Sample records for landfill cover soils

  1. Flux measurements of benzene and toluene from landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Morandi, Andrea; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Nisi, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and CH(4), C(6)H(6) and C(7)H(8) fluxes from the soil cover of Case Passerini landfill site (Florence, Italy) were measured using the accumulation and static closed chamber methods, respectively. Results show that the CH(4)/CO(2), CH(4)/C(6)H(6) and CH(4)/C(7)H(8) ratios of the flux values are relatively low when compared with those of the 'pristine' biogas produced by degradation processes acting on the solid waste material disposed in the landfill. This suggests that when biogas transits through the cover soil, CH(4) is affected by degradation processes activated by oxidizing bacteria at higher extent than both CO(2) and mono-aromatics. Among the investigated hydrocarbons, C(6)H(6) has shown the highest stability in a wide range of redox conditions. Toluene behaviour only partially resembles that of C(6)H(6), possibly because de-methylation processes require less energy than that necessary for the degradation of C(6)H(6), the latter likely occurring via benzoate at anaerobic conditions and/or through various aerobic metabolic pathways at relatively shallow depth in the cover soil where free oxygen is present. According to these considerations, aromatics are likely to play an important role in the environmental impact of biogas released into the atmosphere from such anthropogenic emission sites, usually only ascribed to CO(2) and CH(4). In this regard, flux measurements using accumulation and static closed chamber methods coupled with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis may properly be used to obtain a dataset for the estimation of the amount of volatile organic compounds dispersed from landfills. PMID:21041416

  2. Rapid Methane Oxidation in a Landfill Cover Soil

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S. C.; Reeburgh, W. S.; Sandbeck, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    Methane oxidation rates observed in a topsoil covering a retired landfill are the highest reported (45 g m?2 day?1) for any environment. This microbial community had the capacity to rapidly oxidize CH4 at concentrations ranging from <1 ppm (microliters per liter) (first-order rate constant [k] = ?0.54 h?1) to >104 ppm (k = ?2.37 h?1). The physiological characteristics of a methanotroph isolated from the soil (characteristics determined in aqueous medium) and the natural population, however, were similar to those of other natural populations and cultures: the Q10 and optimum temperature were 1.9 and 31°C, respectively, the apparent half-saturation constant was 2.5 to 9.3 ?M, and 19 to 69% of oxidized CH4 was assimilated into biomass. The CH4 oxidation rate of this soil under waterlogged (41% [wt/vol] H2O) conditions, 6.1 mg liter?1 day?1, was near rates reported for lake sediment and much lower than the rate of 116 mg liter?1 day?1 in the same soil under moist (11% H2O) conditions. Since there are no large physiological differences between this microbial community and other CH4 oxidizers, we attribute the high CH4 oxidation rate in moist soil to enhanced CH4 transport to the microorganisms; gas-phase molecular diffusion is 104-fold faster than aqueous diffusion. These high CH4 oxidation rates in moist soil have implications that are important in global climate change. Soil CH4 oxidation could become a negative feedback to atmospheric CH4 increases (and warming) in areas that are presently waterlogged but are projected to undergo a reduction in summer soil moisture. PMID:16348346

  3. Landfill Gas Effects on Evapotranspirative Landfill Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, M. A.; Mattson, E.; Ankeny, M.; Kelsey, J.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of an evapotranspirative landfill cover can be adversely affected by transport of landfill gases to the plant root zone. Healthy plant communities are critical to the success and effectiveness of these vegetated landfill covers. Poor vegetative cover can result in reduced transpiration, increased percolation, and increased erosion regardless of the thickness of the cover. Visual inspections of landfill covers indicate that vegetation-free areas are not uncommon at municipal waste landfills. Data from soil profiles beneath these areas suggest that anaerobic conditions in the plant-rooting zone are controlling plant distribution. On the same landfill, aerobic conditions exist at similar depths beneath well-vegetated areas. The movement of methane and carbon dioxide, generated by degradation of organic wastes, into the overlying soil cover displaces oxygen in the root zone. Monitoring data from landfills in semi-arid areas indicate that barometric pumping can result in hours of anaerobic conditions in the root zone. Microbial consumption of oxygen in the root zone reduces the amount of oxygen available for plant root respiration but consumption of oxygen and methane also produce water as a reaction byproduct. This biogenic water production can be on the order of centimeters of water per year which, while increasing water availability, also has a negative feedback on transport of landfill gases through the cover. Accounting for these processes can improve evapotranspirative landfill cover design at other sites.

  4. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-?) where ? is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values increased rather linearly with increasing soil air content (?) for both compacted and repacked samples using different size fractions and compaction levels in Japanese and Sri Lankan soils. This suggests that the gas diffusion was controlled primarily by the air-filled pore space and was less affected by the pore structure variations such as tortuosity and connectivity. On the other hand, measured ka values showed nonlinear relations with ? and were highly affected by compaction levels and water blockage effects. For the compacted soils at high energy level, peak values in ka appeared at drier conditions than optimum water contents in the compaction curves. This would be partially caused by the pore structure changes at different water conditions under compaction. Combined effects of soil compaction and water reduction will be further discussed taking pore structure characteristics derived from measured Dp and ka into account.

  5. Effects of biochar amendment on geotechnical properties of landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna R; Yaghoubi, Poupak; Yukselen-Aksoy, Yeliz

    2015-06-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich product obtained when plant-based biomass is heated in a closed container with little or no available oxygen. Biochar-amended soil has the potential to serve as a landfill cover material that can oxidise methane emissions for two reasons: biochar amendment can increase the methane retention time and also enhance the biological activity that can promote the methanotrophic oxidation of methane. Hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength are the most important geotechnical properties that are required for the design of effective and stable landfill cover systems, but no studies have been reported on these properties for biochar-amended landfill cover soils. This article presents physicochemical and geotechnical properties of a biochar, a landfill cover soil and biochar-amended soils. Specifically, the effects of amending 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (of different particle sizes as produced, size-20 and size-40) to soil on its physicochemical properties, such as moisture content, organic content, specific gravity and pH, as well as geotechnical properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength, were determined from laboratory testing. Soil or biochar samples were prepared by mixing them with 20% deionised water based on dry weight. Samples of soil amended with 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (w/w) as-is or of different select sizes, were also prepared at 20% initial moisture content. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity of the soil increases, compressibility of the soil decreases and shear strength of the soil increases with an increase in the biochar amendment, and with a decrease in biochar particle size. Overall, the study revealed that biochar-amended soils can possess excellent geotechnical properties to serve as stable landfill cover materials. PMID:25898984

  6. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke, E-mail: i.rachor@ifb.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  7. Utilisation of chemically stabilized arsenic-contaminated soil in a landfill cover.

    PubMed

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Desogus, Paolo; Schulenburg, Sven; Arenella, Mariarita; Renella, Giancarlo; Brännvall, Evelina; Lagerkvist, Anders; Andreas, Lale; Sjöblom, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if an As-contaminated soil, stabilized using zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) and its combination with gypsum waste, coal fly ash, peat, or sewage sludge, could be used as a construction material at the top layer of the landfill cover. A reproduction of 2 m thick protection/vegetation layer of a landfill cover using a column setup was used to determine the ability of the amendments to reduce As solubility and stimulate soil functionality along the soil profile. Soil amendment with Fe(0) was highly efficient in reducing As in soil porewater reaching 99 % reduction, but only at the soil surface. In the deeper soil layers (below 0.5 m), the Fe treatment had a reverse effect, As solubility increased dramatically exceeding that of the untreated soil or any other treatment by one to two orders of magnitude. A slight bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri was detected in the Fe(0) treatment. Soil amendment with iron and peat showed no toxicity to bacteria and was the most efficient in reducing dissolved As in soil porewater throughout the 2 m soil profile followed by iron and gypsum treatment, most likely resulting from a low soil density and a good air diffusion to the soil. The least suitable combination of soil amendments for As immobilization was a mixture of iron with coal fly ash. An increase in all measured enzyme activities was observed in all treatments, particularly those receiving organic matter. For As to be stable in soil, a combination of amendments that can keep the soil porous and ensure the air diffusion through the entire soil layer of the landfill cover is required. PMID:23709267

  8. Adsorption and transport of methane in landfill cover soil amended with waste-wood biochars.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Bala Yamini; Reddy, Krishna R

    2015-08-01

    The natural presence of methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in landfill soils can stimulate the bio-chemical oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H2O under suitable environmental conditions. This mechanism can be enhanced by amending the landfill cover soil with organic materials such as biochars that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and are capable of adsorbing CH4 while facilitating the growth and activity of MOB within their porous structure. Several series of batch and small-scale column tests were conducted to quantify the CH4 sorption and transport properties of landfill cover soil amended with four types of waste hardwood biochars under different levels of amendment percentages (2, 5 and 10% by weight), exposed CH4 concentrations (0-1 kPa), moisture content (dry, 25% and 75% water holding capacity), and temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C). The linear forms of the pseudo second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model were used to determine the kinetics and the maximum CH4 adsorption capacity of cover materials. The maximum CH4 sorption capacity of dry biochar-amended soils ranged from 1.03 × 10(-2) to 7.97 × 10(-2) mol kg(-1) and exhibited a ten-fold increase compared to that of soil with 1.9 × 10(-3) mol kg(-1). The isosteric heat of adsorption for soil was negative and ranged from -30 to -118 kJ/mol, while that of the biochar-amended soils was positive and ranged from 24 to 440 kJ/mol. The CH4 dispersion coefficients for biochar-amended soils obtained through predictive transport modeling indicated that amending the soil with biochar enhanced the methane transport rates by two orders of magnitude, thereby increasing their potential for enhanced exchange of gases within the cover system. Overall, the use of hardwood biochars as a cover soil amendment to reduce methane emissions from landfills appears to be a promising alternative to conventional soil covers. PMID:25935750

  9. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests.

    PubMed

    Gómez, K E; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Lazzaro, A; Schroth, M H

    2009-09-01

    Methane (CH(4)) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH(4) to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH(4) oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH(4), O(2) and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH(4) with either Ar or CH(4) itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH(4) oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8+/-0.8 h(-1) at location 1 and 18.9+/-0.6 h(-1) at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH(4) concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH(4) concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH(4) in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH(4) oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH(4) oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH(4) concentrations were low. PMID:19525106

  10. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: gomezke@hotmail.com; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Lazzaro, A. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schroth, M.H. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch

    2009-09-15

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH{sub 4} to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH{sub 4} with either Ar or CH{sub 4} itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH{sub 4} oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 {+-} 0.8 h{sup -1} at location 1 and 18.9 {+-} 0.6 h{sup -1} at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH{sub 4} concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH{sub 4} concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH{sub 4} in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH{sub 4} oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH{sub 4} concentrations were low.

  11. Performance evaluation of intermediate cover soil barrier for removal of heavy metals in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Anegawa, Aya; Endo, Kazuto; Yamada, Masato; Ono, Yusaku; Ono, Yoshiro

    2008-11-01

    This pilot-scale study evaluated the use of intermediate cover soil barriers for removing heavy metals in leachate generated from test cells for co-disposed fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators, ash melting plants, and shredder residue. Cover soil barriers were mixtures of Andisol (volcanic ash soil), waste iron powder, (grinder dust waste from iron foundries), and slag fragments. The cover soil barriers were installed in the test cells' bottom layer. Sorption/desorption is an important process in cover soil bottom barrier for removal of heavy metals in landfill leachate. Salt concentrations such as those of Na, K, and Ca in leachate were extremely high (often greater than 30 gL(-1)) because of high salt content in fly ash from ash melting plants. Concentrations of all heavy metals (nickel, manganese, copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium) in test cell leachates with a cover soil barrier were lower than those of the test cell without a cover soil barrier and were mostly below the discharge limit, probably because of dilution caused by the amount of leachate and heavy metal removal by the cover soil barrier. The cover soil barriers' heavy metal removal efficiency was calculated. About 50% of copper, nickel, and manganese were removed. About 20% of the zinc and boron were removed, but lead and cadmium were removed only slightly. Based on results of calculation of the Langelier saturation index and analyses of core samples, the reactivity of the cover soil barrier apparently decreases because of calcium carbonate precipitation on the cover soil barriers' surfaces. PMID:18842283

  12. Attenuation of methane and volatile organic compounds in landfill soil covers.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mosbaek, Hans; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The potential for natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in landfill covers was investigated in soil microcosms incubated with methane and air, simulating the gas composition in landfill soil covers. Soil was sampled at Skellingsted Landfill at a location emitting methane. In total, 26 VOCs were investigated, including chlorinated methanes, ethanes, ethenes, fluorinated hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons. The soil showed a high capacity for methane oxidation resulting in very high oxidation rates of between 24 and 112 microg CH4 g(-1) h(-1). All lower chlorinated compounds were shown degradable, and the degradation occurred in parallel with the oxidation of methane. In general, the degradation rates of the chlorinated aliphatics were inversely related to the chlorine to carbon ratios. For example, in batch experiments with chlorinated ethylenes, the highest rates were observed for vinyl chloride (VC) and lowest rates for trichloroethylene (TCE), while tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was not degraded. Maximal oxidation rates for the halogenated aliphatic compounds varied between 0.03 and 1.7 microg g(-1) h(-1). Fully halogenated hydrocarbons (PCE, tetrachloromethane [TeCM], chlorofluorocarbon [CFC]-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) were not degraded in the presence of methane and oxygen. Aromatic hydrocarbons were rapidly degraded giving high maximal oxidation rates (0.17-1.4 microg g(-1) h(-1)). The capacity for methane oxidation was related to the depth of oxygen penetration. The methane oxidizers were very active in oxidizing methane and the selected trace components down to a depth of 50 cm below the surface. Maximal oxidation activity occurred in a zone between 15 and 20 cm below the surface, as this depth allowed sufficient supply of both methane and oxygen. Mass balance calculations using the maximal oxidation rates obtained demonstrated that landfill soil covers have a significant potential for not only methane oxidation but also cometabolic degradation of selected volatile organics, thereby reducing emissions to the atmosphere. PMID:14964359

  13. Methane oxidation activity and bacterial community composition in a simulated landfill cover soil is influenced by the growth of Chenopodium album L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunlong Wang; Weixiang Wu; Ying Ding; Wei Liu; Anton Perera; Yingxu Chen; Medha Devare

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen availability in landfill cover soil is a major limitation to the growth and activity of methanotrophs as methane oxidation is an aerobic microbial process. Plants tolerant to high concentrations of landfill gas (LFG) may play an important role in improving methane oxidation within landfill cover soil and reducing emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from it. In this study,

  14. Degradation of C2-C15 volatile organic compounds in a landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Liccioli, Caterina; Moretti, Sandro; Nisi, Barbara

    2009-07-15

    The composition of non-methane volatile organic compounds (hereafter VOCs) in i) the cover soil, at depths of 30, 50 and 70 cm, and ii) gas recovery wells from Case Passerini landfill site, (Florence, Italy) was determined by GC-MS. The study, based on the analysis of interstitial gases sampled along vertical profiles within the cover soil, was aimed to investigate the VOC behaviour as biogas transits from a reducing to a relatively more oxidizing environment. A total of 48 and 63 different VOCs were identified in the soil and well gases, respectively. Aromatics represent the dominant group (71.5% of total VOC) in soil gases, followed by alkanes (6.8%), ketones (5.7%), organic acids (5.2%), aldehydes (3.0%), esters (2.6%), halogenated compounds (2.1%) and terpenes (1.3%). Cyclics, heterocyclics, S-bearing compounds and phenols are cover soil shows significant variations: alkanes, aromatics and cyclics decrease at decreasing depth, whereas an inverse trend is displayed by the O-bearing species. Total VOC and CH(4) concentrations at a depth of 30 cm in the soil are comparable, inferring that microbial activity is likely affecting VOCs at a very minor extent with respect to CH(4). According to these considerations, to assess the biogas emission impact, usually carried out on the sole basis of CO(2) and CH(4) emission rates, the physical-chemical behaviour of VOCs in the cover soil, regulating the discharge of these highly contaminant compounds in ambient air, has to be taken into account. The soil vertical distribution of these species can be used to better evaluate the efficiency of oxidative capability of intermediate and final covers. PMID:19446310

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  16. [Effect of operational modes on community structure of type I methanotroph in the cover soil of municipal solid waste landfill].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; He, Pin-Jing; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Type I methanotroph is crucial for methane oxidization and it responses fast to the changes in environment. In this study, 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) gene fingerprint technology was applied to investigate the effect of operational modes, i. e. high-density polyethylene liner (HDPE) isolation or subsurface irrigation of landfill leachate and vegetation, on community structure and diversity of type I methanotroph in soils covering municipal solid waste landfill. 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis reveals type I methanotroph in all tested soils belongs to Methylobacter. According to Shannon-Wiener diversity index and principal component analysis, landfill leachate subsurface irrigation and vegetation have more impact on type I methanotroph community structure and diversity than HDPE liner isolation does, and they reduce type I methanotroph diversity. Leachate irrigation is supposed to inhibit the growth of Methylobacter population. Community structure of type I methanotroph in landfill cover soil isolated by HDPE, i.e. invaded by landfill gas, shifts during long-term gas interference. When cover age is 1.5 years old, Shannon-Wiener diversity index of type I methanotroph reaches its maximum. PMID:19143406

  17. CH4/CO2 ratios indicate highly efficient methane oxidation by a pumice landfill cover-soil.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Chris; Walcroft, Adrian S; Deslippe, Julie; Tate, Kevin R

    2013-02-01

    Landfills that generate too little biogas for economic energy recovery can potentially offset methane (CH(4)) emissions through biological oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria in cover soils. This study reports on the CH(4) oxidation efficiency of a 10-year old landfill cap comprising a volcanic pumice soil. Surface CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes were measured using field chambers during three sampling intervals over winter and summer. Methane fluxes were temporally and spatially variable (-0.36 to 3044 mgCH(4)m(-2)h(-1)); but were at least 15 times lower than typical literature CH(4) fluxes reported for older landfills in 45 of the 46 chambers tested. Exposure of soil from this landfill cover to variable CH(4) fluxes in laboratory microcosms revealed a very strong correlation between CH(4) oxidation efficiency and CH(4)/CO(2) ratios, confirming the utility of this relationship for approximating CH(4) oxidation efficiency. CH(4)/CO(2) ratios were applied to gas concentrations from the surface flux chambers and indicated a mean CH(4) oxidation efficiency of 72%. To examine CH(4) oxidation with soil depth, we collected 10 soil depth profiles at random locations across the landfill. Seven profiles exhibited CH(4) removal rates of 70-100% at depths <60 cm, supporting the high oxidation rates observed in the chambers. Based on a conservative 70% CH(4) oxidation efficiency occurring at the site, this cover soil is clearly offsetting far greater CH(4) quantities than the 10% default value currently adopted by the IPCC. PMID:23186636

  18. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    PubMed

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions. PMID:25475118

  19. Construction Costs of Six Landfill Cover Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-12-23

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side for direct comparison. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  20. Cost comparisons of alternative landfill final covers

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-02-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle ``D`` Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle ``C`` Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed of uniform size, side-by-side. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  1. Field-scale tracking of active methane-oxidizing communities in a landfill cover soil reveals spatial and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Ruth; Chiri, Eleonora; Bodelier, Paul E L; Frenzel, Peter; Lüke, Claudia; Schroth, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in soils mitigate methane (CH4 ) emissions. We assessed spatial and seasonal differences in active MOB communities in a landfill cover soil characterized by highly variable environmental conditions. Field-based measurements of CH4 oxidation activity and stable-isotope probing of polar lipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) were complemented by microarray analysis of pmoA genes and transcripts, linking diversity and function at the field scale. In situ?CH4 oxidation rates varied between sites and were generally one order of magnitude lower in winter compared with summer. Results from PLFA-SIP and pmoA transcripts were largely congruent, revealing distinct spatial and seasonal clustering. Overall, active MOB communities were highly diverse. Type Ia MOB, specifically Methylomonas and Methylobacter, were key drivers for CH4 oxidation, particularly at a high-activity site. Type II MOB were mainly active at a site showing substantial fluctuations in CH4 loading and soil moisture content. Notably, Upland Soil Cluster-gamma-related pmoA transcripts were also detected, indicating concurrent oxidation of atmospheric CH4 . Spatial separation was less distinct in winter, with Methylobacter and uncultured MOB mediating CH4 oxidation. We propose that high diversity of active MOB communities in this soil is promoted by high variability in environmental conditions, facilitating substantial removal of CH4 generated in the waste body. PMID:25186436

  2. FIELD PERMEABILITY TESTING FOR A RCRA LANDFILL FINAL COVER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew M. Petsonk; Walter Romanowski; Vince Richards

    A Quality Assurance - Quality Control (QA\\/QC) Program developed for use at the BKK Corporation Landfill in Southern California involves a unique approach for permeability testing of the Landfill final cover. T he program contains five major elements: (i) in-situ, field permeability testing of the compacted cover material as it is being placed, (ii) laboratory permeameter testing of soil cores,

  3. Influence of Physical Parameters on Methane Oxidation in Landfill Cover Soils

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    an important contribution to the anthropogenic induced global warming, and it has been estimated that landfills and con- tribute to the mitigation of global warming. #12;2 Index Abstract............................................................................................................. 3 1.1 Relevant Gases for Global Warming

  4. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

  5. Long-term distribution, mobility and plant availability of compost-derived heavy metals in a landfill covering soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Businelli; L. Massaccesi; D. Said-Pullicino; G. Gigliotti

    2009-01-01

    The application of municipal waste compost (MWC) and other organic materials may serve to enhance soil fertility of earthen materials and mine spoils used in land reclamation activities, particularly in the recovery of degraded areas left by exhausted quarries, mines and landfill sites among others. The long-term distribution, mobility and phytoavailability of heavy metals in such anthropogenic soils were studied

  6. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  7. TDR calibration for the alternative landfill cover demonstration (ALCD)

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, J.; Dwyer, S.F.; Swanson, J.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.

    1997-09-01

    The Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration is a large scale field test that compares the performance of various landfill cover designs in dry environments. An important component of the comparison is the change in the moisture content of the soils throughout the different cover test plots. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is the primary method for the measurement of the volumetric moisture content. Each of the covers is composed of layers of varying types and densities of soils. The probes are therefore calibrated to calculate the volumetric moisture content in each of the different soils in order to gain the optimum performance of the TDR system. The demonstration plots are constructed in two phases; a different probe is used in each phase. The probe that is used in Phase 1 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, compacted native soil mixed with 6% sodium bentonite by weight, and sand. The probe that is used in Phase 2 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, and sand. In addition, the probes are calibrated for the varying cable lengths of the TDR probes. The resulting empirically derived equations allow for the calculation of in-situ volumetric moisture content of all of the varying soils throughout the cover test plots in the demonstration.

  8. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  9. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  10. EVALUATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL COVER DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HELP (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) Model was used to evaluate the hydrologic behavior of a series of one-, two-, and three-layer cover designs for municipal solid waste landfill cover designs were chosen to isolate the effects of features such as surface veg...

  11. 75 FR 6597 - Determination to Approve Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, MT Landfill...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, MT Landfill; Opportunity for...approve an alternative final cover for the Lake County landfill, a municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) owned and operated by Lake County, Montana on the Confederated...

  12. Hydrologic studies of multilayered landfill covers for closure of waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martin, C.E.; Martinez, J.L.; Schofield, T.G.

    1993-06-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15 and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated waterflow datalogging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system.

  13. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  14. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  15. Transformation of a landfill covering amended with municipal waste compost, Perugia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Businelli, Mario; Calandra, Rolando; Pagliai, Marcello; Businelli, Daniela; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Grasselli, Olga; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Leccese, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    This research deals with the transformation of an anthropomorphous landfill covering composed of a fill soil mixed with mechanically separated municipal waste compost. The study site was a municipal landfill near Perugia, Italy. Throughout the years, waste disposal in the landfill was performed by burial in horizontal layers, each one representing a yearly disposal. The external front of the landfill thus represented the yearly disposal over a 10-yr period starting in 1993. Temporal changes in the anthropomorphous soil over this period were studied by examining and describing soil profiles, and by collecting and analyzing soil samples from the 1993, 1994, 1997, and 2001 disposals. The samples were subjected to a series of physical, chemical, and biochemical analyses. The results obtained suggest that over a 10-yr period the top layer gained a pedological structure (subangular blocky and/or crumb) giving rise to an A horizon. Improved soil structure was confirmed by an increase in macroporosity, particularly for pores larger than 50 microm, measured by image analysis of soil thin sections. Total extractable carbon showed an increase in the content of humic substances, evidenced by parameters of humification. Enzymatic activities in the A and C1 horizons were also indicative of soil evolution and may serve as a valid indicator for monitoring the evolution of anthropogenic soils containing municipal waste compost. PMID:17215234

  16. Field Performance Of Three Compacted Clay Landfill Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted at sites in subtropical Georgia, seasonal and humid Iowa, and arid southeastern California to evaluate the field hydrology of compacted clay covers for final closure of landfills. Water balance of the covers was monitored with large (10 by 20 m ), instrumen...

  17. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  18. Field applicability of self-recovering sustainable liner as landfill final cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ohjung Kwon; Wanjei Cho

    2011-01-01

    Preventing the penetration of rainwater into a landfill site is the main purpose of the final cover in landfill sites. Conventional\\u000a designs of landfill covers use geotextiles, such as geomembrane and geosynthetic clay liners, and clay liners to lower the\\u000a permeability of the final cover of landfill sites. However, differential settlement and climatic effects in landfill sites\\u000a instigate crack development

  19. LANDFILL LEACHATE CLOGGING OF GEOTEXTILE (AND SOIL) FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary leachate collection system of most solid waste landfills contains a filter layer which has historically been a granular soil. ecently, however, various types of geotextile filters have been used to replace the natural soil filters. roject using six different landfill ...

  20. Landfill leachate clogging of geotextile (and soil) filters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Koerner; G. R. Koerner

    1991-01-01

    The primary leachate collection system of most solid waste landfills contains a filter layer which has historically been a granular soil. Recently, however, various types of geotextile filters have been used to replace the natural soil filters. A project using six different landfill leachates and aimed at investigating the functioning of different geotextile filters is the focus of this 36

  1. 75 FR 50930 - Final Determination To Approve Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, Montana Landfill

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, Montana Landfill AGENCY: Environmental...approve an alternative final cover for the Lake County landfill, a municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) owned and operated by Lake County, Montana on the Confederated...

  2. Tension of Geosynthetic Material Regarding Soils on Landfill Liner Slopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHIA-NAN LIU

    Evaluating the tension within geosynthetic components of landfill liner slopes is important for establishing the reliability of the lining system and the design of the anchor system. In this paper, a simple but accurate analytical approach for evaluating tensile loads within geosynthetic materials induced by the soils on landfill liner slopes is introduced. The existing conventional analytical methods consider the

  3. Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan; Zhang, Mengqun; Wu, Weili; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jin

    2011-05-01

    Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term. PMID:21232931

  4. Successive development of soil ecosystems at abandoned coal-ash landfills.

    PubMed

    Pen-Mouratov, Stanislav; Shukurov, Nosir; Yu, Jun; Rakhmonkulova, Shakhnoza; Kodirov, Obidjon; Barness, Gineta; Kersten, Michael; Steinberger, Yosef

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine the effect of the native vegetation on the successive development of the soil ecosystem at abandoned coal-ash landfills of the Angren coal-fired power plant in Uzbekistan. Two different landfills (one not in use for 3 years, termed newer, and the other not in use for 10 years, termed older) with different degrees of vegetation cover were chosen to assess the time and vegetation effects on soil biota and habitat development. The soil biotic structure, including soil microorganisms and soil free-living nematode communities, was investigated both at open plots and under different native plants at the coal-ash landfill area. The observed soil microorganisms were found to be the most important component of the observed ecosystems. Total abundance, biomass, species, trophic and sexual diversity of soil free-living nematodes, along with fungi and organic-matter content, were found to be correlated with trace metals. The nematode trophic and species abundance and diversity increased from the newer toward the older coal-ash landfills. The sex ratio of the nematode communities was found to be dependent on the environmental conditions of the study area, with the males being the most sensitive nematode group. All applied ecological indices confirmed that open landfill plots distant from plants are the most unfavorable areas for soil biota. In that respect, the native plants Alhagi maurorum Desv. and Tamarix sp. were found to be important environmental components for the natural remediation of a soil ecosystem in the coal-ash landfill area. PMID:24676936

  5. Keep your soil covered

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn residue is being considered as a possible feedstock for biofuels production. The long-term impacts on soil health of removing this residue are not well understood. Plant material is one of the soil’s main sources of organic materials. Organic matter is a very important component of soil. It su...

  6. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hrad, Marlies [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within the waste layer. Laboratory results also revealed sufficient air permeability of the soil materials (TS-F and SS-Z) placed in lysimeter C. However, at higher compaction density SS-Z became impermeable at 100% WHC. Methane emissions from the reference lysimeter with the smaller substrate cover (12-52 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) were significantly higher than fluxes from the other lysimeters (0-19 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) during in situ aeration. Regarding water balance, lysimeters covered with compost and compost-sand mixture, showed the lowest leachate rate (18-26% of the precipitation) due to the high water holding capacity and more favourable plant growth conditions compared to the lysimeters with mineral, more cohesive, soil covers (27-45% of the precipitation). On the basis of these results, the authors suggest a layered top cover system using both compost material as well as mineral soil in order to support active low-pressure aeration. Conventional soil materials with lower permeability may be used on top of the landfill body for a more uniform aeration of the waste due to an increased resistance to vertical gas flow. A compost cover may be built on top of the soil cover underlain by a gas distribution layer to improve methane oxidation rates and minimise water infiltration. By planting vegetation with a high transpiration rate, the leachate amount emanating from the landfill could be further minimised. The suggested design may be particularly suitable in combination with intermittent in situ aeration, in the later stage of an aeration measure, or at very small sites and shallow deposits. The top cover system could further regulate water infiltration into the landfill and mitigate residual CH{sub 4} emissions, even beyond the time of active aeration.

  7. Boron in irrigation water and its interactions with soil and plants: an example of municpal landfill leachate reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja ZUPAN?I? JUSTIN

    In several countries, leachate is successfully treated by recirculation to the vegetated landfill cover, as it contains several micro and macronutrients for plant growth. However, the proportion and concentration of some parameters can negatively affect the plant growth and soil quality in the case of high leachate input. The presented research discusses B in leachate and its interactions with soil

  8. Use of impervious covers and carbon adsorption for the control of leachate production in municipal landfills

    E-print Network

    Carmichael, Richard Charles

    1979-01-01

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering USE OF IMPERVIOUS COVPRS AND CARSON ADSOPPTION FOR THL CONTPOI OF LEACHATE PRODUCTION IN MUNICIPAL LANDFILLS A Thesfs by RICHARD CHARLES CARsIICHAEL Approved... and advantages/disadvantages of covering a landfill to prevent water intrusion versus lining a landfill to collect and treat stage-3 leachate were compared. Basically the prevention of etage-3 leachate production appeared the most practical engineering...

  9. Cover Crops Soil Health Forum

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    blinking light, onto Silk Farm Road. 4. Entrance to Center and Sanctuary is on the left. See sign. Cover Crops & Soil Health Forum February 18, 2014 NH Audubon Center 84 Silk Farm Road Concord, NH 03301

  10. USE OF ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS FOR DAILY COVER AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current (ca. 1992) applicability of alternative materials as daily cover at landfills was assessed from an operational, performance, environmental, and economic perspective. he types of products and materials considered included commercially available foams, spray-ons and geo...

  11. Use of the time domain reflectrometry in hydraulic studies of multilayered landfill covers for closure of waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; Martin, C.E.

    1994-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing hydraulic and capillary engineered barriers. Seepage is being evaluated as a function of slope length for each plot, as well as interflow, runoff, and precipitation, using an automated water flow datalogging system that routinely collects hourly data. Soil water content within these 16 field plots has been routinely monitored four times a day since November 1991 using time domain reflectrometry techniques with an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Volumetric water content is measured with a pair of 60-cm-long waveguides at each of 212 locations. One set of waveguides was emplaced vertically in four locations in every soil layer to determine soil water inventory in each field plot. A second set of waveguides was emplaced horizontally in several soil layers to provide a more detailed picture of soil water dynamics close to soil layer interfaces. Field data is presented showing pulses of soil water moving through the soil and engineered barriers with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  12. Field Performance Of A Compacted Clay Landfill Final Cover At A Humid Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted in southern Georgia, USA, to evalaute how the hydraulic properties of the compacted clay barrier layer in a final landfill cover changed over a 4-year service life. The cover was part of a test section constructed in a large drainage lysimeter that allowed ...

  13. Landfill cover revegetation using organic amendments and cobble mulch in the arid southwest

    SciTech Connect

    AGUILAR,RICHARD; DWYER,STEPHEN F.; REAVIS,BRUCE A.; NEWMAN,GRETCHEN CARR; LOFTIN,SAMUEL R.

    2000-02-01

    Cobble mulch and composted biosolids, greenwaste, and dairy manure were added to arid soil in an attempt to improve plant establishment and production, minimize erosion, increase evapotranspiration, and reduce leaching. Twenty-four plots (10 x 10 m) were established in a completely randomized block design (8 treatments, 3 plots per treatment). Treatments included (1) non-irrigated control, (2) irrigated control, (3) non-irrigated greenwaste compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (4) irrigated greenwaste compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (5) non-irrigated biosolids compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (6) irrigated biosolids compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (7) cobble-mulch, and (8) non-irrigated dairy manure compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot). Soil samples were collected from each plot for laboratory analyses to assess organic matter contents, macro-nutrient levels and trace metal contents, and nitrogen mineralization potential. All plots were seeded similarly with approximately equal portions of cool and warm season native grasses. The organic composts (greenwaste, biosolids, dairy manure) added to the soils substantially increased soil organic matter and plant nutrients including total nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the results of a laboratory study of the soils' nitrogen mineralization potential after the application of the various composts showed that the soil nitrogen-supplying capability decreased to non-amended soil levels by the start of the second growing season. Thus, from the standpoint of nitrogen fertilizer value, the benefits of the organic compost amendments appear to have been relatively short-lived. The addition of biosolids compost, however, did not produce significant changes in the soils' copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations and thus did not induce adverse environmental conditions due to excessive heavy metal concentrations. Supplemental irrigation water during the first and second growing seasons did not appear to increase plant biomass production in the irrigated control plots over that produced in the non-irrigated control plots. This surprising result was probably due to the cumulative effects of other factors that influenced the initial establishment and production of plants in the plots (e.g., plant species competition, seed germination delay times, differences in nutrient release and availability). Variation within individual plots, and among the three replicate plots associated with each treatment, rendered many of the recorded differences in vegetation establishment and production statistically insignificant. However, after two complete growing seasons the highest total plant foliar cover and the greatest biomass production and plant species diversity occurred in the cobble-mulched plots. These results suggest that cobble-mulch may be the desired amendment in re-vegetated arid landfill covers if the principal objectives are to quickly establish vegetation cover, stabilize the site from erosion, and increase water usage by plants, thereby reducing the potential for leaching and contaminant movement from the landfill's waste-bearing zone.

  14. Empirical gas emission and oxidation measurement at cover soil of dumping site: example from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Basri, Hassan; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; El-Shafie, Ahmed Hussein

    2013-06-01

    Methane (CH?) is one of the most relevant greenhouse gases and it has a global warming potential 25 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO?), risking human health and the environment. Microbial CH? oxidation in landfill cover soils may constitute a means of controlling CH? emissions. The study was intended to quantify CH? and CO? emissions rates at the Sungai Sedu open dumping landfill during the dry season, characterize their spatial and temporal variations, and measure the CH? oxidation associated with the landfill cover soil using a homemade static flux chamber. Concentrations of the gases were analyzed by a Micro-GC CP-4900. Two methods, kriging values and inverse distance weighting (IDW), were found almost identical. The findings of the proposed method show that the ratio of CH? to CO? emissions was 25.4 %, indicating higher CO? emissions than CH? emissions. Also, the average CH? oxidation in the landfill cover soil was 52.5 %. The CH? and CO? emissions did not show fixed-pattern temporal variation based on daytime measurements. Statistically, a negative relationship was found between CH? emissions and oxidation (R(2) = 0.46). It can be concluded that the variation in the CH? oxidation was mainly attributed to the properties of the landfill cover soil. PMID:23054277

  15. Soil chemistry and pollution study of a closed landfill site at Ampar Tenang, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Adnan, Siti Nur Syahirah Binti; Yusoff, Sumiani; Piaw, Chua Yan

    2013-06-01

    A total of 20 landfills are located in State of Selangor, Malaysia. This includes the Ampar Tenang landfill site, which was closed on 26 January 2010. It was reported that the landfill has been upgraded to a level I type of sanitary classification. However, the dumpsite area is not being covered according to the classification. In addition, municipal solid waste was dumped directly on top of the unlined natural alluvium formation. This does not only contaminate surface and subsurface soils, but also initiates the potential risk of groundwater pollution. Based on previous studies, the Ampar Tenang soil has been proven to no longer be capable of preventing pollution migration. In this study, metal concentrations of soil samples up to 30 m depth were analyzed based on statistical analysis. It is very significant because research of this type has not been carried out before. The subsurface soils were significantly polluted by arsenic (As), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al). As and Pb exceeded the safe limit values of 5.90 mg/kg and 31.00 mg/kg, respectively, based on Provincial Sediment Quality Guidelines for Metals and the Interim Sediment Quality Values. Furthermore, only Cu concentrations showed a significantly decreasing trend with increasing depth. Most metals were found on clay-type soils based on the cluster analysis method. Moreover, the analysis also differentiates two clusters: cluster I-Pb, As, zinc, Cu, manganese, calcium, sodium, magnesium, potassium and Fe; cluster II-Al. Different clustering may suggest a different contamination source of metals. PMID:23528999

  16. A process-based inventory model for landfill CH4 emissions inclusive of seasonal soil microclimate and CH4 oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spokas, K.; Bogner, J.; Chanton, J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed and field-validated an annual inventory model for California landfill CH4 emissions that incorporates both site-specific soil properties and soil microclimate modeling coupled to 0.5° scale global climatic models. Based on 1-D diffusion, CALMIM (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely available JAVA tool which models a typical annual cycle for CH4 emissions from site-specific daily, intermediate, and final landfill cover designs. Literature over the last decade has emphasized that the major factors controlling emissions in these highly managed soil systems are the presence or absence of engineered gas extraction, gaseous transport rates as affected by the thickness and physical properties of cover soils, and methanotrophic CH4 oxidation in cover materials as a function of seasonal soil microclimate. Moreover, current IPCC national inventory models for landfill CH4 emissions based on theoretical gas generation have high uncertainties and lack comprehensive field validation. This new approach, which is compliant with IPCC "Tier III" criteria, has been field-validated at two California sites (Monterey County; Los Angeles County), with limited field validation at three additional California sites. CALMIM accurately predicts soil temperature and moisture trends with emission predictions within the same order of magnitude as field measurements, indicating an acceptable initial model comparison in the context of published literature on measured CH4 emissions spanning 7 orders of magnitude. In addition to regional defaults for inventory purposes, CALMIM permits user-selectable parameters and boundary conditions for more rigorous site-specific applications where detailed CH4 emissions, meteorological, and soil microclimate data exist.

  17. Reuse of MSWI bottom ash mixed with natural sodium bentonite as landfill cover material.

    PubMed

    Puma, Sara; Marchese, Franco; Dominijanni, Andrea; Manassero, Mario

    2013-06-01

    The research described in this study had the aim of evaluating the reuse of incinerator slag, mixed with sodium bentonite, for landfill capping system components. A characterization was performed on pure bottom ash (BA) samples from an incinerator in the north of Italy. The results show that the BA samples had appropriate properties as covers. The compacted dry unit weight of the studied BA (16.2 kN m(-3)) was lower than the average value that characterizes most conventional fill materials and this can be considered advantageous for landfill cover systems, since the fill has to be placed on low bearing capacity ground or where long-term settlement is possible. Moreover, direct shear tests showed a friction angle of 43°, corresponding to excellent mechanical characteristics that can be considered an advantage against failure. The hydraulic conductivity tests indicated a steady-state value of 8 × 10(-10) m s(-1) for a mixture characterized by a bentonite content by weight of 10%, which was a factor 10 better than required by Italian legislation on landfill covers. The results from a swell index test indicated that fine bentonite swelled, even when divalent cations were released by the BA. The leaching behaviour of the mixture did not show any contamination issues and was far better than obtained for the pure BA. Thus, the BA-bentonite mixture qualified as a suitable material for landfill cover in Italy. Moreover, owing to the low release of toxic compounds, the proposed cover system would have no effect on the leachate quality in the landfill. PMID:23478909

  18. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  19. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILLS ON UNDERLYING SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three municipal landfill sites in the eastern and central United States were studied to determine the effects of the disposal facilities on surrounding soils and groundwater. Borings were made up the groundwater gradient, down the groundwater gradient and through the landfill. So...

  20. Assessment of an active dry barrier for a landfill cover system

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ankeny, M.D.; Burkhard, M.E.; Tansey, M.K.; Kelsey, J.A. [Stephens (Daniel B.) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    A dry barrier is a layer of geologic material that is dried by air flow. An active dry barrier system can be designed, installed, and operated as part of a landfill cover system. An active system uses blowers and fans to move air through a high-permeability layer within the cover system. Depending principally on the air-flow rate, it is possible for a dry barrier to remove enough water to substantially reduce the likelihood of water percolating through the cover system. If a material with a relatively great storage capacity, such as processed tuff, is used as the coarse layer, then the efficiency of the dry barrier will be increased.

  1. Utilization of stabilized and solidified sewage sludge as a daily landfill cover material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ha Ik Chung; Yong Soo Lee

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of stabilized and solidified sewage sludge for use as a daily landfill cover material, unconfined\\u000a compressive strength, CBR (California Bearing Ratio), hydraulic conductivity, rainfall drainage ability, and erosion resistance\\u000a were examined. In addition, material segregation of the solidified sewage sludge was investigated. The experiment results\\u000a showed that the solidified sewage sludge material had enough equipment transportability.

  2. PREDICTION/MITIGATION OF SUBSIDENCE DAMAGE TO HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characteristics of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste landfills and of landfilled hazardous wastes have been described to permit development of models and other analytical techniques for predicting, reducing, and preventing landfill settlement and related cove...

  3. GEOSYNTHETIC REINFOR CEMENT IN LANDFILL DESIGN: US PERSPECTIVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge G. Zornberg

    Geosynthetic reinforcement in landfill applications in the US has involved conventional reinforced soil structures and veneer stabilization with re inforcements placed along the landfill slope and anchored at the crest. In addition, i nnovative approaches have been recently implemented in the US to reinforce landfill cover s and base liners. This includes horizontally placed geosyn thetic reinforcements, which are anchored

  4. Isotopic tracing of landfill leachates and pollutant lead mobility in soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Vilomet, J D; Veron, A; Ambrosi, J P; Moustier, S; Bottero, J Y; Chatelet-Snidaro, L

    2003-10-15

    Here we provide evidence of the capability of stable lead isotopes to trace landfill leachate in a shallow groundwater. The municipal landfill we have investigated is located in southeastern France. It has no bottom liner, and wastes are placed directly on the ground. Stable lead isotopes allow the characterization of this landfill leachate signature (206Pb/207Pb = 1.189 +/- 0.004) that is clearly different from that of the local atmosphere (206Pb/207Pb = 1.150 +/- 0.006) and crustal lead (206Pb/207Pb = 1.200 +/- 0.005). Piezometers located in the direct vicinity of the landfill generally display this contaminant imprint. The landfill plume is monitored up to 1000 m downgradient of the landfill, in very good agreement with evaluation from chloride concentration. Meanwhile, 206Pb/207Pb ratios measured at a piezometer located 4600 m downgradient of the landfill suggest a contamination by the landfill plume. This result shows that the complexity of a pollutant plume dispersion in this shallow groundwater system requires several independent tracers to clearly resolve origin and transport pathways for contaminants. Furthermore, seasonal rainfall variation for this Mediterranean mixed Quaternary alluvion reservoir and the use of KCl fertilizers might favor an efficient remobilization of atmospheric lead in plowed soils and its transfer into groundwater as shown by lead isotope systematics. PMID:14594365

  5. Effects of substrate induced respiration on the stability of bottom ash in landfill cover environment.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, A; Lovat, E; Persson, K M

    2014-12-01

    The municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is being increasingly used to construct landfill covers in Sweden. In post-closure, owing to increased cover infiltration, the percolating water can add external organic matter to bottom ash. The addition and subsequent degradation of this external organic matter can affect metal mobility through complexation and change in redox conditions. However, the impacts of such external organic matter addition on bottom ash stability have not been fully evaluated yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of external organic matter on bottom ash respiration and metal leaching. The samples of weathered bottom ash were mixed with oven dried and digested wastewater sludge (1%-5% by weight). The aerobic respiration activity (AT4), as well as the leaching of metals, was tested with the help of respiration and batch leaching tests. The respiration and heavy metal leaching increased linearly with the external organic matter addition. Based on the results, it was concluded that the external organic matter addition would negatively affect the quality of landfill cover drainage. PMID:25395160

  6. Winter cover biomass production and soil penetrability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops can benefit production systems in the southeastern US. Winter cover crops, such as rye (Secale cereale) can reduce weed pressure, increase water infiltration, and improve soil quality over a long period of time. Although several studies have focused on the effects of having a wi...

  7. Field note: comparative efficacy of a woody evapotranspiration landfill cover following the removal of aboveground biomass.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William; Munk, Jens; Byrd, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Woody vegetation cultivated for moisture management on evapotranspiration (ET) landfill covers could potentially serve a secondary function as a biomass crop. However, research is required to evaluate the extent to which trees could be harvested from ET covers without significantly impacting their moisture management function. This study investigated the drainage through a six-year-old, primarily poplar/cottonwood ET test cover for a period of one year following the harvest of all woody biomass exceeding a height of 30 cm above ground surface. Results were compared to previously reported drainage observed during the years leading up to the coppice event. In the first year following coppice, the ET cover was found to be 93% effective at redirecting moisture during the spring/summer season, and 95% effective during the subsequent fall/winter season. This was slightly lower than the 95% and 100% efficacy observed in the spring/summer and fall/winter seasons, respectively, during the final measured year prior to coppice. However, the post-coppice efficacy was higher than the efficacy observed during the first three years following establishment of the cover. While additional longer-term studies are recommended, this project demonstrated that woody ET covers could potentially produce harvestable biomass while still effectively managing aerial moisture. PMID:25254294

  8. Soils and the soil cover of the Valley of Geysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, D. N.; Gennadiev, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    The results of field studies of the soil cover within the tourist part of the Valley of Geysers in Kamchatka performed in 2010 and 2011 are discussed. The morphology of soils, their genesis, and their dependence on the degree of hydrothermal impact are characterized; the soil cover patterns developing in the valley are analyzed. On the basis of the materials provided by the Kronotskii Biospheric Reserve and original field data, the soil map of the valley has been developed. The maps of vegetation conditions, soil temperature at the depth of 15 cm, and slopes of the surface have been used for this purpose together with satellite imagery and field descriptions of reference soil profiles. The legend to the soil map includes nine soil units and seven units of parent materials and their textures. Soil names are given according to the classification developed by I.L. Goldfarb (2005) for the soils of hydrothermal fields. The designation of soil horizons follows the new Classification and Diagnostic System of Russian Soils (2004). It is suggested that a new horizon—a thermometamorphic horizon TRM—can be introduced into this system by analogy with other metamorphic (transformed in situ) horizons distinguished in this system. This horizon is typical of the soils partly or completely transformed by hydrothermal impacts.

  9. A process-based inventory model for landfill CH4 emissions inclusive of seasonal soil microclimate and CH4 oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed and field-validated an annual inventory model for California landfill CH4 emissions that incorporates both site-specific soil properties and soil microclimate modeling coupled to 0.5o scale global climatic models. Based on 1-D diffusion, CALMIM (California Landfill Methane Inventor...

  10. Assessment of Heavy Metals from Landfill Leachate Contaminated to Soil: A Case Study of Kham Bon Landfill, Khon Kaen Province, NE Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuangcham, Udomporn; Wirojanagud, Wanpen; Charusiri, Punya; Milne-Home, William; Lertsirivorakul, Rungruang

    The distribution of heavy metals in landfill leachate contaminated to soil was investigated. Soil samples were collected at different times of the year as well as at various locations and depths in and around the landfill and throughout the contaminated area. The physical and chemical properties of the samples were analyzed. The results indicated that the heavy metals, namely Cd, Cr, Pb, Cu and Zn were significant concentrations in the soil within a radius of 2,000 m from the landfill. The Spearman`s rank correlation coefficient indicated that the appearance of high Cation exchange capacity, clay content and organic matter are statistically correlated with the high heavy metals accumulation. Moreover, the Fe and Mn oxide/oxyhydroxides plays important role in controlling heavy metals sink in soil as pointed out by the spearman ‘s rank correlation coefficient which corresponding to the soil type, red loess with high iron oxide, in the study area.

  11. Fate and distribution of nitrogen in soil and plants irrigated with landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Y. Cheng; L. M. Chu

    2011-01-01

    Landfill leachate contains a high concentration of ammoniacal substances which can be a potential supply of N for plants. A bioassay was conducted using seeds of Brassica chinensis and Lolium perenne to evaluate the phytotoxicity of the leachate sample. A soil column experiment was then carried out in a greenhouse to study the effect of leachate on plant growth. Two

  12. Landfill leachate treatment with a novel process: Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) combined with soil infiltration system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhu Liang; Junxin Liu

    2008-01-01

    A novel combined process was proposed to treat municipal landfill leachate with high concentrations of ammonium and organics. This process consisted of a partial nitritation reactor (PNR), an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) reactor (AR) and two underground soil infiltration systems (USIS-1 and USIS-2). Based on the optimum operating conditions obtained from batch tests of individual unit, the combined process was

  13. Barometric pumping of burial trench soil gases into the atmosphere at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    In 1991, a soil gas survey was performed at the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill as part of the characterization efforts required under the integrated Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation and Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) program. This report details the findings of this survey, which identified several areas of the landfill that were releasing volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere at levels exceeding regulatory standards. Knowledge of the rates of VOC outgassing is necessary to protect site workers, provide input into the human health and environmental risk assessment documents and provide input into the remedial design scenario.

  14. Characterization of trichloroethylene adsorption onto waste biocover soil in the presence of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Su, Yao; Kong, Jiaoyan

    2015-09-15

    Waste biocover soils (WBS) have been demonstrated to have great potential in mitigating trichloroethylene (TCE) emission from landfills, due to the relatively high TCE-degrading capacity. In this study, the characteristics of TCE adsorption on WBS in the presence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were investigated in soil microcosms. The adsorption isotherm of TCE onto WBS was fitted well with linear model within the TCE concentrations of 7000ppmv. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto WBS was affected by temperature, soil moisture content and particle size, of which, temperature was the dominant factor. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto the experimental materials increased with the increasing organic matter content. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the adsorption capacity of TCE and the organic matter content of experimental materials that had relatively higher organic content (r=0.988, P=0.044). To better understand WBS application in practice, response surface methodology was developed to predict TCE adsorption capacity and emissions through WBS in different landfills in China. These results indicated that WBS had high adsorption capacity of TCE in LFG and temperature should be paid more attention to manipulate WBS to reduce TCE emissions from landfills. PMID:25909498

  15. INVESTIGATION OF LANDFILL LEACHATE POLLUTANT ATTENUATION BY SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this laboratory study using 11 soils from 7 major orders in the U.S., the movement and retention of As, Be, Cd, CN, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, V, and Zn when carried by municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate through soils was influenced by the individual properties of the elements,...

