. In summary, LTG has no effect on augmenting Ih in GABAergic INs and does not promote GABAergic inhibitory output. The antiepileptic effect of LTG is likely through Nav channel inhibition and the suppression of global neuronal network activity. PMID:27455251

  6. Comparative evaluation of single and bilayered lamotrigine floating tablets

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, PK; Sridhar, M; Shruthi, B

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to prepare lamotrigine (LM) bilayered and single layered floating tablets and to compare their release profiles. Materials and Methods: LM floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method. Drug, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, lactose monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 constitute controlled release layer components and floating layer components includes polymers and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared tablets were evaluated for physicochemical parameters such as hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, floating lag time (FLT), floating time, in vitro buoyancy study, in vitro release studies. The drug-polymer interaction was studied by fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. Results and Discussion: The FLT of all the formulations were within the prescribed limits (<3 min). When ethyl cellulose was used as floating layer component, tablets showed good buoyancy effect but eroded within 6-8 h. Hence it was replaced with hydroxypropyl cellulose -M hydrophilic polymer, which showed good FLT and floating duration for 16 h. Formulation LFC4 was found to be optimized with dissolution profile of zero order kinetics showing fickian diffusion. A comparative study of bilayered and single layered tablets of LM showed a highest similarity factor of 83.03, difference factor of 2.74 and t-test (P < 0.05) indicates that there is no significant difference between them. Conclusion: Though bilayered tablet possess many advantages, single layered tablet would be economical, cost-effective and reproducible for large scale production in the industry. However, the results of present study demonstrated that the in vitro development of bilayered gastro retentive floating tablets with controlled drug release profile for LM is feasible. PMID:24167788

  7. Model-based lamotrigine clearance changes during pregnancy: clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Akshanth R; Pennell, Page B; Brundage, Richard C; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, Donald J; Viguera, Adele C; Ritchie, James C; Birnbaum, Angela K

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to characterize changes in the oral clearance (CL/F) of lamotrigine (LTG) over the course of pregnancy and the postpartum period through a model-based approach incorporating clinical characteristics that may influence CL/F, in support of developing clinical management guidelines. Methods Women receiving LTG therapy who were pregnant or planning pregnancy were enrolled. Maternal blood samples were collected at each visit. A pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a population-based, nonlinear, mixed-effects model. Results A total of 600 LTG concentrations from 60 women (64 pregnancies) were included. The baseline LTG CL/F was 2.16 L/h with a between-subject variability of 40.6%. The influence of pregnancy on CL/F was described by gestational week. Two subpopulations of women emerged based on the rate of increase in LTG CL/F during pregnancy. The gestational age-associated increase in CL/F displayed a 10-fold higher rate in 77% of the women (0.118 L/h per week) compared to 23% (0.0115 L/h per week). The between-subject variability in these slopes was 43.0%. The increased CL/F at delivery declined to baseline values with a half-life of 0.55 weeks. Interpretation The majority of women had a substantial increase in CL/F from 2.16 to 6.88 L/h by the end of pregnancy, whereas 23% of women had a minimal increase. An increase in CL/F may correspond to decreases in LTG blood concentrations necessitating the need for more frequent dosage adjustments and closer monitoring in some pregnant women with epilepsy. Postpartum doses should be tapered to preconception dose ranges within 3 weeks of delivery. PMID:24883336

  8. The role of MAP4K3 in lifespan regulation of Caenorhabditiselegans

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Maruf H.; Hart, Matthew J.; Rea, Shane L.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of MAP4K3 by RNAi leads to increased mean lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation in the citron homology domain of MAP4K3 leads to increased mean lifespan. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation in the kinase domain of MAP4K3 has no significant effect on mean lifespan. -- Abstract: The TOR pathway is a kinase signaling pathway that regulates cellular growth and proliferation in response to nutrients and growth factors. TOR signaling is also important in lifespan regulation - when this pathway is inhibited, either naturally, by genetic mutation, or by pharmacological means, lifespan is extended. MAP4K3 is a Ser/Thr kinase that has recently been found to be involved in TOR activation. Unexpectedly, the effect of this protein is not mediated via Rheb, the more widely known TOR activation pathway. Given the role of TOR in growth and lifespan control, we looked at how inhibiting MAP4K3 in Caenorhabditiselegans affects lifespan. We used both feeding RNAi and genetic mutants to look at the effect of MAP4K3 deficiency. Our results show a small but significant increase in mean lifespan in MAP4K3 deficient worms. MAP4K3 thus represents a new target in the TOR pathway that can be targeted for pharmacological intervention to control lifespan.

  9. Experimental demonstration of the growth rate–lifespan trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Who-Seung; Monaghan, Pat; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesized negative relationship between growth rate and lifespan has proved very difficult to test robustly because of potentially confounding variables, particularly nutrient availability and final size. Here we provide, to our knowledge, the first rigorous experimental test of this hypothesis, and find dramatic changes in lifespan in the predicted direction in response to both upward and downward manipulations of growth rates. We used brief (less than 4% of median lifespan) exposure to relatively cold or warm temperatures early in life to deflect juvenile three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus from their normal growth trajectories; this induced catch-up or slowed-down growth when ambient temperatures were restored, and all groups attained the same average adult size. Catch-up growth led to a reduction in median lifespan of 14.5 per cent, while slowed-down growth extended lifespan by 30.6 per cent. These lifespan effects were independent of eventual size attained or reproductive investment in adult life. Photoperiod manipulations showed that the effects of compensatory growth on lifespan were also influenced by time available for growth prior to breeding, being more extreme when less time was available. These results demonstrate the growth–lifespan trade-off. While growing more slowly can increase longevity, the optimal resolution of the growth–lifespan trade-off is influenced by time constraints in a seasonal environment. PMID:23235704

  10. No Influence of Indy on Lifespan in Drosophila after Correction for Genetic and Cytoplasmic Background Effects

    PubMed Central

    Toivonen, Janne M; Walker, Glenda A; Martinez-Diaz, Pedro; Bjedov, Ivana; Driege, Yasmine; Jacobs, Howard T; Gems, David; Partridge, Linda

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether alterations in mitochondrial metabolism affect longevity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied lifespan in various single gene mutants, using inbred and outbred genetic backgrounds. As positive controls we included the two most intensively studied mutants of Indy, which encodes a Drosophila Krebs cycle intermediate transporter. It has been reported that flies heterozygous for these Indy mutations, which lie outside the coding region, show almost a doubling of lifespan. We report that only one of the two mutants lowers mRNA levels, implying that the lifespan extension observed is not attributable to the Indy mutations themselves. Moreover, neither Indy mutation extended lifespan in female flies in any genetic background tested. In the original genetic background, only the Indy mutation associated with altered RNA expression extended lifespan in male flies. However, this effect was abolished by backcrossing into standard outbred genetic backgrounds, and was associated with an unidentified locus on the X chromosome. The original Indy line with long-lived males is infected by the cytoplasmic symbiont Wolbachia, and the longevity of Indy males disappeared after tetracycline clearance of this endosymbiont. These findings underscore the critical importance of standardisation of genetic background and of cytoplasm in genetic studies of lifespan, and show that the lifespan extension previously claimed for Indy mutants was entirely attributable to confounding variation from these two sources. In addition, we saw no effects on lifespan of expression knockdown of the Indy orthologues nac-2 and nac-3 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:17571923

  11. Life-Span Learning: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The article discusses learning as embedded processes of development and aging, and as social activity over the life course. The concept of life-span learning is proposed and outlined to discuss these processes as aspects of and propositions in life-span development and aging theory. Life-span learning processes arise and continuously develop in a…

  12. Lifespan Extension by Preserving Proliferative Homeostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Supoyo, Stephen; DeGennaro, Matthew; Lehmann, Ruth; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative processes are critical to maintain tissue homeostasis in high-turnover tissues. At the same time, proliferation of stem and progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled to prevent hyper-proliferative diseases. Mechanisms that ensure this balance, thus promoting proliferative homeostasis, are expected to be critical for longevity in metazoans. The intestinal epithelium of Drosophila provides an accessible model in which to test this prediction. In aging flies, the intestinal epithelium degenerates due to over-proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and mis-differentiation of ISC daughter cells, resulting in intestinal dysplasia. Here we show that conditions that impair tissue renewal lead to lifespan shortening, whereas genetic manipulations that improve proliferative homeostasis extend lifespan. These include reduced Insulin/IGF or Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling activities, as well as over-expression of stress-protective genes in somatic stem cell lineages. Interestingly, proliferative activity in aging intestinal epithelia correlates with longevity over a range of genotypes, with maximal lifespan when intestinal proliferation is reduced but not completely inhibited. Our results highlight the importance of the balance between regenerative processes and strategies to prevent hyperproliferative disorders and demonstrate that promoting proliferative homeostasis in aging metazoans is a viable strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20976250

  13. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Role of Lamotrigine Augmentation to Anti-Depressant Medication in Winter Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Arshad; Shah, Majid Shafi; Roub, Fazl E; Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Wani, Zaid Ahmad; Jan, Mohd Muzzaffar; Wani, Rayees Ahmad; Bhat, Tariq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many therapeutic options have been evaluated and tried for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) including bright light therapy (BLT), anti-depressants, beta-blockers and psychotherapy, but the data supporting use of mood-stabilizing agents is just handful in spite of this condition being understood most frequently to be associated with bipolar affective disorder II (BPAD II). So we planned to study role of Lamotrigine (Mood stabilizing agent) in SAD. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of SAD who were prescribed lamotrigine in addition to antidepressant medications for a minimum of 8 weeks and were assessed for severity using HAM-D were selected retrospectively from the hospital records for this study. HAM-D scores at 2, 4 and 8 weeks were compared to baseline scores. Statistics Analysis: Single tailed t-test was used to study the difference of means to assess the therapeutic response and pre/post analysis of change. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Though no significant difference was seen in HAM-D Scores at 2 weeks of treatment compared to baseline, but results were statistically significant at 4 and 8 weeks of treatment with lamotrigine augmentation of antidepressant medications. Conclusion: We conclude that lamotrigine augmentation was found to be effective treatment strategy for managing winter depression phase of Seasonal Affective Disorder. PMID:26664074

  14. A fMRI evaluation of lamotrigine for the treatment of trigeminal neuropathic pain: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Steven; Wallin, Diana; Moulton, Eric A; Cole, Sadie; Wasan, Ajay D; Lockerman, Larry; Bajwa, Zahid; Upadhyay, Jaymin; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2010-06-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, we evaluated the effects of lamotrigine vs placebo in a double-blind 1:1 randomized trial. Six patients with neuropathic pain were recruited for the study. All subjects had baseline pain >4/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS) and allodynia to brush as inclusion criteria for the study. Patients underwent two fMRI sessions, with half of the subjects receiving placebo first and half receiving drug first (based on the blinding protocol). Lamotrigine decreased their average pain intensity level from 5.6 to 3.5 on a VAS. All subjects had brush, cold, and heat applied to the affected and mirror-unaffected sides of their face. The results show: 1) in a small cohort, lamotrigine had a significant effect on heat VAS but not on the other stimuli; and 2) contrast analysis of fMRI results for heat stimuli applied to the affected face for lamotrigine vs placebo produced an overall decrease in blood oxygen dependent level signal, suggesting a potential inhibitory effect of the drug on predominantly cortical regions (frontal, parietal, and temporal). PMID:20492571

  15. Effects of Lamotrigine on Hippocampal Activation in Corticosteroid-Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E. Sherwood; Zaidel, Liam; Allen, Greg; McColl, Roderick; Vazquez, Miguel; Ringe, Wendy K.

    2010-01-01

    Background An extensive animal literature suggests that stress or excessive corticosteroid exposure is associated with changes in hippocampal function and memory. These findings are pertinent to psychiatric disorders with elevated cortisol, Cushing’s disease and the millions of patients receiving prescription corticosteroids. In animals, agents that decrease glutamate release attenuate the effects of corticosteroids on the hippocampus. Minimal data are available on preventing or reversing the effects of corticosteroids on the human hippocampus. We previously reported improvement in memory in corticosteroid-treated patients given lamotrigine. In this report, we examined the impact of lamotrigine on task-related hippocampal activation in patients taking prescription corticosteroids. Methods A total of 28 outpatients taking long-term oral prednisone for medical conditions, such as renal transplant rejection, were randomized to lamotrigine or placebo for 24 weeks. Hippocampal activation in response to a visual memory task was assessed with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results Consistent with a reduction in glutamate release, the right posterior hippocampus showed a significant decrease in task-related activation in the lamotrigine group as compared to the placebo group. Limitations The modest sample size and an assessment period of only 24 weeks are study limitations. Conclusions Between-group differences in hippocampal activation were observed. The results suggest that an agent that modulates glutamate may modify the effects of long-term corticosteroid exposure on the human hippocampus. PMID:20580827

  16. Lamotrigine increases the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, Daniel; Strandberg, Joakim; Lindquist, Catarina; Asztely, Fredrik

    2011-01-26

    Antidepressant medication and electroconvulsive therapy stabilize mood symptoms and increase hippocampal neurogenesis. We examined whether lamotrigine, suggested to give rise to mood-stabilizing and antidepressant effects in addition to its antiepileptic properties, also increases the number of newborn cells in rat hippocampus. Rats (on day P21) received lamotrigine, valproate, or saline intraperitoneally once daily for 7 days. All animals received four intraperitoneal injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on day P28 and were sacrificed the next day. Quantification of BrdU-labeled cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus showed an increased number of newborn cells in rats receiving lamotrigine (42.6 ± 3.5 cells/slice) compared with valproate (31.6 ± 2.8) and controls (32.2 ± 3.1; P<0.05). The increased number of BrdU-labeled cells suggests increased neurogenesis, possibly explaining the mood-stabilizing and antidepressant effects of lamotrigine. PMID:21150803

  17. Direct nose-to-brain delivery of lamotrigine following intranasal administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2015-07-25

    Pharmacoresistance is considered one of the major causes underlying the failure of the anticonvulsant therapy, demanding the development of alternative and more effective therapeutic approaches. Due to the particular anatomical features of the nasal cavity, intranasal administration has been explored as a means of preferential drug delivery to the brain. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine administered by the intranasal route to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The high bioavailability achieved for intranasally administered lamotrigine (116.5%) underscored the fact that a substantial fraction of the drug has been absorbed to the systemic circulation. Nonetheless, the heterogeneous biodistribution of lamotrigine in different brain regions, with higher concentration levels attained in the olfactory bulb comparatively to the frontal cortex and the remaining portion of the brain, strongly suggest that lamotrigine was directly transferred to the brain via the olfactory neuronal pathway, circumventing the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it seems that intranasal route can be assumed as a suitable and valuable drug delivery strategy for the chronic treatment of epilepsy, also providing a promising alternative approach for a prospective management of pharmacoresistance. PMID:25979854

  18. Regulation of lifespan in Drosophila by modulation of genes in the TOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kapahi, Pankaj; Zid, Brian M; Harper, Tony; Koslover, Daniel; Sapin, Viveca; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-05-25

    In many species, reducing nutrient intake without causing malnutrition extends lifespan. Like DR (dietary restriction), modulation of genes in the insulin-signaling pathway, known to alter nutrient sensing, has been shown to extend lifespan in various species. In Drosophila, the target of rapamycin (TOR) and the insulin pathways have emerged as major regulators of growth and size. Hence we examined the role of TOR pathway genes in regulating lifespan by using Drosophila. We show that inhibition of TOR signaling pathway by alteration of the expression of genes in this nutrient-sensing pathway, which is conserved from yeast to human, extends lifespan in a manner that may overlap with known effects of dietary restriction on longevity. In Drosophila, TSC1 and TSC2 (tuberous sclerosis complex genes 1 and 2) act together to inhibit TOR (target of rapamycin), which mediates a signaling pathway that couples amino acid availability to S6 kinase, translation initiation, and growth. We find that overexpression of dTsc1, dTsc2, or dominant-negative forms of dTOR or dS6K all cause lifespan extension. Modulation of expression in the fat is sufficient for the lifespan-extension effects. The lifespan extensions are dependent on nutritional condition, suggesting a possible link between the TOR pathway and dietary restriction. PMID:15186745

  19. Regulation of Lifespan in Drosophila by Modulation of Genes in the TOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapahi, Pankaj; Zid, Brian M.; Harper, Tony; Koslover, Daniel; Sapin, Viveca; Benzer, Seymour

    2009-01-01

    Summary In many species, reducing nutrient intake without causing malnutrition extends lifespan [1-3]. Like DR (dietary restriction), modulation of genes in the insulin-signaling pathway, known to alter nutrient sensing, has been shown to extend lifespan in various species [1-4]. In Drosophila, the target of rapamycin (TOR) and the insulin pathways have emerged as major regulators of growth and size. Hence we examined the role of TOR pathway genes in regulating lifespan by using Drosophila. We show that inhibition of TOR signaling pathway by alteration of the expression of genes in this nutrient-sensing pathway, which is conserved from yeast to human, extends lifespan in a manner that may overlap with known effects of dietary restriction on longevity. In Drosophila , TSC1 and TSC2 (tuberous sclerosis complex genes 1 and 2) act together to inhibit TOR (target of rapamycin), which mediates a signaling pathway that couples amino acid availability to S6 kinase, translation initiation, and growth [5]. We find that overexpression of dTsc1, dTsc2, or dominant-negative forms of dTOR or dS6K all cause lifespan extension. Modulation of expression in the fat is sufficient for the lifespan-extension effects. The lifespan extensions are dependent on nutritional condition, suggesting a possible link between the TOR pathway and dietary restriction. PMID:15186745

  20. The Drosophila Insulin Receptor Independently Modulates Lifespan and Locomotor Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Michael; Achall, Rajesh; Shirras, Alan; Broughton, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Insulin/IGF-like signalling (IIS) pathway plays an evolutionarily conserved role in ageing. In model organisms reduced IIS extends lifespan and ameliorates some forms of functional senescence. However, little is known about IIS in nervous system ageing and behavioural senescence. To investigate this role in Drosophila melanogaster, we measured the effect of reduced IIS on senescence of two locomotor behaviours, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. Two long-lived fly models with systemic IIS reductions (daGAL4/UAS-InRDN (ubiquitous expression of a dominant negative insulin receptor) and d2GAL/UAS-rpr (ablation of insulin-like peptide producing cells)) showed an amelioration of negative geotaxis senescence similar to that previously reported for the long-lived IIS mutant chico. In contrast, exploratory walking in daGAL4/UAS-InRDN and d2GAL/UAS-rpr flies declined with age similarly to controls. To determine the contribution of IIS in the nervous system to these altered senescence patterns and lifespan, the InRDN was targeted to neurons (elavGAL4/UAS-InRDN), which resulted in extension of lifespan in females, normal negative geotaxis senescence in males and females, and detrimental effects on age-specific exploratory walking behaviour in males and females. These data indicate that the Drosophila insulin receptor independently modulates lifespan and age-specific function of different types of locomotor behaviour. The data suggest that ameliorated negative geotaxis senescence of long-lived flies with systemic IIS reductions is due to ageing related effects of reduced IIS outside the nervous system. The lifespan extension and coincident detrimental or neutral effects on locomotor function with a neuron specific reduction (elavGAL4/UAS-InRDN) indicates that reduced IIS is not beneficial to the neural circuitry underlying the behaviours despite increasing lifespan. PMID:26020640

