Science.gov

Sample records for landfill gas composition

  1. Characterization of landfill gas composition at the Fresh Kills municipal solid-waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.; Anderson, E.P.; Walker, B.L.; Burrows, D.B.

    1998-08-01

    The most common disposal method in the US for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. Until recently, air emissions from these landfills were not regulated. Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. This paper summarizes speciated nonmethane organic compound (NMOC) measurement data collected during an intensive, short-term field program. Over 250 separate landfill gas samples were collected from emission sources at the Fresh Kills landfill in New York City and analyzed for approximately 150 different analytes. The average total NMOC value for the landfill was 438 ppmv (as hexane) versus the regulatory default value of 4,000 ppmv (as hexane). Over 70 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected and quantified in the landfill gas samples. The typical gas composition for this landfill was determined as well as estimates of the spatial, temporal, and measurement variability in the gas composition. The data for NMOC show that the gas composition within the landfill is equivalent to the composition of the gas exiting the landfill through passive vents and through the soil cover.

  2. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 1. Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  3. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill - project data (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  4. LANDFILL GAS MEASUREMENT METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane from landfills contributes to greenhouse gas emissions. The development of cost-effective methods for measuring diffuse emissions from landfills remains a difficult issue for regulators and landfill operators. Currently, two major options are available: (1) above-ground methods which quantif...

  5. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  6. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 2. Appendices to project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  7. Tracing landfill gas migration using chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archbold, M.; Elliot, T. E.; Redeker, K.; Boshoff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Typical landfill gas (LFG) compositions include a wide range of trace-level Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The most mobile VOCs are chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and their presence around landfills may reflect the initial flushing out of VOCs during the early aerobic stage when landfills are most active reaching high temperatures, driving off VOCs, and injecting LFG into the surrounding environment. CFCs are aerobically stable and therefore, may prove a useful means of characterising the environmental impact of landfill gas in the unsaturated zone around landfills. Moreover, as a possible pathfinder environmental tracer of LFG impacts in the environment, any subsequent changes in the CFCs concentrations after injection potentially reflect natural attenuation (NA) processes, which can also affect other VOCs. Thus tracing the CFCs around a landfill may provide an analogue indicator/proxy for other VOCs transport and fate. To assess the feasibility of using chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) as proxy tracers, it is imperative to characterise the effects of possible NA processes on both CFC abundances and their overall systematics. In this research, anaerobic biodegradation microcosm studies, which mimic the unsaturated zone of a LFG plume, are conducted using methanogenic soil samples. Results are discussed in terms of the potential effects on CFCs signatures due to anaerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone and will also explore ways of characterising NA processes by identifying the effects of diffusion on transport processes, and degradation products of CFCs. The discussion will also include how stable carbon isotopic signatures may be used to enhance our assessments of biodegradation of CFCs in the unsaturated zone around landfills.

  8. LANDFILL GAS PRETREATMENT FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the U.S. EPA's program, underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation, to demonstrate landfill methane control and the fuel cell energy recovery concept. In this program, two critical issues are being addressed: (1) a landfill gas cleanup method that would ...

  9. Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    . In his 2003 review of energy recovery from landfill gas, Willumsen1 reported that as of 2001, there were estimated6 that biomass materials such as paper, food and wood, constitute about 70% of the MSW, compiles the Methane Recovery from Landfills Yearbook9 . The data presented in Table 3 is from the 1999

  10. Landfill gas boosted to pipeline quality

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The world's largest landfill recovery facility, located on Staten Island, went on stream in 1982 and is expected to produce 1.3 billion CF/yr of pipeline gas. Containing 45% carbon dioxide, the gas is compressed and cooled in stages to meet the requirements of the Selexol purification plant. Two 1120-kW (1500-hp) Copper Bessemer GMVS-8C integral gas engine-compressors, fueled by the landfill gas, provide the compression needed from the wells to the final solvent-contact stage.

  11. Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, S.A. . E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. . E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. . E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

    2007-07-01

    In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

  12. Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

  13. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  14. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  15. FUEL CELL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    International Fuel Cells Corporation is conducting a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored program to demonstrate energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The US EPA is interested in fuel cells for this application b...

  16. FIRST ORDER KINETIC GAS GENERATION MODEL PARAMETERS FOR WET LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas is produced as a result of a sequence of physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring within an anaerobic landfill. Landfill operators, energy recovery project owners, regulators, and energy users need to be able to project the volume of gas produced and re...

  17. FIELD TEST MEASUREMENTS AT FIVE MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS WITH LANDFILL GAS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY--FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to evaluate landfill gas emissions at five municipal solid waste landfills which have modern control technology for landfill gas emissions. Comprehensive testing was conducted on the raw landfill gas and the combustion outlet exhaust. The project had two ...

  18. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  19. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    PubMed

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual. PMID:26346020

  20. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  1. Evaluation of Partitioning Gas Tracer Tests for Measuring Water in Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Han, B.; Jafarpour, Y.; Gallagher, V. N.; Chiu, P. C.; Fluman, D. A.; Vasuki, N. C.; Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Cohen, K. K.

    2003-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. An important issue in the operation of bioreactor landfills is knowing how much water to add and where to add it. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. We are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. We report the results from laboratory and field tests designed to evaluate the partitioning gas tracer test within an anaerobic landfill operated by the Delaware Solid Waste Authority. Vertical wells were installed within the landfill to inject and extract tracer gases. Gas flow and tracer gas movement in the solid waste were controlled by the landfill's existing gas collection system, which included vertical wells installed throughout the landfill through which a vacuum was applied. The results from this test are reported along with an overview of a similar test planned for the bioreactor landfill cells operated by the Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works.

  2. Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

  3. USERS MANUAL: LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL - VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's guide for a computer model, Version 2.0 of the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM), for estimating air pollution emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The model can be used to estimate emission rates for methane, carbon dioxide, nonmet...

  4. LANDFILL GAS AND THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper is an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. There appears to be a consensus in the international co...

  5. Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

  6. Comparison study of landfill gas emissions from subtropical landfill with various phases: A case study in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lie; Chen, Zhulei; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yanyan; Xie, Ying

    2015-08-01

    The compositions and annual variations of landfill gas (LFG) were studied at two large-scale sites of Chen-Jia-Chong Landfill. Seventy-six wells were built and used for the collection and measurement of LFG. The investigation revealed the similarities and differences of LFG components and variations at two sites with different phases. It was found that ambient temperature and rainfall exhibited strong correlations with LFG components at both sites. Methane (CH?) contents showed excellent correlations with CO?at both sites. Notable correlations between hydrogen sulfide (H?S) and major components (CH?and carbon dioxide [CO?]) were only observed in unstable methane phase. Especially, the CH?/CO?volumetric ratio could act as an excellent indicator for anaerobic reaction stage by judging its phasic variations. The study is beneficial for the efficient operation of LFG collection system and could shed light on gas purification and utilization. PMID:26030713

  7. Removal and determination of trimethylsilanol from the landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Piechota, Grzegorz; Hagmann, Manfred; Buczkowski, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The removal and determination of trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) in landfill gas has been studied before and after the special E3000-ITC System. The system works according to principle of temperature swing. The performance of TMSOH and humidity removal was 20% and more than 90%, respectively. The six of active carbons and impinger method were tested on the full-scale landfill in Poland for TMSOH and siloxanes determination. The extraction method and absorption in acetone were used. The concentration of TMSOH and siloxanes were found in range from 23.6 to 29.2 mg/m3 and from 18.0 to 38.9 mg/m3, respectively. The content of TMSOH in biogas originating from landfill was 41% out of all siloxanes. Moreover, the used system is alternative to other existing technique of landfill gas purification. PMID:22033372

  8. LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION: TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technical issues associated with the use of landfill gas (LFG) compared with natural gas--which is the primary fuel used for energy conversion equipment such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and fuel cells. FG is a medium-heating-value fuel contai...

  9. Hazard ranking of landfills using fuzzy composite programming

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemeister, M.E.; Jones, D.D.; Woldt, W.E.

    1996-04-01

    The environmental and health risks posed by unregulated landfills are concerns that must be addressed. These concerns have been highlighted with the recent reauthorization of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle D, which requires the closure of all unregulated landfills by October 1993. Most communities with unregulated landfills do not have the financial resources to conduct full-scale risk assessments. This paper proposes the use of a multicriteria assessment system as a tool for screening and prioritizing unregulated disposal sites according to their level of environmental and health hazard. This multicriteria assessment system uses a technique termed composite programming and allows for the use of imprecise information through fuzzy set theory. Using this methodology in landfill hazard assessment allows for the consideration of uncertainty associated with parameters that impact the hazard assessment. Additionally, the user can specify hazards that are most detrimental. The complexity of input parameters (first level indicators) were selected to minimize the time required to collect and/or analyze site-specific data. The result obtained in the assessment is a fuzzy number that indicates the most likely range of hazard and the largest likely range of hazard relative to the best and worst case scenarios. A case study, in which this method is applied to a small rural landfill, is presented to illustrate the methodology.

  10. Gas emissions from biodegradable waste in United Kingdom landfills.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Sally Maree; Jilang Pan; Bateson, Thomas; Gronow, Jan R; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to predict the effect that the biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) diversion targets in the European Union landfill directive (99/31/EC) would have on landfill gas emissions. This is important for continued mitigation of these emissions. Work was undertaken in three stages using the GasSim model (v1.03) developed by the Environment Agency (England and Wales). The first stage considered the contribution to gas emissions made by each biodegradable component of the waste stream. The second stage considered how gas emissions from a landfill accepting biodegradable wastes with reduced biodegradable content would be affected. The third stage looked at the contribution to gas emissions from real samples of biologically pretreated BMW. For the first two stages, data on the waste components were available in the model. For the third stage samples were obtained from four different biological treatment facilities and the required parameters determined experimentally. The results of stage 1 indicated that in the first 15 years of the landfill the putrescible fraction makes the most significant contribution, after which paper/card becomes the most significant. The second stage found that biodegradability must be reduced by at least 60% to achieve a reduction in overall methane generation. The third stage found that emissions from samples of biologically pretreated BMW would result in a significant reduction in gas emissions over untreated waste, particularly in the early stage of the landfill lifetime; however, low level emissions would continue to occur for the long term. PMID:21088129

  11. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT THE GROTON, CT, LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results from a seminal assessment conducted on a fuel cell technology which generates electrical power from waste landfill gas. This assessment/ demonstration was the second such project conducted by the EPA, the first being conducted at the Penrose Power...

  12. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

  13. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-07-01

    Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0.013 PE and 0.002 to 0.003 PE respectively). The reason for this is that even if the leachate is treated, slight amounts of contaminants are released through emissions of treated wastewater to surface waters. The largest environmental improvement with regard to the direct cost of the landfill was the capping and leachate treatment system. The capping, though very cheap to establish, gave a huge benefit in lowered impacts, the leachate collection system though expensive gave large benefits as well. The other gas measures were found to give further improvements, for a minor increase in cost. PMID:21435856

  14. Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-09-01

    The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

  15. Evaluation of Fresh Kills landfill gas for industrial applications. Final report, August 1977-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Briceland, C.; Bortz, S.; Khinkis, M.J.; Abassi, H.; Waibel, R.T.

    1980-03-01

    This report describes a combined laboratory and field test program carried out at the Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island to determine the acceptability of landfill gas as a replacement for natural gas and imported fuels in industrial processes. Landfill gas, created by the natural breakdown of organic materials, is about 50 percent methane. The Fresh Kills gas was tested to gauge its performance, characteristics and heat value, especially in relation to natural gas. The result of the tests were so favorable, that an aggressive program has been initiated statewide to identify landfill sites and potential industrial users for the landfill gas.

  16. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION OF LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3) for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the ...

  17. LANDFILL GAS UTILIZATION - DATABASE OF NORTH AMERICAN PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes data in an updated and expanded database for North American landfill-gas (LFG)-to-energy projects. t provides summary statistics, including a list of current projects, trends in conversion technologies, and a list of major developers, energy equipment supplie...

  18. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT PENROSE POWER STATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This demonstration test successfully demonstrated operation of a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell (FC) on landfill gas (LG) at the Penrose Power Station in Sun Valley, CA. Demonstration output included operation up to 137 kW; 37.1% efficiency at 120 kW; exceptionally low sec...

  19. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

  20. Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01

    Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

  1. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  2. U.S. EPA'S RESEARCH TO UPDATE GUIDANCE FOR QUANTIFYING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, tropospheric ozone, and urban smog. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting research to help update EPA's landfill gas emission factors. The last update to EPA's landfill gas emiss...

  3. GAS CHARACTERIZATION, MICROBIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS, AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE IN GRI (GAS RESEARCH INSTITUTE) LANDFILL SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the termination of a five-year pilot-scale project that evaluated methane production and gas enhancement techniques in sanitary landfills. Sixteen simulated landfills were constructed in 1980 and operated until January 1985. Data collected during this termina...

  4. Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan; Zhang, Mengqun; Wu, Weili; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jin

    2011-05-01

    Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term. PMID:21232931

  5. Remote real-time monitoring of subsurface landfill gas migration.

    PubMed

    Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O'Connor, Noel E; Smeaton, Alan F; Diamond, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

  6. Remote Real-Time Monitoring of Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R.; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M.; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O’Connor, Noel E.; Smeaton, Alan F.; Diamond, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

  7. A decision support tool for landfill methane generation and gas collection.

    PubMed

    Emkes, Harriet; Coulon, Frédéric; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a decision support tool (DST) to enhance methane generation at individual landfill sites. To date there is no such tool available to provide landfill decision makers with clear and simplified information to evaluate biochemical processes within a landfill site, to assess performance of gas production and to identify potential remedies to any issues. The current lack in understanding stems from the complexity of the landfill waste degradation process. Two scoring sets for landfill gas production performance are calculated with the tool: (1) methane output score which measures the deviation of the actual methane output rate at each site which the prediction generated by the first order decay model LandGEM; and (2) landfill gas indicators' score, which measures the deviation of the landfill gas indicators from their ideal ranges for optimal methane generation conditions. Landfill gas indicators include moisture content, temperature, alkalinity, pH, BOD, COD, BOD/COD ratio, ammonia, chloride, iron and zinc. A total landfill gas indicator score is provided using multi-criteria analysis to calculate the sum of weighted scores for each indicator. The weights for each indicator are calculated using an analytical hierarchical process. The tool is tested against five real scenarios for landfill sites in UK with a range of good, average and poor landfill methane generation over a one year period (2012). An interpretation of the results is given for each scenario and recommendations are highlighted for methane output rate enhancement. Results demonstrate how the tool can help landfill managers and operators to enhance their understanding of methane generation at a site-specific level, track landfill methane generation over time, compare and rank sites, and identify problems areas within a landfill site. PMID:26168873

  8. Gas flow to a vertical gas extraction well in deformable MSW landfills.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Batlle, Francisco; Carrera, Jesús; Lloret, Antonio

    2009-09-15

    Active gas control systems are commonly used in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills and the design of such systems requires thorough understanding of the gas flow pattern. A model is developed to predict the two-dimensional radial transient gas flow to a vertical gas extraction well in deformable MSW landfills. Variations of gas storage include time-dependent compression of the refuse, dissolution of gas components and porosity enlargement due to organic matter degradation. Mechanical compression of solid skeleton is coupled with gas pressure using K-H rheological model which is capable of reproduce the evolution of settlement for MSW landfills. The new analytical solution obtained in Laplace transform domain can be used to determine excess gas pressure fields, gas fluxes in the well and through the top cover as well as landfill settlements. The solution is validated by comparison with field measurements and numerical simulations. It demonstrates that the gas storage variation term becomes predominant only during early times. Long-term gas flow is controlled by the gas generation rate and the quasi-steady solution is valid. Parametric studies indicate that the solution given in this paper is useful for the prediction of gas fluxes, for the choice of the optimum spacing between wells, and for the determination of the final cover properties as well as appropriate vacuum pressure imposed in the extraction well. PMID:19356846

  9. Siloxane removal from landfill and digester gas - a technology overview.

    PubMed

    Ajhar, M; Travesset, M; Yüce, S; Melin, T

    2010-05-01

    This paper reviews technologies for the removal of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) from biogas. More than 20 years after identifying silicon dioxide in gas engines running on landfill and sewage gas, three technologies are commercially available to remove siloxanes today: adsorption, absorption and deep chilling. Newer concepts based on technologies other than sorption or condensation have not yet gained access to commercial biogas purification. These emerging siloxane removal concepts include biotrickling filters, catalysts, membranes, and in the case of sewage gas, sludge stripping, peroxidation and filtration at point inlet source. This work introduces the main principles of commercial siloxane removal systems and reviews scientific progress in the field over the last decade. PMID:20061140

  10. State of the art of landfill gas recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Optimization of methane recovery from landfills involves management of the physical and reclaimed factors associated with extraction of the gas. The technology of gas-recovery enhancement is rapidly evolving and is linked closely with numerous site-specific variables. The state-of-the-art study describes the most common recovery-system techniques and methodologies, and operates some promising alternative methods that can affect future recovery designs and mathematical models. Gas extraction characteristics are summarized for eight on-line and pending systems. One common element in current recovery progress is the vertical gas gathering well connected by piping networks to a common compressor/process station. Proper management of the recovery systems includes minimizing air intrusion; monitoring system components to maintain anaerobic conditions; elimination of leaks, breakage or blockages in the system; and maximization of gas containment. To optimize gas recovery, gas wells should be surrounded by open network materials that permit creation of zones of relatively high gas permeability. Acceptable materials include broken concrete and asphalt, nonsoluble gravel and rock, and rubber tires. Wherever possible, recovery systems can be integrated with other land uses and operated compatibly with gas migration control systems.

  11. Analysis of a landfill gas to energy system at the municipal solid waste landfill in Gaziantep, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tercan, Safak Hengirmen; Cabalar, Ali Firat; Yaman, Gokhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW), via landfill gas valorization technology, at the landfill of Gaziantep City, Turkey. Rapid increase in population, and industrial developments, throughout the world including Turkey results in larger amount of waste materials generated, increased need for energy, and adverse affects on the environment and human health. Turkey plans to produce 1/3 of its electricity demand using renewable energy sources by the year of 2023. It is recommended to use each year around 25 million tonnes of the MSW generated nationwide for a renewable energy supply. In this study, a concise summary of current status of electricity generation from a MSW landfill gas plant (via biogas harnessing) located in Gaziantep City was analyzed as a case study. PMID:26211632

  12. Feasibility of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel source for refuse trucks.

    PubMed

    Zietsman, Josias; Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul; Rand, Aaron J; Gokhale, Bhushan; Lord, Dominique; Kumar, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology to evaluate the feasibility of using landfill gas (LFG) as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel source for heavy-duty refuse trucks operating on landfills. Using LFG as a vehicle fuel can make the landfills more self-sustaining, reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, and reduce emissions and greenhouse gases. Acrion Technologies Inc. in association with Mack Trucks Inc. developed a technology to generate LNG from LFG using the CO2 WASH process. A successful application of this process was performed at the Eco Complex in Burlington County, PA. During this application two LNG refuse trucks were operated for 600 hr each using LNG produced from gases from the landfill. The methodology developed in this paper can evaluate the feasibility of three LFG options: doing nothing, electricity generation, and producing LNG to fuel refuse trucks. The methodology involved the modeling of several components: LFG generation, energy recovery processes, fleet operations, economic feasibility, and decision-making. The economic feasibility considers factors such as capital, maintenance, operational, and fuel costs, emissions and tax benefits, and the sale of products such as surplus LNG and food-grade carbon dioxide (CO2). Texas was used as a case study. The 96 landfills in Texas were prioritized and 17 landfills were identified that showed potential for converting LFG to LNG for use as a refuse truck fuel. The methodology was applied to a pilot landfill in El Paso, TX. The analysis showed that converting LFG to LNG to fuel refuse trucks proved to be the most feasible option and that the methodology can be applied for any landfill that considers this option. PMID:18512437

  13. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Crest, Marion; Barlaz, Morton A; Spokas, Kurt A; Kerman, Anna; Yuan, Lei

    2012-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers. PMID:22884579

  14. LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL (LANDGEM) VERSION 3.02 USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) is an automated estimation tool with a Microsoft Excel interface that can be used to estimate emission rates for total landfill gas, methane, carbon dioxide, nonmethane organic compounds, and individual air pollutants from municipal soli...

  15. Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: Effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, California landfill gas-recovery plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-10-01

    Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

  16. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Jeremy W.F.; Crest, Marion; Barlaz, Morton A.; Spokas, Kurt A.; Akerman, Anna; Yuan, Lei

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  17. Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01

    Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

  18. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions - Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-30

    BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The two projects received a total of $25 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Private-sector cost share for the projects totaled approximately $186 million.

  19. Landfill Gas Energy Cost Model Version 3.0 (LFGcost-Web V3.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help stakeholders estimate the costs of a landfill gas (LFG) energy project, in 2002, LMOP developed a cost tool (LFGcost). Since then, LMOP has routinely updated the tool to reflect changes in the LFG energy industry. Initially the model was designed for EPA to assist landfil...

  20. U.S. EPA'S FIELD TEST PROGRAMS TO UPDATE DATA ON LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a field test program in which the EPA is currently engaged to improve data on landfill gas (LFG) emissions. LFG emissions data in use at this time are based on determinations made in the late 1980s and early 1990s; changes in landfill operations, such as using...

  1. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism.

    PubMed

    El-Fadel, Mutasem; Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer

    2012-11-01

    This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH(4) flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188±0.014, 0.224±0.012 and 0.237±0.008 l CH(4)/m(2) hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m(2) hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m(2) hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m(2) hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L(0)) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m(3)/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste. PMID:22265005

  2. Sensitivity analysis of the waste composition and water content parameters on the biogas production models on solid waste landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Segura-Sobrino, Francisco; Rodrigo-Clavero, Maria-Elena

    2014-05-01

    Landfills are commonly used as the final deposit of urban solid waste. Despite the waste is previously processed on a treatment plant, the final amount of organic matter which reaches the landfill is large however. The biodegradation of this organic matter forms a mixture of greenhouse gases (essentially Methane and Carbon-Dioxide as well as Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulfide). From the environmental point of view, solid waste landfills are therefore considered to be one of the main greenhouse gas sources. Different mathematical models are usually applied to predict the amount of biogas produced on real landfills. The waste chemical composition and the availability of water in the solid waste appear to be the main parameters of these models. Results obtained when performing a sensitivity analysis over the biogas production model parameters under real conditions are shown. The importance of a proper characterizacion of the waste as well as the necessity of improving the understanding of the behaviour and development of the water on the unsaturated mass of waste are emphasized.

  3. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

  4. LEACHATE COLLECTION AND GAS MIGRATION AND EMISSION PROBLEMS AT LANDFILLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clogging of leachate systems and gas migration and emission problems were evaluated at hazardous waste landfills and surface impoundments. Collective and preventive measures were identified along with research and development needs. The analysis used literature and information ob...

  5. GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides guidance to Superfund remedial project managers, on scene coordinators, facility owners, and potentially responsible parties for conducting an air pathway analysis for landfill gas (LFG) emissions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation...

  6. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fadel, Mutasem; Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

  7. The Measurement of Landfill Gas Emissions with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and CarbonSAT Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil, S. A.; Bovensmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Landfill gas is a significant contributor to anthropogenic emissions of CH4 and CO2. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated the total U.S. 2007 emissions of the CH4 component of landfill gas at 132.9 Tg CO2 Equivalent. This compares to total CH4 emission from all US sources in 2007 at 585.3 Tg CO2 Equivalent. Worldwide CH4 emissions from landfill gas have been estimated at 668 Tg CO2 Equivalent. Satellite remote sensing can also be used to characterize landfill gas emissions. The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) and the proposed CarbonSAT (University of Bremen) satellites are particularly suited for this purpose. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provided high spatial resolution ( < 3 km2 footprints) and high accuracy ( 0.5 to 3 ppm) CO2 measurements. The original OCO satellite failed to achieve orbit in February 2009. A replacement satellite (OCO-2) is under construction and scheduled for launch in February 2013. These characteristics will allow the measurement of CO2 emissions from large landfills on the orbit path. Because surface landfill gas emissions include both CH4 and CO2 , the CH4 concentration can be inferred from CO2 concentrations. The CarbonSAT satellite which is being designed by the University of Bremen, Institute for Environmental Physics, has similar characteristics to OCO-2 but it has been optimized for measurement of both CH4 and CO2 . Key specifications for the CarbonSAT satellite include XCO2 single measurement error of < 1 to 3 ppm and XCH4 single measurement error of < 10 to 18 ppb. These characteristics will make it possible to detect both CO2 and CH4 emissions from large landfills. The spatial resolution and accuracy of the CO2 measurements from OCO-2 and CO2 and CH4 measurements from CarbonSAT present a unique opportunity to measure landfill gas emissions from large landfills such as exist in the United States and other developed countries. In general, landfills in the developed countries have landfill gas control system ground based landfill gas monitoring systems. These ground-based measurements can be used to calibrate OCO-2 and CarbonSAT landfill gas measurements. OCO-2 and CarbonSAT can be used to measure landfill emissions from the large landfills and open dumps of the emerging megacities in the developing world where accurate ground measurements are not available. For example Mexico City generates 26,000 MT of municipal solid waste that is disposed of in two uncontrolled landfills. Similar conditions exist in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Satellite based measurements of these landfill gas emissions could help prioritize greenhouse gas remediation projects for these countries.

  8. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  9. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING U.S. EPA GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--BUSH VALLEY LANDFILL, HARFORD COUNTY, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  10. Methane mass balance at three landfill sites: What is the efficiency of capture by gas collection systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Spokas, K. . E-mail: spokas@morris.ars.usda.gov; Bogner, J.; Chanton, J.P.; Morcet, M.; Aran, C.; Graff, C.; Golvan, Y. Moreau-Le; Hebe, I.

    2006-07-01

    Many developed countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings and the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. This paper presents the results of extensive field campaigns at three landfill sites to elucidate the total methane balance and provide field measurements to quantify these pathways. We assessed the overall methane mass balance in field cells with a variety of designs, cover materials, and gas management strategies. Sites included different cell configurations, including temporary clay cover, final clay cover, geosynthetic clay liners, and geomembrane composite covers, and cells with and without gas collection systems. Methane emission rates ranged from -2.2 to >10,000 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. Total methane oxidation rates ranged from 4% to 50% of the methane flux through the cover at sites with positive emissions. Oxidation of atmospheric methane was occurring in vegetated soils above a geomembrane. The results of these studies were used as the basis for guidelines by the French environment agency (ADEME) for default values for percent recovery: 35% for an operating cell with an active landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, 65% for a temporary covered cell with an active LFG recovery system, 85% for a cell with clay final cover and active LFG recovery, and 90% for a cell with a geomembrane final cover and active LFG recovery.

  11. BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Creighton

    2012-03-13

    The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

  12. Methylated mercury species in municipal waste landfill gas sampled in Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Wallschläger, D.; Prestbo, E. M.; Bloom, N. S.; Price, J.; Reinhart, D.

    Mercury-bearing material has been placed in municipal landfills from a wide array of sources including fluorescent lights, batteries, electrical switches, thermometers, and general waste. Despite its known volatility, persistence, and toxicity in the environment, the fate of mercury in landfills has not been widely studied. The nature of landfills designed to reduce waste through generation of methane by anaerobic bacteria suggests the possibility that these systems might also serve as bioreactors for the production of methylated mercury compounds. The toxicity of such species mandates the need to determine if they are emitted in municipal landfill gas (LFG). In a previous study, we had measured levels of total gaseous mercury (TGM) in LFG in the ?g/m 3 range in two Florida landfills, and elevated levels of monomethyl mercury (MMM) were identified in LFG condensate, suggesting the possible existence of gaseous organic Hg compounds in LFG. In the current study, we measured TGM, Hg 0, and methylated mercury compounds directly in LFG from another Florida landfill. Again, TGM was in the ?g/m 3 range, MMM was found in condensate, and this time we positively identified dimethyl mercury (DMM) in the LGF in the ng/m 3 range. These results identify landfills as a possible anthropogenic source of DMM emissions to air, and may help explain the reports of MMM in continental rainfall.