  16. Environmental polychlorinated biphenyls: Acute toxicity of landfill soil extract to female prepubertal rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Hansen; M.-H. Li; A. Saeed; B. Bush

    1995-01-01

    Subsurface soil from a National Priorities List landfill containing about 2.5% polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was extracted and the extract cleaned by Florisil® slurry and alumina column chromatography. The refined extract contained 48 mg\\/mL PCB, mainly trichlorobiphenyls and tetrachlorobiphenyls, traces of polychlorinated naphthalenes, 125 µg\\/mL 2,2-bis-p-chlorophenyl-1, 1-dichloroethylene (DDE), and low levels of chlorinated dibenzofurans. The refined extract was dissolved in corn

  17. The release of As, Cr and Cu from contaminated soil stabilized with APC residues under landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Travar, I; Kihl, A; Kumpiene, J

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of As, Cr and Cu in contaminated soil treated with air pollution control residues under landfill conditions. The influence of landfill gas and temperature on the release of trace elements from stabilized soil was simulated using a diffusion test. The air pollution control residues immobilized As through the precipitation of Ca-As minerals (calcium arsenate (Ca5H2(AsO4)3 × 5H2O), weilite (CaAsO4) and johnbaumite (Ca5(AsO4)3(OH)), incorporation of As into ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 × 26H2O) and adsorption by calcite (CaCO3). The air pollution control residues generally showed a high resistance to pH reduction, indicating high buffer capacity and stability of immobilized As in a landfill over time. Generation of heat in a landfill might increase the release of trace elements. The release of As from stabilized soil was diffusion-controlled at 60 °C, while surface wash-off, dissolution, and depletion prevailed at 20 °C. The air pollution control residues from the incineration of municipal solid waste immobilized Cr, indicating its stability in a landfill. The treatment of soil with air pollution control residues was not effective in immobilization of Cu. Contaminated soils treated with air pollution control residues will probably have a low impact on overall leachate quality from a landfill. PMID:25528268

  18. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  19. The use of volcanic soil as mineral landfill liner--III. Heavy metals retention capacity.

    PubMed

    Navia, Rodrigo; Fuentes, Bárbara; Diez, María C; Lorber, Karl E

    2005-06-01

    The volcanic soil of Southern Chile was tested for its heavy metal retention capacity. The maximum uptakes for CrO4(2-) (CrVI), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) were determined to be 2.74, 5.32, 5.86 and 7.44 mg g(-1), respectively. At a slightly alkaline pH value (7.5), it seems that a precipitation-adsorption process was responsible for the Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) uptake onto volcanic soil. All the determined values are of the same order of magnitude as natural zeolites heavy metals adsorption capacities. In addition, the heavy metals diffusion model through a 1 m volcanic soil mineral liner shows breakthrough times of 21.6, 10.2 and 8.9 years, for Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively, confirming the trend obtained in the adsorption isotherms. The natural volcanic soil of Southern Chile is an interesting material for possible use as landfill mineral basal sealing. It has an appropriate sealing potential (average Kf value of 5.85 x 10(-9) m s(-1)) and a heavy metals retention capacity comparable with natural zeolites. About two-thirds of the agricultural land in Chile (approximately 0.4 million km2) is derived from volcanic ash, suggesting an important soil volume for future landfill projects, that could be obtained in sufficient quantities from urban building activities. PMID:15988945

  20. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former hospital landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, Fred W.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former hospital landfill located in a 75-acre study area near the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, from April to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone of a creek adjacent to the landfill and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Results from the hyporheic-zone assessment in the unnamed tributary adjacent to the study area indicated that total petroleum hydrocarbons and octane were the most frequently detected organic compounds in groundwater beneath the creek bed. The highest concentrations for these compounds were detected in the upstream samplers of the hyporheic-zone study area. The effort to delineate landfill activity in the study area focused on the western 14 acres of the 75-acre study area where the hyporheic-zone study identified the highest concentrations of organic compounds. This also is the part of the study area where a debris field also was identified in the southern part of the 14 acres. The southern part of this 14-acre study area, including the debris field, is steeper and not as heavily wooded, compared to the central and northern parts. Fifty-two soil-gas samplers were used for the July 2010 soil-gas survey in the 14-acre study area and mostly detected total petroleum hydrocarbons, and gasoline and diesel compounds. The highest soil-gas masses for total petroleum hydrocarbons, diesel compounds, and the only valid detection of perchloroethene were in the southern part of the study area to the west of the debris field. However, all other detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons greater than 10 micrograms and diesel greater than 0.04 micrograms, and all detections of the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were found down slope from the debris field in the central and northern parts of the study area. Five soil-gas samplers were deployed and recovered from September 16 to 22, 2010, and were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents or explosives. Chloroacetophenones (a tear gas component) were the only compounds detected above a method detection level and were detected at the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbons and diesel detections in the southern part of the 14-acre study area. Composite soil samples collected at five locations were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents. None of the inorganic constituents exceeded the regional screening levels. One surface-water sample collected in the western end of the hyporheic-zone study area had a trichlorofluoromethane concentration above the laboratory reporting level and estimated concentrations of chloroform, fluoranthene, and isophorone below laboratory reporting levels.

  1. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    induce preferential water pathways and unusual increase of leachate within the waste mass an escape of landfill gases and creation of leachate through infiltration of surface water. Geophysical of leachate within the waste mass. Currently, these methods are mainly used to trace the migration of leachate

  2. Influence of xenobiotic contaminants on landfill soil microbial activity and diversity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Leblic, M I; Turmero, A; Hernández, M; Hernández, A J; Pastor, J; Ball, A S; Rodríguez, J; Arias, M E

    2012-03-01

    Landfills are often the final recipient of a range of environmentally important contaminants such as hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study the influence of these contaminants on microbial activity and diversity was assessed in a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill placed in Torrejón de Ardoz (Madrid, Spain). Soil samples were collected from four selected areas (T2, T2B, T8 and T9) in which the amount of total hydrocarbons, PAHs and PCBs were measured. Soil biomass, substrate induced respiration (SIR) and physiological profiles of soil samples were also determined and used as indicators of total microbial activity. Highest concentration of total hydrocarbons was detected in T2 and T9 samples, with both PCBs and benzopyrene being detected in T9 sample. Results corresponding to microbial estimation (viable bacteria and fungi, and SIR) and microbiological enzyme activities showed that highest values corresponded to areas with the lowest concentration of hydrocarbons (T2B and T8). It is noticeable that in such areas was detected the lowest concentration of the pollutants PAHs and PCBs. A negative significant correlation between soil hydrocarbons concentration and SIR, total bacteria and fungi counts and most of the enzyme activities determined was established. DGGE analysis was also carried out to determine the microbial communities' structure in the soil samples, establishing different profiles of Bacteria and Archaea communities in each analysed area. Through the statistical analysis a significant negative correlation was only found for Bacteria domain when Shannon index and hydrocarbon concentration were correlated. In addition, a bacterial 16S rRNA gene based clone library was prepared from each soil. From the clones analysed in the samples, the majority corresponded to Proteobacteria, followed by Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria. It is important to remark that the most polluted sample (T9) showed the lowest microbial diversity only formed by six phyla being Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria the most representative. PMID:20724060

  3. Acidovorax soli sp. nov., isolated from landfill soil Jung-Hye Choi, Min-Soo Kim, Seong Woon Roh and Jin-Woo Bae

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    -tetramethyl phenylenediamine (bioMe´rieux), respectively. Enzyme activities and utiliza- tion of carbon sources were testedAcidovorax soli sp. nov., isolated from landfill soil Jung-Hye Choi, Min-Soo Kim, Seong Woon Roh-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile strain, BL21T , was isolated from landfill soil in Pohang, Korea. Strain

  4. Nitrous oxide fluxes from seasonally snow covered subalpine soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Liptzin; B. Seok; G. Philippa; D. Helmig; J. Hueber; M. W. Williams

    2007-01-01

    The release to the atmosphere of nitrogen oxides (N2O and NO) produced by soil microorganisms is an important source of greenhouse gases and affects air quality. Recent evidence suggests that considerable microbial activity occurs beneath the snow in seasonally snow-covered soils, but relatively few studies have addressed nitrogen oxide emissions. The soils in the Colorado subalpine may be particularly prone

  5. Radar backscatter sensitivity of soil moisture in vegetation covered areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faisal Karim; Susan Steele-Dunne; Nick van de Giesen

    2010-01-01

    Radar backscatter is sensitive to the water content of bare soil surface. Vegetation cover masks the soil surface, reducing the sensitivity of the radar backscatter to soil moisture. The water-cloud model is used to account for vegetation effects on the copolarized backscatter coefficient in C and L band. In this sensitivity study, two different models for opacity are compared to

  6. Evolution of the soil cover of soccer fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belobrov, V. P.; Zamotaev, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    A soccer field can be considered a soil-like technogenic formation (STF). According to the theory of soil cover patterns, the artificially constructed (anthropogenic) soil cover of a soccer field is an analogue of a relatively homogeneous elementary soil area. However, the spatial homogeneity of the upper part (50-80 cm) of the STF of soccer fields is unstable and is subjected to gradual transformation under the impact of pedogenetic processes, agrotechnical loads, and mechanical loads during the games. This transformation is favored by the initial heterogeneity of the deep (buried) parts of the STF profile. The technogenic factors and elementary pedogenetic processes specify the dynamic functioning regime of the STF. In 50-75 years, the upper part of the STF is transformed into soil-like bodies with properties close to those in zonal soils. Certain micro- and nanopatterns of the soil cover are developed within the field creating its spatial heterogeneity.

  7. Evaluation of engineering properties for the use of leached brown coal ash in soil covers.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Gavin M; Chakrabarti, Srijib; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2007-01-31

    The need to engineer cover systems for the successful rehabilitation or remediation of a wide variety of solid wastes is increasing. Some common applications include landfills, hazardous waste repositories, or mine tailings dams and waste rock/overburden dumps. The brown coal industry of the Latrobe Valley region of Victoria, Australia, produces significant quantities of coal ash and overburden annually. There are some site-specific acid mine drainage (AMD) issues associated with overburden material. This needs to be addressed both during the operational phase of a project and during rehabilitation. An innovative approach was taken to investigate the potential to use leached brown coal ash in engineered soil covers on this overburden dump. The basis for this is two-fold: first, the ash has favourable physical characteristics for use in cover systems (such as high storage capacity/porosity, moderately low permeability, and an ability to act as a capillary break layer generating minimal leachate or seepage); and second, the leachate from the ash is mildly alkaline (which can help to mitigate and reduce the risk of AMD). This paper will review the engineering issues involved in using leached brown coal ash in designing soil covers for potentially acid-forming overburden dumps. It presents the results of laboratory work investigating the technical feasibility of using leached brown coal ash in engineered solid waste cover systems. PMID:16621267

  8. Assessment of soil-gas and groundwater contamination at the Gibson Road landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Soil-gas and groundwater assessments were conducted at the Gibson Road landfill in 201 to provide screening-level environmental contamination data to supplement the data collected during previous environmental studies at the landfill. Passive samplers were used in both assessments to detect volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil gas and groundwater. A total of 56 passive samplers were deployed in the soil in late July and early August for the soil-gas assessment. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at masses greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram in all samplers and masses greater than 2.0 micrograms in 13 samplers. Three samplers located between the landfill and a nearby wetland had TPH masses greater than 20 micrograms. Diesel was detected in 28 of the 56 soil-gas samplers. Undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane were detected, but undecane was the most common diesel compound with 23 detections. Only five detections exceeded a combined diesel mass of 0.10 microgram, including the highest mass of 0.27 microgram near the wetland. Toluene was detected in only five passive samplers, including masses of 0.65 microgram near the wetland and 0.85 microgram on the southwestern side of the landfill. The only other gasoline-related compound detected was octane in two samplers. Naphthalene was detected in two samplers in the gully near the landfill and two samplers along the southwestern side of the landfill, but had masses less than or equal to 0.02 microgram. Six samplers located southeast of the landfill had detections of chlorinated compounds, including one perchloroethene detections (0.04 microgram) and five chloroform detections (0.05 to0.08 microgram). Passive samplers were deployed and recovered on August 8, 2011, in nine monitoring wells along the southwestern, southeastern and northeastern sides of the landfill and down gradient from the eastern corner of the landfill. Six of the nine samplers had TPH concentrations greater than 100 micrograms per liter. TPH concentrations declined from 320 micrograms per liter in a sampler near the landfill to 18 micrograms in a sampler near the wetland. Five of the samplers had detections of one or more diesel compounds but detections of individual diesel compounds had concentrations below a method detection level of 0.01 microgram per liter. Benzene was detected in three samplers and exceeded the national primary drinking-water standard of 5 micrograms per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The concentrations of benzene, and therefore BTEX, were 6.1 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the eastern corner of the landfill, 27 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the wetland, and 37 micrograms per liter in the sampler at the southern corner of the landfill. Nonfuel-related compounds were detected in the four wells that are aligned between the eastern corner of the landfill and the wetland. The sampler deployed nearest the eastern corner of the landfill had the greatest number of detected organic compounds and had the only detections of two trimethylbenzene compounds, naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. The two up gradient samplers had the greatest number of chlorinated compounds with five compounds each, compared to detections of four compounds and one compound in the two down gradient samplers. All four samplers had detections of 1,1-dichloroethane which ranged from 42 to 1,300 micrograms per liter. Other detections of chlorinated compounds included trichloroethene, perchloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

  9. Radar reflectivity of bare and vegetation-covered soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Bradley, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Radar sensitivity to soil moisture content has been investigated experimentally for bare and vegetation-covered soil using detailed spectral measurements obtained by a truck-mounted radar spectrometer in the 1-8 GHz band and by airborne scatterometer observations at 1.6, 4.75, and 13.3 GHz. It is shown that radar can provide quantitative information on the soil moisture content of both bare and vegetation-covered soil. The observed soil moisture is in the form of the soil matric potential or a related quantity such as the percent of field capacity. The depth of the monitored layer varies from 1 cm for very wet soil to about 15 cm for very dry soil.

  10. The use of volcanic soil as mineral landfill liner--I. Physicochemical characterization and comparison with zeolites.

    PubMed

    Navia, Rodrigo; Hafner, Georg; Raber, Georg; Lorber, Karl E; Schöffmann, Elke; Vortisch, Walter

    2005-06-01

    The main physicochemical characteristics of the volcanic soil of Southern Chile, with allophane as the main pedogenic mineral phase were analysed and compared with common zeolites (clinoptilolite) of the European market. The ultimate goal of this study was to test volcanic soil for the use as mineral landfill liner. The main results indicated that the clay and silt fractions together of the volcanic soil were between 38 and 54%. The buffering capacity of the volcanic soil was higher compared with the studied zeolites, whereas the cationic exchange capacity of the volcanic soil (between 5.2 and 6.5 cmol + kg(-1)) is of the same order of magnitude of the studied zeolites (between 9.7 and 11.4 cmol + kg(-1)). Moreover, the anionic exchange capacity of the volcanic soil was higher compared to the zeolites analysed. The hydraulic conductivity of the volcanic soil, measured in the laboratory at maximum proctor density, ranges between 5.16 x 10(-9) and 6.48 x 10(-9) m s(-1), a range that is comparable to the value of 4.51 x 10(-9) m s(-1) of the studied zeolite. The Proctor densities of the volcanic soil are in a lower range (between 1.11 and 1.15 g ml(-1)) compared with zeolites (between 1.19 and 1.34 g ml(-1)). The volcanic soil physicochemical characteristics are comparable to all the requirements established in the Austrian landfill directive (DVO, 2000). Therefore, the use as mineral landfill basal sealing of the analysed volcanic soil appears reasonable, having a pollutant adsorption capacity comparable to zeolites. It is of special interest for Southern Chile, because there are no alternative mineral raw materials for basal liners of landfills. PMID:15988944

  11. Assessment of soil-gas contamination at the 17th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Assessments of contaminants in soil gas were conducted in two study areas at Fort Gordon, Georgia, in July and August of 2011 to supplement environmental contaminant data for previous studies at the 17th Street landfill. The two study areas include northern and eastern parts of the 17th Street landfill and the adjacent wooded areas to the north and east of the landfill. These study areas were chosen because of their close proximity to the surface water in Wilkerson Lake and McCoys Creek. A total of 48 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the July 28 to August 3, 2011, assessment in the eastern study area. The assessment mostly identified detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gasoline- and diesel-range compounds, but also identified the presence of chlorinated solvents in six samplers, chloroform in three samplers, 2-methyl naphthalene in one sampler, and trimethylbenzene in one sampler. The TPH masses exceeded 0.02 microgram (?g) in all 48 samplers and exceeded 0.9 ?g in 24 samplers. Undecane, one of the three diesel-range compounds used to calculate the combined mass for diesel-range compounds, was detected in 17 samplers and is the second most commonly detected compound in the eastern study area, exceeded only by the number of TPH detections. Six samplers had detections of toluene, but other gasoline compounds were detected with toluene in three of the samplers, including detections of ethylbenzene, meta- and para-xylene, and octane. All detections of chlorinated organic compounds had soil-gas masses equal to or less than 0.08 ?g, including three detections of trichloroethene, three detections of perchloroethene, three chloroform detections, one 1,4-dichlorobenzene detection, and one 1,1,2-trichloroethane detection. Three methylated compounds were detected in the eastern study area, but were detected at or below method detection levels. A total of 32 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the August 11–24, 2011, assessment in the northern study area. All samplers in the survey had detections of TPH, but only eight of the samplers had detections of TPH greater than 0.9 mg. Four samplers had TPH detections greater than 9 mg; the only other fuel-related compounds detected in these four samplers included toluene in three of the samplers and undecane in the fourth sampler. Three samplers deployed along the western margin of the northern landfill had detections of both diesel-and gasoline-related compounds; however, the diesel-related compounds were detected at or below method detection levels. Seven samplers in the northern study area had detections of chlorinated compounds, including three perchloroethene detections, three chloroform detections, and one 1,4-dichloro-benzene detection. One sampler on the western margin of the landfill had detections of 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-tr-methylbenene below method detection levels.

  12. Soil phosphorus forms as quality indicators of soils under different vegetation covers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María-Belén Turrión; Olga López; Francisco Lafuente; Rafael Mulas; César Ruipérez; Alberto Puyo

    2007-01-01

    The type of vegetation cover determines the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil over which they are developing. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different vegetation covers on the forms of soil phosphorus, in order to know which of these forms can be used as a soil quality indicator. The experimental area was located

  13. Irrigating poplar energy crops with landfill leachate negatively affects soil micro- and meso-fauna.

    PubMed

    Coyle, David R; Zalesny, Jill A; Zalesny, Ronald S; Wiese, Adam H

    2011-10-01

    Increased municipal solid waste generated worldwide combined with substantial demand for renewable energy has prompted testing and deployment of woody feedstock production systems that reuse and recycle wastewaters as irrigation and fertilization. Populus selections are ideal for such systems given their fast growth, extensive root systems, and high water usage rates. Maintaining ecological sustainability (i.e., the capacity for an ecosystem to maintain its function and retain its biodiversity over time) during tree establishment and development is an important component of plantation success, especially for belowground faunal populations. To determine the impact of solid waste leachate on soil micro- and meso-fauna, we compared soilfrom eight different Populus clones receiving municipal solid waste landfill leachate irrigation with clones receiving fertilized (N, P K) well water irrigation. Microfauna (i.e., nematodes) communities were more diverse in control soils. Mesofauna (i.e., insects) were associated with all clones; however, they were four times more abundant around trees found within the control plot than those that received leachate treatments. Nematode and insect abundance varied among Populus clones yet insect diversity was greater in the leachate-treated soils. Phytotechnologies must allow for soil faunal sustainability, as upsetting this balance could lead to great reductions in phytotechnology efficacy. PMID:21972508

  14. Cover cropping impacts on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil aggregation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are a management tool which can extend the period of time that a living plant is growing and conducting photosynthesis. This is critical for soil health, because most of the soil organisms, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, are limited by carbon. Research, on-farm, and demon...

  15. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David S. Shafer; Michael H. Young; Stephen F. Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-01-01

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process

  16. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  17. Fate and distribution of nitrogen in soil and plants irrigated with landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C Y; Chu, L M

    2011-06-01

    Landfill leachate contains a high concentration of ammoniacal substances which can be a potential supply of N for plants. A bioassay was conducted using seeds of Brassica chinensis and Lolium perenne to evaluate the phytotoxicity of the leachate sample. A soil column experiment was then carried out in a greenhouse to study the effect of leachate on plant growth. Two grasses (Paspalum notatum and Vetiver zizanioides) and two trees (Hibiscus tiliaceus and Litsea glutinosa) were irrigated with leachate at the EC50 levels for 12 weeks. Their growth performance and the distribution of N were examined and compared with columns applied with chemical fertilizer. With the exception of P. notatum, plants receiving leachate and fertilizer grew better than those receiving water alone. The growth of L. glutinosa and V. zizanioides with leachate irrigation did not differ significantly from plants treated with fertilizer. Leachate irrigation significantly increased the levels of NH(x)-N in soil. Although NO(x)-N was below 1 mg NL(-1) in the leachate sample, the soil NO(x)-N content increased by 9-fold after leachate irrigation, possibly as a result of nitrification. Leachate irrigation at EC50 provided an N input of 1920 kg N ha(-1) over the experimental period, during which up to 1050 kg N ha(-1) was retained in the soil and biomass, depending on the type of vegetation. The amount of nutrient added seems to exceed beyond the assimilative capability. Practitioners should be aware of the possible consequence of N saturation when deciding the application rate if leachate irrigation is aimed for water reuse. PMID:21349695

  18. Beneficial uses of recycled asphalt-stabilized products as landfill cover and capping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Camougis, G. [American Reclamation Corp., Northborough, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The American Reclamation Corporation (AMREC{reg_sign}) has played a major role in the development of new programs for the recycling of discarded materials from construction, demolition, remediation and manufacturing operations. Excavated petroleum-contaminated soils (oily soils), asphalt paving, concrete rubble, and discarded asphalt roofing shingles have been processed and recycled into beneficially useful construction products. AMREC uses a cold-mix, asphalt-emulsion technology to process many of the recyclables received at its recycling facility in Charlton, MA. Recyclable materials are processed and blended to produce recycled, asphalt-stabilized products. In addition, recycled, asphalt-stabilized products are being investigated and tested for other beneficial uses. This includes their uses as capping materials and as containment materials.

  19. The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

    2001-12-01

    The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

  20. Relic components within the soil cover of Mexico: regional variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solleiro Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Sedov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The case of paleosols persisting on the land surface (non-buried paleosols or relict soils) besides paleoecological interest has specific implications for studies of soil geography, ecology and management. In fact these soil bodies form part of the modern soil mantle and provide ecological services for the current (agro)ecosystems but are neither formed nor re-produced by these ecosystems, conforming locally extinct soils (although similar profiles can develop at present under other bioclimatic conditions). In consequence, they are a heritage of past climatic and biotic conditions now extinct, thus presenting a non-restorable component of the present landscape. Mexico has so abundant and diverse paleosols, both surface and buried, that really could be considered to be a "paleopedological paradise". Two groups of factors promote generation of this abundance: Major part of territory of Mexico is occupied by mountainous landscapes with high intensity of tectonic, volcanic and geomorphic processes. These processes create a complex mosaic of geological materials and landforms of different age (like alluvial and lake terraces, eroded slopes, and volcanic deposits of various eruptions). Meanwhile younger landsurfaces are occupied by the recently developed soils, the older ones could bear the relict soil bodies. The same processes produce sedimentary strata (alluvial, colluvial, pyroclastic, etc.) which frequently cover the pre-existing landsurfaces and soils, producing series of buried paleosols. In this work we present three study cases of relict paleosols that are integrated to the modern soil cover of Mexico: the case of reddish-brown soils in the arid landscapes of Sonora (in the north); the pedosediments (tepetates) in central Mexico; and the red soils developed under humid conditions in Yucatan (in the south).

  1. Coupling Cover Crops and Manure Injection: Soil Inorganic N Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of a rye/oat cover crop with liquid swine manure application may enhance retention of manure nitrogen (N) in corn-soybean cropping systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in soil inorganic N following injection of liquid swine manure to plots seeded with a rye/oat co...

  2. Soil Nitrogen Response to Coupling Cover Crops with Manure Injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling winter small grain cover crops (CC) with manure (M) application may increase retention of manure nitrogen (N) in corn-soybean cropping systems. The objective of this research was to quantify soil N changes after application of liquid swine M (Sus scrofa L.) at target N rates of 112, 224, an...

  3. Impact of Landfill Leachate on Iron Release From Northwest Florida Iron Rich Soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pawan Kumar Subramaniam; Mitch Williams

    2007-01-01

    Landfill leachate is blamed for elevated levels of iron in the groundwater monitoring wells downgradient of unlined landfills. It is suspected that the geochemical and geomicrobial iron reduction\\/oxidation processes are responsible for the iron release to the groundwater. When conditions permit, microbial mediated iron reduction and release may be the mechanism for elevated iron observations in the groundwater. In regions

  4. Evaporative losses from soils covered by physical and different types of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chamizo, S.; Cantón, Y.; Domingo, F.; Belnap, J.

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation of soil moisture is one of the most important processes affecting water availability in semiarid ecosystems. Biological soil crusts, which are widely distributed ground cover in these ecosystems, play a recognized role on water processes. Where they roughen surfaces, water residence time and thus infiltration can be greatly enhanced, whereas their ability to clog soil pores or cap the soil surface when wetted can greatly decrease infiltration rate, thus affecting evaporative losses. In this work, we compared evaporation in soils covered by physical crusts, biological crusts in different developmental stages and in the soils underlying the different biological crust types. Our results show that during the time of the highest evaporation (Day 1), there was no difference among any of the crust types or the soils underlying them. On Day 2, when soil moisture was moderately low (11%), evaporation was slightly higher in well-developed biological soil crusts than in physical or poorly developed biological soil crusts. However, crust removal did not cause significant changes in evaporation compared with the respective soil crust type. These results suggest that the small differences we observed in evaporation among crust types could be caused by differences in the properties of the soil underneath the biological crusts. At low soil moisture (<6%), there was no difference in evaporation among crust types or the underlying soils. Water loss for the complete evaporative cycle (from saturation to dry soil) was similar in both crusted and scraped soils. Therefore, we conclude that for the specific crust and soil types tested, the presence or the type of biological soil crust did not greatly modify evaporation with respect to physical crusts or scraped soils.

  5. Vertical migration of leachate pollutants in clayey soils beneath an uncontrolled landfill at Huainan, China: a field and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, T L T; Guan, C; Xie, H J; Chen, Y M

    2014-02-01

    To assess the extent of leachate migration, continuous samples of clayey soils (about 9m) were obtained beneath a 17-year old uncontrolled landfill in southeastern China. The soil samples were sub sectioned and analyzed to determine the concentrations of chloride, sodium and COD in the pore water. Total nitrogen and soil organic matter content of the soil samples were also determined. Leachate-derived chloride was detected in the clayey soil to a maximum depth of 9m. Sodium and COD were found to migrate into the soils to depths of 3-4m due to the attenuation of solutes by the soil organic matter and clay minerals at the shallow soils. The estimated migration depths for the chloride are 3m in the case of pure diffusion. Advection and mechanical dispersion were found to be more important than molecular diffusion for this site with an 8m high leachate mound. By comparing the results obtained by the mathematical modeling for layered advection-dispersion problem with the measured concentration profiles, the ranges of the effective diffusion coefficient, retardation factor and dispersivity of the soils were estimated. Better fits are obtained by employing an artificial effective interface about 1m above the observed interface. The clayey soils showed a relatively high attenuation capacity for COD with the estimated retardation factor of 5. PMID:24144934

  6. Transient soil moisture profile of a water-shedding soil cover in north Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Christopher; Baumgartl, Thomas; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    In current agricultural and industrial applications, soil moisture determination is limited to point-wise measurements and remote sensing technologies. The former has limitations on spatial resolution while the latter, although has greater coverage in three dimensions, but may not be representative of real-time hydrologic conditions of the substrate. This conference paper discusses the use of elongated soil moisture probes to describe the transient soil moisture profile of water-shedding soil cover trial plots in north Queensland, Australia. Three-metre long flat ribbon cables were installed at designed depths across a soil cover with substrate materials from mining activities comprising of waste rocks and blended tailings. The soil moisture measurement is analysed using spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR) (Scheuermann et al., 2009) Calibration of the flat ribbon cable's soil moisture measurement in waste rocks is undertaken in a glasshouse setting. Soil moisture retention and outflows are monitored at specific time interval by mass balance and water potential measurements. These data sets together with the soil hydrologic properties derived from laboratory and field measurements are used as input in the numerical code on unsaturated flow, Hydrus2D. The soil moisture calculations of the glasshouse calibration using this numerical method are compared with results from the STDR soil moisture data sets. In context, the purpose of the soil cover is to isolate sulphide-rich mine wastes from atmospheric interaction as oxidation and leaching of these materials may result to acid and metalliferous drainage. The long term performance of a soil cover will be described in terms of the quantities and physico-chemical characteristics of its outflows. With the soil moisture probes set at automated and pre-determined measurement time intervals, it is expected to distinguish between macropore and soil moisture flows during high intensity rainfall events and, also continuously update data sets on soil moisture retention, especially during long periods of drought. As such, description of the soil cover water balance will be more elaborate as the soil moisture profile will be described in terms of temporal and spatial variability. Moreover, this field data set can lend support on the evaluation of the potential use of mine wastes as cover materials with respect to their hydrologic and geochemical properties.

  7. Radon diffusion in candidate soils for covering uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Silker, W.B.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Diffusion coefficients were measured for radon in 34 soils that had been identified by mill personnel as candidate covers for their tailings piles in order to reduce radon emission. These coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore space of the soils. They were measured in the laboratory by a steady-state method using soil columns compacted to greater than 80% of their Proctor maximum packing densities but with moisture contents generally less than would be expected at a tailings site. An empirical equation was used to extrapolate measured coefficients to value expected at soil-moisture contents representative of tailings sites in the western United States. Extrapolated values for silty sands and clayey sands ranged from 0.004 to 0.06 cm/sup 2//s. Values for inorganic silts and clays ranged from 0.001 to 0.02 cm/sup 2//s.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOTYPE ALTERNATIVE DAILY COVER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl D. Bishop; Susan G. MacKay; Zeomatrix Orono; Michael A. Bilodeau

    Alternative Daily Covers, or ADC's, are primarily valued for their ability to conserve airspace by reducing the soil cover needed for landfills. ADCs fall into two major categories: tarps and spray-on materials. The various spray-on ADCs include foam, mulch, and slurries which harden after application. Each of these alternatives provides adequate cover while freeing up hundreds of cubic yards of

  9. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former 19th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former 19th Street landfill at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from February to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of a creek and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. The passive soil-gas samplers deployed in the water-saturated hyporheic zone and flood plain of the creek adjacent to the former landfill indicated the presence of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and octane above method detection levels in groundwater beneath the creek bed and flood plain at all 12 soil-gas sampler locations. The TPH concentrations ranged from 51.4 to 81.4 micrograms per liter. Octane concentrations ranged from 1.78 to 2.63 micrograms per liter. These detections do not clearly identify specific source areas in the former landfill; moreover, detections of TPH and octane in a soil-gas sampler installed at a seep on the western bank of the creek indicated the potential for these constituents to be derived from source areas outside the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. A passive soil-gas sampler survey was conducted in the former landfill from June 30 to July 5, 2010, and involved 56 soil-gas samplers that were analyzed for petroleum and halogenated compounds not classified as chemical agents or explosives. The TPH soil-gas mass exceeded 2.0 micrograms in 21 samplers. Most noticeable are the two sites with TPH detections which are located in and near the hyporheic zone and are likely to affect the creek. However, most TPH detections were located in and immediately adjacent to a debris field located within the former landfill and in areas where debris was not visible, including the northwestern and southeastern parts of the study area. Two of the four soil-gas samplers installed within a former military training area adjacent to the landfill also had TPH detections above the method detection level. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (as combined BTEX mass) were detected at 0.02 microgram or greater in three soil-gas samplers installed at the northwestern boundary and in five samplers installed in the southeastern part of the study area. There was no BTEX mass detected above the method detection level in samplers installed in the debris field. Toluene was the most frequently detected BTEX compound. Compounds indicative of diesel-range organics were detected above 0.04 microgram in 12 soil-gas samplers and had a distribution similar to that of TPH, including being detected in the debris field. Undecane was the most frequently detected diesel compound. Chloroform and naphthalene were detected in eight and two soil-gas samplers, respectively. Five soil-gas samplers deployed during September 2010 were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents and explosives, but none exceeded the method detection levels. Five composite soil samples collected from within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents, but none of the constituents detected exceeded regional screening levels for industrial soils. The sample collected in the debris field exceeded background levels for aluminum, barium, calcium, chromium, lead, nickel, potassium, sodium, and zinc. Three surface-water samples were collected in September 2010 from a stormwater outfall culvert that drains to the creek and from the open channel of the creek at upstream and downstream locations relative to the outfall. Toluene was detected at 0.661 mi

  10. Concentration and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in surface soil near a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, A; Dettlaff, A; Kukli?ska, K; Namie?nik, J; Wolska, L

    2015-10-15

    Due to a continuous demand of land for infrastructural and residential development there is a public concern about the condition of surface soil near municipal solid waste landfills. A total of 12 surface (0-20cm) soil samples from a territory near a landfill were collected and the concentration of 16 PAHs and 7 PCB congeners were investigated in these samples. Limits of detection were in the range of 0.038-1.2?g/kg for PAHs and 0.025-0.041?g/kg for PCBs. The total concentration of ?PAHs ranged from 892 to 3514?g/kg with a mean of 1974?g/kg. The total concentration of ?PCBs ranged from 2.5 to 12?g/kg with a mean of 4.5?g/kg. Data analyses allowed to state that the PAHs in surface soils near a landfill were principally from pyrogenic sources. Due to air transport, PAHs forming at the landfill are transported outside the landfill. PCB origin is not connected with the landfill. Aroclor 1242 can be the source of PCBs in several samples. PMID:26026405

  11. Nitrous oxide fluxes from seasonally snow covered subalpine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Seok, B.; Philippa, G.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Williams, M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The release to the atmosphere of nitrogen oxides (N2O and NO) produced by soil microorganisms is an important source of greenhouse gases and affects air quality. Recent evidence suggests that considerable microbial activity occurs beneath the snow in seasonally snow-covered soils, but relatively few studies have addressed nitrogen oxide emissions. The soils in the Colorado subalpine may be particularly prone to N2O emissions during the winter. The snow-covered season typically lasts at least six months, and during this time the soils are prevented from freezing by insulation of the snow. Competition between denitrifiers and plants for nitrate is likely lower in the winter. Plant senescence in the fall has recently provided considerable labile carbon. Finally, the amount of N deposition is growing, likely increasing soil nitrate concentrations. In the winter of 2005- 2006 we measured N2O concentration gradients through the snowpack hourly at a subalpine meadow site in the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. We believe these measurements represent the first continuous record of winter N2O fluxes from snow covered soils. The snowpack concentrations of N2O were related to snow depth with concentrations peaking at 1000 ppbv at the time of maximum snow depth. On a daily basis the calculated N2O fluxes averaged 1 ng N cm-2 h-1·. The flux also peaked at the time of maximum snow depth. The simultaneous measurements of NO and CO2 in the winter indicated similar seasonal patterns in their concentration profiles. NO fluxes were measurable, but were typically an order of magnitude less than N2O fluxes. Based on weekly chamber flux measurements, the summer fluxes of N2O were, on average, 4-fold greater than the winter fluxes but exhibited a rapid decline as the soils dried out from June to September. Although the fluxes were lower in winter, the cumulative winter flux contributed approximately 20% of the annual flux in 2005-6. A second year of flux measurements is underway which will allow comparisons of interannual variability. The pattern of the winter fluxes may be quite different because the snowpack development was significantly impacted by an unusual snow melt event in March 2006. This event caused the maximum snow depth to occur two months earlier than average. Overall, it appears that the rates of N2O emissions from these seasonally snow-covered subalpine soils are significant, and a sizeable proportion of the annual flux occurred in the winter.

  12. Interactions Between Snow Cover, Frozen Soils, and the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K.; Zhang, T.; Baker, I.; Lu, L.

    2007-12-01

    We evaluate the complex interactions between frozen soil, snow cover, and the carbon cycle to understand how the soil thermal regime and freeze-thaw processes determine seasonal and inter-annual variability in terrestrial biomass, photosynthesis, respiration, and net CO2 fluxes over continental North America. We use the Simple Biosphere Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (SiBCASA) model driven by the NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), the GIMMS NDVI dataset, and in situ snow depth. To improve simulated soil temperatures, we integrated the Sturm et al. [1995] global snow classification system into the snow parameterization from the Community Climate Model and added simple representations of depth hoar and wind slab development. We also added the effects of peat development in tundra and boreal ecosystems. These additions give more realistic soil and snowpack thermodynamic properties, resulting in significantly improved simulated soil temperatures, freeze and thaw depths, and permafrost. Here, we compare simulated and observed soil temperatures, biomass, and carbon fluxes at eddy covariance flux towers representing a broad range of biome types and snow conditions, from permafrost and boreal forests at high latitudes, to deep snow in the northeast US, to wind blown snow of the Great Plains.

  13. Functional and environmental assessment of the urboecosystems designed in the biologically reclamated landfill with industrial wastes (in Ryazan city)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyakin, Alexey; Vasenev, Ivan; Karyakina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Regional environmental bodies' ability to understand, model and predict their soil cover environmental functions are especially important in case of landfill reclamation. The special attention has to be done to landfills with industrial wastes created earlier in frame of big city - comparatively closed to their residential areas. Dominated in Ryazan region sandy loam gray forest soils with not so high soil organic matter content and soil exchange capacity determine additional problems with landfill biological reclamation and continuous sustainable vegetation cover development. The modern environmental monitoring system has been developed in the big landfill with tanning industrial wastes from the biggest in Europe tannery to develop recommendation on the environmentally friendly reclamation technologies adapted to concrete landscape conditions and functional features of 2 m fresh soil-ground coating the landfill surface. More detailed monitoring system has to be developed to assess the regulatory environmental functions of the regenerated soil cover to minimize the reclamated landfill' negative impacts on the urban ecosystem air, surface and ground water quality. Obtained result will be useful for similar landfills with tanning industrial wastes environmental impact assessment and smart design.

  14. Soil phosphorus forms as quality indicators of soils under different vegetation covers.

    PubMed

    Turrión, María-Belén; López, Olga; Lafuente, Francisco; Mulas, Rafael; Ruipérez, César; Puyo, Alberto

    2007-05-25

    The type of vegetation cover determines the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil over which they are developing. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different vegetation covers on the forms of soil phosphorus, in order to know which of these forms can be used as a soil quality indicator. The experimental area was located on the acidic plateau at the North of Palencia (North Spain), where an area was selected vegetation covers very close to each other: pine (Pinus sylvestris), oak (Quercus pyrenaica), and three different shrub species (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Erica australis and Halimium alyssoides). The Ah horizon was sampled and pH, total organic C (C(org)), total N (N), cationic exchange capacity (CEC), sum of bases (S) and P forms by a sequential fractionation were analysed. Results showed that oak and A. uva-ursi improve the considered soil parameters (pH, C(org)/N ratio, CEC, and S) and provide soils of better quality. Inorganic soil P forms were influenced in greater extent by the vegetation cover than were P organic forms. Labile inorganic P forms could be used as indicators of soil quality. The organic P forms were less sensitive than inorganic ones to the indicated improvements. PMID:17307240

  15. Calculations of radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to develop a simple 'user's' model for simulating the measured radar backscattering coefficients from vegetation-covered fields in conjunction with the data obtained by Jackson et al. (1980, 1982). The theoretical work reported by Fung and Eom (1981) provides the basis for the model. Certain modifications are related to a consideration of the effect of a vegetation canopy. The first part of the model is concerned with a description of scatter from rough bare soil, while the second part takes into account the effect of a vegetation cover. It is shown that the measured angular distribution of the backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered fields can be satisfactory reproduced by using the developed model.

  16. Plant uptake of radiocaesium from artificially contaminated soil monoliths covering major European soil types.

    PubMed

    Waegeneers, Nadia; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Thiry, Yves; Vallejo, V Ramón; Smolders, Erik; Madoz-Escande, Chantal; Bréchignac, François

    2009-06-01

    Uptake of (137)Cs was measured in different agricultural plant species (beans, lettuce, barley and ryegrass) grown in 5 undisturbed soil monoliths covering major European soil types. The first cultivation was made three years after soil contamination and plants were grown during 3 successive years. The plant-soil (137)Cs transfer factors varied maximally 12-fold among soils and 35-fold among species when grown on the same soil. Single correlations between transfer factors and soil properties were found, but they varied widely with plant type and can hardly be used as a predictive tool because of the few soils used. The variation of (137)Cs concentrations in plants among soils was related to differences in soil solution (137)Cs and K concentrations, consistent with previous observations in hydroponics and pot trials. Absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted based on a model validated for pot trials. The (137)Cs activity concentration in soil solution decreased significantly (11- to 250-fold) for most soils in the 1997-1999 period and is partly explained by decreasing K in soil solution. Transfer factors of lettuce showed both increasing and decreasing trends between 2 consecutive years depending on soil type. The trends could be explained by the variation in (137)Cs and K concentrations in soil solution. It is concluded that differences in (137)Cs transfer factors among soils and trends in transfer factors as a function of time can be explained from soil solution composition, as shown previously for pot trials, although absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted. PMID:19375202

  17. Soil carbon sequestration via cover crops- A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Don, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural soils are depleted in soil organic carbon (SOC) and have thus a huge potential to sequester SOC. This can primarily be achieved by increasing carbon inputs into the soil. Replacing winter fallows by cover crop cultivation for green manure has many benefits for the soil and forms an additional carbon input. An increase in carbon concentration has been reported in several studies worldwide. However, the effect on SOC stocks, as well as the influence of environmental parameters and management on SOC dynamics is not known. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to investigate those issues. A total of 33 studies, comprising 47 sites and 147 plots were compiled. A pedotransfer function was used to estimate bulk densities and calculate SOC stocks. SOC stock change was found to be a linear function of time since introduction, with an annual sequestration rate of 0.32 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Since no saturation was visible in the observations, we used the model RothC to estimate a new steady state level and the resulting total SOC stock change for an artificial "average cropland". The total average SOC stock change with an annual input of 1.87 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 was 16.76 Mg C ha-1 for the average soil depth of 22 cm. We estimated a potential global SOC sequestration of 0.12±0.03 Pg C yr-1, which would compensate for 8 % of the direct annual greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture.

  18. Calculations of radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J. (principal investigators)

    1983-01-01

    A model for simulating the measured backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soil surfaces includes both coherent and incoherent components of the backscattered radar pulses from a rough sil surface. The effect of vegetation canopy scattering is also incorporated into the model by making the radar pulse subject to two-way attenuation and volume scattering when it passes through the vegetation layer. Model results agree well with the measured angular distributions of the radar backscattering coefficient for HH polarization at the 1.6 GHz and 4.75 GHz frequencies over grass-covered fields. It was found that the coherent scattering component is very important at angles near nadir, while the vegetation volume scattering is dominant at incident angles 30 degrees.

  19. [Nitrous oxide emissions from municipal solid waste landfills and its measuring methodology: a review].

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Shao-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of three major greenhouse gases and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Landfilling is the major approach for the treatment and disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW), while MSW landfills can be an important anthropogenic source for N2O emissions. Measurements at lab-scale and full-scale landfills have demonstrated that N2O can be emitted in substantial amounts in MSW landfills; however, a large variation in reported emission values exists. Currently, the mechanisms of N2O production and emission in landfills and its contribution to global warming are still lack of sufficient studies. Meanwhile, obtaining reliable N2O fluxes data in landfills remains a question with existing in-situ measurement techniques. This paper summarized relevant literature data on this issue and analyzed the potential production and emission mechanisms of N2O in traditional anaerobic sanitary landfill by dividing it into the MSW buried and the cover soil. The corresponding mechanisms in nitrogen removal bioreactor landfills were analyzed. Finally, the applicability of existing in-situ approaches measuring N2O fluxes in landfills, such as chamber and micrometeorological methods, was discussed and areas in which further research concerning N2O emissions in landfills was urgently required were proposed as well. PMID:25223043

  20. Estonian soil classification as a tool for recording information on soil cover and its matching with local site types, plant covers and humus forms classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kõlli, Raimo; Tõnutare, Tõnu; Rannik, Kaire; Krebstein, Kadri

    2015-04-01

    Estonian soil classification (ESC) has been used successfully during more than half of century in soil survey, teaching of soil science, generalization of soil databases, arrangement of soils sustainable management and others. The Estonian normally developed (postlithogenic) mineral soils (form 72.4% from total area) are characterized by mean of genetic-functional schema, where the pedo-ecological position of soils (ie. location among other soils) is given by means of three scalars: (i) 8 stage lithic-genetic scalar (from rendzina to podzols) separates soils each from other by parent material, lithic properties, calcareousness, character of soil processes and others, (ii) 6 stage moisture and aeration conditions scalar (from aridic or well aerated to permanently wet or reductic conditions), and (iii) 2?3 stage soil development scalar, which characterizes the intensity of soil forming processes (accumulation of humus, podzolization). The organic soils pedo-ecological schema, which links with histic postlithogenic soils, is elaborated for characterizing of peatlands superficial mantle (form 23.7% from whole soil cover). The position each peat soil species among others on this organic (peat) soil matrix schema is determined by mean of 3 scalars: (i) peat thickness, (ii) type of paludification or peat forming peculiarities, and (iii) stage of peat decomposition or peat type. On the matrix of abnormally developed (synlithogenic) soils (all together 3.9%) the soil species are positioned (i) by proceeding in actual time geological processes as erosion, fluvial processes (at vicinity of rivers, lakes or sea) or transforming by anthropogenic and technological processes, and (ii) by 7 stage moisture conditions (from aridic to subaqual) of soils. The most important functions of soil cover are: (i) being a suitable environment for plant productivity; (ii) forming adequate conditions for decomposition, transformation and conversion of falling litter (characterized by humus cover type); (iii) being compartment for deposition of humus, individual organic compounds, plant nutrition elements, air and water, and (iv) forming (bio)chemically variegated active space for soil type specific edaphon. For studying of ESC matching with others ecosystem compartments classifications the comparative analysis of corresponding classification schemas was done. It may be concluded that forest and natural grasslands site types as well the plant associations of forests and grasslands correlate (match) well with ESC and therefore these compartments may be adequately expressed on soil cover matrixes. Special interest merits humus cover (in many countries known as humus form), which is by the issue natural body between plant and soil or plant cover and soil cover. The humus cover, which lied on superficial part of soil cover, has been formed by functional interrelationships of plants and soils, reflects very well the local pedo-ecological conditions (both productivity and decomposition cycles) and, therefore, the humus cover types are good indicators for characterizing of local pedo-ecological conditions. The classification of humus covers (humus forms) should be bound with soil classifications. It is important to develop a pedocentric approach in treating of fabric and functioning of natural and agro-ecosystems. Such, based on soil properties, ecosystem approach to management and protection natural resources is highly recommended at least in temperate climatic regions. The sound matching of soil and plant cover is of decisive importance for sustainable functioning of ecosystem and in attaining a good environmental status of the area.

  1. Airborne particulate soiling of terrestrial photovoltaic modules and cover materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Maag, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the first phase of a photovoltaic-module soiling study that was carried out with NASA participation to investigate the problem of the electrical performance degradation of flat-plate photovoltaic modules exposed at outdoor sites that is due to the accumulation of airborne particulates on sensitive optical surfaces. The results were obtained in both field and laboratory soiling experiments, as well as in materials field experiments using candidate encapsulants and top covers. It is concluded that: (1) the electrical performance degradation shows a significant time and site dependence, ranging from 2% to 60% power loss; (2) the rate of particulate accumulation appears to be largely material independent when natural removal processes do not dominate; (3) the effectiveness of natural removal processes, especially rain, is strongly material dependent; (4) top-cover materials of glass and plexiglass retain fewer particles than silicone rubber; and (5) high module voltages relative to ground do not appear to affect the rate of dirt accumulation on modules.

  2. Leaky Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda L. Cronin

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information on landfills and describes an activity where students learn how a modern landfill is constructed and develop an understanding of the reasons for several regulations regarding modern landfill construction. Students design and construct working models of three types of landfills. (PR)

  3. Landfill leachate treatment with a novel process: anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) combined with soil infiltration system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhu; Liu, Junxin

    2008-02-28

    A novel combined process was proposed to treat municipal landfill leachate with high concentrations of ammonium and organics. This process consisted of a partial nitritation reactor (PNR), an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) reactor (AR) and two underground soil infiltration systems (USIS-1 and USIS-2). Based on the optimum operating conditions obtained from batch tests of individual unit, the combined process was continuously operated on a bench scale for 166 days. Partial nitritation was performed in a fixed bio-film reactor (PNR, working volume=12 L). Ammonium nitrogen-loading rate (Nv) and DO were combined to monitor partial nitritation, and at T=30+/-1 degrees C, Nv=0.27-1.2 kg/(m3.d), DO=0.8-2.3 mg/L, the ratios of nitrite nitrogen (NO2--N) to ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) were successfully kept close to 1.0-1.3 in the effluent. Nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) less than 43 mg/L was observed. The effluent of PNR was ideally suited as influent of AR. Sixty-nine percent CODcr from the raw leachate was degraded in the PNR. Anammox was carried out in a fixed bio-film reactor (AR, working volume=36 L). At T=30+/-1 degrees C, Nv=0.06-0.11 kg/(m3.d), about 60% NH4+-N and 64% NO2--N in the influent of AR were simultaneously removed. Inhibition of high-strength NO2--N (up to 1011 mg/L) should be responsible for the low removal rate of nitrogen. About 35% aquatic humic substance (AHS) was degraded in the AR. With the same working volume (200 L), USIS-1 and USIS-2 were alternately performed to treat the effluent from AR at one cycle of about 30 days. At hydraulic loading rate (HLR)=0.02-0.04 m3/m3.d, pollutant loading rates (PLR)=NH4+-N

  4. Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-02-09

    Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

  5. Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiando Zhao; Thomas Voice

    2006-01-01

    A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at;\\u000aNorthern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of;\\u000a74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and;\\u000a20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but

  6. Minimum depth of soil cover above long-span soil-steel railway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Morteza; Zakeri, Jabbar Ali; Abdulrazagh, Parisa Haji

    2013-12-01

    Recently, soil-steel bridges have become more commonly used as railway-highway crossings because of their economical advantages and short construction period compared with traditional bridges. The currently developed formula for determining the minimum depth of covers by existing codes is typically based on vehicle loads and non-stiffened panels and takes into consideration the geometrical shape of the metal structure to avoid the failure of soil cover above a soil-steel bridge. The effects of spans larger than 8 m or more stiffened panels due to railway loads that maintain a safe railway track have not been accounted for in the minimum cover formulas and are the subject of this paper. For this study, two-dimensional finite element (FE) analyses of four low-profile arches and four box culverts with spans larger than 8 m were performed to develop new patterns for the minimum depth of soil cover by considering the serviceability criterion of the railway track. Using the least-squares method, new formulas were then developed for low-profile arches and box culverts and were compared with Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code formulas. Finally, a series of three-dimensional (3D) finite element FE analyses were carried out to control the out-of-plane buckling in the steel plates due to the 3D pattern of train loads. The results show that the out-of-plane bending does not control the buckling behavior of the steel plates, so the proposed equations for minimum depth of cover can be appropriately used for practical purposes.

  7. Evidence for an underground runoff and soil permeability at the Ouled Fayet (Algiers, Algeria) buried waste pilot project: needs for a specific landfill implantation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djadia, Leila; Abtout, Abdslam; Boudella, Amar

    2014-05-01

    Results from geophysical investigations (electrical resistivity, electromagnetic mapping and seismic refraction) on an empty excavated rack of the Ouled Fayet (Algiers, Algeria) pilot landfill evidenced a more permeable soil than found by a feasibility study and the presence of an underground runoff underneath the rack. The problem was to evaluate the degree of confidence of the feasibility study, based on 76 10-m drilling cores only, 6 of them performed on the studied rack. To the contrary of what is claimed in the feasibility study a threat of lixiviate pollution is real. It is more than urgent to elaborate a code for landfill implantation in Algeria, which should include mandatory geophysical prospecting and deeper drilling cores. Keywords: Landfill, Geophysical prospecting, Underground runoff, Permeability, Algeria.

  8. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.D.

    1996-02-06

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  9. Inter-row Soil Cover to Reduce Incidence of Aphid-borne Viruses in Pumpkin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John F. Murphy; Jorge Mosjidis; Micky D. Eubanks; Jongkit Masiri

    2008-01-01

    Inter-row soil cover used in conjunction with vegetable crop production has the potential to reduce aphid-borne plant virus incidence while also reducing the need for pesticide applications and preserving inter-row soil structure. In this study, inter-row soil covers were compared with a conventional, bare soil treatment for their ability to reduce aphid-borne virus incidence and associated yield loss in pumpkin

  10. Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, G. Y. S.; Wong, M. H.; Whitton, B. A.