  1. The Drosophila insulin receptor independently modulates lifespan and locomotor senescence.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohd Zamri Bin Haji; Hodges, Matt D; Boylan, Michael; Achall, Rajesh; Shirras, Alan; Broughton, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    The Insulin/IGF-like signalling (IIS) pathway plays an evolutionarily conserved role in ageing. In model organisms reduced IIS extends lifespan and ameliorates some forms of functional senescence. However, little is known about IIS in nervous system ageing and behavioural senescence. To investigate this role in Drosophila melanogaster, we measured the effect of reduced IIS on senescence of two locomotor behaviours, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. Two long-lived fly models with systemic IIS reductions (daGAL4/UAS-InRDN (ubiquitous expression of a dominant negative insulin receptor) and d2GAL/UAS-rpr (ablation of insulin-like peptide producing cells)) showed an amelioration of negative geotaxis senescence similar to that previously reported for the long-lived IIS mutant chico. In contrast, exploratory walking in daGAL4/UAS-InRDN and d2GAL/UAS-rpr flies declined with age similarly to controls. To determine the contribution of IIS in the nervous system to these altered senescence patterns and lifespan, the InRDN was targeted to neurons (elavGAL4/UAS-InRDN), which resulted in extension of lifespan in females, normal negative geotaxis senescence in males and females, and detrimental effects on age-specific exploratory walking behaviour in males and females. These data indicate that the Drosophila insulin receptor independently modulates lifespan and age-specific function of different types of locomotor behaviour. The data suggest that ameliorated negative geotaxis senescence of long-lived flies with systemic IIS reductions is due to ageing related effects of reduced IIS outside the nervous system. The lifespan extension and coincident detrimental or neutral effects on locomotor function with a neuron specific reduction (elavGAL4/UAS-InRDN) indicates that reduced IIS is not beneficial to the neural circuitry underlying the behaviours despite increasing lifespan. PMID:26020640

  2. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of ginger on the liver of epileptic female rats treated with lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Poorrostami, Ameneh; Farokhi, Farah; Heidari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug, widely used in the treatment of epilepsy; long-term use of this drug can cause hepatotoxicity. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) possesses antioxidant properties. In present research, the effect ofhydroalcoholic extract of ginger (HEG) on the liver of lamotrigine-treated epileptic rats was investigated Material and Methods: Forty-eight female Wistar rats were selected and allocated to 8 groups of 6 each. Group 1: Negative controls were treated with normal saline. Group 2: Positive controls were treated with lamotrigine (LTG) (10 mg/kg) daily by gavages for 4 consecutive weeks. Epilepsy was induced in treatment groups by i.p. injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) (40 mg/kg). Group 3: Epileptic group received normal saline (10 ml/kg). Group 4: Epileptic group was treated with LTG (10 mg/kg). Groups 5 and 6: Epileptic groups received HEG (50 and 100 mg/kg). Groups 7 and 8: Epileptic groups received LTG and HEG (50 and 100 mg/kg). At the end of 28 days, blood samples were drawn and their livers were processed for light microscopy. Results: The mean values of TG, CHOL, AST, and ALT activity significantly rose (p<0.01) in groups 2, 3, and 4, while in rats treated with HEG (groups 5, 6, 7, and 8), the levels of liver enzymes significantly decreased (p<0.05) compared with epileptic group treated with lamotrigine (group 4). Histopathological changes of liver samples were comparable with respective control. Conclusion: These results suggest that hydroalcoholic extract of ginger improves liver function in lamotrigine-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25068142

  3. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Roy G; Thompson, Kenneth W; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-12-15

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1-C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1-C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1-C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  4. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Roy G.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1–C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1–C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1–C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  5. Effects of acute and chronic treatment elicited by lamotrigine on behavior, energy metabolism, neurotrophins and signaling cascades in rats.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ribeiro, Karine F; Zappellini, Giovanni; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Gomes, Lara M; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Luciano, Thais F; Marques, Scherolin O; Streck, Emilio L; Souza, Cláudio T; Quevedo, João

    2011-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the behavioral and molecular effects of lamotrigine. To this aim, Wistar rats were treated with lamotrigine (10 and 20 mg/kg) or imipramine (30 mg/kg) acutely and chronically. The behavior was assessed using forced swimming test. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), Proteina Kinase B (PKB, AKT), glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) levels, citrate synthase, creatine kinase and mitochondrial chain (I, II, II-III and IV) activities were assessed in the brain. The results showed that both treatments reduced the immobility time. The BDNF were increased in the prefrontal after acute treatment with lamotrigine (20 mg/kg), and the BDNF and NGF were increased in the prefrontal after chronic treatment with lamotrigine in all doses. The AKT increased and Bcl-2 and GSK-3 decreased after both treatments in all brain areas. The citrate synthase and creatine kinase increased in the amygdala after acute treatment with imipramine. Chronic treatment with imipramine and lamotrigine (10 mg/kg) increased the creatine kinase in the hippocampus. The complex I was reduced and the complex II, II-III and IV were increased, but related with treatment and brain area. In conclusion, lamotrigine exerted antidepressant-like, which can be attributed to its effects on pathways related to depression, such as neurotrophins, metabolism energy and signaling cascade. PMID:22044672

  6. Lamotrigine Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Severe and Long-Term Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Tajes Alonso, María; de Leon, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The treatment recommendations in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after lack of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) include augmentation with other drugs, particularly clomipramine, a more potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI), or antipsychotics. We present two cases of response to lamotrigine augmentation in treatment-refractory OCD; each received multiple SRI trials over a >10-year period. The first patient had eleven years of treatment with multiple combinations including clomipramine and SSRIs. She had a >50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 29 to 14) by augmenting paroxetine (60 mg/day) with lamotrigine (100 mg/day). The second patient had 22 years of treatment with multiple combinations, including combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and risperidone. She had an almost 50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 30 to 16) and disappearance of tics by augmenting clomipramine (225 mg/d) with lamotrigine (200 mg/day). These two patients were characterized by lack of response to multiple treatments, making a placebo response to lamotrigine augmentation unlikely. Prospective randomized trials in treatment-resistant OCD patients who do not respond to combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and/or antipsychotics are needed, including augmentation with lamotrigine. Until these trials are available, our cases suggest that clinicians may consider lamotrigine augmentation in such treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:23936714

  7. Elucidating the Mechanism of Weissella-dependent Lifespan Extension in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Lim, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism whereby lactic acid bacteria extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans has previously been elucidated. However, the role of Weissella species has yet not been studied. We show that Weissella koreensis and Weissella cibaria significantly (p < 0.05) extend the lifespan of C. elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50 and induce the expression of several genes related to lifespan extension (daf-16, aak-2, jnk-1, sod-3 and hif-1). Oral administration of Weissella altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lowered the accumulation of lipofuscin and increased locomotor activity (which translates to a delay in ageing). Moreover, Weissella-fed C. elegans had decreased body sizes, brood sizes, ATP levels and pharyngeal pumping rates compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. Furthermore, mutations in sod-3, hif-1 or skn-1 did not alter lifespan extension compared with wild-type C. elegans. However, C. elegans failed to display lifespan extension in loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, aak-2 and jnk-1, which highlights the potential role of these genes in Weissella-induced longevity in C. elegans. Weissella species extend C. elegans lifespan by activating DAF-16 via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, which is related to stress response, and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-pathway that is activated by dietary restriction. PMID:26601690

  8. Lamotrigine-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome with Histologic Features of CD30+ Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Farid; Haber, Roger; Kechichian, Elio; Kamar, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a severe adverse drug reaction. It can present with clinical, paraclinical, and histological findings mimicking skin and/or systemic lymphomas. We report the first case of a lamotrigine-induced DRESS with histologic features of a cutaneous CD30+ lymphoma. The patient responded well to a tapering course of oral steroids. This case highlights the atypical presentation of a lamotrigine-induced DRESS/DIHS in the presence of a cutaneous and a lymph node CD30 + lymphocytic infiltrate mimicking systemic lymphoma. Pathologists and clinicians must be aware of this “lymphomatous” presentation of drug reactions. PMID:27057043

  9. Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) in an Adolescent Treated With Lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ginory, Almari; Chaney-Catchpole, Michelle; Demetree, Julie M; Mayol Sabatier, Laura M; Nguyen, Mathew

    2013-07-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity syndrome most commonly associated with antiepileptic agents, allopurinol, and sulfonamides. It is a severe adverse reaction associated with fever, rash, eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. We present the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian female with bipolar disorder type II and posttraumatic stress disorder treated with lamotrigine for a non-Food and Drug Administration-approved indication that developed DRESS syndrome at an initial dose higher than that recommended. Her symptoms were atypical in that she developed a rash with influenza-like symptoms that resolved after discontinuation of lamotrigine and returned 8 days later. She was hospitalized because of elevated liver enzymes and treated with corticosteroids. In patients presenting with rash and systemic symptoms, DRESS syndrome should be considered and treated appropriately to reduce mortality, which can be as high as 10%. Treatment includes withdrawal of the offending agent and corticosteroids. PMID:24052787

  10. An audit of lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate usage for epilepsy in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Brian; Crawford, Pamela

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this audit was to ascertain outcomes for people who had taken or who were still taking three "new generation" broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), namely lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate. Thirteen percent of people became seizure free and approximately, one-third had a reduction of greater than 50% in their seizures. Two-thirds of people were still taking their audit AED. In addition, approximately one-third of people with a learning disability derived substantial benefit, although the rate of seizure freedom was lower. All three AEDs were most successful at treating primary generalised epilepsy and least successful with symptomatic generalised epilepsy. With some reservations the data suggests that levetiracetam and topiramate are the most efficacious AEDs, but topiramate is the least well tolerated. These results mean consideration of a "general prescribing policy" is important when using and choosing these AEDs. We conclude that lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate are useful additions to the armamentarium of AEDs. PMID:16087359

  11. The evolution of senescence and post-reproductive lifespan in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Reznick, David; Bryant, Michael; Holmes, Donna

    2006-01-01

    The study of post-reproductive lifespan has been of interest primarily with regard to the extended post-menopausal lifespan seen in humans. This unusual feature of human demography has been hypothesized to have evolved because of the "grandmother" effect, or the contributions that post-reproductive females make to the fitness of their children and grandchildren. While some correlative analyses of human populations support this hypothesis, few formal, experimental studies have addressed the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan. As part of an ongoing study of life history evolution in guppies, we compared lifespans of individual guppies derived from populations that differ in their extrinsic mortality rates. Some of these populations co-occur with predators that increase mortality rate, whereas other nearby populations above barrier waterfalls are relatively free from predation. Theory predicts that such differences in extrinsic mortality will select for differences in the age at maturity, allocation of resources to reproduction, and patterns of senescence, including reproductive declines. As part of our evaluation of these predictions, we quantified differences among populations in post-reproductive lifespan. We present here the first formal, comparative study of the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan as a component of the evolution of the entire life history. Guppies that evolved with predators and that experienced high extrinsic mortality mature at an earlier age but also have longer lifespans. We divided the lifespan into three non-overlapping components: birth to age at first reproduction, age at first reproduction to age at last reproduction (reproductive lifespan), and age at last reproduction to age at death (post-reproductive lifespan). Guppies from high-predation environments live longer because they have a longer reproductive lifespan, which is the component of the life history that can make a direct contribution to individual fitness. We found no

  12. The Evolution of Senescence and Post-Reproductive Lifespan in Guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, David; Bryant, Michael; Holmes, Donna

    2006-01-01

    The study of post-reproductive lifespan has been of interest primarily with regard to the extended post-menopausal lifespan seen in humans. This unusual feature of human demography has been hypothesized to have evolved because of the “grandmother” effect, or the contributions that post-reproductive females make to the fitness of their children and grandchildren. While some correlative analyses of human populations support this hypothesis, few formal, experimental studies have addressed the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan. As part of an ongoing study of life history evolution in guppies, we compared lifespans of individual guppies derived from populations that differ in their extrinsic mortality rates. Some of these populations co-occur with predators that increase mortality rate, whereas other nearby populations above barrier waterfalls are relatively free from predation. Theory predicts that such differences in extrinsic mortality will select for differences in the age at maturity, allocation of resources to reproduction, and patterns of senescence, including reproductive declines. As part of our evaluation of these predictions, we quantified differences among populations in post-reproductive lifespan. We present here the first formal, comparative study of the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan as a component of the evolution of the entire life history. Guppies that evolved with predators and that experienced high extrinsic mortality mature at an earlier age but also have longer lifespans. We divided the lifespan into three non-overlapping components: birth to age at first reproduction, age at first reproduction to age at last reproduction (reproductive lifespan), and age at last reproduction to age at death (post-reproductive lifespan). Guppies from high-predation environments live longer because they have a longer reproductive lifespan, which is the component of the life history that can make a direct contribution to individual fitness. We found

  13. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis. PMID:25150682

  14. Calorie restriction does not elicit a robust extension of replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huberts, Daphne H E W; González, Javier; Lee, Sung Sik; Litsios, Athanasios; Hubmann, Georg; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2014-08-12

    Calorie restriction (CR) is often described as the most robust manner to extend lifespan in a large variety of organisms. Hence, considerable research effort is directed toward understanding the mechanisms underlying CR, especially in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the effect of CR on lifespan has never been systematically reviewed in this organism. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of replicative lifespan (RLS) data published in more than 40 different papers. Our analysis revealed that there is significant variation in the reported RLS data, which appears to be mainly due to the low number of cells analyzed per experiment. Furthermore, we found that the RLS measured at 2% (wt/vol) glucose in CR experiments is partly biased toward shorter lifespans compared with identical lifespan measurements from other studies. Excluding the 2% (wt/vol) glucose experiments from CR experiments, we determined that the average RLS of the yeast strains BY4741 and BY4742 is 25.9 buds at 2% (wt/vol) glucose and 30.2 buds under CR conditions. RLS measurements with a microfluidic dissection platform produced identical RLS data at 2% (wt/vol) glucose. However, CR conditions did not induce lifespan extension. As we excluded obvious methodological differences, such as temperature and medium, as causes, we conclude that subtle method-specific factors are crucial to induce lifespan extension under CR conditions in S. cerevisiae. PMID:25071164

  15. Bmk-1 regulates lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by activating hsp-16

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong; Xu, Xiangru; Niklason, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of aging is typically concerned with lifespan determination that is associated with alterations in expression levels or mutations of particular genes. Previous reports in C. elegans have shown that the bmk-1 gene has important functions in chromosome segregation, and this has been confirmed with its mammalian homolog, KIF11. However, this gene has never been implicated in aging or lifespan regulation. Here we show that the bmk-1 gene is an important lifespan regulator in worms. We show that reducing bmk-1 expression using RNAi shortens worm lifespan by 32%, while over-expression of bmk-1 extends worm lifespan by 25%, and enhances heat-shock stress resistance. Moreover, bmk-1 over-expression increases the level of hsp-16 and decreases ced-3 in C. elegans. Genetic epistasis analysis reveals that hsp-16 is essential for the lifespan extension by bmk-1. These findings suggest that bmk-1 may act through enhanced hsp-16 function to protect cells from stress and inhibit the apoptosis pathway, thereby conferring worm longevity. Though it remains unclear whether this is a distinct function from chromosomal segregation, bmk-1 is a potential new target for extension of lifespan and enhancement of healthspan. PMID:26299918

  16. Voluntary alcohol consumption and plasma beta-endorphin levels in alcohol preferring rats chronically treated with lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga; Bajer, Bartosz; Gorska, Dorota; Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Dyr, Wanda; Bieńkowski, Przemysław

    2015-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that lamotrigine, similarly to other antiepileptic drugs, may be useful in the therapy of alcohol dependence. The rationale for using lamotrigine in the treatment of alcohol addiction is based on its multiple mechanisms of action which include inhibition of voltage-sensitive sodium channels, modulation voltage-gated calcium currents and transient potassium outward current. However, the known mechanism of lamotrigine does not fully explain its efficacy in alcohol addiction therapy. For this reason we have decided to examine the effect of lamotrigine on the opioid system. Our previous studies showed that topiramate and levetiracetam (antiepileptic drugs) as well as the most effective drugs in alcohol addiction therapy i.e. naltrexone and acamprosate, when given repeatedly, all increased plasma beta endorphin (an endogenous opioid peptide) level, despite operating through different pharmacological mechanisms. It is known that low beta-endorphin level is often associated with alcohol addiction and also that alcohol consumption elevates the level of this peptide. This study aims to assess the effect of repeated treatment with lamotrigine on voluntary alcohol intake and beta-endorphin plasma level in alcohol preferring rats (Warsaw high preferring (WHP) rats). We observed a decrease in alcohol consumption in rats treated with lamotrigine. However we didn't observe significant changes in beta-endorphin level during withdrawal of alcohol, which may indicate that the drug does not affect the opioid system. We suppose that lamotrigine may be useful in alcohol dependence therapy and presents a potential area for further study. PMID:25449391

  17. Myc-Dependent Genome Instability and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Christina; Lee, Moonsook; Westerhof, Maaike; Milholland, Brandon; Spokony, Rebecca; Vijg, Jan; Secombe, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability. PMID:24040302

  18. Role of Sirtuins in Lifespan Regulation is Linked to Methylation of Nicotinamide

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Kathrin; Mansfeld, Johannes; Kuhlow, Doreen; Weimer, Sandra; Priebe, Steffen; Heiland, Ines; Birringer, Marc; Groth, Marco; Segref, Alexandra; Kanfi, Yariv; Price, Nathan L.; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Platzer, Matthias; Hoppe, Thorsten; Cohen, Haim Y.; Zarse, Kim; Sinclair, David A.; Ristow, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuins, a family of histone deacetylases, have a fiercely debated role in regulating lifespan. Contrasting recent observations, we here find that overexpression of sir-2.1, the orthologue of mammalian SirT1, does extend C. elegans lifespan. Sirtuins mandatorily convert NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM). We here find that NAM and its metabolite, 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), extend C. elegans lifespan, even in the absence of sir-2.1. We identify anmt-1 to encode a C. elegans orthologue of nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase (NNMT), the enzyme that methylates NAM to generate MNA. Disruption and overexpression of anmt-1 have opposing effects on lifespan independent of sirtuins, with loss of anmt-1 fully inhibiting sir-2.1-mediated lifespan extension. MNA serves as a substrate for a newly identified aldehyde oxidase, GAD-3, to generate hydrogen peroxide acting as a mitohormetic ROS signal to promote C. elegans longevity. Taken together, sirtuin-mediated lifespan extension depends on methylation of NAM, providing an unexpected mechanistic role for sirtuins beyond histone deacetylation. PMID:24077178

  19. Mitochondrial hormesis links low-dose arsenite exposure to lifespan extension

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Sebastian; Schmeisser, Kathrin; Weimer, Sandra; Groth, Marco; Priebe, Steffen; Fazius, Eugen; Kuhlow, Doreen; Pick, Denis; Einax, Jürgen W; Guthke, Reinhard; Platzer, Matthias; Zarse, Kim; Ristow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Arsenite is one of the most toxic chemical substances known and is assumed to exert detrimental effects on viability even at lowest concentrations. By contrast and unlike higher concentrations, we here find that exposure to low-dose arsenite promotes growth of cultured mammalian cells. In the nematode C. elegans, low-dose arsenite promotes resistance against thermal and chemical stressors and extends lifespan of this metazoan, whereas higher concentrations reduce longevity. While arsenite causes a transient increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in C. elegans, co-exposure to ROS scavengers prevents the lifespan-extending capabilities of arsenite, indicating that transiently increased ROS levels act as transducers of arsenite effects on lifespan, a process known as mitohormesis. This requires two transcription factors, namely DAF-16 and SKN-1, which employ the metallothionein MTL-2 as well as the mitochondrial transporter TIN-9.1 to extend lifespan. Taken together, low-dose arsenite extends lifespan, providing evidence for nonlinear dose-response characteristics of toxin-mediated stress resistance and longevity in a multicellular organism. PMID:23534459