  13. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  14. Gas generation as a function of leachate management: Mid Auchencarroch experimental landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, C.W.; Fleming, G.; Gronow, J.

    1997-12-31

    Sustainable development is becoming a goal within most of the developed world. In terms of waste management, and specifically landfill, the goal is to progress the waste mass to a non-polluting state, within the relatively short period of 30--50 years. The flushing bioreactor landfill is seen potentially as a method of achieving this goal. The second experimental landfill at the Mid Auchencarroch Landlab facility builds on the success and experience gained on the first site, completed some three years ago. Phase 2 of Mid Auchencarroch Landlab seeks to evaluate methods of managing and controlling the biodegradation processes of landfilled municipal solid waste (MSW). The US$ 500,000 experiment, financed by the landfill industry and UK government research funds, comprises four cells each containing approximately 4000 tonnes of MSW. The main variables of this experiment are pre-treatment of waste by wet pulverization, leachate recirculation at optimum rates, and co-disposal of inert materials with MSW. The manipulation of the moisture regime within the landfill is seen as a key control parameter. Leachate recirculation, via a novel sub cap irrigation system, seeks to develop the concept of the flushing bioreactor, in which the aims of recirculation are not only to homogenize moisture content in order to enhance degradation, but further to flush soluble pollutants from the waste mass. The project moved into the monitoring stage in November 1995, when the cells were capped. A comprehensive regime of data collection operates, including full time gas flow monitoring, with a new type of flowmeter specifically developed for landfill gas. Thus, results presented are both quantitative and qualitative, and in the future will attempt to put a meaningful time scale on landfill gas production curves under various controlling regimes.

  15. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  16. Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L.A.

    2000-10-20

    This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery. Work was done in the following areas: (1) production of natural gas pipeline methane for liquefaction at an existing LNG facility, (2) production of LNG from sewage digester gas, (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling in the production of LNG, liquid CO{sub 2} and pipeline methane, (4) cost estimates for an LNG production facility at the Arden Landfill in Washington PA.

  17. Evaluation test on a landfill gas-fired flare at the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's Puente Hills Landfill Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    A cooperative test program was conducted from February 18 through February 21, 1986, by Air Resources Board (ARB) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) staff to evaluate the gaseous constituents from untreated landfill gas used to fuel a flare at the County of Los Angeles Sanitation District's Puente Hills Landfill. The flare was fueled with gases generated by the anaerobic decomposition of buried refuse. Emissions of criteria pollutants as determined from ARB test data and mass flow rates and Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DRE) of non-criteria pollutant compounds determined at the stack from SCAQMD test data are presented. Mass-flow rates and DREs for chlorinated and aromatic compounds determined from data from ARB resin samples are presented. Destruction and removal efficiencies based on mass flow rates for chlorinated compounds ranged from 35 to 99+ percent and for aromatic compounds ranged from four to 99+ percent. Dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls were not detected in the inlet nor the outlet gas-stream samples.

  18. Terrestrial laser scanning for detection of landfill gas: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetyuk, Yuriy; Mårtensson, Stig-Göran

    2014-04-01

    Methane built up in landfills as a result of breaking down of organic materials can be a renewable energy source if it is taken advantage of. The aim of research presented in this paper is to detect landfill gas (that contains methane) by means of terrestrial laser scanning. The hypothesis is that where no surface leakage has been reported, the landfill gas will expand or migrate. Therefore, it is possible to detect it through repeated scanning of the same area and comparison of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) generated from the point clouds. Only the most significant movements, i.e. vertical, are of interest in this case. During September-November 2011, a small area at Forsbacka landfill in the vicinity of Gävle was scanned 10 times. Epoch-to-epoch comparisons of the resulting DTMs have shown two significant changes (-27 and +19 mm) in elevation of the surface, and it is not impossible that they are caused by migrating landfill gas. The method tested in this study is deemed to be rigorous and accurate for detecting small-scale swell-shrink behaviour of the ground surface (in our case a landfill surface). However, both data processing and interpretation of the results have been considerably complicated by presence of low vegetation (weeds) on the study site, which was dificult to filter away completely from the data. Based on our pilot study, we recommend that a larger area and a longer period of time are chosen to give basis for more grounded conclusions about presence of landfill gas.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes-Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. his phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impur...

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  1. Suitability of Tedlar gas sampling bags for siloxane quantification in landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Ajhar, M; Wens, B; Stollenwerk, K H; Spalding, G; Yüce, S; Melin, T

    2010-06-30

    Landfill or digester gas can contain man-made volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS), usually in the range of a few milligrams per normal cubic metre (Nm(3)). Until now, no standard method for siloxane quantification exists and there is controversy with respect to which sampling procedure is most suitable. This paper presents an analytical and a sampling procedure for the quantification of common VMS in biogas via GC-MS and polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar) bags. Two commercially available Tedlar bag models are studied. One is equipped with a polypropylene valve with integrated septum, the other with a dual port fitting made from stainless steel. Siloxane recovery in landfill gas samples is investigated as a function of storage time, temperature, surface-to-volume ratio and background gas. Recovery was found to depend on the type of fitting employed. The siloxanes sampled in the bag with the polypropylene valve show high and stable recovery, even after more than 30 days. Sufficiently low detection limits below 10 microg Nm(-3) and good reproducibility can be achieved. The method is therefore well applicable to biogas, greatly facilitating sampling in comparison with other common techniques involving siloxane enrichment using sorption media. PMID:20685441

  2. ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

  3. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Chen, Z K; Coo, J L; Chen, R; Zhou, C

    2015-10-01

    Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas-water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different climate conditions. The results of experimental study and numerical simulation reveal that as the degree of saturation and thickness of clay increase, the gas breakthrough pressure increases but the gas emission rate decreases significantly. Under a gas pressure of 10 kPa (the upper bound limit of typical landfill gas pressure), a 0.6m or thicker compacted clay is able to prevent gas breakthrough at degree of saturation of 60% or above (in humid regions). Furthermore, to meet the limit of gas emission rate set by the Australian guideline, a 0.6m-thick clay layer may be sufficient even at low degree of saturation (i.e., 10% like in arid regions). PMID:26184895

  4. Landfill gas and low-NO{sub x} burners cut compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, G.; Cruz, N.P.; Moorehouse, L.; Kwan, Y.; Grant, M.P.; Rowe, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    This article describes how the city of Glendale found an innovative solution to cut power plant emissions and cleanly dispose of landfill gas. Often when environmental compliance projects are implemented the expense does not produce any additional revenue. However, the City decided to seek a technological approach to environmental compliance that might offer a return on the investment. The City identified LFG from the Scholl Canyon landfill as a valuable low-cost fuel source and a committee of City employees was formed to study end-use options for the LFG. Options considered included: compress and deliver the LFG to Grayson Generating Stations and use it to fire the plant`s steam boilers; build an electric power generating plant at the landfill site and produce electricity with LFG; clean LFG to natural gas-pipeline quality and sell it; and extract CO{sub 2} from LFG and sell it to the food processing industry.

  5. Analysis of microbial community structure and composition in leachates from a young landfill by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Köchling, Thorsten; Sanz, José Luis; Gavazza, Sávia; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for degrading the raw leachate generated in sanitary landfills, extracting the soluble fraction of the landfill waste and biotransforming organic matter and toxic residues. To increase our understanding of these highly contaminated ecosystems, we analyzed the microbial communities in the leachate produced by three landfill cells of different ages. Using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we describe the structure of the leachate communities and present their compositional characteristics. All three communities exhibited a high level of abundance but were undersampled, as indicated by the results of the rarefaction analysis. The distribution of the taxonomic operational units (OTUs) was highly skewed, suggesting a community structure with a few dominant members that are key for the degradation process and numerous rare microorganisms, which could act as a resilient microorganism seeder pool. Members of the phylum Firmicutes were dominant in all of the samples, accounting for up to 62% of the bacterial sequences, and their proportion increased with increasing landfill age. Other abundant phyla included Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, which together with Firmicutes comprised 90% of the sequences. The data illustrate a microbial community that degrades organic matter in raw leachate in the early stages, before the methanogenic phase takes place. The genera found fit well into the classical pathways of anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:25652654

  6. Development of correction factors for landfill gas emission model suiting Indian condition to predict methane emission from landfills.

    PubMed

    Sil, Avick; Kumar, Sunil; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2014-09-01

    Methane emission from landfill gas emission (LandGEM) model was validated through the results of laboratory scale biochemical methane potential assay. Results showed that LandGEM model over estimates methane (CH4) emissions; and the true CH4 potential of waste depends on the level of segregation. Based on these findings, correction factors were developed to estimate CH4 emission using LandGEM model especially where the level of segregation is negligible or does not exist. The correction factors obtained from the study were 0.94, 0.13 and 0.74 for food waste, mixed un-segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and vegetable wastes, respectively. PMID:24685512

  7. LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION EXPERIENCE: DISCUSSION OF TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL ISSUES, SOLUTIONS, AND TRENDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses technical and non-technical considerations associated with the development and operation of landfill gas to energy projects. Much of the report is based on interviews and site visits with the major developers and operators of the more than 110 projects in the...

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  9. DATABASE OF LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses factors influencing the increase of landfill gas to energy (LFG-E) projects in the U.S. and presents recent statistics from a database,. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of LFG-E projects in the U.S., due to such factors as implementation of t...

  10. Analysis of Indirect Emissions Benefits of Wind, Landfill Gas, and Municipal Solid Waste Generation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Techniques are introduced to calculate the hourly indirect emissions benefits of three types of green power resources: wind energy, municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion, and landfill gas (LFG) combustion. These techniques are applied to each of the U.S. EPA's eGRID subregions i...

  11. Landfill gas study performance on a IC Engine with addition Liubov Melnikova

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    to an internal combustion engine. Results were measured in terms of exhaust emissions and engine performance Engineering, City College, City University of New York, Combustion and Catalysis Laboratory #12;2 EXECUTIVE1 Landfill gas study performance on a IC Engine with addition of Syngas Liubov Melnikova Advisor

  12. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  13. A CASE STUDY OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY PALOS VERDES LANDFILL GAS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the first-ever-attempt to capture sanitary landfill gases and beneficiate them to natural gas pipeline quality--or very nearly so. For this reason the authors must credit the entrepreneurs for a successful first full-scale demonstration of a technology that ...

  14. Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Koslow Arthur Rood

    2009-08-31

    This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions during MSW landfilling in China: influence of waste characteristics and LFG treatment measures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Na; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Li-Ming; Lü, Fan; He, Pin-Jing

    2013-11-15

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment can be highly cost-effective in terms of GHG mitigation. This study investigated GHG emissions during MSW landfilling in China under four existing scenarios and in terms of seven different categories: waste collection and transportation, landfill management, leachate treatment, fugitive CH4 (FM) emissions, substitution of electricity production, carbon sequestration and N2O and CO emissions. GHG emissions from simple sanitary landfilling technology where no landfill gas (LFG) extraction took place (Scenario 1) were higher (641-998 kg CO2-eq·t(-1)ww) than those from open dump (Scenario 0, 480-734 kg CO2-eq·t(-1)ww). This was due to the strictly anaerobic conditions in Scenario 1. LFG collection and treatment reduced GHG emissions to 448-684 kg CO2-eq·t(-1)ww in Scenario 2 (with LFG flare) and 214-277 kg CO2-eq·t(-1)ww in Scenario 3 (using LFG for electricity production). Amongst the seven categories, FM was the predominant contributor to GHG emissions. Global sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the parameters associated with waste characteristics (i.e. CH4 potential and carbon sequestered faction) and LFG management (i.e. LFG collection efficiency and CH4 oxidation efficiency) were of great importance. A further learning on the MSW in China indicated that water content and dry matter content of food waste were the basic factors affecting GHG emissions. Source separation of food waste, as well as increasing the incineration ratio of mixed collected MSW, could effectively mitigate the overall GHG emissions from landfilling in a specific city. To increase the LFG collection and CH4 oxidation efficiencies could considerably reduce GHG emissions on the landfill site level. While, the improvement in the LFG utilization measures had an insignificant impact as long as the LFG is recovered for energy generation. PMID:24018116

  16. Evaluation of a 2-MW carbonate fuel cell power plant fueled by landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.B. ); Selander, S. ); Rastler, D.M. )

    1991-11-01

    This project assessed the technical and economic feasibility of operating an atmospheric pressure 2 MW carbonate fuel cell power plant on landfill gas. A commercially available low pressure gas pre-treatment system was identified for this application. System simulation studies were performed to identify component bottle-necks which would limit power production, or preclude system operation. An economic assessment was conducted to assess the competitiveness of the fuel cell system. The analysis confirmed the technical feasibility of operating Energy Research Corporation's 2MW fuel cell system on landfill gas. Resulting net electrical efficiency was 50% based on the fuel's lower heating value. Plant capital cost increased by {approximately}$180/kw; this was primarily for gas cleanup. Bus bar power costs for market entry and commercial fuel cell plants were found to be competitive with power produced from baseload coal plants in Minnesota.

  17. TESTING OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: GROTON LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of follow-on tests following a four-phase EPA program. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction of global warming gas emissions (methane and carbon dioxide). The follow-on testing, conducted by N...

  18. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 2. Verification and application of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical landfill gas collection systems for degassing landfills. To this end, the thermophysical model developed in the first part of this work is considered. The model is constructed using the initial data obtained at real dump and landfill with subsequently comparing the calculation results with the data of experimental measurements. A method for determining the average hydrodynamic properties of wastes is proposed, using which the heterogeneity of wastes can be taken into account. The effect the operating and design parameters of the well have on its performance is investigated on the basis of these properties. It has been determined that increasing the suction pressure, drilling diameter, and perforation height allows the well production rate to be increased by around 10%. The effect the increase of the well production rate has on the landfill gas collection project's payback period is demonstrated taking typical dump and landfill as an example.

  19. RECOVERY, PROCESSING, AND UTILIZATION OF GAS FROM SANITARY LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is organized into seven sections. Following the introduction and conclusions and recommendations, are sections describing: the three-component gas generation phenomenon; analysis and comparison of alternative gas utilizations including the processes necessary to prepar...

  20. SALE OF SURPLUS DIGESTER AND LANDFILL GAS TO PUBLIC UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane gas produced by anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge can be upgraded to pipeline quality and sold to a public utility for injection into a natural gas distribution system. Upgrading the gas typically involves treatment for removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfid...

  1. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  2. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  3. Characterization of trichloroethylene adsorption onto waste biocover soil in the presence of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Su, Yao; Kong, Jiaoyan

    2015-09-15

    Waste biocover soils (WBS) have been demonstrated to have great potential in mitigating trichloroethylene (TCE) emission from landfills, due to the relatively high TCE-degrading capacity. In this study, the characteristics of TCE adsorption on WBS in the presence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were investigated in soil microcosms. The adsorption isotherm of TCE onto WBS was fitted well with linear model within the TCE concentrations of 7000 ppmv. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto WBS was affected by temperature, soil moisture content and particle size, of which, temperature was the dominant factor. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto the experimental materials increased with the increasing organic matter content. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the adsorption capacity of TCE and the organic matter content of experimental materials that had relatively higher organic content (r = 0.988, P = 0.044). To better understand WBS application in practice, response surface methodology was developed to predict TCE adsorption capacity and emissions through WBS in different landfills in China. These results indicated that WBS had high adsorption capacity of TCE in LFG and temperature should be paid more attention to manipulate WBS to reduce TCE emissions from landfills. PMID:25909498

  4. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former hospital landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, Fred W.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former hospital landfill located in a 75-acre study area near the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, from April to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone of a creek adjacent to the landfill and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Results from the hyporheic-zone assessment in the unnamed tributary adjacent to the study area indicated that total petroleum hydrocarbons and octane were the most frequently detected organic compounds in groundwater beneath the creek bed. The highest concentrations for these compounds were detected in the upstream samplers of the hyporheic-zone study area. The effort to delineate landfill activity in the study area focused on the western 14 acres of the 75-acre study area where the hyporheic-zone study identified the highest concentrations of organic compounds. This also is the part of the study area where a debris field also was identified in the southern part of the 14 acres. The southern part of this 14-acre study area, including the debris field, is steeper and not as heavily wooded, compared to the central and northern parts. Fifty-two soil-gas samplers were used for the July 2010 soil-gas survey in the 14-acre study area and mostly detected total petroleum hydrocarbons, and gasoline and diesel compounds. The highest soil-gas masses for total petroleum hydrocarbons, diesel compounds, and the only valid detection of perchloroethene were in the southern part of the study area to the west of the debris field. However, all other detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons greater than 10 micrograms and diesel greater than 0.04 micrograms, and all detections of the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were found down slope from the debris field in the central and northern parts of the study area. Five soil-gas samplers were deployed and recovered from September 16 to 22, 2010, and were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents or explosives. Chloroacetophenones (a tear gas component) were the only compounds detected above a method detection level and were detected at the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbons and diesel detections in the southern part of the 14-acre study area. Composite soil samples collected at five locations were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents. None of the inorganic constituents exceeded the regional screening levels. One surface-water sample collected in the western end of the hyporheic-zone study area had a trichlorofluoromethane concentration above the laboratory reporting level and estimated concentrations of chloroform, fluoranthene, and isophorone below laboratory reporting levels.

  5. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  6. Comparison between landfill gas and waste incineration for power generation in Astana, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Rojas-Solórzano, Luis; Kim, Jong; Aitbekova, Aisulu; Ismailova, Aizada

    2015-05-01

    The city of Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan, which has a population of 804,474, and has been experiencing rapid growth over the last 15 years, generates approximately 1.39 kg capita(-1) day(-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW). Nearly 700 tonnes of MSW are collected daily, of which 97% is disposed of at landfills. The newest landfill was built using modern technologies, including a landfill gas (LFG) collection system.The rapid growth of Astana demands more energy on its path to development, and the viability analysis of MSW to generate electricity is imperative. This paper presents a technical-economic pre-feasibility study comparing landfill including LFG utilization and waste incineration (WI) to produce electricity. The performance of LFG with a reciprocating engine and WI with steam turbine power technologies were compared through corresponding greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, cost of energy production (CEP), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) from the analyses. Results demonstrate that in the city of Astana, WI has the potential to reduce more than 200,000 tonnes of GHG per year, while LFG could reduce slightly less than 40,000 tonnes. LFG offers a CEP 5.7% larger than WI, while the latter presents a BCR two times higher than LFG. WI technology analysis depicts a NPV exceeding 280% of the equity, while for LFG, the NPV is less than the equity, which indicates an expected remarkable financial return for the WI technology and a marginal and risky scenario for the LFG technology. Only existing landfill facilities with a LFG collection system in place may turn LFG into a viable project. PMID:25819927

  7. Ionic composition and greenhouse gases evaluation in Tietê River sediment and mud landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La-Scalea, M. A.; Fornaro, A.; Abreu, E. L.; Mendonça, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    There are 39 cities composing the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP) which has grown seven times during the last sixty years, reaching, in 2011, 19.3 million inhabitants. This fact associated with a strong industrial development provoked, among other consequences, a disordered urbanization along the most important river of the region: Tietê. About 100 Km of its 1,150 Km full extension crosses MASP and, during the 60's, Marginal Tietê roadway was constructed, occupying the river banks as access routes. Tietê River was straightened and several landfills were created with its deposit (sediment and mud). EACH-USP (46.50 W, 23.48 S) lies nowadays in one of these areas, where this work has been developed. Therefore, the goal is to evaluate the chemical composition (ionic and gases) and its variability in function of the depth levels using three wells, from 0.60 to 9.0 m of depth. The wells were perforated in September 2011, end of the dry weather. Each well owns a homemade multiport sampling device (HMSD), being possible to push gas and/or water up from 15 available ports. The gases measurements were carried out using a GEM-2000 plus (Landtec) portable analyzer. Aqueous samples containing solid material were taken at each level depth from ports of the HMSD. However, no water was found in some levels. All samples were kept cooled until analysis procedures. After decantation of the solid material, the supernatant liquid was divided in two portions, being its conductivity (Micronal conductimeter) and pH (pH-meter Metrohm 654 with combined glass electrode) measured with the former and ionic analysis with the latter, in which all samples were filtered (Millex 0.22 micrometer pores) before each ionic chromatographic analysis, using Metrohm 850 System, for the ions: sodium, ammonium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate. The first sampling stage was carried out during November and December 2011 in the beginning of rainy season in the mid Spring. From all the analysis performed, a large variability of the results may be observed for both gases and ionic composition not only among the wells, but also among the different depth levels. Vertically, one of the wells (W2) showed the same percentage of gases, methane 55% and carbon dioxide 45%, at all depth levels, while the other two wells (W1 and W3) presented these gases percentages only under 5.0 m deep. Concerning oxygen, 25% of this gas was detected at 1.0 m under the surface in W1 and W3. In relation to aqueous samples, the most acidity was observed near the surface (0.60 m deep, W1), pH 4.65, while pH 7.88 was obtained under 5.0 m deep (W3). For ionic concentrations a large range was observed considering all wells, being the lowest values for sulfate, from 0.60 to 20 mg/l, and the highest values for ammonium, between 14 and 53 mg/l. These results variability can be associated to the different soil composition layers, as well as to the biodegradation process and the time confinement of the river material deposit.

  8. PILOT SCALE EVALUATION OF SLUDGE LANDFILLING: FOUR YEARS OF OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sludge landfill simulator program consisting of 28 lysimeters was used to evaluate sludge landfilling as a disposal option by assessing the environmental impacts on leachate composition and gas production. The disposal scenarios investigated were codisposal, refuse-only, and sl...

  9. PRESENT AND LONG-TERM COMPOSITION OF MSW LANDFILL LEACHATE: A REVIEW. (R827580)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major potential environmental impacts related to landfill leachate are pollution of groundwater and surface waters. Landfill leachate contains pollutants that can be categorized into four groups (dissolved organic matter, inorganic macrocomponents, heavy metals, and xenobi...

  10. Monitoring of leachate quality stored in gas ventilation pipes for evaluating the degree of landfill stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Yasumasa; Sato, Masahiro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of leachate quality is the essential measure in aftercare for evaluating landfill stabilization. Generally, the most common way of leachate monitoring is executed at the inlet of the leachate treatment facility. However, it does not necessarily reflect the actual state of the site. Thus, methodologies which focus on both the discharge, in order to determine when the post-closure care of the facility should terminate, and on the degree of waste stabilization in the landfill are required. In the present study, monitoring of leachate quality stored in 68 gas ventilation pipes was conducted and the degree of waste stabilization at each location in the landfill was estimated by a statistical approach using the results obtained by monitoring. Leachate characteristics varied significantly for each pipe but seemed to reflect the waste condition of the nearby location. Correlation among the analysed items was quite high. Namely, the difference of leachate quality seemed to be categorized only by the level of concentration but not by the specific characteristics. To confirm this, Euclidean distances of dissimilarity were calculated by multidimensional scaling using six items of leachate quality and temperature. Two factors (thickness of leachate and concentration of total organic carbon (TOC) and electric conductivity (EC)) that distinguish leachate characteristics appeared. To indicate the degree of stabilization by location, the spatial distribution of TOC, total nitrogen (TN), inorganic carbon (IC), and chloride ion were estimated by using the ordinary Kriging methodology. As the result, it was estimated that the concentration of leachate existing within the landfill, especially TN, was higher than the completion criteria for leachate in most parts of the investigated area. PMID:20937618

  11. Climate co-benefits of energy recovery from landfill gas in developing Asian cities: a case study in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Menikpura, S N M; Sang-Arun, Janya; Bengtsson, Magnus

    2013-10-01

    Landfilling is the most common and cost-effective waste disposal method, and it is widely applied throughout the world. In developing countries in Asia there is currently a trend towards constructing sanitary landfills with gas recovery systems, not only as a solution to the waste problem and the associated local environmental pollution, but also to generate revenues through carbon markets and from the sale of electricity. This article presents a quantitative assessment of climate co-benefits from landfill gas (LFG) to energy projects, based on the case of Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, Thailand. Life cycle assessment was used for estimating net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, considering the whole lifespan of the landfill. The assessment found that the total GHG mitigation of the Bangkok project would be 471,763 tonnes (t) of carbon dioxide (CO(2))-equivalents (eq) over its 10-year LFG recovery period.This amount is equivalent to only 12% of the methane (CH(4)) generated over the whole lifespan of the landfill. An alternative scenario was devised to analyse possible improvement options for GHG mitigation through LFG-to-energy recovery projects. This scenario assumes that LFG recovery would commence in the second year of landfill operation and gas extraction continues throughout the 20-year peak production period. In this scenario, GHG mitigation potential amounted to 1,639,450 tCO(2)-eq during the 20-year project period, which is equivalent to 43% of the CH(4) generated throughout the life cycle. The results indicate that with careful planning, there is a high potential for improving the efficiency of existing LFG recovery projects which would enhance climate co-benefits, as well as economic benefits. However, the study also shows that even improved gas recovery systems have fairly low recovery rates and, in consequence, that emissions of GHG from such landfills sites are still considerable. PMID:23797299

  12. Hydraulic permeability of bentonite-polymer composites for application in landfill technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, Hanna; Haase, Hanna; Schanz, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Bentonites are often used as barrier materials in landfill technology to prevent infiltration of leachates to the natural environment. Since decades, geoenvironmental engineering aims at improving the hydro-mechanical performance of landfill liners. Various studies on the permeability performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) show effects of non-standard liquids on behaviour of Na+-bentonite regarding its sealing capacity. With increasing concentration of chemical aggressive solutions the sealing capacity decreases (Shackelford et al. 2000). An opportunity to improve the hydraulic permeability of the bentonites is the addition of polymers. The changes in hydraulic permeability performance of polymer treated and untreated bentonites while adding chemical aggressive solutions were studied by several authors. Results obtained by Scalia et al. (2014) illustrate that an increase in permeability can be prevented by adding polymer to Na+-bentonite. On the other hand, Ashmawy et al. (2002) presented results on the incapability of several commercial bentonite-polymer-products. The objective of this study is to characterize the influence of polymer addition on hydraulic performance of Na+-bentonite systematically. Therefore, the influence of 1% polymer addition of cationic and anionic polyacrylamide on the swelling pressure and hydraulic permeability of MX 80 bentonite was investigated. Preparation of bentonite-polymer composites was conducted (1) in dry conditions and (2) using solution-intercalation method. Experiments on hydraulic permeability were carried out using distilled water as well as CaCl2-solution. References Ashmawy, A. K., El-Hajji, D., Sotelo, N. & Muhammad, N. (2002), `Hydraulic Performance of Untreated and Polymer-treated Bentonite in Inorganic Landfill Leachates', Clays and Clay Minerals 50(5), 546-552. Scalia, J., Benson, C., Bohnhoff, G., Edil, T. & Shackelford, C. (2014), 'Long-Term Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bentonite-Polymer Composite Permeated with Aggressive Inorganic Solutions', Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering 140(3). Shackelford, C. D., Benson, C. H., Katsumi, T., Edil, T. B. & Lin, L. (2000), 'Evaluating the hydraulic conductivity of GCLs permeated with non-standard liquids', Geotextiles and Geomembranes 18, 133-161.

  13. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  14. Abatement of synthetic landfill gas including limonene by biotrickling filter and membrane biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Hosoglu, Fatih; Fitch, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a single silicone rubber membrane biofilter was compared to a lava rock biotrickling filter to examine the aerobic biofiltration of synthetic landfill gas including odorous limonene. The membrane bioreactor and biotrickling filter showed, respectively, maximum elimination capacities of 17 g m(-3) h(-1) and 31.3 g m(-3) h(-1) for limonene and removal efficiencies of 11 % and 18 % for methane. The membrane bioreactor was apparently mass transfer-limited and the biotrickling filter was reaction-limited. PMID:22486676

  15. Work plan for development of a data base on potential landfill-gas utilization sites in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    In an attempt to determine the effects of the criteria established by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Section 4004's Open Dump Inventory (ODI) upon the establishment of landfill gas utilization projects, a national survey of landfills was taken. The project, quantified the gas utilization potential for landfills of various types and sizes across the United States. Preliminary information was collected through telephone or mail surveys of people dealing with solid waste disposal in each of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Offices and in each of the 50 states. In addition, visits to eight states were conducted to gather more detailed information and assess the quality of information collected in the preliminary step. The surveys attempted to elicit the following information about the prospective ODI in each state: (1) size, age, and type of each landfill; (2) status of gas control and utilization projects; and (3) location of landfill gas problem sites. In addition, the quality of information in each state's files and the accessibility of those files were evaluated.