    1991-05-01

    An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at Gin Drinkers' Bay (GDB) landfill, Hong Kong, and in the laboratory. Ten species ( Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea glutinosa, Machilus breviflora, Pinus elliottii, and Tristania conferta), belonging to eight families, were transplanted to two sites, one with a high concentration of landfill gas in the cover soil (high-gas site, HGS) and the other with a relatively low concentration of gas (low-gas site, LGS). Apart from the gaseous composition, the general soil properties were similar. A strong negative correlation between tree growth and landfill gas concentration was observed. A laboratory study using the simulated landfill gas to fumigate seedlings of the above species showed that the adventitious root growth of Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Machilus breviflora, and Tristania confera was stimulated by the gas, with shallow root systems being induced. Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, and Litsea glutinosa were gas-tolerant, while root growth of Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, and Pinus elliottii was inhibited. In most cases, shoot growth was not affected, exceptions being Bombax malabaricum, Liquidambar formosana, and Tristania conferta, where stunted growth and/or reduced foliation was observed. A very high CO2 concentration in cover soil limits the depth of the root system. Trees with a shallow root system become very susceptible to water stress. The effects of low O2 concentration in soil are less important than the effects of high CO2 concentration. Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, and Tristania conferta are suited for growth on subtropical completed landfills mainly due to their gas tolerance and/or drought tolerance.

  11. Effects of regenerating forest cover on soil microbial communities: A case study in hilly red soil region, Southern China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Zheng; Z. Y. Ouyang; X. K. Wang; Z. G. Fang; T. Q. Zhao; H. Miao

    2005-01-01

    The stability and function of a soil ecosystem depends on the cycling of nutrients by the soil microbial community. To evaluate the effects of regenerating forest cover on the function of microbial community, the differences of four forest restoration approaches, including plantations of slash pine, Chinese fir, tea-oil camellia and natural secondary forest, in soil microbial community size, activity and

  12. Modeling impact of small Kansas landfills on underlying aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sophocleous, M.; Stadnyk, N.G. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey; Stotts, M. [Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment, Topeka, KS (United States). Bureau of Waste Management

    1996-12-01

    Small landfills are exempt from compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D standards for liner and leachate collection. The authors investigate the ramifications of this exemption under western Kansas semiarid environments and explore the conditions under which naturally occurring geologic settings provide sufficient protection against ground-water contamination. The methodology the authors employed was to run water budget simulations using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, and fate and transport simulations using the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model (MULTIMED) for several western Kansas small landfill scenarios in combination with extensive sensitivity analyses. They demonstrate that requiring landfill cover, leachate collection system (LCS), and compacted soil liner will reduce leachate production by 56%, whereas requiring only a cover without LCS and liner will reduce leachate by half as much. The most vulnerable small landfills are shown to be the ones with no vegetative cover underlain by both a relatively thin vadose zone and aquifer and which overlie an aquifer characterized by cool temperatures and low hydraulic gradients. The aquifer-related physical and chemical parameters proved to be more important than vadose zone and biodegradation parameters in controlling leachate concentrations at the point of compliance.

  13. Modeling impact of small Kansas landfills on underlying aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Stadnyk, N.G.; Stotts, M.

    1996-01-01

    Small landfills are exempt from compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D standards for liner and leachate collection. We investigate the ramifications of this exemption under western Kansas semiarid environments and explore the conditions under which naturally occurring geologic settings provide sufficient protection against ground-water contamination. The methodology we employed was to run water budget simulations using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, and fate and transport simulations using the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model (MULTIMED) for several western Kansas small landfill scenarios in combination with extensive sensitivity analyses. We demonstrate that requiring landfill cover, leachate collection system (LCS), and compacted soil liner will reduce leachate production by 56%, whereas requiring only a cover without LCS and liner will reduce leachate by half as much. The most vulnerable small landfills are shown to be the ones with no vegetative cover underlain by both a relatively thin vadose zone and aquifer and which overlie an aquifer characterized by cool temperatures and low hydraulic gradients. The aquifer-related physical and chemical parameters proved to be more important than vadose zone and biodegradation parameters in controlling leachate concentrations at the point of compliance. ??ASCE.

  14. Radar backscattering measurement of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band and full polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, B.; Kalita, M.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study is to measure backscattered power of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band scatterometer system with full polarization and various angles during monsoon season and relate backscattered power to the density of vegetation over soil. The measurement was conducted at an experimental field located in the campus of Assam Engineering College, Guwahati, India. The soil sample consists of Silt and Clay in higher proportions as compared to Sand. The scatterometer system consists of dual-polarimetric square horn antennas, Power meter, Klystron, coaxial cables, isolator and waveguide detector. The polarization of the horn antennas as well as the look angle can be changed in the set-up. The backscattering coefficients were calculated by applying a radar equation for the measured values at incident angles between 30° and 60° for full polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH), respectively, and compared with vegetation cover over soil for each scatterometer measurement simultaneously. The VH polarization and 60° look angle are found to be the most suitable combination of configuration of an X-band scatterometer for distinguishing the land cover targets such as bare soil and vegetation covered soil. From the analysis of the results, polarimetric scatterometer data appear to be promising to distinguish the land cover types such as bare soil and soil completely covered by vegetation. The results of this study will help the scientists working in the field of active microwave remote sensing.

  15. Ruminant Grazing of Cover Crops: Effects on Soil Properties and Agricultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poffenbarger, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    Integrating livestock into a cropping system by allowing ruminant animals to graze cover crops may yield economic and environmental benefits. The effects of grazing on soil physical properties, soil organic matter, nitrogen cycling and agricultural production are presented in this literature review. The review found that grazing cover crops…

  16. Effects of Vegetation Cover on the Radar Sensitivity to Soil Moisture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fawwaz T. Ulaby; Adnan Aslam; Myron C. Dobson

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the backscattering coefficient ¿°, made for bare and vegetation-covered fields, are used in conjunction with a simple backscattering model to evaluate the effects of vegetation cover on the estimation accuracy of soil moisture when derived from radar observations. The results indicate that for soil moisture values below 50 percent of field capacity, the backscatter contribution of the vegetation

  17. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine, E-mail: nouryhamdi@gmail.com [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia); Srasra, Ezzeddine [Centre National des Recherches en Science des Materiaux, Borj Cedria Techno-Park, B.P. 95-2050, Hammam Lif, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  18. Evidence for an underground runoff and soil permeability at the Ouled Fayet (Algiers, Algeria) subsurface landfill pilot project from geophysical investigations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leila Djadia; Djamel Machane; Jean-Luc Chatelain; Abdesslam Abtout; Rabah Bensalem; Mehdi Amine Guemache; Bertrand Guillier; Amar Boudella; El-Hadi Oubaiche

    2010-01-01

    Results from geophysical investigations (electrical resistivity, electromagnetic mapping and seismic refraction) on an excavated\\u000a cell of the Ouled Fayet (Algiers, Algeria) pilot landfill indicated the presence of an underground runoff and permeable soil\\u000a underneath the cell. These results contradict those obtained by a feasibility study, based, however, only on the analysis\\u000a of seventy-six 10-m drilling cores. The 1D boreholes information

  19. Vegetative cover and PAHs accumulation in soils of urban green space.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Jiao, Wentao

    2012-02-01

    We investigated how urban land uses influence soil accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the urban green spaces composed of different vegetative cover. How did soil properties, urbanization history, and population density affect the outcomes were also considered. Soils examined were obtained at 97 green spaces inside the Beijing metropolis. PAH contents of the soils were influenced most significantly by their proximity to point source of industries such as the coal combustion installations. Beyond the influence circle of industrial emissions, land use classifications had no significant effect on the extent of PAH accumulation in soils. Instead, the nature of vegetative covers affected PAH contents of the soils. Tree-shrub-herb and woodland settings trapped more airborne PAH and soils under these vegetative patterns accumulated more PAHs than those of the grassland. Urbanization history, population density and soil properties had no apparent impact on PAHs accumulations in soils of urban green space. PMID:22230065

  20. Estimation of municipal solid waste landfill settlement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hoe I. Ling; Dov Leshchinsky; Yoshiyuki Mohri; Toshinori Kawabata

    1998-01-01

    The municipal solid waste landfill suffers from large postclosure settlement that occurs over an extended period of time. A large differential settlement may impair foundations, utilities, and other associated facilities constructed on top of a landfill. It may also lead to breakage of the geomembrane and damage of the cover system in a modern municipal solid waste landfill. The waste

  1. Urban Land Use and Surface Cover: Effects on Soil Temperatures

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    C higher than soil temperatures not associated with asphalt (Halverson, 1981), these temperatures were monitored at urban sites. HortScience. 22(4):613-614. Halverson, G.H. and G.M. Heisler. 1981. Soil

  2. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-print Network

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  3. Relationships between rock fragment cover and soil hydrological response in a Mediterranean environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorena M. Zavala; Antonio Jordán; Nicolás Bellinfante; Juan Gil

    2010-01-01

    Rock fragments are a key factor for determining erosion rates, particularly in arid and semiarid environments where vegetation cover is very low. However, the effect of rock fragments in non-cultivated bare soils is still not well understood. Currently, there is a need for quantitative information on the effects of rock fragments on hydrological soil processes, in order to improve soil

  4. Accounting for green vegetation and soil spectral properties to improve remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage methods are beneficial as they disturb soil less and leaves increased crop residue cover (CRC) after planting on the soil surface. CRC helps reduce soil erosion, evaporation, and the need for tillage operations in fields. Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to due to less fos...

  5. Tillage, cover crops, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil nitrogen and cotton and sorghum yields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Upendra M. Sainju; Wayne F. Whitehead; Bharat P. Singh; Shirley Wang

    2006-01-01

    Sustainable soil and crop management practices that reduce soil erosion and nitrogen (N) leaching, conserve soil organic matter, and optimize cotton and sorghum yields still remain a challenge. We examined the influence of three tillage practices (no-till, strip till and chisel till), four cover crops {legume [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth)], nonlegume [rye (Secaele cereale L.)], vetch\\/rye biculture and winter

  6. Evaluation of Spectral Indices for Estimating Crop Residue Cover and Soil Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term use of conservation tillage practices can lead to increased soil organic carbon (SOC) compared to intensively tilled soils. However, monitoring soil tillage intensity over large areas for assessing changes in SOC is difficult. Remote sensing can potentially estimate crop residue cover, a...

  7. SOIL PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO CATTLE GRAZING OF COVER CROPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of crops and livestock could be either detrimental or beneficial to soil properties, depending upon timing and intensity of animal traffic and residue cover of the soil surface. We determined surface-soil properties of a Typic Kanhapludult in northeastern Georgia USA during the first thr...

  8. Soil health benefits using cover crops across the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils in the southeastern U.S. are very low in organic matter, which can be attributed to high temperatures, humidity, and rainfall that oxidizes organic residues very quickly. Conventional tillage exacerbates this condition and generally contributes to poor soil health. As a result, soils in the r...

  9. Management of cruciferous cover crops by mowing for soil and water conservation in southern Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Alcántara; A. Pujadas; M. Saavedra

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the use of cover crops in Mediterranean olive orchards has increased due to serious soil erosion problems and surface water contamination by herbicides. In these areas, the annual precipitation regime is strongly seasonal, with dry summers that require killing the cover crop before it competes with the trees for water. Cruciferous species are being introduced as cover

  10. Simulation of Infiltration Into Organic-covered Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Carey, S. K.; Quinton, W. L.; Janowicz, J. R.; Flerchinger, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Infiltration into frozen or unfrozen soils is critical in permafrost hydrology, controlling active layer soil water dynamics and influencing runoff. Quantifying the infiltration process in permafrost soils is made difficult by variable ground thawing and freezing and the layered soil profile that frequently has organic soils atop mineral horizons. Moreover, harsh environments impose technical and logistic difficulties in accurately monitoring processes experimentally. Few Land Surface Models (LSMs) and Hydrological Models (HMs) have been developed, adapted or tested for frozen conditions and permafrost soils. A need exists to improve these models to better represent the hydrology of permafrost regions, which are undergoing rapid environmental change worldwide. In this study, three infiltration algorithms commonly used in LSMs and HMs were tested against detailed measurements at four sites in Canada's discontinuous permafrost region with organic soil depths ranging from 0.02 to 3 m. Continuous measurements of liquid soil water content, precipitation, air and soil temperatures, snow depth and density and ground thaw were monitored during two consecutive years. Total soil water content (frozen and liquid) was monitored using twin probe gamma attenuation at three sites. Soil infiltration and runoff components estimated from the above measurements were then used to test simulations by the three algorithms. Parameters for the hydraulic conductivity-soil water potential and soil water potential- liquid water content relations were acquired for organic soils. Three soil hydraulic parametrization schemes were also tested. All infiltration algorithms and soil hydraulic parametrization methods were coded into the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) numerical model to conduct the comparison to ensure the identical inputs, parameters and intermediate process simulations. Preliminary analysis indicates: (1) the single most important factor that controls the infiltration process at the sites is thaw depth, indicating coupled simulations of heat and water transfer to quantify the thaw/freeze status are required in infiltration simulations for permafrost regions; (2) differences among the results by different algorithms were small during the early thawing stage and became greater as the active layer developed; (3) all the three soil hydraulic parametrization methods gave the similar results when appropriate parameters were chosen. Results of this study provide guidelines and may be directly implemented in LSMs and HMs for their applications in permafrost regions.

  11. Landfill methane oxidation response to vegetation, fertilization, and liming

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, H.A.; Wollum, A.G.; Barlaz, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Landfills are the fourth largest global source and the largest US source (USDOE, 1997) of anthropogenic CH{sub 4} emissions. Since gram-for-gram, CH{sub 4} has 21 times the 100-yr global-warming potential of CO{sub 2} (USEPA, 1990). CH{sub 4} release into the atmosphere has important implications for global climate change. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetation, N fertilizers, and lime addition on landfill CH{sub 4} oxidation. Columns filled with compacted sandy loam and sparged with synthetic landfill gas were used to simulate a landfill cover. Grass-topped and bare-soil columns reduced inlet CH{sub 4} by 47 and 37%, respectively, at peak uptake; but the rate for both treatments was about 18% at steady state. Nitrate and NH{sub 4} amendments induced a more rapid onset of CH{sub 4} oxidation relative to KCl controls. However, at steady state, NH{sub 4} inhibited CH{sub 4} oxidation in bare columns but not in grassed columns. Nitrate addition produced no inhibitory effects. Lime addition to the soil consistently enhanced CH{sub 4} oxidation. In all treatments, CH{sub 4} consumption increased to a peak value, then declined to a lower steady-state value; and all gassed columns developed a pH gradient. Neither nutrient depletion nor protozoan grazing could explain the decline from peak oxidation levels. Ammonium applied to grassed cover soil can cause transient reductions in CH{sub 4} uptake, but there is no evidence that the inhibition persists. The ability of vegetation to mitigate NH{sub 4} inhibition indicates that results from bare-soil tests may not always generalize to vegetated landfill caps.

  12. Cover crops and crop residue management under no-till systems improve soils and environmental quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Wegner, Brianna; Vahyala, Ibrahim; Osborne, Shannon; Schumacher, Thomas; Lehman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Crop residue harvest is a common practice in the Midwestern USA for the ethanol production. However, excessive removal of crop residues from the soil surface contributes to the degradation of important soil quality indicators such as soil organic carbon (SOC). Addition of a cover crop may help to mitigate these negative effects. The present study was set up to assess the impacts of corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal and cover crops on various soil quality indicators and surface greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The study was being conducted on plots located at the North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL) in Brookings, South Dakota, USA. Three plots of a corn and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) rotation under a no-till (NT) system are being monitored for soils and surface gas fluxes. Each plot has three residue removal (high residue removal, HRR; medium residue removal, MRR; and low residue removal, LRR) treatments and two cover crops (cover crops and no cover crops) treatments. Both corn and soybean are represented every year. Gas flux measurements were taken weekly using a closed static chamber method. Data show that residue removal significantly impacted soil quality indicators while more time was needed for an affect from cover crop treatments to be noticed. The LRR treatment resulted in higher SOC concentrations, increased aggregate stability, and increased microbial activity. The LRR treatment also increased soil organic matter (SOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations. Cover crops used in HRR (high corn residue removal) improved SOC (27 g kg-1) by 6% compared to that without cover crops (25.4 g kg-1). Cover crops significantly impacted POM concentration directly after the residue removal treatments were applied in 2012. CO2 fluxes were observed to increase as temperature increased, while N2O fluxes increased as soil moisture increased. CH4 fluxes were responsive to both increases in temperature and moisture. On average, soils under cover crop management had lower N2O fluxes than soils that did not have a cover crop. Results from this study concluded that it is important to allow crop residues to return to the soil as they help to improve soil quality indicators. The presence of cover crops also will contribute to the improvement of these indicators once established and may help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. COMPACTED SOIL BARRIERS OF ABANDONED LANDFILL SITES ARE LIKELY TO FAIL IN THE LONG-TERM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buried wastes are isolated from the environment by barriers constructed entirely or in part of compacted soil. he chief concern in barrier design has been to isolate the waste in the short term by preventing movement of water into and through the waste. owever, in the long term a...

  14. Changes occurring to minimally disturbed soil and to plant covers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the transition to organic production certain materials and practices, as described under US law, can not be used. During the transition period growers may, or may not, disturb the soil. There is little known about changes that occur if the soil is minimally disturbed during the transition t...

  15. Airborne particulate soiling of terrestrial photovoltaic modules and cover materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Hoffman; C. R. Maag

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the first phase of a photovoltaic-module soiling study that was carried out with NASA participation to investigate the problem of the electrical performance degradation of flat-plate photovoltaic modules exposed at outdoor sites that is due to the accumulation of airborne particulates on sensitive optical surfaces. The results were obtained in both field and laboratory soiling experiments,

  16. Establishment of five cover crops and total soil nutrient extraction in a humid tropical soil in the Peruvian Amazon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to evaluate the establishment of five cover crops and their potential to increase soil fertility through nutrient extraction, an experiment was installed in the Research Station of Choclino, San Martin, Peru. Five cover crops were planted: Arachis pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Greg, Calopogonium m...

  17. Effects of vegetation cover on the microwave radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Razani, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reduction in sensitivity of the microwave brightness temperature to soil moisture content due to vegetation cover is analyzed using airborne observations made at 1.4 and 5 GHz. The data were acquired during six flights in 1978 over a test site near Colby, Kansas. The test site consisted of bare soil, wheat stubble, and fully mature corn fields. The results for corn indicate that the radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture S decreases in magnitude with increasing frequency and with increasing angle of incidence (relative to nadir). The sensitivity reduction factor, defined in terms of the radiometric sensitivities for bare soil and canopy-covered conditions Y = 1 - Scan/Ss was found to be equal to 0.65 for normal incidence at 1.4 GHz, and increases to 0.89 at 5 GHz. These results confirm previous conclusions that the presence of vegetation cover may pose a serious problem for soil moisture detection with passive microwave sensors.

  18. Methanotroph Diversity in Landfill Soil: Isolation of Novel Type I and Type II Methanotrophs Whose Presence Was Suggested by Culture-Independent 16S Ribosomal DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Mark G.; McArthur, J Vaun; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    1999-01-01

    The diversity of the methanotrophic community in mildly acidic landfill cover soil was assessed by three methods: two culture-independent molecular approaches and a traditional culture-based approach. For the first of the molecular studies, two primer pairs specific for the 16S rRNA gene of validly published type I (including the former type X) and type II methanotrophs were identified and tested. These primers were used to amplify directly extracted soil DNA, and the products were used to construct type I and type II clone libraries. The second molecular approach, based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), provided profiles of the methanotrophic community members as distinguished by sequence differences in variable region 3 of the 16S ribosomal DNA. For the culturing studies, an extinction-dilution technique was employed to isolate slow-growing but numerically dominant strains. The key variables of the series of enrichment conditions were initial pH (4.8 versus 6.8), air/CH4/CO2 headspace ratio (50:45:5 versus 90:9:1), and concentration of the medium (1× nitrate minimal salts [NMS] versus 0.2× NMS). Screening of the isolates showed that the nutrient-rich 1× NMS selected for type I methanotrophs, while the nutrient-poor 0.2× NMS tended to enrich for type II methanotrophs. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from selected clones and isolates revealed some of the same novel sequence types. Phylogenetic analysis of the type I clone library suggested the presence of a new phylotype related to the Methylobacter-Methylomicrobium group, and this was confirmed by isolating two members of this cluster. The type II clone library also suggested the existence of a novel group of related species distinct from the validly published Methylosinus and Methylocystis genera, and two members of this cluster were also successfully cultured. Partial sequencing of the pmoA gene, which codes for the 27-kDa polypeptide of the particulate methane monooxygenase, reaffirmed the phylogenetic placement of the four isolates. Finally, not all of the bands separated by DGGE could be accounted for by the clones and isolates. This polyphasic assessment of community structure demonstrates that much diversity among the obligate methane oxidizers has yet to be formally described. PMID:10543800

  19. The suitability of using leaf area index to quantify soil loss under vegetation cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wentai Zhang; Dongsheng Yu; Xuezheng Shi; Hongjie Wang; Zhujun Gu; Xiangyan Zhang; Manzhi Tan

    2011-01-01

    Soil erosion by water under forest cover is a serious problem in southern China. A comparative study was carried out on the\\u000a use of leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation fractional coverage (VFC) in quantifying soil loss under vegetation cover. Five\\u000a types of vegetation with varied LAI and VFC under field conditions were exposed to two rainfall rates (40 mm

  20. Cover and floristics of microphytic soil crusts in relation to indices of landscape health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Eldridge; T. B. Koen

    1998-01-01

    An extensive field survey of 282 sites over 500 000 km2 of rangeland in eastern Australia was carried out to investigate the relationships between cover and floristics of microphytic soil crusts and indices of landscape health. Empirical quadrat-based data were used to calculate three indices of landscape health (soil stability, infiltration capacity and nutrient status) according to the method of

  1. Improved Remote Crop Residue Cover Estimation by Incorporation of Soil and Residue Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern agricultural practices are increasingly making use of conservation (reduced- and no-till) methods, in order to minimize soil erosion and increase soil organic carbon (SOC) content. These methods result in increased crop residue cover after planting when compared to conventional tillage metho...

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation of crop residue cover: Soil mineralogy, surface conditions, and their effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices can enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), improve soil structure, and reduce erosion. However, direct assessment of tillage practice for monitoring SOC change over large regions is difficult. Remote sensing of crop residue cover (CRC) can help assess tillage pra...

  3. Legume Cover Crops are More Beneficial than Natual Fallows in MInimally Tilled Ugandan Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important to establish the various eff ects of legume cover crops on soil physicochemical properties because they have been considered for use as improved fallows (with shorter rest periods) to enhance development and maintenance of soil productivity. Our objectives were to assess: (i) abovegr...

  4. Intraseasonal variation in the thermoinsulation effect of snow cover on soil temperatures and energy balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey A. Sokratov; Roger G. Barry

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the observed variation in the energy balance of a soil surface at Barrow, Alaska, during 1993-1998. When combined with snow depth measurements, the data allow several stages to be distinguished in the intraseasonal variation of the snow cover effect on the temperature regime and energy balance of the underlying soil. Each stage

  5. Intraseasonal variation in the thermoinsulation effect of snow cover on soil temperatures and energy balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey A. Sokratov; Roger G. Barry

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the observed variation in the energy balance of a soil surface at Barrow, Alaska, during 1993–1998. When combined with snow depth measurements, the data allow several stages to be distinguished in the intraseasonal variation of the snow cover effect on the temperature regime and energy balance of the underlying soil. Each stage

  6. Mapping crop Residue Cover and Soil Tillage Intensity Using Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently crop residues were managed primarily to reduce soil erosion and increase soil organic carbon, but demands for biofuels may remove much of the residue. Current methods of measuring crop residue cover are inadequate for characterizing the temporal and spatial variability of crop residu...

  7. Cover Crop and Manure Effects on Soil Properties in a Corn Silage System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous corn (Zea mays L.) silage production, even with no-tillage, can degrade soil quality because of nutrient depletion and minimal organic matter additions. Manure application and the use of different companion or cover crops in corn silage production systems may lessen or prevent soil qualit...

  8. Cover crop and tillage effects on soil enzyme activities following tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Said A. Hamido; K. Kpomblekou-A

    2009-01-01

    Increasing numbers of vegetable growers are adopting conservation tillage practices and including cover crops into crop rotations. The practice helps to increase or maintain an adequate level of soil organic matter and improves vegetable yields. The effects of the practices, however, on enzyme activities in southeastern soils of the United States have not been well documented. Thus, the objectives of

  9. Effects of cover cropping on soil and rhizosphere microbial community structure in tomato production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black polyethylene film is frequently used in vegetable farming systems to promote rapid warming of the soil in spring, conserve soil moisture, and suppress weeds. Alternative systems have been developed using cover cropping with legumes to provide a weed-suppressive mulch while also fixing nitrogen...

  10. Integrating choice of variety, soil amendments, and cover crops to optimize organic rice production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have completed our first year of this project to determine the impact of winter cover crops, soil amendments, and rice varieties on organic rice production at Beaumont, TX. Two winter cover crops were established successfully and the amounts of dry biomass produced were 4,690 and 5,157 lb/acre f...

  11. Effect of Pinyon–Juniper Tree Cover on the Soil Seed Bank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth A. Allen; Robert S. Nowak

    2008-01-01

    As pinyon-juniper (specifically, Pinus monophylla and Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in the western United States increase in distribution and density, understory growth declines and the occurrence of crown fires increases, leaving mountainsides open to both soil erosion and invasion by exotic species. We examined if the loss in understory cover that occurred with increasing tree cover was reflected in the density

  12. CO2 evolution in highland soils of different land cover types in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankasingh, Utra; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Þórsson, Jóhann; Palomaki, Minna

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration is a key ecosystem process that releases carbon from soil as CO2. Soil CO2 emission is sensitive to temperature, moisture and disturbance and is influenced by land use and land cover change, especially in the upper soil organic layer. Release of CO2 from soils of the south Icelandic highlands (318 - 356 m above sea level) was studied to observe soil respiration in different land cover types and to quantify soil C lost as CO2. In a laboratory incubation study, exponential release of CO2 from soils was observed (>6 months) for the field moist soils collected from the highlands. Soils were collected at 12 sites from the land cover types (plant communities) in September 2013. The land cover types, categorized by plant communities, were: grasslands (G1-G8), with moss, Carex Bigelowii and dwarf shrubs; a sandy fluvial wetland (S), and unvegetated gravels (M1-M3). Since this experiment was conducted at 25° C whilst the observed annual average temperature was 1.5 ° C (Vatnsfell, 10 year average), this experiment presents an accelerated picture of CO2 released from soils over a much longer time period. For most soils, the rate of release decreased after 5 days. For all land cover types, the CO2 release was greatest in the topspoil and this decreased with depth. Soils with the highest % organic matter (G sites characterized by mosses and few vascular species) appear to release the most CO2. In the top 5 cm, the CO2 emissions follow the trend: grasslands (G1-G8)> sandy fluvial wetland (S) > unvegetated sites (M1-M3). This trend appears to be related to the amount of organic matter present. For all sites, the less than 250 mg CO2 was lost per kg of soil after 75 days, which is equivalent to losing less than 69 mg C per kg soil, and represented less than 0.5% of the total carbon present in any soil; less than 360 mg CO2 was lost after 260 days.

  13. SOIL AND VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR LEAD (PB) MINE WASTE PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conduct vegetation studies that evaluate a variety of seed mixtures and surface amendments (soil, compost, biosolids, yard waste and fertilizers). US Bureau of Reclamation with experts formerly with US Bureau of Mines to contribute to Vegetation Plan for Big River NTCR EE/CA ...

  14. Factors influencing the establishment of floristically rich grasslands on a restored landfill site

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Natural revegetation on landfill sites often results in a species poor sward dominated by Elymus repens (Shaw, 1983; Davis, 1988; Wong, 1988). The aim of this study was primarily to investigate the mechanism by which E.repens achieved such apparent domination and secondly to investigate various methods to establish floristically rich grasslands on a restored landfill site. Low rates of germination and survival were recorded from seeds of Plantago lanceolata, Centaureau nigrand Leucanthemum vulgare sown into a sward of E.repens on a restored landfill site in Essex, even during periods with adequate soil water. Plants of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L. vulgare were grown in pots and transplanted into the sward of E.repens. Over the following two years a significant decrease in crown cover of these species was recorded. In areas where E.repens had been treated with herbicide or mown, seedlings and introduced plants of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare increased in cover over two years. Stomatal conductance of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare was reduced when these species were growing with E.repens even during periods with adequate soil water. P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare growing with E.repens on restored landfill has been shown experimentally to result in reduced cover. It is suggested that this is due to competition in combination potentially, with allelochemical effects of E.repens. Successful establishment of a floristically rich grass mix was achieved by the reduction in cover of E.repens by herbicide or mowing. On newly restored landfill a careful balance between soil treatments, fertilizer levels and subsequent management in the form of mowing must be attained in order to establish floristically rich grasslands. The results from this study show that by utilizing various management techniques a floristically rich grass mix could be established on a restored landfill site.

  15. Ground cover rice production system facilitates soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Dannenmann, M.; Lin, S.; Saiz, G.; Yan, G.; Yao, Z.; Pelster, D.; Tao, H.; Sippel, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zuo, Q.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-02-01

    Rice production is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, however covering paddy rice soils with films (ground cover rice production system: GCRPS) can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the vegetation period resulting in increased grain yields in colder regions of rice production with seasonal water shortages. It has been speculated that the increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS may result in losses of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional scale experiment, conducted by sampling paired adjacent Paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites in the Shiyan region, which is typical for many mountainous areas across China. Parameters evaluated included soil C and N stocks, soil physical and chemical properties, potential carbon mineralization rates, fractions of soil organic carbon and stable carbon isotopic composition of plant leaves. Furthermore, root biomass was quantified at maximum tillering stage at one of our paired sites. Against expectations the study showed that: (1) GCRPS significantly increased soil organic C and N stocks 5-20 years following conversion of production systems, (2) there were no differences between GCRPS and Paddy in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths with the exception of soil bulk density, (3) GCRPS had lower mineralization potential for soil organic C compared with Paddy over the incubation period, (4) GCRPS showed lower ?15N in the soils and plant leafs indicating less NH3 volatilization in GCRPS than in Paddy; and (5) GCRPS increased yields and root biomass in all soil layers down to 40 cm depth. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative rice production technique that not only increases yields using less irrigation water, but that it also is environmentally beneficial due to increased soil C and N stocks at regional scale.

  16. RESPONSE OF THE SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY TO SOIL FUMIGATION AND MUSTARD COVER CROPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigants such as metam-sodium, used in potato production of the Columbia Basin of WA, are very effective for the control of soil borne pathogens, weeds, and nematodes that reduce crop yield and quality. Soil fumigation has been assumed to have minor impacts on the general soil microbial commun...

  17. Environmental impact assessment on the construction and operation of municipal solid waste sanitary landfills in developing countries: China case study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Na; Damgaard, Anders; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming; Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-05-01

    An inventory of material and energy consumption during the construction and operation (C&O) of a typical sanitary landfill site in China was calculated based on Chinese industrial standards for landfill management and design reports. The environmental impacts of landfill C&O were evaluated through life cycle assessment (LCA). The amounts of materials and energy used during this type of undertaking in China are comparable to those in developed countries, except that the consumption of concrete and asphalt is significantly higher in China. A comparison of the normalized impact potential between landfill C&O and the total landfilling technology implies that the contribution of C&O to overall landfill emissions is not negligible. The non-toxic impacts induced by C&O can be attributed mainly to the consumption of diesel used for daily operation, while the toxic impacts are primarily due to the use of mineral materials. To test the influences of different landfill C&O approaches on environmental impacts, six baseline alternatives were assessed through sensitivity analysis. If geomembranes and geonets were utilized to replace daily and intermediate soil covers and gravel drainage systems, respectively, the environmental burdens of C&O could be mitigated by between 2% and 27%. During the LCA of landfill C&O, the research scope or system boundary has to be declared when referring to material consumption values taken from the literature; for example, the misapplication of data could lead to an underestimation of diesel consumption by 60-80%. PMID:24656422

  18. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration of different land cover types in the Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Fu, B. J.; Gao, G. Y.; Yao, X. L.; Zhou, J.

    2012-08-01

    We studied the impacts of re-vegetation on soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration (ET) of five land cover types in the Loess Plateau in northern China. Soil moisture and temperature variations under grass (Andropogon), subshrub (Artemisia scoparia), shrub (Spiraea pubescens), plantation forest (Robinia pseudoacacia), and crop (Zea mays) vegetation were continuously monitored during the growing season of 2011. There were more than 10 soil moisture pulses during the period of data collection. Surface soil moisture of all of the land cover types showed an increasing trend in the rainy season. Soil moisture under the corn crop was consistently higher than the other surfaces. Grass and subshrubs showed an intermediate moisture level. Grass had slightly higher readings than those of subshrub most of the time. Shrubs and plantation forests were characterized by lower soil moisture readings, with the shrub levels consistently being slightly higher than those of the forests. Despite the greater post-rainfall loss of moisture under subshrub and grass vegetation than forests and shrubs, subshrub and grass sites exhibit a higher soil moisture content due to their greater soil retention capacity in the dry period. The daily ET trends of the forests and shrub sites were similar and were more stable than those of the other types. Soils under subshrubs acquired and retained soil moisture resources more efficiently than the other cover types, with a competitive advantage in the long term, representing an adaptive vegetation type in the study watershed. The interactions between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics contribute to structure and function of the ecosystems studied.

  19. Managing soil nitrate with cover crops and buffer strips in Sicilian vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, A.; Gristina, L.; Guaitoli, F.; Santoro, A.; Cerdà, A.

    2013-04-01

    When soil nitrate levels are inadequate, plants suffer nitrogen deficiency but when the levels are excessive, nitrates (NO3-N) can pollute surface and subsurface waters. Strategies to reduce the nitrate pollution are necessary to reach a sustainable use of resources such as soil, water and plant. Buffer strips and cover crops can contribute to the management of soil nitrates, but little is known of their effectiveness in semiarid vineyards plantations. The experimental site, a 10 m wide and 80 m long area at the bottom of a vineyard was selected in Sicily. The soil between vine rows and upslope of the buffer strip (seeded with Lolium perenne) and non-buffer strips (control) was managed conventionally and with one of two cover crops (Triticum durum and Vicia sativa cover crop). Soil nitrate was measured monthly and nitrate movement was monitored by application of a 15N tracer to a narrow strip between the bottom of vineyard and the buffer and non-buffer strips. L. perenne biomass yield in the buffer strips and its isotopic nitrogen content were monitored. V. sativa cover crop management contribute with an excess of nitrogen, and the soil management determined the nitrogen content at the buffer areas. A 6 m buffer strip reduce the nitrate by 42% with and by 46% with a 9 m buffer strip.

  20. Numerical Modeling of the Soil Cover System Performance from Hydrogeological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, D.; Cheong, Y.; Yim, G.; Baek, H.

    2008-05-01

    Decline of mining industry is drastic in production and consumption in Korea, and the number of operating mines has been reduced by more than 90 percent in last two decades. Environmental concern and the collapse of commercial viability has necessitated the government to close down uneconomical mines, and reclamation of mine waste dumps and the proper treatment of the mine drainage constitute the most important factors for regional rehabilitation programs. A dry soil cover system for mine waste is steadily increasing in Korea, to minimize the influx of water and oxygen into the waste dump. Traditional cover design procedures based on empirical or semi-quantitative analyses can be improved by implementing environmental and hydrological parameters including total precipitation, evapotranspiration, surface runoff, and infiltration associated with different cover configurations. The main objective of this study is to develop a standardized design procedure for dry cover systems to minimize environmental impacts in mine lands, securing both efficiency and long-term structural stability. A numerical analysis technique was adopted for selecting governing parameters which dictate hydrogeologic characteristics of the unsaturated zone in soil cover system. Variables included the soil water characteristic curve, hydraulic conductivity function, and water balance of the study area. A commercial finite element analysis software was applied for performance analysis of three soil cover systems including a simple growth medium, sand layer, and sand-clay-sand complex layer.

  1. Ground cover by three crops cultivated on marginal lands in southwestern Nigeria and implications for soil erosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. K. Salako; F. A. Olowokere; G. Tian; G. Kirchhof; O. Osiname

    2007-01-01

    Resource-poor farmers in developing nations cultivate marginal lands, thereby exacerbating the problem of soil degradation through poor plant growth and ground coverage. An assessment of ground cover under such a practice will provide a guideline for soil conservation. Ground cover by leguminous cover crops (e.g., Mucuna pruriens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Vigna unguiculata), associated with yam, maize and rice was measured

  2. [Study on nutrient and salinity in soil covered with different vegetations in Shuangtaizi estuarine wetlands].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Lin; Lü, Xian-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Sheng; Chen, Zhi-Ke; Liu, Zheng-Mao

    2011-09-01

    Nutrient elements and salinity in soil covered by different vegetations including Phragmites australis (Clay.) Trin., Typha orientalis Presl., Puccinellia distans Parl, and Suaeda salsa in Shuangtaizi estuarine wetlands were investigated to study their distribution characteristics and to reveal the nutrient element variation during the vegetation succession processes. Results indicated that total potassium, total phosphorus and salinity were different significantly in soil between different plant communities while available phosphorus, total nitrogen, available nitrogen, available potassium, total sulfur, iron and soil organic carbon were different insignificantly. Correlation analysis suggested that soil organic carbon were related significantly to total nitrogen, available phosphorus, available potassium, which implied that decomposition of plant litter might be the mail source of soil nitrogen and available nutrient. Salinity was significantly related to total phosphorus and iron in soil. In Shuangtaizi estuarine wetland soil, ratios of carbon to nitrogen (R(C/N)) was in the range of 12.21-26.33 and the average value was 18.21, which was higher than 12.0. It indicated that soil organic carbon in Shuangtaizi estuarine mainly came from land but not ocean and plants contributed the most of soil organic matters. There was no significant difference in R(C/N) between soil from the four plant communities (F = 1.890, p = 0.151). R(C/N) was related significantly to sol salinity (r = 0.346 3, p = 0.035 8) and was increasing with soil salinity. PMID:22165232

  3. Factors affecting temporal H2S emission at construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-02-01

    Odor problems associated with H2S emissions often result in odor complaints from nearby residents of C&D debris landfills, especially in the early morning. As part of a field study conducted on H2S removal ability using different cover materials, daily and seasonal H2S emissions through a soil cover layer were monitored at a C&D debris landfill to investigate factors affecting H2S emissions. H2S emission rates were not a constant, but varied seasonally, with an average emission rate of 4.67×10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1). During a the 10-month field study, as the H2S concentration increased from 140ppm to about 3500ppm underneath the cover soil in the testing cell, H2S emissions ranged from zero to a maximum emission rate of 1.24×10(-5)mgm(-2)s(-1). Continuous emission monitoring indicated that H2S emissions even changed over time throughout the day, generally increasing from morning to afternoon, and were affected by soil moisture and temperature. Laboratory experiments were also conducted to investigate the effects of H2S concentration and cover soil moisture content on H2S emissions. The results showed that increased soil moisture reduced H2S emissions by retarding H2S migration through cover soil and dissolving H2S into soil water. The field study also indicated that due to atmospheric dispersion, high H2S emissions may not cause odor problems. PMID:23968554

  4. Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Lena F.; Salmond, Jennifer A.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2015-04-01

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux. We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 ?mol m-2 s-1. We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The ?13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

  5. Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative.

  6. A field-validated model for landfill methane emissions inclusive of seasonal methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, J. E.; Spokas, K.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    In addition to natural wetlands, atmospheric methane (CH4) has multiple anthropogenic sources with high uncertainties, including rice production, ruminant animals, natural gas leakages, biomass burning, and landfills. For an improved IPCC Tier III methodology for landfill CH4 emissions in California, we have developed a new science-based, field-validated inventory model which decouples emissions from a historical reliance on a theoretical first order kinetic model for CH4 generation potential. The model (CALMIM, CAlifornia Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely-available JAVA tool which estimates net CH4 emissions to the atmosphere for any landfill cover soil over a typical annual cycle, including (1) the effect of engineered gas extraction; (2) the physical effects of daily, intermediate, and final cover materials to retard emissions; and (3) seasonal soil moisture and temperature effects on both gaseous transport and methanotrophic CH4 oxidation. Linking site-specific data with existing globally-validated USDA models for annual climate and soil microclimate (Global TempSim; Global RainSim; Solarcalc; STM2), this model relies on 1-D diffusion as the major driver for emissions. Importantly, unlike current inventory methods based on modeled generation, the driving force for emissions (e.g., the CH4 concentration gradient) can be directly compared to field data. Methane oxidation is scaled to maximum rates over the full range of moisture and temperature conditions based on extensive supporting laboratory studies using California landfill cover soils. Field validation included meteorological data, soil moisture/temperature measurements, and seasonal (wet/dry) CH4 emissions & oxidation measurements for daily, intermediate, and final cover soils over two annual cycles at a northern (Monterey County) and southern California (Los Angeles County) landfill. The model accurately predicted soil temperature and moisture trends for individual cover materials with acceptable order-of-magnitude predictability for field emissions within the context of published literature spanning 7 orders of magnitude. In addition to regional defaults for inventory purposes, CALMIM permits user-selectable parameters and boundary conditions for more rigorous site-specific applications where detailed CH4 emissions, meteorological, and soil microclimate data exist.

  7. Effects of soil compaction caused by tillage and seed covering techniques on soil physical properties and performance of wheat crop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Latif; M. A. Khan; T. Ali

    2008-01-01

    To link the damage caused to the soil structure by the movements of machinery and other crop production operations and their effects on plant fate, a 24-plots experiment was established. The impact of two secondary tillage implements (Disc harrow and cultivator) and four seed covering techniques ranging from zero planking to double planking with 152 kg weight were studied on

  8. Considerations over the distribution of the organic matter in the soil cover of Transylvania Plain (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovean, Horia; Man, Titus; Rusu, Teodor

    2010-05-01

    Considerations over the distribution of the organic matter in the soil cover of Transylvania Plain (Romania) Horea Cacovean*, Titus Man**, Teodor Rusu*** *OSPA-Cluj- 1Faglui street, Cluj Napoca, RO-40048, Romania- turda75@yahoo.com ** Faculty of Geographie, University of Babes-Bolyai, 5-7 Clinicilor street, Cluj Napoca, RO-400006, Romania *** Faculty of Agriculture, USAMV, 3-5 Calea Manastur street,Cluj Napoca, RO-400372, Romania Soil degradation has become a major concern in the Transylvania Plain. Erosion, landslides, salinization, gleysation, and loss of humus are the main forms of soil deterioration in that region. This factsheet deals with the role of organic matter in soil productivity and the effects of various management practices and abandonment of the lands on soil organic matter. Soils in Transylvania Plain are analyzed concerning the amount of humus they contain. The influence of soil texture, climatic variables, and soil management on the qualitative soil humus content was studied in the top 20 cm of different managed loess soils of more then 100 profiles along a climosequence in that region. Taken together, soil, landform, land use and vegetation data suggest: (1) summit positions are relatively stable with immobilizing humus environments; (2) the content of humus increase progressively down steep at the contact with the floodplains; 3) without the influx of organic materials, erodible backslopes may become humus depleted as it happen the poor inputs of grassland and forest litter are mixed with surface soil horizon; 4) influx of mixed sediment and organic materials from backslopes maintains concentrations of humus on footslopes and toeslopes. This influence was more pronounced in the heavy clayey soils, suggesting that the accumulation of humus was enhanced by organo-mineral interactions. Entrenchment of drainage ways can circumvent these translocation processes. The results underscore the importance of functional connectivity between upland hillslopes and alluvial soils.

  9. Comparison of seasonal soil microbial process in snow-covered temperate ecosystems of northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei; Chen, Weile; Zhang, Naili; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    More than half of the earth's terrestrial surface currently experiences seasonal snow cover and soil frost. Winter compositional and functional investigations in soil microbial community are frequently conducted in alpine tundra and boreal forest ecosystems. However, little information on winter microbial biogeochemistry is known from seasonally snow-covered temperate ecosystems. As decomposer microbes may differ in their ability/strategy to efficiently use soil organic carbon (SOC) within different phases of the year, understanding seasonal microbial process will increase our knowledge of biogeochemical cycling from the aspect of decomposition rates and corresponding nutrient dynamics. In this study, we measured soil microbial biomass, community composition and potential SOC mineralization rates in winter and summer, from six temperate ecosystems in northern China. Our results showed a clear pattern of increased microbial biomass C to nitrogen (N) ratio in most winter soils. Concurrently, a shift in soil microbial community composition occurred with higher fungal to bacterial biomass ratio and gram negative (G-) to gram positive (G+) bacterial biomass ratio in winter than in summer. Furthermore, potential SOC mineralization rate was higher in winter than in summer. Our study demonstrated a distinct transition of microbial community structure and function from winter to summer in temperate snow-covered ecosystems. Microbial N immobilization in winter may not be the major contributor for plant growth in the following spring. PMID:24667929

  10. Comparison of Seasonal Soil Microbial Process in Snow-Covered Temperate Ecosystems of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei; Chen, Weile; Zhang, Naili; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    More than half of the earth's terrestrial surface currently experiences seasonal snow cover and soil frost. Winter compositional and functional investigations in soil microbial community are frequently conducted in alpine tundra and boreal forest ecosystems. However, little information on winter microbial biogeochemistry is known from seasonally snow-covered temperate ecosystems. As decomposer microbes may differ in their ability/strategy to efficiently use soil organic carbon (SOC) within different phases of the year, understanding seasonal microbial process will increase our knowledge of biogeochemical cycling from the aspect of decomposition rates and corresponding nutrient dynamics. In this study, we measured soil microbial biomass, community composition and potential SOC mineralization rates in winter and summer, from six temperate ecosystems in northern China. Our results showed a clear pattern of increased microbial biomass C to nitrogen (N) ratio in most winter soils. Concurrently, a shift in soil microbial community composition occurred with higher fungal to bacterial biomass ratio and gram negative (G-) to gram positive (G+) bacterial biomass ratio in winter than in summer. Furthermore, potential SOC mineralization rate was higher in winter than in summer. Our study demonstrated a distinct transition of microbial community structure and function from winter to summer in temperate snow-covered ecosystems. Microbial N immobilization in winter may not be the major contributor for plant growth in the following spring. PMID:24667929

  11. Effects of leguminous ground cover competition on red birch and soil nutrient status in the nursery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Hänninen; R. Ohtonen; S. Huttunen

    1999-01-01

    Legumes as ground cover are regularly planted to increase nitrogen economy of crops and to improve soil. In the present study\\u000a various clover species were evaluated as vegetative ground cover in nursery field production of micropropagated red birch\\u000a (Betula pubescensEhrh. f. rubraUlvinen f. nova) in two 2-year experiments. The clover species and cultivars, Trifolium pratenseL. ‘Bjursele’, T. repens L. ‘Jogeva’,

  12. Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

  13. Elemental contents of plants growing on soil-covered retorted shale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Schwab; W. L. Lindsay; P. J. Smith

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (F, B, Mo, Pb, Ni, Co, Cd, Cr, Hg, Se, and As) were determined in plants growing on various depths of soil covering retorted (Paraho) shale. The plants that were sampled include: Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), western wheat-grass (Agropyron smithii), Sherman's big bluegrass (Poa ampla), Utah sweetvetch (Hedysarum boreale),

  14. Effect of Soil Salinity on Nutrient Uptake, Growth, and Decorative Value of Four Ground Cover Shrubs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Marosz

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient uptake and growth of ground cover shrubs: Cotoneaster horizontalis, Cotoneaster “Ursynów,” Potentilla fruticosa “Longacre,” and Spiraea “Grefsheim,” grown at different soil salinity levels, were determined. Plants were watered five times in seven days intervals with water or four different sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions, every year during 1997–1999. Tolerant species such as Potentilla fruticosa and Cotoneaster horizontalis were not affected

  15. Applications of remote sensing and GIS in surface hydrology: Snow cover, soil moisture and precipitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianwei Wang

    2008-01-01

    Studies on surface hydrology can generally be classified into two categories, observation for different components of surface water, and modeling their dynamic movements. This study only focuses on observation part of surface water components: snow cover, soil moisture, and precipitation. Moreover, instead of discussion on the detailed algorithm and instrument technique behind each component, this dissertation pours efforts on analysis

  16. Cover crops alter phosphorus soil fractions and organic matter accumulation in a Peruvian cacao agroforestry system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many tropical soils, excessive weathering of primary minerals confounded by intense agricultural production has resulted in the depletion of organic matter and plant available forms of phosphorus (P). Long-term growth of cover crops in tropical agroforestry systems have been shown to influence nu...

  17. Impact of polypropylene fibers on desiccation cracking and hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sami Mansour Rifai

    2000-01-01

    Compacted clay soils are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in waste containment systems such as in liners and covers for landfills, impoundments, reservoirs, and ponds. Compacted clays can minimize infiltration of fluid into waste or control the release of contaminated fluids to the surrounding soils and groundwater. The hydraulic properties of these soil-based structures can be adversely affected by desiccation

  18. Movement of unlined landfill under preloading surcharge.

    PubMed

    Al-Yaqout, Anwar F; Hamoda, Mohamed F

    2007-01-01

    As organic solid waste is decomposed in a landfill and mass is lost due to gas and leachate formation, the landfill settles. Settlement of a landfill interferes with the rehabilitation and subsequent use of the landfill site after closure. This study examined the soil/solid waste movement at the Al-Qurain landfill in Kuwait after 15 years of closure as plans are underway for redevelopment of the landfill site that occupies about a km(2) with an average depth of 8-15m. Field experiments were conducted for 6 mo to measure soil/solid waste movement and water behavior within the landfill using two settlement plates with a level survey access, Casagrande-type piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, and magnetic probe extensometers. Previous results obtained indicated that biological decomposition of refuse continued after closure of the landfill site. The subsurface water rise enhanced the biological activities, which resulted in the production of increasing quantities of landfill gas. The refuse fill materials recorded a high movement rate under the imposed preloading as a result of an increase in the stress state. Up to 55% of the total movement was observed during the first 2 weeks of fill placement and increased to 80% within the first month of the 6-mo preloading test. Pneumatic piezometers showed an increase in water head, which is attributed to the developed pressure of gases escaping during the preloading period. PMID:16574394

  19. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  20. Restoring the biological crust cover of soils across biomes in arid North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Antoninka, Anita; Bowker, Matthew; Giraldo Silva, Ana; Nelson, Corey; Velasco Ayuso, Sergio; Barger, Nichole; Belnap, Jayne; Reed, Sasha; Duniway, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crust communities provide important ecosystem services to arid lands, particularly regarding soil fertility and stability against erosion. In North America, and in many other areas of the globe, increasingly intense human activities, ranging from cattle grazing to military training, have resulted in the significant deterioration of biological soil surface cover of soils. With the intent of attaining sustainable land use practices, we are conducting a 5-year, multi-institutional research effort to develop feasible soil crusts restoration strategies for US military lands. We are including field sites of varying climatic regions (warm and cold deserts, in the Chihuahuan Desert and in the Great Basin, respectively) and varying edaphic characteristics (sandy and silty soils in each). We have multiple aims. First, we aim to establishing effective "biocrust nurseries" that produce viable and pedigreed inoculum, as a supply center for biocrust restoration and for research and development. Second, we aim to develop optimal field application methods of biocrust inoculum in a series of field trials. Currently in our second year of research, we will be reporting on significant advances made on optimizing methodologies for the large-scale supply of inoculum based on a) pedigreed laboratory cultures that match the microbial community structure of the original sites, and b) "in soil" biomass enhancement, whereby small amounts of local crusts are nursed under greenhouse conditions to yield hundred-fold increases in biomass without altering significantly community structure. We will also report on field trials for methodologies in field application, which included shading, watering, application of chemical polymers, and soil surface roughening. In a soon-to-be-initiated effort we also aim to evaluate soil and plant responses to biocrust restoration with respect to plant community structure, soil fertility, and soil stability, in multi-factorial field experiments. An important part of the plan will be to construct effective channels for sharing challenges and solutions in biocrust restoration with military and federal land managers.