  20. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  1. N-acylethanolamine signalling mediates the effect of diet on lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Held, Jason M; Vantipalli, Maithili C; Klang, Ida M; Graham, Jill B; Gibson, Bradford W; Lithgow, Gordon J; Gill, Matthew S

    2011-05-12

    Dietary restriction is a robust means of extending adult lifespan and postponing age-related disease in many species, including yeast, nematode worms, flies and rodents. Studies of the genetic requirements for lifespan extension by dietary restriction in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have implicated a number of key molecules in this process, including the nutrient-sensing target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway and the Foxa transcription factor PHA-4 (ref. 7). However, little is known about the metabolic signals that coordinate the organismal response to dietary restriction and maintain homeostasis when nutrients are limited. The endocannabinoid system is an excellent candidate for such a role given its involvement in regulating nutrient intake and energy balance. Despite this, a direct role for endocannabinoid signalling in dietary restriction or lifespan determination has yet to be demonstrated, in part due to the apparent absence of endocannabinoid signalling pathways in model organisms that are amenable to lifespan analysis. N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are lipid-derived signalling molecules, which include the mammalian endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamide. Here we identify NAEs in C. elegans, show that NAE abundance is reduced under dietary restriction and that NAE deficiency is sufficient to extend lifespan through a dietary restriction mechanism requiring PHA-4. Conversely, dietary supplementation with the nematode NAE eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamide not only inhibits dietary-restriction-induced lifespan extension in wild-type worms, but also suppresses lifespan extension in a TOR pathway mutant. This demonstrates a role for NAE signalling in ageing and indicates that NAEs represent a signal that coordinates nutrient status with metabolic changes that ultimately determine lifespan. PMID:21562563

  2. Extension of Drosophila melanogaster lifespan with a GPCR peptide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ja, William W.; West, Anthony P.; Delker, Silvia L.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Benzer, Seymour

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate signaling from extracellular ligands to intracellular signal transduction proteins1. Methuselah (Mth) is a class B (secretin-like) GPCR, a family typified by their large, ligand-binding, N-terminal extracellular domains2. Down-regulation of mth increases the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster3— inhibitors of Mth signaling would thus be expected to enhance longevity. We used mRNA display selection4,5 to identify high affinity (KD = 15 to 30 nM) peptide ligands that bind to the N-terminal ectodomain of Mth. The selected peptides are potent antagonists of Mth signaling, and structural studies suggest that they perturb the interface between the Mth ecto- and transmembrane (TM) domains. Flies constitutively expressing a Mth antagonist peptide exhibit a robust lifespan extension, suggesting that the peptides inhibit Mth signaling in vivo. Our work thus provides novel lifespan-extending ligands for a metazoan and a general approach for the design of modulators of this important class of GPCRs. PMID:17546039

  3. Lifespan of mice and primates correlates with immunoproteasome expression

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Andrew M.; Lehr, Marcus; Miller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    There is large variation in lifespan among different species, and there is evidence that modulation of proteasome function may contribute to longevity determination. Comparative biology provides a powerful tool for identifying genes and pathways that control the rate of aging. Here, we evaluated skin-derived fibroblasts and demonstrate that among primate species, longevity correlated with an elevation in proteasomal activity as well as immunoproteasome expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Immunoproteasome enhancement occurred with a concurrent increase in other elements involved in MHC class I antigen presentation, including β-2 microglobulin, (TAP1), and TAP2. Fibroblasts from long-lived primates also appeared more responsive to IFN-γ than cells from short-lived primate species, and this increase in IFN-γ responsiveness correlated with elevated expression of the IFN-γ receptor protein IFNGR2. Elevation of immunoproteasome and proteasome activity was also observed in the livers of long-lived Snell dwarf mice and in mice exposed to drugs that have been shown to extend lifespan, including rapamycin, 17-α-estradiol, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. This work suggests that augmented immunoproteasome function may contribute to lifespan differences in mice and among primate species. PMID:25866968

  4. Density functional theory, restricted Hartree - Fock simulations and FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic studies on lamotrigine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, T.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman spectra of lamotrigine have been recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The title compound is used as Antiepileptic drug. The optimized geometry, frequency, and intensities of the vibrational bands of the lamotrigine were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/631G** basis set and ab initio method at the restricted Hartree Fock/6-31** level. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural population analysis, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, infra red intensities and Raman scattering activities, force constant were calculated by DFT and RHF methods. The quality of lamotrigine under different storage containers were analyzed using UV-Vis spectral technique.

  5. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  6. Lamotrigine Augmentation Versus Placebo in Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhali, Mohammadrasoul; Zarrabi, Homa; Kafie, Moosa; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used in first-line treatments for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Nevertheless, many of these patients do not respond well to initial therapy. The hypothesis of glutamatergic dysfunction in specific brain regions has been proposed in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was designed to evaluate the possible efficacy of lamotrigine, a glutamatergic agent in Serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Method: This study was a 12-week, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive fixed-doses of lamotrigine (100 mg) to Serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eligible subjects who had a total Y-BOCS of 21 or above were randomly assigned to receive adjunctive treatment with either lamotrigine (n = 26), or placebo (n = 27). Response to lamotrigine was defined as clinical improvement (>25% decrease in the total Y-BOCS score), which was administered at weeks 0, 8 and 12. Results: At the endpoint (week 12), significant differences were observed in obsession, compulsion, and total Y-BOCS scores comparing lamotrigine to placebo (P = 0.01, 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). The mean reduction in obsession, compulsion and total scores in lamotrigine group was about 4.15, 4.50 and 8.73, respectively. Similarly, the mean reductions in the placebo group were 2.52, 2.56 and 5.07. Effect sizes for efficacy measureswerecalculatedbyCohen’sd, and it was calculated as 0.54 for the total YBOCS. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that this augmentation is well tolerated and may be an effective strategy for patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27437007

  7. Observation of neutral, ionic and intermediate states in lamotrigine-acid complexes- inference from crystallographic bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2014-09-01

    The anticonvulsant and antiepileptic drug lamotrigine was crystallized with three aromatic acids viz., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (I), para-toluenesulfonic acid (II) and 4-bromobenzoic acid (III), with the objective of understanding the formation of a salt or co-crystal in the solid state. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and FT-infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out for all of them. The asymmetric units of I and II contain two lamotriginium cations and two anions (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate in I and para-toluenesulfonate in II), respectively, and additionally II contains one water molecule. The asymmetric unit of III comprises one lamotriginium cation, one 4-bromobenzoate anion and one dimethylformamide (DMF) solvate. In all three complexes the protonation occurs at the N2 atom of the triazine ring. In I and II, the complete proton transfer is observed. However in III, only partial proton transfer is inferred from O to N because of the acidic H atom disorder. The protonation of lamotrigine is also confirmed by the unambiguous location of H atom from the difference Fourier map and as well as from the geometrical bond analysis. Further, various lamotrigine-acid complexes from the CSD were analyzed to establish a correlation between different ionization states (neutral, intermediate and ionic) and changes in the geometrical parameters. The bond angles of triazine ring in lamotrigine and bond distances of carboxylic acid are found to be the best descriptors for distinguishing all three ionization states, whereas, the bond angles of carboxylic acid have to failed to distinguish intermediate state from ionic. From hydrogen bonding point of view, only the lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon is observed in I and II, whereas in III, both lamotrigine-lamotrigine homosynthon and lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon are observed. In I, the cation-anion and anion-anion interactions form a supramolecular two-dimension hydrogen-bonded square grid network, while the water molecule

  8. Multisite, open-label, prospective trial of lamotrigine for geriatric bipolar depression: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Gildengers, Ariel; Jurdi, Rayan K Al; Gyulai, Laszlo; Cassidy, Kristin A; Greenberg, Rebecca L; Bruce, Martha L; Mulsant, Benoit H; Have, Thomas Ten; Young, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Aims This is a multisite, 12-week, open-label trial of lamotrigine augmentation in 57 older adults (≥ 60 years; mean ± SD age = 66.5 ± 6.7 years) with either type I or type II bipolar depression. Methods Primary outcome measure was change from baseline on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Secondary outcome measures included Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar version (CGI-BP), and the WHO-Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II). The Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) was used to assess side effects. Results A total of 77.2% of the study subjects had bipolar I disorder. The mean (SD) lamotrigine dose was 150.9 (68.5) mg/day. There was significant improvement in the MADRS, HAM-D, CGI-BP, and in most domains on the WHO-DAS II. For patients for whom final MADRS score was available: 31 (57.4%) met remission criteria and 35 (64.8%) met response criteria. There were 19/57 (33.3%) who dropped out of the study prematurely, with 6 dropouts due to adverse events (4 cases of rash, 1 manic switch, and 1 hyponatremia). Two cases of rash were possibly drug related and were resolved with drug discontinuation. The most common UKU adverse effects were reduced sleep duration (n = 14, 24.6%), weight loss (n = 12, 21.1%), increased dream activity (n = 12, 21.1%), polyuria/polydipsia (n = 11, 19.3%), weight gain (n = 9, 15.8%), diminished sexual desire (n = 9, 15.8%), increased sleep (n = 9, 15.8%), lassitude/fatigue (n = 8, 14%), and unsteady gait (n = 8, 14%). No significant changes in electrocardiogram or laboratory tests were observed. Conclusions In bipolar depressed elders, lamotrigine was associated with improvement in depression, psychopathology, and functional status. There was a moderate number of adverse events, although relationship of adverse events (particularly falls) to study medication could not be clearly determined in this uncontrolled trial. Controlled studies are needed to further

  9. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  10. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-08-31

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  11. Telomere length in early life predicts lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Heidinger, Britt J.; Blount, Jonathan D.; Boner, Winnie; Griffiths, Kate; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Monaghan, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of telomeres, the ends of eukaryote chromosomes, is thought to play an important role in cell deterioration with advancing age. The observed variation in telomere length among individuals of the same age is therefore thought to be related to variation in potential longevity. Studies of this relationship are hampered by the time scale over which individuals need to be followed, particularly in long-lived species where lifespan variation is greatest. So far, data are based either on simple comparisons of telomere length among different age classes or on individuals whose telomere length is measured at most twice and whose subsequent survival is monitored for only a short proportion of the typical lifespan. Both approaches are subject to bias. Key studies, in which telomere length is tracked from early in life, and actual lifespan recorded, have been lacking. We measured telomere length in zebra finches (n = 99) from the nestling stage and at various points thereafter, and recorded their natural lifespan (which varied from less than 1 to almost 9 y). We found telomere length at 25 d to be a very strong predictor of realized lifespan (P < 0.001); those individuals living longest had relatively long telomeres at all points at which they were measured. Reproduction increased adult telomere loss, but this effect appeared transient and did not influence survival. Our results provide the strongest evidence available of the relationship between telomere length and lifespan and emphasize the importance of understanding factors that determine early life telomere length. PMID:22232671

  12. Lamotrigine positively affects the development of psychiatric comorbidity in epileptic animals, while psychiatric comorbidity aggravates seizures.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Chimirri, Serafina; Aiello, Rossana; De Fazio, Salvatore; Leo, Antonio; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Marra, Rosario; Labate, Angelo; De Fazio, Pasquale; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-08-01

    Several clinical and preclinical studies have focused on the relationship between epilepsy and psychological disturbances. Although behavior in some experimental models of epilepsy has been studied, only few of them can be considered as models of epilepsy and mood disorder comorbidity. Since several models of epilepsy or psychiatric disorders are already available, we wondered whether a mixture of the two could experimentally represent a valid alternative to study such comorbidity. Here, we present a possible experimental protocol to study drug effects and physiopathogenesis of psychiatric comorbidity in epileptic animals. Pentylentetrazol-kindled animals were subjected to the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure; furthermore, we tested the effects of chronic lamotrigine treatment on the development of comorbidity. We found that epileptic-depressed animals showed more pronounced behavioral alterations in comparison to other mice groups, indicating that kindled animals develop more pronounced CMS-induced behavioral alterations than nonepileptic mice; lamotrigine was able to prevent the development of comorbidities such as anxiety, depression-like behavior, and memory impairment. PMID:23773980

  13. Role of the GH/IGF-1 axis in lifespan and healthspan: lessons from animal models

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Darlene E.; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Thorner, Michael O.

    2009-01-01

    Animal models are fundamentally important in our quest to understand the genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that contribute to human aging. In comparison to humans, relatively short-lived mammals are useful models as they allow for rapid assessment of both genetic manipulation and environmental intervention as related to longevity. These models also allow for the study of clinically relevant pathologies as a function of aging. Data associated with more distant species offers additional insight and critical consideration of the basic physiological processes and molecular mechanisms that influence lifespan. Consistently, two interventions, caloric restriction and repression of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin like growth factor-1/insulin axis, have been shown to increase lifespan in both invertebrates and vertebrate animal model systems. Caloric restriction (CR) is a nutrition intervention that robustly extends lifespan whether it is started early or later in life. Likewise, genes involved in the GH/IGF-1 signaling pathways can lengthen lifespan in vertebrates and invertebrates, implying evolutionary conservation of the molecular mechanisms. Specifically, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-like signaling and its downstream intracellular signaling molecules have been shown to be associated with lifespan in fruit flies and nematodes. More recently, mammalian models with reduced growth hormone (GH) and/or IGF-1 signaling have also been shown to have extended lifespans as compared to control siblings. Importantly, this research has also shown that these genetic alterations can keep the animals healthy and disease-free for longer periods and can alleviate specific age-related pathologies similar to what is observed for CR individuals. Thus, these mutations may not only extend lifespan but may also improve healthspan, the general health and quality of life of an organism as it ages. In this review, we will provide an overview of how the

  14. Dance Talent Development across the Lifespan: A Review of Current Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chua, Joey

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compile and synthesize empirically based articles published between 2000 and 2012 about the critical issues of developing dance talents across the lifespan of children, adolescents and adults. The present article updates and extends a review article related to the identification and development in dance written by…

  15. The determinants of lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: a short primer.

    PubMed

    Geanacopoulos, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Transparent, easily-maintained, amenable to genetic manipulation, and living for only a few weeks, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a leading animal model for the study of the determinants of lifespan. The original genetic screen for increased longevity identified a mutant, age-1, with a defect in one component of a signal transduction pathway. This pathway functioned as a genetic switch and governed the decision whether to enter a specialized larval form, dauer, that enables the worm to withstand the scarcity of food or other stressful conditions. These age-1 worms had an increased tendency to become dauers, but if they did not adopt the dauer developmental pathway, they lived longer than wild type worms. age-1 and other longevity mutants with dauer phenotypes are vigorous, indicating that they do not suffer from a significant energy deficit, and stress resistant. Mutation of genes encoding mitochondrial components was found to be another means of extending the lifespan of the worm, although the associated phenotypes suggest a deficiency of available energy. While there are now many documented genetic manipulations which can extend the worm's lifespan, it has been difficult to come to definite conclusions as to the mechanism(s) by which lifespan is extended. The most carefully studied mutant strains have complex changes in gene expression and metabolism making it difficult to ascertain what changes are critical. The free radical theory of aging is the dominant biochemical theory of aging, and the phenotypes of the well-characterized longevity mutants worm can be accommodated to it. However discrete interventions to lower reactive oxygen species, or mitigate their effects, have not produced consistent easily-interpretable results in terms of lifespan extension. It has become clear that the insulin-dependent signalling mechanism that regulates lifespan in the worm functions in the context of a complex endocrine system and the hormonal control of aging is an

  16. Lifespan extension of rotifers by treatment with red algal extracts

    PubMed Central

    Snare, David J.; Fields, Allison M.; Snell, Terry W.; Kubanek, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Aging results from an accumulation of damage to macromolecules inhibiting cellular replication, repair, and other necessary functions. Damage may be due to environmental stressors such as metal toxicity, oxidative stress caused by imperfections in electron transfer reactions, or other metabolic processes. In an effort to discover medical treatments that counteract this damage, we initiated a search for small molecule drugs from natural sources using life table experiments which, through their unbiased approach, present the opportunity to discover first-in-class molecules. We have identified marine red algae as a source of natural products that slow aging of the invertebrate rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Rotifers are a promising model organism for life extension studies as they maintain a short, measurable lifespan while also having an extensive literature related to aging. Rotifer lifespan was increased 9–14% by exposure to three of a total of 200 screened red algal extracts. Bioassay guided fractionation led to semi-purified extracts composed primarily of lipids responsible for rotifer life extension. The life extending mixture from the red alga Acanthophora spicifera contained eicosanoic, octadecanoic, and hexadecanoic acids as well as several unidentified unsaturated fatty acids. The life extending effects of these small molecule mixtures are not a result of their direct antioxidant capacity; other unknown mechanisms of action are likely involved. An understanding of how these natural products interact with their molecular targets could lead to selective and effective treatments for slowing aging and reducing age related diseases. PMID:24120568

  17. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters. PMID:27039311

  18. The thioredoxin TRX-1 regulates adult lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Barrios, Maria; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} First in vivo data for thioredoxin in dietary-restriction-(DR)-induced longevity. {yields} Thioredoxin (trx-1) loss suppresses longevity of eat-2 mutant, a genetic DR model. {yields} trx-1 overexpression extends wild-type longevity, but not that of eat-2 mutant. {yields} Longevity by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic DR model, requires trx-1. {yields} trx-1 expression in ASJ neurons of aging adults is increased in response to DD. -- Abstract: Dietary restriction (DR) is the only environmental intervention known to extend adult lifespan in a wide variety of animal models. However, the genetic and cellular events that mediate the anti-aging programs induced by DR remain elusive. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to provide the first in vivo evidence that a thioredoxin (TRX-1) regulates adult lifespan extension induced by DR. We found that deletion of the gene trx-1 completely suppressed the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2, a genetic surrogate of DR in the worm. However, trx-1 deletion only partially suppressed the long lifespan caused by mutation of the insulin-like receptor gene daf-2 or by mutation of the sensory cilia gene osm-5. A trx-1::GFP translational fusion expressed from its own promoter in ASJ neurons (Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP) rescued the trx-1 deletion-mediated suppression of the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2. This rescue was not observed when trx-1::GFP was expressed from the ges-1 promoter in the intestine. In addition, overexpression of Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP extended lifespan in wild type, but not in eat-2 mutants. trx-1 deletion almost completely suppressed the lifespan extension induced by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic, nutrient-based model of DR in the worm. Moreover, DD upregulated the expression of a trx-1 promoter-driven GFP reporter gene (Ptrx-1::GFP) in ASJ neurons of aging adults, but not that of control Pgpa-9::GFP (which is also expressed in ASJ neurons). We propose

  19. Enigma, a mitochondrial protein affecting lifespan and oxidative stress response in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mourikis, Philippos; Hurlbut, Gregory D.; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2006-01-01