  16. [Impact of leachate recirculation loadings on efficiency of landfill gas (LFG) generation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-dong; Jiang, Jian-guo; Huang, Yun-feng; Huang, Zhong-lin; Feng, Xiang-ming; Zhou, Sheng-yong; Deng, Zhou

    2006-10-01

    Effects of leachate recirculation loading on the efficiency of aerogenesis or methanogenesis of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) was investigated in four simulated anaerobic bioreactors (R1-R4), which were filled with 30 tons of wet weight waste each and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2 m3 leachate and 0.1 m3 pure water, respectively. The results indicated that R1, with the highest recirculation ratio of 5.3%, began to produce landfill gas (LFG) largely after 5 weeks of leachate recirculation, while the other columns took 7-13 more weeks of lag phase time of LFG production. And LFG generation rates had good relationships with pollution loadings, such as COD and VFA in the leachate. By the 50th week, the waste in R1 was more stabilized with the highest loading rate. The accumulative transfer ratios to gas phase of TOC and COD were 28.96% and 14.57%, respectively, which meant large mount of organic matter was carried out by the effluent of the early stage and thus the potential of LFG generation was reduced. Therefore, to enhance the efficiency of LFG generation, the regimes of leachate recirculation in bioreactor landfills should be adjusted timely according to the phases of waste stabilization. PMID:17256623

  17. Long-term monitoring and prediction for settlement and composition of refuse in Shanghai Laogang Municipal Landfill.

    PubMed

    Jiangying, Liu; Dimin, Xu; Youcai, Zhao; Shaowei, Chen; Guojian, Li; Qi, Zhou

    2004-09-01

    Parameters about composition of refuse such as mass percentage of biodegradable matter, volatile solid, organic carbon, cellulose, total sugar, and settlement were monitored and analyzed in a large-scale experimental unit. The empirical formulas between composition and refuse age were established in terms of the data obtained from the experimental unit and verified by comparing with the corresponding parameters of refuse in the closed landfill units from 1991 until 1994 in the Shanghai Laogang Municipal Landfill. Furthermore, the long-term prediction for the composition of refuse was made, and it was predicted that the half-life is 7 to 11 years for biodegradable matter, 9 to 12 years for organic carbon or volatile solid, 7 to 16 years for cellulose, and 4 to 6 years for total sugar. In addition, a mathematical model, based on the mechanism of refuse biodegradation in the landfill, was developed to simulate the relationship between the settlement and the refuse age and manifests the secondary settlement potential. The mathematical model was proved not only to be reliable but also should be accurate for predicting the settlement of the landfill. The secondary settlement, which mainly results from the slow and gradual biodegradation of refuse, is linear with respect to the exponent of refuse age. Finally, according to the settlement model and empirical biodegradation formulas, it may be predicted that, 79.4% of biodegradable matter, 92.9% of total sugar, 72.7% of volatile solid and organic carbon, and 73.1% of cellulose will be biodegraded and that 79% of the maximum secondary settlement potential will occur before the Shanghai Laogang Municipal Landfill is in a high stabilization situation, i.e., approximately 21 years after final closure. PMID:15520900

  18. Electrical power obtained from burning landfill gas into a gas turbine generator: Experience after one year of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, R.; Mignani, N.

    1998-07-01

    A typical example of a ``waste to energy'' concept can be found also in the landfill environment. The biogas derived by fermentation process is usually burnt into gas engines. This choice is usually due to the electric efficiency that is normally higher than gas turbine application and to the size that usually, almost in Italian landfill size, does not allow power higher than 1,000 kW. On the other side gas turbine applications, typically based on generator sets greater than 1,000 kW do not require special biogas pre-treatment; require less maintenance and have an extremely higher reliability. The paper describes an application of a gas turbine generator of 4,800 kW outlining the experiences collected after one year of operation. During this period, the system fulfilled the target of a total operating time greater than 8,000 hours. Description is done of the biogas compression system feeding the turbine and also of the subsystem adopted to reach the above mentioned target reliability.

  19. Assessment of soil-gas and groundwater contamination at the Gibson Road landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Soil-gas and groundwater assessments were conducted at the Gibson Road landfill in 201 to provide screening-level environmental contamination data to supplement the data collected during previous environmental studies at the landfill. Passive samplers were used in both assessments to detect volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil gas and groundwater. A total of 56 passive samplers were deployed in the soil in late July and early August for the soil-gas assessment. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at masses greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram in all samplers and masses greater than 2.0 micrograms in 13 samplers. Three samplers located between the landfill and a nearby wetland had TPH masses greater than 20 micrograms. Diesel was detected in 28 of the 56 soil-gas samplers. Undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane were detected, but undecane was the most common diesel compound with 23 detections. Only five detections exceeded a combined diesel mass of 0.10 microgram, including the highest mass of 0.27 microgram near the wetland. Toluene was detected in only five passive samplers, including masses of 0.65 microgram near the wetland and 0.85 microgram on the southwestern side of the landfill. The only other gasoline-related compound detected was octane in two samplers. Naphthalene was detected in two samplers in the gully near the landfill and two samplers along the southwestern side of the landfill, but had masses less than or equal to 0.02 microgram. Six samplers located southeast of the landfill had detections of chlorinated compounds, including one perchloroethene detections (0.04 microgram) and five chloroform detections (0.05 to0.08 microgram). Passive samplers were deployed and recovered on August 8, 2011, in nine monitoring wells along the southwestern, southeastern and northeastern sides of the landfill and down gradient from the eastern corner of the landfill. Six of the nine samplers had TPH concentrations greater than 100 micrograms per liter. TPH concentrations declined from 320 micrograms per liter in a sampler near the landfill to 18 micrograms in a sampler near the wetland. Five of the samplers had detections of one or more diesel compounds but detections of individual diesel compounds had concentrations below a method detection level of 0.01 microgram per liter. Benzene was detected in three samplers and exceeded the national primary drinking-water standard of 5 micrograms per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The concentrations of benzene, and therefore BTEX, were 6.1 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the eastern corner of the landfill, 27 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the wetland, and 37 micrograms per liter in the sampler at the southern corner of the landfill. Nonfuel-related compounds were detected in the four wells that are aligned between the eastern corner of the landfill and the wetland. The sampler deployed nearest the eastern corner of the landfill had the greatest number of detected organic compounds and had the only detections of two trimethylbenzene compounds, naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. The two up gradient samplers had the greatest number of chlorinated compounds with five compounds each, compared to detections of four compounds and one compound in the two down gradient samplers. All four samplers had detections of 1,1-dichloroethane which ranged from 42 to 1,300 micrograms per liter. Other detections of chlorinated compounds included trichloroethene, perchloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

  20. Assessment of soil-gas contamination at the 17th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Assessments of contaminants in soil gas were conducted in two study areas at Fort Gordon, Georgia, in July and August of 2011 to supplement environmental contaminant data for previous studies at the 17th Street landfill. The two study areas include northern and eastern parts of the 17th Street landfill and the adjacent wooded areas to the north and east of the landfill. These study areas were chosen because of their close proximity to the surface water in Wilkerson Lake and McCoys Creek. A total of 48 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the July 28 to August 3, 2011, assessment in the eastern study area. The assessment mostly identified detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gasoline- and diesel-range compounds, but also identified the presence of chlorinated solvents in six samplers, chloroform in three samplers, 2-methyl naphthalene in one sampler, and trimethylbenzene in one sampler. The TPH masses exceeded 0.02 microgram (?g) in all 48 samplers and exceeded 0.9 ?g in 24 samplers. Undecane, one of the three diesel-range compounds used to calculate the combined mass for diesel-range compounds, was detected in 17 samplers and is the second most commonly detected compound in the eastern study area, exceeded only by the number of TPH detections. Six samplers had detections of toluene, but other gasoline compounds were detected with toluene in three of the samplers, including detections of ethylbenzene, meta- and para-xylene, and octane. All detections of chlorinated organic compounds had soil-gas masses equal to or less than 0.08 ?g, including three detections of trichloroethene, three detections of perchloroethene, three chloroform detections, one 1,4-dichlorobenzene detection, and one 1,1,2-trichloroethane detection. Three methylated compounds were detected in the eastern study area, but were detected at or below method detection levels. A total of 32 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the August 11–24, 2011, assessment in the northern study area. All samplers in the survey had detections of TPH, but only eight of the samplers had detections of TPH greater than 0.9 mg. Four samplers had TPH detections greater than 9 mg; the only other fuel-related compounds detected in these four samplers included toluene in three of the samplers and undecane in the fourth sampler. Three samplers deployed along the western margin of the northern landfill had detections of both diesel-and gasoline-related compounds; however, the diesel-related compounds were detected at or below method detection levels. Seven samplers in the northern study area had detections of chlorinated compounds, including three perchloroethene detections, three chloroform detections, and one 1,4-dichloro-benzene detection. One sampler on the western margin of the landfill had detections of 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-tr-methylbenene below method detection levels.

  1. Assessing the performance of gas collection systems in select Chinese landfills according to the LandGEM model: drawbacks and potential direction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Yue, Dongbei; Li, Rundong; Yang, Ting; Liu, Shiliang

    2015-12-01

    In China, municipal solid waste (MSW) is primarily treated by landfilling. Landfill gas (LFG) collection effectively reduces methane emission from MSW landfills. An accurate system of LFG collection is important in landfill planning, design, and operation. However, China has not developed such systems. In this study, the efficiency of methane collection is calculated in three Chinese landfills with different collection systems (A: vertical wells for MSW before 2010; combined horizontal trenches and under-membrane pipes for MSW from 2011 onwards; B: combined horizontal trenches and vertical wells; C: vertical wells only). This efficiency was computed by dividing the quantity of methane obtained from landfill operation records by the quantity estimated based on the LandGEM model. Results show that the collection efficiencies of landfills with vertical wells and/or horizontal pipes ranged from 8.3% to 27.9%, whereas those of a system equipped with geomembrane reached 65.3%. The poor performance of the landfills was attributed to the open burning of early-stage LFG, LFG release from cracks in high-density polyethylene covers, and high levels of leachate within a landfill site. Therefore, this study proposes an integrated LFG collection system that can remove leachate and collect gas from landfills that accept waste with high moisture content. PMID:26510610

  2. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  3. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a case study that applies EPA/600/R-05/123a, the guidance for conducting air pathway analyses of landfill gas emissions that are of interest to superfund remedial project managers, on-scene coordinators, facility owners, and potentially responsible parties. T...

  4. Review of past research and proposed action plan for landfill gas-to-energy applications in India.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Faisal Zia; Zaidi, Sadaf; Pandey, Suneel; Khan, Mohd Emran

    2013-01-01

    Open dumps employed for disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) are generally referred to as landfills and have been traditionally used as the ultimate disposal method in India. The deposition of MSW in open dumps eventually leads to uncontrolled emission of landfill gas (LFG). This article reviews the MSW disposal practices and LFG emissions from landfills in India during the period 1994 to 2011. The worldwide trend of feasibility of LFG to energy recovery projects and recent studies in India indicate a changed perception of landfills as a source of energy. However, facilitating the implementation of LFG to energy involves a number of challenges in terms of technology, developing a standardized framework and availability of financial incentives. The legislative framework for promotion of LFG to energy projects in India has been reviewed and a comprehensive strategy and action plan for gainful LFG recovery is suggested. It is concluded that the market for LFG to energy projects is not mature in India. There are no on-ground case studies to demonstrate the feasibility of LFG to energy applications. Future research therefore should aim at LFG emission modeling studies at regional level and based on the results, pilot studies may be conducted for the potential sites in the country to establish LFG to energy recovery potential from these landfills. PMID:23255613

  5. Integrated Cryogenic System for CO2 Separation and Lng Production from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. M.; Chung, M. J.; Park, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    An integrated cryogenic system to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and produce LNG from landfill gas is investigated and designed. The main objective of this design is to eliminate the requirement of a standard CO2 removal process in the liquefaction system such distillation or (temperature or pressure) swing adsorption, and to directly separate carbon dioxide as frost at the liquefying channel of methane. Two identical sets of heat exchangers are installed in parallel and switched alternatively with a time period so that one is in separation-liquefaction mode while the other is in CO2 clean-up mode. A thermal regeneration scheme is presented for the purpose of saving energy and avoiding the stoppage of LNG production followed by the flow switching. The switching period is determined from results of a combined heat and mass transfer analysis on the CO2 freeze-out process.

  6. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T. . E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-07-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

  7. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  8. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former 19th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former 19th Street landfill at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from February to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of a creek and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. The passive soil-gas samplers deployed in the water-saturated hyporheic zone and flood plain of the creek adjacent to the former landfill indicated the presence of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and octane above method detection levels in groundwater beneath the creek bed and flood plain at all 12 soil-gas sampler locations. The TPH concentrations ranged from 51.4 to 81.4 micrograms per liter. Octane concentrations ranged from 1.78 to 2.63 micrograms per liter. These detections do not clearly identify specific source areas in the former landfill; moreover, detections of TPH and octane in a soil-gas sampler installed at a seep on the western bank of the creek indicated the potential for these constituents to be derived from source areas outside the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. A passive soil-gas sampler survey was conducted in the former landfill from June 30 to July 5, 2010, and involved 56 soil-gas samplers that were analyzed for petroleum and halogenated compounds not classified as chemical agents or explosives. The TPH soil-gas mass exceeded 2.0 micrograms in 21 samplers. Most noticeable are the two sites with TPH detections which are located in and near the hyporheic zone and are likely to affect the creek. However, most TPH detections were located in and immediately adjacent to a debris field located within the former landfill and in areas where debris was not visible, including the northwestern and southeastern parts of the study area. Two of the four soil-gas samplers installed within a former military training area adjacent to the landfill also had TPH detections above the method detection level. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (as combined BTEX mass) were detected at 0.02 microgram or greater in three soil-gas samplers installed at the northwestern boundary and in five samplers installed in the southeastern part of the study area. There was no BTEX mass detected above the method detection level in samplers installed in the debris field. Toluene was the most frequently detected BTEX compound. Compounds indicative of diesel-range organics were detected above 0.04 microgram in 12 soil-gas samplers and had a distribution similar to that of TPH, including being detected in the debris field. Undecane was the most frequently detected diesel compound. Chloroform and naphthalene were detected in eight and two soil-gas samplers, respectively. Five soil-gas samplers deployed during September 2010 were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents and explosives, but none exceeded the method detection levels. Five composite soil samples collected from within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents, but none of the constituents detected exceeded regional screening levels for industrial soils. The sample collected in the debris field exceeded background levels for aluminum, barium, calcium, chromium, lead, nickel, potassium, sodium, and zinc. Three surface-water samples were collected in September 2010 from a stormwater outfall culvert that drains to the creek and from the open channel of the creek at upstream and downstream locations relative to the outfall. Toluene was detected at 0.661 mi

  9. Producing electricity from landfill gas: The 23 MW Gazmont power plant in Montreal

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The City of Montreal operates one of the larger below-grade landfills in North America. This site, which is close to residential areas, is a great source of energy, producing nearly 750,000 cubic meters of landfill gas (LFG) daily. Since September 1996, Gazmont has been operating a new thermal power plant , using this LFG to produce 23.3 MW of electricity, which is sold to Hydro-Quebec. The technology used consists of a 90 MW boiler that feeds a steam turbine with high pressure steam, coupled to a three phase synchronous generator. To control NO{sub x} emissions, the boiler is equipped with low NO{sub x} burners and a flue gas recirculation system. The energy is dissipated to a wet surface air cooler that minimizes the vapor plume. After describing the process and the key parameters of the operation (e.g., LFG heat input values), the main components of the monitoring program are presented. Available results of the continuous emission monitoring system (NO{sub x}) and of stack emission monitoring (SO{sub 2}, HCl, total hydrocarbons, dioxins and furans, PAHs, particulates) conducted in 1996 are discussed. The results show very low values of dioxins and furans emitted by the combustion of LFG in a boiler. The NO{sub x} emissions are around 10 ng/J of heat input. The preliminary results of the monitoring program regarding the cooling tower vapor plume are also presented, as it represents a sensitive issue, the plant being located at about 300 m from an elevated express-way.

  10. Environmental assessment of gas management options at the Old Ammässuo landfill (Finland) by means of LCA-modeling (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Simone; Niskanen, Antti; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    The current landfill gas (LFG) management (based on flaring and utilization for heat generation of the collected gas) and three potential future gas management options (LFG flaring, heat generation and combined heat and power generation) for the Old Ammässuo landfill (Espoo, Finland) were evaluated by life-cycle assessment modeling. The evaluation accounts for all resource utilization and emissions to the environment related to the gas generation and management for a life-cycle time horizon of 100 yr. The assessment criteria comprise standard impact categories (global warming, photo-chemical ozone formation, stratospheric ozone depletion, acidification and nutrient enrichment) and toxicity-related impact categories (human toxicity via soil, via water and via air, eco-toxicity in soil and in water chronic). The results of the life-cycle impact assessment show that disperse emissions of LFG from the landfill surface determine the highest potential impacts in terms of global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and human toxicity via soil. Conversely, the impact potentials estimated for other categories are numerically-negative when the collected LFG is utilized for energy generation, demonstrating that net environmental savings can be obtained. Such savings are proportional to the amount of gas utilized for energy generation and the gas energy recovery efficiency achieved, which thus have to be regarded as key parameters. As a result, the overall best performance is found for the heat generation option - as it has the highest LFG utilization/energy recovery rates - whereas the worst performance is estimated for the LFG flaring option, as no LFG is here utilized for energy generation. Therefore, to reduce the environmental burdens caused by the current gas management strategy, more LFG should be used for energy generation. This inherently requires a superior LFG capture rate that, in addition, would reduce fugitive emissions of LFG from the landfill surface, bringing further environmental benefits. PMID:19081238

  11. Influence of mechanical-biological waste pre-treatment methods on the gas formation in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Bockreis, A. . E-mail: a.bockreis@iwar.tu-darmstadt.de; Steinberg, I.

    2005-07-01

    In order to minimise emissions and environmental impacts, only pre-treated waste should be disposed of. For the last six years, a series of continuous experiments has been conducted at the Institute WAR, TU Darmstadt, in order to determine the emissions from pre-treated waste. Different kinds of pre-treated waste were incubated in several reactors and various data, including production and composition of the gas and the leachate, were collected. In this paper, the interim results of gas production and the gas composition from different types of waste after a running time of six years are presented and discussed.

  12. Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

    2000-10-20

    This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

  13. Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    Gas Technology Institute will collaborate with Integrated CHP Systems Corporation, West Virginia University, Vronay Engineering Services, KAR Engineering Associates, Pioneer Air Systems, and Energy Concepts Company to recover waste heat from reciprocating engines. The project will integrate waste heat recovery along with gas clean-up technology system improvements. This will address fuel quality issues that have hampered expanded use of opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester biogas, and coal mine methane. This will enable increased application of CHP using renewable and domestically derived opportunity fuels.

  14. Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

    1998-08-01

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

  15. Insight into the composition and degradation potential of dissolved organic matter with different hydrophobicity in landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Gao, Ru-Tai; Zhang, Hui; Dang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Dan; Huang, Cai-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated into hydrophobic acid (HOA), hydrophobic neutral (HON), hydrophobic base (HOB) fractions and hydrophilic matter (HIM) based on hydrophobicity, and the composition and degradation potential of the bulk DOM and its fractions were investigated by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis. Results showed that the bulk DOM comprised fulvic-, humic-, tryptophan- and tyrosine-like substances, as well as component C1, whose composition and origin was unidentified. Landfill process increased the content of component C1, fulvic- and humic-like matter. The HON fractions comprised primarily component C1 and tyrosine-like matter. The HOA, HOB and HIM fractions isolated from the young leachates consisted mainly of tryptophan- and tyrosine-like substances. As to the intermediate and old leachates, the HOA and HOB fractions comprised mainly component C1, while the HIM comprised mainly fulvic-like matter. The HIM showed the most resistant against biodegradation among the four fractions, and was the main component of leachate treatment. Advanced oxidation and/or membrane treatment are recommended to remove the HIM fraction due to its hydrophilic and stable characteristics. PMID:26347928

  16. Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Gokhale, Bhushan

    2007-04-25

    The energy consumption throughout the world has increased substantially over the past few years and the trend is projected to continue indefinitely. The primary sources of energy are conventional fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal. The most...

  17. BIOREACTOR LANDFILL DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modern landfill design entails many elements including foundations, liner systems, leachate collection systems, stormwater control systems, slope stability considerations, leachate management systems, gas extraction systems, and capping and closure. The use of bioreactor technolo...

  18. Performance and bacterial compositions of aged refuse reactors treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Xiong, Shunzi; Liang, Shaobo; Hu, Chong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Aged landfill leachates become more refractory over time and difficulty to treat. Recently, aged refuse bioreactors show great promise in treating leachates. In this study, aged refuse bioreactors were constructed to simulate landfill leachate degradation process. The characteristics of leachate were: CODcr, ?2200 mg/L; BOD5, ?280 mg/L; total nitrogen, ?2030 mg/L; and ammonia, ?1900 mg/L. Results showed that bioreactor could remove leachate pollutants effectively at hydraulic loading of 20 L/m3 d. The removal rate reduced when hydraulic loading doubled or temperature lowered. Effluent recirculation could alleviate the temperature effect. Combining aged refuse and slag biofilters could treat leachate more efficiently. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that bacteria from Pseudomonas, Lysobacter, Bacillus and ?-proteobacter, Flexibacteraceae were more abundant in the samples. The Shannon index decreased at lower temperature, while evenness and equitability increased with recirculation. We suggest that filter medium and temperature may be the main factors for shaping bacterial community structure. PMID:22023964

  19. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  20. Research, development and demonstration in the design of sanitary landfill to optimize the generation and capture of compressible gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosanov, M. E.; Teeple, F. E.; Buesch, S. C.

    1982-02-01

    The influences of selected factors on the generation and recovery of methane gas from sanitary landfills were investigated. The factors included encapsulation, shredding, air classifying, moisture, and pH. Facilities consisting of six model sanitary landfill cells, each with a capacity of approximately 450 cubic yards of municipal waste, and auxiliary subsystems were constructed. Municipal waste in each cell is contained in a 30-mil thick polyvinly chloride plastic sheeting forming a virtually gas-tight envelope. Two cells were filled with as-collected urban waste, two with shredded waste, and two with shredded and air classified waste, constituting three pairs of cells. One of each pair is a control cell with the other used as an experimental variable. Systems were provided for adding measured amounts of water, removing and recirculating leachate, and for extracting gas and measuring gas flow. During testing, gas production and internal cell characteristics were measured to determine the effects of mechanical processing, moisture content, and leachate pH.

  1. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  2. Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks 

    E-print Network

    Sprague, Stephen M.

    2011-02-22

    such as plastic bottles, rubber tires, paper, aluminum cans, glass bottles, and scrap metal. The removal of these items will enable organic materials to occupy a greater percentage of the landfill space. These items degrade much more quickly than non-organic..., computers, tires, and refrigerators. These are the materials generally disposed of in landfills along with some other materials not classified as MSW such as construction debris, municipal waste treatment sludge, and non-hazardous industrial waste although...

  3. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-30

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

  4. USING LANDFILL GAS IN FUEL CELLS - A STEP CLOSER TO COMMERICAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses Phase II and Phase III results of a U.S. EPA program underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation. The program involves controlling methane emissions from landfills using a fuel cell. The fuel cell would reduce air emissions affecting global warming, aci...

  5. Microbial Methane Oxidation Processes and Technologies for Mitigation of Landfill Gas Emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this paper is to review the present knowledge regarding the microbial methane oxidation in natural or engineered landfill environments with focus on process understanding, engineering experiences and modeling. This review includes seven sections. First, the methane oxidation is put in con...

  6. Gas composition shifts in Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Schettler, P.D.; Parmely, C.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Analysis of the gas composition of Devonian shale wells indicates that the composition of produced gas shifts during the production history of the well. Possible mechanisms to explain this behavior are examined in light of field and laboratory data. Application of diffusion theory is made to explain adsorption-like behavior exhibited by some shales.

  7. Thermodynamic stability, spectroscopic identification, and gas storage capacity of CO2-CH4-N2 mixture gas hydrates: implications for landfill gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Hoon; Ahn, Sook-Hyun; Nam, Byong-Uk; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Gang-Woo; Moon, Donghyun; Shin, Hyung Joon; Han, Kyu Won; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Landfill gas (LFG), which is primarily composed of CH(4), CO(2), and N(2), is produced from the anaerobic digestion of organic materials. To investigate the feasibility of the storage and transportation of LFG via the formation of hydrate, we observed the phase equilibrium behavior of CO(2)-CH(4)-N(2) mixture hydrates. When the specific molar ratio of CO(2)/CH(4) was 40/55, the equilibrium dissociation pressures were gradually shifted to higher pressures and lower temperatures as the mole fraction of N(2) increased. X-ray diffraction revealed that the CO(2)-CH(4)-N(2) mixture hydrate prepared from the CO(2)/CH(4)/N(2) (40/55/5) gas mixture formed a structure I clathrate hydrate. A combination of Raman and solid-state (13)C NMR measurements provided detailed information regarding the cage occupancy of gas molecules trapped in the hydrate frameworks. The gas storage capacity of LFG hydrates was estimated from the experimental results for the hydrate formations under two-phase equilibrium conditions. We also confirmed that trace amounts of nonmethane organic compounds do not affect the cage occupancy of gas molecules or the thermodynamic stability of LFG hydrates. PMID:22380606

  8. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, ?(b), and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D(p)/D(o), ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k(a)) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting ?(b) values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm(-3). Results showed that D(p) and k(a) values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content (?), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D(p)/D(f), the ratio of measured D(p) to D(p) in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k(a)/k(a)(,pF4.1), the ratio of measured k(a) to k(a) at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content (?) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D(p)(?/f) and k(a)(?/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D(p) and P for k(a)). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to ?(b) values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models. PMID:21813272

  9. Alachua county southwest landfill gas production as a function of time. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, G.R.

    1992-05-01

    Refuse disposal is an issue that must be addressed by virtually every community in the country. In the last twenty years, the demand for disposal techniques that minimize impact on the environment has increased. In addition, there has been a heightened interest in energy recovery from wastes as a method to reduce both the cost of waste disposal and national dependence on foreign energy supplies. The most common method of solid waste disposal in the United States is the utilization of sanitary landfills. Landfilling remains an economically viable method of solid waste disposal. Alternative means of disposal have often proven to be less effective in terms of both cost and in meeting solid waste disposal demands.