  1. Spatiotemporal patterns of soil CO2 efflux in drylands are modulated by the type of cover: The role of biocrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Cantón, Yolanda; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Domingo, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Although the quantification of carbon (C) flux dynamics in arid and semiarid ecosystems has acquired relevant interest, it is recognized that C fluxes of drylands have been poorly measured and modeled, despite these regions represent 40% of the Earth land's surface and are known to play a crucial role in the global C cycle. Scarce vegetation and heterogeneity of non vegetated areas contributes to significant uncertainty in evaluating the roles of these ecosystems in C fluxes. In addition, interplant soils in most arid and semiarid areas are covered by biocrusts (communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and mosses in association with soil particles) which strongly affect C uptake and release and also contribute to increasing uncertainty in the assessment of C balance in these ecosystems. A better understanding of CO2 efflux in different soil covers and how they are regulated by environmental factors is necessary for identifying the relationships between C sinks and sources of arid and semiarid ecosystems. Our goal was to analyse temporal dynamics of soil CO2 on representative cover types of semiarid ecosystems (soil under plant, biocrusts and bare soil) and the influence of environmental factors (soil moisture and temperature) on soil CO2 patterns. The study area chosen was a badlands site (El Cautivo, Almería, SE Spain) where biocrusts occupy up to 50% of soil surface. Soil CO2 molar fraction (?c) was continuously monitored using small solid-state CO2 sensors (GM222, Vaisala, Helsinki, Finland) buried at 5 cm under the different covers, during one year. Soil temperature and soil moisture were also measured under these covers. From the CO2 time-series measured, we calculated soil CO2 efflux (Fs) from the 0-5 cm soil profile using Fick's law of diffusion. Our results demonstrate that soil moisture was the main factor driving soil ?c. During summer, when soil was dry, all cover types showed similar soil ?c. Following a rain, there was a rapid increase in soil ?c in all cover types but marked differences were found among them: soil under plant reached the highest values, while in the interplant soil, soils covered by biocrusts showed up to 2 times greater soil ?c than bare soils. Soil ?c also varied depending on the type of biocrust, with higher values under lichen than cyanobacteria biocrusts, attributed to higher organic matter content and higher abundance and diversity of microfauna under more developed than less developed biocrusts. At daily scale, there was a positive relationship between soil ?c and soil temperature. Positive values of Fs (CO2 emissions) were frequently found after rain. Fs was higher in soil under plant (up to 2 µmol m-2 s-1), followed by soil covered by lichens and the lowest in soils covered by cyanobacteria and bare soils (~0.5 µmol m-2 s-1). Our results demonstrate the high spatial variability in CO2 efflux in arid and semiarid areas and the need to consider the contributions of the different representative ground covers to improve C quantification and to make more accurate predictions of the effects of climate change in arid and semiarid regions.

  2. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiong; Grunwald, Sabine; Myers, D Brenton; Ross, C Wade; Harris, Willie G; Comerford, Nicolas B

    2014-09-15

    Historically, Florida soils stored the largest amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) among the conterminous U.S. states (2.26 Pg). This region experienced rapid land use/land cover (LULC) shifts and climate change in the past decades. The effects of these changes on SOC sequestration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to 1) investigate the change in SOC stocks in Florida to determine if soils have acted as a net sink or net source for carbon (C) over the past four decades and 2) identify the concomitant effects of LULC, LULC change, and climate on the SOC change. A total of 1080 sites were sampled in the topsoil (0-20 cm) between 2008 and 2009 representing the current SOC stocks, 194 of which were selected to collocate with historical sites (n = 1251) from the Florida Soil Characterization Database (1965-1996) for direct comparison. Results show that SOC stocks significantly differed among LULC classes--sugarcane and wetland contained the highest SOC, followed by improved pasture, urban, mesic upland forest, rangeland, and pineland while crop, citrus and xeric upland forest remained the lowest. The surface 20 cm soils acted as a net sink for C with the median SOC significantly increasing from 2.69 to 3.40 kg m(-2) over the past decades. The SOC sequestration rate was LULC dependent and controlled by climate factors interacting with LULC. Higher temperature tended to accelerate SOC accumulation, while higher precipitation reduced the SOC sequestration rate. Land use/land cover change observed over the past four decades also favored the C sequestration in soils due to the increase in the C-rich wetland area by ~140% and decrease in the C-poor agricultural area by ~20%. Soils are likely to provide a substantial soil C sink considering the climate and LULC projections for this region. PMID:25010945

  3. Prediction of soil properties using imaging spectroscopy: Considering fractional vegetation cover to improve accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, M. H. D.; Demattê, J. A. M.; da Silva Terra, F.; Vicente, L. E.; Bartholomeus, H.; de Souza Filho, C. R.

    2015-06-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have become attractive to assess soil properties because they are fast, require little labor and may reduce the amount of laboratory waste produced when compared to conventional methods. Imaging spectroscopy (IS) can have further advantages compared to laboratory or field proximal spectroscopic approaches such as providing spatially continuous information with a high density. However, the accuracy of IS derived predictions decreases when the spectral mixture of soil with other targets occurs. This paper evaluates the use of spectral data obtained by an airborne hyperspectral sensor (ProSpecTIR-VS - Aisa dual sensor) for prediction of physical and chemical properties of Brazilian highly weathered soils (i.e., Oxisols). A methodology to assess the soil spectral mixture is adapted and a progressive spectral dataset selection procedure, based on bare soil fractional cover, is proposed and tested. Satisfactory performances are obtained specially for the quantification of clay, sand and CEC using airborne sensor data (R2 of 0.77, 0.79 and 0.54; RPD of 2.14, 2.22 and 1.50, respectively), after spectral data selection is performed; although results obtained for laboratory data are more accurate (R2 of 0.92, 0.85 and 0.75; RPD of 3.52, 2.62 and 2.04, for clay, sand and CEC, respectively). Most importantly, predictions based on airborne-derived spectra for which the bare soil fractional cover is not taken into account show considerable lower accuracy, for example for clay, sand and CEC (RPD of 1.52, 1.64 and 1.16, respectively). Therefore, hyperspectral remotely sensed data can be used to predict topsoil properties of highly weathered soils, although spectral mixture of bare soil with vegetation must be considered in order to achieve an improved prediction accuracy.

  4. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The variability in crop yield between two fields is determined by their differences in mesorelief, A-horizon average thickness and slightly changes in soil temperature. The within-field crop yield variability is determined by microrelief and connected differences in soil moisture. Higher soil cover variability reflects in higher variability of winter ray yield and its quality that could be predicted and planed in conditions of concrete field and year according to principal limiting factors evaluation.

  5. Spreading topsoil encourages ecological restoration on embankments: soil fertility, microbial activity and vegetation cover.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M; Costa-Tenorio, Marga; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (?-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased ?-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, ?-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the original substrate should be previously assessed on a site by site basis. PMID:24984137

  6. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (?-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased ?-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, ?-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the original substrate should be previously assessed on a site by site basis. PMID:24984137

  7. Corn residue removal and cover crop impacts on soil parameters under a corn-soybean cropping system of South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of crop residue has been shown to degrade soil organic carbon (SOC), and hence soil quality. The present study was conducted to assess the impacts of corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal and cover crops on various soil quality parameters. The experimental site was located in Brookings County, ...

  8. Improvement of remote sensing of crop residue cover by accounting for green vegetation and soil spectral properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage methods are beneficial as they disturb soil less and leaves increased crop residue cover (CRC) after planting on the soil surface. CRC helps reduce soil erosion, evaporation, and the need for tillage operations in fields. Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to due to less fos...

  9. Hazardous waste landfill leachate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, C. (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Maryland Heights, MO (United States)); Loehr, R.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Program); Haikola, B. (Remediation Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Leachate data from 18 commercial hazardous waste landfills or cells were evaluated to determine overall leachate characteristics and parameters that may affect leachate generation and characteristics. The landfills studied have a wide range of practices, none of which are necessarily representative of the most current landfill design, operating or closure practice in the United States. The leachate samples were from landfills that represented varying waste types, waste age, geographic locations and climate. The parameters evaluated included chemical properties, co-disposal of hazardous and municipal solid wastes, climatic conditions, and waste age in the landfills. The leachate samples had been analyzed for 62 volatiles, 107 semi-volatiles, 16 metals, 28 pesticides, herbicides and insecticides, and 17 other chemicals. The results indicate that: (a) the organics in the leachate with high concentrations had high solubilities and low octanol-water coefficients, (b) landfills in arid climates produced less leachate than those in temperate and sub-tropical climates, and (c) leachate production appeared to be related to use of a cap or cover.

  10. Can differences in root responses to soil drying and compaction explain differences in performance of trees growing on landfill sites?

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Chan, Gilbert Y. S.; Wong, M. H.

    1999-07-01

    Two tropical woody species, Acacia confusa Merrill and Litsea glutinosa (Lour.) C.B. Robinson, were grown under controlled conditions in PVC pipes filled with John Innes No. 2 soil. To investigate root distribution, physiological characteristics and hydraulic conductivity, four soil treatments were imposed-well-watered and noncompacted (control), well-watered and compacted; unwatered and noncompacted, and unwatered and compacted. In L. glutinosa, rooting depth and root elongation were severely restricted when soil bulk density increased from around 1.12 to 1.62 g cm(-3), whereas soil compaction had little effect on these parameters in A. confusa. As soil drying progressed, root water potential and osmotic potential declined more slowly in L. glutinosa than in A. confusa. Both the soil drying and compaction treatments significantly stimulated the accumulation of root abscisic acid (ABA) in both species. Soil drying damaged the root cell membrane of A. confusa, but had little influence on the root cell membrane of L. glutinosa. Soil drying had a greater effect on root hydraulic conductivity (L(p)) in L. glutinosa than in A. confusa, whereas the effect of soil compaction on L(p) was less in L. glutinosa than in A. confusa. Soil drying enhanced the effects of soil compaction on root L(p). We conclude that soil drying and compaction have large species-specific effects on the distribution, growth and physiology of roots. The relationships of these root properties to the species' ability to tolerate unfavorable soil conditions were examined. PMID:12651537

  11. Soil wetting processes at high temporal resolution in a semiarid mediterranean watershed with scattered tree cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; van Schaik, Loes; Schnabel, Susanne; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Soil wetting processes play a key role for the distribution of water and solutes and thereby for the water availability for plants. However, characterization of such processes (from slower to faster flows), frequency of occurrence, and factors that cause them, are still poorly known. This characterization is important in hydrological studies because enables a better understanding of spatio-temporal variability of water resources and allows improving the design of models. Using a method based on the maximal soil water increase registered by a sensor over a minimum given time interval during a rainfall event, types of soil wetting processes were classified and quantified. For this, capacitance sensors which registered the volumetric water content at high temporal resolution (30-min) along of more than two hydrological years (mainly for 2010-2011 and 2011-2012), were installed in soil profiles at 5, 15 cm, and 5 cm above the bedrock and depending on soil depth. This distribution along the soil profile is justified because soils are generally very shallow and most of the roots are concentrated in the upper layer. The sensors were gathered in 9 soil moisture stations characterized by lithology, topographic position, as well as by different vegetation covers: under tree canopy, under shrub, and in open spaces or grasslands. Besides, the data mining technique Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline (MARS) was used to identify and rank the factors influencing flow types as well as modelling their occurrence. The work was carried out in an experimental catchment of the Spanish region of Extremadura. Results indicated that there is a general behavior or pattern of soil moisture dynamics in the catchment with a dominant occurrence of slower soil wetting processes (>50%), which may be considered as matrix flows, and a low occurrence of those faster processes (<30%), considered as preferential flows. Nevertheless, when the total volume of water is considered then preferential flow becomes the dominant process, so that the ecological role of both flow types becomes prominent in water-limited environments. Statistical multivariate analyses based on data-mining techniques proved that although both flow types depend on variables associated with precipitation and antecedent soil moisture conditions, faster soil wetting processes are mainly related to variables as rainfall intensity and topography, while slower soil wetting processes are related to soils or vegetation.

  12. DETECTING LANDFILL LEACHATE CONTAMINATION USING REMOTE SENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for using remote sensing to detect landfill leachate contamination of ground and surface water is described. Among the topics covered are leachate indicators, spatial and temporal aspects of leachate detection, sensor selection, flight design and data interpretation...

  13. Evaluation of the soil biological activity in a remediation soil assay using organic amendments and vegetal cover.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Conde, Isabel; Cabezas, José Gerardo; Guerrero, Ana; Vicente, María Angeles; Lobo, María Del Carmen

    2007-05-25

    The recovery of a degraded soil was assayed in greenhouse conditions by applying organic amendments and revegetation with grasses. Two types of organic residues were used: sewage sludge composted with pruning waste (CPW), at 8.5 and 85 Mg ha(-1) and sewage sludge treated by thermal drying (TD), at 22 and 46 Mg ha(-1). The vegetal cover was established by sowing different herbaceous species commonly used in the revegetation of degraded alkaline soils (100 and 200 Kg of seeds ha(-1)). The chemical soil parameters and enzymatic activities (alkaline phosphatase, urease, and beta-glucosidase) and the vegetal biomass were evaluated. The type of amendment and the doses applied had different effects on the soil characteristics. However sowing dose did not have a significant effect on the parameters analysed. Organic matter was the only soil parameter affected by the interaction between the sowing rate and the amendment dose. The phosphatase and glucosidase activities showed significant correlation with the percentage of N in the leaves and stems, furthermore the phosphate activity was significantly related to the dry weight of leaves and stems. PMID:17306865

  14. Associations between land cover categories, soil concentrations of arsenic, lead and barium, and population race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Davis, Harley T; Aelion, C Marjorie; Lawson, Andrew B; Cai, Bo; McDermott, Suzanne

    2014-08-15

    The potential of using land cover/use categories as a proxy for soil metal concentrations was examined by measuring associations between Anderson land cover category percentages and soil concentrations of As, Pb, and Ba in ten sampling areas. Land cover category and metal associations with ethnicity and socioeconomic status at the United States Census 2000 block and block group levels also were investigated. Arsenic and Pb were highest in urban locations; Ba was a function of geology. Consistent associations were observed between urban/built up land cover, and Pb and poverty. Land cover can be used as proxy for metal concentrations, although associations are metal-dependent. PMID:24914533

  15. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  16. Revegetation of acidic coal refuse: effects of soil cover material depth and limiting rate on initial establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, J.D.; Dvorak, A.J.; Knight, M.J.; Mueller, B.K.

    1981-09-01

    Sixteen plots were established in April 1977 on a recontoured coal refuse disposal site near the town of Staunton in southwestern Illinois, as a part of a larger project that is demonstrating and evaluating new and cost-effective methods for reclaiming abandoned coal refuse sites. The plots were designed to compare the effects of four soil cover material depths and two limestone application rates on vegetation establishment and growth. All plots were fertilized at the same rate and seeded with a mixture of seven grasses and one legume. Plot treatments and plant species were chosen on the basis of laboratory pot-culture experiments. During the initial growing season, plant germination, density, cover, and production, as well as soil abiotic parameters, were measured. Excellent plant cover (89 to 99%) developed over the first growing season on those plots with soil cover material. However, plant cover and production were dominated by invading annuals characteristic of old-field succession. The eight planted perennial species contributed minimally to both cover and production, but plant density data indicated that the planted species, although small in size, were becoming established in relatively large numbers on the plots with soil cover material. Even though the plots with the maximum depth (60 cm) of soil cover material supported the greatest plant production, by August total plant densities on the plots with soil cover material were not affected by either cover material depth or liming rate. Survival and growth of both planted and invader species were very poor on the plots without soil cover material; plant cover here was less than 3%.

  17. Effects of compaction and wetting of laterite cover soil on development and survival of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) immatures.

    PubMed

    Abu Tahir, Nurita; Ahmad, Abu Hassan

    2013-09-01

    Effects of laterite cover soil with different characteristics on survival of buried eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae of Musca domestica (L.) were studied experimentally. Soil treatments were loose dry soil, loose wet soil, compacted dry soil, and compacted wet soil (CWS). Eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae were buried under 30 cm of the different soil treatments and placed under field conditions until adults emerged. Rearing medium was provided for eggs and larvae, and control treatments of all stages were unburied immatures placed on soil surface. Egg and pupal survival to adult were significantly affected by the cover soil treatments, but third instars were more resilient. Wet soil treatments (loose wet soil and CWS) resulted in significantly reduced pupal survival, but increased survival of eggs. However, CWS significantly reduced adult emergence from buried eggs. Though emergence of house flies buried as eggs was significantly reduced, some were able to hatch and emerging first instar larvae developed to pupation. Although cover soil does not completely prevent fly emergence, it did limit development and emergence of buried house flies. PMID:24180104

  18. Parameterization of Organic-covered Permafrost Soils in Land Surface and Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Carey, S. K.; Quinton, W. L.; Janowicz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Close to one-third of the earth's surface is underlain with permafrost and much of the permafrost terrain is covered with a surface organic layer of various depths. The need to improve mathematical representation and parameterization of cold region processes in land surface and hydrological models have been well recognized in recent decades. However, progress has been hindered by (a) the complexity and variability of the soil system associated with thawing/freezing processes and organic cover and (b) the shortage of high quality field data due to the technical and logistic difficulties imposed by the harsh environments. Large variations exist in the parameterizations of thermal and hydrological processes in current land surface and hydrological models. Many of them were developed and validated in soil and climate conditions different from those in permafrost regions. In this study, efforts have been made to examine the most important thermal and hydraulic parameterizations and their effects on the simulations of ground thawing/freezing and infiltration/runoff processes against detailed measurements obtained at six field sites in Canada's discontinuous permafrost region. The tested parameterizations include (a) three methods for thermal conductivity, (b) three methods for hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention, (c) three methods for unfrozen water content, (d) six algorithms for thawing/freezing simulation and (e) five algorithms for infiltration simulation. The field sites cover various vegetation types including boreal forest, alpine tundra and wetland peat plateau. The soil organic depth ranges from 0.0 to 3 m. Field data used include daily meteorological variables (solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and wind speed), daily liquid soil water content and soil temperature at various depths, and daily snow depth. Total soil water content (frozen and liquid) was monitored using twin probe gamma attenuation at three sites. Ground thawing and freezing depths, snow melt, infiltration and runoff were estimated from the above measurements. Methods of different parameterization were compared using identical inputs and evaluated against the same set of observed outputs. The main conclusions of this study include: (a) de Vries' method is recommended to parameterize the thermal conductivity in permafrost soils; (b) the van Genuchten method provides the best fit to the observed soil hydraulic curves, but has the most parameters. while the Brooks and Corey method and Clapp and Hornberger method achieve similar results for most soil moisture conditions as long as appropriate parameters were chosen; (c) the segmented linear function is the simplest to be parameterized with limited available data, while the water potential-freezing point depression equation is recommend for coupled thermal and moisture simulations; (d) a numerical model with an apparent heat capacity treatment gives the most accurate simulation of ground thawing/freezing depths in all the tested sites; and (e) no current infiltration scheme is valid for all the infiltration situations in organic-covered permafrost soils as different methods must be employed in different infiltration stages.

  19. Cover crops impact on excess rainfall and soil erosion rates in orchards and potato fields, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egozi, Roey; Gil, Eshel

    2015-04-01

    Bare soil and high drainage densities are common characteristics of intensive agriculture land. The couplings of these characteristics lead to high runoff and eroded soil volumes leaving the field or the orchard via the local drainage system into the fluvial system. This process increase flood risk due to massive deposition of the coarse fraction of the eroded soil and therefore reduces channel capacity to discharge the increase volumes of concentrated runoff. As a result drainage basin authorities are forced to invest large amount of money in maintaining and enlarging the drainage network. However this approach is un-sustainable. On the other hand, implementing cover crops (CC) and modification to current agricultural practices over the contributing area of the watershed seems to have more benefits and provide sustainable solution. A multi-disciplinary approach applied in commercial potatoes fields and orchards that utilize the benefit of CC shows great success as means of soil and water conservation and weed disinfestation without reduction in the yield, its quality or its profitability. The results indicate that it is possible to grow potatoes and citrus trees under CC with no reduction in yield or nutrient uptake, with more than 95% reduction in soil loss and more than 60% in runoff volumes and peak discharges.

  20. Use of LANDSAT images of vegetation cover to estimate effective hydraulic properties of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The estimation of the spatially variable surface moisture and heat fluxes of natural, semivegetated landscapes is difficult due to the highly random nature of the vegetation (e.g., plant species, density, and stress) and the soil (e.g., moisture content, and soil hydraulic conductivity). The solution to that problem lies, in part, in the use of satellite remotely sensed data, and in the preparation of those data in terms of the physical properties of the plant and soil. The work was focused on the development and testing of a stochastic geometric canopy-soil reflectance model, which can be applied to the physically-based interpretation of LANDSAT images. The model conceptualizes the landscape as a stochastic surface with bulk plant and soil reflective properties. The model is particularly suited for regional scale investigations where the quantification of the bulk landscape properties, such as fractional vegetation cover, is important on a pixel by pixel basis. A summary of the theoretical analysis and the preliminary testing of the model with actual aerial radiometric data is provided.

  1. Short-term cover crop decomposition in organic and conventional soils: Soil microbial and nutrient cycling indicator variables associated with different levels of soil suppressiveness to Pythium aphanidermatum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. J. Grünwald; S. Hu; A. H. C. van Bruggen

    2000-01-01

    Stages of oat-vetch cover crop decomposition were characterized over\\u000a time in terms of carbon and nitrogen cycling, microbial activity and\\u000a community dynamics in organically and conventionally managed soils in a\\u000a field experiment and a laboratory incubation experiment. We subsequently\\u000a determined which variables describing soil microbial community dynamics,\\u000a C and N cycling could be used as predictors of Pythium aphanidermatum\\u000a damping-off

  2. Effects of Tillage, Rotation and Cover Crop on the Physical Properties of a Silt-Loam Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Samuel Idoko; Nkongolo, Nsalambi Vakanda

    2015-04-01

    Soil and crop management practices can affect the physical properties and have a direct impact on soil sustainability and crop performance. The objective of this study was to investigate how soil physical properties were affected by three years of tillage, cover crop and crop rotation treatments in a corn and soybean field. The study was conducted on a Waldron siltyloam soil at Lincoln University of Missouri. Soil physical properties studied were soil bulk density, volumetric and gravimetric water contents, volumetric air content, total pore space, air-filled and water-filled pore space, gas diffusion coefficient and pore tortuosity factor. Results showed significant interactions (p<0.05) between cover crop and crop rotation for bulk density, gravimetric and total pore space in 2013. In addition, cover crop also significantly interacted (p<0.05) with tillage for bulk density and total pore space. All soil physical properties studied were significantly affected by the depth of sampling (p<0.0001), except for bulk density, the pore tortuosity factor and total pore space in 2012, and gravimetric and volumetric in 2013. Overall, soil physical properties were significantly affected by the treatments, with the effects changing from one year to another. Addition of a cover crop improved soil physical properties better in rotation than in monoculture.

  3. Cover and liner system designs for mixed-waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    MacGregor, A. [ERM Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Land disposal of mixed waste is subject to a variety of regulations and requirements. Landfills will continue to be a part of waste management plans at virtually all facilities. New landfills are planned to serve the ongoing needs of the national laboratories and US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and environmental restoration wastes will ultimately need to be disposed in these landfills. This paper reviews the basic objectives of mixed-waste disposal and summarizes key constraints facing planners and designers of these facilities. Possible objectives of cover systems include infiltration reduction; maximization of evapotranspiration; use of capillary barriers or low-permeability layers (or combinations of all these); lateral drainage transmission; plant, animal, and/or human intrusion control; vapor/gas control; and wind and water erosion control. Liner system objectives will be presented, and will be compared to the US Environmental Protection Agency-US Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidance for mixed-waste landfills. The measures to accomplish each objective will be reviewed. Then, the design of several existing or planned mixed-waste facilities (DOE and commercial) will be reviewed to illustrate the application of the various functional objectives. Key issues will include design life and performance period as compared/contrasted to postclosure care periods, the use (or avoidance) of geosynthetics or clays, intermediate or interim cover systems, and soil erosion protection in contrast to vegetative enhancement. Possible monitoring approaches to cover systems and landfill installations will be summarized as well.

  4. Infiltration through layered-soil trench covers: Response to an extended period of rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, T.H.; Keefer, D.A.; Albrecht, K.A.; Cartwright, K.

    1988-01-01

    Four experimental waste disposal trench covers were constructed to test the effectiveness of layered-soil cover designs in reducing infiltration. Three covers each consisted of a layer of gravel between an overlying wick layer of compacted fine-grained material (either silt or loam) and a compacted loam base; the fourth consisted of compactd silt over a loam base. Capillary pressures were monitored at various depths within each cover during October through December, 1985, a period of high rainfall following a dry summer. Moisture movement in response to the rainfall was rapid within the upper layers of all four test covers, but was retained within the upper layers of the three wick-system trenches, despite variations in the design thickness and composition of the wick layers. In the wick systems, moisture did not enter the gravel until a threshold level of pressure approaching saturation was established in the wick layer. Once this level was reached, moisture moved into and through the gravel. This experiment demonstrates the functionality of field-scale wick systems. ?? 1988.

  5. Land-cover effects on soil organic carbon stocks in a European city.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Davies, Zoe G; McCormack, Sarah A; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-02-15

    Soil is the vital foundation of terrestrial ecosystems storing water, nutrients, and almost three-quarters of the organic carbon stocks of the Earth's biomes. Soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks vary with land-cover and land-use change, with significant losses occurring through disturbance and cultivation. Although urbanisation is a growing contributor to land-use change globally, the effects of urban land-cover types on SOC stocks have not been studied for densely built cities. Additionally, there is a need to resolve the direction and extent to which greenspace management such as tree planting impacts on SOC concentrations. Here, we analyse the effect of land-cover (herbaceous, shrub or tree cover), on SOC stocks in domestic gardens and non-domestic greenspaces across a typical mid-sized U.K. city (Leicester, 73 km(2), 56% greenspace), and map citywide distribution of this ecosystem service. SOC was measured in topsoil and compared to surrounding extra-urban agricultural land. Average SOC storage in the city's greenspace was 9.9 kg m(-2), to 21 cm depth. SOC concentrations under trees and shrubs in domestic gardens were greater than all other land-covers, with total median storage of 13.5 kg m(-2) to 21 cm depth, more than 3 kg m(-2) greater than any other land-cover class in domestic and non-domestic greenspace and 5 kg m(-2) greater than in arable land. Land-cover did not significantly affect SOC concentrations in non-domestic greenspace, but values beneath trees were higher than under both pasture and arable land, whereas concentrations under shrub and herbaceous land-covers were only higher than arable fields. We conclude that although differences in greenspace management affect SOC stocks, trees only marginally increase these stocks in non-domestic greenspaces, but may enhance them in domestic gardens, and greenspace topsoils hold substantial SOC stores that require protection from further expansion of artificial surfaces e.g. patios and driveways. PMID:24309424

  6. The influence of soil type, vegetation cover and soil moisture on spin up behaviour of a land surface model in a monsoonal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anwesha; Mandal, Manabottam

    2015-04-01

    Model spin-up is the process through which the model is adequately equilibrated to ensure balance between the mass fields and velocity fields. In this study, an offline one dimensional Noah land surface model is integrated recursively for three years to assess its spin-up behavior at different sites over the Indian Monsoon domain. Several numerical experiments are performed to investigate the impact of soil category, vegetation cover, initial soil moisture and subsequent dry or wet condition on model spin-up. These include simulations with the dominant soil and vegetation covers of this region, different initial soil moisture content (observed soil moisture; dry soil; moderately wet soil; saturated soil), simulations initialized at different rain conditions (no rain; infrequent rain; continuous rain) and different seasons (Winter, Spring, Summer/Pre-Monsoon, Monsoon and Autumn). It is seen that the spin-up behavior of the model depends on the soil type and vegetation cover with soil characteristics having the larger influence. Over India, the model has the longest spin-up in the case of simulations with loamy soil covered with mixed-shrub. It is noted that the model has a significantly longer spin-up when initialized with very low initial soil moisture content than with higher soil moisture content. It is also seen that in general, simulations initialized just before a continuous rainfall event have the least spin-up time. This observation is reinforced by the results from the simulations initialized in different seasons. It is seen that for monsoonal region, the model spin-up time is least for simulations initialized just before the Monsoon. Model initialized during the Monsoon rain episodes has a longer spin-up than that initialized in any other season. Furthermore, it is seen that the model has a shorter spin-up if it reaches the equilibrium state predominantly via drying process and could be as low as two months under quasi-equilibrium condition depending on the time of initialization.

  7. Elimination of sulphur odours at landfills by bioconversion and the corona discharge plasma technique.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fangfang; Liu, Xin; Kang, Ying; He, Ruo; Wu, Zucheng

    2014-09-22

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) contributes a lot to odours at landfills, which is a threat to the environment and the health of the staff therein. To mitigate its emission, the bioconversion within landfill cover soils (LCSs) was introduced. H2S emission and concentration both in the field air above the landfill and in microcosm testing were surveyed. Results indicated that H2S emission and concentration in the landfill varied with landfill seasons and sites. There existed relationship between H2S concentration and fluxes spatially and temporally. To characterize and assess the spatial and temporal diversity of sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the LCSs, the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was employed. Using the functional genes of dsrB and soxB, SOB, including Halothiobacillus, Rhodothalassium, Paracocccus, Allochromatium, and Thiobacillus, and SRB, including Desulfovibrio, Syntrophobacter, Desulfomonile and Desulfobacca, were identical and exhibited the dominant role in the LCSs. By employing an alternative available corona reactor, more than 90% removal efficiencies of sulphides were demonstrated, suggesting that the LCSs for eliminating odours in a lower concentration would be feasible. PMID:25244028

  8. Impact of urban cover fraction on SMOS and SMAP surface soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, N.; Walker, J. P.; Rudiger, C.; Ryu, D.; Gurney, R.

    2011-12-01

    L-band (~1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry has been widely acknowledged as the most promising technique for surface (top ~5cm) soil moisture observation at regional and global scales, due to its all weather capability, direct relationship to soil moisture, and reduced sensitivity to surface roughness and vegetation. Radiometer observations of microwave emission from the soil surface are used to estimate soil moisture through a radiative transfer model using ancillary information including land cover and soil properties etc. This technique has been applied to the ESA's (European Space Agency) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, the first soil moisture dedicated space mission, launched on 2nd Nov. 2009. Similarly, radiometer techniques will be employed by NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission, in both the passive and active-passive products. However, passive microwave soil moisture retrieval suffers from land surface heterogeneity at coarse scales; with the radiometer footprints of both missions being ~40 km, which is the best spatial resolution currently achievable using current satellite antenna technology. In order to achieve the ~0.04 m3/m3 target volumetric soil moisture accuracies at such scales, microwave contributions of non-soil targets (such as urban areas) within the sensors' field-of-view needs to be considered in the retrieval algorithm error budget and implementation, since the impact could potentially be significant if ignored. Currently there is a lack of knowledge on the microwave behaviour of non-soil targets, with little assessment of their microwave emissions and impact on satellite scale footprints. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to 1) investigate the relationship between urban induced brightness temperature uncertainties and urban fraction, 2) extract urban fraction thresholds for negligible brightness temperature impact by urban areas based on the SMOS and SMAP error budgets, and 3) use these thresholds to identify SMOS and SMAP pixels with likely non-negligible urban impacts world-wide. In this work, airborne datasets from three field campaigns in the Murrumbidgee catchment, in southeast of Australia, were used: i) the NAFE'06 (National Airborne Field Experiment in 2006), ii) the AACES-1 (Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiment for SMOS), and iii) the AACES-2. During these campaigns, brightness temperature observations were made at 1-km resolution across 20 independent SMOS/SMAP sized footprints of which a number contain urban areas of different size. The NSW (New South Wales, Australia) Land use map with 50 m resolution was used to distinguish brightness temperature observations of the urban area and surrounding natural land surface, from which urban fraction thresholds for SMOS and SMAP were derived. These thresholds were then applied globally based on an urban fraction map calculated using the MODIS Urban Land Cover 500-m product.

  9. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Lauer 1 Sanitary Landfill (Boundary road), Menomonee Falls, WI, March 11, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Boundary Road Landfill (formerly known as the Lauer 1 Landfill) is located in the northeastern portion of the Village of Menomonee Falls. Construction of a new multi-layer soil cover system over the landfill; installation of leachate extraction measures in the northeastern portion of the site; installation of an active landfill gas extraction system; construction of a new leachate conveyance, likely a forcemain (pressure pipe), to transmit all extracted leachate from the site to the local sanitary sewer system; continued operation and maintenance of an existing slurry cut-off wall and leachate collection system, including conveyance of leachate from the collection system to the new forcemain; implementation of proper institutional controls; installation of new fencing and improvement of existing fencing to restrict site access; long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and landfill gas; supplementary studies of groundwater quality and internal landfill leachate elevations; and implementation of additional remedial actions found to be necessary under the additional studies of groundwater quality and internal leachate elevations.

  10. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    SciTech Connect

    Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  11. Cover crops influence soil microorganisms and phytoextraction of copper from a moderately contaminated vineyard.

    PubMed

    Mackie, K A; Schmidt, H P; Müller, T; Kandeler, E

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of summer (Avena sativa [oat], Trifolium incarnatum [crimson clover], Chenopodium [goosefoot]) and winter (Vicia villosa [hairy vetch], Secale Cereale L. [Rye], Brassica napus L. partim [rape]) cover crops, including a mixed species treatment, to extract copper from an organic vineyard soil in situ and the microbial communities that may support it. Clover had the highest copper content (14.3mgCukg(-1) DM). However, it was the amount of total biomass production that determined which species was most effective at overall copper removal per hectare. The winter crop rye produced significantly higher amounts of biomass (3532kgDMha(-1)) and, therefore, removed significantly higher amounts of copper (14,920mgCuha(-1)), despite less accumulation of copper in plant shoots. The maximum annual removal rate, a summation of best performing summer and winter crops, would be 0.033kgCuha(-1)y(-1). Due to this low annual extraction efficiency, which is less than the 6kgCuha(-1)y(-1) permitted for application, phytoextraction cannot be recommended as a general method of copper extraction from vineyards. Copper concentration did not influence aboveground or belowground properties, as indicated by sampling at two distances from the grapevine row with different soil copper concentrations. Soil microorganisms may have become tolerant to the copper levels at this site. Microbial biomass and soil enzyme activities (arylsulfatase and phosphatase) were instead driven by seasonal fluxes of resource pools. Gram+ bacteria were associated with high soil moisture, while fungi seemed to be driven by extractable carbon, which was linked to high plant biomass. There was no microbial group associated with the increased phytoextraction of copper. Moreover, treatment did not influence the abundance, activity or community structure of soil microorganisms. PMID:25217742

  12. Effect of turfgrass cover and irrigation on soil mobility and dissipation of mefenoxam and propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D S; Branham, B E

    2001-01-01

    Irrigation effects on pesticide mobility have been studied, but few direct comparisons of pesticide mobility or persistence have been conducted on turfgrass versus bare soil. The interaction of irrigation practices and the presence of turfgrass on the mobility and dissipation of mefenoxam [N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)-D-alanine methyl ester] and propiconazole (1-[[2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole) was studied. Sampling cylinders (20-cm diam.) were placed in either creeping bentgrass [Agrostis stolonifera L. var. palustris (Huds.) Farw.] or bare soil. Mefenoxam was applied at 770 g a.i. ha(-1) and propiconazole was applied at 1540 g a.i. ha(-1) on 14 June 1999. Sampling cylinders were removed 2 h after treatment and 4,8,16, 32, and 64 days after treatment (DAT) and the cores were sectioned by depth. Dissipation of mefenoxam was rapid, regardless of the amount of surface organic matter or irrigation. The half-life (t1/2) of mefenoxam was 5 to 6 d in turf and 7 to 8 d in bare soil. Most mefenoxam residues found in soil under turfgrass were in the 0- to 1-cm section at 0, 4, and 8 DAT. Residues were found in the 15- to 30-cm section at 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 DAT, regardless of turf cover or irrigation. The t1/2 of propiconazole was 12 to 15 d in turfgrass and 29 d in bare soil. Little movement of propiconazole was observed in either bare soil or turf. PMID:11577867

  13. Black oat cover crop management effects on soil temperature and biological properties on a Mollisol in Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This field experiment was conducted to evaluate effects of mowing (no mowing, flail mowing, or sickle mowing) management of a black oat (Avena strigosa [Schreb.]) cover crop on soil microenvironmental conditions and on microbial biomass, dissolved organic C (DOC), soil inorganic N, resin-extractable...

  14. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems has the potential to substantially improve our understanding of the vulnerability of alpine grassland

  15. Effects of cover crops, compost, and manure amendments on soil microbial community structure in tomato production systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Carrera; J. S. Buyer; B. Vinyard; A. A. Abdul-Baki; L. J. Sikora; J. R. Teasdale

    2007-01-01

    Soil microbial community structure and crop yield was investigated in field tomato production systems that compared black polyethylene mulch to hairy vetch mulch and inorganic N to organic N. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) hairy vetch cover cropping increases crop yield and significantly affects soil microbial community structure when compared to the standard plastic mulch and synthetic fertilizer-based system;

  16. Cover crops tillage and glyphosate effects on chemical and biological properties of a Lower Mississippi Delta soil and soybean yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adoption of sustainable cropping systems, including cover crops and no-tillage practices can promote soil conservation and improve soil quality. However, the selection of the best management practices to increase crop production is needed. A field study was conducted from 2001 to 2005 at Stone...

  17. Use of LANDSAT images of vegetation cover to estimate effective hydraulic properties of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of natural, spatially variable, semivegetated landscapes using a linear, stochastic, canopy-soil reflectance model. A first application of the model was the investigation of the effects of subpixel and regional variability of scenes on the shape and structure of red-infrared scattergrams. Additionally, the model was used to investigate the inverse problem, the estimation of subpixel vegetation cover, given only the scattergrams of simulated satellite scale multispectral scenes. The major aspects of that work, including recent field investigations, are summarized.

  18. Migration of inorganic ions from the leachate of the Rio das Ostras landfill: a comparison of three different configurations of protective barriers.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Cláudia Virgínia; Ritter, Elisabeth; Pires, João Antônio da Costa; de Castro, José Adilson

    2014-11-01

    Batch tests and diffusion tests were performed to analyze the efficiency of a protective barrier in a landfill consisting of compacted soil with 10% bentonite compared to the results obtained for only compacted soil and for compacted soil covered with a 1-mm-thick HDPE geomembrane; the soil and leachate were collected from the Rio das Ostras Landfill in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The diffusion tests were performed for periods of 3, 10 and 60 days. After the test period, the soil pore water was analyzed and the profiles for chloride, potassium and ammonium were determined along a 6-cm soil depth. The results of the batch tests performed to define sorption parameters were used to adjust the profiles obtained in the diffusion cell experiment by applying an ion transfer model between the interstitial solution and the soil particles. The MPHMTP model (Multi Phase Heat and Mass Transfer Program), which is based upon the solution of the transport equations of the ionic contaminants, was used to solve the inverse problem of simultaneously determining the effective diffusion coefficients. The results of the experimental tests and of the model simulation confirmed that the compacted soil with 10% bentonite was moderately efficient in the retention of chloride, potassium and ammonium ions compared to the configurations of compacted soil with a geomembrane and compacted soil alone, representing a solution that is technically feasible and requires potentially lower costs for implementation in landfills. PMID:25042116

  19. Partial least-squares regression for linking land-cover patterns to soil erosion and sediment yield in watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z. H.; Ai, L.; Li, X.; Huang, X. D.; Wu, G. L.; Liao, W.

    2013-08-01

    There are strong ties between land cover patterns and soil erosion and sediment yield in watersheds. The spatial configuration of land cover has recently become an important aspect of the study of geomorphological processes related to erosion within watersheds. Many studies have used multivariate regression techniques to explore the response of soil erosion and sediment yield to land cover patterns in watersheds. However, many landscape metrics are highly correlated and may result in redundancy, which violates the assumptions of a traditional least-squares approach, thus leading to singular solutions or otherwise biased parameter estimates and confidence intervals. Here, we investigated the landscape patterns within watersheds in the Upper Du River watershed (8973 km2) in China and examined how the spatial patterns of land cover are related to the soil erosion and sediment yield of watersheds using hydrological modeling and partial least-squares regression (PLSR). The results indicate that the watershed soil erosion and sediment yield are closely associated with the land cover patterns. At the landscape level, landscape characteristics, such as Shannon’s diversity index (SHDI), aggregation index (AI), largest patch index (LPI), contagion (CONTAG), and patch cohesion index (COHESION), were identified as the primary metrics controlling the watershed soil erosion and sediment yield. The landscape characteristics in watersheds could account for as much as 65% and 74% of the variation in soil erosion and sediment yield, respectively. Greater interspersion and an increased number of patch land cover types may significantly accelerate soil erosion and increase sediment export. PLSR can be used to simply determine the relationships between land-cover patterns and watershed soil erosion and sediment yield, providing quantitative information to allow decision makers to make better choices regarding landscape planning. With readily available remote sensing data and rapid developments in geographic information system (GIS) technology, this practical and simple PLSR approach could be applied to a variety of other watersheds.

  20. Accumulation and Crop Uptake of Soil Mineral Nitrogen as Influenced by Tillage, Cover Crops, and Nitrogen Fertilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Upendra M. Sainju; Bharat P. Singh; Wayne F. Whitehead; Shirley Wang

    2007-01-01

    Management practices may influence soil N levels due to crop up- take and leaching. We evaluated the effects of three tillage practices (no-till (NT), strip till (ST), and chisel till (CT)), four cover crops (hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth), rye (Secale cereale L.), vetch 1 rye biculture, and winter weeds or no cover crop), and three N fertilization rates (0,

  1. Land cover inventory in the Netherlands using remote sensing; application in a soil and groundwater vulnerability assessment system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. A. M. THUNNISSEN; M. N. JAARSMA; O. F. SCHOUMANS

    1992-01-01

    Information on actual land cover is necessary for various applications, such as soil and groundwater protection studies and hydrological studies. Therefore, a decision to produce a national land cover data base of the Netherlands, using satellite images, was made. The first version of the data base is now available for the whole of the Netherlands. Prior to the supervised classification

  2. Species-diversified plant cover enhances orchard ecosystem resistance to climatic stress and soil erosion in subtropical hillside*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Yi-song; Tang, Jian-jun

    2004-01-01

    Naturally occurring plants in agroecosystem evidently play an important role in ecosystem stability. Field studies on the ecological effects of native plants conserved in orchard and their resistance to adverse climatic stress, and soil erosion were conducted from 1998 to 2001 in a newly developed Changshan-huyou (Citrus changshan-huyou Y.B. Chang) orchard. The experimental area covered 150 ha in typical red soil hilly region in southeastern China. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with six combinations of twelve plant species with four replications. All species used were native in the orchard. Plots were 15×8 m2 and separated by 2 m buffer strips. Precipitation, soil erosion in rainstorm days and aboveground biomass of plant community when rainstorm days ended, soil temperature and moisture under various plant covers during seasonal megathermal drought period, antiscourability of soil with different root density under various simulated rainfalls were measured. Plant cover significantly decreased the daily highest and mean soil temperature and its daily variation in hot-drought season, but there was no significant difference of the alleviation among various plant covers. Plant covers significantly increased the soil moisture in seasonal megathermal drought period. Better moisture maintenance and soil erosion reduction was found when the plant species numbers in cover plant communities increased from one to eight. Higher root density in plant communities with higher species richness increased significantly the antiscourability of the soil. It was suggested that conserving plant communities with diversified native species could produce the best positive ecological effects on citrus orchard ecosystem stability. PMID:15362189

  3. Numerical simulations of the effect of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep convection

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.A.; Arritt, R.W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A one-dimensional (column) version of a primitive equations model has been used to study the impact of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep cumulus convection in the absence of dynamical forcing. The model includes parameterizations of radiation, turbulent exchange, deep convection, shallow boundary layer convective clouds, vegetation, and soil temperature and moisture. Multiple one-dimensional experiments were performed using the average July sounding for Topeka, Kansas, as the initial condition. A range of volumetric soil moisture from one-half of the wilting point to saturation and vegetation cover ranging from bare soil to full cover were considered. Vegetation cover was found to promote convection, both by extraction of soil moisture and by shading the soil so that conduction of heat into the soil was reduced (thereby increasing the available energy). The larger values of initial soil moisture were found to delay the onset of precipitation and to increase the precipitation amount. The greatest rainfall amounts were generally predicted to occur for moist, fully vegetated surfaces. Vegetation cover also had a pronounced moderating influence, decreasing the sensitivity of the results to the soil moisture content. The general nature of the results prevailed for modest variations in the initial summertime atmospheric profile and changes in the details of the surface parameterization. The inclusion of shading by shallow cumulus clouds tended to reduce the convection for moist, bare (or partly bare) soil. The nonlinearity of the interaction between the land surface and convective precipitation implies that the effects of subgrid landscape heterogeneity in climate models cannot accurately be represented by linear averages of the contributions from the different surface types. 53 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Numerical Simulations of the Effect of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Cover on the Development of Deep Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig A.; Arritt, Paymond W.

    1995-09-01

    A one-dimensional (column) version of a primitive equations model has been used to study the impact of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep cumulus convection in the absence of dynamical forcing. The model includes parameterizations of radiation, turbulent exchange, deep convection, shallow boundary layer convective clouds, vegetation, and soil temperature and moisture. Multiple one-dimensional experiments were performed using the average July sounding for Topeka, Kansas, as the initial condition. A range of volumetric soil moisture from one-half of the wilting point to saturation and vegetation cover ranging from bare soil to full cover were considered.Vegetation cover was found to promote convection, both by extraction of soil moisture and by shading the soil so that conduction of heat into the soil was reduced (thereby increasing the available energy). The larger values of initial soil moisture were found to delay the onset of precipitation and to increase the precipitation amount. The greatest rainfall amounts were generally predicted to occur for moist, fully vegetated surfaces. Vegetation cover also had a pronounced moderating influence, decreasing the sensitivity of the results to the soil moisture content. The general nature of the results prevailed for modest variations in the initial summertime atmospheric profile and changes in the details of the surface parameterization. The inclusion of shading by shallow cumulus clouds tended to reduce the convection for moist, bare (or partly bare) soil. The nonlinearity of the interaction between the land surface and convective precipitation implies that the effects of subgrid landscape heterogeneity in climate models cannot accurately be represented by linear averages of the contributions from the different surface types.

  5. Bowen ratio measurements above various vegetation covers and its comparison with actual evapotranspiration estimated by SoilClim model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The principle of Bowen ratio is one of the available techniques for measurements of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) as one of essential water balance fractions. The main aims of submitted study were: (i) to compare the water balance of selected crops, (ii) to compare outputs of SoilClim model with observed parameters (including ETa on Bowen ratio basis). The measurements were conducted at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. Together with Bowen ratio the global solar radiation, radiation balance, soil heat flux, volumetric soil moisture and temperature within selected depths, precipitation and wind speed were measured. The measurements were conducted simultaneously above various covers within the same soil conditions: spring barley vs. winter wheat, spring barley vs. winter rape; grass vs. poplars; harvested field after tillage vs. harvested field after cereals without any tillage. The observed parameters from different covers were compared with SoilClim estimates. SoilClim model is modular software for water balance and soil temperature modelling and finally could be used for soil Hydric and Thermic regimes (according to USDA classification) identification. The core of SoilClim is based on modified FAO Penman-Monteith methodology. Submitted study proved the applicability of SoilClim model for ETa, soil moisture within two defined layers and soil temperature (in 0.5 m depth) estimates for various crops, covers, selected soil types and climatic conditions. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and the project NAZV QI91C054. The study was also supported by Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of controlled ecosystems and their adaptability to climate change".

  6. Isolation of methanotrophic bacteria from a london landfill: a preliminary study using molecular and stable isotopic techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriskantharajah, S.; Cutting, S.; Lowry, D.; Grassineau, N.; Nisbet, E.

    2003-04-01

    Methane emissions from landfills are an important source of European greenhouse emissions, and could be reduced by a biological management program that used methanotrophs in landfill cover soils. Topsoil samples taken from a London Landfill were incubated on Nitrate Mineral Salts medium in the presence of methane. The resulting colonies were probed for methanotrophic DNA using PCR amplification. DNA from methanotroph positive colonies was cloned and sequenced for identification. Isolates belonging to the genera Methylocaldum, Methylomonas and Methylosinus were detected. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the presence of possible new species. In addition dried samples of the isolates were analysed for their stable carbon isotope (? 13C) composition. The results were ? 13C values of -27 per mil and -25 per mil for Methylomonas isolates, -35 per mil and -44 per mil for Methylosinus isolates, -58 per mil and -60 per mil for some of the Methylocaldum isolates and -35 per mil and -45 per mil for the others. This isotopic variation is reflected in a phylogenetic tree of the isolates. The differences shown in the ? 13C analysis could be due to differing biochemical properties, and if the technique is further developed, it may be used for rapid identification of bacteria useful in landfill management for reducing methane emissions. The results suggest that useful reductions in methane emissions could be achieved by a careful design of landfill cover to culture methanotrophs.

  7. Effect of plant cover on distribution of soil organic matter pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Ryzhova, Irina

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies reported that quality and quantity of primary production and also the rate of litter decomposition determine the carbon (C) content and its distribution in soils. Our objective was to examine how the type of plant cover affects C sequestration in the following pools: unprotected, spatial inaccessible, interacting with silt and clay, and biochemically protected SOM. The large lysimeters of Moscow State University allowed quantification of C stocks under broadleaf forest (Acer platanoides and Quercus robur), coniferous forest (Picea abies) and agricultural crops (9-field rotation), while other soil forming factors affecting SOC content were identical. In 1965 the lysimeters (S=9 m2, depth=1.5 m) were filled with carbonate free clay loam taken in Moscow region, originated from the Valday glaciation, and plant communities listed above were planted. We collected soil samples from the mineral horizons, from 0-5 cm depth, in spring 2012. The soils were physically separated by combination of the particle size and density fractionations (8 fractions in total), and C and N contents were analyzed. The total C and N contents in non-fractionated soil were higher under broadleaf forest (66 and 3.1 g kg-1), than under coniferous forest (34.5 and 1.23 g kg-1) and agricultural crops (13.7 and 0.9 g kg-1). Under forests 45-50% of Ctotal and 30% of Ntotal were in the unprotected pool, in agricultural soil these percentages were in 3 times less. The greatest portions of protected C were in spatial inaccessible pool: 28, 32 and 40% of the Ctotal for broadleaf forest, coniferous forest and agricultural crops, respectively. However, the total C amount in this pool under agricultural crops was in 3 times less, than under forests. This is indicative for the loss of C-rich macroaggregates and an increase of C-depleted microaggregates in agricultural soils due to the plowing. The amounts of C, stabilized by interactions with silt and clay, were nearly the same (3-6 g kg-1) because of the identical texture of soil parent material. The portion of biochemically protected C was maximal in agricultural soil - 27%, whereas on forest plots it was 2 times less. The amount of C in this pool did not strongly differ among the investigated soils, but C/N ratio was lower under agricultural crops than under forests. This indicates deeper degradation of organics in cultivated soil, N addition by fertilization, and a growing contribution of microbially-derived C to the biochemically protected pool. Wide C/N ratio in biochemically protected pool in the forest soils reflects the accumulation of primary recalcitrant plant substances with high C/N such as lignin and cellulose. Thus, forest vegetation contributes mainly to the SOM sequestration in the spatial inaccessible pool and is source of the high amount of non-protected C. Under agricultural crops however, the most of SOM is stabilized by interactions with silt and clay and is stabilized biochemically.

  8. Feasibility of using LANDSAT images of vegetation cover to estimate effective hydraulic properties of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    Research activities conducted from February 1, 1985 to July 31, 1985 and preliminary conclusions regarding research objectives are summarized. The objective is to determine the feasibility of using LANDSAT data to estimate effective hydraulic properties of soils. The general approach is to apply the climatic-climax hypothesis (Ealgeson, 1982) to natural water-limited vegetation systems using canopy cover estimated from LANDSAT data. Natural water-limited systems typically consist of inhomogeneous vegetation canopies interspersed with bare soils. The ground resolution associated with one pixel from LANDSAT MSS (or TM) data is generally greater than the scale of the plant canopy or canopy clusters. Thus a method for resolving percent canopy cover at a subpixel level must be established before the Eagleson hypothesis can be tested. Two formulations are proposed which extend existing methods of analyzing mixed pixels to naturally vegetated landscapes. The first method involves use of the normalized vegetation index. The second approach is a physical model based on radiative transfer principles. Both methods are to be analyzed for their feasibility on selected sites.