    Deregulation of energy metabolism by external interventions or mutations in metabolic genes can extend lifespan in a wide range of species. We describe mutations in Drosophila melanogaster that confer resistance to oxidative stress and display a longevity phenotype. These phenotypes are associated with molecular lesions in a hitherto uncharacterized gene we named Enigma. We show that Enigma encodes a mitochondrial protein with homology to enzymes of the β-oxidation of fatty acids and that mutations in this locus affect lipid homeostasis. Our analysis provides further support to the notion that lipid metabolism may play a central role in metazoan lifespan regulation. PMID:16434470

  20. Extension of Drosophila Lifespan by Rhodiola rosea Depends on Dietary Carbohydrate and Caloric Content in a Simplified Diet.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Coskun, Volkan; Hogan, Sean P; Nguyen, Cindy T; Lopez, Terry E; Jafari, Mahtab

    2016-03-01

    The root and rhizome extract of Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used in traditional medicine to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. We also previously found that the extract can act independently of dietary restriction (DR), a treatment that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. Here, we report that the ability of R. rosea extract to extend lifespan in flies is dependent on the carbohydrate and caloric content when supplemented with a simplified diet composed of yeast and sucrose. R. rosea extract elevated the sugar content in flies and down-regulated hexokinase expression, suggesting that it perturbs carbohydrate metabolism in flies. In our previous studies, bananas, barley malt, and corn syrup provided dietary carbohydrates, and R. rosea extract could extend lifespan with a range of caloric levels. We conclude that the lifespan-extending effect of R. rosea extract in flies is dependent on dietary carbohydrate and caloric contents coupled with an interaction with complex dietary components present in bananas, barley, or corn. PMID:26987024

  1. Design of a novel bilayered gastric mucoadhesive system for localized and unidirectional release of lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Raghava Srivalli, K.; Lakshmi, P.K.; Balasubramaniam, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a BCS class II drug with pH dependent solubility. The bilayered gastric mucoadhesive tablets of lamotrigine were designed such that the drug and controlled release polymers were incorporated in the upper layer and the lower layer had the mucoadhesive polymers. The major ingredients selected for the upper layer were the drug and control release polymer (either HPMC K15M or polyox) while the lower MA layer predominantly comprised of Carbopol 974P. A 23 full factorial design was constructed for this study and the tablets were optimized for parameters like tablet size, shape, ex vivo mucoadhesive properties and unidirectional drug release. Oval tablets with an average size of 14 mm diameter were set optimum. Maximum mucoadhesive bond strength of 79.3 ± 0.91 * 103 dyn/cm2 was achieved with carbopol when used in combination with a synergistic resin polymer. All the tested formulations presented a mucoadhesion time of greater than 12 h. The incorporation of methacrylic polymers in the lower layer ensured unidirectional drug release from the bilayered tablets. The unidirectional drug release was confirmed after comparing the dissolution results of paddle method with those of a modified basket method. Model independent similarity and dissimilarity factor methods were used for the comparison of dissolution results. Controlled drug release profiles with zero order kinetics were obtained with polyox and HPMC K15M which reported t90% at 6th and 12th hours, respectively. The “n” value with polyox was 0.992 and that with HPMC K15M was 0.946 indicating an approximate case II transport. These two formulations showed the potential for oral administration of lamotrigine as bilayered gastric mucoadhesive tablets by yielding highest similarity factor values, 96.06 and 92.47, respectively, between the paddle and modified basket method dissolution release profiles apart from reporting the best tablet physical properties and maximum mucoadhesive strength. PMID

  2. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A; Hart, Anne C

    2016-03-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5'-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. PMID:26854551

  3. FET proteins regulate lifespan and neuronal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Martine; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dion, Patrick A.; Parker, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    The FET protein family includes FUS, EWS and TAF15 proteins, all of which have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Here, we show that a reduction of FET proteins in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans causes synaptic dysfunction accompanied by impaired motor phenotypes. FET proteins are also involved in the regulation of lifespan and stress resistance, acting partially through the insulin/IGF-signalling pathway. We propose that FET proteins are involved in the maintenance of lifespan, cellular stress resistance and neuronal integrity. PMID:27117089

  4. A lifespan view of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2011-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental changes over the lifespan, from childhood through adulthood into old age, have important implications for the onset, presentation, course, and treatment of anxiety disorders. This article presents data on anxiety disorders as they appear in older adults, as compared with earlier in life. In this article, we focus on aging-related changes in the epidemiology, presentation, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Also, this article describes some of the gaps and limitations in our understanding and suggests research directions that may elucidate the mechanisms of anxiety disorder development later in life. Finally we describe optimal management of anxiety disorders across the lifespan, in “eight simple steps” for practitioners. PMID:22275845

  5. Lamotrigine versus other antiepileptic drugs: a star rating system is born.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M J

    1994-01-01

    With the launching worldwide of a range of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the prescriber has a much wider choice than ever before. Comparative studies between new and established AEDs are few, and those between new AEDs are rarely performed. This report considers the strengths and weaknesses of nine new and established AEDs. Scores ranging from -2 to +2 are given under six headings: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, side effects, drug interactions, and a comfort factor. Perceived advantages and disadvantages in their clinical use are summarized and a final "star rating" produced for each. This process is illustrated by a detailed critique of lamotrigine (LTG). The star system is intended to stimulate dialogue among epileptologists in reaching a consensus in the pharmacologic management of the epileptic patient. PMID:8039470

  6. Do lamotrigine and levetiracetam solve the problem of using sodium valproate in women with epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Craig, John J

    2012-01-01

    Women with epilepsy, especially those of child-bearing age, are faced with difficult choices when it comes to choosing the most suitable antiepileptic drug (AED). This is particularly so for those with idiopathic generalized epilepsies, or those for whom seizure syndrome is not immediately apparent, where sodium valproate is still considered the drug of choice. While with treatment most might expect to become seizure free, without any adverse effects, other considerations for women mean that valproate is usually initially avoided, with other AEDs such as lamotrigine or levetiracetam being chosen in preference. Based on current information, this article attempts to provide an overview on whether or not the availability of these and other broad-spectrum AEDs have solved the difficulties of using valproate in women of child-bearing age.

  7. Formulation Development and evaluation of fast disintegrating tablets of Lamotrigine using liqui-solid technique

    PubMed Central

    Koteswari, Poluri; Sunium, Suvarnala; Srinivasababu, Puttugunta; Babu, Govada Kishore; Nithya, Pinnamraju Durga

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder. Lamotrigine is an alternative to lithium for the treatment of epilepsy, and its oral bioavailability is 98%; however, its poor aqueous solubility hinders its oral absorption. Among the techniques available to enhance the solubility, dissolution rate and bio availability of poorly soluble drugs, liqui-solid technique is a novel and promising approach. The objectives of the investigation are to formulate, optimize lamotrigine liqui-solid compacts using 23 factorial experiments, validate experimental designs statistically and to compare with the marketed tablets using similarity and difference factors. Materials and Methods: Based on solubility studies tween 20 as nonvolatile liquid, avicel pH 101 as a carrier and aerosil 200 as a coating material were used. Liquid load factor other flow and compression characteristics were determined for different ratios of carrier and coat materials. Suitable quantities of carrier and coat materials were taken, according to the experimental designs other excipients were added, liqui-solid tablets were prepared by direct compression and evaluated. Drug excipient compatibility was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The hardness, disintegration time and T75% were considered for validation of experimental designs. Results: The physicochemical properties of tablets such as hardness (1.5 ± 0.8–4.95 ± 0.96 kg), in vitro disintegration time (40 ± 20–320 ± 25 s) and Friability (0.39 ± 0.5–1.45 ± 0.2% also <1%) possess all the Indian pharmacopoeal requirements. The T75% was calculated and found to be 6.62–22.8 min. The rate of drug release followed first order kinetics. f1 and f2 values indicated the similarity in dissolution profiles between marketed and the optimized formulation and 63.64% similar with that of the marketed fast disintegrating tablets. FTIR studies revealed the absence of drug excipient incompatibility. PMID

  8. Mitochondria, cellular stress resistance, somatic cell depletion and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-03-01

    The causes of aging and determinants of maximum lifespan in animal species are multifaceted and complex. However, a wealth of experimental data suggests that mitochondria are involved both in the aging process and in regulating lifespan. Here we outline a somatic cell depletion (SCD) model to account for correlations between: (1) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lifespan; (2) mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and lifespan; (3) mitochondrial DNA mutation and lifespan and (4) cellular stress resistance and lifespan. We examine the available data from within the framework of the SCD model, in which mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death and gradual loss of essential somatic cells eventually contributes to the decline in physiological performance that limits lifespan. This model is useful in explaining many of the mitochondrial manipulations that alter maximum lifespan in a variety of animal species; however, there are a number of caveats and critical experiments outstanding, and these are outlined in this review. PMID:20021396

  9. Dimensions of Women's Health across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; Vamos, Sandra D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This teaching strategy provides students with an opportunity to promote women's health literacy via construction of a creative health information booklet. Students will be able to: (1) Identify health issues that affect women during one particular lifespan stage; (2) Categorize issues according to the seven dimensions of health; (3)…

  10. A Lifespan Perspective on Embodied Cognition.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Jonna; Raab, Markus; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2016-01-01

    Since its infancy embodied cognition research has fundamentally changed our understanding of how action, perception, and cognition relate to and interact with each other. Ideas from different schools of thought have led to controversial theories and a unifying framework is still being debated. In this perspective paper, we argue that in order to improve our understanding of embodied cognition and to take significant steps toward a comprehensive framework, a lifespan approach is mandatory. Given that most established theories have been developed and tested in the adult population, which is characterized by relatively robust and stable sensorimotor and cognitive abilities, we deem it questionable whether embodied cognition effects found in this population are representative for different life stages such as childhood or the elderly. In contrast to adulthood, childhood is accompanied by a rapid increase of sensorimotor and cognitive skills, and the old age by a decline of such capacities. Hence, sensorimotor and cognitive capacities, as well as their interactions, are more fragile at both extremes of the lifespan, thereby offering a unique window into the emergence of embodied cognition effects and age-related differences therein. A lifespan approach promises to make a major contribution toward a unifying and comprehensive theory of embodied cognition that is valid across the lifespan and 'gets better with age.' PMID:27313562

  11. Incidental Sequence Learning across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiermann, Brigitte; Meier, Beat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incidental sequence learning across the lifespan. We tested 50 children (aged 7-16), 50 young adults (aged 20-30), and 50 older adults (aged >65) with a sequence learning paradigm that involved both a task and a response sequence. After several blocks of practice, all age groups slowed down…

  12. Sources of Meaning through the Lifespan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Steven K.

    This study was conducted to investigate the sources of meaningful events across the lifespan. Both a quantitative approach and a qualitative approach were used to examine whether or not different measures reflected different domains of meaning and purpose. Subjects were 215 men and women, were classified in five developmental groupings: young…

  13. Interdisciplinary Handbook of Adult Lifespan Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Jan D., Ed.

    This book is divided into three parts: theories and models, learning in specific life contexts, and the influence of aging on learning. Chapters include: "Chaos Theory as a Framework for Understanding Adult Lifespan Learning" (John C. Cavanaugh, Lisa C. McGuire); "The Future Impact of the Communication Revolution" (Lynn Johnson); "The Educated…

  14. A Lifespan Perspective on Embodied Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Jonna; Raab, Markus; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2016-01-01

    Since its infancy embodied cognition research has fundamentally changed our understanding of how action, perception, and cognition relate to and interact with each other. Ideas from different schools of thought have led to controversial theories and a unifying framework is still being debated. In this perspective paper, we argue that in order to improve our understanding of embodied cognition and to take significant steps toward a comprehensive framework, a lifespan approach is mandatory. Given that most established theories have been developed and tested in the adult population, which is characterized by relatively robust and stable sensorimotor and cognitive abilities, we deem it questionable whether embodied cognition effects found in this population are representative for different life stages such as childhood or the elderly. In contrast to adulthood, childhood is accompanied by a rapid increase of sensorimotor and cognitive skills, and the old age by a decline of such capacities. Hence, sensorimotor and cognitive capacities, as well as their interactions, are more fragile at both extremes of the lifespan, thereby offering a unique window into the emergence of embodied cognition effects and age-related differences therein. A lifespan approach promises to make a major contribution toward a unifying and comprehensive theory of embodied cognition that is valid across the lifespan and ‘gets better with age.’ PMID:27313562

  15. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 3 Regulates Metabolism and Lifespan in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moritoh, Yusuke; Oka, Masahiro; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Hiroyuki; Iwachidow, Kimihiko; Fuse, Hiromitsu; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 3 (IP6K3) generates inositol pyrophosphates, which regulate diverse cellular functions. However, little is known about its own physiological role. Here, we show the roles of IP6K3 in metabolic regulation. We detected high levels of both mouse and human IP6K3 mRNA in myotubes and muscle tissues. In human myotubes, IP6K3 was upregulated by dexamethasone treatment, which is known to inhibit glucose metabolism. Furthermore, Ip6k3 expression was elevated under diabetic, fasting, and disuse conditions in mouse skeletal muscles. Ip6k3(-/-) mice demonstrated lower blood glucose, reduced circulating insulin, deceased fat mass, lower body weight, increased plasma lactate, enhanced glucose tolerance, lower glucose during an insulin tolerance test, and reduced muscle Pdk4 expression under normal diet conditions. Notably, Ip6k3 deletion extended animal lifespan with concomitant reduced phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein in the heart. In contrast, Ip6k3(-/-) mice showed unchanged skeletal muscle mass and no resistance to the effects of high fat diet. The current observations suggest novel roles of IP6K3 in cellular regulation, which impact metabolic control and lifespan. PMID:27577108

  16. Siglec receptors impact mammalian lifespan by modulating oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Flavio; Pearce, Oliver M T; Wang, Xiaoxia; Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Garcia, Javier O; Lin, Hongqiao; Fu, Xiaoming; Garcia-Bingman, Andrea; Secrest, Patrick; Romanoski, Casey E; Heyser, Charles; Glass, Christopher K; Hazen, Stanley L; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process that includes the lifelong accumulation of molecular damage, leading to age-related frailty, disability and disease, and eventually death. In this study, we report evidence of a significant correlation between the number of genes encoding the immunomodulatory CD33-related sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors (CD33rSiglecs) and maximum lifespan in mammals. In keeping with this, we show that mice lacking Siglec-E, the main member of the CD33rSiglec family, exhibit reduced survival. Removal of Siglec-E causes the development of exaggerated signs of aging at the molecular, structural, and cognitive level. We found that accelerated aging was related both to an unbalanced ROS metabolism, and to a secondary impairment in detoxification of reactive molecules, ultimately leading to increased damage to cellular DNA, proteins, and lipids. Taken together, our data suggest that CD33rSiglecs co-evolved in mammals to achieve a better management of oxidative stress during inflammation, which in turn reduces molecular damage and extends lifespan. PMID:25846707

  17. Siglec receptors impact mammalian lifespan by modulating oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Flavio; Pearce, Oliver MT; Wang, Xiaoxia; Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Garcia, Javier O; Lin, Hongqiao; Fu, Xiaoming; Garcia-Bingman, Andrea; Secrest, Patrick; Romanoski, Casey E; Heyser, Charles; Glass, Christopher K; Hazen, Stanley L; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process that includes the lifelong accumulation of molecular damage, leading to age-related frailty, disability and disease, and eventually death. In this study, we report evidence of a significant correlation between the number of genes encoding the immunomodulatory CD33-related sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors (CD33rSiglecs) and maximum lifespan in mammals. In keeping with this, we show that mice lacking Siglec-E, the main member of the CD33rSiglec family, exhibit reduced survival. Removal of Siglec-E causes the development of exaggerated signs of aging at the molecular, structural, and cognitive level. We found that accelerated aging was related both to an unbalanced ROS metabolism, and to a secondary impairment in detoxification of reactive molecules, ultimately leading to increased damage to cellular DNA, proteins, and lipids. Taken together, our data suggest that CD33rSiglecs co-evolved in mammals to achieve a better management of oxidative stress during inflammation, which in turn reduces molecular damage and extends lifespan. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06184.001 PMID:25846707

  18. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 3 Regulates Metabolism and Lifespan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moritoh, Yusuke; Oka, Masahiro; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Hiroyuki; Iwachidow, Kimihiko; Fuse, Hiromitsu; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 3 (IP6K3) generates inositol pyrophosphates, which regulate diverse cellular functions. However, little is known about its own physiological role. Here, we show the roles of IP6K3 in metabolic regulation. We detected high levels of both mouse and human IP6K3 mRNA in myotubes and muscle tissues. In human myotubes, IP6K3 was upregulated by dexamethasone treatment, which is known to inhibit glucose metabolism. Furthermore, Ip6k3 expression was elevated under diabetic, fasting, and disuse conditions in mouse skeletal muscles. Ip6k3−/− mice demonstrated lower blood glucose, reduced circulating insulin, deceased fat mass, lower body weight, increased plasma lactate, enhanced glucose tolerance, lower glucose during an insulin tolerance test, and reduced muscle Pdk4 expression under normal diet conditions. Notably, Ip6k3 deletion extended animal lifespan with concomitant reduced phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein in the heart. In contrast, Ip6k3−/− mice showed unchanged skeletal muscle mass and no resistance to the effects of high fat diet. The current observations suggest novel roles of IP6K3 in cellular regulation, which impact metabolic control and lifespan. PMID:27577108

  19. Resveratrol and food effects on lifespan and reproduction in the model crustacean Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsuk; Ansell, Christine M; Dudycha, Jeffry L

    2014-01-01

    Longevity is a highly variable life history trait and its variation is attributable to both genetic and environmental factors. Exploring well-known environmental factors in a new model system is a useful approach to explore taxonomic variation in plasticity of longevity. We examined responsiveness of the Daphnia pulex clone TCO to potentially related interventions that have been reported to extend lifespan: resveratrol and dietary restriction. First, we examined effects of resveratrol on lifespan and fecundity in TCO which were grown at moderate (12K cells Ankistrodesmus falcatus mL⁻¹) and high (20K cells A. falcatus mL⁻¹) food levels. We found no evidence for lifespan extension by resveratrol, but found a reduction of lifetime fecundity. The effect of resveratrol on fecundity was more pronounced early in life. We then conducted an additional life table to test the effect of dietary restriction on TCO. Surprisingly, reduced food level did not extend the lifespan of TCO, which contrasts with previous studies in D. pulex. Our results suggest that variation in the response to dietary restriction might be more common than previously thought. If resveratrol activates genes involved in the response to dietary restriction, genetic polymorphisms in dietary restriction will influence responses to resveratrol. Thus, this experiment suggests that careful re-examination of resveratrol effects using diverse genotypes is required. PMID:24133070

  20. Resveratrol and Food Effects on Lifespan and Reproduction in the Model Crustacean Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUNSUK; ANSELL, CHRISTINE M.; DUDYCHA, JEFFRY L.