  10. PAEs and BPA removal in landfill leachate with Fenton process and its relationship with leachate DOM composition.

    PubMed

    He, Pin-Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Li-Ming; Tang, Qiong-Yao

    2009-08-15

    An increasing attention has been paid to the trace endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in landfill leachate. In this paper, the removal of EDCs including phthalic acid esters (PAEs) and bisphenol A (BPA) from the fresh and mature landfill leachate by Fenton treatment was studied. More than 40% of PAEs and about 62% of BPA were removed from the raw mature leachate while only 20% of PAEs and 37% of BPA in the raw fresh leachate were reduced, respectively. After the fresh and mature leachates were spiked with PAEs to 1.5 mg L(-1) and BPA to 0.08 mg L(-1), the removal efficiencies of BPA and PAEs increased to more than 88%. The results indicated that the removing efficiencies of the EDCs in the leachate had a relationship with their concentrations, and that the trace levels of EDCs in leachate challenged the treatment capacity of the Fenton process. Most of the EDCs in the enriched leachate were removed by oxidation, which had no clear correlation with the hydrophobicity of the EDCs. The flocculation played an important role in the removal of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate that could not be completely oxidized in the Fenton process, in that the EDCs with high n-octanol/water partition coefficient inclined to precipitate after the Fenton process. The dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the fresh leachate inhibited the EDCs removal more than the DOM in the mature leachate did. Both the composition of the leachate DOM and the characteristics of the EDCs determined the removing efficiencies of the EDCs in the Fenton process. PMID:19520416

  11. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ? 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water was 29%, while the moisture content, the mass of water divided by total wet mass of solid waste, was 28%. Near the sloped sides of the landfill, PTT results indicated that only 7.1% of the pore space was filled with water, while the moisture content was estimated to be 6.9%. These measurements are in close agreement with gravimetric measurements made on solid waste samples collected after each PTT: moisture content of 27% in the center of the landfill and only 6% near the edge of the landfill. We discuss these measurements in detail, the limitations of the PTT method for landfills, and operational guidelines for achieving unbiased measurements of moisture content in landfills using the PTT method.

  12. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  13. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  14. OUTER LOOP LANDFILL CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will describe the interim data reaulting from a CRADA between USEPA and Waste Management, Inc. at the outer Loop Landfill Bioreactor research project located in Louisville, KY. Recently updated data will be presented covering landfill solids, gas being collecte...

  15. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  16. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  17. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

  18. Mobile Robots for Localizing Gas Emission Sources on Landfill Sites: Is Bio-Inspiration the Way to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Neumann, Patrick P.; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully “translated” into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms. PMID:22319493

  19. Mobile robots for localizing gas emission sources on landfill sites: is bio-inspiration the way to go?

    PubMed

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Neumann, Patrick P; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully "translated" into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms. PMID:22319493

  20. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  1. Gas plume modeling of landfill emissions - a real-life engineering application of large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, B.; Chow, F. K.; Han, B.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    Methane emissions from landfills pose a challenge not only for mitigation of greenhouse gases, but for regulatory monitoring efforts which seek to quantify these emissions. Current measurement practices are usually based on and limited by sparse and/or infrequent field measurements. Mesoscale atmospheric models, on the other hand, can provide better spatial and temporal coverage of the impacted region, though their usefulness is traditionally limited to regional- and synoptic-scales, due to the coarse grid-spacing as well as the treatment of turbulence. In this study, we explore the use of state-of-the-art large-eddy simulations (LES), to model CH4 emissions from Sandtown Landfill in Delaware. Since LES can explicitly resolve the unsteady, turbulent atmospheric flows, it is potentially beneficial in assessing the local impact of the CH4 plume on a short-term (hourly) scale. It can thus be used to enhance interpretation of field measurements. To ensure a faithful representation of atmospheric flow, real initial and boundary conditions are provided through grid nesting from the mesoscale to the microscale. LES is performed on the innermost domain with 30 m horizontal grid spacing. In addition, we incorporate two existing techniques, a vegetation canopy model and a tracer decay method into our LES. The former provides a better representation of the flow, and the latter is used to calculate scalar plume advection/diffusion statistics. Model results are verified against surface and airborne observations. This numerical study demonstrates the usefulness of LES in a real-life environmental engineering application. The LES results are used to help interpret tracer dilution measurements of methane emission at this site, helping to explain plume meandering and differences in tracer concentrations measured at the surface versus aloft with a weather balloon. A snapshot of the gas plume, represented by an iso-surface contour.

  2. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  3. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maria, Francesco Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

  4. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Bernhard; Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20‰ to ?25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation–reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

  5. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Area with daily soil cover and active gas collection CE3: 60%. A4: Area with an intermediate soil cover, or a final soil cover not meeting the criteria for A5 below, and active gas collection CE4: 75%. A5: Area with a final soil cover of 3 feet or thicker of clay and/or geomembrane cover system and...

  6. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Area with daily soil cover and active gas collection CE3: 60%. A4: Area with an intermediate soil cover, or a final soil cover not meeting the criteria for A5 below, and active gas collection CE4: 75%. A5: Area with a final soil cover of 3 feet or thicker of clay and/or geomembrane cover system and...

  7. Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)

    SciTech Connect

    Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

    2010-01-07

    The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

  8. Bringing new life to old landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Rabasca, L.

    1996-01-01

    On the West Coast, Waste Management, Inc. is bringing new life to old landfills. The Bradley Landfill in Sun Valley, CA, just outside of Los Angeles, is being transformed into a recycling park, while a few hundred miles north, in the San Francisco Bay Area, an old landfill is now home to a transfer station and recycling center. WMI began transforming the landfill in the early 1990s.The first change was to process wood and green waste rather than landfilling it. In 1993, WMI added a sorting facility, and in 1994, after the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, the company added a construction and demolition debris (C and D) facility. There also is a landfill gas collection facility on the site. In the future, WMI hopes to add the following facilities: composting, railhaul, alternative fuels production, tire processing, and soil remediation. WMI also hopes several companies that use recycled materials as feedstock will build their plants at the landfill.

  9. Impacts of landfill New Source Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, W.G.; McGuigan, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    On May 30, 1991, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a Rule to control landfill gas (LFG) emissions under the authority of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Since that time the Rule has been modified significantly, with an emphasis on regulating large US landfills. To date, landfill owners and operators have not been affected by this new CAA regulation. However, with the Rule promulgated in early 1996 and its subsequent implementation by the states to follow by the end of the year, landfill owners and operators need to understand these new requirements and their associated costs. To this end, the goal of this paper is to provide insight into the impacts of the Rule on individual landfill sites. By performing the emission analyses specified in the Rule on actual landfills, and comparing these sites to others, an understanding can be gained on the potential impacts of the NSPS Rule`s requirements on individual landfills.

  10. Quantification of landfill methane using modified Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's waste model and error function analysis.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Siva Shangari; Agamuthu, P

    2014-10-01

    Waste management can be regarded as a cross-cutting environmental 'mega-issue'. Sound waste management practices support the provision of basic needs for general health, such as clean air, clean water and safe supply of food. In addition, climate change mitigation efforts can be achieved through reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management operations, such as landfills. Landfills generate landfill gas, especially methane, as a result of anaerobic degradation of the degradable components of municipal solid waste. Evaluating the mode of generation and collection of landfill gas has posted a challenge over time. Scientifically, landfill gas generation rates are presently estimated using numerical models. In this study the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Waste Model is used to estimate the methane generated from a Malaysian sanitary landfill. Key parameters of the model, which are the decay rate and degradable organic carbon, are analysed in two different approaches; the bulk waste approach and waste composition approach. The model is later validated using error function analysis and optimum decay rate, and degradable organic carbon for both approaches were also obtained. The best fitting values for the bulk waste approach are a decay rate of 0.08 y(-1) and degradable organic carbon value of 0.12; and for the waste composition approach the decay rate was found to be 0.09 y(-1) and degradable organic carbon value of 0.08. From this validation exercise, the estimated error was reduced by 81% and 69% for the bulk waste and waste composition approach, respectively. In conclusion, this type of modelling could constitute a sensible starting point for landfills to introduce careful planning for efficient gas recovery in individual landfills. PMID:25323145

  11. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein

    1999-01-11

    ''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ustohalova, Veronika . E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim; Widmann, Renatus

    2006-07-01

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  13. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling.

    PubMed

    Ustohalova, Veronika; Ricken, Tim; Widmann, Renatus

    2006-01-01

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section. PMID:16406761

  14. Quantifying Uncontrolled Air Emissions from Two Florida Landfills

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, trospospheric ozone, and urban smog. Measuring emissions from landfills presents unique challenges due to the large and variable source area, spatial and temporal variability of emissions, and...

  15. Methane emissions from MBT landfills.

    PubMed

    Heyer, K-U; Hupe, K; Stegmann, R

    2013-09-01

    Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency ("Umweltbundesamt"), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18-24 m(3)CH(4)/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH(4)/(m(2)h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000-135,000 t CO(2-eq.)/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government. PMID:23756351

  16. Landfills as a biorefinery to produce biomass and capture biogas.

    PubMed

    Bolan, N S; Thangarajan, R; Seshadri, B; Jena, U; Das, K C; Wang, H; Naidu, R

    2013-05-01

    While landfilling provides a simple and economic means of waste disposal, it causes environmental impacts including leachate generation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the introduction of gas recovery systems, landfills provide a potential source of methane (CH4) as a fuel source. Increasingly revegetation is practiced on traditionally managed landfill sites to mitigate environmental degradation, which also provides a source of biomass for energy production. Combustion of landfill gas for energy production contributes to GHG emission reduction mainly by preventing the release of CH4 into the atmosphere. Biomass from landfill sites can be converted to bioenergy through various processes including pyrolysis, liquefaction and gasification. This review provides a comprehensive overview on the role of landfills as a biorefinery site by focusing on the potential volumes of CH4 and biomass produced from landfills, the various methods of biomass energy conversion, and the opportunities and limitations of energy capture from landfills. PMID:23069612

  17. Acoustic composition sensor for cryogenic gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Luchik, T. S.; Back, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic sensor useful for the determination of the composition of a gaseous binary mixture in cryogenic liquid spills has been characterized. One version of the instrument traps a known mixture of helium and nitrogen at ambient temperature in a tube which is interrogated by sonic pulses to determine the speed of sound and hence the composition. Experimental data shows that this sensor is quite accurate. The second version uses two unconfined microphones which sense sound pulses. Experimental data acquired during mixing when liquid nitrogen is poured into a vessel of gaseous helium is presented. Data during transient cooling of the tubular sensor containing nitrogen when the sensor is dipped into liquid nitrogen and during transient warm-up when the sensor is withdrawn are also presented. This sensor is being developed for use in the mixing of liquid cryogens with gas evolution in the simulation of liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen explosion hazards.

  18. In situ denitrification in controlled landfill systems

    SciTech Connect

    Onay, T.T.; Pohland, F.G.

    1996-11-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfill disposal sites vary according to the operational stage of the landfill. Leachates from old landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable refuse substrates. The relative concentration accumulating as stabilization progresses is also influenced by washout as leachate is collected and removed for external treatment. However, in landfills operated as bioreactors with leachate containment, collection and in situ recirculation to accelerate decomposition of readily available organic fractions of the refuse, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to much higher levels. High leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations in landfill leachate have been reported, resulting in separate treatment challenges if direct discharge to either land or receiving waters is practiced. External treatment options for landfill leachate may involve complex physical-chemical and/or biological processes for removal of both high-strength organic and inorganic fractions, including nitrogen. Such separate leachate treatment systems are often costly and difficult to control on a continuum. Therefore, this study focused on the investigation of landfill ammonia nitrogen generation patterns, and the potential for its in situ attenuation and conversion in landfills constructed to permit sequential nitrification and denitrification using leachate recirculation. Accordingly, the landfill is constructed and operated as a controlled bioreactor system, with opportunity to convert ammonia to nitrate by nitrification and nitrate to nitrogen gas by denitrification. The results presented in this paper focus on in situ landfill denitrification of nitrified ammonia.

  19. Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

  20. Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system recovery for municipal solid waste management: a case study', Int. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 15,No results in increasing environmental pollution. The state of an economy, to a large extent, influences

  1. Theory for a gas composition sensor based on acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Scott; Dain, Yefim; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Sound travelling through a gas propagates at different speeds and its intensity attenuates to different degrees depending upon the composition of the gas. Theoretically, a real-time gaseous composition sensor could be based on measuring the sound speed and the acoustic attenuation. To this end, the speed of sound was modelled using standard relations, and the acoustic attenuation was modelled using the theory for vibrational relaxation of gas molecules. The concept for a gas composition sensor is demonstrated theoretically for nitrogen-methane-water and hydrogen-oxygen-water mixtures. For a three-component gas mixture, the measured sound speed and acoustic attenuation each define separate lines in the composition plane of two of the gases. The intersection of the two lines defines the gas composition. It should also be possible to use the concept for mixtures of more than three components, if the nature of the gas composition is known to some extent.

  2. Assessing methods to estimate emissions of non-methane organic compounds from landfills.

    PubMed

    Saquing, Jovita M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A; Scheutz, Charlotte; Blake, Don R; Imhoff, Paul T

    2014-11-01

    The non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emission rate is used to assess compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). A recent USEPA Report (EPA/600/R-11/033) employed a ratio method to estimate speciated NMOC emissions (i.e., individual NMOC emissions): speciated NMOC emissions=measured methane (CH4) emission multiplied by the ratio of individual NMOCs concentration relative to CH4 concentration (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in the landfill header gas. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of the ratio method in estimating speciated NMOC flux from landfills; (2) determine for what types of landfills the ratio method may be in error and why, using recent field data to quantify the spatial variation of (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in landfills; and (3) formulate alternative models for estimating NMOC emissions from landfills for cases in which the ratio method results in biased estimates. This study focuses on emissions through landfill covers measured with flux chambers and evaluates the utility of the ratio method for estimating NMOC emission through this pathway. Evaluation of the ratio method was performed using CH4 and speciated NMOC concentration and flux data from 2012/2013 field sampling of four landfills, an unpublished landfill study, and literature data from three landfills. The ratio method worked well for landfills with thin covers (<40 cm), predicting composite NMOC flux (as hexane-C) to within a factor of 10× for 13 out of 15 measurements. However, for thick covers (?40 cm) the ratio method overestimated NMOC emissions by ?10× for 8 out of 10 measurements. Alternative models were explored incorporating other chemical properties into the ratio method. A molecular weight squared (MW)(2)-modified ratio equation was shown to best address the tendency of the current ratio method to overestimate NMOC fluxes for thick covers. While these analyses were only performed using NMOC fluxes through landfill covers measured with flux chambers, results indicate the current USEPA approach for estimating NMOC emissions may overestimate speciated NMOC emission ?10× for many compounds. PMID:25108756

  3. Movement of unlined landfill under preloading surcharge.

    PubMed

    Al-Yaqout, Anwar F; Hamoda, Mohamed F

    2007-01-01

    As organic solid waste is decomposed in a landfill and mass is lost due to gas and leachate formation, the landfill settles. Settlement of a landfill interferes with the rehabilitation and subsequent use of the landfill site after closure. This study examined the soil/solid waste movement at the Al-Qurain landfill in Kuwait after 15 years of closure as plans are underway for redevelopment of the landfill site that occupies about a km(2) with an average depth of 8-15m. Field experiments were conducted for 6 mo to measure soil/solid waste movement and water behavior within the landfill using two settlement plates with a level survey access, Casagrande-type piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, and magnetic probe extensometers. Previous results obtained indicated that biological decomposition of refuse continued after closure of the landfill site. The subsurface water rise enhanced the biological activities, which resulted in the production of increasing quantities of landfill gas. The refuse fill materials recorded a high movement rate under the imposed preloading as a result of an increase in the stress state. Up to 55% of the total movement was observed during the first 2 weeks of fill placement and increased to 80% within the first month of the 6-mo preloading test. Pneumatic piezometers showed an increase in water head, which is attributed to the developed pressure of gases escaping during the preloading period. PMID:16574394

  4. Cleaner Landfills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Osmotek, Inc. developed the Direct Osmosis treatment system through SBIR funding from Ames Research Center. Using technology originally developed for flight aboard the Space Station, the company brought it to their commercial water purification treatment system, Direct Osmosis. This water purification system uses a direct osmosis process followed by a reverse osmosis treatment. Because the product extracts water from a waste product, Osmotek is marketing the unit for use in landfills. The system can treat leachate (toxic chemicals leached into a water source), by filtering the water and leaving behind the leahcate. The leachate then becomes solidified into substance that can not seep into water.

  5. ESTIMATE OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM U.S. LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a statistical regression model used for estimating methane (CH4) emissions, which relates landfill gas (LFG) flow rates to waste-in-place data from 105 landfills with LFG recovery projects. (NOTE: CH4 flow rates from landfills with LFG reco...

  6. The Application Of Biofilter System For Reduction Of Methane Emissions From Modern Sanitary Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Park, S.

    2007-12-01

    Increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) caused by anthropogenic activities has been related to global climate change. Methane, the second most important GHG after CO2, is 21 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2. Therefore, methane emission control is of utmost importance for global warming reduction. To minimize leachate production and protect groundwater resources, modern sanitary landfills are equipped with composite covers and gas collection systems. Methane from modern sanitary landfills is vented directly to the atmosphere, except for some of the largest landfills where it is recovered as energy and burned at the site. However, the efficiency of energy recovery systems in larger landfills is reduced as the amount of CH4 generated from landfill begins to decrease. In this study, the performance of a lab-scale model biofilter system was investigated to treat CH4 gas emitted from modern sanitary landfills by conducting batch and column experiments using landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast as the filter bed medium. From the batch experiments to measure the influence of moisture content and temperature of the filter medium on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system, the optimum moisture content and temperature were found to be 10-15% by weight and 25-35°C, respectively. The column experiment was conducted to measure the influence of inlet CH4 concentration and CH4 loading rate on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system. As the inlet CH4 concentration decreased, the percentage of CH4 oxidized increased. Up to a CH4 loading rate of 2785 g CH4 m3 h- 1 (EBRT = 7.7 min), the CH4 removal efficiency of the biofilter was able to reach 100%. Based on the results of the study, the installation of a properly managed biofilter system should be capable of achieving a reduction in atmospheric CH4 emissions from modern sanitary landfills at low CH4 generation stage.

  7. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997) and has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and economic growth will continue to render landfilling as an important and necessary component of solid waste management. Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works, Division of Integrated Waste Management is demonstrating a new landfill technology called Bioreactor Landfill to better manage solid waste. In a Bioreactor Landfill, controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray-water, etc.) are added and recirculated to increase the moisture content of the waste and improve waste decomposition. As demonstrated in a small-scale demonstration project at the Yolo County Central Landfill in 1995, this process significantly increases the biodegradation rate of waste and thus decreases the waste stabilization and composting time (5 to 10 years) relative to what would occur within a conventional landfill (30 to 50 years or more). When waste decomposes anaerobically (in absence of oxygen), it produces landfill gas (biogas). Biogas is primarily a mixture of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which can be recovered for electricity or other uses. Other benefits of a bioreactor landfill composting operation include increased landfill waste settlement which increases in landfill capacity and life, improved leachate chemistry, possible reduction of landfill post-closure management time, opportunity to explore decomposed waste for landfill mining, and abatement of greenhouse gases through highly efficient methane capture over a much shorter period of time than is typical of waste management through conventional landfilling. This project also investigates the aerobic decomposition of waste of 13,000 tons of waste (2.5 acre) for elimination of methane production and acceleration of waste decomposition. In the first phase of this project a 12-acre module that contains a 9.5-acre anaerobic cell and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell has been constructed and filled with over 220,000 tons of municipal solid waste. Water and leachate addition began in April 2002 and to date less than 200,000 gallons of liquid has been added to the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell. The waste filling phase of the aerobic cell was completed in June of 2002 and a 12-inches soil cover and 12-inches of greenwaste compost cover was placed on top of the cell. A vacuum will be applied to the piping within the waste to draw air through the landfill. Instrumentations have been installed to monitor the following parameters: waste temperature, moisture, leachate volumes, leachate hydraulic head over the primary liner, leachate composition, gas volumes and composition. A supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed to monitor and control the operation of the bioreactor cells. Waste samples were taken from each cell for laboratory testing in early June 2002.

  8. The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Assamoi, Bernadette; Lawryshyn, Yuri

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

  9. 30 CFR 36.26 - Composition of exhaust gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composition of exhaust gas. 36.26 Section 36.26... EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.26 Composition of exhaust gas. (a) Preliminary engine... immediately at full load and speed. The preliminary liquid-fuel-injection rate shall be such that the...

  10. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1998-07-01

    Smooth, dense, uniformly thick membranes were solution cast from poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) and their permeability properties were investigated for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} (P{sub N{sub 2}} = 5.8 {+-} 0.4, P{sub O{sub 2}} = 15.6 {+-} 0.8, P{sub CH{sub 4}} = 17.8 {+-} 1.4, P{sub CO{sub 2}} = 63.6 {+-} 2.2 Barrers), and selectivity properties were calculated ({alpha}{sub O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 2.7 {+-} 0.2, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 11.2 {+-} 0.8, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}} = 3.6 {+-} 0.2). NaY/POT composite membranes (20, 30, and 40% w/w zeolite) were prepared by stirring the polymer into a zeolitic suspension. Facilitated transport of gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2}) was observed for each of the zeolite loadings, the magnitude of which depended on the chemical nature of the gas and polymer/zeolite-penetrant interaction. Maximum facilitation was observed for 40% NaY/POT composite membranes (Facilitation ratio of N{sub 2} = 0.38 {+-} 0.03, O{sub 2} = 0.56 {+-} 0.02, CH{sub 4} = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, CO{sub 2} = 0.71 {+-} 0.02). An increase in the selectivity of gases was also observed for all zeolite loadings.

  11. Early rhizosphere microbiome composition is related to the growth and Zn uptake of willows introduced to a former landfill.

    PubMed

    Bell, Terrence H; Cloutier-Hurteau, Benoît; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Turmel, Marie-Claude; Yergeau, Etienne; Courchesne, François; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Although plants introduced for site restoration are pre-selected for specific traits (e.g. trace element bioaccumulation, rapid growth in poor soils), the in situ success of these plants likely depends on the recruitment of appropriate rhizosphere microorganisms from their new environment. We introduced three willow (Salix spp.) cultivars to a contaminated landfill, and performed soil chemical analyses, plant measurements, and Ion Torrent sequencing of rhizospheric fungal and bacterial communities at 4 and 16 months post-planting. The abundance of certain dominant fungi was linked to willow accumulation of Zn, the most abundant trace element at the site. Interestingly, total Zn accumulation was better explained by fungal community structure 4 months post-planting than 16 months post-planting, suggesting that initial microbial recruitment may be critical. In addition, when the putative ectomycorrhizal fungi Sphaerosporella brunnea and Inocybe sp. dominated the rhizosphere 4 months post-planting, Zn accumulation efficiency was negatively correlated with fungal diversity. Although field studies such as this rely on correlation, these results suggest that the soil microbiome may have the greatest impact on plant function during the early stages of growth, and that plant-fungus specificity may be essential. PMID:25970820

  12. MANAGEMENT OF GAS AND LEACHATE IN LANDFILLS: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (3RD) HELD AT ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI ON MARCH 14, 15 AND 16, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Current research on land disposal of municipal solid wastes; Summary of office of solid waste gas and leachate activities; State of Missouri solid waste management activities; Region VII solid waste activities; Landfill research activities in Canada; The effects of indu...

  13. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area. PMID:26445364

  14. Characterization and control of odorous gases at a landfill site: a case study in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ding; Chuanyu, Cai; Bin, Hu; Yueen, Xu; Xuejuan, Zheng; Yingxu, Chen; Weixiang, Wu

    2012-02-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are one of the major sources of offensive odors potentially creating annoyance in adjacent communities. At the end of May 2007, an odor pollution incident occurred at the Tianziling landfill site, Hangzhou, China, where the residents lodged complaints about the intense odor from the landfill, which drew a significant attention from the government. In this study, ambient air monitoring was conducted at the Tianziling landfill site. The main odor composition of the gas samples collected on June 1st 2007 and the reduction of various odorous gases from the samples collected on June 1st 2009 due to the applied odor control techniques were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, variations of primary odorous gaseous (NH(3) and H(2)S) concentrations at different locations in the landfill site from July 2007 to June 2009 were also investigated by using classical spectrophotometric methods. Results showed that a total of 68 volatile compounds were identified among which H(2)S (56.58-579.84 ?g/m(3)) and NH(3) (520-4460 ?g/m(3)) were the notable odor components contributing to 4.47-10.92% and 83.91-93.94% of total concentrations, respectively. Similar spatial and temporal shifts of H(2)S and NH(3) concentrations were observed and were significantly affected by environmental factors including temperature, air pressure and wind direction. Odor pollution was worse when high temperature, high humidity, low air pressure, and southeast, northeast or east wind appeared. Moreover, the environmental sampling points of the dumping area and the leachate treatment plant were found to be the main odor sources at the Tianziling landfill site. The odor control technologies used in this project had a good mitigating effect on the primary odorous compounds. This study provides long-term valuable information concerning the characteristics and control of odors at landfill sites in a long run. PMID:22137772

  15. Ground penetrating radar characterization of a landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochim, April Theresa

    Ground penetrating radar was investigated in an active landfill to determine if the in-situ water content could be measured. Water content is an important parameter in predicting the generation of landfill gas (LFG), an important renewable energy source. Unfortunately, predicting the quantity of LFG is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in a landfill and the lack of in-situ input parameters. GPR is a non-invasive, near-surface geophysical technique that provides high resolution images of dielectric properties in the earth's subsurface. A transmitter emits high frequency (10 - 1000 MHz) electromagnetic pulses through the subsurface, with the receiver recording the echo. Specialized software is then used to create images of the subsurface. The challenge with using GPR in landfills is the heterogeneity of the subsurface and the clay cap linear covering landfills, both affecting the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses. The use of GPR in a landfill was evaluated at the Region of Waterloo's Waste Management Centre. Measurements were completed using both the surface and the borehole approach. The results indicated that a borehole GPR can be used, with successful measurement of water content a function of borehole separation distance and frequency of the electromagnetic pulses. The developed approach was confirmed at the City of Hamilton's Glanbrook Landfill. The successful comparison of in-situ water content values to laboratory determined values at both landfills shows that GPR can be used to measure in-situ water content.

  16. Degradability of Chlorinated Solvents in Landfill Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Litman, M.

    2002-12-01

    The use of landfills as an in situ remediation system represents a cost-effective alternative for groundwater remediation in the source area. This research was conducted to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). This research, using excavated refuse samples, studied how the reductive dechlorination of CAHs is linked to the decomposition of solid waste in landfills. Most research effort in groundwater remediation has focused on the contaminant plumes beneath and downgradient from landfills, while the source area remediation has received increasing attention. Bioreactor landfill and leachate recirculation projects have been planned and implemented by the USEPA and some states. However, the use of bioreactor landfill has primarily been considered only to expedite refuse decomposition. This research provides an understanding of the biological fate of CAHs in landfills, an understanding that can lead to the bioreactor landfill system designed to promote the degradation of pollutants right at the source. The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples were excavated from a municipal solid waste landfill located in Wayland, Massachusetts, USA. Bioreactors were designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. For each reactor, leachate was collected and recirculated back to the reactor and gas was collected into a gas bag and the methane production rate was monitored. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at about 20 uM each in leachate. The design is to study the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. Changes of biochemical conditions in bioreactors, including leachate pH, leachate COD, and methane production, were monitored throughout the refuse decomposition process. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Complementary to the bioreactor experiment, the serum bottle experiment was designed to investigate specific conditions that potentially control or limit the reductive dechlorination of CAHs in landfills. The conditions tested include 1) inhibited refuse methanogenesis, 2) enhanced methanogenic refuse decomposition, 3) presence of other organic carbons commonly found in landfills such as cellulose, lactate, ethanol, and acetate and 4) presence of yeast extract and humic acids which are commonly found in aged landfills. This research investigated the degradability, the degradation rate, and the extent of dechlorination of CAHs in a landfill ecosystem as the refuse decomposition progresses. The results can lead to a broader application of the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of landfills. An in situ remedial strategy directly tackling the contaminant source can minimize the risk of future impact and achieve a significant saving in remediation cost. The information of contaminant fate in landfills can also help regulatory agencies formulate risk-based guidelines for post-closure monitoring programs and potential re-development projects.