  9. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  10. Fate and Transport of Pharmaceutical Compounds Applied to Turf-Covered Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Green, R. L.; Devitt, D.; McCullough, M.; Wright, L.; Vanderford, B. J.; Snyder, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the use of treated wastewater for landscape irrigation is becoming common practice and a significant asset to conserve potable water supplies. Public interest and lack of field-scale data are leading to a concern that compounds found in reuse water could persist in the environment and contaminate groundwater. As part of a larger study, 2-yr experiments were conducted in CA and NV, where reuse water was the primary source of non-ambient water input. A total of 13 compounds were studied, all originating in irrigation water applied to soil covered in turf or left bare. The target compounds included atenolol, atorvastatin, carbamazepine, diazepam, diclofenac, fluoxetine, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, meprobamate, naproxen, primidone, sulfamethoxazole, triclosan, and trimethoprim. Analytical protocols for all compounds (detection at ng/L range) were established before the study commenced. The goals of the research were to increase available data on the fate and transport of these target compounds in turfgrass/soil systems, and to use these data to assess long-term risk from using water containing these compounds. Experiments conducted at two scales are discussed here: lysimeter-scale and field-scale. At the lysimeter-scale, 24 drainage lysimeters (120 cm thick) were exposed to treated wastewater as an irrigation source. Lysimeters varied by soil type (two types), soil cover (bare- versus turf-covered) and leaching fraction (5% and 25%). Upper and lower boundary conditions were monitored throughout the study. Water samples were collected periodically after water breakthrough. After the study, soil samples were analyzed for compound mass, allowing compound mass balance and removal to be assessed. At the field-scale, passive drain gages (Decagon Devices) were installed in triplicate in fairways at four operational golf courses, one in NV and three in CA, all with histories of using treated wastewater. The gages measure water fluxes through the 60-cm thick column and store water for subsequent sampling and analysis. Irrigation water was sampled and analyzed for input mass. Using output mass, removal efficiencies could also be assessed. Results of the lysimeter study showed that mass fluxes were reduced to less than 1 g/ha/yr for all compounds (sulfamethoxazole was highest at 0.25 g/ha/yr). Solute breakthrough was concentrated during fall and winter periods when turf was overseeded and sites received winter precipitation. Results of the golf course study were similar, showing scalability. We report more than 100 instances of target compounds detected in water that percolated through the turf and upper 60 cm of soil, but with total mass fluxes of <0.1 g/ha throughout the study. Sulfamethoxazole, meprobamate, and carbamazepine were most commonly found in drainage water, but gemfibrozil, diclofenac, naproxen, and triclosan were also found in more than one sample. The results allowed for a preliminary risk assessment to be conducted. Based on our results, restricting the use of recycled water, based solely on the presence of PPCPs should only be considered at sites where soils are extremely sandy and irrigation regimes are not based on an evapotranspiration feedback approach.

  11. Soil carbon storage as influenced by tree cover in the Dehesa cork oak silvopasture of central-western Spain.

    PubMed

    Howlett, David Scott; Moreno, Gerardo; Mosquera Losada, Maria Rosa; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D

    2011-07-01

    The extent of carbon (C) stored in soils depends on a number of factors including soil characteristics, climatic and other environmental conditions, and management practices. Such information, however, is lacking for silvopastoral systems in Spain. This study quantified the amounts of soil C stored at various depths (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 cm) under a Dehesa cork oak (Quercus suber L.) silvopasture at varying distances (2, 5, and 15 m) to trees. Soil C in the whole soil and three soil fractions (<53, 53-250, and 250-2000 ?m) was determined. Results showed soil depth to be a significant factor in soil C stocks in all soil particle sizes. Distance to tree was a significant factor determining soil C stocks in the whole soil and the 250-2000 ?m soil fraction. To 1 m depth, mean total C storage at 2, 5, and 15 m from cork oak was 50.2, 37, and 26.5 Mg ha(-1), respectively. Taking into account proportions of land surface area containing these C stocks at varying distances to trees to 1 m depth, with a tree density of 35 stems ha(-1), estimated landscape soil C is 29.9 Mg ha(-1). Greater soil C stocks directly underneath the tree canopy suggest that maintaining or increasing tree cover, where lost from disease or management, may increase long term storage of soil C in Mediterranean silvopastoral systems. The results also demonstrate the use of soil aggregate characteristics as better indicators of soil C sequestration potential and thus a tool for environmental monitoring. PMID:21643613

  12. Linking the planting of cover crops to soil and water nutrient dynamics in Shatto Ditch Watershed, IN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, S. F.; Tank, J. L.; Hanrahan, B. R.; Mahl, U. H.; Huang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Tile drainage systems are common in the Midwest, and facilitate the transfer of excess inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils to adjacent streams. These non-point sources contribute to elevated nutrient loads to tributaries in the Mississippi River Basin, which have been linked to widespread hypoxia and associated ecological and economic problems in the Gulf of Mexico. In agricultural areas dominated by row-crops, the planting of cover crops after the cash crop has been harvested offers a potential mechanism to reduce nutrient leaching from fields to tile drains in the off-season. In general, cover crops retain nutrients on fields and increase soil organic matter (SOM) content after they are harvested. The planting of cover crops also promotes immobilization of soil N and reduction in losses of dissolved P from soils due to reduced erosion, resulting in significantly less leaching to surface waters through tile drains. As part of a demonstration project in the Shatto Ditch Watershed, located in the Tippecanoe River Basin, IN, we are testing whether the planting of cover crops will influence soil nutrient and organic matter, and how cover crops alter the dynamics of nutrient leaching from tile drains. We have been sampling tile drain outflows on a twice-monthly sampling regime and have been measuring dissolved inorganic N and P concentrations in tile water since November 2012. During Spring 2013, tile drain nitrate concentrations sampled synoptically throughout the watershed ranged from 2.6 - 38.9 mg NO3- L -1 (mean = 17.2 +/- 1.6 mg NO3- L -1) with the lowest concentrations coming from fields planted in cover crops (range = 2.6 - 19.0 mg NO3- L -1, mean = 9.7 +/- 1.5 mg NO3- L -1). In contrast, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations were much lower in tile drain water and ranged from 7.5 - 182.7 ?g L-1 (mean = 24.5 +/- 5.0 ?g L-1 SRP) and preliminary data suggest that there were no differences between fields with and without cover crops. In July 2012, we also sampled soils for SOM and inorganic N and P, 6 weeks after cover crop planting because the net effects of mineralization, leaching, and other potential losses that may have occurred since the cover crop was harvested are most accurately assessed at this time. Preliminary results suggest SOM content in the near-surface soil layer (i.e., 0 - 5 cm) in 3 fields planted in cover crops were similar (mean = 4.6 % +/- 0.3 %) to the mean SOM across the other 17 fields sampled without cover crops (mean = 5.8 % +/- 0.9 %). Finally, based on nutrient signatures in the tile drain samples, we predict that soil nitrate concentrations will be lower in soils planted with cover crops, but there will be little difference in soil extractable P between cover crop and non-cover crop fields. The combined sampling of both tile water and field soils will help assess whether cover crops provide a management compromise that allows farmers to improve their soil health, while at the same time improving adjacent stream water quality.

  13. EFFECT OF SOIL PROPERTIES AND A SYNTHETIC MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE ON THE RETENTION OF CD, NI, PB, AND ZN IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch equilibrium metal immobilization studies were conducted using seven soil and sediment materials spiked with varying concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The objective was to examine the potential mobility of metals in subsoils of metals-contaminated sites. Soil pH influenc...

  14. The Effect of Leaf Litter Cover on Surface Runoff and Soil Erosion in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Niu, Jianzhi; Xie, Baoyuan

    2014-01-01

    The role of leaf litter in hydrological processes and soil erosion of forest ecosystems is poorly understood. A field experiment was conducted under simulated rainfall in runoff plots with a slope of 10%. Two common types of litter in North China (from Quercus variabilis, representing broadleaf litter, and Pinus tabulaeformis, representing needle leaf litter), four amounts of litter, and five rainfall intensities were tested. Results revealed that the litter reduced runoff and delayed the beginning of runoff, but significantly reduced soil loss (p<0.05). Average runoff yield was 29.5% and 31.3% less than bare-soil plot, and for Q. variabilis and P. tabulaeformis, respectively, and average sediment yield was 85.1% and 79.9% lower. Rainfall intensity significantly affected runoff (R?=?0.99, p<0.05), and the efficiency in runoff reduction by litter decreased considerably. Runoff yield and the runoff coefficient increased dramatically by 72.9 and 5.4 times, respectively. The period of time before runoff appeared decreased approximately 96.7% when rainfall intensity increased from 5.7 to 75.6 mm h?1. Broadleaf and needle leaf litter showed similarly relevant effects on runoff and soil erosion control, since no significant differences (p?0.05) were observed in runoff and sediment variables between two litter-covered plots. In contrast, litter mass was probably not a main factor in determining runoff and sediment because a significant correlation was found only with sediment in Q. variabilis litter plot. Finally, runoff yield was significantly correlated (p<0.05) with sediment yield. These results suggest that the protective role of leaf litter in runoff and erosion processes was crucial, and both rainfall intensity and litter characteristics had an impact on these processes. PMID:25232858

  15. Application of Digital Image Processing Integration with Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS in Land Use Land Cover Change and Soil Erosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyaw Zaya Htun; Lal Samarakoon

    The relationship between land use land cover change s and soil erosion is investigated using digital imag e processing integrated with Remote Sensing The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE -Wischmeier and Smith, 1978) was applied to build a model to estimate the annual soil loss from the watershed in 1976 and 2002. The analysis process on land use land cover

  16. Late Holocene deforestation of a tree line site: estimation of pre-fire vegetation composition and black spruce cover using soil charcoal

    E-print Network

    Asselin, Hugo

    and black spruce cover using soil charcoal Hugo Asselin and Serge Payette Asselin, H. and Payette, S. 2005 and black spruce cover using soil charcoal. Á/ Ecography 28: 801Á/805. Anatomical identification of soil charcoal fragments was used to reconstruct the pre- fire vegetation composition of a tree line site

  17. An experimental investigation to characterise soil macroporosity under different land use and land covers of northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shougrakpam, Sangeeta; Sarkar, Rupak; Dutta, Subashisa

    2010-10-01

    Saturated macropore flow is the dominant hydrological process in tropical and subtropical hilly watersheds of northeast India. The process of infiltration into saturated macroporous soils is primarily controlled by size, network, density, connectivity, saturation of surrounding soil matrix, and depthwise distribution of macropores. To understand the effects of local land use, land cover and management practices on soil macroporosity, colour dye infiltration experiments were conducted with ten soil columns (25 × 25 × 50 cm) collected from different watersheds of the region under similar soil and agro-climatic zones. The sampling sites included two undisturbed forested hillslopes, two conventionally cultivated paddy fields, two forest lands abandoned after Jhum cultivation, and two paddy fields, one pineapple plot and one banana plot presently under active cultivation stage of the Jhum cycle. Digital image analyses of the obtained dye patterns showed that the infiltration patterns differed significantly for different sites with varying land use, land cover, and cultivation practices. Undisturbed forest soils showed high degree of soil macroporosity throughout the soil profile, paddy fields revealed sealing of macropores at the topsoil due to hard pan formation, and Jhum cultivated plots showed disconnected subsoil macropores. The important parameters related to soil macropores such as maximum and average size of macropores, number of active macropores, and depthwise distribution of macropores were estimated to characterise the soil macroporosity for the sites. These experimentally derived quantitative data of soil macroporosity can have wide range of applications in the region such as water quality monitoring and groundwater pollution assessment due to preferential leaching of solutes and pesticides, study of soil structural properties and infiltration behaviour of soils, investigation of flash floods in rivers, and hydrological modelling of the watersheds.

  18. Learning from Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project in which students developed an all-class laboratory activity called "The Decomposition of Organic and Inorganic Substances in a Landfill". Explores what conditions are necessary to facilitate decomposition in a landfill. (SAH)

  19. The influence of vegetation covers on soil moisture dynamics at high temporal resolution in scattered tree woodlands of Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; Schnabel, Susanne; Ceballos-Barbancho, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Soil water is a key factor that controls the organization and functioning of dryland ecosystems. However, in spite of its great importance in ecohydrological processes, most of the studies focus on daily or longer timescales, while its dynamics at shorter timescales are very little known. The main objective of this work was to determine the role of vegetation covers (grassland and tree canopy) in the soil hydrological response using measurements with high temporal resolution in evergreen oak woodland with Mediterranean climate. For this, soil water content was monitored continuously with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes and by means of capacitance sensors, mainly for the hydrological years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. They were installed at 5, 10 and 15 cm, and 5 cm above the bedrock and depending on soil profile. This distribution along the soil profile is justified because soils are generally very shallow and most of the roots are concentrated in the upper layer. The sensors were gathered in 8 soil moisture stations in two contrasting situations characterized by different vegetation covers: under tree canopy and in open spaces or grasslands. Soil moisture variations were calculated at rainfall event scale at top soil layer and deepest depth by the difference between the final and initial soil moisture registered by a sensor at the finish and the beginning of the rainfall event, respectively. Besides, as soil moisture changes are strongly influenced by antecedent conditions, different antecedent soil moisture conditions or states, from driest to wettest, were also defined. The works were carried out in 3 experimental farms of the Spanish region of Extremadura. Results obtained revealed that rainwater amount bypassing vegetation covers and reaching the soil may temporarily be modified by covers according to precipitation properties and antecedent environmental conditions (from dry to wet) before the rain episode. Rainfall amounts triggering a positive soil hydrological response decreased as initial states became drier, being more accentuated below tree canopies. The frequency of the antecedent states seem to be as important or even more than duration or precipitation amount. The role of vegetation was more decisive under drier environmental conditions, where events lower than 6 mm and 2 mm never caused soil hydrological response either below tree canopy or grassland, respectively. This is important because initial conditions were independent of seasonality and because more than half of all rainfall events registered amounts smaller than 5 mm. If changes on temperature regime or precipitation patterns turn out in drier conditions, dry spells as well as the evaporative demand could increase, causing an increase of interception capacity of vegetation and consequently affecting ecological processes.

  20. Evaluation of landfill gas as an energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    The benefits and problems associated with landfill gas recovery were considered by the City of Baltimore, resulting in the structuring and testing of a realistic gas recovery evaluation procedure for use by local governments. The Baltimore methodology is summarized and results of its application to a large landfill in the Baltimore area are presented. The landfill gas generation process potential uses for the recovered gas, and treatment requirements are covered.

  1. Surface energy balance model of transpiration from variable canopy cover and evaporation from residue-covered or bare-soil systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Octavio Lagos; Derrel L. Martin; Shashi B. Verma; Andrew Suyker; Suat Irmak

    2009-01-01

    A surface energy balance model based on the Shuttleworth and Wallace (Q J R Meteorol Soc 111:839–855, 1985) and Choudhury and Monteith (Q J R Meteorol Soc 114:373–398, 1988) methods was developed to estimate evaporation from soil and crop residue, and transpiration from crop canopies. The model\\u000a describes the energy balance and flux resistances for vegetated and residue-covered surfaces. The

  2. MUNICIPAL LANDFILL GAS CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New regulations relative to air emissions from municipal landfills may require the installation of gas collection systems at landfills. As landfill gas (LFG) is collected, water and other vapors in the gas condense in the system or are purposely removed in the normal treatment of...

  3. Phytomass and soil organic carbon inventories related to land cover classification and periglacial features in Taimyr Peninsula,Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramage, J. L.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; Palmtag, J.; Lashchinskiy, N.

    2012-12-01

    The predicted increase in atmospheric temperatures is expected to affect the turnover of soil organic carbon in permafrost soils through modifications of the soil thermal regime. However, the tundra biome is formed of a mosaic of diverse landscape types with differing patterns of soil organic carbon storage and partitioning. Among these, differences in e.g. vegetation diversity and soil movements due to freeze-thaw processes are of main importance for assessing potential C remobilization under a changing climate. In this study, we described the storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) and the aboveground phytomass carbon in relation to geomorphology and periglacial features for two areas on Taymir Peninsula (Arctic Russia). An average of 29.5 kg C m2, calculated by upscaling with a land cover classification, is stored in the upper soil meter at these two study sites. The mean C phytomass storage amounts to ca.0.406 Kg C m2, or only 1.38 % of the total SOC storage. The topography, at different scales, plays an important role in the carbon partitioning. High amounts of soil organic carbon are found in highland areas and within the patterned ground features found in peatlands. The highest amounts of aboveground phytomass carbon are found in deciduous shrubs and moss layers. The large variability in carbon distribution within land cover types among the sites reveals the challenge of upscaling the carbon storage values over the Arctic and thus highlights the necessity to carry out detailed field inventories in this region.

  4. The efficacy of winter cover crops to stabilize soil inorganic nitrogen after fall-applied anhydrous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Corey; Armstrong, Shalamar

    2015-03-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the ability of cover crops to increase the effectiveness of fall-applied nitrogen (N). The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two cover crop species to stabilize inorganic soil N after a fall application of N. Fall N was applied at a rate of 200 kg N ha into living stands of cereal rye, tillage radish, and a control (no cover crop) at the Illinois State University Research and Teaching Farm in Lexington, Illinois. Cover crops were sampled to determine N uptake, and soil samples were collected in the spring at four depths to 80 cm to determine the distribution of inorganic N within the soil profile. Tillage radish (131.9-226.8 kg ha) and cereal rye (188.1-249.9 kg ha N) demonstrated the capacity to absorb a minimum of 60 to 80% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N, respectively. Fall applying N without cover crops resulted in a greater percentage of soil NO-N (40%) in the 50- to 80-cm depth, compared with only 31 and 27% when tillage radish and cereal rye were present at N application. At planting, tillage radish stabilized an average of 91% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N within the 0- to 20-cm, depth compared with 66 and 57% for the cereal rye and control treatments, respectively. This study has demonstrated that fall applying N into a living cover crop stand has the potential to reduce the vulnerability of soil nitrate and to stabilize a greater concentration of inorganic N within the agronomic depths of soil. PMID:26023963

  5. Soil quality regime in relation to land cover and slope position across a highly modified slope landscape

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo-Jie FU; Shi-Liang LIU; Li-Ding CHEN; Yi-He LÜ; Jun QIU

    2004-01-01

    Vegetation and land-use mosaics of shrub land, grassland, farmland and reforested land are characteristic for residential areas of the Wolong nature reserve in Sichuan province, southwest China. The patterns represent a stage in long-term human disturbance and natural secondary succession since deforestation. The aim of this paper was to elucidate the soil-land cover types, soil-slope position relationships on a typical

  6. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  7. Variation in Aboveground Cover Influences Soil Nitrogen Availability at Fine Spatial Scales Following Severe Fire in Subalpine Conifer Forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica G. Turner; William H. Romme; Erica A. H. Smithwick; Daniel B. Tinker; Jun Zhu

    Following fire, fine-scale variation in early successional vegetation and soil nutrients may influence development of ecosystem\\u000a structure and function. We studied conifer forests burned by stand-replacing wildfire in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA)\\u000a to address two questions: (1) How do the variability and spatial structure of aboveground cover and soil nitrogen availability\\u000a change during the first 4 years following stand-replacing fire? (2)

  8. Strip-tilled Cover Cropping for Managing Nematodes, Soil Mesoarthropods, and Weeds in a Bitter Melon Agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Koon-Hui; Sipes, Brent S.; Hooks, Cerruti R.R.

    2010-01-01

    A field trial was conducted to examine whether strip-tilled cover cropping followed by living mulch practice could suppress root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and enhance beneficial nematodes and other soil mesofauna, while suppressing weeds throughout two vegetable cropping seasons. Sunn hemp (SH), Crotalaria juncea, and French marigold (MG), Tagetes patula, were grown for three months, strip-tilled, and bitter melon (Momordica charantia) seedlings were transplanted into the tilled strips; the experiment was conducted twice (Season I and II). Strip-tilled cover cropping with SH prolonged M. incognita suppression in Season I but not in Season II where suppression was counteracted with enhanced crop growth. Sunn hemp also consistently enhanced bacterivorous and fungivorous nematode population densities prior to cash crop planting, prolonged enhancement of the Enrichment Index towards the end of both cash crop cycles, and increased numbers of soil mesoarthropods. Strip-tilled cover cropping of SH followed by clipping of the living mulch as surface mulch also reduced broadleaf weed populations up to 3 to 4 weeks after cash crop planting. However, SH failed to reduce soil disturbance as indicated by the Structure Index. Marigold suppressed M. incognita efficiently when planted immediately following a M. incognita-susceptible crop, but did not enhance beneficial soil mesofauna including free-living nematodes and soil mesoarthropods. Strip-tilled cover cropping of MG reduced broadleaf weed populations prior to cash crop planting in Season II, but this weed suppression did not last beyond the initial cash crop cycle. PMID:22736847

  9. Strip-tilled cover cropping for managing nematodes, soil mesoarthropods, and weeds in a bitter melon agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Marahatta, Sharadchandra P; Wang, Koon-Hui; Sipes, Brent S; Hooks, Cerruti R R

    2010-06-01

    A field trial was conducted to examine whether strip-tilled cover cropping followed by living mulch practice could suppress root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and enhance beneficial nematodes and other soil mesofauna, while suppressing weeds throughout two vegetable cropping seasons. Sunn hemp (SH), Crotalaria juncea, and French marigold (MG), Tagetes patula, were grown for three months, strip-tilled, and bitter melon (Momordica charantia) seedlings were transplanted into the tilled strips; the experiment was conducted twice (Season I and II). Strip-tilled cover cropping with SH prolonged M. incognita suppression in Season I but not in Season II where suppression was counteracted with enhanced crop growth. Sunn hemp also consistently enhanced bacterivorous and fungivorous nematode population densities prior to cash crop planting, prolonged enhancement of the Enrichment Index towards the end of both cash crop cycles, and increased numbers of soil mesoarthropods. Strip-tilled cover cropping of SH followed by clipping of the living mulch as surface mulch also reduced broadleaf weed populations up to 3 to 4 weeks after cash crop planting. However, SH failed to reduce soil disturbance as indicated by the Structure Index. Marigold suppressed M. incognita efficiently when planted immediately following a M. incognita-susceptible crop, but did not enhance beneficial soil mesofauna including free-living nematodes and soil mesoarthropods. Strip-tilled cover cropping of MG reduced broadleaf weed populations prior to cash crop planting in Season II, but this weed suppression did not last beyond the initial cash crop cycle. PMID:22736847

  10. Environmental assessment of Ammässuo Landfill (Finland) by means of LCA-modelling (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Antti; Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H; Anderson, Reetta

    2009-08-01

    The Old Ammässuo Landfill (Espoo, Finland) covers an area of 52 hectares and contains about 10 million tonnes of waste that was landfilled between 1987 and 2007. The majority of this waste was mixed, of which about 57% originated from households. This paper aims at describing the management of the Old Ammässuo Landfill throughout its operational lifetime (1987-2007), and at developing an environmental evaluation based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) using the EASEWASTE-model. The assessment criteria evaluate specific categories of impact, including standard impact categories, toxicity-related impact categories and an impact categorized as spoiled groundwater resources (SGR). With respect to standard and toxicity-related impact categories, the LCA results show that substantial impact potentials are estimated for global warming (GW), ozone depletion (OD), human toxicity via soil (HTs) and ecotoxicity in water chronic (ETwc). The largest impact potential was found for SGR and amounted to 57.6 person equivalent (PE) per tonne of landfilled waste. However, the SGR impact may not be viewed as a significant issue in Finland as the drinking water is mostly supplied from surface water bodies. Overall, the results demonstrate that gas management has great importance to the environmental performance of the Old Ammässuo Landfill. However, several chemicals related to gas composition (especially trace compounds) and specific emissions from on-site operations were not available or were not measured and were therefore taken from the literature. Measurement campaigns and field investigations should be undertaken in order to obtain a more robust and comprehensive dataset that can be used in the LCA-modelling, before major improvements regarding landfill management are finalized. PMID:19423588

  11. Structure and condition of soil-vegetation cover in the Klyazma river basin applying remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Repkin, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Constant observation of vegetation and soil cover is one of the key issues of river basins ecologic monitoring. It is necessary to consider that observation objects have been continuously changing and these changes are comprehensive and depend on temporal and dimensional parameters. Remote sensing data, embracing vast areas and reflecting various interrelations, allow excluding accidental and short-term changes though concentrating on the transformation of the observed river basin ecosystem environmental condition. The research objective is to assess spatial-temporal peculiarities of soil-vegetation structure formation in the Klyazma basin as a whole and minor river basins within the area. Research objects are located in the centre of European Russia. Data used in our research include both statistic and published data, characterizing soil-vegetation cover of the area, space images Landsat. Research methods: Remote data analysis for assessing land utilization structure and soil-vegetation condition according to NDVI. Laying soil-geobotanic landscape profiles river valleys slopes. Phytomass reserve, phytoproductivity, soil fertility characteristics assessment. NDVI computation for each image pixel helped to map general condition of the Klyazma vegetation cover and to determine geographic ranges without vegetation or with depressed vegetation. For instance high vegetation index geographic range has been defined which corresponded to Vladimir Opolye characterized with the most fertile grey forest soil in the region. Comparative assessment of soil vegetation cover of minor river basins within the Klyazma basin, judging by the terrestrial data, revealed its better condition in the Koloksha basin which is also located in the area of grey forest soil. Besides here the maximum value of vegetation index for all phytocenosis was detected. In the research the most dynamically changing parts of the Klyazma basin have been determined according to NDVI dynamics analysis. Analyzing the reasons for such changes of NDVI the most significant ecologic processes in the region connected to the changes of vegetation cover condition have been revealed. Fields overgrowing and agricultural crops replacement are the most important of them. Soil-geobotanic profiles, laid in minor river basin of the Sudogda, allowed to reveal various vegetation association and to describe the confined soil profile. It is shown that well drained landscape forms correspond to arboreal vegetation type, more humidified elements of the landscape are occupied with gramineous meadow vegetation. There is sand and clay sand under mixed forest humus horizon. In pinewood forests light loam prevails in surface horizons. The results can be used for environmental monitoring of the river basins and for rational agricultural structuring.

  12. Process-level controls on CO 2 fluxes from a seasonally snow-covered subalpine meadow soil, Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Liptzin; Mark W. Williams; Detlev Helmig; Brian Seok; Gianluca Filippa; Kurt Chowanski; Jacques Hueber

    2009-01-01

    Fluxes of CO2 during the snow-covered season contribute to annual carbon budgets, but our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the\\u000a seasonal pattern and magnitude of carbon emissions in seasonally snow-covered areas is still developing. In a subalpine meadow\\u000a on Niwot Ridge, Colorado, soil CO2 fluxes were quantified with the gradient method through the snowpack in winter 2006 and 2007 and

  13. Risk Based Post Closure Care Analysis for Florida Landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Banu Sizirici Yildiz

    2009-01-01

    Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires a post closure period of 30 years for non hazardous wastes in landfills. Post closure care (PCC) activities under Subtitle D include leachate collection and treatment, groundwater monitoring, inspection and maintenance of the final cover, and monitoring to ensure that landfill gas does not migrate off site or into

  14. Risk based post closure care analysis for Florida landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Banu Sizirici Yildiz

    2009-01-01

    Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires a post closure period of 30 years for non hazardous wastes in landfills. Post closure care (PCC) activities under Subtitle D include leachate collection and treatment, groundwater monitoring, inspection and maintenance of the final cover, and monitoring to ensure that landfill gas does not migrate off site or into

  15. Pilot investigations of surface parts of three closed landfills and factors affecting them.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Jouko

    2003-05-01

    Aftercare of closed sanitary landfills in a major environmental problem. Rehabilitation of the landfill with vegetation and reducing leachate production are two issues that must be dealt. For this reason, Finnish Environment Institute has conducted several projects on closed landfills. This research aims at determining the physical and chemical properties of the soils at three closed landfills in Helsinki, Finland. Research was conducted to understand the impact by studying the following properties: Chemical, nutrient metal, gamma and radon analysis of surface soils of three closed landfills in Helsinki area. PMID:12733818

  16. Assessment of soil-gas, seep, and soil contamination at the North Range Road Landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Falls, William F.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic concentrations in all four soil samples did not exceed regional screening levels established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Barium concentrations, however, were two to three times higher than the background concentrations reported in similar Coastal Plain sediments of South Carolina.

  17. LCA comparison of windrow composting of yard wastes with use as alternative daily cover (ADC).

    PubMed

    van Haaren, Rob; Themelis, Nickolas J; Barlaz, Morton

    2010-12-01

    This study compared the environmental impacts of composting yard wastes in windrows with using them in place of soil as alternative daily cover (ADC) in landfills. The Life Cycle Assessment was made using the SimaPro LCA software and showed that the ADC scenario is more beneficial for the environment than windrow composting. ADC use is also a less costly means of disposal of yard wastes. This finding applies only in cases where there are sanitary landfills in the area that are equipped with gas collection systems and can use yard wastes as alternative daily cover. Otherwise, the environmentally preferable method for disposal of source-separated yard wastes is composting rather than landfilling. PMID:20615683

  18. Ecolotree{sup {trademark}} cap at the Barje Landfill, Ljubljana, Slovenia, prototype demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, L.; Schnoor, J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Ecolotree{reg_sign} Buffer uses strategically planted Populus spp. (poplar) trees and forbs to prevent water pollution while growing fiber for biomass fuels, paper pulps, and construction materials. The concept, developed at the University of Iowa, uses root systems that act as a pump to predictable depths greater than 1.5 m (5 ft). The plant uptakes water, nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, etc.), and adsorbable organics (such as herbicides) from soil. When the plant survival, growth rate, rooted soil depth, and water uptake are predictable, the site`s hydrology can be managed, and regulatory agencies are more willing to issue operating permits that include this vegetated barrier. Poplars transpire 600 to 1000 kilograms of water for every kilogram of stem dry matter (DM) growth. Measured poplar growth rates for 4-year old trees was 16,600 kg DM/hectare/yr. Conservatively, the water uptake calculated using the 600:1 water/stem growth ratio is 10,000,000 liters/hectare/yr. When transpiration exceeds rainfall, plants remove stored water from rooted soils. This dehydrating action effectively gives the soil a water storage capacity during winter dormancy. This Ecolotree{reg_sign} Buffer technology develops the ability to greatly reduce water leakage without the need for membrane or clay layers in landfill cover soils. This concept is now being used to manage water at American and Slovenian landfills. In contrast with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved clay or geomembrane covers designed with slight regard for plant growth, this cover focuses on reestablishing a vigorous ecosystem. While accomplishing the primary goal of protecting groundwater purity, the Ecolotree{reg_sign} Buffer grows a productive cover that stabilizes soil slopes, produces marketable crops, develops wildlife habitat, and provides a more pleasing ambiance.

  19. Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone and simulated time of arrival of landfill leachate at the water table, municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, Peter F.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) is located about 10 miles northeast of downtown El Paso, Texas. The landfill is built on the Hueco Bolson, a deposit that yields water to five public-supply wells within 1.1 miles of the landfill boundary on all sides. The bolson deposits consist of lenses and mixtures of sand, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. The unsaturated zone at the landfill is about 300 feet thick. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model for Evaluating the Land Disposal of Wastes (MULTIMED) computer models were used to simulate the time of first arrival of landfill leachate at the water table. Site-specific data were collected for model input. At five sites on the landfill cover, hydraulic conductivity was measured by an in situ method; in addition, laboratory values were obtained for porosity, moisture content at field capacity, and moisture content at wilting point. Twenty-seven sediment samples were collected from two adjacent boreholes drilled near the southwest corner of the landfill. Of these, 23 samples were assumed to represent the unsaturated zone beneath the landfill. The core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for various characteristics required for the HELP and MULTIMED models: initial moisture content, dry bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention percentages at various suction values, total organic carbon, and pH. Parameters were calculated for the van Genuchten and Brooks-Corey equations that relate hydraulic conductivity to saturation. A reported recharge value of 0.008 inch per year was estimated on the basis of soil- water chloride concentration. The HELP model was implemented using input values that were based mostly on site-specific data or assumed in a conservative manner. Exceptions were the default values used for waste characteristics. Flow through the landfill was assumed to be at steady state. The HELP-estimated landfill leakage rate was 101.6 millimeters per year, approximately 500 times the estimated recharge rate for the area near the landfill. The MULTIMED model was implemented using input values that were based mainly on site-specific data and some conservatively assumed values. Landfill leakage was assumed to begin when the landfill was established and to continue at a steady-state rate of 101.6 millimeters per year as estimated by the HELP model. By using an assumed solute concentration in the leachate of 1 milligram per liter and assuming no delay or decay of solute, the solute serves as a tracer to indicate the first arrival of landfill leachate. The simulated first arrival of leachate at the water table was 204 to 210 years after the establishment of the landfill.

  20. A method for assessing the distinguishability of land covers and soils in land surface models: Basic principles and first results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Land surface-atmosphere interactions are shaped by temporally and spatially varying characteristics of land cover and soil. Yet, model parameters representing these characteristics are oftentimes highly uncertain. Against the background of the parameter uncertainty it is questionable if models are actually always able to describe the emulated systems in such detail as is claimed. Taking this into account, honesty demands that models are simplified as far as possible. A further argument for such a simplification is that the parameterisation of a model is generally an expensive task and should be avoided for land covers and soils whose physical effect cannot be distinguished by the model. On the other hand, the simplification must not go too far. Land surface models have to meet certain minimum requirements pertaining to their ability to reproduce land covers and soils in a differentiated manner. In a model which is used for a land cover change study, for example, the respective covers have to distinguished not only formally, but in their acual effect. A method is presented which contributes to answering the following fundamental questions: (1) How far should land surface models be simplified in order not to feign an explanatory power they do not possess? (2) How far can land surface models be simplified without loosing their explanatory power? (3) Which land surface model is appropriate for a given task with respect to its ability to differentiate between the land covers and soils of interest? Where is need for model improvements? Application of the method is exemplified by means of the model Noah-LSM. Ongoing studies aiming at characterising a number of wide-spread land surface models with respect to their ability to distinguish the physical effect of different land covers are outlined.

  1. Greenhouse gas fluxes in different soil covers in the Caatinga in Pernambuco State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Kelly; Ometto, Jean; Sousa-Neto, Eráclito; Ferreira, Willian; Deusdara, Karinne; Avalá, Plínio; Lima, Romualdo

    2014-05-01

    The study aims to assess the changes in the fluxes of the three main greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) due to land use changes (LUC) in the Brazilian semi-arid region during dry season (October to December) and rainy season (April-July). This region is known as Caatinga and has unique features, and covers about 11 % of the Brazilian territory (about 850 km2). It is a densely populated region and the shifting of native vegetation to pasture stands out among the major environmental problems related to the changes in land use and land occupation. Pastures and agricultural areas cover about 27 % of the Caatinga (201,786 m²). Such drastic changes in land together with the conditions of low nutrient availability in soils and irregular rainfall events, usually leads to soil degradation with direct effects on the dynamics of CO2, N2O and CH4. This experiment was conducted in the municipality of São João, in Pernambuco State (8°52'30" S, 36°22'00" W), in an Entisol with predominantly sandy texture. Samplings were performed in April 2012 (dry season) and August 2013 (rainy season). The fluxes were measured using static PVC chambers in periods of 30 minutes, and the design of this experiment consisted of two treatments: Native Vegetation - Caatinga (C) and grassland (P), distributed in 3 blocks (replicates). The CO2 fluxes were higher during the dry season (One-way ANOVA, p=0.000), with the highest emissions found in grassland (4.6 g m-2 d-1) and the lowest in the Caatinga (3.2 g m-2 d-1). During rainy season, there was no difference between treatments, and CO2 fluxes in Caating and grassland were, respectively, 3.4 g m² d-1 and 3.6 m g -2 d-1. High emissions of N2O were found during the dry season (One-way ANOVA, p= 0.000), and the highest emissions were found in grassland (0.66 mg m² d-1) and the lowest in the Caatinga (0.33 mg m² d-1). During the rainy season there was no significant difference between treatments, and the fluxes were 0.03 mg m² d-1 in the grassland and 0.01 mg m-2 d-1 in the Caatinga. There was no significant difference between fluxes of CH4 for treatments or seasons. During dry season, high soil temperatures (31.3 °C) were observed, which was 17 % higher than the temperature measured in the rainy season (24.5 °C), and air temperature (29.6 °C), which was 10% higher than the temperature found in the rainy season (25.5 °C). These preliminary results may suggest a possible trend of increasing CO2 and N2O by elevation of temperature, which is strongly influenced by changes in land cover in this biome. The results of this research will also be used for future comparisons with similar regions located in the Brazilian Northeast, as well as in other semi-arid regions of the planet.

  2. Evaluation of Cover Crops with Potential for Use in Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) for Susceptibility to Three Species of Meloidogyne

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several cover crops with potential for use in tropical and subtropical regions were assessed for susceptibility to three common species of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica. Crops were selected based on potential use as organic amendments in anaerobic soil disin...

  3. Large-area spatially explicit estimates of tropical soil carbon stocks and response to land-cover change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen W. Holmes; Oliver A. Chadwick; Phaedon C. Kyriakidis; Eliomar P. Silva de Filho; João Vianei Soares; Dar A. Roberts

    2006-01-01

    Studies of tropical soil organic carbon (SOC) response to deforestation present conflicting results, confounding estimates of the regional effects of land-cover change on carbon storage. We calculated the change in SOC stocks due to deforestation through 1996 for the state of Rondônia, Brazil, in the southwestern Amazon basin. Whereas the net change in SOC for the state as a whole

  4. Revegetation of acidic coal refuse: effects of soil cover material depth and limiting rate on initial establishment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Jastrow; A. J. Dvorak; M. J. Knight; B. K. Mueller

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen plots were established in April 1977 on a recontoured coal refuse disposal site near the town of Staunton in southwestern Illinois, as a part of a larger project that is demonstrating and evaluating new and cost-effective methods for reclaiming abandoned coal refuse sites. The plots were designed to compare the effects of four soil cover material depths and two

  5. Cultural strategies for managing weeds and soil moisture in cover crop-based no-till soybean production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A four site-year study was conducted in North Carolina to evaluate the effects of soybean planting timing and row spacing on soil moisture, weed pressure, soybean lodging and yield in a cover crop-based soybean production system. Soybean planting timing included roll-kill and soybean planting occu...

  6. EFFECTS OF COVER CROPPING AND PLASTICULTURE ON SOIL AND RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN TOMATO PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study (Carrera et al., submitted for publication) we found that soil microbial community structure was distinctly different under plasticulture than under hairy vetch cover crops in tomato production systems. In order to determine the major factors affecting microbial communities we se...

  7. EFFECTS OF COVER CROPPING AND PLASTICULTURE ON SOIL AND RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN TOMATO PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study (Carrera et al., submitted for publication) we found that soil microbial community structure was distinctly different under black polyethylene film than under hairy vetch cover crops in tomato production systems. In order to determine the major factors affecting microbial communi...

  8. Quantifying Spatial and Temporal Variability of Methane Emissions from a Complex Area Source: Case Study of a Central Indiana Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Bogner, J. E.; Green, R. B.; Shepson, P. B.; Thoma, E. D.; Foster-wittig, T. A.; Spokas, K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that is responsible for about 17% of the total direct radiative forcing from long-lived greenhouse gases (IPCC 2013). While the global emission of methane is relatively well quantified, the temporal and spatial variability of methane emissions from individual area or point sources are still poorly understood. Using 4 field methods (aircraft-based mass balance, tracer correlation, vertical radial plume mapping, and static chambers) and a new field-validated process-based model (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model, CALMIM 5.4), we investigated both the total emissions from a central Indiana landfill as well as the partitioned emissions inclusive of methanotrophic oxidation for the various cover soils. This landfill is an upwind source for the city of Indianapolis, so the resolution of m2 to km2 scale emissions, as well as understanding the temporal variability for this complex area source, contributes to improved regional inventory calculations. Emissions for the site as a whole were measured using both an aircraft-based mass balance approach as well as a ground-based tracer correlation method, permitting direct comparison of the strengths, limitations, and uncertainties of these two approaches. Because US landfills are highly-engineered and composed of daily, intermediate, and final cover areas with differing thicknesses, composition, and implementation of gas recovery, we also expected different emission signatures and strengths from the various cover areas. Thus we also deployed static chambers and vertical radial plume mapping to quantify the spatial variability of emissions from the thinner daily and intermediate cover areas. Understanding the daily, seasonal and annual emission rates from a landfill is not trivial, and usually requires a combination of measurement and modeling approaches. Thus, our unique data set provides an opportunity to gain an improved understanding of the emissions from a complex area source, an essential requirement for developing improved urban-scale greenhouse gas inventories relevant for addressing mitigation strategies. We report on the results here.

  9. Soil infiltration, runoff and sediment yield from a shallow soil with varied stone cover and intensity of rain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K UMAR M ANDAL; K. V. R AO; P. K. M ISHRA; K. L. S HARMA; B. N ARSIMLU

    Summary Stones on the surface of the soil enhance infiltration and protect the soil against erosion. They are often removed in modern mechanized agriculture, with unfortunate side-effects. We evaluated experimentally the influence of surface stones on infiltration, runoff and erosion under field conditions using a portable rainfall simulator on bare natural soil in semi-arid tropical India, because modernization and mechan-

  10. Effect of soil spectral properties on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices have been shown to improve soil structure, enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), and reduce soil erosion. Conservation tillage practices include reduced- and no-till methods, which often leave appreciable amounts of crop residues over the soil surfaces after harv...

  11. Morphometry and land cover based multi-criteria analysis for assessing the soil erosion susceptibility of the western Himalayan watershed.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Sadaff; Meraj, Gowhar; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Complex mountainous environments such as Himalayas are highly susceptibility to natural hazards particular those that are triggered by the action of water such as floods, soil erosion, mass movements and siltation of the hydro-electric power dams. Among all the natural hazards, soil erosion is the most implicit and the devastating hazard affecting the life and property of the millions of people living in these regions. Hence to review and devise strategies to reduce the adverse impacts of soil erosion is of utmost importance to the planners of watershed management programs in these regions. This paper demonstrates the use of satellite based remote sensing data coupled with the observational field data in a multi-criteria analytical (MCA) framework to estimate the soil erosion susceptibility of the sub-watersheds of the Rembiara basin falling in the western Himalaya, using geographical information system (GIS). In this paper, watershed morphometry and land cover are used as an inputs to the MCA framework to prioritize the sub-watersheds of this basin on the basis of their different susceptibilities to soil erosion. Methodology included the derivation of a set of drainage and land cover parameters that act as the indicators of erosion susceptibility. Further the output from the MCA resulted in the categorization of the sub-watersheds into low, medium, high and very high erosion susceptibility classes. A detailed prioritization map for the susceptible sub-watersheds based on the combined role of land cover and morphometry is finally presented. Besides, maps identifying the susceptible sub-watersheds based on morphometry and land cover only are also presented. The results of this study are part of the watershed management program in the study area and are directed to instigate appropriate measures to alleviate the soil erosion in the study area. PMID:25154685

  12. Large-scale assessment of soil erosion in Africa: satellites help to jointly account for dynamic rainfall and vegetation cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrieling, Anton; Hoedjes, Joost C. B.; van der Velde, Marijn

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to map and monitor soil erosion need to account for the erratic nature of the soil erosion process. Soil erosion by water occurs on sloped terrain when erosive rainfall and consequent surface runoff impact soils that are not well-protected by vegetation or other soil protective measures. Both rainfall erosivity and vegetation cover are highly variable through space and time. Due to data paucity and the relative ease of spatially overlaying geographical data layers into existing models like USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation), many studies and mapping efforts merely use average annual values for erosivity and vegetation cover as input. We first show that rainfall erosivity can be estimated from satellite precipitation data. We obtained average annual erosivity estimates from 15 yr of 3-hourly TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data (1998-2012) using intensity-erosivity relationships. Our estimates showed a positive correlation (r = 0.84) with long-term annual erosivity values of 37 stations obtained from literature. Using these TMPA erosivity retrievals, we demonstrate the large interannual variability, with maximum annual erosivity often exceeding two to three times the mean value, especially in semi-arid areas. We then calculate erosivity at a 10-daily time-step and combine this with vegetation cover development for selected locations in Africa using NDVI - normalized difference vegetation index - time series from SPOT VEGETATION. Although we do not integrate the data at this point, the joint analysis of both variables stresses the need for joint accounting for erosivity and vegetation cover for large-scale erosion assessment and monitoring.

  13. LEACHATE COLLECTION IN LANDFILLS: STEADY CASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper analyzes the performance of landfill leachate collection systems with low-permeability soil liners under steady-state conditions. lgebraic equations and graphs are presented for predicting the average and maximum saturated depth on the liner, the location of the maximu...

  14. LANDFILLS EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS GUIDELINES DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: This resource served as the main information source for national characteristics of landfills for the landfills effluent guidelines. The database was developed based on responses to the "1994 Waste Treatment Industry Questionnaire: Phase II Landfills" and...

  15. Vegetation cover and land use impacts on soil water repellency in an Urban Park located in Vilnius, Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    It is strongly recognized that vegetation cover, land use have important impacts on the degree of soil water repellency (SWR). Soil water repellency is a natural property of soils, but can be induced by natural and anthropogenic disturbances as fire and soil tillage (Doerr et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007; Mataix-Solera et al., 2014). Urban parks are areas where soils have a strong human impact, with implications on their hydrological properties. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different vegetations cover and urban soils impact on SWR and the relation to other soil variables as pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC) and soil organic matter (SOM) in an urban park. The study area is located in Vilnius city (54°.68' N, 25°.25' E). It was collected 15 soil samples under different vegetation cover as Pine (Pinus Sylvestris), Birch (Alnus glutinosa), Penduculate Oak (Quercus robur), Platanus (Platanus orientalis) and other human disturbed areas as forest trails and soils collected from human planted grass. Soils were taken to the laboratory, air-dried at room temperature and sieved with the <2 mm mesh in order to remove the coarse material. Subsequently were placed in petri dishes and exposed to a controlled laboratory environment (temperature of 20C and 50% of air relative humidity) for one week to avoid potential impacts of the atmospheric conditions on SWR (Doerr, 1998). The persistence of SWR was measured using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) (Wessel, 1998). The classification of WDPT was according to Bisdom et al. (1993) <5 (wettable), 5-60 (slightly water repellent), 60-600 (strongly water repellent), 600-3600 (severely water repellent) and >3600 (extremely water repellent). The results showed significant differences among the different vegetation cover (Kruskal-Wallis H=20.64, p<0.001). The WDPT soil median values collected under Pine, Birch, Penduculate Oak, forest trails and soils from planted grass were significantly higher than Platanus soil. The soils from Pine, Birch, Penduculate Oak, forest trails and planted grass were majorly severely water repellent, while Platanus soils were mostly strong water repellent. Soil water repellency of Pine soils had a significant negative correlation with pH (-0.52, p<0.05) and a significant negative correlation with SOM (0.69, p<0.01) and EC (0.53, p<0.05). In relation to Birch soils, SWR had a significant negative correlation with pH (-0.88, p<0.001) and significant positive correlation with SOM (0.78, p<0.001). In relation to the other species no significant correlations were observed between SWR and pH, EC and SOM. Acknowledgments POSTFIRE (Soil quality, erosion control and plant cover recovery under different post-fire management scenarios, CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness; Fuegored; RECARE (Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care, FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE), funded by the European Commission; and for the COST action ES1306 (Connecting European connectivity research). References Bisdom, E.B.A., Dekker, L., Schoute, J.F.Th. (1993) Water repellency of sieve fractions from sandy soils and relationships with organic material and soil structure. Geoderma, 56, 105-118. Doerr, S.H., Shakesby, R.A., Walsh, R.P.D. (2000) Soil water repellency: Its causes, characteristics and hydro-geomorphological significance. Earth-Science Reviews, 51, 33-65. Doerr, S.H. (1998) On standardising the "Water Drop Penetration Time" and the "Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet" techniques to classify soil hydrophobicity: a case study using medium textured soils. Earth Surface Process and Landforms, 23, 663-668. Mataix-Solera, J., Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L., Perez-Bejarano, A., Jordan, A., Morugan-Coronado, A., Barcenas-Moreno, G., Jimenez-Pinilla, P., Lozano, E., Granjed, A.J.P., Gil-Torres, J. (2014) Small variations of soil properties control fire induced water repellency, Spanish Journal of Soil Science, 4, 51-60. Urbanek., E., Hallet, P., Feeney, D

  16. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticides transport through undisturbed soil1 columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Effect of grass cover on water and pesticides transport through undisturbed soil1 columns-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their12 higher organic matter contents pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater17 quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached

  17. Solid\\/Liquid REE Fractionation in the Lateritic System of Goyoum, East Cameroon: The Implication for the Present Dynamics of the Soil Covers of the Humid Tropical Regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Jacques Braun; Jérôme Viers; Bernard Dupré; Mireille Polve; Jules Ndam; Jean-Pierre Muller

    1998-01-01

    The REE-Th weathering geochemistry and mineralogy has been investigated in a lateritic soil cover in relation to the close hydrographical system at Goyoum (East Cameroon). The stutied area, composed of gneissic hills covered by humid tropical forest, belongs to the Sanaga river basin and corresponds to a transition vegetation zone between rainforest and savannah. A representative soil catena was taken

  18. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  19. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  20. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  1. Landfill disposal systems

    PubMed Central

    Slimak, Karen M.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated. A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual inspections and any repairs can be made without disturbing the waste. The surface seal landfill does not employ a subsurface barrier. The surface seal landfill successfully addresses each of the four environmental problems listed above, provided that this landfill design is utilized for dry wastes only and is located at a site which provides protection from groundwater and temporary perched water tables. ImagesFIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 7.FIGURE 7. PMID:738247

  2. Soil cover patterns and SOC dynamics impacts on the soil processes, land management and ecosystem services in Central Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Chernikov, Vladimir; Yashin, Ivan; Geraskin, Mikhail; Morev, Dmitriy

    2014-05-01

    In the Central Region of Russia (CRR) the soil cover patterns usually play the very important role in the soil forming and degradation processes (SFP & SDP) potential and current rates, soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and pools, greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and soluble SOC fluxes that we need take into attention for better assessment of the natural and especially man-changed ecosystems' services and for best land-use practices development. Central Region of Russia is the biggest one in RF according to its population and role in the economy. CRR is characterized by high spatial variability of soil cover due to as original landscape heterogeneity as complicated history of land-use practices during last 700 years. Our long-term researches include the wide zonal-provincial set of representative ecosystems and soil cover patterns with different types and history of land-use (forest, meadow-steppe and agricultural ones) from middle-taiga to steppe zones with different level of continentality. The carried out more than 30-years region- and local-scale researches of representative natural and rural landscapes in Tver', Yaroslavl', Kaluga, Moscow, Vladimir, Saransk (Mordovia), Kursk, Orel, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov oblasts give us the interregional multi-factorial matrix of elementary soil cover patterns (ESCP) with different soil forming and degradation processes rates and soil organic carbon dynamics due to regionally specific soil-geomorphologic features, environmental and dominated microclimate conditions, land-use current practices and history. The validation and ranging of the limiting factors of SFP and SDP develop¬ment, soil carbon dynamics and sequestration potential, ecosystem (agroecosystem) principal services, land functional qualities and agroecological state have been done for dominating and most dynamical components of ESCP regional-typological forms - with application of SOC structure analysis, regional and local GIS, soil spatial patterns detail mapping, traditional regression kriging, correlation tree models and DSS adapted to concrete region and agrolandscape conditions. The outcomes of statistical process modeling show the essential amplification of erosion, dehumification, CO2, CH4 and N2O emission, soluble SOC fluxes, acidification or alkalization, disaggregation and overcompaction processes due to violation of environmentally sound land-use systems and traditional balances of organic matter, nutrients, Ca and Na in agrolandscapes. Due to long-term intensive and out-of-balance land-use practices the most zonal soils and soil cover pattern essentially lost not only their unique natural features (humus horizons depth till 1 m and more in case of Chernozems, 2-6 % of SOC and favorable agrophysical features), but ecosystem services and ecological functions including terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance and the GHG fluxes control. Key-site monitoring results and regional generalized data showed 1-1.5% SOC lost during last 50 years period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus profile eluvial-illuvial redistribution too. A drop of Corg content below threshold "humus limiting content" values (for different soils they vary from 1 to 3-4% of SOC) considerably reduces effectiveness of used fertilizers and possibility of sustai¬nable agronomy here. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus supplies can be ten-tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with strong spatial variability due to slope and land-use parameters. These processes have essentially different sets of environmental consequences and ecosystem services that we need to understand in frame of environmental and agroecological problems development prediction.