    2014-01-01

    Longevity is a highly variable life history trait and its variation is attributable to both genetic and environmental factors. Exploring well-known environmental factors in a new model system is a useful approach to explore taxonomic variation in plasticity of longevity. We examined responsiveness of the Daphnia pulex clone TCO to potentially related interventions that have been reported to extend lifespan: resveratrol and dietary restriction. First, we examined effects of resveratrol on lifespan and fecundity in TCO which were grown at moderate (12K cells Ankistrodesmus falcatus mL−1) and high (20K cells A. falcatus mL−1) food levels. We found no evidence for lifespan extension by resveratrol, but found a reduction of lifetime fecundity. The effect of resveratrol on fecundity was more pronounced early in life. We then conducted an additional life table to test the effect of dietary restriction on TCO. Surprisingly, reduced food level did not extend the lifespan of TCO, which contrasts with previous studies in D. pulex. Our results suggest that variation in the response to dietary restriction might be more common than previously thought. If resveratrol activates genes involved in the response to dietary restriction, genetic polymorphisms in dietary restriction will influence responses to resveratrol. Thus, this experiment suggests that careful re-examination of resveratrol effects using diverse genotypes is required. PMID:24133070

  1. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed. PMID:25645391

  2. Neuroprotective effects of lamotrigine in global ischemia in gerbils. A histological, in vivo microdialysis and behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, A; Mahmood, R H; Wishart, T; Kanthan, R; Murabit, M A; Ijaz, S; Miyashita, H; Howlett, W

    1995-12-01

    A sudden surge in the release of glutamate is currently believed to be an important initiating step in neuronal damage due to an ischemic insult. In this experiment, we tested the efficacy of neuroprotection with lamotrigine, a novel antiepileptic drug that blocks voltage gated sodium channels and inhibits the ischemia-induced release of glutamate in the gerbil forebrain model of cerebral ischemia. The medication was administered 30 min before and 30 min after the insult in two groups of animals. Histological assessment of neuronal damage was evaluated at 7 and 28 days after the ischemic insult. Animals evaluated at 28 days also underwent behavioral testing. Microdialysis was used in the same model to study the response of ischemia-induced glutamate in saline treated controls versus animals treated with lamotrigine 20 min before the insult. There was highly significant neuronal protection in animals who were treated with lamotrigine either before or after the insult. Protection was seen both at 7 and 28 days after the insult. Behavioral testing also showed significantly better recovery in both sets of animals in comparison to the saline-treated group. Microdialysis confirmed a significant attenuation of the ischemia-induced glutamate surge when compared to the saline-treated animals. Our morphological, behavioral and microdialysis experiments show that lamotrigine offers significant neuroprotection from the effects of transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Neuroprotection with post-ischemic therapy probably depends on preserving the capacity of the sodium/calcium exchanger to reduce intracellular calcium concentrations or persistent 'toxicity' of glutamate in the reperfusion period on the already 'primed' injured neurons. These concepts need further study. PMID:8846077

  3. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by cinnamon through a sex-specific dependence on the insulin receptor substrate chico

    PubMed Central

    Schriner, Samuel E.; Kuramada, Steven; Lopez, Terry E.; Truong, Stephanie; Pham, Andrew; Jafari, Mahtab

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamon is a spice commonly used worldwide to flavor desserts, fruits, cereals, breads, and meats. Numerous health benefits have been attributed to its consumption, including the recent suggestion that it may decrease blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Insulin signaling is an integral pathway regulating the lifespan of laboratory organisms, such as worms, flies, and mice. We posited that if cinnamon truly improved the clinical signs of diabetes in people that it would also act on insulin signaling in laboratory organisms and increase lifespan. We found that cinnamon did extend lifespan in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. However, it had no effect on the expression levels of the 3 aging-related Drosophila insulin-like peptides nor did it alter sugar, fat, or soluble protein levels, as would be predicted. In addition, cinnamon exhibited no protective effects in males against oxidative challenges. However, in females it did confer a protective effect against paraquat, but sensitized them to iron. Cinnamon provided no protective effect against desiccation and starvation in females, but sensitized males to both. Interestingly, cinnamon protected both sexes against cold, sensitized both to heat, and elevated HSP70 expression levels. We also found that cinnamon required the insulin receptor substrate to extend lifespan in males, but not females. We conclude that cinnamon does not extend lifespan by improving stress tolerance in general, though it does act, at least in part, through insulin signaling. PMID:25456850

  4. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by cinnamon through a sex-specific dependence on the insulin receptor substrate chico.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Kuramada, Steven; Lopez, Terry E; Truong, Stephanie; Pham, Andrew; Jafari, Mahtab

    2014-12-01

    Cinnamon is a spice commonly used worldwide to flavor desserts, fruits, cereals, breads, and meats. Numerous health benefits have been attributed to its consumption, including the recent suggestion that it may decrease blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Insulin signaling is an integral pathway regulating the lifespan of laboratory organisms, such as worms, flies, and mice. We posited that if cinnamon truly improved the clinical signs of diabetes in people that it would also act on insulin signaling in laboratory organisms and increase lifespan. We found that cinnamon did extend lifespan in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. However, it had no effect on the expression levels of the 3 aging-related Drosophila insulin-like peptides nor did it alter sugar, fat, or soluble protein levels, as would be predicted. In addition, cinnamon exhibited no protective effects in males against oxidative challenges. However, in females it did confer a protective effect against paraquat, but sensitized them to iron. Cinnamon provided no protective effect against desiccation and starvation in females, but sensitized males to both. Interestingly, cinnamon protected both sexes against cold, sensitized both to heat, and elevated HSP70 expression levels. We also found that cinnamon required the insulin receptor substrate to extend lifespan in males, but not females. We conclude that cinnamon does not extend lifespan by improving stress tolerance in general, though it does act, at least in part, through insulin signaling. PMID:25456850

  5. Ontogenetic patterns in the dreams of women across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Dale, Allyson; Lortie-Lussier, Monique; De Koninck, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The present study supports and extends previous research on the developmental differences in women's dreams across the lifespan. The participants included 75 Canadian women in each of 5 age groups from adolescence to old age including 12-17, 18-24, 25-39, 40-64, and 65-85, totaling 375 women. One dream per participant was scored by two independent judges using the method of content analysis. Trend analysis was used to determine the ontogenetic pattern of the dream content categories. Results demonstrated significant ontogenetic decreases (linear trends) for female and familiar characters, activities, aggression, and friendliness. These patterns of dream imagery reflect the waking developmental patterns as proposed by social theories and recognized features of aging as postulated by the continuity hypothesis. Limitations and suggestions for future research including the examining of developmental patterns in the dreams of males are discussed. PMID:26433930

  6. [Changes in prescription patterns to patients with bipolar syndromes. Increased use of lamotrigine and decreased use of lithium].

    PubMed

    Karanti, Alina; Kardell, Mathias; Lundberg, Ulrika; Landén, Mikael

    Lithium is a first line option in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, but several alternative treatment regimens have been introduced in recent years, among them treatment with antiepileptic compounds and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Little is known about if and how this has changed the prescription patterns of mood stabilizers. We analysed trends in prescription of mood stabilisers in Sweden using the national quality register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR), the Prescribed Drug Register, and the Patient Register during the years 2007-2011. We found that lithium use decreased while lamotrigine use increased in bipolar patients. These changes could not be ex-plained by differences in bipolar subtypes; lithium use decreased in both bipolar type I and type II, and the use of lamotrigine increased in bipolar type II. Lithium use was more common in men, whereas lamotrigine use was more common in women. The prescription of other mood stabilisers did not change during these years.  PMID:25514669

  7. Fate of carbamazepine, its metabolites, and lamotrigine in soils irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Sorption, leaching and plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Paz, Anat; Tadmor, Galit; Malchi, Tomer; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-10-01

    Irrigation with reclaimed wastewater may result in the ubiquitous presence of pharmaceutical compounds (PCs) and their metabolites in the agroecosystem. In this study, we focused on two highly persistent anticonvulsant drugs, lamotrigine and carbamazepine and two of its metabolites (EP-CBZ and DiOH-CBZ), aiming to elucidate their behavior in agricultural ecosystem using batch and lysimeter experiments. Sorption of the studied compounds by soils was found to be governed mainly by the soil organic matter level. Sorption affinity of compounds to soils followed the order lamotrigine > carbamazepine > EP-CBZ > DiOH-CBZ. Sorption was reversible, and no competition between sorbates in bi-solute systems was observed. The results of the lysimeter studies were in accordance with batch experiment findings, demonstrating accumulation of lamotrigine and carbamazepine in top soil layers enriched with organic matter. Detection of carbamazepine and one of its metabolites in rain-fed wheat previously irrigated with reclaimed wastewater, indicates reversibility of their sorption, resulting in their potential leaching and their availability for plant uptake. This study demonstrates the long-term implication of introduction of PCs to the agroecosystem. PMID:27351902

  8. Sex differences and stress across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Bale, Tracy L; Epperson, C Neill

    2015-10-01

    Sex differences in stress responses can be found at all stages of life and are related to both the organizational and activational effects of gonadal hormones and to genes on the sex chromosomes. As stress dysregulation is the most common feature across neuropsychiatric diseases, sex differences in how these pathways develop and mature may predict sex-specific periods of vulnerability to disruption and increased disease risk or resilience across the lifespan. The aging brain is also at risk to the effects of stress, where the rapid decline of gonadal hormones in women combined with cellular aging processes promote sex biases in stress dysregulation. In this Review, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms driving sex differences in stress responses and their relevance to disease. Although stress is involved in a much broader range of diseases than neuropsychiatric ones, we highlight here this area and its examples across the lifespan. PMID:26404716

  9. Sex differences and stress across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Tracy L; Epperson, C Neill

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in stress responses can be found at all stages of life and are related to both the organizational and activational effects of gonadal hormones and to genes on the sex chromosomes. As stress dysregulation is the most common feature across neuropsychiatric diseases, sex differences in how these pathways develop and mature may predict sex-specific periods of vulnerability to disruption and increased disease risk or resilience across the lifespan. The aging brain is also at risk to the effects of stress, where the rapid decline of gonadal hormones in women combined with cellular aging processes promote sex biases in stress dysregulation. In this Review, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms driving sex differences in stress responses and their relevance to disease. Although stress is involved in a much broader range of diseases than neuropsychiatric ones, we highlight here this area and its examples across the lifespan. PMID:26404716

  10. Pharmacological evidence for the involvement of the NMDA receptor and nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ahangari, Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Chamanara, Mohsen; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant agent that shows clinical antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) synthesis in possible antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine in forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Intraperitoneal administration of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the FST (P<0.01) without any effect on locomotor activity in the open-field test (OFT), while higher dose of lamotrigine (30mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST (P<0.001) as well as the number of crossings in the OFT. Pretreatment of animals with NMDA (75mg/kg), l-arginine (750mg/kg, a substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, a phosphodiesterase [PDE] 5 inhibitor) reversed the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine (10mg/kg) in the FST. Injection of l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, a neuronal NOS inhibitor), methylene blue (20mg/kg, an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]), or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg) as NMDA receptor antagonists in combination with a sub-effective dose of lamotrigine (5mg/kg) diminished the immobility time of animals in the FST compared with either drug alone. None of the drugs produced significant effects on the locomotor activity in the OFT. Based on our findings, it is suggested that the antidepressant-like effect of lamotrigine might mediated through inhibition of either NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP synthesis. PMID:27470415

  11. Intersex effect of lamotrigine on the pharmacokinetic parameters of CDRI-97/78, a novel trioxane antimalarial compound, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, H N; Gautam, N; Misra, A; Singh, B; Kumar, S; Siddiqui, H H; Singh, S K

    2012-06-01

    Reports regarding drug toxicity and adverse events resulting from coadministration of multiple drugs are increasing at an alarming rate. CDRI-97/78 is an 1,2,4-trioxane antimalarial agent under development which gets metabolized to the in vivo active metabolite 97/63. In order to assess its drug interaction potential, CDRI-97/78 was administered alone and in combination with lamotrigine to male and female rats via the oral route. Quantification of the active metabolite 97/63 in rat plasma was achieved with an LC-MS/MS assay. After oral administration of 97/78, the Tmax and Cmax values of 97/63 in male rats were 1.75±0.77 h and 862±306 ng/mL while female rats showed values for Cmax of 622.75±95.09 ng/mL and for Tmax of 7.5±0.5 h. Coadministration of 97/78 and lamotrigine resulted in decreased Tmax and Cmax values in both male and female rats (Tmax and Cmax of 0.77±0.16 h and 58.58±6.43 ng/mL in male rats; 1.13±0.22 h and 62.95±12.00 ng/mL in female rats, respectively). A statistically significant difference (P<0.05) was observed for the pharmacokinetic parameters of 97/63 after oral administration of 97/78 alone and upon its coadministration with lamotrigine except for the Cmax and Tmax values in male and for the T1/2 value in female rats. Statistically, no significant difference for the pharmacokinetic parameters of 97/63 between male and female rats after oral administration of 97/78 alone or in combination with lamotrigine was determined except for Tmax. The study indicates that coadministration of 97/78, an antimalarial agent, and the antiepileptic lamotrigine may require dose adjustments. Additional clinical drug interaction trials may be required to confirm these findings. PMID:22508175

  12. Why do the well-fed appear to die young? A new evolutionary hypothesis for the effect of dietary restriction on lifespan.

    PubMed

    Adler, Margo I; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2014-05-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) famously extends lifespan and reduces fecundity across a diverse range of species. A prominent hypothesis suggests that these life-history responses evolved as a survival-enhancing strategy whereby resources are redirected from reproduction to somatic maintenance, enabling organisms to weather periods of resource scarcity. We argue that this hypothesis is inconsistent with recent evidence and at odds with the ecology of natural populations. We consider a wealth of molecular, medical, and evolutionary research, and conclude that the lifespan extension effect of DR is likely to be a laboratory artifact: in contrast with captivity, most animals living in natural environments may fail to achieve lifespan extension under DR. What, then, is the evolutionary significance of the suite of responses that extend lifespan in the laboratory? We suggest that these responses represent a highly conserved nutrient recycling mechanism that enables organisms to maximize immediate reproductive output under conditions of resource scarcity. PMID:24609969

  13. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Anika E.; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies. PMID:26375250

  14. Lifespan extension and elevated hsp gene expression in Drosophila caused by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanmei; Sun, Hui; Lu, Jun; Li, Xiaoxue; Chen, Xia; Tao, Dan; Huang, Weifeng; Huang, Baiqu

    2005-02-01

    The heat shock proteins (Hsps) play a positive role in lifespan determination, and histone acetylation has been shown to be involved in transcription of hsp genes in Drosophila. To further determine if hsp22 and hsp70 expression is correlated with lifespan, and if histone acetylation participates in this process, RNA levels for hsp22 and hsp70 were analyzed throughout the lifespan in the long-lived and short-lived iso-female lines. The results showed that hsp22 and hsp70 RNA levels were higher in long-lived line than in short-lived line and that the long-lived flies responded more rapidly to heat but were more tolerant to high temperature. Moreover, we investigated the influences of histone acetylation modification on longevity and on hsp gene expression by using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors TSA and BuA. The results demonstrated that both inhibitors were able to extend the lifespan and promote hsp22 and hsp70 expression. However, the optimal concentrations of these inhibitors, and probably the mechanisms of their actions, vary with the genetic background. In addition, we showed that HDAC inhibitors caused the hyperacetylation of core histone H3, implicating the involvement of chromatin modulation in hsp gene transcription. These data suggested a close correlation among histone acetylation, hsp gene expression and longevity in D. melanogaster. PMID:15695762

  15. A Mitochondrial ATP synthase Subunit Interacts with TOR Signaling to Modulate Protein Homeostasis and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wheeler, Charles T.; Yolitz, Jason; Laslo, Mara; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Yaning; Song, Qisheng; Zou, Sige

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Diet composition is a critical determinant of lifespan and nutrient imbalance is detrimental health. However, how nutrients interact with genetic factors to modulate lifespan remains elusive. We investigated how diet composition influences mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit d (ATPsyn-d) in modulating lifespan in Drosophila. ATPsyn-d knockdown extended lifespan in females fed low carbohydrate-to-protein (C:P) diets, but not the high C:P ratio diet. This extension was associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress, transcriptional changes in metabolism, proteostasis and immune genes, reduced protein damage and aggregation, and reduced phosphorylation of S6K and ERK in TOR and MAPK signaling, respectively. ATPsyn-d knockdown did not extend lifespan in females with reduced TOR signaling induced genetically by Tsc2 overexpression or pharmacologically by rapamycin. Our data reveal a link among diet, mitochondria, MAPK and TOR signaling in aging and stresses the importance of considering genetic background and diet composition in implementing interventions for promoting healthy aging. PMID:25220459

  16. Stress resistance and lifespan are increased in C. elegans but decreased in S. cerevisiae by mafr-1/maf1 deletion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ying; Wei, Yue-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Maf1 is a conserved effector of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), an aging promoting kinase. However, whether Maf1 is required for lifespan extension caused by mTOR inhibition, such as dietary restriction (DR) or calorie restriction (CR) remains elusive. Here we show that deletion of maf1 in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae but not mafr-1 in C. elegans prevents DR or CR to extend lifespan. Interestingly, mafr-1 deletion increases stress tolerance and extends lifespan. MAFR-1 is phosphorylated in a mTOR-dependent manner and mafr-1 deletion alleviates the inhibition of tRNA synthesis caused by reduced mTOR activity. We find that the opposite effect of mafr-1 deletion on lifespan is due to an enhancement of stress response, including oxidative stress response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and autophagy. mafr-1 deletion also attenuates the paralysis of a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease. Our study reveals distinct mechanisms of lifespan regulation by Maf1 and MAFR-1. PMID:26934328

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Lamotrigine: Effects on Postnatal Development and Behaviour in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sathiya, Sekar; Ganesh, Murugan; Kalaivani, Periyathambi; Ranju, Vijayan; Janani, Srinivasan; Pramila, Bakthavachalam; Saravana Babu, Chidambaram

    2014-01-01

    Use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in pregnancy warrants various side effects and also deleterious effects on fetal development. The present study was carried out to assess the effects of prenatal exposure to lamotrigine (LTG) on postnatal development and behavioural alterations of offspring. Adult male and female Sprague Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g b. wt. were allowed to copulate and pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal cytology. Pregnant rats were treated with LTG (11.5, 23, and 46 mg/kg, p.o) from gestational day 3 (GND 3) and this treatment continued till postnatal day 11 (PND 11). Offspring were separated from their dam on day 21 following parturition. LTG, at 46 mg/kg, p.o, produced severe clinical signs of toxicity leading to death of dam between GND 15 and 17. LTG, at 11.5 and 23 mg/kg, p.o, showed significant alterations in offspring's incisors eruption and vaginal opening when compared to age matched controls. LTG (23 mg/kg, p.o) exposed female offspring expressed hyperactive behaviour and decreased GABA-A receptor expression when compared to control rats. These results reveal that prenatal exposure to LTG may impart differential postnatal behavioural alterations between male and female rats which paves way for further investigations. PMID:24967313