  17. Landfills in New York City: 1844--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.C.; LaFleur, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Historic topographic maps are reviewed to locate landfills constructed within New York City during four time intervals between 1844 and 1994. A total of 184.75 km{sup 2} (45,650 acres) of landfill are identified (approximately 20% of the study area). Data are not available to determine the fill composition at most sites but literature sources indicate that municipal solid waste (MSW) has been an important source of fill since at least 1891. Qualitative temporal trends in the spatial distribution of landfills and the composition and thickness of MSW landfills are observed. The oldest landfills are clustered in the vicinity of the early urban center (southern New York County) but expand in spatial distribution after the turn of this century. Logs of borings through 10 MSW landfills show that waste landfills built prior to the mid-1950s contain abundant ash (coal ash is common in the oldest landfills) and are relatively thin (3--7 m) with no topographic mounding. In MSW landfills built since that time, uncombusted organic matter is abundant, thicknesses increase greatly (16--27 m), and pronounced topographic mounding is observed. Most landfills identified in this study were built on tidal wetlands. Fine-grained wetland deposits underlying the landfills and close proximity to large surface-water bodies favor lateral transport of leachate from MSW landfills in shallow ground water and local discharge to surface water. The wide distribution of historic landfills and common use of MSW for fill indicates that these sites should be considered in investigations of ground water, surface water, and sediment quality in New York City and other urban areas where extensive historic landfilling has occurred.

  18. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M. Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors, dispersion coefficients of Cu, ranging from 3.47 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s to 5.37 x 10{sup -2} m{sup 2}/s, was determined to be higher than others obtained for Zn and Fe. Average molecular diffusion coefficients of phenolic compounds were estimated to be about 5.64 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 5.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 2.69 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s and 3.29 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s for R1, R2, R3 and R4 systems, respectively. The findings of this study clearly indicated that about 35-50% of transport of phenolic compounds to the groundwater is believed to be prevented with the use of zeolite and bentonite materials in landfill liner systems.

  19. Determination of nonylphenol isomers in landfill leachate and municipal wastewater using steam distillation extraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Caixiang; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Pontolillo, James; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Wang, Yanxin

    2012-01-01

    4-Nonylphenols (4-NPs) are known endocrine disruptors and by-products of the microbial degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylate surfactants. One of the challenges to understanding the toxic effects of nonylphenols is the large number of isomers that may exist in environmental samples. In order to attribute toxic effects to specific compounds, a method is needed for the separation and quantitation of individual nonylphenol isomers. The pre-concentration methods of solvent sublimation, solid-phase extraction or liquid–liquid extraction prior to chromatographic analysis can be problematic because of co-extraction of thousands of compounds typically found in complex matrices such as municipal wastewater or landfill leachate. In the present study, steam distillation extraction (SDE) was found to be an effective pre-concentration method for extraction of 4-NPs from leachate and wastewater, and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled with fast mass spectral data acquisition by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) enhanced the resolution and identification of 4-NP isomers. Concentrations of eight 4-NP isomers were determined in leachate from landfill cells of different age and wastewater influent and effluent samples. 4-NP isomers were about 3 times more abundant in leachate from the younger cell than the older one, whereas concentrations in wastewater effluent were either below detection limits or <1% of influent concentrations. 4-NP isomer distribution patterns were found to have been altered following release to the environment. This is believed to reflect isomer-specific degradation and accumulation of 4-NPs in the aquatic environment.

  20. Corrosion inhibition by control of gas composition during mist drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Snyder, T.L.

    1981-05-01

    Chemical compositional specifications have been generated for inert gases which reduce drill string corrosion when used in conjunction with mist drilling processes. These specifications are based on the assumption that the corrosion rate is dependent on the dissolved gaseous species concentrations. Data taken both from the literature and from a mist drilling field test with nitrogen in Valle Grande, NM, relate corrosion rates to fluid compositions. These solution compositions are then associated with gas phase compositions using equilibrium data available from the literature and material balances. Two sources of gas were considered: cryogenically purified nitrogen from air and exhaust gas from a diesel engine, which contain (in addition to N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/) CO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, and CO. A maximum concentration of 50 ppM O/sub 2/ in the gas phase is recommended to alleviate pitting corrosion.

  1. An absorption spectrum amplifier for determining gas composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, E. F.; Peterson, N. C.; Kurylo, M. J.; Bass, A. M.; Brown, W.; Keller, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Compositions of gas samples are frequently studied by laser absorption spectroscopy. Sensitivity is improved by two orders of magnitude when absorption cell is placed inside an organic-dye laser cavity.

  2. Development of an empirical model of methane emissions from landfills. Final report Mar-Dec 91

    SciTech Connect

    Peer, R.L.; Epperson, D.L.; Campbell, D.L.; von Brook, P.

    1992-03-01

    The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. Site-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (refuse mass), average age of the refuse, and climate. A correlation analysis showed that refuse mass was positively linearly correlated with landfill depth, volume, area, and well depth. Regression of the CH4 recovery rate on depth, refuse mass, and volume was significant, but depth was the best predictive variable (R2 = 0.53). Refuse mass was nearly as good (R2 = 0.50). None of the climate variables (precipitation, average temperature, dewpoint) were correlated with the CH4 recovery rate or with CH4 recovery per metric ton of refuse. Much of the variability in CH4 recovery remains unexplained, and is likely due to between-site differences in landfill construction, operation, and refuse composition. A model for global landfill emissions estimation is proposed.

  3. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  4. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa; Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2007-07-01

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

  5. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Janus T; Birgisdottir, Harpa; Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael; Christensen, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion. PMID:17382531

  6. LANDFILL GAS CONVERSION TO LNG AND LCO{sub 2}. PHASE 1, FINAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 1998-FEBRUARY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    COOK,W.J.; NEYMAN,M.; SIWAJEK,L.A.; BROWN,W.R.; VAN HAUWAERT,P.M.; CURREN,E.D.

    1998-02-25

    Process designs and economics were developed to produce LNG and liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas (LFG) using the Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process. The patented Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process uses liquid CO{sub 2} to absorb contaminants from the LFG. The process steps are compression, drying, CO{sub 2} wash contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery, residual CO{sub 2} removal and methane liquefaction. Three flowsheets were developed using different residual CO{sub 2} removal schemes. These included physical solvent absorption (methanol), membranes and molecular sieves. The capital and operating costs of the flowsheets were very similar. The LNG production cost was around ten cents per gallon. In parallel with process flowsheet development, the business aspects of an eventual commercial project have been explored. The process was found to have significant potential commercial application. The business plan effort investigated the economics of LNG transportation, fueling, vehicle conversion, and markets. The commercial value of liquid CO{sub 2} was also investigated. This Phase 1 work, March 1998 through February 1999, was funded under Brookhaven National laboratory contract 725089 under the research program entitled ``Liquefied Natural Gas as a Heavy Vehicle Fuel.'' The Phase 2 effort will develop flowsheets for the following: (1) CO{sub 2} and pipeline gas production, with the pipeline methane being liquefied at a peak shaving site, (2) sewage digester gas as an alternate feedstock to LFG and (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling. Phase 2 will also study the modification of Acrion's process demonstration unit for the production of LNG and a market site for LNG production.

  7. Gas composition sensing using carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and system for estimating one, two or more unknown components in a gas. A first array of spaced apart carbon nanotubes (''CNTs'') is connected to a variable pulse voltage source at a first end of at least one of the CNTs. A second end of the at least one CNT is provided with a relatively sharp tip and is located at a distance within a selected range of a constant voltage plate. A sequence of voltage pulses {V(t.sub.n)}.sub.n at times t=t.sub.n (n=1, . . . , N1; N1.gtoreq.3) is applied to the at least one CNT, and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of a curve I(t.sub.n) for current or a curve e(t.sub.n) for electric charge transported from the at least one CNT to the constant voltage plate. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas.

  8. COMPOSITION OF LOW-REDSHIFT HALO GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Renyue

    2013-06-20

    Halo gas in low-z (z < 0.5) {>=}0.1 L{sub *} galaxies in high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is examined with respect to three components: cold, warm, and hot with temperatures of <10{sup 5}, 10{sup 5-6}, and >10{sup 6} K, respectively. Utilizing O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 absorption lines, the warm component is compared to observations, and agreement is found with respect to the galaxy-O VI line correlation, the ratio of the O VI line incidence rate in blue to red galaxies, and the amount of O VI mass in star-forming galaxies. A detailed account of the sources of warm halo gas (stellar feedback heating, gravitational shock heating, and accretion from the intergalactic medium), inflowing and outflowing warm halo gas metallicity disparities, and their dependencies on galaxy types and environment is also presented. With the warm component securely anchored, our simulations make the following additional predictions. First, cold gas is the primary component in inner regions with its mass comprising 50% of all gas within galactocentric radius r = (30, 150) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies. Second, at r > (30, 200) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies the hot component becomes the majority. Third, the warm component is a perpetual minority, with its contribution peaking at {approx}30% at r = 100-300 kpc in blue galaxies and never exceeding 5% in red galaxies. The significant amount of cold gas in low-z early-type galaxies, which was found in simulations and in agreement with recent observations (Thom et al.), is intriguing, as is the dominance of hot gas at large radii in blue galaxies.

  9. Landfill disposal systems.

    PubMed

    Slimak, K M

    1978-12-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated.A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual inspections and any repairs can be made without disturbing the waste. The surface seal landfill does not employ a subsurface barrier. The surface seal landfill successfully addresses each of the four environmental problems listed above, provided that this landfill design is utilized for dry wastes only and is located at a site which provides protection from groundwater and temporary perched water tables. PMID:738247

  10. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  11. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  12. Critical evaluation of factors required to terminate the postclosure monitoring period at solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Barlaz, Morton A; Rooker, Alix P; Kjeldsen, Peter; Gabr, Mohammed A; Bordent, Robert C

    2002-08-15

    Regulations governing the disposal of solid waste in landfills specify that they must be monitored for 30 years after closure unless this period is extended by the governing regulatory authority. Given the wide range of conditions under which refuse is buried, technical criteria, rather than a specific time period, are preferable for evaluation of when it is acceptable to terminate postclosure monitoring. The objectives of this paper are to identify and evaluate parameters that can be used to define the end of the postclosure monitoring period and to present a conceptual framework for an investigation of whether postclosure monitoring can be terminated at a landfill. Parameters evaluated include leachate composition and leachate and gas production. Estimates of leachate production from closed landfills are used to assess the potential environmental impacts of a hypothetical release to surface water or groundwater. The acceptability of gaseous releases should be evaluated against criteria for odors, the potential for subsurface migration, and greenhouse gas and ozone precursor emissions. The approach presented here must be tested on a site-specific basis to identify additional data requirements and regulatory activity that might be required to prepare regulators for the large number of requests to terminate postclosure monitoring expected over the next 20 years. An approach in which the frequency and extent of postclosure monitoring is reduced as warranted by site-specific data and impact analysis should provide an effective strategy to manage closed landfills. PMID:12214635

  13. Hydrological and geochemical factors affecting leachate composition in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Part II. The geochemistry of leachate from Landfill Lostorf, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. Annette; Kaeppeli, Michael; Brandenberger, Sandro; Ulrich, Andrea; Baumann, Werner

    1999-12-01

    The leachate composition of the Landfill Lostorf, Buchs, Switzerland has been examined as a function rain events and dry periods between November 1994 and November 1996. Discharge and electrical conductivity of the central drainage discharge were monitored continuously, whilst samples for chemical analysis were taken at discrete intervals. The average total concentrations of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca and SO 4 are 44.5, 47.1, 11.8, 0.63, 8.2 and 12.4 mM, respectively. During rain events, the leachate is diluted by the preferential flow of rainwater into the drainage discharge. Drainage discharge pH values range between 8.68 and 11.28, the latter under dry conditions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that CaSO 4, ettringite (3CaOAl 2O 3CaSO 4·32H 2O) and Al(OH) 3 may control the concentrations of the components Ca, SO 4 and Al. Dissolved Si may be in thermodynamic equilibrium with either Ca silicate hydrate or imogolite. Cadmium, Mo, V, Mn and Zn are also diluted during rain events and concentration changes agree with those of conductivity (representing the major constituents). Average concentrations are 0.012, 5.4, 2.3, 0.085, and 0.087 ?M, respectively. Components such as Al, Cu, Sb and Cr increase in concentration with increased discharge. Average concentrations are 1.6, 0.27 and 0.21 ?M, respectively. For Cu, the explanation lies in its affinity for total organic carbon (TOC). Thermodynamic calculations indicate that whilst dissolution/precipitation reactions with metal hydroxides and carbonates can explain the observed concentrations of Cd, sorption and complexation reactions probably influence the concentrations of Cu, Pb (average measurable concentration 0.013 ?M), Zn and Mn. For the oxyanion species such as MoO 4 and WO 4 (average concentration 0.61 ?M), it is probable that Ca metallate formation plays a dominant role in determining concentration ranges. Geochemical processes appear to determine concentration ranges and the hydrological factors, the fluctuations in concentration.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. Site-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (...

  15. ESTIMATE OF GLOBAL METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS AND OPEN DUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an empirical model to estimate global methane (CH4) emissions from landfills and open dumps based on EPA data from landfill gas (LFG) recovery projects. The EPA CH4 estimates for 1990 range between 19 and 40 teragrams (10 to the 12th power) per year (Tg/yr), w...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. ite-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (r...

  17. 40 CFR 60.752 - Standards for air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Because of the many site-specific factors involved with landfill gas system design...entire area of the landfill that warrants control...group of cells in the landfill in which the initial...to minimize off-site migration of...

  18. 40 CFR 60.752 - Standards for air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Because of the many site-specific factors involved with landfill gas system design...entire area of the landfill that warrants control...group of cells in the landfill in which the initial...to minimize off-site migration of...

  19. 40 CFR 60.752 - Standards for air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Because of the many site-specific factors involved with landfill gas system design...entire area of the landfill that warrants control...group of cells in the landfill in which the initial...to minimize off-site migration of...

  20. 40 CFR 60.752 - Standards for air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Because of the many site-specific factors involved with landfill gas system design...entire area of the landfill that warrants control...group of cells in the landfill in which the initial...to minimize off-site migration of...

  1. 40 CFR 60.752 - Standards for air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Because of the many site-specific factors involved with landfill gas system design...entire area of the landfill that warrants control...group of cells in the landfill in which the initial...to minimize off-site migration of...

  2. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1999-01-01

    Poly 2-(3-thienyl)ethylacetate (PAET) was synthesized and solution cast as thin films to form dense membranes. These membranes are mechanically robust and are redox active, holding out promise as gas separation materials. The permeability properties of PAET membranes were evaluated for N{sub 2} (0.048 {+-} 0.008 Barrers), O{sub 2} (0.24 {+-} 0.02 Barrers), CH{sub 4} (0.081 {+-} 0.005 Barrers), and CO{sub 2} (1.4 {+-} 0.1 Barrers). The corresponding selectivity values ({alpha}) were: O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 5.1, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 29, and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} = 18.

  3. Environmental applications using graphene composites: water remediation and gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, K. Christian; Seema, Humaira; Saleh, Muhammad; Le, Nhien H.; Mahesh, Kandula; Chandra, Vimlesh; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-03-01

    This review deals with wide-ranging environmental studies of graphene-based materials on the adsorption of hazardous materials and photocatalytic degradation of pollutants for water remediation and the physisorption, chemisorption, reactive adsorption, and separation for gas storage. The environmental and biological toxicity of graphene, which is an important issue if graphene composites are to be applied in environmental remediation, is also addressed.

  4. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method.

    PubMed

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Whole-site methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills were assessed using a mobile tracer dispersion method with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), using nitrous oxide as a tracer gas, or cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS), using acetylene as a tracer gas. The landfills were chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2)d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was 154 tons y(-1). This average was obtained from a few measurement campaigns conducted at each of the 15 landfills and extrapolating to annual emissions requires more measurements. Assuming that these landfills are representative of the average Danish landfill, the total emission from Danish landfills were calculated at 20,600 tons y(-1), which is significantly lower than the 33,300 tons y(-1) estimated for the national greenhouse gas inventory for 2011. PMID:25442105

  5. Fuel composition effects on natural gas vehicle emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, C.F.; Grimes, J.; Freeman, P.; Bailey, B.K.; Colucci, C.

    1994-09-01

    Under a contract from DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and support from Brooklyn Union Gas Company (BUG), Northern Illinois Gas Co., the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) evaluated four state-of-the-art, electronic, closed-loop natural gas vehicle (NGV) conversion systems. The systems included an Impco electronic closed-loop system, Mogas electronic closed-loop system, Stewart and Stevenson`s GFI system, and an Automotive Natural Gas Inc. (ANGI) Level 1 electronic closed-loop conversion system. Conversion system evaluation included emission testing per 40 CFR Part 86, and driveability. All testing was performed with a 1993 Chevy Lumina equipped with a 3.1 liter MPFI V6 engine. Each system was emission tested using three different certified compositions of natural gas, representing the 10th, mean and 90th percentile gas compositions distributed in the United States. Emission testing on indolene was performed prior to conversion kit testing to establish a base emission value. Indolene testing was also performed at the end of the project when the vehicle was converted to its OEM configuration to ensure that the vehicle`s emissions were not altered during testing. The results of these tests will be presented.

  6. Geothermal gas compositions in yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheppard, D.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Janik, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Gas samples collected between 1974 and 1986 have been analysed for the ten major components. Samples have been collected almost exclusively from the tops of pools, which has degraded the value of the data, and limited inter-comparisons to the relatively insoluble components, Ar, N2, CH4, H2 and He. A general gas distribution pattern in the park, in terms of these components, shows the major heat source(s) to underlie the Gibbon and Mud Volcano areas with all other geothermal areas having gas compositions consistent with a general north-south water flow. Shoshone Basin gases show a large range of compositions and these are analysed in detail. The patterns conform to that which would be expected from an east-west flow or fluid with progressive boiling and subsequent dilution. ?? 1992.

  7. Geothermal gas compositions in yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. S.; Truesdell, A. H.; Janik, C. J.

    1992-06-01

    Gas samples collected between 1974 and 1986 have been analysed for the ten major components. Samples have been collected almost exclusively from the tops of pools, which has degraded the value of the data, and limited inter-comparisons to the relatively insoluble components, Ar, N 2, CH 4, H 2 and He. A general gas distribution pattern in the park, in terms of these components, shows the major heat source(s) to underlie the Gibbon and Mud Volcano areas with all other geothermal areas having gas compositions consistent with a general north-south water flow. Shoshone Basin gases show a large range of compositions and these are analysed in detail. The patterns conform to that which would be expected from an east-west flow or fluid with progressive boiling and subsequent dilution.

  8. Bioreactor landfill technology in municipal solid waste treatment: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Mudhoo, Ackmez

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, due to an advance in knowledge of landfill behaviour and decomposition processes of municipal solid waste, there has been a strong thrust to upgrade existing landfill technologies for optimizing these degradation processes and thereafter harness a maximum of the useful bioavailable matter in the form of higher landfill gas generation rates. Operating landfills as bioreactors for enhancing the stabilization of wastes is one such technology option that has been recently investigated and has already been in use in many countries. A few full-scale implementations of this novel technology are gaining momentum in landfill research and development activities. The publication of bioreactor landfill research has resulted in a wide pool of knowledge and useful engineering data. This review covers leachate recirculation and stabilization, nitrogen transformation and corresponding extensive laboratory- and pilot-scale research, the bioreactor landfill concept, the benefits to be derived from this bioreactor landfill technology, and the design and operational issues and research trends that form the basis of applied landfill research. PMID:20578971

  9. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  10. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  11. [Dispersion and analysis of odor pollution in landfill area under the enclosed operation condition].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Wu, Shi-Xing; Dai, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Su, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Fei; Dai, Zhan-Guo; Lu, Xu-Fei; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Kai; Wei, Pan-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Odor pollution of landfill site is a serious problem accompanied with the urbanization process that influences city life. Generally, odor emission points in landfill boundary are detected by experience, but the pollution intensity, distribution and variation in the scope of landfill boundary are difficulty to describe. In this research, odor emission points were disclosed with equal odor concentration curves that were delineated using electric nose and GPS instrument. The leakage of landfill gas and exhaust emission from biogas incineration torch was the main cause of the odor pollution in landfill area. Gas production evaluation suggested that the improvement of landfill gas consumption is the key point to control the odor pollution at the landfill site. PMID:23745385

  12. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  13. The Gas Leakage Analysis in C/C Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Hatta, Hiroshi; Bando, Takamasa; Sugibayashi, Toshio

    Gas leakage through carbon fiber reinforcement carbon composites, C/Cs, was discussed so as to apply C/Cs to heat exchangers in an engine system for a future space-plane. Since C/Cs include many cracks and pores, gas easily leaks through C/Cs. To predict and to prevent the gas flow through a C/C, leakage rate was measured as a function of pressure and gas flow path was identified by micro-observation of the C/C. Then, several analytical models were examined to clarify principal mechanism yielding gas flow resistance. It was found that laminar flow models gave far small flow resistance compared with experimental results, but a model based on adiabatic expansion and compression flow, used for gas leak through labyrinth seals, resulted in reasonable agreement. Finally, Si impregnation in a C/C was examined to minimize the gas leakage. This treatment was shown to be an excellent measure to reduce the gas leakage through C/C.

  14. Initial results of detected methane emissions from landfills in the Los Angeles Basin during the COMEX campaign by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a greenhouse gas in-situ analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Kolyer, Richard; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Sam; Buchwitz, Michael; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas beside carbon dioxide (CO2). Significant contributors to the global methane budget are fugitive emissions from landfills. Due to the growing world population, it is expected that the amount of waste and, therefore, waste disposal sites will increase in number and size in parts of the world, often adjacent growing megacities. Besides bottom-up modelling, a variety of ground based methods (e.g., flux chambers, trace gases, radial plume mapping, etc.) have been used to estimate (top-down) these fugitive emissions. Because landfills usually are large, sometimes with significant topographic relief, vary temporally, and leak/emit heterogeneously across their surface area, assessing total emission strength by ground-based techniques is often difficult. In this work, we show how airborne based remote sensing measurements of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4 can be utilized to estimate fugitive emissions from landfills in an urban environment by a mass balance approach. Subsequently, these emission rates are compared to airborne in-situ horizontal cross section measurements of CH4 taken within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) upwind and downwind of the landfill at different altitudes immediately after the remote sensing measurements were finished. Additional necessary parameters (e.g., wind direction, wind speed, aerosols, dew point temperature, etc.) for the data inversion are provided by a standard instrumentation suite for atmospheric measurements aboard the aircraft, and nearby ground-based weather stations. These measurements were part of the CO2 and Methane EXperiment (COMEX), which was executed during the summer 2014 in California and was co-funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remote sensing measurements were taken by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) developed and operated by the University of Bremen and the German Research Center for Geoscience (GFZ) in Potsdam. The in-situ measurements were obtained by a greenhouse gas (GHG) in-situ analyser operated by NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC). Both instruments were installed aboard a DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). Initial results - including estimated fugitive emission rates - will be presented for the landfill Olinda Alpha in Brea, Orange County, Los Angeles Basin, California, which was overflown on four different days during the COMEX field campaign in late summer 2014.

  15. Noble gas composition in rainwater and associated weather patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Rohit B.; Clara Castro, M.; Hall, Chris M.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2013-06-01

    work represents the first comprehensive noble gas study in rainwater. It was carried out in southeast Michigan. Results show that all rainwater samples are in disequilibrium with surface conditions. Two noble gas patterns are identified. The first one, associated with low-pressure systems, presence of fog and light rainfall, displays a relative Ar enrichment together with Ne, Kr, and Xe depletion. The second one, associated with the passage of frontal systems, displays a mass-dependent depletion pattern. Precipitation is characterized by thunderstorms, heavy rainfall, and high cloud ceiling heights. A diffusion mass-transfer model suggests that noble gas patterns originate from ice. Complete re-equilibration with surface conditions should occur within hours. For the first time, this study establishes a direct correlation between the noble gas composition in rainwater and weather patterns and highlights their potential to identify timing and location of recharge in shallow aquifer systems where infiltration is rapid.

  16. The carbon isotopic composition of catalytic gas: A comparative analysis with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Elrod, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Tee idea that natural gas is the thermal product of organic decomposition has persisted for over half a century. Crude oil is thought to be an important source of gas, cracking to wet gas above 150 C, and dry gas above 200 C. But there is little evidence to support this view. For example, crude oil is proving to be more stable than previously thought and projected to remain intact over geologic time at typical reservoir temperature. Moreover, when oil does crack, the products do not resemble natural gas. Oil to gas could be catalytic, however, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sediments. This would explain the low temperatures at which natural gas forms, and the high amounts of methane. This idea gained support recently when the natural progression of oil to dry gas was duplicated in the laboratory catalytically. The authors report here the isotopic composition of catalytic gas generated from crude oil and pure hydrocarbons between 150 and 200 C. {delta}{sup 13}C for C{sub 1} through C{sub 5} was linear with 1/n (n = carbon number) in accordance with theory and typically seen in natural gases. Over extended reaction, isobutane and isopentane remained lighter than their respective normal isomers and the isotopic differentials were constant as all isomers became heavier over time. Catalytic methane, initially {minus}51.87{per_thousand} (oil = {minus}22.5{per_thousand}), progressed to a final composition of {minus}26.94{per_thousand}, similar to the maturity trend seen in natural gases: {minus}50{per_thousand} to {minus}20{per_thousand}. Catalytic gas is thus identical to natural gas in molecular and isotopic composition adding further support to the view that catalysis by transition metals may be a significant source of natural gas.

  17. Methane balance of a bioreactor landfill in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Jenny; Hettiaratchi, Patrick; Hunte, Carlos; Hurtado, Omar; Keller, Alejandro

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents results from a methane (CH4) gas emission characterization survey conducted at the Loma Los Colorados landfill located 60 km from Santiago, Chile. The landfill receives approximately 1 million metric tons (t) of waste annually, and is equipped with leachate control systems and landfill gas collection systems. The collected leachate is recirculated to enable operation of the landfill as a bioreactor. For this study, conducted between April and July 2000, a total of 232 surface emission measurements were made over the 23-ha surface area of the landfill. The average surface flux rate of CH4 emissions over the landfill surface was 167 g x m(-2) x day(-1), and the total quantity of surface emissions was 13,320 t/yr. These values do not include the contribution made by "hot spots," originating from leachate pools caused by "daylighting" of leachate, that were identified on the landfill surface and had very high CH4 emission rates. Other point sources of CH4 emissions at this landfill include 20 disconnected gas wells that vent directly to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are 13 gas wells connected to an incinerator responsible for destroying 84 t/yr of CH4. The balance also includes CH4 that is being oxidized on the surface of the landfill by meth-anotrophic bacteria. Including all sources, except leachate pool emissions, the emissions were estimated to be 14,584 t/yr CH4. It was estimated that less than 1% of the gas produced by the decomposition of waste was captured by the gas collection system and 38% of CH4 generated was emitted to the atmosphere through the soil cover. PMID:18512438

  18. The new Waste Law: Challenging opportunity for future landfill operation in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Meidiana, Christia; Gamse, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Waste Law No. 18/2008 Article 22 and 44 require the local governments to run environmentally sound landfill. Due to the widespread poor quality of waste management in Indonesia, this study aimed to identify the current situation by evaluating three selected landfills based on the ideal conditions of landfill practices, which are used to appraise the capability of local governments to adapt to the law. The results indicated that the local governments have problems of insufficient budget, inadequate equipment, uncollected waste and unplanned future landfill locations. All of the selected landfills were partially controlled landfills with open dumping practices predominating. In such inferior conditions the implementation of sanitary landfill is not necessarily appropriate. The controlled landfill is a more appropriate solution as it offers lower investment and operational costs, makes the selection of a new landfill site unnecessary and can operate with a minimum standard of infrastructure and equipment. The sustainability of future landfill capacity can be maintained by utilizing the old landfill as a profit-oriented landfill by implementing a landfill gas management or a clean development mechanism project. A collection fee system using the pay-as-you-throw principle could increase the waste income thereby financing municipal solid waste management. PMID:20935025

  19. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    SciTech Connect

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  20. Risk assessment of an old landfill regarding the potential of gaseous emissions--a case study based on bioindication, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tintner, Johannes; Smidt, Ena; Böhm, Katharina; Matiasch, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Risk assessment of two sections (I and II) of an old landfill (ALH) in Styria (Austria) in terms of reactivity of waste organic matter and the related potential of gaseous emissions was performed using conventional parameters and innovative tools to verify their effectiveness in practice. The ecological survey of the established vegetation at the landfill surface (plant sociological relevés) indicated no relevant emissions over a longer period of time. Statistical evaluation of conventional parameters reveals that dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respiration activity (RA(4)), loss of ignition (LOI) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) mostly influence the variability of the gas generation sum (GS(21)). According to Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data and the results of the classification model the reactivity potential of the investigated sections is very low which is in accordance with the results of plant sociological relevés and biological tests. The interpretation of specific regions in the FT-IR spectra was changed and adapted to material characteristics. Contrary to mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) materials, where strong aliphatic methylene bands indicate reactivity, they are rather assigned to the C-H vibrations of plastics in old landfill materials. This assumption was confirmed by thermal analysis and the characteristic heat flow profile of plastics containing landfill samples. Therefore organic carbon contents are relatively high compared to other stable landfills as shown by a prediction model for TOC contents based on heat flow profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). The stability of the landfill samples, expressed by the relation of CO(2) release and enthalpies, was compared to unreactive landfills, archeological samples, earthlike materials and hardly degradable organic matter. Due to the material composition and the aging process the landfill samples are located between hardly degradable, but easily combustible materials and thermally resistant materials with acquired stability. PMID:22902203

  1. Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Composite for High-Performance Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan Feng; Aldalbahi, Ali; Feng, Peter Xianping

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of composite tungsten oxide nanowires-based gas sensors. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, and chemical compositions of the obtained nanowires have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman scattering, respectively. The experimental measurements reveal that each wire consists of crystalline nanoparticles with an average diameter of less than 250 nm. By using the synthesized nanowires, highly sensitive prototypic gas sensors have been designed and fabricated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane and hydrogen gases as a function of time has been obtained. Various sensing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, and repeatability were investigated in order to reveal the sensing ability. PMID:26512670

  2. Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Composite for High-Performance Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Feng-Chen, Siyuan; Aldalbahi, Ali; Feng, Peter Xianping

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of composite tungsten oxide nanowires-based gas sensors. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, and chemical compositions of the obtained nanowires have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman scattering, respectively. The experimental measurements reveal that each wire consists of crystalline nanoparticles with an average diameter of less than 250 nm. By using the synthesized nanowires, highly sensitive prototypic gas sensors have been designed and fabricated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane and hydrogen gases as a function of time has been obtained. Various sensing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, and repeatability were investigated in order to reveal the sensing ability. PMID:26512670

  3. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-05-10

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying operations. The problems were evaluated to answer specific design questions. The document is formatted as a topical report with each section representing a specific problem solution. The problem solutions are reported in the calculation format specified in HNF-1613, Rev. 0, EP 7.6.