  3. Design Rationale for Construction and Monitoring of Unsaturated Soil Covers at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    E-print Network

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    ' performance to that of a US Resource Conservation and Recov- ery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C cover with a goal of zero percolation; hence, their designation at RMA as "RCRA-Equivalent Covers." The RMA covers were to levels that posed unacceptable health risks to humans and the environment. RCRA-EQUIVALENT COVER DESIGN

  4. Effects of soil amendments at a heavy loading rate associated with cover crops as green manures on the leaching of nutrients and heavy metals from a calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Ren; Li, Yun-Cong; Klassen, Waldemar

    2003-11-01

    The potential risk of groundwater contamination by the excessive leaching of N, P and heavy metals from soils amended at heavy loading rates of biosolids, coal ash, N-viro soil (1:1 mixture of coal ash and biosolids), yard waste compost and co-compost (3:7 mixture of biosolids to yard wastes), and by soil incorporation of green manures of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) and sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) was studied by collecting and analyzing leachates from pots of Krome very gravelly loam soil subjected to these treatments. The control consisted of Krome soil without any amendment. The loading rate was 205 g pot(-1) for each amendment (equivalent to 50 t ha(-1) of the dry weight), and the amounts of the cover crops incorporated into the soil in the pot were those that had been grown in it. A subtropical vegetable crop, okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.), was grown after the soil amendments or cover crops had been incorporated into the soil. The results showed that the concentration of NO3-N in leachate from biosolids was significantly higher than in leachate from other treatments. The levels of heavy metals found in the leachates from all amended soils were so low, as to suggest these amendments may be used without risk of leaching dangerous amounts of these toxic elements. Nevertheless the level of heavy metals in leachate from coal ash amended soil was substantially greater than in leachates from the other treatments. The leguminous cover crop, sunn hemp, returned into the soil, increased the leachate NO3-N and inorganic P concentration significantly compared with the non-legume, sorghum sudangrass. The results suggest that at heavy loading rates of soil amendments, leaching of NO3- could be a significant concern by application of biosolids. Leaching of inorganic P can be increased significantly by both co-compost and biosolids, but decreased by coal ash and N-viro soil by virtue of improved adsorption. The leguminous cover crop, sunn hemp, when incorporated into the soil, can cause the concentration of NO3-N to increase by about 7 fold, and that of inorganic P by about 23% over the non-legume. Regarding the metals, biosolids, N-viro soil and coal ash significantly increased Ca and Mg concentrations in leachates. Copper concentration in leachate was increased by application of biosolids, while Fe concentration in leachates was increased by biosolids, coal ash and co-compost. The concentrations of Zn, Mo and Co in leachate were increased by application of coal ash. The concentrations of heavy metals in leachates were very low and unlikely to be harmful, although they were increased significantly by coal ash application. PMID:14649715

  5. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.024 Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged sediment

    E-print Network

    doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.024 Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged in a pseudogley soil (pH 8.2­8.3) before and after contamination by land-disposition of a dredged sediment ([Zn points-of-interest in the uncontaminated and contaminated soil. Bulk average powder EXAFS spectroscopy

  6. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH4) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO3-N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, N2O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N2O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N2O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N2O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha(-1) and 27 Mg ha(-1) rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH4 emission flux while decreased N2O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N2O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha(-1) cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (<250 ?m), and that proportionately increased the N2O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N2O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N2O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH4, but N2O should also be considered especially for fallow season to calculate total GWP. PMID:24880551

  7. Soil cover characterization at large scale: the example of Perugia Province in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Giulia; Salciarini, Diana; Tamagnini, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    In the last years, physically-based models aimed at predicting the occurrence of landslides have had a large diffusion because the opportunity of having landslide susceptibility maps can be essential to reduce damages and human losses. On one hand physically-based models rationally analyse problems, because mathematically describe the physical processes that actually happen, on the other hand their diffusion is limited by the difficulty of having and managing accurate data over large areas. For this reason, and also because in the Perugia province geotechnical data are partial and not regularly distributed, a data collection campaign has been started in order to have a wide physical-mechanical data set that can be used to apply any physically-based model. The collected data have been derived from mechanical tests and investigations performed to characterize the soil. The data set includes about 3000 points and each record is characterized by the following quantitative information: coordinates, geological description, cohesion, friction angle. Besides, the records contain the results of seismic tests that allow knowing the shear waves velocity in the first 30 meters of soil. The database covers the whole Perugia province territory and it can be used to evaluate the effects of both rainfall-induced and earthquake-induced landslides. The database has been analysed in order to exclude possible outliers; starting from the all data set, 16 lithological units have been isolated, each one with homogeneous geological features and the same mechanical behaviour. It is important to investigate the quality of the data and know how much they are reliable; therefore statistical analyses have been performed to quantify the dispersion of the data - i.e. relative and cumulative frequency - and also geostatistical analyses to know the spatial correlation - i.e. the variogram. The empirical variogram is a common and useful tool in geostatistics because it quantifies the spatial correlation between data. Once the variogram has been calculated, it is possible to use it to forecast the best estimation of a parameter in a generic point where information are missing. One of the most used interpolation techniques is the Kriging, which makes a prediction of a function in a given point as weighted average of known values of such function in the nearest points, deriving the weights from the variogram.

  8. Comparison of algorithms and parameterisations for infiltration into organic-covered permafrost soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infiltration into frozen and unfrozen soils is critical in hydrology, controlling active layer soil water dynamics and influencing runoff. Few Land Surface Models (LSMs) and Hydrological Models (HMs) have been developed, adapted or tested for frozen conditions and permafrost soils. Considering the v...

  9. COVER CROP, TILLAGE, AND HERBICIDE EFFECTS ON WEEDS, SOIL PROPERTIES, MICROBIAL POPULATIONS, AND SOYBEAN YIELD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study was conducted during 1997-2001 on a Dundee silt loam soil at Stoneville, MS to examine effects of rye and crimson clover residues on weeds, soil properties, soil microbial populations, and soybean yield under conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) systems with preemergence (PRE)...

  10. EFFECTS OF COVER CROPPING, SOLARIZATION, AND SOIL FUMIGATION ON NEMATODE COMMUNITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While free-living nematodes play important roles in soil nutrient cycling, many pre-plant soil practices act as perturbations to nematode communities. A two-year field experiment was conducted to examine nematode communities in soil treated with methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, solarization (S) for 6...

  11. Exploring warm-season cover crops as carbon sources for anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been shown to be an effective strategy for controlling soilborne plant pathogens and plant parasitic nematodes in vegetable production systems. Soil treatment by ASD relies on the supply of labile carbon (C) to stimulate microbially-driven anaerobic soil condi...

  12. Rehabilitation materials from surface- coal mines in western USA. I. Chemical characteristics of spoil and replaced cover-soil.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    A range of at least one order of magnitude was observed for DTPA-extractable Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn and organic matter content of samples of spoil and cover-soil from eleven western USA surface-coal mines. The observed pH of these samples ranged from 3.9 to 8.9; however, most samples were near-neutral to alkaline in reaction. Most constituent levels were found to be below proposed guidelines for maximum permissible levels in mine soil. -from Authors

  13. Soil macroinvertebrates' abundance and diversity in home gardens in Tabasco, Mexico, vary with soil texture, organic matter and vegetation cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Huerta; Wal van der J. C

    2012-01-01

    We studied the composition of soil invertebrate communities and vegetation in 50 home gardens in the humid tropical lowlands of Tabasco, Mexico, located in five geomorphological regions. Five monoliths were made in each home garden and soil invertebrates were hand sorted, weighed and classified to morhospecies, functional groups and orders. We determined pH, organic matter, available phosphorus and texture in

  14. SWS 4303/5305 Soil Microbial Ecology Course Description Lectures and laboratory exercises will cover the soil as a

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    1 SWS 4303/5305 Soil Microbial Ecology Fall, 2014 Course Description Lectures and laboratory microorganisms, and the fundamentals of the microbial ecology of nutrient cycles, symbiotic associations activities in soil, and translate those to ecological interactions and processes. Instructor: Andrew Ogram

  15. Carbon supply and storage in tilled and nontilled soils as influenced by cover crops and nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sainju, Upendra M; Singh, Bharat P; Whitehead, Wayne F; Wang, Shirley

    2006-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) sequestration in tilled and nontilled areas can be influenced by crop management practices due to differences in plant C inputs and their rate of mineralization. We examined the influence of four cover crops {legume [hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth)], nonlegume [rye (Secale cereale L.)], biculture of legume and nonlegume (vetch and rye), and no cover crops (or winter weeds)} and three nitrogen (N) fertilization rates (0, 60 to 65, and 120 to 130 kg N ha(-1)) on C inputs from cover crops, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)], and soil organic carbon (SOC) at the 0- to 120-cm depth in tilled and nontilled areas. A field experiment was conducted on Dothan sandy loam (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Plinthic Paleudults) from 1999 to 2002 in central Georgia. Total C inputs to the soil from cover crops, cotton, and sorghum from 2000 to 2002 ranged from 6.8 to 22.8 Mg ha(-1). The SOC at 0 to 10 cm fluctuated with C input from October 1999 to November 2002 and was greater from cover crops than from weeds in no-tilled plots. In contrast, SOC values at 10 to 30 cm in no-tilled and at 0 to 60 cm in chisel-tilled plots were greater for biculture than for weeds. As a result, C at 0 to 30 cm was sequestered at rates of 267, 33, -133, and -967 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1) for biculture, rye, vetch, and weeds, respectively, in the no-tilled plot. In strip-tilled and chisel-tilled plots, SOC at 0 to 30 cm decreased at rates of 233 to 1233 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1). The SOC at 0 to 30 cm increased more in cover crops with 120 to 130 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) than in weeds with 0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), regardless of tillage. In the subtropical humid region of the southeastern United States, cover crops and N fertilization can increase the amount of C input and storage in tilled and nontilled soils, and hairy vetch and rye biculture was more effective in sequestering C than monocultures or no cover crop. PMID:16825471

  16. Hillslope-scale hydrological and snow cover dynamics derived from a wireless soil moisture and temperature monitoring network and time-lapse digital photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Vogt, Constantin; Kögler, Simon; Martini, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    In mountainous catchments, snowmelt may be an important component of the water balance. We apply data from a wireless soil moisture and temperature monitoring network in combination with time-lapse digital photographs from a hillslope in the Schäfertal catchment, Lower Harz Mountains, to investigate interactions between hillslope-scale snow cover, soil moisture and soil temperature. The time series of digital photographs is evaluated using an automatic algorithm that estimates snow height at the position of several snow stakes placed along the hillslope using the green value of the RGB color cube. Inferred snow heights are applied to interpret near-subsurface soil moisture and soil temperature dynamics from the same time period including snow accumulation and melt. The combination of time-lapse digital photography, soil moisture and soil temperature monitoring clearly shows the strong influence of the snow cover on subsurface soil moisture and soil temperature dynamics. The shallow snow cover has a strong insulating effect on near-subsurface soil temperatures keeping the soil unfrozen even at air temperatures reaching down to less than -10 °C. The time-lapse photographs, soil moisture and soil temperature observations also show the different snowmelt behavior of the north- and south-exposed slopes. These observations are important information for future modelling of hillslope and catchment-scale hydrological dynamics.

  17. Soil-water impacts from using vegetation and rock covers for surface stabilization of uranium-mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an analysis of vegetated and rock covers and their effect on the moisture content in a covered uranium mill tailings system. Based on a one-dimensional analysis of moisture movement, the results indicate that care must be taken when selecting a surface stabilization system for a tailings pile. The moisture-content response of the tailings pile and cover system can be radically altered by different surface treatments. The two cases considered in this study indicate that (under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado) the evapotranspiration from a vegetated cover can result in a relatively stable moisture content. A rock cover, however, may increase the moisture content of the tailings pile by significantly reducing evaporation. In fact, moisture storage may increase to the point that drainage occurs. If drainage does occur, the potential for groundwater pollution is increased. These results suggest that vegetation, thinner rock covers, engineered drainage systems, and/or liner systems may be needed to reduce drainage and potential leaching of contaminants. Additional work is needed to improve the description of the surface boundary condition and provide a more accurate moisture sink term. This work should focus on better descriptions of plant growth and moisture extraction behavior as a function of climatological and soil conditions. Additional work is required to more accurately describe the diffusion of water vapor through rock covers, and to quantify the effects of wind.

  18. Impact of spruce forest and grass vegetation cover on soil micromorphology and hydraulic properties of organic matter horizon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radka Kodešová; Lenka Pavl?; Vít Kodeš; Anna Žigová; Antonín Nikodem

    2007-01-01

    Two organic matter horizons developed under a spruce forest and grass vegetation were chosen to demonstrate the impact of\\u000a a different vegetation cover on the micromorphology, porous system and hydraulic properties of surface soils. Micromorphological\\u000a studies showed that the decomposed organic material in the organic matter horizon under the grass vegetation was more compact\\u000a compared to the decomposed organic material

  19. Weed science and management, in soil sciences, land cover, and land use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integral component of conservation agriculture systems in cotton is the use of a high-residue winter cover crop; however, terminating such cover crops is a cost and planting into high-residue is a challenge. Black oat, rye, and wheat winter cover crops were flattened with a straight-blade mechan...

  20. Effects of a killed-cover crop mulching system on sweetpotato production, soil pests, and insect predators in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D Michael; Harrison, Howard F

    2008-12-01

    Sweetpotatoes, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae), are typically grown on bare soil where weeds and erosion can be serious problems. Conservation tillage systems using cover crop residues as mulch can help reduce these problems, but little is known about how conservation tillage affects yield and quality of sweetpotato or how these systems impact populations of beneficial and pest insects. Therefore, field experiments were conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, in 2002-2004 to evaluate production of sweetpotatoes in conventional tillage versus a conservation tillage system by using an oat (Avena sativa L. (Poaceae)-crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) (Fabaceae) killed-cover crop (KCC) mulch. The four main treatments were 1) conventional tillage, hand-weeded; 2) KCC, hand-weeded; 3) conventional tillage, weedy; and 4) KCC, weedy. Each main plot was divided into three subplots, whose treatments were sweetpotato genotypes: 'Ruddy', which is resistant to soil insect pests; and 'SC1149-19' and 'Beauregard', which are susceptible to soil insect pests. For both the KCC and conventional tillage systems, sweetpotato yields were higher in plots that received hand weeding than in weedy plots. Orthogonal contrasts revealed a significant effect of tillage treatment (conventional tillage versus KCC) on yield in two of the 3 yr. Ruddy remained resistant to injury by soil insect pests in both cropping systems; and it consistently had significantly higher percentages of clean roots and less damage by wireworm-Diabrotica-Systena complex, sweetpotato flea beetles, grubs, and sweetpotato weevils than the two susceptible genotypes. In general, injury to sweetpotato roots by soil insect pests was not significantly higher in the KCC plots than in the conventionally tilled plots. Also, more fire ants, rove beetles, and carabid beetle were captured by pitfall traps in the KCC plots than in the conventional tillage plots during at least 1 yr of the study. This study suggests that a sweetpotatoes can be successfully grown under a killed-cover crop production system. PMID:19133469

  1. Development of a fully-distributed daily hydrologic feedback model addressing vegetation, land cover, and soil water dynamics (VELAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changhui; Lee, Jejung; Koo, Min-Ho

    2013-06-01

    A simple hydrologic feedback model has been developed to simulate daily responses of hydrologic processes including interception, runoff, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and recharge under various conditions of vegetation, land cover, and soil in a fully-distributed manner. The daily soil water balance is a key element to link surface and subsurface models as it calculates infiltration and groundwater recharge by considering a time delay routing through a vadose zone down to the groundwater table. MODFLOW is adopted to simulate groundwater flow and interaction with surface water components as well. The model also can easily be localized by simple modification of soil and crop properties. The actual application of the model for a watershed in the Geum River Basin in Korea showed reliable hydrologic feedbacks between the surface and subsurface hydrologic systems.

  2. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, S.; Li, N.; Xiang, B.; Wang, X.; Ye, B.; McGuire, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Soil surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for the simulation of soil temperature by environmental models. It is influenced by atmospheric and soil conditions and by vegetation cover. In sophisticated land surface models, it is simulated iteratively by solving surface energy budget equations. In ecosystem, permafrost, and hydrology models, the consideration of soil surface temperature is generally simple. In this study, we developed a methodology for representing the effects of vegetation cover and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Our approach integrated measurements from meteorological stations with simulations from a sophisticated land surface model to develop an equation set for estimating soil surface temperature. After implementing this equation set into an ecosystem model and evaluating the performance of the ecosystem model in simulating soil temperature at different depths in the soil profile, we applied the model to simulate interactions among vegetation cover, freeze-thaw cycles, and soil erosion to demonstrate potential applications made possible through the implementation of the methodology developed in this study. Results showed that (1) to properly estimate daily soil surface temperature, algorithms should use air temperature, downward solar radiation, and vegetation cover as independent variables; (2) the equation set developed in this study performed better than soil surface temperature algorithms used in other models; and (3) the ecosystem model performed well in simulating soil temperature throughout the soil profile using the equation set developed in this study. Our application of the model indicates that the representation in ecosystem models of the effects of vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics has the potential to substantially improve our understanding of the vulnerability of alpine grassland ecosystems to changes in climate and grazing regimes.

  3. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Atmospheric methane transport near landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P; Pilinis, Christodoulos; Halvadakis, Constantinos P

    2003-02-01

    Methane production rates that have been estimated by a biogas production model (MICROGEN) are combined with an air dispersion model in order to determine the spatial distribution of methane around landfill sites. By utilising dispersion models under extreme atmospheric conditions, a maximum methane concentration around the landfills can be determined. The factors that enhance the maximum methane concentrations, using the meteorological model CALMET in conjunction with the dispersion model CALPUFF, are found to be the wind speed and the percentage of cloud cover. The rates of temperature and pressure variation, as well as the land use category seem to have no effect on the maximum methane concentrations. A rapid reduction of methane concentration is observed a few metres away from the landfill centre while a slower reduction is observed at distances greater than 300 m from it. The performance of this methodology is evaluated by comparing measured concentrations with model predictions. PMID:12667020

  5. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Li, N.; Xiang, B.; Wang, X.; Ye, B.; McGuire, A. D.

    2013-07-01

    surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for the simulation of soil temperature by environmental models. It is influenced by atmospheric and soil conditions and by vegetation cover. In sophisticated land surface models, it is simulated iteratively by solving surface energy budget equations. In ecosystem, permafrost, and hydrology models, the consideration of soil surface temperature is generally simple. In this study, we developed a methodology for representing the effects of vegetation cover and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Our approach integrated measurements from meteorological stations with simulations from a sophisticated land surface model to develop an equation set for estimating soil surface temperature. After implementing this equation set into an ecosystem model and evaluating the performance of the ecosystem model in simulating soil temperature at different depths in the soil profile, we applied the model to simulate interactions among vegetation cover, freeze-thaw cycles, and soil erosion to demonstrate potential applications made possible through the implementation of the methodology developed in this study. Results showed that (1) to properly estimate daily soil surface temperature, algorithms should use air temperature, downward solar radiation, and vegetation cover as independent variables; (2) the equation set developed in this study performed better than soil surface temperature algorithms used in other models; and (3) the ecosystem model performed well in simulating soil temperature throughout the soil profile using the equation set developed in this study. Our application of the model indicates that the representation in ecosystem models of the effects of vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics has the potential to substantially improve our understanding of the vulnerability of alpine grassland ecosystems to changes in climate and grazing regimes.

  6. Simulating runoff from an area covered by soil contour ridges using a hydraulic cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slah, Nasri

    2015-04-01

    Runoff agriculture and rainwater harvesting are well known farming techniques that have guaranteed crop production in the arid zone of Tunisia since ancient times. At present, soil contour ridges (banquettes) are the main water and soil conservation used. Actually about one million ha farming land were protected by this technique. Usually, soil contour ridges are designed for a 10-year return period to reduce runoff and erosion in hill-slope catchments. However, the detailed hydraulic function of this technique is still to a major extent unknown. For this purpose a runoff model was developed to simulate the discharge from an upstream system of several soil contour ridges. The model was validated using experimental runoff. The simulated runoff agreed well with observed discharge. The validated model was used to simulate runoff from a system of one to several soil contour ridges in a cascade from a 10-year rainfall event. Practical conclusions are drawn by discussing the spacing and design of the soil contour ridges. Key words: Soil surface management, soil contour ridge, discharge, hydraulic cascade.

  7. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Janus T; Birgisdottir, Harpa; Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael; Christensen, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion. PMID:17382531

  8. Effects of rock fragment cover on hydrological response and soil loss from Regosols in a semi-humid environment in South-West China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhaoxia; Cai, Chongfa; Shi, Zhihua; Xu, Qinxue; Fu, Zhiyong; Guo, Zhonglu

    2012-05-01

    Controlling soil hydrological processes and combating soil erosion on agricultural fields are high priorities for crop production and ecological environments. In this research, the effect of land application of rock fragments on surface runoff, subsurface runoff, infiltration and soil loss on Regosols had been investigated under field conditions using a portable rainfall simulator. Experimental twin-plot (two subplot with 1-m wide by 2-m long, 32% slope) with different rock fragment covers ranging from 0-40% were exposed to three rainfall intensities, low (57 ± 2 mm h-1), medium (91 ± 3 mm h-1), and high (122 ± 5 mm h-1). Fifteen treatments were conducted in the experiments in duplicates. Surface runoff, subsurface runoff, soil moisture and sediment were measured. Results show that surface rock fragment cover retarded surface runoff, increased infiltration and subsurface runoff, and diminished sediment concentration and soil loss. The final infiltration rates, which increased with increasing rock fragment covers, were 16.5-42.7 mm h-1 at low intensity, 19.7-50.8 mm h-1 at medium intensity and 23.8-56.4 mm h-1 at high intensity. Compared with bare soils, surface runoff rates were reduced to 24%, 51% and 64% in soils with 40% rock fragment cover at low, medium and high intensity rainfall, respectively. Subsurface runoff volume was significantly higher and time to start subsurface runoff was shorter as surface rock fragment cover increased. Compared with bare soils, subsurface runoff coefficients increased to 3.5, 3.3 and 2.9 times in soils with 40% rock fragment cover at low, medium and high intensity, respectively. Sediment concentrations increased from 9.8 g L-1 for 40% rock fragment cover under high intensity rainfall to 51.5 g L-1 for bare soils with rain falling at high intensity. The erosion rate was < 12 g m-2 min-1 for soils with 40% rock fragment cover, even when rainfall intensity was high, while it was > 15 g m-2 min-1 for bare soils under low intensity. The relationship between rock fragment cover and soil loss ratio can be expressed by an exponential function with a high degree of reliability, regardless of rainfall intensities. Overall, results indicate the surface rock fragments can be influential in shaping hydrological processes and soil loss from sloping farmland.

  9. Quantification of tillage, plant cover, and cumulative rainfall effects on soil surface microrelief by statistical, geostatistical and fractal indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Bertol, I.; Vidal Vázquez, E.

    2008-07-01

    Changes in soil surface microrelief with cumulative rainfall under different tillage systems and crop cover conditions were investigated in southern Brazil. Surface cover was none (fallow) or the crop succession maize followed by oats. Tillage treatments were: 1) conventional tillage on bare soil (BS), 2) conventional tillage (CT), 3) minimum tillage (MT) and 4) no tillage (NT) under maize and oats. Measurements were taken with a manual relief meter on small rectangular grids of 0.234 and 0.156 m2, throughout growing season of maize and oats, respectively. Each data set consisted of 200 point height readings, the size of the smallest cells being 3×5 cm during maize and 2×5 cm during oats growth periods. Random Roughness (RR), Limiting Difference (LD), Limiting Slope (LS) and two fractal parameters, fractal dimension (D) and crossover length (l) were estimated from the measured microtopographic data sets. Indices describing the vertical component of soil roughness such as RR, LD and l generally decreased with cumulative rain in the BS treatment, left fallow, and in the CT and MT treatments under maize and oats canopy. However, these indices were not substantially affected by cumulative rain in the NT treatment, whose surface was protected with previous crop residues. Roughness decay from initial values was larger in the BS treatment than in CT and MT treatments. Moreover, roughness decay generally tended to be faster under maize than under oats. The RR and LD indices decreased quadratically, while the l index decreased exponentially in the tilled, BS, CT and MT treatments. Crossover length was sensitive to differences in soil roughness conditions allowing a description of microrelief decay due to rainfall in the tilled treatments, although better correlations between cumulative rainfall and the most commonly used indices RR and LD were obtained. At the studied scale, parameters l and D have been found to be useful in interpreting the configuration properties of the soil surface microrelief.

  10. Podzol development in S Norway - a soil chronosequence of 31 pedons covering soil ages from 85 to 9650 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Svendgård-Stokke, Siri; Sperstad, Ragnhild; Sørensen, Rolf; Fuchs, Markus; Gebers, Henrik; Schülli-Maurer, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    The Oslofjord region in SE-Norway has undergone steady glacio-isostatic uplift all over the Holocene. Hence, in the coastal areas land surface age continuously increases with elevation, providing suitable conditions for studying soil development with time. A chronosequence of soils on beach sand and sandy terraces of the Lågen River, showing progressive podzolization with soil age, was studied on the western side of the Oslofjord. 31 pedons with soil ages ranging from 85 years (0.25 m a. s. l.) to ca. 9650 years (62 m a. s. l.) were described and are currently analysed. Soil ages were estimated by relating elevations of the sites to a Holocene relative sea level curve based on twelve AMS 14C-dates of gyttja from the isolation contact (marine / fresh water boundary) and six marine macrofossil 14C-dates (Sørensen et al., 2012). The climate in the study area is comparatively mild, with mean annual temperatures ranging from 5.3°C (Ramnes) to 6.3°C (Sandefjord, Larvik) and a mean annual precipitation of 909 mm (Sandefjord) - 1150 mm (Stokke). The vegetation consists predominantly of mixed forest. In this soil chronosequence, soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation in the A horizons reaches a steady state in less than 2300 years, while SOM in the B horizons continues to accumulate. Soil pH (in water) drops from pH 6.9 in the recent beach sand to pH 4.6 within about 4500 years and stays constant thereafter, which is attributed to sesquioxide buffering. Base saturation shows an exponential decrease with time. Progressive weathering is reflected by increasing Fed and Ald contents, and proceeding podzolization by increasing amounts of pyrophophate- and oxalate-soluble Fe and Al with soil age. Increases of most Fe and Al fractions can be best described by exponential models. Micromorphological analysis reveals accumulation of cloudy, iron-rich, reddish fine material in the Bs horizons that proceeds with soil age, leading to chitonic c/f-related distribution in the Bs horizons. The mineralogical composition of the parent material is dominated by quartz and feldspars, whereby the feldspar grains show features of proceeding weathering with time. In addition to podzolisation features, illuvial clay is observed below the Bs horizons. Apparently, the sand is sufficiently buffered during the first millennia of soil formation so that acidification proceeds slowly enough to allow for clay translocation prior to podzolisation. Reference Sørensen, R., Høeg, H.I., Henningsmoen, K.E., Skog, G., Labowsky, S.F., Stabell, B. (2012): Utviklingen av det senglasiale og tidlig preboreale landskapet og vegetasjonen omkring steinalderboplassene ved Pauler, Larvik kommune, Vestfold. In: Jaksland, L. (Ed.), E18 Brunlaneprospektet. Varia 79. Kulturhistorisk Museum, University of Oslo.

  11. The influence of cover crops and tillage on actual and potential soil erosion in an olive grove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Blanca; Bienes, Ramón; García-Díaz, Andrés; Panagopoulos, Thomas; José Marqués, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The study was carried out in an olive grove in central Spain (South of Madrid; Tagus River Basin). In this semi-arid zone, the annual mean temperature is 13.8 ºC and the annual precipitation is 395 mm. Olive groves are planted in an erosion prone area due to steep slopes up to 15%. Soil is classified as Typic Haploxerept with clay loam texture. The land studied was formerly a vineyard, but it was replaced by the studied olive grove in 2004. It covers approximately 3 ha and olive trees are planted every 6 x 7 metres. They were usually managed by tillage to decrease weed competition. This conventional practice results in a wide surface of bare soil prone to erosion processes. In the long term soil degradation may lead to increase the desertification risk in the area. Storms have important consequences in this shallow and vulnerable soil, as more than 90 Mg ha-1 have been measured after one day with 40 mm of rainfall. In order to avoid this situation, cover crops between the olive trees were planted three years ago: sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and purple false brome (Brachypodium distachyon), and they were compared with annual spontaneous vegetation after a minimum tillage treatment (ASV). The results regarding erosion control were positive. We observed (Oct. 2012/Sept. 2013) annual soil loss up to 11 Mg ha-1 in ASV, but this figure was reduced in the sown covers, being 8 Mg ha-1 in sainfoin treatment, 3,7 Mg ha-1 in barley treatment, and only 1,5 Mg ha-1 in false brome treatment. Those results are used to predict the risk of erosion in long term. Moreover, soil organic carbon (SOC) increased with treatments, this is significant as it reduces soil erodibility. The increases were found both in topsoil (up to 5 cm) and more in depth, in the root zone (from 5 to 10 cm depth). From higher to lower SOC values we found the false brome (1.05%), barley (0.92%), ASV (0.79%) and sainfoin (0.71%) regarding topsoil. In the root zone (5-10 cm depth) we found 0.76% in false brome and ASV, 0.70% in barley and 0.58% in sainfoin. Other important variable to estimate erosion processes is soil permeability. During the period of study there were no significant differences between treatments. An average of 45±20 mm h-1 was measured. This study addresses the comparison between soil erosion rates measured on the ground with soil erosion risk estimated by models. Mapping soil risk can provide the evidence to demonstrate that economic investments in research, good practices and agri-environment payments are worth to achieve sustainable land management. The use of case studies is usually recommended to help in the dissemination of research. This case also includes the influence of treatments in production and quality of olive oil to respond to the needs of land users.

  12. Landfill in a Bottle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-10-04

    In this activity, learners discover how landfills affect the natural environment. By observing a 2-liter bottle filled with household garbage over a month, learners can estimate how long it takes for average household garbage takes to break down.

  13. Assessing Vegetation Cover Dynamics Induced by Policy-Driven Ecological Restoration and Implication to Soil Erosion in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jien; Wang, Tianming; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the severe droughts and floods at the end of the 20th century, the Chinese government launched several ecological restoration projects, including the Natural Forest Protection Program in 1998 and the Grain-for-Green Program in 1999, to promote afforestation and reforestation to reduce surface runoff and consequent soil erosion nationwide. However, it is still unclear how vegetation has changed in southern China since the launch of these programs. In this study, we used the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) to analyze the vegetation cover dynamics in southern China from 2000 to 2009 and evaluate the resulting effects of controlling soil erosion. Our observations indicate that 5.3% of the study area significantly increased and 0.98% significantly decreased in EVI value (p < 0.05). The spring EVI had largest increase in space. The conversions of croplands on steep slopes to forests resulting from national policies led to significant increases in EVI. The increase in EVI was not driven by annual average temperature and annual precipitation. By referencing ecological restoration statistical data and field observations, we showed that ecological restoration programs significantly improved vegetation cover in southern China. Increase in the area of farmland-converted forestlands has reduced soil erosion based upon monitoring sediment yields at hydrologic stations in the Yangtze River. This study displays the spatial patterns of trend in vegetation growth since the beginning of the 21st century in southern China and highlights the important role of China’s afforestation program. PMID:26115116

  14. Optimal spatial resolution for collection of ground data and multi-sensor image mapping of a soil erosion cover factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxing; Gertner, George; Howard, Heidi; Anderson, Alan

    2008-09-01

    Military training activities disturb ground and vegetation cover of landscapes and increases potential soil erosion. To monitor the dynamics of soil erosion, there is an important need for an optimal sampling design in which determining the optimal spatial resolutions in terms of size of sample plots used for the collection of ground data and the size of pixels for mapping. Given a sample size, an optimal spatial resolution should be cost-efficient in both sampling costs and map accuracy. This study presents a spatial variability-based method for that purpose and compared it with the traditional methods in a study area in which a soil erosion cover factor was sampled and mapped with multiple plot sizes and multi-sensor images. The results showed that the optimal spatial resolutions obtained using the spatial variability-based method were 12 and 20 m for years 1999 and 2000, respectively, and were consistent with those using the traditional methods. Moreover, the most appropriate spatial resolutions using the high-resolution images were also consistent with those using ground sample data, which provides a potential to use the high-resolution images instead of ground data to determine the optimal spatial resolutions before sampling. The most appropriate spatial resolutions above were then verified in terms of cost-efficiency which was defined as the product of sampling cost and map error using ordinary kriging without images and sequential Gaussian co-simulation with images to generate maps. PMID:17628322

  15. Assessing Vegetation Cover Dynamics Induced by Policy-Driven Ecological Restoration and Implication to Soil Erosion in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jien; Wang, Tianming; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the severe droughts and floods at the end of the 20th century, the Chinese government launched several ecological restoration projects, including the Natural Forest Protection Program in 1998 and the Grain-for-Green Program in 1999, to promote afforestation and reforestation to reduce surface runoff and consequent soil erosion nationwide. However, it is still unclear how vegetation has changed in southern China since the launch of these programs. In this study, we used the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) to analyze the vegetation cover dynamics in southern China from 2000 to 2009 and evaluate the resulting effects of controlling soil erosion. Our observations indicate that 5.3% of the study area significantly increased and 0.98% significantly decreased in EVI value (p < 0.05). The spring EVI had largest increase in space. The conversions of croplands on steep slopes to forests resulting from national policies led to significant increases in EVI. The increase in EVI was not driven by annual average temperature and annual precipitation. By referencing ecological restoration statistical data and field observations, we showed that ecological restoration programs significantly improved vegetation cover in southern China. Increase in the area of farmland-converted forestlands has reduced soil erosion based upon monitoring sediment yields at hydrologic stations in the Yangtze River. This study displays the spatial patterns of trend in vegetation growth since the beginning of the 21st century in southern China and highlights the important role of China's afforestation program. PMID:26115116

  16. Field studies of engineered barriers for closure of low level radioactive waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martin, C.E.; Martinez, J.L.; Schofield, T.G.

    1993-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated water flow data logging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Field data is presented to show the effects of slope and slope length on the performance of each landfill cover design for the first 15 months of this field experiment.

  17. Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties 

    E-print Network

    Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

    1988-01-01

    permanent or at least persists through several cropping cycles and has an effect on the crops to which the field is planted. " Causes of variability include nutrient deficiencies or toxicities, soil mois- ture stress, compaction of the root zone... OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW vi viii ix Remote Sensing Reclamation of Disturbed Lands Pyrite Oxidation and Soil pH Physical and Chemical Properties...

  18. Brassicaceous and rye cover crops altered free-living soil nematode community composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Stocking Gruver; Ray R. Weil; Inga A. Zasada; Sandra Sardanelli; Bahram Momen

    2010-01-01

    Nematode community analysis was utilized to evaluate the biofumigant or allelopathic effects of brassicaceous and rye winter cover crops on non-target nematodes in three experiments (two sites) in Maryland. The cover crop treatments included mustard blend (Sinapis alba and Brassica juncea) ‘Caliente’, rapeseed (B. napus) ‘Essex’\\/’Humus’, forage radish (Raphanus sativus) ‘Dichon’, oilseed radish (R. sativus) ‘Adagio’\\/’Colonel’, rye (Secale cereale) ‘Wheeler’

  19. Effects of land-cover change on soil loss in the Sao Gabriel do Oeste area (Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Disperati; Gaia Righini; Riccardo Salvini; Alessandro Ciali; Nicola Coscini; Pier L. Fantozzi; Luigi Carmignani; Alberto P. Fiori; Antonio C. Paranhos Filho; Michele Bocci

    1999-01-01

    In the Sao Gabriel do Oeste area (Pantanal, Brazil), since the '60s, zootechnics and farming activities have developed and arable lands and pastures replaced shrubs and forests. The 1966 to 1996 land-cover change was investigated through Remote Sensing and GIS methodologies. The effect on soil loss was evaluated through the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). By integrating supervised classification and

  20. Parameterization of an intra-seasonal variation in the thermo-insulation effect of snow cover on soil temperatures and energy balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey A. Sokratov; Roger G. Barry

    We present results of the analysis of an observed variation in the energy balance of a soil surface in Barrow, Alaska, in 1993-1998. When combined with data on snow depth, the data allowed several stages to be distinguished in the intra-seasonal variation of the snow cover effect on the temperature regime and energy balance of the underlying soil. Each stage

  1. The effects of vegetation cover on the radar and radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Brunfeldt, D. R.; Razani, M.

    1982-01-01

    The measured effects of vegetation canopies on radar and radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture are compared to emission and scattering models. The models are found to predict accurately the measured emission and backscattering for various crop canopies at frequencies between 1.4 and 5.0 GHz, especially at theta equal to or less than 30 deg. Vegetation loss factors, L(theta), increase with frequency and are found to be dependent upon canopy type and water content. In addition, the radiometric power absorption coefficient of a mature corn canopy is 1.75 times that calculated for the radar. Comparison of an L-band radiometer with a C-band radar shows the two systems to be complementary in terms of accurate soil moisture sensing over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil moisture conditions.

  2. Modeling the effects of two different land cover change data sets on the carbon stocks of plants and soils in concert with CO2 and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Atul K. Jain; Xiaojuan Yang

    2005-01-01

    A geographically explicit terrestrial carbon cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) is used to examine the response of plant and soil carbon stocks to historical changes in cropland land cover, atmospheric CO2, and climate. The ISAM model is forced with two different land cover change data sets for cropland: one spatially resolved set based on cropland statistics

  3. Effects of winter cover crops residue returning on soil enzyme activities and soil microbial community in double-cropping rice fields.

    PubMed

    Hai-Ming, Tang; Xiao-Ping, Xiao; Wen-Guang, Tang; Ye-Chun, Lin; Ke, Wang; Guang-Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Residue management in cropping systems is useful to improve soil quality. However, the studies on the effects of residue management on the enzyme activities and microbial community of soils in South China are few. Therefore, the effects of incorporating winter cover crop residue with a double-cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) system on soil enzyme activities and microbial community in Southern China fields were studied. The experiment has conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Soil and Fertilizer Research, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Science, China since winter 2004. Four winter cropping systems were used: rice-rice-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) (R-R-Ry), rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L.) (R-R-Mv), rice-rice-rape (Brassica napus L.) (R-R-Ra) and rice-rice with winter fallow (R-R-Fa). The result indicated that the enzyme activities in the R-R-Ry, R-R-Mv and R-R-Ra systems were significantly higher (P<0.05) than in the R-R-Fa system during the early and late rice season. The ?-glucosidase activities reached peak values at the tillering stage after residue application, and alkaline phosphatase activities reached peak values at the booting stage after residue application, respectively, the activities of ?-glucosidase and alkaline phosphatase gradually decreased after this. Arylsulfatase activities reached peak values at the maturity stage. Arylamidase activities reached peak values at the maturity stage. The numbers of aerobic bacteria, actinomycete and fungus of residue treatments were significantly higher (P<0.05) than that the R-R-Ra system. However, the number of anaerobic bacteria under the R-R-Ry and R-R-Mv systems was significantly lower (P<0.05) than that under the R-R-Fa system during early rice and late rice growth stage. Thus, incorporation of winter cover crops into rotations may increase enzyme activities and microbial community in soil and therefore improve soil quality. PMID:24956152

  4. Effects of Winter Cover Crops Residue Returning on Soil Enzyme Activities and Soil Microbial Community in Double-Cropping Rice Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hai-Ming, Tang; Xiao-Ping, Xiao; Wen-Guang, Tang; Ye-Chun, Lin; Ke, Wang; Guang-Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Residue management in cropping systems is useful to improve soil quality. However, the studies on the effects of residue management on the enzyme activities and microbial community of soils in South China are few. Therefore, the effects of incorporating winter cover crop residue with a double-cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) system on soil enzyme activities and microbial community in Southern China fields were studied. The experiment has conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Soil and Fertilizer Research, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Science, China since winter 2004. Four winter cropping systems were used: rice–rice–ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) (R-R-Ry), rice–rice–Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L.) (R-R-Mv), rice–rice–rape (Brassica napus L.) (R-R-Ra) and rice–rice with winter fallow (R-R-Fa). The result indicated that the enzyme activities in the R-R-Ry, R-R-Mv and R-R-Ra systems were significantly higher (P<0.05) than in the R-R-Fa system during the early and late rice season. The ?-glucosidase activities reached peak values at the tillering stage after residue application, and alkaline phosphatase activities reached peak values at the booting stage after residue application, respectively, the activities of ?-glucosidase and alkaline phosphatase gradually decreased after this. Arylsulfatase activities reached peak values at the maturity stage. Arylamidase activities reached peak values at the maturity stage. The numbers of aerobic bacteria, actinomycete and fungus of residue treatments were significantly higher (P<0.05) than that the R-R-Ra system. However, the number of anaerobic bacteria under the R-R-Ry and R-R-Mv systems was significantly lower (P<0.05) than that under the R-R-Fa system during early rice and late rice growth stage. Thus, incorporation of winter cover crops into rotations may increase enzyme activities and microbial community in soil and therefore improve soil quality. PMID:24956152

  5. Electrical conductivity monitoring of soil condition and available N with animal manure and a cover crop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A Eigenberg; J. W Doran; J. A Nienaber; R. B Ferguson; B. L Woodbury

    2002-01-01

    Development of sustainable agricultural management systems will depend, in part, on the ability to better use renewable resources, such as animal manure, and to synchronize the levels of soil available N with crop plant needs during the growing season. This study was conducted at the US Meat Animal Research Center in the central USA to determine whether differences in electromagnetic

  6. Quantifying soil carbon and nitrogen under different types of vegetation cover using near infrared-spectroscopy: a case study from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudoss, Dinakaran; Rao, Ks

    2014-05-01

    Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) is becoming a promising technique in soil analyses. Several studies have demonstrated the ability of NIRS, for rapid and non-destructive technique for the quantification of soil carbon and nitrogen in different ecosystems. We have used this technique for measuring the soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations in soils from different climatic zones (semi arid, dry sub humid and mist sub humid) under different types of vegetation cover. The effects of different soil moisture contents on predicting equations were developed for the quantification of soil carbon and nitrogen. Soil carbon and nitrogen was successfully predicted (R2= 0.90 for carbon and R2= 0.85 for nitrogen) by the equations developed. The standard error of prediction (SEP), standard error of prediction corrected for bias SEP (C) and bias for predicting equations of carbon and nitrogen were 0.73, 0.73, 0.04 and 0.07, 0.07, 0.005, respectively. Our results of soil moisture experiments showed that the equations developed by the NIRS predicted most accurately for carbon and nitrogen in dried soil samples than soils with moisture content. The results of this study showed that NIRS can be used as a rapid and non destructive analytical technique to measure the soil carbon and nitrogen. Key words: Soil carbon, soil nitrogen, NIRS, India, chemometric analysis.

  7. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method.

    PubMed

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Whole-site methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills were assessed using a mobile tracer dispersion method with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), using nitrous oxide as a tracer gas, or cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS), using acetylene as a tracer gas. The landfills were chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2)d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was 154 tons y(-1). This average was obtained from a few measurement campaigns conducted at each of the 15 landfills and extrapolating to annual emissions requires more measurements. Assuming that these landfills are representative of the average Danish landfill, the total emission from Danish landfills were calculated at 20,600 tons y(-1), which is significantly lower than the 33,300 tons y(-1) estimated for the national greenhouse gas inventory for 2011. PMID:25442105

  8. Municipal landfill leachate management

    SciTech Connect

    Kusterer, T.; Willson, R. [Montgomery County Div. of Solid Waste Services, Rockville, MD (United States); Bruce, S.C.; Tissue, E. Lou, P.J. [Roy F. Weston Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    From 1995 to 1997, the Montgomery County Leachate Pretreatment Facility (MCLPF) has successfully pretreated in excess of 18,000,000 gallons of leachate generated by the county`s municipal solid waste landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill, the new lined section, and the ash cell to the leachate pump station. The leachate, prior to being pumped to the leachate pretreatment system, is equalized in two storage lagoons with a combined capacity of more than 5,000,000 gallons. The innovative leachate treatment system, incorporating a biological reactor system equipped with a submerged fixed-film reactor using a patented Matrix Biological Film (MBF) media, continues to provide excellent pretreatment results for the leachate generated at the Oaks Landfill in Montgomery County, Maryland. In 1995 and 1996, the system responded to the substantial challenges imposed by the changing characteristics of the material being landfilled and by the significant amounts of incinerator ash, received in 1995 from the county`s resource recovery facility (RRF), which influenced the influent leachate characteristics.

  9. Thermal remote sensing of surface soil water content with partial vegetation cover for incorporation into climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Robert R.; Carlson, Toby N.

    1995-01-01

    This study outlines a method for the estimation of regional patterns of surface moisture availability (M(sub 0)) and fractional vegetation (Fr) in the presence of spatially variable vegetation cover. The method requires relating variations in satellite-derived (NOAA, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)) surface radiant temperature to a vegetation index (computed from satellite visible and near-infrared data) while coupling this association to an inverse modeling scheme. More than merely furnishing surface soil moisture values, the method constitues a new conceptual and practical approach for combining thermal infrared and vegetation index measurements for incorporating the derived values of M(sub 0) into hydrologic and atmospheric prediction models. Application of the technique is demonstrated for a region in and around the city of Newcastle upon Tyne situated in the northeast of England. A regional estimate of M(sub 0) is derived and is probabbly good for fractional vegetation cover up to 80% before errors in the estimated soil water content become unacceptably large. Moreover, a normalization scheme is suggested from which a nomogram, `universal triangle,' is constructed and is seen to fit the observed data well. The universal triangle also simplifies the inclusion of remotely derived M(sub 0) in hydrology and meteorological models and is perhaps a practicable step toward integrating derived data from satellite measurements in weather forecasting.

  10. Metal immobilization and soil amendment efficiency at a contaminated sediment landfill site: a field study focusing on plants, springtails, and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bert, Valérie; Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Caron, Lucie; Biaz, Asmaa; Dazy, Marc; Masfaraud, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Metal immobilization may contribute to the environmental management strategy of dredged sediment landfill sites contaminated by metals. In a field experiment, amendment effects and efficiency were investigated, focusing on plants, springtails and bacteria colonisation, metal extractability and sediment ecotoxicity. Conversely to hydroxylapatite (HA, 3% DW), the addition of Thomas Basic Slag (TBS, 5% DW) to a 5-yr deposited sediment contaminated with Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb and As resulted in a decrease in the 0.01 M Ca(NO(3))(2)-extractable concentrations of Cd and Zn. Shoot Cd and Zn concentration in Calamagrostis epigejos, the dominant plant species, also decreased in the presence of TBS. The addition of TBS and HA reduced sediment ecotoxicity and improved the growth of the total bacterial population. Hydroxylapatite improved plant species richness and diversity and decreased antioxidant enzymes in C. Epigejos and Urtica dïoica. Collembolan communities did not differ in abundance and diversity between the different treatments. PMID:22647548

  11. Evaluation of Cover Crops with Potential for Use in Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) for Susceptibility to Three Species of Meloidogyne.

    PubMed

    Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy; Butler, David M; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2013-12-01

    Several cover crops with potential for use in tropical and subtropical regions were assessed for susceptibility to three common species of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and M. javanica. Crops were selected based on potential use as organic amendments in anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) applications. Nematode juvenile (J2) numbers in soil and roots, egg production, and host plant root galling were evaluated on arugula (Eruca sativa, cv. Nemat), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata, cv. Iron & Clay), jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis, cv. Comum), two commercial mixtures of Indian mustard and white mustard (Brassica juncea & Sinapis alba, mixtures Caliente 61 and Caliente 99), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum, cv. Tifleaf III), sorghum-sudangrass hybrid (Sorghum bicolor × S. bicolor var. sudanense, cv. Sugar Grazer II), and three cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus, cvs. 545A, Nusun 660CL, and Nusun 5672). Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cv. Rutgers) was included in all trials as a susceptible host to all three nematode species. The majority of cover crops tested were less susceptible than tomato to M. arenaria, with the exception of jack bean. Sunflower cv. Nusun 5672 had fewer M. arenaria J2 isolated from roots than the other sunflower cultivars, less galling than tomato, and fewer eggs than tomato and sunflower cv. 545A. Several cover crops did not support high populations of M. incognita in roots or exhibit significant galling, although high numbers of M. incognita J2 were isolated from the soil. Arugula, cowpea, and mustard mixture Caliente 99 did not support M. incognita in soil or roots. Jack bean and all three cultivars of sunflower were highly susceptible to M. javanica, and all sunflower cultivars had high numbers of eggs isolated from roots. Sunflower, jack bean, and both mustard mixtures exhibited significant galling in response to M. javanica. Arugula, cowpea, and sorghum-sudangrass consistently had low numbers of all three Meloidogyne species associated with roots and are good selections for use in ASD for root-knot nematode control. The remainder of crops tested had significant levels of galling, J2, and eggs associated with roots, which varied among the Meloidogyne species tested. PMID:24379486

  12. Cover crop effects on soil microbial communities and enzyme activity in semiarid agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare a fallow-winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotation to several cover crop-winter wheat rotations under dryland and irrigated conditions in the semiarid US High Plains. We carried out a study that included two sites (Sidney, NE, and Akron, CO), and three s...

  13. Impact of Winter Cover Crop Biomass Removal on Soil Properties and Cotton Yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest on alternatives sources of energy, especially renewable sources. Numerous materials can be used for this purpose, including crop residues. The use of crop residues would give farmers a new source of income. The use of winter cover crops (WCC) is recommende...

  14. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, Stewart M., E-mail: soakley@csuchico.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Chico State University, California State University, Chico, CA 95929 (United States); Jimenez, Ramon, E-mail: rjimenez1958@yahoo.com [Public Works, Municipality of Villanueva, Cortes (Honduras)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m{sup 2}/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48,000, with a land requirement of 0.2 m{sup 2}/person year, a cover to waste ratio of 0.2, and an estimated soil surplus of 298,000 m{sup 3} that is valorized and used onsite. The landfill has been operated solely by the municipality with an operational cost in 2010 estimated at US$4.60 per ton. A modified water balance analysis at Villanueva shows negligible leachate generation from covered trenches and 700 m{sup 3}/yr (60 m{sup 3}/ha yr) from the two open trenches required for daily operation. If the site were an open dump, however, leachate generation is estimated to be 3900 m{sup 3}/ha yr and contaminated runoff 5000 m{sup 3}/ha yr. A simple model used to estimate dilution of generated leachate based on groundwater flow data and aquifer stratigraphy suggests that the leachate will be diluted by a factor of 0.01 in the aquifer. Leachate contaminants will not accumulate because the aquifer discharges to the Ulua River 2 km south of the landfill. While not suitable for all sites, the Villanueva method nevertheless serves as an excellent example of how a small city landfill with natural compaction of waste and attenuation of leachate can be sustainably operated.

  15. Migration ability of radionuclides in soil-vegetation cover of Belarus after Chernobyl accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Sokolik; T. G. Ivanova; S. L. Leinova; S. V. Ovsiannikova; I. M. Kimlenko

    2001-01-01

    This paper illustrates the experimental experience achieved in the research of the self-restoration of radioactive-contaminated natural ecosystems. The main directions of studies were: the content and geochemical stability of “hot” particles in radioactive fallout from Chernobyl accident; the physicochemical forms (water-soluble, exchangeable, mobile and fixed) of Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-239, 240 and Am-241 in the wide varieties of soils; the biological

  16. Landfill wall revegetation combined with leachate recirculation: a convenient procedure for management of closed landfills.