  18. Lamotrigine kidney distribution in male rats following a single intraperitoneal dose.

    PubMed

    Castel-Branco, M M; Falcão, A C; Figueiredo, I V; Macedo, T R A; Caramona, M M

    2004-02-01

    As it has been previously shown that lamotrigine (LTG) accumulates in the kidney of male rats, the purpose of the present investigation was to characterize the kidney profiles of LTG and its kidney distribution pattern in male rats, in order to confirm if a preferential distribution exists and to analyse if it does or does not affect the LTG systemic pharmacokinetics. Adult male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of LTG. The concentration-time profiles of LTG in plasma and whole kidney were determined over 120 h postdose. The distribution of LTG in the rat kidney was investigated in another group of rats by measuring LTG levels in the renal cortex and medulla. The LTG plasma concentration-time profiles revealed a linear relationship with dose. However, a slight increase in the LTG elimination half-life with dose was observed. In contrast, a nonlinear relationship was established between LTG kidney levels and the dose administered. Consequently, nonparallel patterns were observed between LTG plasma and kidney profiles. The LTG kidney distribution pattern revealed an accumulation of LTG in the renal cortex. The present study demonstrated that LTG distributes preferentially to the kidneys of the male rat in a dose-dependent manner and suggests that such distribution may slightly affect the systemic kinetics of the drug. PMID:14748754

  19. Valproic Acid versus Lamotrigine as First-line Monotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Idiopathic Generalized Tonic –Clonic Seizures in Adults – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Om Prakash; Khan, Farhan Ahmad; Kumar, Narendra; Kumar, Ajay; Haque, Ataul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (GTCS) are frequently encountered in adults. Their successful control is necessary to improve the quality of life of these patients. Valproic acid is a simple branched-chain carboxylic acid and lamotrigine is a phenyltriazine derivative. Opinions differ in regards to their effectiveness in idiopathic GTCS. Aim To compare the effectiveness of valproic acid and lamotrigine in newly diagnosed adults with idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Materials and Methods The present prospective randomized study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from idiopathic GTCS. Thirty patients received valproic acid and rest 30 patients received lamotrigine. All patients were followed regularly monthly for one year for treatment response and adverse effects. Results After 12 months follow-up, 76.67% patients taking valproic acid and 56.67% patients taking lamotrigine were seizure-free. Common adverse effects recorded were nausea, dyspepsia, headache and skin rash. Conclusion Valproic acid is more effective than lamotrigine as first-line drug in the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

  20. Simultaneous extraction and quantification of lamotrigine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples using solidified floating organic drop microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Abbasi, Bijan

    2015-07-01

    A novel and simple method based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples. Factors affecting microextraction efficiency such as the type and volume of the extraction solvent, sample pH, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and sample volume were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. extraction solvent, 1-undecanol (40 μL); sample pH, 8.0; temperature, 25°C; stirring rate, 500 rpm; sample volume, 7 mL; potassium chloride concentration, 5% and extraction time, 50 min), the limits of detection for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were 1.0, 0.1, and 0.3 μg/L, respectively. Also, the calibration curves for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were linear in the concentration range of 2.0-300.0, 0.3-200.0, and 1.0-200.0 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations for six replicate extractions and determinations of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin at 50 μg/L level were less than 4.6%. The method was successfully applied to determine phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in plasma and urine samples. PMID:25953277

  1. The novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala (TA) significantly enhances the lifespan and healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhao, Y; Wang, X; Lin, R; Zhang, Y; Ma, H; Guo, Y; Xu, L; Zhao, B

    2016-04-20

    Food-derived bioactive peptides may have various physiological modulatory and regulatory functions and are now being studied extensively. Recently, the novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala was isolated from hydrolyzed maize protein. Tyr-Ala significantly prolonged the lifespan of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans and extended the nematode healthspan and lifespan during heat/oxidative stress. Compared with its constituent amino acids, Tyr-Ala was more efficient in enhancing stress resistance. Further studies demonstrated that the significant longevity-extending effects of Tyr-Ala on Caenorhabditis elegans were attributed to its in vitro and in vivo free radical-scavenging effects, in addition to its ability to up-regulate stress resistance-related proteins, such as SOD (Superoxide Dismutase)-3 and HSP (Heat Shock Protein)-16.2. Real-time PCR results showed that the up-regulation of aging-associated genes, such as daf-16, sod-3, hsp-16.2 and skn-1, also contributed to the stress-resistance effect of Tyr-Ala. These results indicate that the novel dipeptide Tyr-Ala can protect against external stress and thus extend the lifespan and healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Thereby, Tyr-Ala could be used as a potential medicine in anti-aging research. PMID:26987062

  2. A Life-Span, Relational, Public Health Model of Self-Regulation: Impact on Individual and Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniar, Swapnil; Zaff, Jonathan F.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors extend the ideas around the development of self-regulation and its impact on development by proposing a life-span, relational, public health model. They propose that the role of self-regulation should be understood across transitions from childhood to adulthood and through an individual and community perspective,…

  3. Neurodevelopmental origins of lifespan changes in brain and cognition.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Krogsrud, Stine K; Amlien, Inge K; Bartsch, Hauke; Bjørnerud, Atle; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Grydeland, Håkon; Hagler, Donald J; Håberg, Asta K; Kremen, William S; Ferschmann, Lia; Nyberg, Lars; Panizzon, Matthew S; Rohani, Darius A; Skranes, Jon; Storsve, Andreas B; Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Tamnes, Christian K; Thompson, Wesley K; Reuter, Chase; Dale, Anders M; Fjell, Anders M

    2016-08-16

    Neurodevelopmental origins of functional variation in older age are increasingly being acknowledged, but identification of how early factors impact human brain and cognition throughout life has remained challenging. Much focus has been on age-specific mechanisms affecting neural foundations of cognition and their change. In contrast to this approach, we tested whether cerebral correlates of general cognitive ability (GCA) in development could be extended to the rest of the lifespan, and whether early factors traceable to prenatal stages, such as birth weight and parental education, may exert continuous influences. We measured the area of the cerebral cortex in a longitudinal sample of 974 individuals aged 4-88 y (1,633 observations). An extensive cortical region was identified wherein area related positively to GCA in development. By tracking area of the cortical region identified in the child sample throughout the lifespan, we showed that the cortical change trajectories of higher and lower GCA groups were parallel through life, suggesting continued influences of early life factors. Birth weight and parental education obtained from the Norwegian Mother-Child Cohort study were identified as such early factors of possible life-long influence. Support for a genetic component was obtained in a separate twin sample (Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging), but birth weight in the child sample had an effect on cortical area also when controlling for possible genetic differences in terms of parental height. Our results provide novel evidence for stability in brain-cognition relationships throughout life, and indicate that early life factors impact brain and cognition for the entire life course. PMID:27432992

  4. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Jana J.; Snoek, L. Basten; Kammenga, Jan E.; Harvey, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction. PMID:26539794

  5. Validated Liquid Culture Monitoring System for Lifespan Extension of Caenorhabditis elegans through Genetic and Dietary Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Win, Myat Thu Thu; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Han, Dong; Harada, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Nutritional and genetic factors influence aging and life expectancy. The reduction of food intake without malnutrition, referred to caloric restriction (CR), has been shown to increase lifespan in a wide variety of species. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is one of the principle models with which to study the biology of aging and search for anti-aging compounds. In this study, we validated and optimized a high-throughput liquid culture system to monitor C. elegans lifespan with minimized mechanical stress. We used alive and ultraviolet (UV)-killed Escherichia coli (E. coli) OP50 at 10(8) or 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu)/ml to feed Bristol N2 wild-type (WT) and mutant worms of a well-characterized insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (ILS) pathway: the insulin receptor homolog daf-2 (e1370), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase age-1 (hx546), and transcriptional factor FOXO homolog daf-16 (mu86 and mgDf50). Compared with alive E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml, supplementations of alive E. coli at 10(8) cfu/ml or UV-killed E. coli at 10(9) cfu/ml dramatically prolonged lifespan in WT and age-1 mutants, and to a lesser extent, in daf-2 and daf-16 mutants, suggesting that signaling pathways in CR and ILS do not overlap fully. Feeding 10(8) cfu/ml UV-killed E. coli, which led to maximally saturated longevity in WT and daf-2 mutant, can prolonged lifespan in age-1, but not daf-16, mutants. This approach will be useful for investigating the biology of aging, physiological responses and gene functions under CR conditions and also for screening pharmacologic compounds to extend lifespan or affect other biologic processes. PMID:23936742

  6. Properties of human brain sodium channel α-subunits expressed in HEK293 cells and their modulation by carbamazepine, phenytoin and lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xin; Sun, Guangchun; Clare, Jeffrey J; Werkman, Taco R; Wadman, Wytse J

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Voltage-activated Na+ channels contain one distinct α-subunit. In the brain NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6 are the four most abundantly expressed α-subunits. The antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) carbamazepine, phenytoin and lamotrigine have voltage-gated Na+ channels as their primary therapeutic targets. This study provides a systematic comparison of the biophysical properties of these four α-subunits and characterizes their interaction with carbamazepine, phenytoin and lamotrigine. Experimental approach Na+ currents were recorded in voltage-clamp mode in HEK293 cells stably expressing one of the four α-subunits. Key results NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 subunits have a relatively slow recovery from inactivation, compared with the other subunits and NaV1.1 subunits generate the largest window current. Lamotrigine evokes a larger maximal shift of the steady-state inactivation relationship than carbamazepine or phenytoin. Carbamazepine shows the highest binding rate to the α-subunits. Lamotrigine binding to NaV1.1 subunits is faster than to the other α-subunits. Lamotrigine unbinding from the α-subunits is slower than that of carbamazepine and phenytoin. Conclusions and implications The four Na+ channel α-subunits show subtle differences in their biophysical properties, which, in combination with their (sub)cellular expression patterns in the brain, could contribute to differences in neuronal excitability. We also observed differences in the parameters that characterize AED binding to the Na+ channel subunits. Particularly, lamotrigine binding to the four α-subunits suggests a subunit-specific response. Such differences will have consequences for the clinical efficacy of AEDs. Knowledge of the biophysical and binding parameters could be employed to optimize therapeutic strategies and drug development. PMID:24283699

  7. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children. PMID:27215601

  8. Turner Syndrome: Four Challenges Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Erica J; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Bondy, Carolyn A; Gollust, Sarah E; King, Donnice; Biesecker, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a sex chromosome condition that occurs in approximately 1/2500 live female births. Despite the prevalence of this chromosomal condition, the challenges these women face throughout their lives are not fully understood. This qualitative research study aimed to characterize the subjective experiences of individuals with Turner syndrome throughout their lifespan, to investigate their concerns and obstacles, and to offer insight into the strengths and weaknesses of health care delivery, as they perceived them. Ninety-seven girls and women with TS and 21 parents consented to participate in this interview study. Interviews were semi-structured and open-ended in design. Questions sought to elicit responses relating to existing concerns associated with their condition and positive and negative health care experiences. Participants were divided into four age categories (childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and mature adulthood) to facilitate a comparative analysis across the age spectrum. Regardless of age, infertility was the most frequently cited concern followed closely by short stature. Sexual development and function and general health were also viewed as challenges by a number of participants in each age group. Although the relative weight of these four concerns tended to shift based upon the individual’s age and life experiences, all four issues remained significant throughout the lifespan. Enhanced awareness of the evolving physical and psychological challenges faced by girls and women with TS may help health care providers improve the quality of life for these individuals. PMID:16252273

  9. Advances in asthma 2015: Across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew H; Anderson, William C; Dutmer, Cullen M; Searing, Daniel A; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, progress in understanding asthma ranged from insights to asthma inception, exacerbations, and severity to advancements that will improve disease management throughout the lifespan. 2015's insights to asthma inception included how the intestinal microbiome affects asthma expression with the identification of specific gastrointestinal bacterial taxa in early infancy associated with less asthma risk, possibly by promoting regulatory immune development at a critical early age. The relevance of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating asthma-related gene expression was strengthened. Predicting and preventing exacerbations throughout life might help to reduce progressive lung function decrease and disease severity in adulthood. Although allergy has long been linked to asthma exacerbations, a mechanism through which IgE impairs rhinovirus immunity and underlies asthma exacerbations was demonstrated and improved by anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab). Other key molecular pathways underlying asthma exacerbations, such as cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) and orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3), were elucidated. New anti-IL-5 therapeutics, mepolizumab and reslizumab, were US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. In a clinical trial the novel therapeutic inhaled GATA3 mRNA-specific DNAzyme attenuated early- and late-phase allergic responses to inhaled allergen. These current findings are significant steps toward addressing unmet needs in asthma prevention, severity modification, disparities, and lifespan outcomes. PMID:27497278

  10. Studies on induction of lamotrigine metabolism in transgenic UGT1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Argikar, U. A.; Senekeo-Effenberger, K.; Larson, E. E.; Tukey, R. H.; Remmel, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    A transgenic ‘knock-in’ mouse model expressing a human UGT1 locus (Tg-UGT1) was recently developed and validated. Although these animals express mouse UGT1A proteins, UGT1A4 is a pseudo-gene in mice. Therefore, Tg-UGT1 mice serve as a ‘humanized’ UGT1A4 animal model.Lamotrigine (LTG) is primarily metabolized to its N-glucuronide (LTGG) by hUGT1A4. This investigation aimed at examining the impact of pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators on LTG glucuronidation in vivo and in vitro. Tg-UGT1 mice were administered the inducers phenobarbital (CAR), pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile (PXR), WY-14643 (PPAR-α), ciglitazone (PPAR-γ), or L-165041 (PPAR-β), once daily for 3 or 4 days. Thereafter, LTG was administered orally and blood samples were collected over 24 h. LTG was measured in blood and formation of LTGG was measured in pooled microsomes made from the livers of treated animals.A three-fold increase in in vivo LTG clearance was seen after phenobarbital administration. In microsomes prepared from phenobarbital-treated Tg-UGT1 animals, 13-fold higher CLint (Vmax/Km) value was observed as compared with the untreated transgenic mice. A trend toward induction of catalytic activity in vitro and in vivo was also observed following pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile and WY-14643 treatment. This study demonstrates the successful application of Tg-UGT1 mice as a novel tool to study the impact of induction and regulation on metabolism of UGT1A4 substrates. PMID:19845433

  11. Effects of phenytoin and lamotrigine treatment on serum BDNF levels in offsprings of epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Soysal, Handan; Doğan, Zümrüt; Kamışlı, Özden

    2016-04-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is to promote and modulate neuronal responses across neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Therefore, abnormal BDNF signaling may be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Low BDNF levels have been reported in brains and serums of patients with psychotic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of antiepileptic drugs on BDNF in developing rats. Pregnant rats were treated with phenytoin (PHT), lamotrigine (LTG) and folic acid for long-term, all through their gestational periods. Experimental epilepsy (EE) model was applied in pregnant rats. Epileptic seizures were determined with electroencephalography. After birth, serum BDNF levels were measured in 136 newborn rats on postnatal day (PND) 21 and postnatal day 38. In postnatal day 21, serum BDNF levels of experimental epilepsy group were significantly lower compared with PHT group. This decrease is statistically significant. Serum BDNF levels increased in the group LTG. This increase compared with LTG+EE group was statistically significant. In the folic acid (FA) group, levels of serum BDNF decreased statistically significantly compared to the PHT group. On postnatal day 38, no significant differences were found among the groups for serum BDNF levels. We concluded that, the passed seizures during pregnancy adversely affect fetal brain development, lowering of serum BDNF levels. PHT use during pregnancy prevents seizure-induced injury by increasing the levels of BDNF. About the increase level of BDNF, LTG is much less effective than PHT, the positive effect of folic acid on serum BDNF levels was not observed. LTG increase in BDNF is much less effective than PHT, folic acid did not show a positive effect on serum BDNF levels. Epilepsy affects fetal brain development during gestation in pregnant rats, therefore anti-epileptic therapy should be continued during pregnancy. PMID:26706181

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of fast-dissolving tablets containing solid dispersion of lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Arti; Gundamaraju, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation of in vitro/in vivo behavior of fast-dissolving tablets containing solid dispersions (SDs) of lamotrigine (LM) was the aim and focus of the present research work. Material and Methods: The effect of various hydrophilic polymers on the aqueous solubility of LM was studied. Polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) was selected as the vehicle and SDs were prepared by melting and solvent evaporation method (SEM). Evaluation of SD for dissolution indicated SVM was more appropriate as seen from an enhancement in drug dissolution. Infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicated a lack of physicochemical interaction between the drug and the carrier. A total of nine formulations were compressed into fast-dissolving tablets using Avicel pH 102 as a directly compressible filler and ac-di-sol, sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone as super disintegrates and evaluated for pre- and post-compression parameters and in vitro drug release. Results: Mathematical analysis of in vitro data suggested that first order was most suitable mathematical model for describing the optimized formulation. Stability studies indicated that the effect of storage was insignificant at 5% level of confidence. In vivo studies of pure drug, selected formulation and marketed product were carried out in male Wistar rats and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated using PK function for Microsoft Excel. The best formulation has shown Tmax of 0.5 h which was highly significant (P < 0.05) when compared with pure drug and marketed formulation. The statistical significance was assessed by one way analysis of variance. Conclusion: Therefore, the SDs prepared by SEM using PEG 6000 as hydrophilic carrier can be successfully used for improvement of dissolution of LM and resulted in faster onset of action as indicated by in vivo studies. PMID:25599034

  13. Lifespan Control by Redox-Dependent Recruitment of Chaperones to Misfolded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hanzén, Sarah; Vielfort, Katarina; Yang, Junsheng; Roger, Friederike; Andersson, Veronica; Zamarbide-Forés, Sara; Andersson, Rebecca; Malm, Lisa; Palais, Gael; Biteau, Benoît; Liu, Beidong; Toledano, Michel B; Molin, Mikael; Nyström, Thomas

    2016-06-30

    Caloric restriction (CR) extends the lifespan of flies, worms, and yeast by counteracting age-related oxidation of H2O2-scavenging peroxiredoxins (Prxs). Here, we show that increased dosage of the major cytosolic Prx in yeast, Tsa1, extends lifespan in an Hsp70 chaperone-dependent and CR-independent manner without increasing H2O2 scavenging or genome stability. We found that Tsa1 and Hsp70 physically interact and that hyperoxidation of Tsa1 by H2O2 is required for the recruitment of the Hsp70 chaperones and the Hsp104 disaggregase to misfolded and aggregated proteins during aging, but not heat stress. Tsa1 counteracted the accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates during aging and the reduction of hyperoxidized Tsa1 by sulfiredoxin facilitated clearance of H2O2-generated aggregates. The data reveal a conceptually new role for H2O2 signaling in proteostasis and lifespan control and shed new light on the selective benefits endowed to eukaryotic peroxiredoxins by their reversible hyperoxidation. PMID:27264606

  14. Naturally occurring p16Ink4a-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Darren J.; Childs, Bennett G.; Durik, Matej; Wijers, Melinde E.; Sieben, Cynthia J.; Zhong, Jian; Saltness, Rachel; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Versoza, Grace C.; Pezeshki, Abdul-Mohammad; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Miller, Jordan D.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stress-induced irreversible growth arrest often characterized by p16Ink4a expression and a distinctive secretory phenotype, prevents the proliferation of preneoplastic cells and has beneficial roles in tissue remodelling during embryogenesis and wound healing. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs over time and have been speculated to play a role in aging. To explore the physiological relevance and consequences of naturally occurring senescent cells, we used a previously established transgene, INK-ATTAC, to induce apoptosis in p16Ink4a-expressing cells of wild-type mice by injection of AP20187 twice a week starting at one year of age. Here we show that compared to vehicle alone, AP20187 treatment extended median lifespan in both male and female mice of two distinct genetic backgrounds. Clearance of p16Ink4a-positive cells delayed tumorigenesis and attenuated age-related deterioration of several organs without apparent side effects, including kidney, heart and fat, where clearance preserved the functionality of glomeruli, cardio-protective KATP channels, and adipocytes, respectively. Thus, p16Ink4a-positive cells that accumulate during adulthood negatively influence lifespan and promote age-dependent changes in multiple organs, and their therapeutic removal may be an attractive approach to extend healthy lifespan. PMID:26840489