  4. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  5. 30 CFR 36.43 - Determination of exhaust-gas composition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of exhaust-gas composition. 36.43... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.43 Determination of exhaust-gas composition. (a) Samples shall be taken to determine the composition of the exhaust gas while the engine is operated at loads and...

  6. Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

    2012-01-01

    A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 μm ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

  7. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  8. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  9. Global Biogenic Emission of Carbon Dioxide from Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R.; Nolasco, D.; Meneses, W.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.

    2002-12-01

    Human-induced increases in the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gas components have been underway over the past century and are expected to drive climate change in the coming decades. Carbon dioxide was responsible for an estimated 55 % of the antropogenically driven radiactive forcing of the atmosphere in the 1980s and is predicted to have even greater importance over the next century (Houghton et al., 1990). A highly resolved understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2, and how they are affected by climate and land use, is essential in the analysis of the global carbon cycle and how it may be impacted by human activities. Landfills are biochemical reactors that produce CH4 and CO2 emissions due to anaerobic digestion of solid urban wastes. Estimated global CH4 emission from landfills is about 44 millions tons per year and account for a 7.4 % of all CH4 sources (Whiticar, 1989). Observed CO2/CH4 molar ratios from landfill gases lie within the range of 0.7-1.0; therefore, an estimated global biogenic emission of CO2 from landfills could reach levels of 11.2-16 millions tons per year. Since biogas extraction systems are installed for extracting, purifying and burning the landfill gases, most of the biogenic gas emission to the atmosphere from landfills occurs through the surface environment in a diffuse and disperse form, also known as non-controlled biogenic emission. Several studies of non-controlled biogenic gas emission from landfills showed that CO2/CH4 weight ratios of surface landfill gases, which are directly injected into the atmosphere, are about 200-300 times higher than those observed in the landfill wells, which are usually collected and burned by gas extraction systems. This difference between surface and well landfill gases is mainly due to bacterial oxidation of the CH4 to CO2 inducing higher CO2/CH4 ratios for surface landfill gases than those well landfill gases. Taking into consideration this observation, the global biogenic CO2 emission from landfills could be estimated about 8.8-13.2\\times103 million tons per year, equivalent to a 0.04-0.06 % of the fossil fuel emission of CO2.

  10. Modelling biogas production of solid waste: application of the BGP model to a synthetic landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Segura-Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-04-01

    Production of biogas as a result of the decomposition of organic matter included on solid waste landfills is still an issue to be understood. Reports on this matter are rarely included on the engineering construction projects of solid waste landfills despite it can be an issue of critical importance while operating the landfill and after its closure. This paper presents an application of BGP (Bio-Gas-Production) model to a synthetic landfill. The evolution in time of the concentrations of the different chemical compounds of biogas is studied. Results obtained show the impact on the air quality of different management alternatives which are usually performed in real landfills.

  11. Municipal landfill leachate management

    SciTech Connect

    Kusterer, T.; Willson, R.; Bruce, S.C.; Tissue, E. Lou, P.J.

    1998-12-31

    From 1995 to 1997, the Montgomery County Leachate Pretreatment Facility (MCLPF) has successfully pretreated in excess of 18,000,000 gallons of leachate generated by the county`s municipal solid waste landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill, the new lined section, and the ash cell to the leachate pump station. The leachate, prior to being pumped to the leachate pretreatment system, is equalized in two storage lagoons with a combined capacity of more than 5,000,000 gallons. The innovative leachate treatment system, incorporating a biological reactor system equipped with a submerged fixed-film reactor using a patented Matrix Biological Film (MBF) media, continues to provide excellent pretreatment results for the leachate generated at the Oaks Landfill in Montgomery County, Maryland. In 1995 and 1996, the system responded to the substantial challenges imposed by the changing characteristics of the material being landfilled and by the significant amounts of incinerator ash, received in 1995 from the county`s resource recovery facility (RRF), which influenced the influent leachate characteristics.

  12. Effect of gas composition on octane number of natural gas fuels. Topical report, December 1991-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kubesh, J.T.

    1992-05-01

    Variations in the composition of natural gas fuels are recognized to have a significant impact on the performance of internal combustion engines. In particular, the knock resistance of the fuel is governed by its gas composition. The octane number is a standard measure of the knock resistance of a fuel, and several gas blends were tested to determine their octane numbers. Octane number of natural gas fuels was found to be dependent on gas composition. Several correlations were found between gas composition and the octane number of a fuel, which allow prediction of the motor octane number if gas composition is known. In particular, a good correlation was found between the hydrogen-carbon ratio of the fuel and the octane number. Correlations were also found between measured motor octane numbers and measured methane numbers, as well as between motor octane numbers and predicted methane numbers.

  13. Gas content and composition of gas hydrate from sediments of the southeastern North American continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Collett, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Gas hydrate samples were recovered from four sites (Sites 994, 995, 996, and 997) along the crest of the Blake Ridge during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 164. At Site 996, an area of active gas venting, pockmarks, and chemosynthetic communities, vein-like gas hydrate was recovered from less than 1 meter below seafloor (mbsf) and intermittently through the maximum cored depth of 63 mbsf. In contrast, massive gas hydrate, probably fault filling and/or stratigraphically controlled, was recovered from depths of 260 mbsf at Site 994, and from 331 mbsf at Site 997. Downhole-logging data, along with geochemical and core temperature profiles, indicate that gas hydrate at Sites 994, 995, and 997 occurs from about 180 to 450 mbsf and is dispersed in sediment as 5- to 30-m-thick zones of up to about 15% bulk volume gas hydrate. Selected gas hydrate samples were placed in a sealed chamber and allowed to dissociate. Evolved gas to water volumetric ratios measured on seven samples from Site 996 ranged from 20 to 143 mL gas/mL water to 154 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 994, and to 139 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 997, which can be compared to the theoretical maximum gas to water ratio of 216. These ratios are minimum gas/water ratios for gas hydrate because of partial dissociation during core recovery and potential contamination with pore waters. Nonetheless, the maximum measured volumetric ratio indicates that at least 71% of the cages in this gas hydrate were filled with gas molecules. When corrections for pore-water contamination are made, these volumetric ratios range from 29 to 204, suggesting that cages in some natural gas hydrate are nearly filled. Methane comprises the bulk of the evolved gas from all sites (98.4%-99.9% methane and 0%-1.5% CO2). Site 996 hydrate contained little CO2 (0%-0.56%). Ethane concentrations differed significantly from Site 996, where they ranged from 720 to 1010 parts per million by volume (ppmv), to Sites 994 and 997, which contained much less ethane (up to 86 ppmv). Up to 19 ppmv propane and other higher homologues were noted; however, these gases are likely contaminants derived from sediment in some hydrate samples. CO2 concentrations are less in gas hydrate than in the surrounding sediment, likely an artifact of core depressurization, which released CO2 derived from dissolved organic carbon (DIC) into sediment. The isotopic composition of methane from gas hydrate ranges from ??13C of -62.5??? to -70.7??? and ??D of -175??? to -200??? and is identical to the isotopic composition of methane from surrounding sediment. Methane of this isotopic composition is mainly microbial in origin and likely produced by bacterial reduction of bicarbonate. The hydrocarbon gases here are likely the products of early microbial diagenesis. The isotopic composition of CO2 from gas hydrate ranges from ??13C of -5.7 to -6.9, about 15??? lighter than CO2 derived from nearby sediment.

  14. Ultrasensitive Gold Nanostar-Polyaniline Composite for Ammonia Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vished; Patil, Vithoba; Apte, Amey; Harale, Namdev; Patil, Pramod; Kulkarni, Sulabha

    2015-12-01

    Gold in the form of bulk metal mostly does not react with gases or liquids at room temperature. On the other hand, nanoparticles of gold are very reactive and useful as catalysts. The reactivity of nanoparticles depends on the size and the morphology of the nanoparticles. Gold nanostars containing copper have rough surfaces and large numbers of active sites due to tips, sides, corners, and large surface area-to-volume ratios due to their branched morphology. Here the sensitivity of the gold nanostar-polyaniline composite (average size of nanostars ?170 nm) toward ammonia gas has been investigated. For 100 ppm ammonia, the sensitivity of the composite increased to 52% from a mere 7% value for pure polyaniline. The gold nanostar-polyaniline composite even showed a response time as short as 15 s at room temperature. The gold nanostars act as a catalyst in the nanocomposite. The stability and sensitivity at different concentrations and the selectivity for ammonia gas were also investigated. PMID:26522375

  15. Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broe; Petersen, Per Haugsted; Jørgensen, Jørgen Henrik Bjerre; Ucendo, Inmaculada Maria Buendia; Mønster, Jacob G; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Methane generated at landfills contributes to global warming and can be mitigated by biocover systems relying on microbial methane oxidation. As part of a closure plan for an old unlined landfill without any gas management measures, an innovative biocover system was established. The system was designed based on a conceptual model of the gas emission patterns established through an initial baseline study. The study included construction of gas collection trenches along the slopes of the landfill where the majority of the methane emissions occurred. Local compost materials were tested as to their usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux chamber based emission measurements and logging of compost temperatures) proved that the biocover system had an average mitigation efficiency of approximately 80%. The study showed that the system also had a high efficiency during winter periods with temperatures below freezing. An economic analysis indicated that the mitigation costs of the biocover system were competitive to other existing greenhouse gas mitigation options. PMID:24755356

  16. LANDFILLS EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS GUIDELINES DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:This resource served as the main information source for national characteristics of landfills for the landfills effluent guidelines. The database was developed based on responses to the "1994 Waste Treatment Industry Questionnaire: Phase II Landfills" and...

  17. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  18. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  19. Quantifying Spatial and Temporal Variability of Methane Emissions from a Complex Area Source: Case Study of a Central Indiana Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Bogner, J. E.; Green, R. B.; Shepson, P. B.; Thoma, E. D.; Foster-wittig, T. A.; Spokas, K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that is responsible for about 17% of the total direct radiative forcing from long-lived greenhouse gases (IPCC 2013). While the global emission of methane is relatively well quantified, the temporal and spatial variability of methane emissions from individual area or point sources are still poorly understood. Using 4 field methods (aircraft-based mass balance, tracer correlation, vertical radial plume mapping, and static chambers) and a new field-validated process-based model (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model, CALMIM 5.4), we investigated both the total emissions from a central Indiana landfill as well as the partitioned emissions inclusive of methanotrophic oxidation for the various cover soils. This landfill is an upwind source for the city of Indianapolis, so the resolution of m2 to km2 scale emissions, as well as understanding the temporal variability for this complex area source, contributes to improved regional inventory calculations. Emissions for the site as a whole were measured using both an aircraft-based mass balance approach as well as a ground-based tracer correlation method, permitting direct comparison of the strengths, limitations, and uncertainties of these two approaches. Because US landfills are highly-engineered and composed of daily, intermediate, and final cover areas with differing thicknesses, composition, and implementation of gas recovery, we also expected different emission signatures and strengths from the various cover areas. Thus we also deployed static chambers and vertical radial plume mapping to quantify the spatial variability of emissions from the thinner daily and intermediate cover areas. Understanding the daily, seasonal and annual emission rates from a landfill is not trivial, and usually requires a combination of measurement and modeling approaches. Thus, our unique data set provides an opportunity to gain an improved understanding of the emissions from a complex area source, an essential requirement for developing improved urban-scale greenhouse gas inventories relevant for addressing mitigation strategies. We report on the results here.

  20. The Response of Nitriding Chemistry to Different Initial Gas Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, ?. Bedii; Akar, Firat

    2015-08-01

    The response of the kinetics of surface-catalyzed reactions to different initial conditions in a gas nitriding furnace has been studied. The predictions are made under the conditions with both high and low concentrations of ammonia and a process temperature of around 520 °C. Results are presented in temporal variations of gas temperature and concentrations and coverages of surface species. It has been shown that in the composition where NH3 content is richer, there is a strong possibility of developing substantially higher Nad coverage and so diffusion into the material. Reducing the ammonia content, which means an increase in the proportion of N2 in the initial mixture, leads to a quicker saturation of the furnace atmosphere to the desorption of the reaction product, N2, which eventually suppresses the advance of reaction in the forward direction. Low coverage values of Had have proved that the adsorbed hydrogen is the most unstable species on the surface.

  1. Methods of Sensing Land Pollution from Sanitary Landfills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosanov, Myron Ellis; Bowerman, Frank R.

    1971-01-01

    Major cities are congested and large sites suitable for landfill development are limited. Methane and other gases are produced at most sanitary landfills and dumps. These gases may migrate horizontally and vertically and have caused fatalities. Monitoring these gases provides data bases for design and construction of safe buildings on and adjacent to landfills. Methods of monitoring include: (1) a portable combustible gas indicator; and (2) glass flasks valved to allow simultaneous exhaust of the flask and aspiration of the sample into the flask. Samples are drawn through tubing from probes as deep as twenty-five feet below the surface.

  2. Performance of bioreactor landfill with waste mined from a dumpsite.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Obuli P; Swati, M; Nagendran, R; Joseph, Kurian

    2007-12-01

    Emissions from landfills via leachate and gas are influenced by state and stability of the organic matter in the solid waste and the environmental conditions within the landfill. This paper describes a modified, ecologically sound waste treatment technique, where municipal solid waste is anaerobically treated in a lysimeter-scale landfill bioreactor with leachate recirculation to enhance organic degradation. The results demonstrate a substantial decrease in organic matter (BOD 99%, COD 88% and TOC 81%) and a clear decrease in nutrient concentrations especially ammonia (85%) over a period of 1 year with leachate recirculation. PMID:17457683

  3. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  4. Clean Air Act Title III accidental emission release risk management program, and how it applies to landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    On June 20, 1996, EPA promulgated regulations pursuant to Title III of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 (Section 112(r)(7) of the CAA). The rule, contained in 40 CFR Part 68, is called Accidental Release Prevention Requirements: Risk Management Programs, and is intended to improve accident prevention and emergency response practices at facilities that store and/or use hazardous substances. Methane is a designated highly hazardous chemical (HHC) under the rule. The rule applies to facilities that have 10,000 pounds of methane or more in any process, roughly equivalent to about 244,000 cubic feet of methane. The US EPA has interpreted this threshold quantity as applying to landfill gas within landfills. This paper presents an overview of the Accidental Release Prevention regulations, and how landfills are affected by the requirements. This paper describes methodologies for calculating the threshold quantity of landfill gas in a landfill. Methane is in landfill gas as a mixture. Because landfill gas can burn readily, down to concentrations of about five percent methane, the entire landfill gas mixture must be treated as the regulated substance, and counts toward the 10,000-pound threshold. It is reasonable to assume that the entire landfill gas collection system, active or passive, is filled with landfill gas, and that a calculation of the volume of the system would be a calculation of the landfill gas present in the process on the site. However, the US EPA has indicated that there are some instances in which pore space gas should be included in this calculation. This paper presents methods available to calculate the amount of pore space gas in a landfill, and how to determine how much of that gas might be available for an explosion. The paper goes through how to conduct the release assessment to determine the worst-case hazard zone around the landfill.

  5. Quantifying Methane Abatement Efficiency at Three Municipal Solid Waste Landfills; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements were conducted at three municipal solid waste landfills to compare fugitive methane emissions from the landfill cells to the quantity of collected gas (i.e., gas collection efficiency). The measurements were conducted over a multi-week sampling campaign using EPA Oth...

  6. ADAPTING WOODY SPECIES AND PLANTING TECHNIQUES TO LANDFILL CONDITIONS, FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to determine which tree species can best maintain themselves in a landfill environment; to investigate the feasibility of preventing landfill gas from penetrating the root zone of selected species by using gas-barrier techniques; and to identify the (those)...

  7. E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates

    E-print Network

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates Odd I. Levik(1) , Jean for storage and transport of natural gas. Storage of natural gas in the form of hydrate at elevated pressure concept) (Gud- mundsson et al. 1998). Natural gas hydrate contains up to 182 Sm3 gas per m3 hydrate

  8. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES AND PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Johann LeRoux

    2002-02-01

    The first phase of this project involved the development of a high performance composite membranes for the treatment of natural gas. The objective of the second phase is to demonstrate the commercial potential of a full-size membrane module in a pilot scale field test. This phase is undertaken jointly with our commercial partner, UOP LLC. At the conclusion of Phase I, two composite membrane products had been developed for the enrichment (sweetening) of natural gas. The one was a low pressure membrane with a high CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation factor that falls within the target range of 25-30 (at 50 C) set for the program. This is a significant improvement over current commercial membranes that have separation factors of around 18-19. The second membrane had excellent high pressure capability and good contamination resistance, with a separation factor of 20-22. Based on the performance and the economic evaluation of the newly developed membranes, and with the input of UOP and DOE, it was decided to devote the demonstration phase of the program to the field testing and commercial evaluation of natural gas dehydration membranes. Due to the events of September 11, the program was also extended by 6 months until June 30, 2002. In Phase II, UOP has essentially completed preparation of the field test site. Site preparation included the re-design of the test system, purchase and installation of analytical equipment, and making the necessary piping and other hardware changes. IMS has produced two commercial sized dehydration membrane modules for the field tests. These have been successfully tested up to pressures expected in the field tests, and the modules have been shipped to the test site. The remainder of the program will comprise performance testing of the membrane modules, evaluation of the results and submission of the final report with recommendations.

  9. Developments to a landfill processes model following its application to two landfill modelling challenges.

    PubMed

    White, J K; Beaven, R P

    2013-10-01

    The landfill model LDAT simulates the transport and bio-chemical behaviour of the solid, liquid and gas phases of waste contained in a landfill. LDAT was applied to the LMC1 and LMC2 landfill modelling challenges held in 2009 and 2011. These were blind modelling challenges with the model acting in a predictive mode based on limited early time sections of full datasets. The LMC1 challenge dataset was from a 0.34m deep 0.48m diameter laboratory test cell, and the LMC2 dataset was from a 55m×80m 8m deep landfill test cell which formed part of the Dutch sustainable landfill research programme at Landgraaf in the Netherlands. The paper describes developments in LDAT arising directly from the experience of responding to the two challenges, and discusses the model input and output data obtained from a calibration using the full datasets. The developments include the modularisation of the model into a set of linked sub-models, the strategy for converting conventional waste characteristics into model input parameters, the identification of flexible degradation pathways to control the CO2:CH4 ratio, and the application of a chemical equilibrium model that includes a stage in which the solid waste components dissolve into the leachate. PMID:23318154

  10. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOEpatents

    Doehler, Joachim (Union Lake, MI)

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  11. Post-closure care of engineered municipal solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Amalendu; Bhattacharya, Abhik

    2015-03-01

    Post-closure care is divided into perpetual care (PPC) and long-term care (LTC). Guidelines for post-closure care and associated costs are important for engineered municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. In many states in the USA, landfill owners are required to set aside funds for 30-40 years of LTC. Currently there are no guidelines for PPC, which is also required. We undertook a pilot study, using two landfills (note: average landfill capacity 2.5 million MT MSW waste) in Wisconsin, to establish an approach for estimating the LTC period using field data and PPC funding need. Statistical analysis of time versus concentration data of selected leachate parameters showed that the concentration of most parameters is expected to be at or below the preventive action limit of groundwater and leachate volume will be very low, within 40 years of the LTC period. The gas extraction system may need to be continued for more than 100 years. Due to lack of data no conclusion could be made regarding adequacy of the LTC period for the groundwater monitoring system. The final cover must be maintained for perpetuity. The pilot study shows that although technology is available, the financial liability of maintaining a 'Dry Tomb' design for landfills is significantly higher than commonly perceived. The paper will help landfill professionals to estimate realistic post-closure funding and to develop field-based policies for LTC and PPC of engineered MSW landfills. PMID:25687915

  12. Temperature effects: methane generation from landfill samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, K.E.; Klink, R.E.; Ham, R.K.

    1983-08-01

    An understanding of the breakdown of municipal solid wastes into gaseous products, especially methane, is important. Landfills act as batch anaerobic digestors. Temperature, one of the variables that affect digestion is examined. Since very minor temperature changes can be accomplished with rather substantial changes in methane generation, the generation rate can be modified to match the capacity of the gas recovery system. The effects of moisture content, oxygen supply, liquid solid ratios and bacterial acclimation are mentioned.

  13. Studies of methanogenesis in samples from landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    Increasing demand for energy, in particular natural gas, has prompted interest in the biological convertion of organic waste materials to methane, a natural gas substitute. Solid waste is largely organic material and therefore amenable to biological decomposition with the generation of methane under anaerobic conditions. The first major objective of this investigation was to establish one or more methods of obtaining controlled decomposition data in the laboratory which was representative of typical landfill operation. The second major objective of this investigation was to modify the temperature and moisture conditions of some of the samples for the purpose of observing the gas production response.

  14. Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

  15. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Williamson, K L; Owen, A G

    2006-01-01

    Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250m(3)ha(-1)yr(-1). However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios. PMID:16168631

  16. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.L. . E-mail: d.jones@bangor.ac.uk; Williamson, K.L.; Owen, A.G.

    2006-07-01

    Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios.

  17. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. ); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. )

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  18. Lubrication contributes to improved landfill cogeneration plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Prince George`s county, Maryland, cogeneration plant consists of three lean-burn, 12-cylinder, Waukesha 5790GL turbocharged gas engines, each powering an 850 kW Kato generator. Four Waukesha F1197G engines run gas compressors that draw and compress gas from the landfill, pumping an average of 28000 m{sup 3}/day at 6.2 bar from 29 wells. Landfill gas is 50% methane, 30% carbon dioxide, 10% nitrogen and 10% other gas constituents. These other gas constituents consist of 160 chemical compounds, many of which are very destructive to engines and other equipment. Probably the worst of these are the total organic halide expressed as chloride (TOH/CL), formed from the decomposition of household cleaning preparations and other materials containing chlorides. Landfill gas also contains an abundance of water, which combines not only with the TOH/CLs but with oxides of nitrogen, which are by-products of the combustion process, to form acids. To handle the highly contaminated landfill gas, the Waukesha Engine Division and people from Curtis Engine and Equipment modified the equipment and maintenance practices. One of the first changes was in lubrication. Curtis switched from a standard gas engine oil to Mobile Pegasus 446 oil, an SAE 40 oil that has a total base number (TBN) of 9.5, because of its extended acid-neutralizing capabilities.

  19. Structure and composition analysis of natural gas hydrates: 13C NMR spectroscopic and gas uptake measurements of mixed gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yutaek; Kang, Seong-Pil; Jang, Wonho

    2009-09-01

    Gas hydrates are becoming an attractive way of storing and transporting large quantities of natural gas, although there has been little effort to understand the preferential occupation of heavy hydrocarbon molecules in hydrate cages. In this work, we present the formation kinetics of mixed hydrate based on a gas uptake measurement during hydrate formation, and how the compositions of the hydrate phase are varied under corresponding formation conditions. We also examine the effect of silica gel pores on the physical properties of mixed hydrate, including thermodynamic equilibrium, formation kinetics, and hydrate compositions. It is expected that the enclathration of ethane and propane is faster than that of methane early stage hydrate formation, and later methane becomes the dominant component to be enclathrated due to depletion of heavy hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. The composition of the hydrate phase seems to be affected by the consumed amount of natural gas, which results in a variation of heating value of retrieved gas from mixed hydrates as a function of formation temperature. 13C NMR experiments were used to measure the distribution of hydrocarbon molecules over the cages of hydrate structure when it forms either from bulk water or water in silica gel pores. We confirm that 70% of large cages of mixed hydrate are occupied by methane molecules when it forms from bulk water; however, only 19% of large cages of mixed hydrate are occupied by methane molecules when it forms from water in silica gel pores. This result indicates that the fractionation of the hydrate phase with heavy hydrocarbon molecules is enhanced in silica gel pores. In addition when heavy hydrocarbon molecules are depleted in the vapor phase during the formation of mixed hydrate, structure I methane hydrate forms instead of structure II mixed hydrate and both structures coexist together, which is also confirmed by 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis. PMID:19658414

  20. Decolorization of landfill leachate using electrochemical oxidation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumaah, Majd Ahmed; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the electrochemical oxidation of landfill leachate from the Jeram sanitary landfill leachate using charcoal base metallic composite electrodes. The control parameters used were applied voltage, Cl- concentration (as supporting electrolyte) and pH of the solution. The optimum conditions obtained were NaCl concentration of 1.5 % (w/v), applied voltage of 10 V, operating time 180 min and C60CG Co10PVC15 electrode as an anode.15 Electrochemical treatment using charcoal base metallic composite electrode was able to remove color up to 79%.

  1. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

    2015-02-01

    According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH4 produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH4/CO2 ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3-1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0-2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH4+CO2% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills. PMID:25488731

  2. Estimate of global methane emissions from landfills and open dumps. Final report, January 1992-September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, M.R.J.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    The report presents an empirical model to estimate global methane (CH4) emissions from landfills and open dumps, based on EPA data from landfill gas (LFG) recovery projects. CH4 produced by the anaerobic decomposition of waste buried in landfills and open dumps is a significant contributor to global CH4 emissions, with estimates ranging from 10 to 70 Tg/yr. Methods of managing solid waste vary widely, ranging from open dumps and open burning to sanitary landfills with leachate collection systems and LFG control.

  3. Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim (Chicago, IL); Targos, William M. (Palatine, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A catalyst composition for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

  4. Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, H.; Targos, W.M.