    PubMed

    Del Moro, G; Barca, E; Cassano, D; Di Iaconi, C; Mascolo, G; Brunetti, G

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for a reliable sustainable option to effectively manage the landfill leachate generation. This study presents a simple procedure for the revegetation of the walls of closed landfills, employing the leachate as a fertirrigant. The native plants Lepidium sativum, Lactuca sativa, and Atriplex halimus, which suit the local climate, were chosen for this study in Southern Italy. The methodology was structured into three phases (i) early stage toxicity assessment phase (apical root length and germination tests), (ii) adult plant resistance assessment phase, and (iii) soil properties verification phase. The rationale of the proposed approach was first to look at the distinctive qualities and the potential toxicity in landfill leachates for fertigation purposes. Afterwards, through specific tests, the plants used were ranked in terms of resistance to the aqueous solution that contained leachate. Finally, after long-term irrigation, any possible worsening of soil properties was evaluated. The results demonstrated the real possibility of using blended leachate as a fertigant for the revegetation of the walls of closed landfills. In particular, the plants maintained good health when leachate was blended at concentrations of lower than 25 and 5%, respectively for A. halimus and Lepidium sativum. Irrigation tests showed good resistance of the plants, even at dosages of 112 and 133.5 mm m(-2), at maximum concentrations of 25 and 5%, respectively, for A. halimus and Lepidium sativum. The analysis of the total chlorophyll content and of aerial parts dried weight confirmed the results reported above. PMID:24737024

  17. HYDROLOGIC EVALUATION OF LANDFILL PERFORMANCE (HELP) MODEL: USER'S GUIDE FOR VERSION 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer program is a quasi-two-dimensional hydrologic model of water movement across, into, through and out of landfills. he model accepts weather, soil and design data. andfill systems including various combinations of ve...

  18. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Crest, Marion, E-mail: marion.crest@suez-env.com [Suez Environnement, 38 rue du President Wilson, 78230 Le Pecq (France); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Spokas, Kurt A., E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, 439 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Akerman, Anna, E-mail: anna.akerman@sita.fr [SITA France, Tour CB 21, 16 Place de l'Iris, 92040 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Yuan, Lei, E-mail: lyuan@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  19. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) Model: B (Set Includes, A- User's Guide for Version 3 w/disks, B-Engineering Documentation for Version 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer program is a quasi-two-dimensional hydrologic model of water movement across, into, through and out of landfills. The model accepts weather, soil and design data. Landfill systems including various combinations o...

  20. Landfills: Building Them Better

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Waste disposal has been an ongoing societal problem since medieval times. In this lesson, students learn about the three methods of waste disposal in use by modern communities. They also investigate how engineers design sanitary landfills to prevent leachate from polluting the underlining groundwater.

  1. Invisible threat: Odors and landfill gas from construction and demolition waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    It once was thought that construction and demolition (C and D) waste used as clean fill and landfill cover would generate little or no gas or odors. Previous experience with municipal solid waste (MSW) traditionally generated odors of a few parts per million (ppm) up to maybe 100 ppm of hydrogen sulfide (HâS) in the landfill gas formed. However, people

  2. The role of land cover change in modulating the soil moisture-temperature land-atmosphere coupling strength over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A. L.; Pitman, A. J.; Kala, J.

    2014-08-01

    The severity of recent droughts and heat waves have been linked to land-atmosphere feedbacks. However, investigations of how these feedbacks are influenced by land use and land cover change (LULCC) are limited. Using the Weather and Research Forecasting model with an ensemble framework of planetary boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes, we combine the Global Land Atmosphere Coupling Experiment methodology with LULCC to assess how LULCC affects land-atmosphere coupling strength for maximum temperature over Australia. We find a statistically significant decrease in soil moisture-temperature coupling over regions where forest changes to crops, which was consistent across the implemented model physics and background climate. This was associated with a decrease in the ensemble mean variance suggesting that LULCC influences regional climate variability via changes in the regional scale hydrology and surface energy balance. Our results highlight the need to consider land surface changes and coupling strength in combination, rather than in isolation.

  3. Effect of Turfgrass Cover and Irrigation on Soil Mobility and Dissipation of Mefenoxam and Propiconazole

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Gardner; B. E. Branham

    2001-01-01

    conducted on turfgrass versus bare soil. The interaction of irrigation practices and the presence of turfgrass on the mobility and dissipation (methoxyacetyl)-DL-alanine methyl ester), pendimethalin of mefenoxam (N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)-D-alanine (N-(1-ethylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-2,6-dinitrobenzenamine), methyl ester) and propiconazole (1-((2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-pro- chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl-O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) pyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)methyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole) was studied. Sam- phosphorothioate), and isazofos (O-5-chloro-1-isopropyl- pling cylinders (20-cm diam.) were placed in either creeping bentgrass 1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl O,O-diethylphosphorothioate) ap- (Agrostis stolonifera L.

  4. Hydrogeological Environmental Assessment of Sanitary Landfill Project at Jammu City, India

    E-print Network

    Nagar, Bharat Bhushan; Mirza, Umar Karim

    2002-01-01

    leachate and minimization of soil erosion may include some aspects of environmental management of the landfill project.leachate management due to the terrestrial nature of environmental degradation caused by the project.

  5. FIELD STUDIES OF LINER INSTALLATION METHODS AT LANDFILLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates procedures for subgrade preparation and liner placement during the construction of lined surface impoundments and landfills. Lining materials studied include admixes, soils and clays, sprayed-on membranes, and polymeric membranes. Objectives of the study w...

  6. Soil cover patterns in the northern part of the area of aspen-fir taiga in the southeast of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, S. V.; Geras'ko, L. I.; Kulizhskii, S. P.; Amelin, I. I.; Istigechev, G. I.

    2015-04-01

    Soil cover patterns in the northern part of the area of aspen-fir taiga on the Tom'-Yaya interfluve at 170-270 m a.s.l. are analyzed. Landscapes of the subtaiga piedmont province are found at somewhat lower heights. The three major forms of the local mesotopography include virtually flat interfluve surfaces, slopes (that predominate in area), and the network of ravines and small river valleys. Modal soil combinations on the slopes consist of the typical soddy-podzolic soils with very deep bleached eluvial horizons and dark gray (or gray) residual-humus gleyic soils with dark humus coatings. With an increase in the degree of drainage of the territory (toward the local erosional network), the portion of gleyic soil subtypes decreases from nearly 100% on the flat interfluves to 10-15% on the slopes; the portion of soils with residual humus features decreases from 80-90 to 10-15%, respectively. These two soil subtypes can be considered intergrades between typical soils of the aspen-fir taiga (soddy-podzolic soils with very deep bleached horizons) and dark gray and gray residual-humus soils characteristic of the subtaiga zone in the south of Western Siberia.

  7. Influence of Snow Cover Duration on Soil Respiration and Evaporation Efflux in Mixed-Conifer Ecosystems. Subalpine mixed conifer ecosystems are sensitive to a warming climate and are dependent on snow fall, which is expected to decrease in

    E-print Network

    Papuga, Shirley A.

    Influence of Snow Cover Duration on Soil Respiration and Evaporation Efflux in Mixed fall, which is expected to decrease in coming years. We are measuring soil respiration and evaporation affect CO2 and H2O fluxes out of the soil. Soil Respiration and Evaporation Santa Catalina Mountains: Co

  8. Acceleration of landfill stabilization using leachate recycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. G. Townsend; W. L. Miller; Hyung-Jib Lee; J. F. K. Earle

    1996-01-01

    A leachate recycle system was constructed and operated at an existing lined landfill in North-Central Florida to observe the effects of leachate recycle on landfill stabilization. Samples of leachate, landfill gas, and landfilled solid waste were collected and analyzed throughout a four-year period, before and after the start of leachate recycle. The settlement of landfilled waste was also measured in

  9. Effects of Cover Crops to Offset Soil Carbon Changes Under No-till on an Ohio farm when Biomass is Harvested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, J. M.; Everett, L. R.; Richards, W.

    2003-12-01

    The results of a long term experiment to look at the use of cover crops and there effect on soil organic carbon. No-till has been shown to increase SOC and improve the overall soil quality under conditions where the biomass has been returned to the field. However, biomass may be removed as silage or for use in biofuels. The removal will reduce the inputs to the field so to overcome the amount of biomass not returned to the soil different cover crops were used. This experiment was done on a working farm where the corn biomass was being removed as silage. Four cover crops were planted in early September of 2002: rye, oats, clover, and canola with two controls, one with no cover crop and one where corn stubble was left on the field. The soils were sampled soon after the crops were planted and again in the spring of 2003 before the cover crops were killed just prior to planting. The first results indicate that the most root biomass was produced by the rye followed by oats then canola and then clover.

  10. COVER CROP SYSTEM EFFECTS ON CARBON/NITROGEN SEQUESTRATION AND THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF COASTAL PLAIN SOILS UNDER CONSERVATION TILLAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop growth and water/solute movement are affected by soil properties. Crop growth is affected by soil moisture retention, which relates to soil structure (particle and pore size distribution), which is greatly affected by soil C levels. Soil hydraulic conductivity depends on particle size distrib...

  11. Geochemical processes in landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstner, Ulrich; Kersten, Michael; Wienberg, Reinhard

    The present review focusses on the qualitative long-term perspectives of processes and mechanisms controlling the interactions of critical pollutants with organic and inorganic substrates both in "reactor landfills" and in deposits, which already consist of rock-like material ("final storage quality"). The behavior of pollutants in landfills is determined by the chemistry of interstitial solutions, i.e. by pH and redox conditions, and concentration of inorganic and organic ligands; in "reactor landfills" these conditions are widely variable as a result of biochemical reactions, while "final storage quality" implies less variations of chemical interactions. In both alternatives, however, prediction of short- and long-term effects on groundwater quality should be based on the proportion of "active species" of compounds ("mobility concept"). Qualitative assessment of potentially mobile pollutants may involve a controlled significative intensivation of important parameters such as pH-values. Using sequential extraction rearrangements of specific solid "phases" can be evaluated prior to the actual remobilisation of the pollutant into the dissolved phase. From a geochemical point of view the "reactor landfill" is characterized by labile conditions during the initial aerobic and acid anaerobic phases, the former mainly due to uncontrolled interactions with organic solutes. On the other hand, final storage quality, which is defined by the composition of earth crust material, in most cases is not attained by simple incineration of municipal waste, i.e. by reduction of organic fractions only. There is, in particular, the problem of easily soluble minerals, such as chlorides. Nonetheless the type of inorganic residue deposits will increasingly receive prevalence as a method of final storage for municipal wastes in the future.

  12. Assessment of the environmental impact of landfill sites with open combustion located in arid regions by combined chemical and ecotoxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, H; Kolb, M; Jopke, P; Schmidt, C; Alawi, M; Bahadir, M

    2006-12-01

    Two different waste disposal sites in Jordan were investigated in order to determine the environmental situation in context with waste disposal techniques. One landfill, located at Marka/Amman, had been closed about 25 years ago and covered with soil. Here, the waste had been actively open combusted and openings in the cover, still emitting smoke, indicated that waste was still smoldering inside the landfill's body. The second disposal site close to Ekeeder/Irbid is still operated. On this ground, the solid waste is not intentionally burned, although spontaneous fires frequently come up. Samples of waste, soil, and entrained dust were collected and analyzed. From the solid samples, respectively, their eluates, sum parameters, ecotoxicological effects as well as contents of elements/heavy metals and organic pollutants (PAH, PCDD/F) were determined. In general, the Ekeeder-samples were low-contaminated. The investigation of the Marka-samples showed higher contamination of the site's center, clearly being influenced by combustion processes. A significant contamination of the landfill's vicinity by its emissions could not be derived from the analytical data. Ecotoxicological investigations, applying a bio-test battery, revealed correlations with the sum parameters but not with the trace pollutants. Thus, the Marka-samples with the highest measured values of sum parameters caused adverse effects on three different test species, whereas other samples from Marka and Ekeeder had small or no effects. The results of these investigations depict the influence of different disposal techniques on the contamination situation of a landfill and they shall contribute to assess the conditions of other disposal sites in (semi)arid regions. PMID:16764903

  13. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. (Hydrologic Consultants, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. (P.E. LaMoreaux and Associates, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  14. A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE AT TWO NASA CLPX

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Lee

    -ARID CLIMATE AT TWO NASA CLPX SITES Submitted by Julie D. Holcombe Department of Forest, Rangeland AT TWO NASA CLPX SITES BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE AT TWO NASA CLPX SITES Snow cover depletion and soil moisture recharge

  15. Effects of mycorrhizal roots and extraradical hyphae on 15N uptake from vineyard cover crop litter and the soil microbial community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to quantify the contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae to 15N uptake from vineyard cover crop litter, and to examine the soil microbial community under the influence of the mycorrhizosphere and the hyphosphere. Mycorrhizal grapevines were grown in containers, ...

  16. he Influence of Pre-settlement and Current High Plains Land Use and Land Cover on Atmospheric, Soils, and Vegetation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, C. A.; Pielke, R. A.; Sohl, T. L.; Sayler, K. L.; Loveland, T. R.; Steyaert, L. T.

    2005-12-01

    Changes in land use and land cover can alter local and regional weather, hydrology, and ecosystem function. In the High Plains Region of the central and western United States (the area immediately east of the Rocky Mountains from South Dakota to Texas), human landscape modification from native grasslands to intensively managed croplands is especially striking. Before this shift was initiated in the mid-19th century, relatively continuous short-, mixed-, and tallgrass prairies dominated the region. In contrast, the current landscape is a mosaic of croplands (irrigated and non-irrigated), grasslands, reservoirs, and urban areas. Associated with the observed land-cover conversion over the last 150 years, land-atmosphere interactions, water cycling, and ecosystem functions have also changed. Our objective is to quantify the role of land-use and land-cover change in the High Plains in modifying precipitation, near-surface air temperature, soil moisture and temperature, and plant growth. To do this, pre-settlement land cover was derived from Küchler's (1964) map of potential native vegetation and present land cover was adapted from National Land Cover Data (NLCD, Vogelmann et al. 2001) and agricultural statistics. Further, the land-cover datasets were enriched with C4 vegetation fractions from Tieszen et al. (1997). The contrasting land-cover data were used to define the lower boundary conditions in a coupled plant, land-surface, and atmospheric model (GEMRAMS) running on a 10 km horizontal grid increment. To isolate the spatial and temporal effects of the altered land surface on atmospheric properties, precipitation, soil moisture and temperature, and plant growth, paired GEMRAMS simulations were performed using identical large-scale meteorological and soil conditions. In addition, dry, intermediate, and wet spring and summer meteorological conditions were used to examine sensitivity to precipitation variation among the simulations.

  17. Potential methane production and oxidation in soil reclamation covers of an oil sands mining site in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pum, Lisa; Reichenauer, Thomas; Germida, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities create a number of significant greenhouse gases and thus potentially contribute to global warming. Methane production is significant in some agricultural production systems and from wetlands. In soil, methane can be oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about methane production and oxidation in oil sand reclamation covers. The purpose of this study was to investigate methane production and oxidation potential of tailing sands and six different reclamation layers of oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada. Methane production and oxidation potential were investigated in laboratory scale microcosms through continuous headspace analysis using gas chromatography. Samples from a reclamation layer were collected at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL) reclamation site at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-40 cm in October 2014. In addition, tailing sands provided by Suncor Energy Inc. and soil from a CNRL wetland were studied for methane production. Samples were dried, crushed and sieved to 4 mm, packed into serum bottle microcosms and monitored for eight weeks. Methane production potential was assessed by providing an anoxic environment and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 100 %. Methane oxidation potential was examined by an initial application of 2 vol % methane to the microcosms and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 50 %. Microcosm headspace gas was analysed for methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen. All experiments were carried out in triplicates, including controls. SF6 and Helium were used as internal standards to detect potential leaks. Our results show differences for methane production potential between the soil depths, tailing sands and wetlands. Moreover, there were differences in the methane oxidation potential of substrate from the three depths investigated and between the reclamation layers. In conclusion, the present study shows that reclamation layers for oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada have the potential to oxidize on-site produced methane emissions to the less harmful greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Such oxidation might mitigate impacts of methane production from these sites.

  18. Influence of a Municipal Waste Landfill on the Spatial Distribution of Mercury in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gworek, Barbara; Dmuchowski, Wojciech; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Koda, Eugeniusz; Osiecka, Renata; Borzyszkowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigations were focused on assessing the influence of a 35-year-old municipal waste landfill on environmental mercury pollution. The total Hg content was determined in the soil profile, groundwater, and the plants (Solidago virgaurea and Poaceae sp.) in the landfill area. Environmental pollution near the landfill was relatively low. The topsoil layer, groundwater and the leaves of Solidago virgaurea and Poaceae sp. contained 19–271 ?g kg-1, 0.36–3.01 ?g l-1, 19–66 ?g kg-1 and 8–29 ?g kg-1 of Hg, respectively. The total Hg content in the soil decreased with the depth. The results are presented as pollution maps of the landfill area based on the total Hg content in the soil, groundwater and plants. Statistical analysis revealed the lack of correlation between the total Hg content in the soil and plants, but a relationship between the total concentration of Hg in groundwater and soil was shown. The landfill is not a direct source of pollution in the area. The type of land morphology did not influence the pollution level. Construction of bentonite cut-off wall bypassing MSW landfill reduces the risk of mercury release into ground-water environment. PMID:26176607

  19. Transport of the Pathogenic Prion Protein through Landfill Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Lee, Seunghak; McKenzie, Debbie; Benson, Craig H.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are a class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting a variety of mammalian species including humans. A misfolded form of the prion protein (PrPTSE) is the major, if not sole, component of the infectious agent. Recent TSE outbreaks in domesticated and wild animal populations has created the need for safe and effective disposal of large quantities of potentially infected materials. Here, we report the results of a study to evaluate the potential for transport of PrPTSE derived from carcasses and associated wastes in a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. Column experiments were conducted to evaluate PrPTSE transport in quartz sand, two fine-textured burial soils currently used in landfill practice, a green waste residual material (a potential burial material), and fresh and aged MSW. PrPTSE was retained by quartz sand and the fine-textured burial soils, with no detectable PrPTSE eluted over more than 40 pore volumes. In contrast, PrPTSE was more mobile in MSW and green waste residual. Transport parameters were estimated from the experimental data and used to model PrPTSE migration in a MSW landfill. To the extent that the PrPTSE used mimics that released from decomposing carcasses, burial of CWD-infected materials at MSW landfills could provide secure containment of PrPTSE provided reasonable burial strategies (e.g., encasement in soil) are used. PMID:19368208

  20. Dynamics of cover, UV-protective pigments, and quantum yield in biological soil crust communities of an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Smith, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an integral part of dryland ecosystems. We monitored the cover of lichens and mosses, cyanobacterial biomass, concentrations of UV-protective pigments in both free-living and lichenized cyanobacteria, and quantum yield in the soil lichen species Collema in an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland. During our sampling time, the site received historically high and low levels of precipitation, whereas temperatures were close to normal. Lichen cover, dominated by Collema tenax and C. coccophorum, and moss cover, dominated by Syntrichia caninervis, responded to both increases and decreases in precipitation. This finding for Collema spp. at a hot Mojave Desert site is in contrast to a similar study conducted at a cool desert site on the Colorado Plateau in SE Utah, USA, where Collema spp. cover dropped in response to elevated temperatures, but did not respond to changes in rainfall. The concentrations of UV-protective pigments in free-living cyanobacteria at the Mojave Desert site were also strongly and positively related to rainfall received between sampling times (R2 values ranged from 0.78 to 0.99). However, pigment levels in the lichenized cyanobacteria showed little correlation with rainfall. Quantum yield in Collema spp. was closely correlated with rainfall. Climate models in this region predict a 3.5-4.0 ??C rise in temperature and a 15-20% decline in winter precipitation by 2099. Based on our data, this rise in temperature is unlikely to have a strong effect on the dominant species of the soil crusts. However, the predicted drop in precipitation will likely lead to a decrease in soil lichen and moss cover, and high stress or mortality in soil cyanobacteria as levels of UV-protective pigments decline. In addition, surface-disturbing activities (e.g., recreation, military activities, fire) are rapidly increasing in the Mojave Desert, and these disturbances quickly remove soil lichens and mosses. These stresses combined are likely to lead to shifts in species composition and the local extirpation of some lichen or moss species. As these organisms are critical components of nutrient cycling, soil fertility, and soil stability, such changes are likely to reverberate throughout these ecosystems.

  1. Phytoextraction of metals by Erigeron canadensis L. from fly ash landfill of power plant "Kolubara".

    PubMed

    Krgovi?, Rada; Trifkovi?, Jelena; Milojkovi?-Opsenica, Dušanka; Manojlovi?, Dragan; Markovi?, Marijana; Muti?, Jelena

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd, As, Cr, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Ba, Fe, Al and Ag in Erigeron canadensis L. growing on fly ash landfill of power plant "Kolubara", Serbia. The content of each element was determined in every part of plant separately (root, stalk and inflorescence) and correlated with the content of elements in each phase of sequential extraction of fly ash. In order to ambiguously select the factors that are able to decidedly characterize the particular part of plant, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were performed. The bioconcentration factors and translocation factors for each metal were calculated in order to determine the feasibility of the use of plant E. canadensis L. for phytoremediation purpose. There were strong positive correlations between metals in every part of plant samples, and metals from pseudo total form of sequential extraction indicate that the bioavailability of elements in fly ash is similarly correlated with total form. Retained Al, Fe, Cr and Co in the root indicate its suitability for phytostabilization. This plant takes up Cd and Zn from the soil (bioconcentration factors (BCFs) greater than 1), transporting them through the stalk into the inflorescence (translocation factors (TFs) higher than 1). Regarding its dominance in vegetation cover and abundance, E. canadensis L. can be considered adequate for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn from coal ash landfills at Kolubara. PMID:25728199

  2. Pathway analysis for a contaminated landfill in Middlesex, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Merry-Libby, P.; Yang, J.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy began excavating contaminated materials from the Middlesex Municipal landfill in 1984. A total of 16,000 mT of landfill materials covering a 0.2-ha area was excavated, of which 11,000 mT was contaminated and has been transported to the nearby sampling plant site for interim storage. Based on the pathway analysis for the onsite and near-site resident scenarios, the radiation dose rates and radionuclide concentrations in groundwater would be below the regulatory requirements for both the short-term and long-term scenarios. Hence, the potential health risks to maximally exposed individuals due to radioactive releases from the Middlesex landfill would be insignificant.

  3. Influence of cover crops and crop residue treatment on soil organic carbon stocks evaluated in Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Bolinder, Martin A.; Börjesson, Gunnar; Kätterer, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in agricultural soils are strongly controlled by management. In this study we quantified the effect of cover crops and crop residue management on SOC stocks in Swedish long-term experiments. Eight pairs of cover crop (undersown ryegrass) vs. no cover crop were investigated in Swedish long-term field experiments (16 to 24 years). Yields of the main crop were not affected by the cover crop. Cover crops significantly increased SOC stocks, with a mean carbon sequestration rate in all experiments (excluding one) of 0.32±0.29 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Interestingly, this sequestration is similar to that estimated for a U.S.experiment, where ryegrass growth is much less temperature- and light-limited than under Swedish conditions. This sequestration rate is also the same as that recently reported for many other cover crops in a global meta-analysis but less than SOC changes in ley-dominated rotations which under Nordic conditions were shown to accumulate in average 0.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 more carbon compared to exclusively annual cropping systems. Thus, originally introduced in agricultural rotations to reduce nitrate leaching, cover crops are also an effective practice to increase SOC stocks, even at relatively high latitudes. The effect of crop residue treatment was studied in 16 pairs of straw incorporated (SI) vs. straw removed (SR) treatments in six Swedish long-term field experiments. Data series on SOC with 5-28 sampling dates during 27-53 years were analysed using ICBM, a dynamic SOC model. At five out of six sites, the humification coefficient for straw (hlitter; the fraction of straw C that is entering the slow C pool) was much smaller (0-0.09) than the ICBM default h-value for plant material estimated in previous studies (0.125). The derived hlitter-values and thus the stabilization of straw-derived carbon increased significantly with clay content. For an Italian site (with five pairs of SI vs. SR) that was used for model validation we found the best model fits with hlitter-values ranging from 0 to 0.05, increasing with nitrogen fertilization. We explained this with increased substrate use efficiency of microbes due to increasing N availability. We conclude that i) the efficiency of incorporating straw to increase SOC stocks depends on soil texture and nitrogen availability, ii) using straw for bioenergy production could be a more sustainable and climate-smart option, especially in coarse textured soils, and iii) the introduction of cover crops may be a more efficient strategy for C sequestration in cereal-dominated rotations rather than incorporation of crop residues.

  4. A COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS FOR THE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a z. A COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE the contribution to the greenhouse effect due to methane emitted by municipal solid waste landfills. The objective an inventory of methane emissions covering all municipal solid waste landfills in France. EQUIPMENT AND METHODS

  5. Sour landfill gas problem solved

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, G.; Cantrall, R. [Wheelabrator Clean Air Systems, Inc., Schaumburg, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In Broward County, Fla., near Pompano Beach, Waste Management of North America (WMNA, a subsidiary of WMX Technologies, Oak Brook, IL) operates the Central Sanitary Landfill and Recycling Center, which includes the country`s largest landfill gas-to-energy plant. The landfill consists of three collection sites: one site is closed, one is currently receiving garbage, and one will open in the future. Approximately 9 million standard cubic feet (scf) per day of landfill gas is collected from approximately 300 wells spread over the 250-acre landfill. With a dramatic increase of sulfur-containing waste coming to a South Florida landfill following Hurricane Andrew, odors related to hydrogen sulfide became a serious problem. However, in a matter of weeks, an innovative desulfurization unit helped calm the landfill operator`s fears. These very high H{sub 2}S concentrations caused severe odor problems in the surrounding residential area, corrosion problems in the compressors, and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission problems in the exhaust gas from the turbine generators.

  6. Trends in landfill leachate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Akyurek, M. [Rust Environment and Infrastructure, Sheboygan, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Leachate may be defined as the water or other liquid that has been contaminated by dissolved or suspended materials due to contact with solid waste or gases within the landfill. Research shows that leachate composition is a function of various factors such as rainfall, refuse permeability, refuse depth, and landfill age. Of these factors, landfill age has been found to have the greatest effect on leachate composition. Generally, leachate from new landfills will be higher in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and will show a steady decline leveling off at about 10 years. Traditionally, leachate treatment methods have been based on the leachate`s metals, COD, and ammonia concentrations. A different approach based on mass of contaminant released from the landfill may be more appropriate. This paper presents data from a landfill (Landfill A) showing mass of contaminant release over a period of time. This paper also presents a different design approach based on leachate mass contaminant release in lieu of a design approach based on leachate concentrations.

  7. Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Study continued on p

    E-print Network

    Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment to include an under- liner system to collect and remove leachate water that soaks through the waste pile

  8. Modelling the impact of land-cover change on potential soil loss in the Taita Hills, Kenya, between 1987 and 2003 using remote-sensing and geospatial data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hakki Emrah Erdogan; Petri K. E. Pellikka; Barnaby Clark

    2011-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, natural vegetation is being transformed into agricultural lands at a fast rate, endangering ecosystem services and increasing soil-loss potential, which may trigger land degradation. For the Taita Hills study area in Kenya, multi-temporal land-cover models of 1987, 1999 and 2003, derived from Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) imagery using a multi-scale segmentation\\/object relationship modelling (MSS\\/ORM)

  9. Cotton Root Rot Studies with Special Reference to Sclerotia, Cover Crops, Rotations, Tillage, Seeding Rates, Soil Fungicides, and Effects on Seed Quality. 

    E-print Network

    Rogers, Cyril H.

    1942-01-01

    as Affecting Root Rot and Crop Yields 27 iffeet of Date of Tillage and Destruction of Cotton Stalks on Root Rot 29 lubsoiling and its Effects on Root Rot 32 Xffect of Rate of Planting Cottonseed on Root Rot 33 Cotton Yield and Seed Quality as Affected...- TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas [LLETIN NO. 614 JUNE 1942 TON ROOT ROT STUDIES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE 1 SCLEROTIA, COVER CROPS, ROTATIONS, TILL- AGE, SEEDING RATES, SOIL FUNGICIDES...

  10. Cotton Root Rot Studies with Special Reference to Sclerotia, Cover Crops, Rotations, Tillage, Seeding Rates, Soil Fungicides, and Effects on Seed Quality.

    E-print Network

    Rogers, Cyril H.

    1942-01-01

    as Affecting Root Rot and Crop Yields 27 iffeet of Date of Tillage and Destruction of Cotton Stalks on Root Rot 29 lubsoiling and its Effects on Root Rot 32 Xffect of Rate of Planting Cottonseed on Root Rot 33 Cotton Yield and Seed Quality as Affected...- TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas [LLETIN NO. 614 JUNE 1942 TON ROOT ROT STUDIES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE 1 SCLEROTIA, COVER CROPS, ROTATIONS, TILL- AGE, SEEDING RATES, SOIL FUNGICIDES...

  11. Equivalence demonstration of an alternative cover system 307 EQUIVALENCE DEMONSTRATION OF AN ALTERNATIVE COVER SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    engineered components of municipal and hazardous waste landfills is the cover system. The cover system should to zero percolation) should not be within any engineer's expectations. Instead, the engineer should: an evapotranspirative cover acts not as a barrier, but as a sponge or a reservoir that stores moisture during

  12. Technical Note Assessing the Performance of Evapotranspiration Covers

    E-print Network

    Toledo, University of

    Technical Note Assessing the Performance of Evapotranspiration Covers for Municipal Solid Waste of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, but often produce higher rates of percolation in regions that receive; Evapotranspiration; Ohio; Water balance; Municipal wastes; Landfills; Solid wastes. Author keywords: Dredged sediment

  13. Bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of cucumbers grown in soils covering a wide range of cucumber cropping histories and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqiang; Gao, Lihong

    2014-11-01

    Rhizosphere microorganisms in soils are important for plant growth. However, the importance of rhizosphere microorganisms is still underestimated since many microorganisms associated with plant roots cannot be cultured and since the microbial diversity in the rhizosphere can be influenced by several factors, such as the cropping history, biogeography, and agricultural practice. Here, we characterized the rhizosphere bacterial diversity of cucumber plants grown in soils covering a wide range of cucumber cropping histories and environmental conditions by using pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We also tested the effects of compost addition and/or bacterial inoculation on the bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere. We identified an average of approximately 8,883 reads per sample, corresponding to around 4,993 molecular operational taxonomic units per sample. The Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in almost all soils. The abundances of the phyla Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia varied among the samples, and together with Proteobacteria, these phyla were the six most abundant phyla in almost all analyzed samples. Analyzing all the sample libraries together, the predominant genera found were Flavobacterium, Ohtaekwangia, Opitutus, Gp6, Steroidobacter, and Acidovorax. Overall, compost and microbial amendments increased shoot biomass when compared to untreated soils. However, compost addition decreased the bacterial ?-diversity in most soils (but for three soils compost increased diversity), and no statistical effect of microbial amendment on the bacterial ?-diversity was found. Moreover, soil amendments did not significantly influence the bacterial ?-diversity. Soil organic content appeared more important than compost and microbial amendments in shaping the structure of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of cucumber. PMID:25027276

  14. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is composed of the original 32-acre landfill, plus expansion areas to the north and south that added 16 and 22 acres, respectively, to the facility. The landfill is subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and currently operates under South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Domestic Waste Permit 87A. Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor the groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (formerly Aquifer Zone I/IIC[sub 2]) (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill. These wells are sampled quarterly for certain indicator parameters, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, volatile organics, and other constituents as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the SCDHEC domestic waste permit. This report reviews the 1992 activities of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  15. Where Should the Landfill Go?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Rosario P.; McFaden, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project where students were involved in finding the most suitable site for a landfill in their community. This two-month project was conducted using team teaching. Two twelfth grade geoscience classes were involved. (PR)

  16. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    First decades of XXI century actualized for soil researches the principal methodical problem of most modern geosciences: what spatial and temporal scale would be optimal for land quality evaluation and land-use practice optimizing? It is becoming obvious that this question cannot have one solution and have to be solved with especial attention on the features of concrete region and landscape, land-use history and practical issues, land current state and environmental functions, soil cover patterns and variability, governmental requirements and local society needs, best available technologies and their potential profitability. Central Russia is one of the most dynamical economic regions with naturally high and man-made complicated landscape and soil cover variability, long-term land-use history and self-contradictory issues, high potential of profitable farming and increased risks of land degradation. Global climate and technological changes essentially complicate the originally high and sharply increased in XX century farming land heterogeneity in the Central Russia that actualizes system analysis of its zonal, intra-zonal and azonal soil cover patterns according to their influence on land environmental functions, agroecological quality, and land-use and monitoring efficiency variability. Developed by the Laboratory of agroecological monitoring, ecosystem modeling & prediction (LAMP / RTSAU with support of RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regional systems of greenhouse gases environmental monitoring RusFluxNet (6 fixed & 1 mobile eddy covariance stations with zonal functional sets of key plots with chamber investigations in 5 Russian regions) and of agroecological monitoring (in representative key plots with different farming practice in 9 RF regions) allow to do this analysis in frame of enough representative regional multi-factorial matrix of soil cover patterns, bioclimatic conditions, landscape features, and land-use history and current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality, monitoring results functional interpretation, spatial and temporal interpolation a

  17. Soil Is More than Just Dirt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carrie; Graves, C. John

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a series of activities in which students investigate soil, culminating in the biomimicry of reducing landfill waste. After students learned about soil's ecosystem structure and the function of its food web with nutrient cycling and decomposition, they discovered that they know a solution to reduce the trash in landfills by…

  18. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-07-01

    Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0.013 PE and 0.002 to 0.003 PE respectively). The reason for this is that even if the leachate is treated, slight amounts of contaminants are released through emissions of treated wastewater to surface waters. The largest environmental improvement with regard to the direct cost of the landfill was the capping and leachate treatment system. The capping, though very cheap to establish, gave a huge benefit in lowered impacts, the leachate collection system though expensive gave large benefits as well. The other gas measures were found to give further improvements, for a minor increase in cost. PMID:21435856

  19. Migrating landfill gas proves challenging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Dobrowolski; A. S. Dellinger

    1994-01-01

    Located in the San Fernando Valley at the foothills of the San Gabriel mountains, the 41-acre Sheldon-Arleta Landfill originated as one of many gravel pits in the area and was operated by CalMat as a gravel quarry pit from the mid 1950s until 1962. In 1967, methane gas was detected in the residential dwellings located across from the landfill along

  20. Woodland establishment on closed old-style landfill sites in N.W. England

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen Rawlinson; Nicholas Dickinson; Paul Nolan; Philip Putwain

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale field experiment on 11 closed old-style landfill sites aims to identify the constraints to tree survival and growth, and the opportunity for restoration to community forestry. This paper analyses survival and growth during the first 3 years. A preliminary site investigation showed that the main environmental constraints to tree growth were soil depth, site exposure, soil compaction, waterlogging

  1. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Summer 1993 (Northside landfill site profile, Spokane, Washington)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Cleanup of the Northside Landfill in Spokane, Washington is an example of effective collaboration with state and local governments in addressing a Superfund hazardous waste site. City officials recognized that the landfill had reached capacity, local wells were contaminated, and ground water needed thorough treatment. EPA and Ecology worked with Spokane's Department of Solid Waste Management to: Provide a clean source of drinking water and construct a state-of-the-art plastic cover to cap the landfill and guard against the further spread of contaminants.

  2. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: the semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Stewart M; Jimenez, Ramón

    2012-12-01

    Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48,000, with a land requirement of 0.2m(2)/person year, a cover to waste ratio of 0.2, and an estimated soil surplus of 298,000 m(3) that is valorized and used onsite. The landfill has been operated solely by the municipality with an operational cost in 2010 estimated at US$4.60 per ton. A modified water balance analysis at Villanueva shows negligible leachate generation from covered trenches and 700 m(3)/yr (60 m(3)/ha yr) from the two open trenches required for daily operation. If the site were an open dump, however, leachate generation is estimated to be 3900 m(3)/ha yr and contaminated runoff 5000 m(3)/ha yr. A simple model used to estimate dilution of generated leachate based on groundwater flow data and aquifer stratigraphy suggests that the leachate will be diluted by a factor of 0.01 in the aquifer. Leachate contaminants will not accumulate because the aquifer discharges to the Ulua River 2 km south of the landfill. While not suitable for all sites, the Villanueva method nevertheless serves as an excellent example of how a small city landfill with natural compaction of waste and attenuation of leachate can be sustainably operated. PMID:22929224

  3. [The effect of petrochemical and oil-refining enterprises on the sanitary state of the soil cover].

    PubMed

    Sule?manov, R A; Safonnikova, S M; Iakhina, M R; Magzhanova, S A

    1996-01-01

    Pollution of soil and agricultural plants was studied in the areas of petrochemical and oil-processing enterprises. Massive soil pollution was found in the adjacent 1-3-km areas. Hydrocarbons and metals from wastes accumulate in onions, radish, potatoes, and apples. PMID:8925953

  4. Soil microbial and plant responses to the absence of plant cover and monoculturing in low arctic meadows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minna-Maarit Kytöviita; Anne Pietikäinen; Hannu Fritze

    2011-01-01

    Arctic ecosystems are sensitive to disturbance yet there is little information on the fate and recovery of soil microbial communities after disturbance and persistence in the absence of plants. Neighbouring plants may facilitate seedling establishment through amelioration of the physical environment and maintenance of arbuscular fungal community in soil. The inoculum of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbionts is critical for the establishment

  5. Success with cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are an important tool for producers interested in improving soil and crop productivity. They help control erosion, improve soil quality, improve soil properties that impact water infiltration and conservation, provide habitat and food for beneficial insects, and provide food for wildlif...

  6. Attenuation of municipal landfill leachate through land treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of municipal landfill’s leachate is considered as one of the most significant environmental issues. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted through land treatment, achieving an efficient and economical method by using Vetiver plant. Moreover, the effects of land treatment of leachate of municipal landfills on the natural reduction of organic and inorganic contaminants in the leachate after the pre-treatment in the Aradkouh disposal center are invested. Three pilots including the under-investigation region’s soil planted by Vetiver plant, the region’s intact soil pilot and the artificial composition of the region’s soil including the natural region’s soil, sand, and rock stone are used. The leachate, having passed its initial treatment, passed through the soil and to the pilot. It was collected in the end of the pilots and its organic and inorganic contaminants were measured. However, the land treatment of leachate was conducted in a slow rate at various speeds. According to the results, in order to remove COD, BOD5, TDS, TSS, TOC the best result was obtained in the region’s soil planted with Vetiver plant and at the speed of 0.2 ml per minute which resulted 99.1%, 99.7%, 52.4%, 98.8%, 94.9% removal efficiencies, respectively. It also can be concluded that the higher the organic rate load is, the lower the efficiency of the removal would be. In addition, EC & pH were measured and the best result was obtained in the region’s soil planted with Vetiver plant and at the speed of 0.2 ml/min. PMID:24397862

  7. Landfill to Learning Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-05-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in scientific exploration and discovery is the main goal of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will bring hands-on scientific experiences to the 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Our programs adhere to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and are modified for accessibility for the underserved communities that visit us, specifically those individuals that have mobility, sensory, and/or cognitive ability differences. The programs are conducted in a classroom setting and are designed to nourish the individual's inquisitive nature and provide an opportunity to function as a scientist by, making observations, performing experiments and recording data. We have an $850,000, three year NSF grant that targets adults with disabilities and older adults with age related limitations in vision, hearing, cognition and/or mobility. From dip netting in the marsh to astronomical investigation of the cosmos, the MEC/CESE remains committed to reaching the largest audience possible and leaving them with a truly exceptional scientific experience that serves to educate and inspire.

  8. Soil nitrogen and plant cover of an old?field on the shortgrass steppe in southeastern Colorado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blaine E. Horn; Edward F. Redente

    1998-01-01

    Croplands of the Colorado shortgrass steppe abandoned from cultivation in the 1930s are in a midseral successional stage and may take an additional 20–50 years to become dominated by late?seral species. In some disturbed ecosystems, an enhancement of soil nitrogen (N) resulted in a retention of early?seral plants, whereas a limitation of soil N encouraged an increase in midseral to

  9. Empirical approach to predict leached nutrients from landfill site.

    PubMed

    Barman, Pranab Jyoti; Kartha, Suresh A; Pradhan, Bulu

    2015-05-01

    An empirical approach is made in this investigation to predict the leached concentrations of sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), and potassium (K) in the effluents from a landfill site. Water at certain predetermined inflow filling rate is applied to a specific ponding depth, at the top of an experimental column filled with landfill refuse soil at the top (upper layer) and normal local soil at the bottom (base layer). The water infiltrates into the upper layer soil, percolates through the pores in upper and base layers, and in the process leaches the nutrients from the soils that are collected at the bottom of the column. The experimentations were for different combinations of heights of upper and base layer soils, water ponding depth, and inflow filling rates. The nutrient concentrations in the outflow leachates are measured using flame photometer. The observations showed mixed responses of leaching and trapping of nutrients in the soil layers for the various combinations. The experimental observations also inferred that the nutrient leaching is more for cases involving higher ponding depths and higher inflow filling rates. Empirical relationships with respect to the geometrical parameters, to predict the leached concentrations of Na, Ca, and K, are developed from the experimental observations using nonlinear least squares regressive techniques. Exponential equations gave the best empirical fit among various nonlinear relations in the regression technique. The empirical models also predicted well for each subcategory of independent variables that are substantiated by high correlation coefficients. PMID:25410312

  10. Spatial distribution and physiology of biological soil crusts from semi-arid central Spain are related to soil chemistry and shrub cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raúl Ochoa-Hueso; Rebecca R. Hernandez; José J. Pueyo; Esteban Manrique

    2011-01-01

    Despite the critical role of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in arid and semi-arid ecosystem function, few studies are found concerning the most important environmental variables affecting their distribution and physiology. This study seeks to determine soil and microenvironmental factors affecting the spatial distribution and pigment production of BSC-forming lichens and mosses in open patches of a semi-arid Mediterranean kermes oak

  11. Soil-to-plant transfer of native selenium for wild vegetation cover at selected locations of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Száková, Ji?ina; Tremlová, Jana; Pegová, Kristýna; Najmanová, Jana; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Total selenium (Se) contents were determined in aboveground biomass of wild plant species growing in two uncultivated meadows at two different locations. The soils in these locations had pseudototal (Aqua Regia soluble) Se in concentration ranges of between 0.2 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) at the first location, and between 0.7 and 1.4 mg kg(-1) at the second location. The plant species represented 29 plant families where the most numerous ones were Poaceae, Rosaceae, Fabaceae , and Asteraceae. The selenium contents in the plants varied between undetectable levels (Aegopodium podagraria, Achillea millefolium, Lotus corniculatus) and 0.158 mg kg(-1) (Veronica arvensis, Veronicaceae). The Se levels were roughly one order of magnitude lower compared to other elements with similar soil content, such as cadmium and molybdenum. The transfer factors of Se, quantifying the element transfer from soil to plants, varied between <0.001 and 0.146 with no significant differences between the locations, confirming the limited soil-plant selenium transfer regardless of location, soil Se level, and plant species. Among the plant families, no unambiguous trend to potential elevated Se uptake was observed. Low Se content in the soil and its plant availability was comparable to other Se-deficient areas within Europe. PMID:25975239

  12. Soil

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Bauer (USDA-ARS; )

    2006-05-23

    Soil is an example of a non-living thing. Soil contains nutrients and living organisms, but the soil itself is not alive. Soil is important in plant growth because soil gives plants a place to anchor their roots and it also provides the plant with essential nutrients.

  13. Conceptual engineered cover design for the solar evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, P.; Stenseng, S. [Parsons Environmental Services, Denver, CO (United States); Ogg, R.; Austin, M. [EG and G Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located outside of Denver, Colorado, operated several lined Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP) from 1953 until 1986 for the disposal of liquid radioactive and hazardous waste. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has signed an Interagency Agreement with the Colorado Department of Health and the US Environmental Protection Agency, agreeing to close the SEP through an Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action accelerated program. The DOE is considered an alternative: to consolidate contaminated liner materials, debris, and soil media under an engineered cover. The regulatory agencies may approve this alternative if DOE demonstrates that it would protect human health and the environment for a 1,000-yr period as required by the Colorado hazardous landfill siting regulations. The DOE utilized research results from the Hanford and Los Alamos sites to design an engineered cover for the SEP that would fulfill the regulatory requirements. This paper presents the conceptual design of the engineered cover.

  14. Characterization of landfill gas composition at the Fresh Kills municipal solid-waste landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

    1998-01-01

    The most common disposal method in the US for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. Until recently, air emissions from these landfills were not regulated. Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and\\/or measurements. This paper

  15. Gaseous methyl- and inorganic mercury in landfill gas from landfills in Florida, Minnesota, Delaware, and California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Lindberg; G. Southworth; E. M. Prestbo; D. Wallschläger; M. A. Bogle; J. Price

    2005-01-01

    Municipal waste landfills contain numerous sources of mercury which could be emitted to the atmosphere. Their generation of methane by anaerobic bacteria suggests that landfills may act as bioreactors for methylated mercury compounds. Since our previous study at a single Florida landfill, gaseous inorganic and methylated mercury species have now been identified and quantified in landfill gas at nine additional

  16. Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.

    1999-07-28

    This report summarizes the performance of the Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test data, an evaluation of applicability, conclusions, recommendations, and related information for implementation of this remediation technology at the SRS Sanitary Landfill.

  17. Long-Range Radar Station and Landfill

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This oblique aerial photograph from 2006 shows the Barter Island long-range radar station landfill threatened by coastal erosion. The landfill was subsequently relocated further inland, however, the coastal bluffs continue to retreat. ...

  18. Acceleration of landfill stabilization using leachate recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, T.G.; Miller, W.L.; Lee, H.J.; Earle, J.F.K. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A leachate recycle system was constructed and operated at an existing lined landfill in North-Central Florida to observe the effects of leachate recycle on landfill stabilization. Samples of leachate, landfill gas, and landfilled solid waste were collected and analyzed throughout a four-year period, before and after the start of leachate recycle. The settlement of landfilled waste was also measured in wetted and dry areas of the landfill. Leachate quality was not dramatically impacted by leachate recycle. Moisture content was significantly greater in the area of the landfill subjected to leachate recycle. Waste temperature and pH measurements indicated that conditions suitable for anaerobic decomposition were present in both the treated and untreated areas. Measurements of solid waste biochemical methane potential and subsidence showed that a greater degree of landfill stabilization had occurred in the leachate recycle area relative to the untreated area.

  19. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock-581-3468 Garfield City of Enid Landfill 580-249-4917 Garvin Foster Waste Disposal Landfill 405-238-2012 Jackson City American Environmental Landfill 918-245-7786 Call ahead Pontotoc City of Ada Municipal Landfill 580

  20. Health assessment for Red Penn Sanitation Co. Inc. , Landfill Peewee Valley, Kentucky, Region 4. CERCLIS No. KYD981469794. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-14

    The Red Penn Sanitation Co., Inc., Landfill, located in Oldham County, Kentucky, near the town of Peewee Valley, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an Update 7 site. The site covers 150 acres. A site investigation, conducted in 1986 as part of the NPL nomination protocol, identified heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the wastes, soils, sediments, groundwater, and surface water. On the basis of the information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has concluded that this site is of potential health concern because humans may be exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects.

  1. Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is a diverse natural material characterized by solid, liquid, and gas phases that impart unique chemical, physical, and biological properties. Soil provides many key functions, including supporting plant growth and providing environmental remediation. Monitoring key soil properties and processe...

  2. Woody plant roots fail to penetrate a clay-lined landfill: Managment implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    In many locations, regulatory agencies do not permit tree planting above landfills that are sealed with a capping clay, because roots might penetrate the clay barrier and expose landfill contents to leaching. We find, however, no empirical or theoretical basis for this restriction, and instead hypothesize that plant roots of any kind are incapable of penetrating the dense clays used to seal landfills. As a test, we excavated 30 trees and shrubs, of 12 species, growing over a clay-lined municipal sanitary landfill on Staten Island, New York. The landfill had been closed for seven years, and featured a very shallow (10 to 30-cm) soil layer over a 45-cm layer of compacted grey marl (Woodbury series) clay. The test plants had invaded naturally from nearby forests. All plants examined—including trees as tall as 6 m—had extremely shallow root plates, with deformed tap roots that grew entirely above and parallel to the clay layer. Only occasional stubby feeder roots were found in the top 1 cm of clay, and in clay cracks at depths to 6 cm, indicating that the primary impediment to root growth was physical, although both clay and the overlying soil were highly acidic. These results, if confirmed by experimental research should lead to increased options for the end use of many closed sanitary landfills.

  3. Field measurement of seepage and evapotranspiration rate for a soil under plant cover: A comparison of soil water balance and tritium labeling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, K.; Strebel, O.; Renger, M.

    1980-08-01

    Vertical water flux at 90 cm depth and evapotranspiration were measured in a loess Parabraunerde soil profile, under spring wheat and sugar beets, respectively, during a time period of nearly 21 months. Two field methods were compared: the HTO-tracer method (labeling soil water at a depth of 60 cm followed by core sampling) and the soil water balance method (measuring soil water suction and water content as a function of depth and time). Outside the vegetation season the results of the two methods agreed well, but not during the vegetation season. The reason is that the reference soil compartment, with its reference depth of 90 cm, lies within the root zone and the HTO-method does not correctly reflect the water flux through the roots and the water withdrawal by the roots from this reference compartment. It is shown, that after correcting the HTO-values for these root-activity-dependent effects, a good agreement between the two methods was found also during periods with root activity. Investigations with the HTO-method lead to inaccurate results if the reference depth or the median value of the tracer distribution lie within the zone of active roots.

  4. A simulation study of the effects of land cover and crop type on sensing soil moisture with an orbital C-band radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, M. C.; Ulaby, F. T.; Moezzi, S.; Roth, E.

    1983-01-01

    Simulated C-band radar imagery for a 124-km by 108-km test site in eastern Kansas is used to classify soil moisture. Simulated radar resolutions are 100 m by 100 m, 1 km by 1 km, and 3 km by 3 km, and each is processed using more than 23 independent samples. Moisture classification errors are examined as a function of land-cover distribution, field-size distribution, and local topographic relief for the full test site and also for subregions of cropland, urban areas, woodland, and pasture/rangeland. Results show that a radar resolution of 100 m by 100 m yields the most robust classification accuracies.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of the GEMS soil organic carbon model to land cover land use classification uncertainties under different climate scenarios in senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieye, A. M.; Roy, D. P.; Hanan, N. P.; Liu, S.; Hansen, M.; Touré, A.

    2012-02-01

    Spatially explicit land cover land use (LCLU) change information is needed to drive biogeochemical models that simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. Such information is increasingly being mapped using remotely sensed satellite data with classification schemes and uncertainties constrained by the sensing system, classification algorithms and land cover schemes. In this study, automated LCLU classification of multi-temporal Landsat satellite data were used to assess the sensitivity of SOC modeled by the Global Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). The GEMS was run for an area of 1560 km2 in Senegal under three climate change scenarios with LCLU maps generated using different Landsat classification approaches. This research provides a method to estimate the variability of SOC, specifically the SOC uncertainty due to satellite classification errors, which we show is dependent not only on the LCLU classification errors but also on where the LCLU classes occur relative to the other GEMS model inputs.

  6. [Pathways of mercury emissions to atmosphere from closed municipal landfills].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Gen; Feng, Xin-Bin; Tang, Shun-Lin; Wang, Shao-Feng

    2006-01-01

    Using the automated mercury vapor analyzer and dynamic flux chamber (DFC) method, the pathways of mercury emissions to atmosphere were measured at a closed landfill in Wuhan, China. The results show that the mainly pathway is by the surface cover, and emissions from vent pipes is negligible. Average Hg fluxes during the observation period was (192.5 +/- 245.3) ng x (m2 x h)(-1), which was 1 - 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from background zone. Hg flux exhibited a clearly diurnal pattern, reaching the maximum near midday and the lowest during night. Solar radiation was the environmental factor that has highest relationship with Hg flux, with coefficient of 0.77, this indicated that photo-reduction of Hg(II) being a prominent process in the production of volatile elemental mercury (Hg(0)). Mercury concentrations in landfill gas (LFG) at different vent pipes averaged from 7.0 - 68.9 ng x m(-3), which was much lower than that of operational landfills, and the flow rate of landfill gas was very slow. PMID:16599114

  7. Organic compounds in municipal landfill leachates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Paxéus

    2000-01-01

    Leachates from three municipal landfills in the Göteborg area of western Sweden were characterised in terms of their content of individual organic compounds. Two of the investigated landfills were still in use during the time of this study. The third landfill was closed down in the mid-seventies. More than 200 individual organic compounds and classes of compounds were identified in

  8. FIELD VERIFICATION OF HELP MODEL FOR LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term simulations of 17 landfill cells from six sites are performed using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer model. esults are compared with field data from a variety of landfills to verify the model and to identify shortcomings. he sites are lo...