  15. Naturally occurring p16(Ink4a)-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan.

    PubMed

    Baker, Darren J; Childs, Bennett G; Durik, Matej; Wijers, Melinde E; Sieben, Cynthia J; Zhong, Jian; Saltness, Rachel A; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Verzosa, Grace Casaclang; Pezeshki, Abdulmohammad; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Miller, Jordan D; van Deursen, Jan M

    2016-02-11

    Cellular senescence, a stress-induced irreversible growth arrest often characterized by expression of p16(Ink4a) (encoded by the Ink4a/Arf locus, also known as Cdkn2a) and a distinctive secretory phenotype, prevents the proliferation of preneoplastic cells and has beneficial roles in tissue remodelling during embryogenesis and wound healing. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs over time, and have been speculated to have a role in ageing. To explore the physiological relevance and consequences of naturally occurring senescent cells, here we use a previously established transgene, INK-ATTAC, to induce apoptosis in p16(Ink4a)-expressing cells of wild-type mice by injection of AP20187 twice a week starting at one year of age. We show that compared to vehicle alone, AP20187 treatment extended median lifespan in both male and female mice of two distinct genetic backgrounds. The clearance of p16(Ink4a)-positive cells delayed tumorigenesis and attenuated age-related deterioration of several organs without apparent side effects, including kidney, heart and fat, where clearance preserved the functionality of glomeruli, cardio-protective KATP channels and adipocytes, respectively. Thus, p16(Ink4a)-positive cells that accumulate during adulthood negatively influence lifespan and promote age-dependent changes in several organs, and their therapeutic removal may be an attractive approach to extend healthy lifespan. PMID:26840489

  16. [Microdevice for the investigation of high-glucose induced lifespan and the protective effect of polydatin in C. elegans].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoli; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has been widely used as a model organism for biomedical research due to its sufficient homology with human at molecular or genomic level. In this work, we describe a microfluidic device not only to investigate the response of C. elegans including lifespan and oxidative stress, but also to evaluate the protective effect of polydatin induced by high-glucose condition. It was found that the mean lifespan of worms was significantly reduced and the oxidative stress protein GST-4 was increased in worms that are subjected to high glucose. However, a certain dose of polydatin could weaken the increased oxidative stress induced by high-glucose and extend the lifespan, indicating the protective effect of polydatin against the toxic of high-glucose. The established approach is simple to operate, easy for realtime imaging and multiparatemer evaluations in parallel, providing a potential platform for drug evaluation/screening in a high throughput format at single animal resolution. PMID:27382717

  17. Transient rapamycin treatment can increase lifespan and healthspan in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandro; Ito, Takashi K; Pineda, Victor V; LeTexier, Nicolas J; Huang, Heather Z; Sutlief, Elissa; Tung, Herman; Vizzini, Nicholas; Chen, Belle; Smith, Kaleb; Meza, Daniel; Yajima, Masanao; Beyer, Richard P; Kerr, Kathleen F; Davis, Daniel J; Gillespie, Catherine H; Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The FDA approved drug rapamycin increases lifespan in rodents and delays age-related dysfunction in rodents and humans. Nevertheless, important questions remain regarding the optimal dose, duration, and mechanisms of action in the context of healthy aging. Here we show that 3 months of rapamycin treatment is sufficient to increase life expectancy by up to 60% and improve measures of healthspan in middle-aged mice. This transient treatment is also associated with a remodeling of the microbiome, including dramatically increased prevalence of segmented filamentous bacteria in the small intestine. We also define a dose in female mice that does not extend lifespan, but is associated with a striking shift in cancer prevalence toward aggressive hematopoietic cancers and away from non-hematopoietic malignancies. These data suggest that a short-term rapamycin treatment late in life has persistent effects that can robustly delay aging, influence cancer prevalence, and modulate the microbiome. PMID:27549339

  18. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the…

  19. The Path to Competence: A Lifespan Developmental Perspective on Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a developmental model of reading that encompasses changes across the lifespan. The need for such a lifespan orientation toward reading within our educational institutions is great. Until we adopt this lifelong perspective, we continue to run the risk of turning out undeveloped, unmotivated, and uncritical…

  20. Minority Stress across the Career-Lifespan Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispenza, Franco; Brown, Colton; Chastain, Taylor E.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual minority persons (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer) are likely to encounter "minority stress", such as discrimination, concealment, expectation of rejection, and internalized heterosexism. Minority stress occurs alongside one's lifespan and has considerable implications in the context of the career lifespan trajectory.…

  1. Pomegranate Juice Enhances Healthy Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Mohan, Jayaram; Chatterjee, Arunita; Patnaik, Esha; Kukkupuni, Subrahmanya Kumar; Nongthomba, Upendra; Venkatasubramanian, Padmavathy

    2014-01-01

    Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy aging of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine) that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements, and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v) pomegranate juice (PJ) extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18 and 8%, respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8). MSD for control and resveratrol (RV) groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days, respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced) and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in human beings. PMID:25566518

  2. Pomegranate Juice Enhances Healthy Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Mohan, Jayaram; Chatterjee, Arunita; Patnaik, Esha; Kukkupuni, Subrahmanya Kumar; Nongthomba, Upendra; Venkatasubramanian, Padmavathy

    2014-01-01

    Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy aging of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine) that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements, and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v) pomegranate juice (PJ) extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18 and 8%, respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8). MSD for control and resveratrol (RV) groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days, respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced) and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in human beings. PMID:25566518

  3. Extending the viability of acute brain slices.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Yossi; Breen, Paul P; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W

    2014-01-01

    The lifespan of an acute brain slice is approximately 6-12 hours, limiting potential experimentation time. We have designed a new recovery incubation system capable of extending their lifespan to more than 36 hours. This system controls the temperature of the incubated artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF) while continuously passing the fluid through a UVC filtration system and simultaneously monitoring temperature and pH. The combination of controlled temperature and UVC filtering maintains bacteria levels in the lag phase and leads to the dramatic extension of the brain slice lifespan. Brain slice viability was validated through electrophysiological recordings as well as live/dead cell assays. This system benefits researchers by monitoring incubation conditions and standardizing this artificial environment. It further provides viable tissue for two experimental days, reducing the time spent preparing brain slices and the number of animals required for research. PMID:24930889

  4. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  5. Interplay of dFOXO and Two ETS-Family Transcription Factors Determines Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Nazif; Giannakou, Maria E.; Papatheodorou, Irene; Hoddinott, Matthew P.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Bolukbasi, Ekin; Partridge, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors (TFs) are key drivers of complex transcriptional programmes that determine animal lifespan. FoxOs regulate a number of other TFs, but how these TFs in turn might mediate the anti-ageing programmes orchestrated by FoxOs in vivo is unclear. Here, we identify an E-twenty six (ETS)-family transcriptional repressor, Anterior open (Aop), as regulated by the single Drosophila melanogaster FoxO (dFOXO) in the adult gut. AOP, the functional orthologue of the human Etv6/Tel protein, binds numerous genomic sites also occupied by dFOXO and counteracts the activity of an ETS activator, Pointed (Pnt), to prevent the lifespan-shortening effects of co-activation of dFOXO and PNT. This detrimental synergistic effect of dFOXO and PNT appears to stem from a mis-regulation of lipid metabolism. At the same time, AOP activity in another fly organ, the fat body, has further beneficial roles, regulating genes in common with dfoxo, such as the secreted, non-sensory, odorant binding protein (Obp99b), and robustly extending lifespan. Our study reveals a complex interplay between evolutionarily conserved ETS factors and dFOXO, the functional significance of which may extend well beyond animal lifespan. PMID:25232726

  6. The first international mini-symposium on methionine restriction and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Ables, Gene P; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Church, Christopher D; Elshorbagy, Amany K; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Miller, Richard A; Mitchell, James R; Richie, John P; Rogina, Blanka; Stipanuk, Martha H; Orentreich, David S; Orentreich, Norman

    2014-01-01

    It has been 20 years since the Orentreich Foundation for the Advancement of Science, under the leadership Dr. Norman Orentreich, first reported that low methionine (Met) ingestion by rats extends lifespan (Orentreich et al., 1993). Since then, several studies have replicated the effects of dietary methionine restricted (MR) in delaying age-related diseases (Richie et al., 1994; Miller et al., 2005; Ables et al., 2012; Sanchez-Roman and Barja, 2013). We report the abstracts from the First International Mini-Symposium on Methionine Restriction and Lifespan held in Tarrytown, NY, September 2013. The goals were (1) to gather researchers with an interest in MR and lifespan, (2) to exchange knowledge, (3) to generate ideas for future investigations, and (4) to strengthen relationships within this community. The presentations highlighted the importance of research on cysteine, growth hormone (GH), and ATF4 in the paradigm of aging. In addition, the effects of dietary restriction or MR in the kidneys, liver, bones, and the adipose tissue were discussed. The symposium also emphasized the value of other species, e.g., the naked mole rat, Brandt's bat, and Drosophila, in aging research. Overall, the symposium consolidated scientists with similar research interests and provided opportunities to conduct future collaborative studies (Figure 3). PMID:24847356

  7. Water sensor ppk28 modulates Drosophila lifespan and physiology through AKH signaling

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Michael J.; Chung, Brian Y.; Harvanek, Zachary M.; Ostojic, Ivan; Alcedo, Joy; Pletcher, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory perception modulates lifespan across taxa, presumably due to alterations in physiological homeostasis after central nervous system integration. The coordinating circuitry of this control, however, remains unknown. Here, we used the Drosophila melanogaster gustatory system to dissect one component of sensory regulation of aging. We found that loss of the critical water sensor, pickpocket 28 (ppk28), altered metabolic homeostasis to promote internal lipid and water stores and extended healthy lifespan. Additionally, loss of ppk28 increased neuronal glucagon-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH) signaling, and the AKH receptor was necessary for ppk28 mutant effects. Furthermore, activation of AKH-producing cells alone was sufficient to enhance longevity, suggesting that a perceived lack of water availability triggers a metabolic shift that promotes the production of metabolic water and increases lifespan via AKH signaling. This work provides an example of how discrete gustatory signals recruit nutrient-dependent endocrine systems to coordinate metabolic homeostasis, thereby influencing long-term health and aging. PMID:24821805

  8. Bicarbonate-sensitive calcification and lifespan of klotho-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Leibrock, Christina B; Voelkl, Jakob; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kuro-O, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Klotho, a protein counteracting aging, is a powerful inhibitor of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] formation and regulator of mineral metabolism. In klotho hypomorphic (kl/kl) mice, excessive 1,25(OH)2D3 formation leads to hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and vascular calcification, severe growth deficits, accelerated aging and early death. Kl/kl mice further suffer from extracellular volume depletion and hypotension, leading to the stimulation of antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone release. A vitamin D-deficient diet, restriction of dietary phosphate, inhibition of mineralocorticoid receptors with spironolactone, and dietary NaCl all extend the lifespan of kl/kl mice. Kl/kl mice suffer from acidosis. The present study explored whether replacement of tap drinking water by 150 mM NaHCO3 affects the growth, tissue calcification, and lifespan of kl/kl mice. As a result, NaHCO3 administration to kl/kl mice did not reverse the growth deficit but substantially decreased tissue calcification and significantly increased the average lifespan from 78 to 127 days. NaHCO3 did not significantly affect plasma concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca(2+) but significantly decreased plasma phosphate concentration and plasma aldosterone concentration. The present study reveals a novel effect of bicarbonate, i.e., a favorable influence on vascular calcification and early death of klotho-deficient mice. PMID:26538435

  9. Analysis of lifespan-promoting effect of garlic extract by an integrated metabolo-proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Wu, Yuan-Heng; Zhong, Linda; Tseng, Mu-Yun; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial effects of garlic (Allium sativum) consumption in treating human diseases have been reported worldwide over a long period of human history. The strong antioxidant effect of garlic extract (GE) has also recently been claimed to prevent cancer, thrombus formation, cardiovascular disease and some age-related maladies. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, aqueous GE was herein shown to increase the expression of longevity-related FOXO transcription factor daf-16 and extend lifespan by 20%. By employing microarray and proteomics analysis on C. elegans treated with aqueous GE, we have systematically mapped 229 genes and 46 proteins with differential expression profiles, which included many metabolic enzymes and yolky egg vitellogenins. To investigate the garlic components functionally involved in longevity, an integrated metabolo-proteomics approach was employed to identify metabolites and protein components associated with treatment of aqueous GE. Among potential lifespan-promoting substances, mannose-binding lectin and N-acetylcysteine were found to increase daf-16 expression. Our study points to the fact that the lifespan-promoting effect of aqueous GE may entail the DAF-16-mediated signaling pathway. The result also highlights the utility of metabolo-proteomics for unraveling the complexity and intricacy involved in the metabolism of natural products in vivo. PMID:25940980

  10. Edible bird's nest enhances antioxidant capacity and increases lifespan in Drosophila Melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Li, G; Yao, H; He, S; Li, H; Liu, S; Wu, Y; Lai, X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aims to investigate the effects of edible bird's nest (EBN) on anti-aging efficacy. In order to investigate lifespan and mortality rate of flies, we treated flies with various doses of EBN. Besides, fecundity, water content and food are determined and heat-stress test is conducted after flies treating with different medium. Effects of EBN on total antioxidant activity (T-AOC), super-oxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in drosophila melanogaster. Results indicated that flies in EBN treated group illustrated significantly lower mortality rates and longer median and maximum lifespan compared to control group (P<0.05). The fecundity in EBN-treated group was increased compared to control group. SOD levels and CAT activity were significantly increased, and MDA levels decreased in EBN-treated group compared to control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, EBN can extend lifespan, decrease mortality rate and increase survival rate in heat-stress test, and which can also promote SOD and CAT activity and reduce MDA levels. EBN is able to delay drosophila melanogaster aging, attributing to the increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and decreasing content of lipid peroxidation products in drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27188745

  11. A Functional Genomic Screen for Evolutionarily Conserved Genes Required for Lifespan and Immunity in Germline-Deficient C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2014-01-01

    The reproductive system regulates lifespan in insects, nematodes and vertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans removal of germline increases lifespan by 60% which is dependent upon insulin signaling, nuclear hormone signaling, autophagy and fat metabolism and their microRNA-regulators. Germline-deficient C. elegans are also more resistant to various bacterial pathogens but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Firstly, we demonstrate that previously identified genes that regulate the extended lifespan of germline-deficient C. elegans (daf-2, daf-16, daf-12, tcer-1, mir-7.1 and nhr-80) are also essential for resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila. We then use a novel unbiased approach combining laser cell ablation, whole genome microarrays, RNAi screening and exposure to X. nematophila to generate a comprehensive genome-wide catalog of genes potentially required for increased lifespan and innate immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans. We find 3,440 genes to be upregulated in C. elegans germline-deficient animals in a gonad dependent manner, which are significantly enriched for genes involved in insulin signaling, fatty acid desaturation, translation elongation and proteasome complex function. Using RNAi against a subset of 150 candidate genes selected from the microarray results, we show that the upregulated genes such as transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, the PTEN homolog lipid phosphatase DAF-18 and several components of the proteasome complex (rpn-6.1, rpn-7, rpn-9, rpn-10, rpt-6, pbs-3 and pbs-6) are essential for both lifespan and immunity of germline deficient animals. We also identify a novel role for genes including par-5 and T12G3.6 in both lifespan-extension and increased survival on X. nematophila. From an evolutionary perspective, most of the genes differentially expressed in germline deficient C. elegans also show a conserved expression pattern in germline deficient Pristionchus pacificus, a nematode species

  12. Nuclear hormone receptor DHR96 mediates the resistance to xenobiotics but not the increased lifespan of insulin-mutant Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Afschar, Sonita; Toivonen, Janne M; Hoffmann, Julia Marianne; Tain, Luke Stephen; Wieser, Daniela; Finlayson, Andrew John; Driege, Yasmine; Alic, Nazif; Emran, Sahar; Stinn, Julia; Froehlich, Jenny; Piper, Matthew D; Partridge, Linda

    2016-02-01

    Lifespan of laboratory animals can be increased by genetic, pharmacological, and dietary interventions. Increased expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, together with resistance to xenobiotics, are frequent correlates of lifespan extension in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila, and mice. The Green Theory of Aging suggests that this association is causal, with the ability of cells to rid themselves of lipophilic toxins limiting normal lifespan. To test this idea, we experimentally increased resistance of Drosophila to the xenobiotic dichlordiphenyltrichlorethan (DDT), by artificial selection or by transgenic expression of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450. Although both interventions increased DDT resistance, neither increased lifespan. Furthermore, dietary restriction increased lifespan without increasing xenobiotic resistance, confirming that the two traits can be uncoupled. Reduced activity of the insulin/Igf signaling (IIS) pathway increases resistance to xenobiotics and extends lifespan in Drosophila, and can also increase longevity in C. elegans, mice, and possibly humans. We identified a nuclear hormone receptor, DHR96, as an essential mediator of the increased xenobiotic resistance of IIS mutant flies. However, the IIS mutants remained long-lived in the absence of DHR96 and the xenobiotic resistance that it conferred. Thus, in Drosophila IIS mutants, increased xenobiotic resistance and enhanced longevity are not causally connected. The frequent co-occurrence of the two traits may instead have evolved because, in nature, lowered IIS can signal the presence of pathogens. It will be important to determine whether enhanced xenobiotic metabolism is also a correlated, rather than a causal, trait in long-lived mice. PMID:26787908

  13. Nuclear hormone receptor DHR96 mediates the resistance to xenobiotics but not the increased lifespan of insulin-mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Afschar, Sonita; Toivonen, Janne M.; Tain, Luke Stephen; Wieser, Daniela; Finlayson, Andrew John; Driege, Yasmine; Alic, Nazif; Emran, Sahar; Stinn, Julia; Froehlich, Jenny; Piper, Matthew D.; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Lifespan of laboratory animals can be increased by genetic, pharmacological, and dietary interventions. Increased expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, together with resistance to xenobiotics, are frequent correlates of lifespan extension in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila, and mice. The Green Theory of Aging suggests that this association is causal, with the ability of cells to rid themselves of lipophilic toxins limiting normal lifespan. To test this idea, we experimentally increased resistance of Drosophila to the xenobiotic dichlordiphenyltrichlorethan (DDT), by artificial selection or by transgenic expression of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450. Although both interventions increased DDT resistance, neither increased lifespan. Furthermore, dietary restriction increased lifespan without increasing xenobiotic resistance, confirming that the two traits can be uncoupled. Reduced activity of the insulin/Igf signaling (IIS) pathway increases resistance to xenobiotics and extends lifespan in Drosophila, and can also increase longevity in C. elegans, mice, and possibly humans. We identified a nuclear hormone receptor, DHR96, as an essential mediator of the increased xenobiotic resistance of IIS mutant flies. However, the IIS mutants remained long-lived in the absence of DHR96 and the xenobiotic resistance that it conferred. Thus, in Drosophila IIS mutants, increased xenobiotic resistance and enhanced longevity are not causally connected. The frequent co-occurrence of the two traits may instead have evolved because, in nature, lowered IIS can signal the presence of pathogens. It will be important to determine whether enhanced xenobiotic metabolism is also a correlated, rather than a causal, trait in long-lived mice. PMID:26787908

  14. Lifespan Extension in a Semelparous Chordate Occurs via Developmental Growth Arrest Just Prior to Meiotic Entry

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Gunasekaran; Campsteijn, Coen; Thompson, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that the ageing process is linked to signaling from the germline such that the rate of ageing can be adjusted to the state of the reproductive system, allowing these two processes to co-evolve. Mechanistic insight into this link has been primarily derived from iteroparous reproductive models, the nematode C. elegans, and the arthropod Drosophila. Here, we examined to what extent these mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved in a semelparous chordate, Oikopleura dioica, where we identify a developmental growth arrest (GA) in response to crowded, diet-restricted conditions, which can extend its lifespan at least three-fold. Under nutritional stress, the iteroparative models sacrifice germ cells that have entered meiosis, while maintaining a reduced pool of active germline stem cells (GSCs). In contrast, O. dioica only entered GA prior to meiotic entry. Stress conditions encountered after this point led to maturation in a normal time frame but with reduced reproductive output. During GA, TOR signaling was inhibited, whereas MAPK, ERK1/2 and p38 pathways were activated, and under such conditions, activation of these pathways was shown to be critical for survival. Direct inhibition of TOR signaling alone was sufficient to prevent meiotic entry and germline differentiation. This inhibition activated the p38 pathway, but did not activate the ERK1/2 pathway. Thus, the link between reproductive status and lifespan extension in response to nutrient-limited conditions is interpreted in a significantly different manner in these iteroparative versus semelparous models. In the latter case, meiotic entry is a definitive signal that lifespan extension can no longer occur, whereas in the former, meiotic entry is not a unique chronological event, and can be largely erased during lifespan extension in response to nutrient stress, and reactivated from a pool of maintained GSCs when conditions improve. PMID:24695788

  15. The lifespan extension effects of resveratrol are conserved in the honey bee and may be driven by a mechanism related to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Rascón, Brenda; Hubbard, Basil P.; Sinclair, David A.; Amdam, Gro V.