    1987-12-22

    A catalyst composition is described for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

  5. Composite nuclear fuel fabrication methodology for gas fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

    An advanced fuel form for use in Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) was investigated. Criteria for the fuel includes operation at high temperature (˜1400°C) and high burnup (˜150 MWD/MTHM) with effective retention of fission products even during transient temperatures exceeding 1600°C. The GFR fuel is expected to contain up to 20% transuranics for a closed fuel cycle. Earlier evaluations of reference fuels for the GFR have included ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion type composite fuels of mixed carbide or nitride microspheres coated with SiC in a SiC matrix. Studies have indicated that ZrC is a potential replacement for SiC on account of its higher melting point, increased fission product corrosion resistance and better chemical stability. The present work investigated natural uranium carbide microspheres in a ZrC matrix instead of SiC. Known issues of minor actinide volatility during traditional fabrication procedures necessitated the investigation of still high temperature but more rapid fabrication techniques to minimize these anticipated losses. In this regard, fabrication of ZrC matrix by combustion synthesis from zirconium and graphite powders was studied. Criteria were established to obtain sufficient matrix density with UC microsphere volume fractions up to 30%. Tests involving production of microspheres by spark erosion method (similar to electrodischarge machining) showed the inability of the method to produce UC microspheres in the desired range of 300 to 1200 mum. A rotating electrode device was developed using a minimum current of 80A and rotating at speeds up to 1500 rpm to fabricate microspheres between 355 and 1200 mum. Using the ZrC process knowledge, UC electrodes were fabricated and studied for use in the rotating electrode device to produce UC microspheres. Fabrication of the cercer composite form was studied using microsphere volume fractions of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The macrostructure of the composite and individual components at various stages were characterized to understand the required fabrication techniques and at the same time meet the necessary GFR fuel characteristics.

  6. The volatile composition of comets as inferred from gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Adam Joseph

    Comets are small (1-10 km in radius) icy objects that orbit the Sun on highly eccentric orbits. The composition of comets has been relatively unalterred since their formation 4.5 billion years ago due to their small size and their cold storage in the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud. This makes comets "fossils" that can be studied in order to understand the physical conditions and composition of our Solar System during its infancy. Specifically, studying the volatile (ice) composition of comets can place constraints on molecule formation during the planetary formation stage and volatile transport to the inner Solar System. However, for most comets we must infer the volatile composition of the nucleus from gas present in the coma. The composition of the coma is alterred by physical and chemical processes, so the composition of the coma does not exactly reflect that of the nucleus. In this thesis we present analysis of observations of comets 103P/Hartley and C/2009 P1 Garradd in an effort to understand the physical and chemical processes operating in cometary comae. We obtained optical and NIR spectra in an effort to understand the gas production of comets Hartley and Garradd. We employed the ARCES instrument mounted on the ARC 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, NM to acquire optical spectra, while we used the CSHELL instrument mounted on NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea in Hawaii to acquire NIR spectra. We started our analysis with studies of atomic oxygen using the optical spectra and of CO and H2O using the NIR spectra. Specifically, the 5577 A, 6300, and 6300 A lines can potentially used as a proxy for CO2 in comets, which is very imporant because CO2 cannot be observed from the ground directly. Our analysis of the oxygen lines in several comets confirms that analysis of the oxygen line intensities can be employed to obtain quantitative measurements of CO2 in comets, though the accuracy of this method still needs to be firmly established. We also confirmed from observations of CO, H2O, and atomic oxygen in Garradd that CO photodissociation is not an important source of atomic oxygen in cometary comae. Our analysis of comets C/2006 W3 Christensen and C/2009 P1 Garradd at large heliocentric distance showed that the CO2 abundance in comets at heliocentric distances of > 2.5 AU is systematically higher than that of comets that are observed when they are closer to the Sun. Applying our analysis to other comets at heliocentric distances of < 2.5 AU demonstrates that comets have much higher CO2/H20 ratios than previously thought. This may suggest that comets formed in an oxidizing environment. We extended our analysis to the simple molecules CN, C2, CH, and NH2. These molecules are all products of coma photochemistry, and are not inherently present in the nucleus of the comet in ice form. Therefore understanding the progeny of these molecules is important for understanding coma photochemistry. We found that the CN and NH2 abundances in both Hartley and Garradd can be accounted for by HCN and NH 3 photodissociation, respectively. However, the C2 abundance in both comets cannot be accounted for by invoking only C2H 2 photodissociation. Therefore another source is needed. From studies of the rotational variation of C2 production in Hartley and heliocentric distance variation in Garradd, we present the hypothesis that a large fraction of the observed C2 in these comets originates from the sublimation of carbonaceous dust grains. We provide evidence that CH4 photodissociation cannot be the sole source of CH, and that another source, possibly carbonaceous dust grains or PAH's, is required. From analysis of the rotational variation of mixing ratios in Hartley and heliocentric distance variation of mixing ratios in Garradd, we found evidence that the parent of CN (HCN) is spatially correlated with CO 2 in the nucleus and is distinct from the H2O ice. This suggests that two or more phases of ice exist in cometary nuclei, thereby exhibiting small scale compositional heterogeneity. These results have profound

  7. Closed landfills to solar energy power plants: Estimating the solar potential of closed landfills in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Devon R.

    Solar radiation is a promising source of renewable energy because it is abundant and the technologies to harvest it are quickly improving. An ongoing challenge is to find suitable and effective areas to implement solar energy technologies without causing ecological harm. In this regard, one type of land use that has been largely overlooked for siting solar technologies is closed or soon to be closed landfills. Utilizing Geographic Information System (GIS) based solar modeling; this study makes an inventory of solar generation potential for such sites in the state of California. The study takes account of various site characteristics in relation to the siting needs of photovoltaic (PV) geomembrane and dish-Stirling technologies (e.g., size, topography, closing date, solar insolation, presence of landfill gas recovery projects, and proximity to transmission grids and roads). This study reaches the three principal conclusions. First, with an estimated annual solar electricity generation potential of 3.7 million megawatt hours (MWh), closed or soon to be closed landfill sites could provide an amount of power significantly larger than California's current solar electric generation. Secondly, the possibility of combining PV geomembrane, dish-Stirling, and landfill gas (LFG) to energy technologies at particular sites deserves further investigation. Lastly, there are many assumptions, challenges, and limitations in conducting inventory studies of solar potential for specific sites, including the difficulty in finding accurate data regarding the location and attributes of potential landfills to be analyzed in the study. Furthermore, solar modeling necessarily simplifies a complex phenomenon, namely incoming solar radiation. Additionally, site visits, while necessary for finding details of the site, are largely impractical for a large scale study.

  8. Air emissions assessment and air quality permitting for a municipal waste landfill treating municipal sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, J.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a case study into the air quality permitting of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in the San Francisco Bay Area undergoing a proposed expansion in operations to increase the life of the landfill. The operations of this facility include MSW landfilling, the treatment and disposal of municipal sewage sludge, the aeration of petroleum-contaminated soils, the construction of a new on-site plant to manufacture soil amendment products from waste wood and other organic material diverted from the landfill, and the installation of a vaporator to create steam from leachate for injection into the landfill gas flare. The emissions assessment for each project component relied upon interpretation of source tests from similar operations, incorporation of on-site measurements into emissions models and mass balances, and use of AP-42 procedures for emissions sources such as wind-blown dust, material handling and transfer operations, and fugitive landfill gas. Air permitting issues included best available control technology (BACT), emission offset thresholds, new source performance standards (NSPS), potential air toxics health risk impacts, and compliance with federal Title V operating permit requirements. With the increasing difficulties of siting new landfills, increasing pressures to reduce the rate of waste placement into existing landfills, and expanding regulatory requirements on landfill operations, experiences similar to those described in this paper are likely to increase in the future as permitting scenarios become more complex.

  9. Stabilizing Waste Materials for Landfills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The test procedures used to evaluate the suitability of landfilled materials of varying stability and to determine the leachate from such materials are reviewed. A process for stabilizing a mixture of sulfur dioxide sludge, fly ash, and bottom ash with lime and other additives for deposition in landfills is detailed. (BT)

  10. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 40 CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppo...

  11. Brownfields and health risks--air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment at landfill redevelopment sites.

    PubMed

    Ofungwu, Joseph; Eget, Steven

    2006-07-01

    Redevelopment of landfill sites in the New Jersey-New York metropolitan area for recreational (golf courses), commercial, and even residential purposes seems to be gaining acceptance among municipal planners and developers. Landfill gas generation, which includes methane and potentially toxic nonmethane compounds usually continues long after closure of the landfill exercise phase. It is therefore prudent to evaluate potential health risks associated with exposure to gas emissions before redevelopment of the landfill sites as recreational, commercial, and, especially, residential properties. Unacceptably high health risks would call for risk management measures such as limiting the development to commercial/recreational rather than residential uses, stringent gas control mechanisms, interior air filtration, etc. A methodology is presented for applying existing models to estimate residual landfill hazardous compounds emissions and to quantify associated health risks. Besides the toxic gas constituents of landfill emissions, other risk-related issues concerning buried waste, landfill leachate, and explosive gases were qualitatively evaluated. Five contiguously located landfill sites in New Jersey intended for residential and recreational redevelopment were used to exemplify the approach. PMID:16869439

  12. Site-specific criteria for the completion of landfill aftercare.

    PubMed

    Laner, David; Fellner, Johann; Brunner, Paul H

    2012-09-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills need to be managed after closure to assure long-term environmental compatibility. Aftercare can be completed when the authorities consider the landfill not likely to pose a threat to humans and the environment. In this work, a methodology for deriving site-specific aftercare completion criteria is presented and its application is illustrated via a case study. The evaluation method combines models addressing waste emission behavior, long-term barrier performance, and pollutant migration to assess the potential impact of landfill emissions on the environment. Based on the definition of acceptable impact levels at certain points of compliance, scenario- and pollutant-specific aftercare completion criteria are derived. The methodology was applied to a closed MSW landfill in Austria and potential aftercare durations were determined. While landfill gas emissions may become environmentally tolerable within decades at the site, leachate-related aftercare measures were expected to be necessary for centuries (primarily as a result of ammonium). Although the evaluation comes with large uncertainties, it allows for linking aftercare intensity and duration with respect to an environmentally compatible state of the landfill in the absence of aftercare. However, further case studies including regulatory review and acceptance are needed to use the methodology in a decision support tool on aftercare completion. PMID:22993138

  13. Anammox: an option for ammonium removal in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Roberto; Zon, Willem van der; Woelders, Hans; Lubberding, Henk J; Gijzen, Huub J

    2011-11-01

    Experiments carried out in bioreactor landfill simulators demonstrated that more than 40% of the total N was transferred into the liquid and gas phases during the incubation period of 380 days. Ammonium, an end product of protein degradation and important parameter to consider during landfill closure, tends to accumulate up to inhibitory levels in the leachate of landfills especially in landfills with leachate recirculation. Most efforts to remove ammonium from leachate have been focused on ex situ and partial in situ methods such as nitrification, denitrification and chemical precipitation. Besides minimal contributions from other N-removal processes, Anammox (Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation) bacteria were found to be active within the simulators. Anammox is considered to be an important contributor to remove N from the solid matrix. However, it was unclear how the necessary nitrite for Anammox metabolism was produced. Moreover, little is known about the nature of residual nitrogen in the waste mass and possible mechanisms to remove it. Intrusion of small quantities of O2 is not only beneficial for the degradation process of municipal solid waste (MSW) in bioreactor landfills but also significant for the development of the Anammox bacteria that contributed to the removal of ammonium. Volatilisation and Anammox activity were the main N removal mechanisms in these pilot-scale simulators. The results of these experiments bring new insights on the behaviour, evolution and fate of nitrogen from solid waste and present the first evidence of the existence of Anammox activity in bioreactor landfill simulators. PMID:21795036

  14. A finite element simulation of biological conversion processes in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Robeck, M.; Ricken, T.

    2011-04-15

    Landfills are the most common way of waste disposal worldwide. Biological processes convert the organic material into an environmentally harmful landfill gas, which has an impact on the greenhouse effect. After the depositing of waste has been stopped, current conversion processes continue and emissions last for several decades and even up to 100 years and longer. A good prediction of these processes is of high importance for landfill operators as well as for authorities, but suitable models for a realistic description of landfill processes are rather poor. In order to take the strong coupled conversion processes into account, a constitutive three-dimensional model based on the multiphase Theory of Porous Media (TPM) has been developed at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The theoretical formulations are implemented in the finite element code FEAP. With the presented calculation concept we are able to simulate the coupled processes that occur in an actual landfill. The model's theoretical background and the results of the simulations as well as the meantime successfully performed simulation of a real landfill body will be shown in the following.

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Bush Valley Landfill Superfund Site, Harford County, Abingdon, MD, (final remedial action), September 26, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Record of Decision (`ROD`) presents the final remedial action selected for the Bush Valley Landfill Superfund Site (`Site`), located near the town of Abingdon in Hardford County, Maryland. The remedial action selected for this Site is a final remedy which will address the wastes buried in the landfill, contaminated soils, leachate, landfill gas, the adjacent wetlands and streams, and contaminated ground water.

  16. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC RETENTION PARAMETERS DATABASE FOR REFRIGERANT MIXTURE COMPOSITION MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composition management of mixed refrigerant systems is a challenging problem in the laboratory, manufacturing facilities, and large refrigeration machinery. Ths issue of composition management is especially critical for the maintenance of machinery that utilizes zeotropic mixture...

  17. Numerical studies of gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation: An application to the IODP site 1327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structure I methane hydrate is the most common type found in nature. Structure I gas hydrate has two types of cages that gas molecules may be hosted. Because the larger cavities filled with ethane would be more stable than those filled by methane (Sloan and Koh, 2008), the larger cavities preferentially enclose ethane during the formation of gas hydrate, which results gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation. Based on the principle of gas composition differentiation, we establish a numerical model for the gas composition differentiation between methane and ethane during gas hydrate accumulation and applied the model to IODP site 1327. The simulation shows that the gas composition differentiation only occurs at the interval where gas hydrate presents. The lowest methane/ethane (C1/C2) point indicates the bottom of hydrate zone, and the composition differentiation produces the upward increase of C1/C2 within the gas hydrate zone. The C1/C2 reaches the largest value at the top occurrence of gas hydrate and keeps relative stable above the top occurrence of gas hydrate. The top and bottom occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the inflection points of the C1/C2 profile are similar to those indicated by the negative anomalies of measured chloride concentrations (Riedel et al., 2006). By comparing with the measured C1/C2, the differentiation coefficient (kh=Xe,h/Xe,w, Xe,h is C1/C2 of the formed gas hydrate, Xe,w [mol/kg] is the concentration of ethane in water ) is calculated to 70 kg/mol. The top occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the C1/C2 profile also confines the water flux to be 0.4kg/m2-year, similar to that confined by the chloride profile. To best fit the measured C1/C2 profile, the methane flux is calculated to 0.04mol/m2-year. Therefore, the C1/C2 profile could be used to obtain the gas hydrate accumulation information. Acknowledgments:This study was supported by Chinese National Science Foundation (grant 41303044, 91228206 ) ReferencesRiedel M, Collett T S, Malone, M J, et al. (2006), Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling, Volume 311. Sloan D E, Koh C A. (2008), Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases. Third edition. CRC Press, New York,USA

  18. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M.; Powell, John S.; Barlaz, Morton A.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup ?1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than previously reported.

  19. Leachate recirculation at the Nanticoke sanitary landfill using a bioreactor trench. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, J.J.; Scrudato, R.J.; Sumner, G.M.

    1998-02-01

    A one-year landfill leachate recirculation demonstration project was conducted in a 20-acre cell at the Broome County, NY, Nanticoke Landfill using a retrofit bioreactor trench design concept to introduce landfill leachate to the surrounding refuse mass. Over the course of the project, 1.1 million gallons of landfill leachate were distributed through the bioreactor trench, substantially increasing the moisture content (approaching 70%) of the surrounding municipal solid waste. Experimental results also indicate that the bioreactor trench functioned as an in-situ anaerobic bioreactor, effectively treating landfill leachate retained within the trench due to decreasing refuse permeability and enhanced leachate hydraulic retention time. A significant and steady decline was noted in landfill leachate chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA), and total organic carbon (TOC), suggesting that the rapid biological stabilization of the refuse within the 20-acre demonstration area was influenced by the bioreactor trench. Characterization of the resulting landfill gas indicated that optimum methane:carbon dioxide ratios were measured in all experimental gas wells and in the bioreactor trench. No apparent enhancement of landfill gas production was noted in promixity to the bioreactor trench.

  20. LANDFILL GAS CONSUMPTION IN RHIZOSPHERE OF ALTERNATIVE LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two identical 12 ft by 12 ft by 12 ft, polished stainless steel, insulated Environmental Chambers, located within the Testing and Evaluation (T&E) Facility, incorporate unique design features. Each chamber is equipped with 16 light fixtures containing a total of 32 light bulb...

  1. Melt-infiltrated Sic Composites for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay V.

    2004-01-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) manufactured by the slurry -cast melt-infiltration (MI) process are leading candidates for many hot-section turbine engine components. A collaborative program between Goodrich Corporation and NASA-Glenn Research Center is aimed at determining and optimizing woven SiC/SiC CMC performance and reliability. A variety of composites with different fiber types, interphases and matrix compositions have been fabricated and evaluated. Particular focus of this program is on the development of interphase systems that will result in improved intermediate temperature stressed-oxidation properties of this composite system. The effect of the different composite variations on composite properties is discussed and, where appropriate, comparisons made to properties that have been generated under NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program.

  2. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  3. Using observed data to improve estimated methane collection from select U.S. landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Nagpure, Ajay S; DeCarolis, Joseph F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-04-01

    The anaerobic decomposition of solid waste in a landfill produces methane, a potent greenhouse gas, and if recovered, a valuable energy commodity. Methane generation from U.S. landfills is usually estimated using the U.S. EPA's Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM). Default values for the two key parameters within LandGEM, the first-order decay rate (k) and the methane production potential (L0) are based on data collected in the 1990s. In this study, observed methane collection data from 11 U.S. landfills and estimates of gas collection efficiencies developed from site-specific gas well installation data were included in a reformulated LandGEM equation. Formal search techniques were employed to optimize k for each landfill to find the minimum sum of squared errors (SSE) between the LandGEM prediction and the observed collection data. Across nearly all landfills, the optimal k was found to be higher than the default AP-42 of 0.04 yr(-1) and the weighted average decay for the 11 landfills was 0.09 - 0.12 yr(-1). The results suggest that the default k value assumed in LandGEM is likely too low, which implies that more methane is produced in the early years following waste burial when gas collection efficiencies tend to be lower. PMID:23469937

  4. Hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging in young and mature landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Niloufar M; Lastra, Andres A; Watts, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The final discharge point for collected landfill leachates is frequently the local municipal wastewater treatment facility. The salinity, color, nutrient, and anthropogenic organics contamination of leachates often necessitate some form of pre-treatment. When advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are considered for pre-treatment, the unique composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the relatively high concentrations of some inorganic solutes in leachate will inhibit treatment efficiency. The most important benchmark for design of AOPs is the expected steady-state production of free radical (OH). Without a quantitative assessment of total OH consumption in high-strength waste water, like a landfill leachate, efficient AOP treatment is uncertain. For this reason, two landfill leachates, distinct in color, DOM, and age of landfill, were characterized for OH-scavenging using an established competition kinetics method. After stripping the samples of inorganic carbon, the DOM in leachate from mature (stabilized) landfill was found to react with OH at a rate of 9.76 × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1). However, DOM in leachate from newer landfill was observed to scavenge available OH at a faster rate (8.28 × 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)). The combination of fast rate of reaction with OH and abundance of DOM in the sampled leachate severely limited the contribution of OH to degradation of an O3- and OH-labile organic probe compound (bisphenol-a) in oxidized mature leachate (fOH = 0.03). Substantial dosing of both O3 and H2O2 (>70 mg/L and >24 mg/L, respectively) may be required to see at least 1-log-removal (>90%) of an OH-selective leachate contaminant (i.e., parachlorobenzoic acid) in a mature landfill leachate. PMID:24675270

  5. New landfill technology for an old landfill`s problems: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, T.A.; Warren, V.L.

    1996-11-01

    There are presently 111 solid waste sites in Indiana where groundwater is being monitored on a regular basis. Solid waste regulations passed in 1989 required leachate collection systems (LCS) in all new landfills. Of the 111 monitored solid waste facilities, only about 20 of them have an LCS, either built into the original design or retrofitted into an old design. Furthermore, 42 solid waste sites are presently under Phase 2 or assessment monitoring (suspected of causing groundwater contamination) and 8 are in corrective action with confirmed groundwater contamination. It is significant that none of these sites with suspected or confirmed groundwater contamination have leachate collection systems. It has been the authors` experience that many old landfills without LCSs have problems with leachate breakouts on sideslopes. However, these same landfills are found to have good natural base liners and a low chance of contaminating groundwater. On the other hand, if an old landfill has no LCS, yet is not experiencing leachate breakouts on the sideslopes, the base liner may be suspect and leachate may be exiting the landfill bottom and into underlying groundwater. This paper presents a case study of an old landfill that, until recently, had no leachate control system. The landfill had experienced significant leachate breakouts on sideslopes except for one particular corner of the fill area.

  6. Use of high temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites in gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL); Merrill, Gary Brian (Pittsburgh, PA); Ludeman, Evan McNeil (New Boston, NH); Lane, Jay Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition for insulating components, made of ceramic matrix composites, of gas turbines is provided. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere and the arrangement of spheres is such that the composition is dimensionally stable and chemically stable at a temperature of approximately 1600.degree. C. A stationary vane of a gas turbine comprising the composition of the present invention bonded to the outer surface of the vane is provided. A combustor comprising the composition bonded to the inner surface of the combustor is provided. A transition duct comprising the insulating coating bonded to the inner surface of the transition is provided. Because of abradable properties of the composition, a gas turbine blade tip seal comprising the composition also is provided. The composition is bonded to the inside surface of a shroud so that a blade tip carves grooves in the composition so as to create a customized seal for the turbine blade tip.

  7. LANDFILL CONTAINMENT AND COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its research and field experiences has developed control strategies for hazardous and municipal solid waste landfills and surface impoundments. hese control strategies include liner and cover systems. he liner systems include doubl...

  8. Where Should the Landfill Go?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Rosario P.; McFaden, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project where students were involved in finding the most suitable site for a landfill in their community. This two-month project was conducted using team teaching. Two twelfth grade geoscience classes were involved. (PR)

  9. Release and conversion of ammonia in bioreactor landfill simulators.

    PubMed

    Lubberding, Henk J; Valencia, Roberto; Salazar, Rosemarie S; Lens, Piet N L

    2012-03-01

    Bioreactor landfills are an improvement to normal sanitary landfills, because the waste is stabilised faster and the landfill gas is produced in a shorter period of time in a controlled way, thus enabling CH(4) based energy generation. However, it is still difficult to reach, within 30 years, a safe status of the landfill due to high NH(4)(+) levels (up to 3 g/L) in the leachate and NH(4)(+) is extremely important when defining the closure of landfill sites, due to its potential to pollute aquatic environments and the atmosphere. The effect of environmental conditions (temperature, fresh versus old waste) on the release of NH(4)(+) was assessed in experiments with bench (1 L) and pilot scale (800 L) reactors. The NH(4)(+) release was compared to the release of Cl(-) and BOD in the liquid phase. The different release mechanisms (physical, chemical, biological) of NH(4)(+) and Cl(-) release from the solid into the liquid phase are discussed. The NH(4)(+) level in the liquid phase of the pilot scale reactors starts decreasing after 100 days, which contrasts real-scale observations, where the NH(4)(+) level increases or remains constant. Based on the absence of oxygen in the simulators, the detectable levels of hydrazin and the presence of Anammox bacteria, it is likely that Anammox is involved in the conversion of NH(4)(+) into N(2). Nitrogen release was shown to be governed by physical and biological mechanisms and Anammox bacteria are serious candidates for the nitrogen removal process in bioreactor landfills. These results, combined with carbon removal and improved hydraulics, will accelerate the achievement of environmental sustainability in the landfilling of municipal solid waste. PMID:20884112

  10. Tips for profitable landfill acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Nangunoori, R.K.; Duffy, D.P.

    1994-05-01

    There is a gap between the amount of solid wastes generated and te landfill capacity. The acquisition of existing facilites and their remaining disposal space are a good option. The acquisitions by large firms have slowed down, but those by secondary and regional firms have increased. This paper presents information which could aid the prospective buyer and related staffing in making a feasible decision to acquire a sanitary landfill.

  11. Enhanced Landfill Mining case study: Innovative separation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyvers, Lars; Moerenhout, Tim; Helsen, Stefan; Van de Wiele, Katrien; Behets, Tom; Umans, Luk; Wille, Eddy

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, a corporate vision on Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM)1 was approved by the OVAM Board of directors, which resulted in an operational programme over the period 2011-2015. OVAM (Public Waste Agency of Flanders) is the competent authority in charge of waste, Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) and contaminated soil management in Flanders. The introduction of the ELFM concept needs to be related with the concept of SMM and the broader shift to a circular economy. Within the concept of ELFM, landfills are no longer considered to be a final and static situation, but a dynamic part of the materials cycle. The main goal of this research programme is to develop a comprehensive policy on resource management to deal with the issue of former landfills. In order to investigate the opportunities of ELFM, the OVAM is applying a three step approach including mapping, surveying and mining of these former landfills. As a result of the mapping part over 2,000 landfill sites, that will need to be dealt with, were revealed. The valorisation potential of ELFM could be assigned to different goals, according to the R³P-concept : Recycling of Materials, Recovery of Energy, Reclamation of Land and Protection of drinking water supply. . On behalf of the OVAM, ECOREM was assigned to follow-up a pilot case executed on a former landfill, located in Zuienkerke, Flanders. Within this case study some technical tests were carried out on the excavated waste material to investigate the possibilities for a waste to resource conversion. The performance of both on site and off site techniques were evaluated. These testings also contribute to the mapping part of OVAM's research programme on ELFM and reveal more information on the composition of former landfills dating from different era's. In order to recover as many materials as possible, five contractors were assigned to perform separation tests on the bulk material from the Zuienkerke landfill. All used techniques were described, resulting in a separate flowsheet for every contractor. The resulting fractions and materials were described in detail to obtain an inventory of the bulk material. Based on the characteristics from the obtained fractions, all possible valorisation pathways are listed, suggesting a Waste to Material (WtM) or a Waste to Energy (WtE) valorisation pathway. Fractions that needed further treatment were also discussed. The results of the separation tests proved to be very promising and delivered well sorted waste streams. The composition of the waste material, on the other hand, proved to be less beneficial to be economically feasible. Due to the high amount of sand and clay (up to 90wt%) in the Zuienkerke landfill the share of instant recoverable materials proved to be very limited. Due to the limited number of tests concerning the separation and valorisation of landfilled waste, the feasibility of ELFM in the short term is not fully described yet. Based on the first experiences, the main drivers to introduce the ELFM concept on these type of landfills are the necessity of urgent remediation actions and the reclamation of land. The added value of land reuse for the future might close the financial gap in a significant way, making the implementation of ELFM feasible on former landfills. 1 Jones et al.,2010: "the safe conditioning, excavation and integrated valorisation of landfilled waste streams as both materials and energy, using innovative transformation technologies and respecting the most stringent social and ecological criteria".

  12. Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems

    E-print Network

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic composition in substrates, which are used in closed hydroponic systems. For analyses of carbon dioxide (CO2, in the in the nutrient solution, and in the drain solution. To analyze the root zone, a hydroponic system

  13. Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)

    SciTech Connect

    White, Steven

    2012-11-15

    The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

  14. Effects of gas composition in headspace and bicarbonate concentrations in media on gas and methane production, degradability, and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production techniques.