  9. APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING GLOBAL LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an overview of available country-specific data and modeling approaches for estimating global landfill methane. Current estimates of global landfill methane indicate that landfills account for between 4 and 15% of the global methane budget. The report describes an ap...

  10. The decomposition of forest products in landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Micales; K. E. Skog

    1997-01-01

    Large quantities of forest products are disposed of in landfills annually. The fate of this vast pool of carbon is important since carbon sequestration and the generation of landfill gases have important implications for global warming. Published estimates of methane yields were used to estimate the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from landfilled forest products. These calculations suggest

  11. Landfill alternative offers powerful case.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    With many of Europe's landfill sites now close to capacity, and the EU Landfill Directive requiring that, by 2020, the amount of waste sent to landfill should be just 35% of the volume similarly disposed of in 1995, pressure is mounting to find environmentally acceptable waste disposal alternatives. At a recent IHEEM waste seminar, Gary Connelly, a technical consultant at environmental technology consultancy the Cameron Corporation, described a technology which he explained can effectively convert 85% of the European Waste Catalogue of materials into an inert residue, is "cleaner and cheaper" than incineration, and can generate both electricity an waste heat. As HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports, a key target market is healthcare facilities. PMID:21585140

  12. A performance-based system for the long-term management of municipal waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-04-01

    Landfills have been the dominant alternative for disposal of solid waste and there are tens of thousands of closed landfills throughout the world that require a long-term management strategy. In contrast to approaches based on time or target values, this paper describes a performance-based methodology for evaluation of post-closure care (PCC). Using the methodology, critical components of PCC at a landfill, including leachate and gas management, groundwater monitoring and cover integrity, are considered to determine whether a landfill meets defined conditions for functional stability and can transition from regulated PCC to a post-regulatory custodial care program representing de minimus care activities only. The methodology is predicated on understanding the biological, chemical, and physical behavior of a landfill and the presence of sufficient data to verify expected trends in landfill behavior. If an evaluation suggests that a change can be made to PCC, the landfill owner must perform confirmation monitoring and then surveillance monitoring at a decreasing frequency to verify that the change is protective of human health and the environment. A hypothetical case study showed that using the methodology to evaluate site-specific PCC requirements could result in increased environmental protection at comparable cost by spending available funds where they are most needed. PMID:21186115

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Syosset Landfill, Nassau County, Syosset, NY. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-27

    The 35-acre Syosset Landfill site is a closed municipal landfill in Syosset, Oyster Bay, New York. From 1933 to 1975, commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, and agricultural wastes, sludge, and ash were disposed of in the onsite landfill. Typical wastes included heavy metals, solvents, organics, oils, sludges, and metal hydroxides. The county closed the landfill in 1975 because of suspected ground water contamination. Subsequent studies have confirmed ground water contamination beneath and downgradient of the site resulting from landfill leachate. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses source control at the site. A subsequent ROD will address onsite ground water contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; other organics; and metals including arsenic.

  14. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  15. Influences of spatial scale and soil permeability on relationships between land cover and baseflow stream nutrient concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Little Miami River (LMR) basin, dominated by agriculture, contains two geologically-distinct regions; a glaciated northern till plain with soils three times more permeable than a southern, pre-Wisconsinan drift plain. The influences of two landscape measures, percent row crop...

  16. Spatial variability of soil lipids reflects vegetation cover in a French peatland Renata Zocatellia,b,c*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the lipid fraction of the underlying soil. La Guette is a fen peatland located in Central France dominated by Sphagnum spp. and ericaceous shrubs, colonized by sedges (Molinia caerulea) and trees since the 1970s (early colonization by trees) constituted mainly by Ericaceae, Sphagnum and graminoids. The comparison

  17. EFFECTS OF COVER CROPS, COMPOST, AND MANURE AMENDMENTS ON SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN TOMATO PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial community structure was investigated in field tomato production systems that compared black polyethylene mulch to hairy vetch mulch and inorganic N to organic N. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was used. Treatments consisted of ammonium nitrate, hairy vetch cov...

  18. Improving the mining soil quality for a vegetation cover after addition of sewage sludges: inorganic ions and low-molecular-weight organic acids in the soil solution.

    PubMed

    Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Guzmán-Carrizosa, Ignacio; Fernández-Espinosa, Antonio J

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the effects of applying stabilized sewage sludge (SSL) and composted sewage sludge (CLV), at 5 and 10% to an acid mining soil. Limed soil (NCL) amended or not with SSL and CLV was incubated for 47 days. We studied the cations and organic and inorganic anions in the soil solution by means of ion chromatography. Liming led to big increases in Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) and to significant decreases in K(+), Mg(2+), NH4(+) and NO3(-). Addition of both organic amendments increased some cations (NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Na(+)) and anions (Cl(-), NO3(-) only with CLV and PO4(3-) only with SSL) and provided a greater amount of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (SSL more than CLV). Incubation led to decreases in all cations, particularly remarkable for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in SSL-10. A decrease in NH4(+) was associated with variations in NO2(-) and NO3(-) resulting from nitrification reactions. During incubation the LMWOAs content tended to decrease similarly to the cations, especially in SSL-10. Chemometric tools revealed a clear discrimination between SSL, CLV and NCL. Furthermore, treatment effects depended upon dose, mainly in SSL. Amendment nature and dose affect the quality of a mining soil and improve conditions for plant establishment. PMID:25506677

  19. Cover crops as a gateway to greater conservation in Iowa?: Integrating crop models, field trials, economics and farmer perspectives regarding soil resilience in light of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesch-McNally, G. E.; Basche, A.; Tyndall, J.; Arbuckle, J. G.; Miguez, F.; Bowman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists predict a number of climate changes for the US Midwest with expected declines in crop productivity as well as eco-hydrological impacts. More frequent extreme rain events particularly in the spring may well increase saturated soils thus complicating agronomic interests and also exacerbate watershed scale impairments (e.g., sediment, nutrient loss). In order to build more resilient production systems in light of climate change, farmers will increasingly need to implement conservation practices (singularly or more likely in combination) that enable farmers to manage profitable businesses yet mitigate consequential environmental impacts that have both in-field and off-farm implications. Cover crops are empirically known to promote many aspects of soil and water health yet even the most aggressive recent estimates show that only 1-2% of the total acreage in Iowa have been planted to cover crops. In order to better understand why farmers are reluctant to adopt cover crops across Iowa we combined agronomic and financial data from long-term field trials, working farm trials and model simulations so as to present comprehensive data-driven information to farmers in focus group discussions in order to understand existing barriers, perceived benefits and responses to the information presented. Four focus groups (n=29) were conducted across Iowa in four geographic regions. Focus group discussions help explore the nuance of farmers' responses to modeling outputs and their real-life agronomic realities, thus shedding light on the social and psychological barriers with cover crop utilization. Among the key insights gained, comprehensive data-driven research can influence farmer perspectives on potential cover crop impacts to cash crop yields, experienced costs are potentially quite variable, and having field/farm benefits articulated in economic terms are extremely important when farmers weigh the opportunity costs associated with adopting new practices. Our work represents multidisciplinary collaboration necessary to gain greater understanding of what it will take for farmers to cover the ground to prevent erosion and nutrient losses in the context of a changing climate.

  20. Establishment of a successional oldfield on a capped hazardous waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Young, W. [Restoration Partners, Lansdale, PA (United States); [Restoration Partners, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Bayer Corporation recently closed a 100-year old pigment manufacturing facility in Haledon, New Jersey. All buildings associated with the production portion of the site were demolished and due to subsurface contamination by a number of volatile organics, 12 acres of the site were capped in accordance with the strictest regulations that could be imposed. Rather than paving or installing turf grass on the cap, the cover was designed to simulate a northeastern successional oldfield. Criteria for selection of plants included: native, ability to survive with little maintenance (no irrigation), highly reproductive (i.e., early fruiting and/or clonal growth to expand the planting), high diversity, varying age and size for more diverse habitat structure, and aesthetics. The design emphasized the use of native warm season grasses and perennial wildflowers for year-round interest. It also included the use of tree/shrub islands or fingers between sampling wells within the main meadow to obscure the landfill mound, the use of problem soils and waste products for soil building to save the cost of topsoil, and the use of coir fabrics for erosion control. After establishment, the meadow will require only annual mowing and will ultimately provide an educational and aesthetic amenity to the Borough.

  1. Soils

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pamela Gore

    1995-08-29

    The purpose of the handout is to identify the three major types of soils: pedalfer, pedocal, and laterite, and to understand the soil profile. This is accomplished with brief descriptions of the soil horizons and the designation of common elements to pedalfers, pedocals, and laterite soils. The handout is concluded with a discussion of soil erosion. Links are provided to the online Physical Geology resources at Georgia Perimeter College.

  2. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  3. INVERSE AND DIRECT MODELING ASSESSMENT OF SOIL FLOW AND LEACHING CHANGES INTRODUCED BY A SUMMER COVER CROP IN SOUTH FLORIDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to measure impacts of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) production under South Florida’s subtropical conditions on groundwater quality and to determine the extent to which these impacts may be reduced by use of the leguminous summer cover crop sunn-hemp (Crotalaria juncea) as a potent...

  4. Impacts of landfill New Source Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, W.G.; McGuigan, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    On May 30, 1991, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a Rule to control landfill gas (LFG) emissions under the authority of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Since that time the Rule has been modified significantly, with an emphasis on regulating large US landfills. To date, landfill owners and operators have not been affected by this new CAA regulation. However, with the Rule promulgated in early 1996 and its subsequent implementation by the states to follow by the end of the year, landfill owners and operators need to understand these new requirements and their associated costs. To this end, the goal of this paper is to provide insight into the impacts of the Rule on individual landfill sites. By performing the emission analyses specified in the Rule on actual landfills, and comparing these sites to others, an understanding can be gained on the potential impacts of the NSPS Rule`s requirements on individual landfills.

  5. FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 5. COUNTIES: HILLSBOROUGH, HOLMES, INDIAN RIVER, JACKSON, JEFFERSON, LAFAYETTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

  6. The Current Use of Remote-Sensing Data in Peat, Soil, Land-Cover and Crop Inventories in Scotland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Stove

    1983-01-01

    The remote-sensing methodology developed, at the Macaulay Institute, for natural resource surveys is introduced and some recent mapping and environmental monitoring projects are reviewed. These include peat resource and peatland vegetation mapping in Lewis and North Harris, crop monitoring in Kincardineshire and land-cover mapping in the Buchan Area of Grampian Region, NE Scotland. The current use of remote-sensing data by

  7. Dynamic response analysis procedure for landfills with geosynthetic liners

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, M.K.; Harb, J.N.; Kadakal, U. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1998-10-01

    The dynamic response of geosynthetic interfaces commonly encountered in municipal solid waste landfills were investigated using a shaking table facility. The force-slip relationships for the tested interfaces showed almost rigid and then plastic deformation where the maximum shear force transmitted through the interface increases slightly with increasing slip. The force-slip relationships were modeled with equivalent stiffness and damping ratios. These equivalent parameters were established as a function of slip displacements to account for the nonlinear behavior of the interfaces. Using the equivalent stiffness and damping, the dynamic properties of an equivalent soil layer were established such that the dynamic response of the equivalent soil layer is similar to that of the geosynthetic interface it represents. The purpose of this representation was to allow the modeling of geosynthetic interfaces in wave propagation analysis, such as SHAKE analysis. The properties of the equivalent soil layer were validated by comparing the measured dynamic response of a rigid block placed on geosynthetics with that computed using the SHAKEW program and the properties of the equivalent soil layer developed. A procedure for analysis of the dynamic response of landfills with geosynthetic liners is proposed.

  8. In situ denitrification in controlled landfill systems

    SciTech Connect

    Onay, T.T.; Pohland, F.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfill disposal sites vary according to the operational stage of the landfill. Leachates from old landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable refuse substrates. The relative concentration accumulating as stabilization progresses is also influenced by washout as leachate is collected and removed for external treatment. However, in landfills operated as bioreactors with leachate containment, collection and in situ recirculation to accelerate decomposition of readily available organic fractions of the refuse, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to much higher levels. High leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations in landfill leachate have been reported, resulting in separate treatment challenges if direct discharge to either land or receiving waters is practiced. External treatment options for landfill leachate may involve complex physical-chemical and/or biological processes for removal of both high-strength organic and inorganic fractions, including nitrogen. Such separate leachate treatment systems are often costly and difficult to control on a continuum. Therefore, this study focused on the investigation of landfill ammonia nitrogen generation patterns, and the potential for its in situ attenuation and conversion in landfills constructed to permit sequential nitrification and denitrification using leachate recirculation. Accordingly, the landfill is constructed and operated as a controlled bioreactor system, with opportunity to convert ammonia to nitrate by nitrification and nitrate to nitrogen gas by denitrification. The results presented in this paper focus on in situ landfill denitrification of nitrified ammonia.

  9. Relationships between climate, soil moisture and phenology of the woody cover in two sites located along the West African latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghieri, Josiane; Vescovo, Aude; Padel, Karine; Soubie, Remy; Arjounin, Marc; Boulain, Nicolas; de Rosnay, Patricia; Galle, Sylvie; Gosset, Marielle; Mouctar, Abakar H.; Peugeot, Christophe; Timouk, Franck

    2009-08-01

    SummaryThe study quantifies the relationships at local scale between phenology and determinants of climate and soil water resources at two sites located along the latitudinal gradient of West Africa, one in the central Sahel (Mali), the other in the Sudanian bioclimatic zone (Benin). The aim is to improve our knowledge on possible vegetation response to possible climate change. Within the Sudanian site, average annual rainfall is 1200 mm, extending from April to October, while, in the Sahelian site, it is 370 mm, occurring from June to September. Physical data were collected from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis research programme. The phenology of the dominant species was monitored in four types of vegetation cover at the wetter site, and in three types of vegetation cover at the drier site. For each sampled plant, leafing, flowering and fruiting were recorded as binary variables in terms of the presence/absence of phenophases. A small proportion of the variability of each phenophase occurrence is explained by the logit models. However, rainfall rise is significantly linked to leafing probability increase in the Sahelian site but not in the Sudanian site. Day length extension and temperature decrease are significantly correlated with an increase in leafing in the Sudanian site, but not in the Sahelian. On both sites, the increase in cumulative rainfall is not found to be linked to an increased probability of reproductive phenophases (negative or non-significant relationships). Air temperature is positively correlated with flowering rate in the Sudanian site, but, all other factors being constant, no climate factors are found to be highly significant of flowering occurrence in the Sahel. Fruiting probability is positively correlated mainly with temperature within the Sahelian site. Leafing occurrence is positively correlated with soil moisture in the 0-1 m layer for the Sudanian site, but not for the Sahelian site. Significant relationships between fruiting occurrence and soil moisture may reflect a prior selection of plants on fruiting period that maximizes seed dispersion and germination differently at the two sites. While vegetative and reproduction schedules may be determined by specific genetic factors, the physical environment controls the possibility of their expression. Reduction of the rainfall amount and intensity may increase reproduction rates in wet areas. Although this factor should decrease leafing rate, it does not influence reproduction at dry sites, except through the decrease in air humidity. In wetter areas, increasing temperature may reduce leafing, but may increase reproduction rates. Cover reduction may have an impact on local physical factors and, consequently, probably also affects vegetation phenology.

  10. Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (?13C and ?D Py-CSIA) of soil organic matter size fractions under four vegetation covers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Almendros, Gonzalo; De la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    A chemical characterization of soil organic matter (SOM) under different ground cover from a Mediterranean climate (Doñana National Park, Andalusia, Spain) is approached using bulk ?15N, ?13C, ?18O and ?D isotopic analysis (C/TC-IRMS) and ?13C and ?D pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA: Py-GC-C/TC-IRMS). Soil samples were collected in sandy soils, Arenosols (WRB 2006) from the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) under different vegetation cover: cork oak (Quercus suber, QS), eagle fern (Pteridium aquilinum, PA), pine (Pinus pinea, PP) and rockrose (Halimium halimifolium, HH). Two size fractions; coarse (C: 1-2 mm) and fine (F: <0.05 mm) were studied from each soil. A complete conventional analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) of these samples have been studied in detail (Jiménez-Morillo et al., 2015). Bulk isotopic analysis of stable light elements (?15N, ?13C, ?18O and ?D) revealed particular isotopic signatures showing differences related with the main vegetation cover and the different soil size fraction. All samples had a carbon isotopic signature between ?26 and ?29 ‰, which indicated that the organic matter in the two fractions of each soil sample derived from C3-type plants. The bulk ?D isotopic signature in whole soil sample indicate a lower deuterium fractionation occurs in SOM under arboreal than under no-arboreal vegetation, this can be caused by the occurrence of a higher water evaporation rate under bush vegetation and/or to differences due to leaf morphology as previously described (Leaney et al., 1985). A ?15N vs. ?18O chart may provide some clues about N origin in the soil and particularly about the original source of nitrates (Kendall et al., 1996). In in all sample and size fractions our values are in the chart area corresponding to NO3 in precipitation, with lighter ?18O (c. 20 ‰) values compatible with fertilizers may be from adjacent crops. In addition we were able to assign ?13C and ?D values for a number of specific SOM compounds released directly from pyrolysis (Py-CSIA); lipids (Alkenes), aromatic unspecific (alkylphenols), lignin (methoxyphenols) and polysaccharides (anhydrosugars) derived molecules. For all coarse fractions the ?13C and ?D values had the same general behavior with sugar derived molecules being enriched in the heavy isotope. Regarding alkenes ?13C isotopic signature, this was variable and dependent upon the main cover vegetation that may reflect different fractionations at different synthesis stages (Chikaraishi & Naraoka, 2001), The ?D values for specific compounds had a similar behavior to that for ?13C, being the sugar derived compounds the most deuterium enriched in comparison with lipid and lignin derived pyrolysis products. A conspicuous ?D fractionation was observed for the sugar derived compounds in the fine fractions as compared with the coarse ones, with a depletion in deuterium, mainly for the PA sample where the depletion was the highest (c. ?140 ‰). This may points to the occurrence of biological reworking with a higher microbiological activity fixing the lighter isotope in the soil fine organic fractions. It is known that lipid hydrogen is deuterium depleted relative to bulk organic hydrogen (Smith and Epstein, 1970). In line with this, in our study the lipid derived compounds had the largest deuterium depleted signature with a difference between bulk and lipid ?D values was c. ?35‰. This fractionation was highest in Pine (PP) and Rockrose (HH). The combination of traditional techniques for the study of SOM i.e. Py-GC/MS and IRMS, with new hyphenated analytical pyrolysis techniques i.e. Py-CSIA opens new possibilities and windows of information in SOM research. Our findings points to the occurrence of more or less complex processes that affects SOM chemical characteristics; whereas the coarse fraction resembles the chemical structure of the above vegetation, this SOM "memory" is less defined in the fine fractions, probably due to biologically mediated chemical conversions, additions and selective

  11. Pricing landfill externalities: Emissions and disamenity costs in Cape Town, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Nahman, Anton, E-mail: anahman@csir.co.za [Environmental and Resource Economics Group, Natural Resources and the Environment, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 320, Stellenbosch 7599 (South Africa)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > The paper estimates landfill externalities associated with emissions, disamenities and transport. > Transport externalities vary from 24.22 to 31.42 Rands per tonne. > Costs of emissions (estimated using benefits transfer) vary from 0.07 to 28.91 Rands per tonne. > Disamenities (estimated using hedonic pricing) vary from 0.00 to 57.46 Rands per tonne. > Overall, external costs for urban landfills exceed those of a regional landfill. - Abstract: The external (environmental and social) costs of landfilling (e.g. emissions to air, soil and water; and 'disamenities' such as odours and pests) are difficult to quantify in monetary terms, and are therefore not generally reflected in waste disposal charges or taken into account in decision making regarding waste management options. This results in a bias against alternatives such as recycling, which may be more expensive than landfilling from a purely financial perspective, but preferable from an environmental and social perspective. There is therefore a need to quantify external costs in monetary terms, so that different disposal options can be compared on the basis of their overall costs to society (financial plus external costs). This study attempts to estimate the external costs of landfilling in the City of Cape Town for different scenarios, using the benefits transfer method (for emissions) and the hedonic pricing method (for disamenities). Both methods (in particular the process of transferring and adjusting estimates from one study site to another) are described in detail, allowing the procedures to be replicated elsewhere. The results show that external costs are currently R111 (in South African Rands, or approximately US$16) per tonne of waste, although these could decline under a scenario in which energy is recovered, or in which the existing urban landfills are replaced with a new regional landfill.

  12. FEASIBILITY OF IN SITU SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF LANDFILLED HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the feasibility of solidifying or stabilizing hazardous industrial wastes that are already in place at a landfill. Solidification methods considered include (1) incorporating the waste into solids, (2) fusing the waste with soil, and (3) isolating the waste ...

  13. Landfill gas to electricity demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, A. J.; Cagliostro, L. A.

    1982-03-01

    Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring by product of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10 percent of the natural gas used annually in the State. The 18-month Landfill Gas to Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

  14. Tried and True: Soil is more than just dirt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carrie Taylor

    2010-04-01

    This article describes a series of activities in which students investigate soil, culminating in the biomimicry of reducing landfill waste. After students learned about soil’s ecosystem structure and the function of its food web with nutrient cycling and decomposition, they discovered that they know a solution to reduce the trash in landfills by 50% and turn “waste” into a useful resource. This was accomplished by imitating the soil food web through composting.

  15. Environmental impact of an urban landfill on a coastal aquifer (El Jadida, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chofqi, Amina; Younsi, Abedelkader; Lhadi, El Kbir; Mania, Jacky; Mudry, Jacques; Veron, Alain

    2004-06-01

    The El Jadida landfill is one among many uncontrolled dumping sites in Morocco with no bottom liner. About 150 tons/day of solid wastes from mixed urban and industrial origins are placed directly on the ground. At the site of this landfill, the groundwaters circulate deeply (10-15 m) in the Cenomanian rock (calcareous-marl), which is characterised by an important permeability from cracks. The soil is sand-clay characterized by a weak coefficient of retention. The phreatic water ascends to the bottom of three quarries, which are located within the landfill. These circumstances, along with the lack of a leachate collection system, worsen the risks for a potential deterioration of the aquifer. To evaluate groundwater pollution due to this urban landfill, piezometric level and geochemical analyses have been monitored since 1999 on 60 wells. The landfill leachate has been collected from the three quarries that are located within the landfill. The average results of geochemical analyses show an important polluant charge vehiculed by landfill leachate (chloride = 5680 mg l -1, chemical oxygen demand = 1000 mg l -1, iron = 23 000 ?g l -1). They show also an important qualitative degradation of the groundwater, especially in the parts situated in the down gradient area and in direct proximity to the landfill. In these polluted zones, we have observed the following values: higher than 4.5 mS cm -1 in electric conductivity, 1620 and 1000 mg l -1 respectively in chlorides and sulfate ( SO42-), 15-25 ?g l -1 in cadmium, and 60-100 ?g l -1 in chromium. These concentrations widely exceed the standard values for potable water. Several determining factors in the evolution of groundwater contamination have been highlighted, such as (1) depth of the water table, (2) permeability of soil and unsaturated zone, (3) effective infiltration, (4) humidity and (5) absence of a system for leachate drainage. So, to reduce the pollution risks of the groundwater, it is necessary to set a system of collection, drainage and treatment of landfill leachates and to emplace an impermeable surface at the site of landfill, in order to limit the infiltration of leachate.

  16. Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate 

    E-print Network

    Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

  17. Ecotoxicological evaluation of area 9 landfill at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge: Biological impact and residues

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, M.J.

    1992-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead were investigated in soil and biota at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge (CONWR) and related to biological effects. PCBs were rapidly mobilized from the soil into the terrestrial food chain as evidenced by high residue levels in adult beetles, caged house crickets, and white-footed mice. Bioaccumulation of lead was not observed in invertebrates, but was observed in white-footed mice. Invertebrate abundance and biomarkers were evaluated for signs of toxic response to soil contaminants. The control site and the Area 9 Landfill did not differ in abundance of five common terrestrial invertebrate families. The absence of detectable biological effects in invertebrates shows that these animals can tolerate relatively high environmental concentrations of these contaminants. The intensive use of Area 9 Landfill by invertebrates and their apparent tolerance of soil contaminants eludes to the importance of chemical transfer to higher trophic levels, especially for PCBs.

  18. Proximity of Louisiana sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats. Data on individual landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. W. Lambou; R. C. Herndon; J. E. Moerlins; R. L. Gebhard

    1989-01-01

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. This report documents the proximity of sanitary landfills included in the study in Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams, bays, etc.). The sanitary landfills were identified on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory maps. The nearness

  19. Evolution of soil and vegetation cover on the bottom of drained thermokarst lake (a case study in the European Northeast of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaverin, Dmitry; Pastukhov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of soils and landscapes has been studied in a lake bed of former thermokarst lake, which was totally drained in 1979. Melioration of thermokarst lakes was conducted experimentally and locally under Soviet economics program during 1970-s. The aim of the program was to increase in biomass productivity of virgin tundra permafrost-thermokarst sites under agricultural activities. The former thermokarst lake "Opytnoe" located in the Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Russian European Northeast. The lake bed is covered by peat-mineral sediments, which serves as soil-forming sediments favoring subsequent permafrost aggradation and cryogenic processes as well. Initially, after drainage, swampy meadows had been developed almost all over the lake bed. Further on, succession of landscape went diversely, typical and uncommon tundra landscapes formed. When activated, cryogenic processes favored the formation of peat mounds under dwarf shrub - lichen vegetation (7% of the area). Frost cracks and peat circles affected flat mounds all over the former lake bottom. On drained peat sites, with no active cryogenic processes, specific grass meadows on Cryic Sapric Histosols were developed. Totally, permafrost-affected soils occupy 77% of the area (2011). In some part of the lake bed further development of waterlogging leads to the formation of marshy meadows and willow communities where Gleysols prevail. During last twenty years, permafrost degradation has occurred under tall shrub communities, and it will progress in future. Water erosion processes in the drained lake bottom promoted the formation of local hydrographic network. In the stream floodplain grassy willow-stands formed on Fluvisols (3% of the area). The study has been conducted under Clima-East & RFBR 14-05-31111 projects.

  20. Appointment in Sonzay: Landfill gas fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Balbo, M.E. [SITA Group, Paris (France)

    1997-05-01

    The SITA Group (Paris, France) an international waste management company, wanted to research and develop a means to economically and environmentally reuse the inherent value of its landfill gas. As the owner of more than 100 landfills in France alone--both hazardous and non-hazardous--SITA felt that it had a responsibility to research innovative gas treatment and/or reuse options, particularly as public scrutiny of landfill management practices was on the rise. In a successful pilot program initiated by SITA, landfill gas was reused as biofuel for vehicles in a way that was economically viable and environmentally sound.

  1. YOU COVERED HEALTH COVER

    E-print Network

    is an amount you agree to pay toward the cost of a hospital admission ­ which in turn can help reduce your! Available on selected hospital covers. Bowel Cancer screening kits Purchase a Detectacol or Insure Bowel Cancer screening kit and you'll receive a $22.00 benefit. Simply claim your benefit by providing your

  2. Characterization and tropical seasonal variation of leachate: results from landfill lysimeter studied.

    PubMed

    Rafizul, Islam M; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to characterize the leachate and to investigate the tropical climatic influence on leachate characteristics of lysimeter studies under different seasonal variations at KUET campus, Bangladesh. Three different situations of landfill were considered here as well as both the open dump lysimeter-A having a base liner and sanitary landfill lysimeter-B and C at two different types of cap liner were simulated. The leachate characteristics, leachate generation and climatic influence parameter had been continually monitored since June 2008 to May 2010, these periods cover both the dry and rainy season. The leachate generation had followed the rainfall pattern and the open dump lysimeter-A without top cover was recorded to have highest leachate generation. Moreover, the open dump lysimeter-A had lower total kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), ammonia nitrogen (NH(4)-N) and TKN load, while both the COD concentration and load was higher compared with sanitary landfill lysimeter-B and C. In addition, sanitary landfill lysimeter-B, not only had lowest leachate generation, but also produces reasonable low COD concentration and load compared with open dump lysimeter-A. Result reveals that lysimeter operational mode had direct effect on leachate quality. Finally, it can be concluded that the knowledge of leachate quality will be useful in planning and providing remedial measures of proper liner system in sanitary landfill design and leachate treatment. PMID:22349100

  3. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

  4. Cover crops and vegetable rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have long known that winter cover crops can decrease soil erosion, increase soil organic matter and fertility, and provide a beneficial impact on the following crop, but it is not always known which cover crop will provide the best results for a specific region and cropping system. Research...

  5. Engineered Municipal Waste Landfills: Climate Significance, Benefits, and some Landfill "Geophysics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenstein, D.; Yazdani, R.

    2002-12-01

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills have unique features: Wastes worldwide emit biogenic methane to the atmosphere of magnitude comparable to the total atmospheric buildup between 1980 and 1990. Carbon sequestered in landfills is large in geologic terms Management of decomposition in landfilled waste is desirable: (a) Control of waste decomposition and methane promises over tenfold cheaper greenhouse gas abatement compared to most other greenhouse gas abatement strategies. This is due in part to carbon sequestration and landfill gas energy offset of fossil fuel consumption (b) Landfill gas energy potential worldwide, is up to 1% of world energy. Use of landfill gas conserves a resource otherwise wasted (c) Monetary benefits of landfill life extension from decomposition and rapid volume reduction can be quite attractive This is a benefit for the US, where landfills are increasingly difficult and expensive to site. (d) Landfills containing mixed waste can be significant sources of atmospheric and groundwater pollutants needing control. Control is possible from advancing landfill management approaches (e) The stabilization of waste lessens pollutant risk and needs for costly long-term landfill aftercare. Greater control of landfill decomposition has been advocated in the form of "controlled" or "bioreactor" landfills. (SWANA, 1999; Reinhart and Townsend, 1996). Field trials are encouraging by several environmental/monetary criteria. Control of moisture and temperature have given fivefold or more acceleration of methane generation (Augenstein et al, 1998, 2000). There has been rapid volume loss of the landfilled waste as well, with conversion of waste organics to gas. Many trials over years have shown potential for abatement of pollutants in landfill leachate. Demonstration work by the solid waste management community attests to the benefits potential. Increasing field demonstrations, have been accompanied by observation and/or solution of several issues. As noted the heat generation in landfills may become controlling, Heat can be dissipated, but at energy and monetary cost. Increased waste liquid content, required for biological activity has been a concern. Offsetting risk is the accelerated treatment of many dissolved contaminants in landfill liquid with time. It has proven possible to manage liquid flows within environmental and regulatory constraints. There have been concerns about containment by chemosynthetic lining of leachate liquids draining from landfills. Yet molecular bonds of lining under anaerobic conditions could be expected to last for centuries (and in fact up to millenia). There is of course no landfill experience over millenia but analogous compounds of geologic relevance have shown very desirable long term stability. Two other areas being investigated are waste slope stability and the precipitation of carbonate salts The climate significance and geophysical issues with landfills will be discussed, and some experimental findings leading to conclusions will be reviewed

  6. Proximity of Louisiana sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats. Data on individual landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. This report documents the proximity of sanitary landfills included in the study in Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams, bays, etc.). The sanitary landfills were identified on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory maps. The nearness or proximity of the sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats was determined by drawing three concentric regions around the point representing the location of each landfill. The radii of the concentric regions were: 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, and 1 mile. A companion report summarizes the statewide results. The data on individual landfills include general facility/site data and wetlands/deepwater habitat data. These facilities have the potential to adversely affect sensitive ecosystems, such as wetlands and deepwater habitats, either through habitat alterations or through the migration of contaminants from sanitary landfills.

  7. Development of a qualitative pathogen risk-assessment methodology for municipal-sludge landfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report addresses potential risks from microbiological pathogens present in municipal sludge disposal in landfills. Municipal sludges contain a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminths, and fungi. Survival characteristics of pathogens are critical factors in assessing the risks associated with potential transport of microorganisms from the sludge-soil matrix to the ground-water environment of landfills. Various models are discussed for predicting microbial die-off. The order of persistence in the environment from longest to shortest survival time appears to be helminth eggs > viruses > bacteria > protozoan cysts. Whether or not a pathogen reaches ground-water and is transported to drinking-water wells depends on a number of factors, including initial concentration of the pathogen, survival of the pathogen, number of pathogens that reach the sludge-soil interface, degree of removal through the unsaturated and saturated-soil zones, and the hydraulic gradient. The degree to which each of these factors will influence the probability of pathogens entering ground-water cannot be determined precisely. Information on the fate of pathogens at existing landfills is sorely lacking. Additional laboratory and field studies are needed to determine the degree of pathogen leaching, survival and transport in ground-water in order to estimate potential risks from pathogens at sludge landfills with reasonable validity.

  8. Armored Geomembrane Cover Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Foye, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Geomembranes are an important component of modern engineered barriers to prevent the infiltration of stormwater and runoff into contaminated soil and rock as well as waste containment facilities—a function generally described as a geomembrane cover. This paper presents a case history involving a novel implementation of a geomembrane cover system. Due to this novelty, the design engineers needed to assemble from disparate sources the design criteria for the engineering of the cover. This paper discusses the design methodologies assembled by the engineering team. This information will aid engineers designing similar cover systems as well as environmental and public health professionals selecting site improvements that involve infiltration barriers. PMID:21776229

  9. PROCESS DESIGN MANUAL: MUNICIPAL SLUDGE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides general guidance and a source of information to be used in the planning, design, and operation of a landfill receiving municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge. Major alternative sludge landfilling methods are identified and described. Guidance is given on...

  10. Landfill leachate treatment: Review and opportunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Renou; J. G. Givaudan; S. Poulain; F. Dirassouyan; P. Moulin

    2008-01-01

    In most countries, sanitary landfilling is nowadays the most common way to eliminate municipal solid wastes (MSW). In spite of many advantages, generation of heavily polluted leachates, presenting significant variations in both volumetric flow and chemical composition, constitutes a major drawback. Year after year, the recognition of landfill leachate impact on environment has forced authorities to fix more and more

  11. LANDFILL GAS PRETREATMENT FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the U.S. EPA's program, underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation, to demonstrate landfill methane control and the fuel cell energy recovery concept. In this program, two critical issues are being addressed: (1) a landfill gas cleanup method that would ...

  12. LANDFILL GAS AND THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper is an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. There appears to be a consensus in the international co...

  13. SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION

    E-print Network

    #12;SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN DOE FRAP 1997-07\\TOC.DOC SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS.0 POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES 6-1 6.1 Pollution Prevention Opportunities 6-1 6.2 P2 Options Screening

  14. Enhancement of methane production and bio-stabilisation of municipal solid waste in anaerobic bioreactor landfill.

    PubMed

    Mali Sandip, T; Khare Kanchan, C; Biradar Ashok, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the experiment was to enhance biodegradation and methane production of municipal solid waste (MSW). Two groups of simulated anaerobic bioreactor landfill were used; one group of mixed MSW with three bioreactors (R1, R2 and R3) and second group was compostable MSW with two bioreactors (R4 and R5). The different combinations of operational parameters were aeration with addition of aerobic microbial culture, anaerobic sludge, coarse gravel mixing, intermediate soil cover and varied leachate recirculation rate. The results observed at the end of 270days prevail that the process combination of above operational parameters adopted in compostable MSW bioreactor was more efficient approach for stabilization of MSW. It has accelerated the methane production rate (141.28Lkg(-1)dry waste) by 25%. It was also observed that the degradation time of MSW was reduced by 25% compared to maximum values quoted in the literature. The nonlinear regression of the cumulative biogas production and digestion time shows that Gompertz growth equation fits the results well. PMID:22342079

  15. Soil physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jury, W.A.; Gardner, W.H.; Gardner, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    In response to shifting research interests, this 5th edition book has been prepared to present contemporary information on traditional as well as current soil physics topics. Soil solid phase and soil dynamics have been reduced from 5 chapters in the previous edition to a single chapter here. Wind and water erosion have been eliminated. Information concerning transport of heat, water and chemicals has been expanded. Soil water relations, thermal regime aeration, solute transport and spatial variations of soil properties are well covered.

  16. Health assessment for Jones Industrial Services (JIS) landfill, South Brunswick Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD097400998 (amended June 10, 1991). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-10

    The Jones Industrial Landfill site began as a 33 acre pit that had been excavated to provide soil needed during the construction of the New Jersey Turnpike. Landfilling operations reportedly began in 1955. In the 1960's, as part of the landfilling operation, toxic chemicals were dumped into the pit. The site is currently ranked 45 of 110 Superfund sites in New Jersey. The primary pathway of concern is the domestic use of contaminated groundwater. Residents near the JIS landfill have experienced contamination of their well water since 1975. On the basis of the information reviewed, ATSDR and NJDOH have concluded that the site is of public health concern because humans have probably been exposed to VOCs, heavy metals, phthalates and pesticides at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. The Jones Industrial Services Landfill site is being considered for appropriate follow-up health study and evaluation.

  17. Benthic macroinvertebrate and periphyton community responses to a complex mixture in landfill leachate seep discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.A.; Kusnier, J. Jr. [Midwest Environmental Consultants, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States); Lowe, R.L. [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Typically, the composition of sanitary landfill leachate is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals. The existence of landfill facilities which operated prior to current solid waste disposal regulations, has resulted in the need for evaluation of potential risks/hazards to the environment, due to leaching of this complex mixture of contaminants to surface and/or subsurface media. Evaluation an a chemical specific basis is tedious at best, and gives little information about the effects of the mixture of chemicals present. Therefore, an evaluation of in-situ community response was conducted. This paper focuses on the response of the macroinvertebrate and periphyton communities, in terms of dominant taxa and community structure, in a small pond adjacent to a former sanitary landfill facility, which receives leachate seep discharge via groundwater flow from an unconfined aquifer. The pond, created during use of the landfill, is actually an area where cover material was obtained for landfill construction. Macroinvertebrate and periphyton community structure was assessed at three shallow, sandy locations in the pond, at varying distances from the areas of known leachate seeps. General water quality and laboratory toxicity testing with Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Chironomus tentans was also conducted using ambient water and sediment from the three locations. Differences between locations are distinct in both the periphyton and macroinvertebrate communities, and in the results of the aquatic toxicity testing. No difference between locations was observed, however, in terms of toxicity testing with chironomids.

  18. Design document for landfill capping Prototype Decision Support System. Draft 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.J.; Paige, G.; Hakonson, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lane, L.J. [USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, AZ (United State)

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of the Prototype Decision Support System for shallow land burial project is to ``Develop a Decision Support System tool which incorporates simulation modeling and multi-objective decision theory for the purpose of designing and evaluating alternative trench cap designs for mixed waste landfill covers. The goal is to improve the quality of technical information used by the risk manager to select landfill cover designs while taking into account technological, economical, and regulatory factors.`` The complexity of the technical and non-technical information, and how the information varies in importance across sites, points to the need for decision analysis tools that provide a common basis for integrating, synthesizing, and valuing the decision input. Because the cost of remediating thousands of contaminated DOE sites is projected to be in the 10`s--100`s of billions of dollars, methods will be needed to establish cleanup priorities and to help in the selection and evaluation of cost effective remediation alternatives. Even at this early stage in DOE`s cleanup program, it is certain that capping technologies will be heavily relied upon to remediate the 3000+ landfills on DOE property. Capping is favored in remediating most DOE landfills because, based on preliminary baseline risk assessments, human and ecological risks are considered to be low at most of these sites and the regulatory requirements for final closure of old landfills can be met using a well designed cap to isolate the buried waste. This report describes a program plan to design, develop, and test a decision support system (DSS) for assisting the DOE risk manager in evaluating capping alternatives for radioactive and hazardous waste landfills. The DOE DSS will incorporate methods for calculating, integrating and valuing technical, regulatory, and economic criteria.

  19. Electrochemical oxidation for landfill leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yang [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, McArthur Building, Room 325, 1251 Memorial Dr., University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)], E-mail: dengyang7@yahoo.com; Englehardt, James D. [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, McArthur Building, Room 325, 1251 Memorial Dr., University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper aims at providing an overview of electrochemical oxidation processes used for treatment of landfill leachate. The typical characteristics of landfill leachate are briefly reviewed, and the reactor designs used for electro-oxidation of leachate are summarized. Electrochemical oxidation can significantly reduce concentrations of organic contaminants, ammonia, and color in leachate. Pretreatment methods, anode materials, pH, current density, chloride concentration, and other additional electrolytes can considerably influence performance. Although high energy consumption and potential chlorinated organics formation may limit its application, electrochemical oxidation is a promising and powerful technology for treatment of landfill leachate.

  20. Reverse osmosis module successfully treats landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    By law, modern landfills are to be constructed with double liners to prevent contaminants from leaching into surface and ground water. Despite this design feature, however, both hazardous and non-hazardous compounds do leach from the waste disposed in landfills. The resulting contaminated water, or leachate, must be collected and treated. Rochem Environmental, Inc. (Houston, Texas) has developed a new membrane process, known as the Disc Tube{trademark} system, to remove a variety of contaminants from landfill leachate. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Implementation guide for landfill gas utilization

    SciTech Connect

    McGuigan, M.J.; Conrad, E.T. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Handley, R.L. [Northeast Regional Biomass Program, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The technology for recovering and converting landfill gas (LFG) to energy has been known for sometime, and implementation of projects have been occurring over the past 15 years. This paper describes the evolution of LFG utilization development, the barriers that exist for this form of biomass, and technical and economic factors regarding LFG utilization. The basis of this paper is the authors` experience in successful and unsuccessful LFG projects and two projects sponsored by NRBP: (1) Implementation Guide to Landfill Gas Recovery in the Northeast and, (2) Comparative Analysis of Landfill Gas Utilization Technologies. This paper presents the findings of the first study and an introduction to the second study.

  2. Estimation of VOC emissions at petroleum-contaminated soil treatment and disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, B.L. [Chesapeake Environmental Group, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States); Gunkel, K. [Wildwood Environmental Engineering Consultants, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Federal and State standards have been developed for calculating potential emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the disposal or treatment of soils contaminated with petroleum products. States are the primary permitting authority for this emission source. States also have primary responsibility for implementing the Corrective Action provisions of the federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. UST Corrective Actions account for a large portion of the petroleum-contaminated soils (PCS) taken by the treatment and disposal facilities. The States` desire for cost-effective disposal or treatment of soils contaminated with petroleum products often conflicts with Federal and State regulations that limit the release of pollutants into the air. Currently there are several different types of facilities in operation that treat the contaminants contained in the soil. Additionally, landfilling or use of PCS as daily cover at landfills continues to be widely practiced. US EPA`s Office of Air (OAR) has standardized emission factors for determining a facility`s potential to emit based primarily on the vapor pressure and concentration of VOC in the contaminated soil. The conflict between the OAR and OSW requirements and a State`s regulations is illustrated by the way emissions are calculated for off-site commercial PCS treatment facilities and solid waste landfills. VOC emission controls may be needed at facilities that use bioremediation and cold-mixing as the treatment technology, but are rarely required. This paper reviews current literature concerning VOC losses during off-site treatment or disposal. The paper also examines the US EPA`s recommended emission factors and calculation methods for off-site PCS treatment and disposal facilities. The paper then cites as examples facilities that are using uncontrolled VOC volatilization as a primary treatment method.

  3. Stability monitoring system for the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, T.G.; Khoury, M.A.; Rosenfarb, J.L.; Napolitano, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, New York, serves as the repository of all municipal solid waste from the five boroughs of New York City. Because of the existence of compressible soils under most of the filling areas and the urban environment surrounding the landfill, considerable importance is being placed on the relationship between filling operations and the stability of the landfill. As a result of this concern and to address Order on Consent requirements, a program of geotechnical site characterizations, stability analyses, and design and implementation of a geotechnical instrumentation program was undertaken. Geotechnical instruments have been installed within the refuse fill and foundation soils to monitor both the magnitude and rate of change of pore pressure, lateral and vertical movements, and temperature. This paper presents an overview of the subsurface conditions, the overall instrumentation plan for assessing the landfill stability, a description of the various instruments, the performance of these instruments to date, an overview of the collected measurements, and a description of how these measurements are used to monitor the stability.

  4. Zinc Requirements of Tropical Legume Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soils are deficient in essential plant nutrients, including zinc (Zn). Using cover crops in cropping systems is an important option to improve soil fertility for sustainable crop production. However, success of cover crops in highly weathered tropical infertile acid soils is greatly influen...

  5. Public health assessment for Sayreville Landfill, Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980505754. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-16

    The Sayreville Landfill site, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey, was used primarily for the disposal of municipal wastes from 1970 through 1977. Illegal dumping of possibly hazardous materials allegedly occurred during active landfill operations and after landfill closure. Organic and inorganic compounds were found in on-site subsurface soil, ground water, surface water, and sediments at levels above public health assessment comparison values. The community is concerned about the safety of eating fish from the South River. The potential exists for past, present, and future exposure of local residents and workers to contaminated subsurface soil, nearby surface water, and sediments. The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) has concluded that the site is an indeterminate public health hazard since insufficient data exist for all environmental media to which humans may be exposed.

  6. The use of tritium content as an indicator of the groundwater contamination by sanitary landfills leachates in the region of Belo Horizonte City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, J V; Mingote, R M; Baptista, M B; Oliveira, D M; Lima, F P

    2008-01-01

    Tritium content in the leachate of sanitary landfills, in concentrations well above those observed in global precipitation, can be used as a tracer for the evaluation of the contamination of groundwater in piezometers of the landfills and in neighbouring tubular wells. This possibility was first investigated in Brazil for sanitary landfills in the region of Belo Horizonte City. Tritium levels together with the content of metals present in water and the measurement of soil electrical conductivity, proved to be valuable for these studies and also as a tracer for hydrodynamic studies of the surface water in the Ressaca creek. PMID:18587178

  7. Evaluation of Y-12 landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, G.A. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Daugherty, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hutzler, C.W.; Smith, C.M. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA)); Wylie, A.N. (Adams, Craft, Herz, Walker, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-12-12

    The purpose of this project was to provide team members with practical experience in application of Civil Engineering 555, Solid Waste Management principles. Team members chose to evaluate the functional elements of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's (Y-12's) solid waste management system. The following factors contributed to selection of Y-12'system for evaluation: team members' familiarity with the Y-12 system; knowledge that the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was nearing capacity; and presence of the unique issues posed by special national security and potential radioactive contamination considerations. This report was limited to evaluation of the solid waste management system for conventional solid waste; hazardous radioactive, and radioactive mixed waste were not addressed. The report: (1) describes each functional element including waste generation, storage, collection, transport, processing, recovery, and disposal; (2) identifies and evaluates alternatives for each element and (3) identifies system strengths and recommends opportunities for improvement. 34 figs.

  8. THE ALTERNATIVE COVERS ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (ACAP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative covers attempt to achieve equivalent performance to conventional impermeable covers through an action that has been described as 'sponge and pump'. In this type of cover system, the soil and plants absorb moisture from precipitation, store it in the plant and soil str...

  9. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3?ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4+) was calculated as 222?ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7?vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3?vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  10. Analysis of ammonia toxicity in landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3?ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4 (+) ) was calculated as 222?ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7?vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3?vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  11. Modelling flow to leachate wells in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Beaven, R.P.; White, J.K

    2004-07-01

    Vertical wells are frequently used as a means of controlling leachate levels in landfills. They are often the only available dewatering option for both old landfills without any basal leachate collection layer and for newer sites where the installed drainage infrastructure has failed. When the well is pumped, a seepage face develops at the entry into the well so that the drawdown in the surrounding waste will not be as great as might be expected. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW-SURFACT, which contains the functionality to model seepage surfaces, has been used to investigate the transient dewatering of a landfill. The study concludes that the position of the seepage face and information about the characteristics of the induced seepage flow field are important and should not be neglected when designing wells in landfills.

  12. Experience with landfill gas monitoring and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenness, S.R.; Wilcox, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    Landfills have recently come under additional environmental scrutiny for their potential as air emission sources. This paper discusses an air monitoring program that was performed in 1997 for the landfill located at US Army Fort Dix, New Jersey. Results of the program are presented as well as conclusions that were drawn from the sampling data and the sampling techniques employed. The Fort Dix Landfill air monitoring program consisted of quarterly measurements of gas vent (more than 50) flow rates. Flow rates were measured twice per day (morning and afternoon) with vane anemometers in order to assess diurnal effects. Measurements of ambient pressure and temperature were also taken for correlation with the gas vent flow rates. Additional gas sampling was performed on selected vents at the landfill to ascertain fixed gases (methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen) content, total non-methane organic compounds (NMOC), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) content, mercury content, and over sixty individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  13. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer and pumping five leachate recovery wells. Results of the flow analysis indicate that the telescoping grid modeling approach can be used to simulate ground-water flow in small areas such as the Lantana landfill site and to simulate the effects of possible remedial actions. Water-quality data indicate the leachate-enriched ground water is divided vertically into two parts by a fine sand layer at about 40 to 50 feet below land surface. Data also indicate the extent of the leachate-enriched ground-water contamination and concentrations of constituents seem to be decreasing over time.

  14. GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Masoner, Jason; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Suflita, Joseph; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    The Norman Landfill is a closed municipal solid waste landfill located on an alluvium associated with the Canadian River in Norman, Oklahoma. It has operated as a research site since 1994 because it is typical of many closed landfill sites across the U.S. Leachate from the unlined landfill forms a groundwater plume that extends downgradient approximately 250 m from the landfill toward the Canadian River. To investigate the impact of the landfill leachate on the diversity and functional structure of microbial communities, groundwater samples were taken from eight monitoring wells at a depth of 5m, and analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene array covering about 50,000 genes involved in key microbial processes, such as biogeochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, and bioremediation of organic contaminants and metals. Wells are located within a transect along a presumed flow path with different distances to the center of the leachate plume. Our analyses showed that microbial communities were obviously impacted by the leachate-component from the landfill. The number of genes detected and microbial diversity indices in the center (LF2B) and its closest (MLS35) wells were significantly less than those detected in other more downgradient wells, while no significant changes were observed in the relative abundance (i.e., percentage of each gene category) for most gene categories. However, the microbial community composition or structure of the landfill groundwater did not clearly show a significant correlation with the distance from well LF2B. Burkholderia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were found to be the dominant microbial populations detected in all wells, while Bradyrhizobium sp. and Ralstonia sp. were dominant populations for seven wells except LF2B. In addition, Mantel test and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicate that pH, sulfate, ammonia nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have significant effects on the microbial community structure. The results suggest that the leachate from unlined landfills significantly impact the structures of groundwater microbial communities, and that more distal wells recover by natural attenuation.

  15. Landfill leachates pretreatment by coagulation-flocculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Amokrane; C. Comel; J. Veron

    1997-01-01

    After biological and\\/or physico-chemical treatment of stabilised landfill leachates, COD and salinity content are often larger than reject requirements. In this case, reverse osmosis can be used to treat effectively these residual COD and salinity. However, reverse osmosis feasibility is limited by the membrane fouling. In order to reduce the landfill leachates high fouling power, coagulation-flocculation is examined in this

  16. Landfill leachate treatment methods: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wiszniowski; D. Robert; J. Surmacz-Gorska; K. Miksch; J. V. Weber

    2006-01-01

    Landfilling of municipal waste is still a major issue of the waste management system in Europe. The generated leachate must\\u000a be appropriately treated before being discharged into the environment. Technologies meant for leachate treatment can be classified\\u000a as follows (i) biological methods, (ii) chemical and physical methods. Here we review briefly the main processes currently\\u000a used for the landfill leachates

  17. Evaluation of soil-gas transport of organic chemicals into residential buildings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    This investigation consisted of theoretical, laboratory, and field study phases with the overall objective of determining the importance of pressure-driven flow of soil gas in the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from soil into a house. In the first phase, the mechanisms of advection, diffusion, and retardation of VOC in soil were evaluated. Using the theory of fluid mechanics and empirical for equilibrium partitioning of VOC among gas, aqueous, and solid phase of soil, a one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation or the transport of gas-phase VOC through soil was developed. An experimental apparatus and method were developed for the direct observation of pressure-driven transport of VOC through soil under controlled laboratory conditions. The retardation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) and hexafluorobenzene with respect to the flow of the bulk gas was measured in soil-column experiments using different soils and soil-moisture conditions. The results were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Since SF/sub 6/ was not lost by sorption to soil, it was selected for use as a tracer