    2012-01-01

    Our interest in healthy aging and in evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of lifespan extension prompted us to investigate whether features of age-related decline in the honey bee could be attenuated with resveratrol. Resveratrol is regarded as a caloric restriction mimetic known to extend lifespan in some but not all model species. The current, prevailing view is that resveratrol works largely by activating signaling pathways. It has also been suggested that resveratrol may act as an antioxidant and confer protection against nervous system impairment and oxidative stress. To test whether honey bee lifespan, learning performance, and food perception could be altered by resveratrol, we supplemented the diets of honey bees and measured lifespan, olfactory learning, and gustatory responsiveness to sucrose. Furthermore, to test the effects of resveratrol under metabolic challenge, we used hyperoxic environments to generate oxidative stress. Under normal oxygen conditions, two resveratrol treatments—30 and 130 μM—lengthened average lifespan in wild-type honey bees by 38% and 33%, respectively. Both resveratrol treatments also lengthened maximum and median lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxic stress abolished the resveratrol life-extension response. Furthermore, resveratrol did not affect learning performance, but did alter gustation. Honey bees that were not fed resveratrol exhibited greater responsiveness to sugar, while those supplemented with resveratrol were less responsive to sugar. We also discovered that individuals fed a high dose of resveratrol—compared to controls—ingested fewer quantities of food under ad libitum feeding conditions. PMID:22868943

  16. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the “neutron discrepancy problem” – the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima – was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  17. Docosahexaenoic Acid and Cognition throughout the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Butt, Christopher M.; Mohajeri, M. Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the predominant omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) found in the brain and can affect neurological function by modulating signal transduction pathways, neurotransmission, neurogenesis, myelination, membrane receptor function, synaptic plasticity, neuroinflammation, membrane integrity and membrane organization. DHA is rapidly accumulated in the brain during gestation and early infancy, and the availability of DHA via transfer from maternal stores impacts the degree of DHA incorporation into neural tissues. The consumption of DHA leads to many positive physiological and behavioral effects, including those on cognition. Advanced cognitive function is uniquely human, and the optimal development and aging of cognitive abilities has profound impacts on quality of life, productivity, and advancement of society in general. However, the modern diet typically lacks appreciable amounts of DHA. Therefore, in modern populations, maintaining optimal levels of DHA in the brain throughout the lifespan likely requires obtaining preformed DHA via dietary or supplemental sources. In this review, we examine the role of DHA in optimal cognition during development, adulthood, and aging with a focus on human evidence and putative mechanisms of action. PMID:26901223

  18. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    PubMed Central

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the action-phase model of developmental regulation with their original life-span theory of control to present a comprehensive theory of development. Third, they reviewed the relevant empirical literature testing key propositions of the Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. Finally, because the conceptual reach of their theory goes far beyond the current empirical base, they pointed out areas that deserve further and more focused empirical inquiry. PMID:20063963

  19. The association between intelligence and lifespan is mostly genetic

    PubMed Central

    Arden, Rosalind; Deary, Ian J; Reynolds, Chandra A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plassman, Brenda L; McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare; Visscher, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies in the new field of cognitive epidemiology have shown that higher intelligence predicts longer lifespan. This positive correlation might arise from socioeconomic status influencing both intelligence and health; intelligence leading to better health behaviours; and/or some shared genetic factors influencing both intelligence and health. Distinguishing among these hypotheses is crucial for medicine and public health, but can only be accomplished by studying a genetically informative sample. Methods: We analysed data from three genetically informative samples containing information on intelligence and mortality: Sample 1, 377 pairs of male veterans from the NAS-NRC US World War II Twin Registry; Sample 2, 246 pairs of twins from the Swedish Twin Registry; and Sample 3, 784 pairs of twins from the Danish Twin Registry. The age at which intelligence was measured differed between the samples. We used three methods of genetic analysis to examine the relationship between intelligence and lifespan: we calculated the proportion of the more intelligent twins who outlived their co-twin; we regressed within-twin-pair lifespan differences on within-twin-pair intelligence differences; and we used the resulting regression coefficients to model the additive genetic covariance. We conducted a meta-analysis of the regression coefficients across the three samples. Results: The combined (and all three individual samples) showed a small positive phenotypic correlation between intelligence and lifespan. In the combined sample observed r = .12 (95% confidence interval .06 to .18). The additive genetic covariance model supported a genetic relationship between intelligence and lifespan. In the combined sample the genetic contribution to the covariance was 95%; in the US study, 84%; in the Swedish study, 86%, and in the Danish study, 85%. Conclusions: The finding of common genetic effects between lifespan and intelligence has important implications for public

  20. Extracorporeal irradiation of blood: dosimetry corrected for shortened erythrocyte lifespans

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Pate, H.R.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The amount of radiation delivered to erythrocytes during extracorporeal irradiation of blood (ECIB) has been described using Poisson distribution statistics. The Poisson expression for erythrocyte radiation dose distribution was simplified by considering the slight dilution of blood with fluid that is initially in the extracorporeal tubing. An algorithm was devised that allows curtailed lifespans of irradiated erythrocytes to be taken into account in a short computer program of radiation dosimetry for ECIB. Radiation doses to erythrocytes with and without lifespan corrections are compared.

  1. [Sense and sensibility: bipolar affective disorder as a battlefield of cognitions and emotions--lamotrigine therapy as a peacekeeper].

    PubMed

    Kálmán, János; Kálmán, János

    2010-06-01

    The cortico-limbic dysregulation theory of bipolar affective disorder (BAD) is supported by ample of recent research evidences. This concept is based on the dysharmonic regulation of prefrontal and anterior limbic structures manifested in a strong interaction of cognitive and affective symptoms. The major aim of the present review is to characterize the BAD specific cognitive profile and to describe the cognitive syndrome of BAD during the natural course of the disorder, based on recent findings in neurobiology, neuropathology, neuroradiology, cognitive psychology and neurogenetics. The authors recommend that BAD-associated cognitive symptoms should always be considered during the recognition, follow up and treatment phases of the disorder. The importance of the cognitive syndrome is also emphasized from the aspects of outcome and existing therapeutic regimens of the disorder. The cognitive syndrome-associated perspective of BAD could therefore provide new approaches regarding the long-term management issues of patients. Evidence from recent clinical trials is also summarized regarding the interactions of existing BAD treatment options with cognitive symptoms of the disorder, since all of the recommended antipsychotics and antiepileptics have a certain degree of cognitive toxicity. Based on the overview of the existing clinical trials, it was concluded that lamotrigine has the smallest cognitive toxicity among the mood stabilizers used for the treatment of BAD type-2. Therefore, as far as the cognitive toxicity profile is concerned, lamotrigine is recommended as the most promising therapeutic approach both for the treatment of bipolar depressive phases and relapse prevention. In addition, neuroprotective properties of the same molecule might also be beneficial regarding the proposed pathomechanism of BAD. PMID:20606245

  2. Effects of diet and host access on fecundity and lifespan in two fruit fly species with different life history patterns

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, James F.; Chen, Kehui; Müller, Hans-Georg; Wang, Jane-Ling; Vargas, Roger I.; Carey, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The reproductive ability of female tephritids can be limited and prevented by denying access to host plants and restricting the dietary precursors of vitellogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the delayed egg production in each case are initiated by different physiological processes that are anticipated to have dissimilar effects on lifespan and reproductive ability later in life. The egg laying abilities of laboratory reared females of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedmann) and melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett) from Hawaii are delayed or suppressed by limiting access to host fruits and dietary protein. In each case, this is expected to prevent the loss of lifespan associated with reproduction until protein or hosts are introduced. Two trends are observed in each species: Firstly, access to protein at eclosion leads to a greater probability of survival and higher reproductive ability than if it is delayed, and secondly, that delayed host access reduces lifetime reproductive ability without improving life expectancy. When host access and protein availability are delayed, the rate of reproductive senescence is reduced in the medfly, whereas the rate of reproductive senescence is generally increased in the melon fly. Overall, delaying reproduction lowers the fitness of females by constraining their fecundity for the remainder of the lifespan without extending the lifespan. PMID:23483775

  3. The bright side of reactive oxygen species: lifespan extension without cellular demise

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, protein misfolding, programmed cell death with apoptosis and autophagy, and the promotion of aging –dependent processes. Mitochondria control the processing of redox energy that yields adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the oxidation of glucose, pyruvate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Ultimately, the generation of ROS occurs with the aerobic production of ATP. Although reduced levels of ROS may lead to tolerance against metabolic, mechanical, and oxidative stressors and the generation of brief periods of ROS during ischemia-reperfusion models may limit cellular injury, under most circumstances ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction can lead to apoptotic caspase activation and autophagy induction that can result in cellular demise. Yet, new work suggests that ROS generation may have a positive impact through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport that can extend lifespan. Such mechanisms may bring new insight into clinically relevant disorders that are linked to cellular senescence and aging of the body’s system. Further investigation of the potential “bright side” of ROS and mitochondrial respiration is necessary to target specific pathways, such as the mechanistic target of rapamycin, nicotinamidases, sirtuins, mRNA decoupling and protein expression, and Wnt signaling, that can impact oxidative stress-ROS mechanisms to extend lifespan and eliminate disease onset. PMID:27200181

  4. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rosa damascena associated with an increased sensitivity to heat

    PubMed Central

    Schriner, Samuel E.; Katoozi, Niki S.; Pham, Kevin Q.; Gazarian, Maral; Zarban, Asghar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2011-01-01

    Rosa damascena, or Damask rose, is a rose hybrid commonly harvested for rose oil used in perfumery and for rose water used to flavor food. The petal extract of R. damascena was recently found to decrease Drosophila melanogaster mortality without impairing reproductive fitness or metabolic rate. Here, we report that R. damascena extended both mean and maximum lifespan of the fly. The extract also protected against oxidative stress in flies, predominantly in females. However, it did not alter mitochondrial respiration or content, superoxide production, or the major antioxidant defenses, superoxide dismutase and catalase. The extract increased survival in both sexes when exposed to reduced iron, though surprisingly, it sensitized both sexes to heat stress (survival at 37° C), and appeared to down-regulate the major heat shock protein HSP70 and the small mitochondrial heat shock protein HSP22, at 25° C and after heat shock (4 hours at 37° C). We hypothesize that R. damascena extends lifespan by protecting against iron, which concomitantly leads to decreased HSP expression and compromising heat tolerance. PMID:21928072

  5. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rosa damascena associated with an increased sensitivity to heat.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Katoozi, Niki S; Pham, Kevin Q; Gazarian, Maral; Zarban, Asghar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2012-04-01

    Rosa damascena, or Damask rose, is a rose hybrid commonly harvested for rose oil used in perfumery and for rose water used to flavor food. The petal extract of R. damascena was recently found to decrease Drosophila melanogaster mortality without impairing reproductive fitness or metabolic rate. Here, we report that R. damascena extended both mean and maximum lifespan of the fly. The extract also protected against oxidative stress in flies, predominantly in females. However, it did not alter mitochondrial respiration or content, superoxide production, or the major antioxidant defenses, superoxide dismutase and catalase. The extract increased survival in both sexes when exposed to reduced iron, though surprisingly, it sensitized both sexes to heat stress (survival at 37°C), and appeared to down-regulate the major heat shock protein HSP70 and the small mitochondrial heat shock protein HSP22, at 25°C and after heat shock (4 h at 37°C). We hypothesize that R. damascena extends lifespan by protecting against iron, which concomitantly leads to decreased HSP expression and compromising heat tolerance. PMID:21928072

  6. Neonatal outcomes with the use of lamotrigine for bipolar disorder in pregnancy and breastfeeding: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wakil, Laura; Epperson, C Neill; Gonzalez, Juan; O'Reardon, John P; Kim, Deborah R

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of bipolar disorder in pregnant women and the postpartum period is a complex clinical issue requiring careful consideration of the risks involved in using psychotropic medications versus the benefits of successfully managing this chronic illness. We present three cases of women exposed to lamotrigine during pregnancy and breastfeeding, with follow up of their infants until 15-18 months of development. PMID:19752842

  7. Blueberry polyphenols increase lifespan and thermotolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark A; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Ingram, Donald K; Joseph, James A; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2006-01-01

    Summary The beneficial effects of polyphenol compounds in fruits and vegetables are mainly extrapolated from in vitro studies or short-term dietary supplementation studies. Due to cost and duration, relatively little is known about whether dietary polyphenols are beneficial in whole animals, particularly with respect to aging. To address this question, we examined the effects of blueberry polyphenols on lifespan and aging of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, a useful organism for such a study. We report that a complex mixture of blue-berry polyphenols increased lifespan and slowed aging-related declines in C. elegans. We also found that these benefits did not just reflect antioxidant activity in these compounds. For instance, blueberry treatment increased survival during acute heat stress, but was not protective against acute oxidative stress. The blueberry extract consists of three major fractions that all contain antioxidant activity. However, only one fraction, enriched in proanthocyanidin compounds, increased C. elegans lifespan and thermotolerance. To further determine how polyphenols prolonged C. elegans lifespan, we analyzed the genetic requirements for these effects. Prolonged lifespan from this treatment required the presence of a CaMKII pathway that mediates osmotic stress resistance, though not other pathways that affect stress resistance and longevity. In conclusion, polyphenolic compounds in blueberries had robust and reproducible benefits during aging that were separable from antioxidant effects. PMID:16441844

  8. Blueberry polyphenols increase lifespan and thermotolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark A; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Ingram, Donald K; Joseph, James A; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2006-02-01

    The beneficial effects of polyphenol compounds in fruits and vegetables are mainly extrapolated from in vitro studies or short-term dietary supplementation studies. Due to cost and duration, relatively little is known about whether dietary polyphenols are beneficial in whole animals, particularly with respect to aging. To address this question, we examined the effects of blueberry polyphenols on lifespan and aging of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, a useful organism for such a study. We report that a complex mixture of blueberry polyphenols increased lifespan and slowed aging-related declines in C. elegans. We also found that these benefits did not just reflect antioxidant activity in these compounds. For instance, blueberry treatment increased survival during acute heat stress, but was not protective against acute oxidative stress. The blueberry extract consists of three major fractions that all contain antioxidant activity. However, only one fraction, enriched in proanthocyanidin compounds, increased C. elegans lifespan and thermotolerance. To further determine how polyphenols prolonged C. elegans lifespan, we analyzed the genetic requirements for these effects. Prolonged lifespan from this treatment required the presence of a CaMKII pathway that mediates osmotic stress resistance, though not other pathways that affect stress resistance and longevity. In conclusion, polyphenolic compounds in blueberries had robust and reproducible benefits during aging that were separable from antioxidant effects. PMID:16441844

  9. Development of a simple column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for rapid and simultaneous routine serum monitoring of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and 10-monohydroxycarbazepine (MHD).

    PubMed

    Greiner, Christine; Haen, Ekkehard

    2007-07-01

    Using isocratic column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) we established a group method for automated quantitative analysis of the antiepileptic drugs lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and its metabolite 10-monohydroxycarbazepine (MHD) that are also used in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. Samples were cleaned from interfering proteins and lipids by transfer onto a pre-column, using a PerfectBond C-8 material, with 8% acetonitrile in water as a pre-column eluent. Separation was performed by elution onto the analytical column (Betasil C6 5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min with potassium dihydrogenphosphate buffer (20 mmol/l, pH3.0)/acetonitrile (70/30; v/v) as analytical eluent. UV-spectrophotometric detection was set to 215 nm for all three compounds. The analytical run was finished within 18 min. Detection limit was 30 ng/ml for lamotrigine, 35 ng/ml for oxcarbazepine and 25 ng/ml for 10-monohydroxycarbazepine. The method was found to be suitable for automated analysis of serum samples of patients treated with lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine. PMID:17478128

  10. The comparative short-term outcome of bipolar II disorder patients variably meeting or not meeting DSM-5 duration criteria following lamotrigine treatment.

    PubMed

    McCraw, Stacey; Parker, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    There is accruing clinical and empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of lamotrigine as a treatment for bipolar II disorder. However, the treatment response experienced by those with 'short duration' hypomania (or 'other specified' bipolar disorder) has been under-researched. We reviewed a clinical sample of 123 patients diagnosed with a bipolar II disorder three months following their initial assessment. A research interview evaluated treatment strategies implemented, depressive and hypomanic episode pattern and functional outcomes. Of patients who had achieved a minimum level of 75 mg of lamotrigine, n = 51 were assigned to the BP II disorder group (i.e., hypomanic episodes lasted four days or longer) and n = 28 to the short duration group (i.e., hypomanic episodes always lasted less than four days). There were no significant differences between the two groups at the three-month follow-up on self-report measures of changes in depressive and hypomanic episode pattern or functioning across six domains (i.e., intimate relationships, family relationships, friendships, work relationships, work performance, overall quality of life), and with the majority of patients reporting some level of improvement. Study limitations include being an observational, uncontrolled design with a relatively small sample size for detecting statistical differences. Nonetheless, lamotrigine appeared to be a suitable medication to be trialled in patients who alternate between depressive episodes and short periods of hypomania, (as for those with DSM-defined hypomanic episodes), and should prompt further investigation. PMID:26905918