    PubMed

    Patra, Amlan Kumar; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-07-01

    Headspace gas composition and bicarbonate concentrations in media can affect methane production and other characteristics of rumen fermentation in in vitro gas production systems, but these 2 important factors have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, these 2 factors were investigated with respect to gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of feed substrate, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile using in vitro gas production techniques. Three headspace gas compositions (N2+ CO2+ H2 in the ratio of 90:5:5, CO2, and N2) with 2 substrate types (alfalfa hay only, and alfalfa hay and a concentrate mixture in a 50:50 ratio) in a 3×2 factorial design (experiment 1) and 3 headspace compositions (N2, N2 + CO2 in a 50:50 ratio, and CO2) with 3 bicarbonate concentrations (80, 100, and 120 mM) in a 3×3 factorial design (experiment 2) were evaluated. In experiment 1, total gas production (TGP) and net gas production (NGP) was the lowest for CO2, followed by N2, and then the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas after fermentation was greater for CO2 than for N2 and the gas mixture, whereas total methane production (TMP) and net methane production (NMP) were the greatest for CO2, followed by the gas mixture, and then N2. Headspace composition did not affect in vitro digestibility or the VFA profile, except molar percentages of propionate, which were greater for CO2 and N2 than for the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas, TGP, and NGP were affected by the interaction of headspace gas composition and substrate type. In experiment 2, increasing concentrations of CO2 in the headspace decreased TGP and NGP quadratically, but increased the concentrations of methane, NMP, and in vitro fiber digestibility linearly, and TMP quadratically. Fiber digestibility, TGP, and NGP increased linearly with increasing bicarbonate concentrations in the medium. Concentrations of methane and NMP were unaffected by bicarbonate concentration, but TMP tended to increase due to increasing bicarbonate concentration. Although total VFA concentration and molar percentage of butyrate were unchanged, the molar percentage of acetate, and acetate-to-propionate ratio decreased, whereas the molar percentage of propionate increased quadratically with increasing bicarbonate concentration. This study demonstrated for the first time that headspace composition, especially CO2 content, and bicarbonate concentration in media could significantly influence gas and methane production, and rumen fermentation in gas production techniques. PMID:23684023

  15. Thermal treatment of landfill leachate and the emission control.

    PubMed

    Atabarut, Tamer; Ekinci, Ekrem

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop an appropriate system for the thermal treatment of landfill leachate. In the initial phase of this study, characterization studies were conducted both for the waste disposed and leachate generated. For the thermal treatment of the landfill leachate two different incineration systems, namely a double-phase liquid waste incineration system and a new pilot-scale incineration system, were tested. During the experimental study, the capability of the new pilot-scale incineration system was proven to treat the landfill leachate. However, high concentrations of NOx were recorded. On the other hand, the experimental data, obtained during the testing period of the double-phase liquid waste incineration system, indicated that the fluidized bed incinerator provided an extra unit sufficient to complete the oxidation of partial products of combustion and organics carried from the initial incinerator. Therefore, lower gaseous emissions were noted. However, an agglomeration problem has occurred, due to the high concentrations of Na, Ca and K. It was concluded that considering the flexibility of the thermal processes, thermal treatment of leachate could successfully be applied to Odayeri landfill, as well as to many landfills, if proper gas treatment systems are applied. PMID:16849137

  16. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  17. Methanogenesis acceleration of fresh landfilled waste by micro-aeration.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Xiao-Hua; Li, Guo-Jian

    2005-01-01

    When municipal solid waste (MSW) with high content of food waste is landfilled, the rapid hydrolysis of food waste results in the imbalance of anaerobic metabolism in the landfill layer, indicated by accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and decrease of pH value. This occurrence could lead to long lag time before the initiation of methanogenesis and to the production of strong leachate. Simulated landfill columns with forced aeration, with natural ventilation, and with no aeration, were monitored regarding their organics degradation rate with leachate recirculation. Hydrolysis reactions produced strong leachate in the column with no aeration. With forced aeration, the produced VFA could be effectively degraded, leading to the reduction in COD of the leachate effluent since the week 3. The CH4 in the landfill gas from the column with aeration rate of 0.39 m3/(m3 x d) and frequency of twice/d, leachate recirculation rate of 12.2 mm/d and frequency of twice/d, could amount to 40% (v/v) after only 20 weeks. This amount had increased up to 50% afterward even with no aeration. Most of COD in the recirculated leachate was removed. Using natural ventilation, CH4 could also be produced and the COD of the leachate effluent be reduced after 10 weeks of operation. However, the persistent existence of oxygen in the landfill layer yielded instability in methanogenesis process. PMID:16083105

  18. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Talib E. Lockley, Elaine; Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K.

    2008-07-01

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  19. Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Di Trapani, Daniele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2011-08-15

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

  20. Gas storage cylinder formed from a composition containing thermally exfoliated graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A gas storage cylinder or gas storage cylinder liner, formed from a polymer composite, containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m(exp 2)/g to 2600 m(exp 2)2/g.

  1. PRACTICE REVIEW OF FIVE BIOREACTOR/RECIRCULATION LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six bioreactor landfills were analyzed to provide a perspective of current practice and technical issues that differentiate bioreactor landfills from conventional landfills. Five of the bioreactor landfills were anaerobic and one was aerated. In one case, nearly identical cells e...

  2. Slope stability of bioreactor landfills during leachate injection: effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic municipal solid waste conditions.

    PubMed

    Giri, Rajiv K; Reddy, Krishna R

    2014-03-01

    In bioreactor landfills, leachate recirculation can significantly affect the stability of landfill slope due to generation and distribution of excessive pore fluid pressures near side slope. The current design and operation of leachate recirculation systems do not consider the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the increased pore gas pressures in landfilled waste caused due to leachate recirculation on the physical stability of landfill slope. In this study, a numerical two-phase flow model (landfill leachate and gas as immiscible phases) was used to investigate the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of MSW on moisture distribution and pore-water and capillary pressures and their resulting impacts on the stability of a simplified bioreactor landfill during leachate recirculation using horizontal trench system. The unsaturated hydraulic properties of MSW were considered based on the van Genuchten model. The strength reduction technique was used for slope stability analyses as it takes into account of the transient and spatially varying pore-water and gas pressures. It was concluded that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW with varied unit weight and saturated hydraulic conductivity significantly influenced the moisture distribution and generation and distribution of pore fluid pressures in landfill and considerably reduced the stability of bioreactor landfill slope. It is recommended that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW must be considered as it provides a more reliable approach for the design and leachate operations in bioreactor landfills. PMID:24554462

  3. A Study of Hybrid Insulation Composition Joint using Gas and Solid Insulator for Gas Insulated Power Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkai, Hiroyuki; Goshima, Hisashi; Yashima, Masafumi

    SF6 is used as the main insulation gas for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS), but it has recently become a gas that must be restricted because of its greenhouse effect. To date, we have studied the insulation characteristics of compressed N2 and CO2 as a possible alternative for SF6. We have reported that N2 or CO2 must be pressurized up to 2.0MPa when it is used as a substitute for SF6 of 0.5MPa. Therefore, we have proposed a hybrid insulation composition that uses the gas and solid insulators. Because the central conductor of GIS is the covered by solid insulator in this composition, the high-pressure gas of 2.0MPa is not needed. However, the joint of the solid insulator becomes the weak point for discharge development. In this paper, we describe the effective configuration for the improvement of withstand voltage on the basis of the experiment. As a result, the most effective connector was made of resin without an implanted electrode and the configuration was the case without the solid-solid interface between the solid insulator of the central conductor and the resin connector. In this experiment, the improvement of the breakdown electric field of the hybrid composition was 44% or more compared with the case of only gas insulation (conventional method). In addition, a further improvement can be expected by optimizing the insulation creepage distance and configuration.

  4. Potential for enhanced phytoremediation of landfills using biosolids--a review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Despite the use of recyclable materials increasing worldwide, waste disposal to landfill remains the most common method of waste management because it is simple and relatively inexpensive. Although landfill disposal is an effective waste management system, if not managed correctly, a number of potential detrimental environmental impacts have been identified including soil and ground water contamination, leachate generation, and gas emissions. In particular, improper post-closure treatment of landfills or deterioration of the conventional clay landfill capping were shown to result in land degradation which required remediation to secure contaminants within the landfill site. Phytoremediation is an attractive technology for landfill remediation, as it can stabilize soil and simultaneously remediate landfill leachate. In addition, landfill phytoremediation systems can potentially be combined with landfill covers (Phytocapping) for hydrological control of infiltrated rainfall. However, for the successful application of any phytoremediation system, the effective establishment of appropriate, desired vegetation is critical. This is because the typically harsh and sterile nature of landfill capping soil limits the sustainable establishment of vegetation. Therefore, the physicochemical properties of landfill capping soils often need to be improved by incorporating soil amendments. Biosolids are a common soil amendment and will often meet these demanding conditions because they contain a variety of plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, as well as a large proportion of organic matter. Such amendment will also ameliorate the physical properties of the capping soils by increasing porosity, moisture content, and soil aggregation. Contaminants which potentially originate from biosolids will also be remediated by activities congruent with the establishment of plants and bacteria. PMID:19939550

  5. Uncontrolled methane emissions from a MSW landfill surface: influence of landfill features and side slopes.

    PubMed

    Di Trapani, Daniele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Viviani, Gaspare

    2013-10-01

    Sanitary landfills for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal have been identified as one of the most important anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4) emissions; in order to minimize its negative effects on the environment, landfill gas (LFG) recovery is a suitable tool to control CH4 emissions from a landfill site; further, the measurement of CH4 emissions can represent a good way to evaluate the effectiveness of LFG recovering systems. In general, LFG will escape through any faults in the landfill capping or in the LFG collection system. Indeed, some areas of the capping can be more permeable than others (e.g. portions of a side slope), especially when considering a temporarily capped zone (covered area that is not expected to receive any further waste for a period of at least 3 months, but for engineering reasons does not have a permanent cap yet). These areas, which are characterized by abnormal emissions, are usually defined as "features": in particular, a feature is a small, discrete area or an installation where CH4 emissions significantly differ from the surrounding zones. In the present study, the influence that specific features have on CH4 emissions has been investigated, based on direct measurements carried out in different seasons by means of a flux chamber to the case study of Palermo (IT) landfill (Bellolampo). The results showed that the flux chamber method is reliable and easy to perform, and the contoured flux maps, obtained by processing the measured data were found to be a suitable tool for identifying areas with abnormal (high) emissions. Further, it was found that a relationship between methane emission rates and landfill side slope can be established. Concerning the influence of the temporary HDPE cover system on CH4 recovery efficiency, it contributed to a significant decrease of the free surface area available for uncontrolled emissions; this aspect, coupled to the increase of the CH4 volumes collected by the LFG recovery system, led to a significant increase of the recovery efficiency. PMID:23465313

  6. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuzhong; Guo Yang; Chen Chongming; Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  7. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  8. Compositional Discrimination of Decompression and Decomposition Gas Bubbles in Bycaught Seals and Dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Greer, Bill; Niemeyer, Misty; Bogomolni, Andrea L.; Moore, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Gas bubbles in marine mammals entangled and drowned in gillnets have been previously described by computed tomography, gross examination and histopathology. The absence of bacteria or autolytic changes in the tissues of those animals suggested that the gas was produced peri- or post-mortem by a fast decompression, probably by quickly hauling animals entangled in the net at depth to the surface. Gas composition analysis and gas scoring are two new diagnostic tools available to distinguish gas embolisms from putrefaction gases. With this goal, these methods have been successfully applied to pathological studies of marine mammals. In this study, we characterized the flux and composition of the gas bubbles from bycaught marine mammals in anchored sink gillnets and bottom otter trawls. We compared these data with marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Fresh animals or with moderate decomposition (decomposition scores of 2 and 3) were prioritized. Results showed that bycaught animals presented with significantly higher gas scores than stranded animals. Gas composition analyses indicate that gas was formed by decompression, confirming the decompression hypothesis. PMID:24367623

  9. Use of lightweight composites for GAS payload structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    A key element in the design of a small self-contained payload is the supporting structure. This structure must support the experiments and other components while using as little space and weight as possible. Hence, the structure material must have characteristics of being both strong and light. Aluminum was used for the structure on the first Purdue University payload, but consumed a relatively large percentage of the total payload weight. The current payload has a larger power supply requirement than did the previous payload. To allow additional weight for the batteries, a composite material has been chosen for the structure which has the required strength while being considerably lighter than aluminum. A radial fin design has been chosen for ease of composite material lay-up and its overall strength of design. A composite plate will connect the free ends of the fins and add strength and reduce vibration. The physical characteristics of the composite material and the method of open lay-up construction is described. Also discussed are the testing, modifications, and problems encountered during assembly of the experiments to the structure.

  10. Pollution profiles and physicochemical parameters in old uncontrolled landfills.

    PubMed

    Regadío, M; Ruiz, A I; de Soto, I S; Rastrero, M Rodriguez; Sánchez, N; Gismera, M J; Sevilla, M T; da Silva, P; Procopio, J Rodríguez; Cuevas, J

    2012-03-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the geological barrier beneath municipal-waste landfills is a critical issue for soil and groundwater protection. This study examines natural clayey soils directly in contact with the waste deposited in three landfills over 12 years old in Spain. Several physicochemical and geological parameters were measured as a function of depth. Electrical conductivity (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), Cl(-), NH(4)(+), Na(+) and exchangeable NH(4)(+) and Na(+) were used as parameters to measure the penetration of landfill leachate pollution. Mineralogy, specific surface area and cationic-exchange capacities were analyzed to characterize the materials under the landfills. A principal component analysis, combined with a Varimax rotation, was applied to the data to determine patterns of association between samples and variables not evident upon initial inspection. The main factors explaining the variation in the data are related to waste composition and local geology. Although leachates have been in contact with clays for long time periods (13-24 years), WSOC and EC fronts are attenuated at depths of 0.2-1.5m within the clay layer. Taking into account this depth of the clayey materials, these natural substrata (>45% illite-smectite-type sheet silicates) are suitable for confining leachate pollution and for complying with European legislation. This paper outlines the relevant differences in the clayey materials of the three landfills in which a diffusive flux attenuation capacity (A(c)) is defined as a function (1) of the rate of decrease of the parameters per meter of material, (2) of the age and area of the landfill and (3) of the quantity and quality of the wastes. PMID:22169764

  11. Landfill mining for resource recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reith, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    Landfills are repositories of subeconomic resources. Landfill mining is an important enterprise that will someday return these resources to productive use, closing the loop on finite resources and stimulating economic development in communities near landfills. Secondary development of interred resources (landfill waste) will become economically viable as the environmental externalities of primary resource development -- e.g., the destruction of pristine habitat -- are more fully accounted for in programs of ecological design and design for environment. It is important to take an integrated and holistic approach to this new endeavor, which will be a complex assemblage of disciplines. Component disciplines include: resource economics, characterization, and excavation; contaminant control, and protection of environmental safety and health; material sorting, blending, and pretreatment; resource conversion, recovery, storage, and distribution; and reclamation for long-term land use. These technical elements must be addressed in close combination with compelling social issues such as environmental justice that may be especially critical in economically depressed communities surrounding today`s landfills.

  12. Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    -Section of Closure #12;Schedule III ­ Gazette 19 & 21 Specifications for Landfill Cover Daily cover of 10cm of soil;Post Closure Care-Requirements The Post-closure care of landfill site shall be conducted for at leastMunicipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities Arun

  13. Long-Range Radar Station and Landfill

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This oblique aerial photograph from 2006 shows the Barter Island long-range radar station landfill threatened by coastal erosion. The landfill was subsequently relocated further inland, however, the coastal bluffs continue to retreat. ...

  14. NOVEL COMPOSITE MEMBRANES AND PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Bikson; Sal Giglia; Jibin Hao

    2003-03-01

    In the second phase of this project, the newly developed membrane module for natural gas dehydration was tested and evaluated in a pilot plant located at a commercial natural gas treatment site. This phase was undertaken jointly with UOP LLC, our commercialization partner. The field test demonstrated that a commercial-size membrane module for natural gas dehydration was successfully manufactured. The membrane module operated reliably over 1000 psi differential pressure across the membrane in the field test. The effects of feed gas pressure, permeate gas pressure, feed flow rate, purge ratio (flow rate ratio of permeate outlet to feed), and feed gas dew point on the membrane module performance were determined and found to meet the design expectations. Although water vapor permeance was lower than expected, substantial natural gas dehydration was demonstrated with low purge ratio. For example, dew point was suppressed by as much as 30 F with only about 2 {approx} 3% purge ratio. However the bore side pressure drops were significantly higher than the projected value from the fluid dynamic calculation. It is likely that not all the fibers were open in either the sweep or the permeate tube sheet end. This could help to explain the relatively low water vapor permeances that were measured in the field. An economic evaluation of the membrane process and the traditional Triethylene Glycol (TEG) process to dehydrate natural gas was performed and the economics of the two processes were compared. Two sets of membrane module performance properties were used in the economic analysis of the membrane process. One was from the results of this field test and the other from the results of the previous small-scale test with a medium pressure membrane variant conducted at 750 psig. The membrane process was competitive with the TEG process for the natural gas feed flow rate below 10 MMSCFD for the membrane with previously measured water vapor permeance. The membrane process was competitive for the feed flow rate below 1 MMSCFD even for the membrane with the water vapor permeance of this field test.

  15. Astronomy on a Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  16. Astronomy on a Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-05-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  17. New tool for landfill location.

    PubMed

    Vasiloglou, Vasilios Chr

    2004-12-01

    In the present paper a decision-making process for the potential location of new landfill areas with wide community participation and acceptance is suggested. The main scientific contribution of this work is the elaboration of an independent decision-making tool, which can be used in landfill site selection. Specifically, at a first level it acts as an intermediary between experts (i.e. engineers, technical advisors) and decision-makers (i.e. elected representatives, appointive advisors), helping decision-makers to use experts' knowledge. At a higher level, it acts as an independent processor of decision-makers judgments thereby giving a result that is in accordance with pre-chosen criteria. In this way, the local authorities can effectively participate in the decision-making process and avert the violation of possible agreements. Furthermore, the criteria (pre-selection - evaluation) and the methodology of multicriteria analysis for new landfill location are presented. PMID:15666446

  18. Design of landfill daily cells.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakopoulos, D; Dokas, I

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the behaviour of the landfill soil-to-refuse (S/R) ratio when size, geometry and operating parameters of the daily cell vary over realistic ranges. A simple procedure is presented (1) for calculating the cell parameters values which minimise the S/R ratio and (2) for studying the sensitivity of this minimum S/R ratio to variations in cell size, final refuse density, working face length, lift height and cover thickness. In countries where daily soil cover is required, savings in landfill space could be realised following this procedure. The sensitivity of minimum S/R to variations in cell dimensions decreases with cell size. Working face length and lift height affect the S/R ratio significantly. This procedure also offers the engineer an additional tool for comparing one large daily cell with two or more smaller ones, at two different working faces within the same landfill. PMID:11720268

  19. Background Information Document for Updating AP42 Section 2.4 for Estimating Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revised draft document was prepared for U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development, and describes the data analysis undertaken to update the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfill section of AP-42. This 2008 update includes the addition of data from 62 landfill gas emission...

  20. Subsurface investigation in Sarimukti landfill using DC resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirana, Kartika Hajar; Susanto, Kusnahadi; Susilawati, Anggie

    2015-09-01

    Layering process in landfill will produce leachate that produced by the entry of a mixture of rain water or ground water into the piles solid waste. In Sarimukti landfill, leachate from landfill channeled through a pipe to the leachate pond that planted beneath the soil surface. If the pipe is leaking, the leachate will contaminate the surrounding soil and may also to contaminate groundwater. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate subsurface conditions. One type of subsurface investigation can be determined by measuring the resistivity by using DC resistivity method. Resistivity measured in Sarimukti landfill with semigriding design including 8 lines perpendicular to each other. The result show there is resistivity contrast of materials, such as the solid waste, soil, water content that is predicted as leachate, and methane gas. The range of resistivity values are from 1 ?m to 500 ?m with variations of depth in according to line lenght. The resistivity values respectively: leachate is 1 to 10 ?m; Wet soil is 10 to 100 ?m; wet waste is 100 to 400 ?m; gas is > 400 ?m. Then, leachate was found at depth of 25 meters and wet soil is predicted as aquifer layer with 70 meters depth. The resistivity of aquifer layer is 1 to 20 ?m and covered by silt clay as clay cap. Thus, it can predicted that leachate not seep into the aquifer layer.

  1. Constraints on the origins of hydrocarbon gas from compositions of gases at their site of origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.; Schoell, M.

    1995-01-01

    IT is widely accepted that natural gas is formed from thermal decomposition of both oil in reservoirs and, to a lesser extent, the organic matter in shales from which the oil was derived1-6. But laboratory pyrolysis experiments on shales do not reproduce the methane-rich composition typical of most gas reservoirs7, leading to suggestions7 that other mechanisms, such as transition-metal catalysis, may be important. The discrepancy might, however, instead arise because gas (and oil) deposits have migrated from their source rocks, so that the reservoir composition might not be representative of the composition in the source rocks where the hydrocarbons were generated. To address this question, we have analysed gas samples coproduced with oils directly from a source rock (the Bakken shales, North Dakota, USA) where the local geology has prevented significant hydrocarbon migration. The methane contents of these Bakken-shale gases are much lower than that of conventional gas reservoirs, but are consistent with that from pyrolysis experiments8,9 on these shales. Thus, because these Bakken gases form with (rather than from) oils, we argue that compositional differences between gases from source rocks and conventional gas deposits result from fractionation processes occurring after hydrocarbon expulsion from the source rock.

  2. RECLAMATION EFFORTS AT THE LOCKWOOD LANDFILL STATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reclamation of disturbed arid rangelands is a monumental task under the best of conditions. The Lockwood Landfill located 17 km east of Reno, Nevada is a Regional Landfill of some 8800 ha in area. This landfill services all of northern Nevada as well as much of northern California. Returning la...

  3. BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS, THEORETICAL ADVANTAGES AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioreactor landfills are municipal solid waste landfills that utilize bulk liquids in an effort to accelerate solid waste degradation. There are few potential benefits for operating a MSW landfill as a bioreactor. These include leachate treatment and management, increase in the s...

  4. APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING GLOBAL LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an overview of available country-specific data and modeling approaches for estimating global landfill methane. Current estimates of global landfill methane indicate that landfills account for between 4 and 15% of the global methane budget. The report describes an ap...

  5. Mining landfills for space and fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Flosdorf, H.W.; Alexieff, S.

    1993-03-01

    Lancaster County, Pennsylvania`s experiments with landfill reclamation are helping the county remain self-sufficient in managing its solid waste stream. Landfill mining is proving to be a worthwhile approach to extending landfill life and obtaining fuel for the county`s waste-to-energy plant.

  6. Impact of changes in barometric pressure on landfill methane emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liukang; Lin, Xiaomao; Amen, Jim; Welding, Karla; McDermitt, Dayle

    2014-07-01

    Landfill methane emissions were measured continuously using the eddy covariance method from June to December 2010. The study site was located at the Bluff Road Landfill in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Our results show that landfill methane emissions strongly depended on changes in barometric pressure; rising barometric pressure suppressed the emission, while falling barometric pressure enhanced the emission, a phenomenon called barometric pumping. There was up to a 35-fold variation in day-to-day methane emissions due to changes in barometric pressure. Wavelet coherence analysis revealed a strong spectral coherency between variations of barometric pressure and methane emission at periodicities ranging from 1 day to 8 days. Power spectrum and ogive analysis showed that at least 10 days of continuous measurements was needed in order to capture 90% of the total variance in the methane emission time series at our landfill site. From our results, it is clear that point-in-time measurements taken at monthly or longer time intervals using techniques such as the trace plume method, the mass balance method, or the closed-chamber method will be subject to large variations in measured emission rates because of the barometric pumping phenomenon. Estimates of long-term integrated methane emissions from landfills based on such measurements could yield uncertainties, ranging from 28.8% underestimation to 32.3% overestimation. Our results demonstrate a need for continuous measurements to quantify annual total landfill emissions. This conclusion may apply to the study of methane emissions from wetlands, peatlands, lakes, and other environmental contexts where emissions are from porous media or ebullition. Other implications from the present study for hazard gas monitoring programs are also discussed.

  7. Dew point, internal gas pressure, and chemical composition of the gas within the free volume of DWPF canistered waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.; Herman, D.T.; Crump, S.; Miller, T.J.; McIntosh, J.

    1996-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) produced 55 canistered waste forms containing simulated waste glass during the four Waste Qualification campaigns of the DWPF Startup Test Program. Testing of the gas within the free volume of these canisters for dew point, internal gas pressure, and chemical composition was performed as part of a continuing effort to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications. Results are presented for six glass-filled canisters. The dew points within the canisters met the acceptance criterion of < 20{degrees}C for all six canisters. Factors influencing the magnitude of the dew point are presented. The chemical composition of the free volume gas was indistinguishable from air for all six canisters. Hence, no foreign materials were present in the gas phase of these canisters. The internal gas pressures within the sealed canisters were < 1 atm at 25{degrees}C for all six canisters which readily met the acceptance criterion of an internal gas pressure of less than 1.5 atm at 25{degrees}C. These results provided the evidence required to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications.

  8. Life-cycle inventory and impact evaluation of mining municipal solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pradeep; Powell, Jon T; Smith, Justin L; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2014-01-01

    Recent research and policy directives have emerged with a focus on sustainable management of waste materials, and the mining of old landfills represents an opportunity to meet sustainability goals by reducing the release of liquid- and gas-phase contaminants into the environment, recovering land for more productive use, and recovering energy from the landfilled materials. The emissions associated with the landfill mining process (waste excavation, screening, and on-site transportation) were inventoried on the basis of diesel fuel consumption data from two full-scale mining projects (1.3-1.5 L/in-place m(3) of landfill space mined) and unit emissions (mass per liter of diesel consumption) from heavy equipment typically deployed for mining landfills. An analytical framework was developed and used in an assessment of the life-cycle environmental impacts of a few end-use management options for materials deposited and mined from an unlined landfill. The results showed that substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions can be realized in both the waste relocation and materials and energy recovery scenarios compared to a "do nothing" case. The recovery of metal components from landfilled waste was found to have the greatest benefit across nearly all impact categories evaluated, while emissions associated with heavy equipment to mine the waste itself were found to be negligible compared to the benefits that mining provided. PMID:24512420

  9. Potential application of biocover soils to landfills for mitigating toluene emission.

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Pei, Junshen; Tian, Baohu; Fan, Fengxi; Tang, Mengling; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2015-12-15

    Biocover soils have been demonstrated to be a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH4 emission from landfills. To evaluate the potential of biocover soil in mitigating emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from landfills, simulated cover soil columns with the influx of toluene (chosen as typical of NMVOCs) concentrations of 102-1336mgm(-3) in the presence or absence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were conducted in this study. In the two experimental materials (waste biocover soils (WBS) and landfill cover soils (LCS)), higher toluene reduction was observed in WBS with respect to LCS. After the introduction of landfill gas, an increase of microbial diversity and relative abundance of toluene-degrading bacteria and methanotrophs occurred in WBS. To illustrate the role of toluene-degrading activity in mitigating toluene emissions through landfill covers, an analytical model was developed by incorporating the steady-state vapor transport with the first-order kinetics of aerobic biodegradation limited by O2 availability. This study demonstrated that biocover soils have great potential in applying to landfills for mitigating toluene emission to the atmosphere. PMID:26073517

  10. Modified biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays to assess biodegradation potential of landfilled refuse

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, J.E.; Rose, C.; Piorkowski, R.

    1989-01-01

    Modified Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) assays were used to assess biogas production potential of solid landfill samples. In landfill samples with visible soil content, moisture addition alone was generally as effective at stimulating biogas production as the addition of a comprehensive nutrient media. In a variety of samples from humid and semiarid landfills, addition of an aqueous nutrient media was the most effective stimulant for biogas production; however, moisture addition was almost as effective for most samples, suggesting that water addition would be the most cost-effective field approach. Onset of methanogenesis was slower in fresh refuse samples (even when inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge) than in landfill samples, indicating that the soil into which materials are landfilled is a major source of microorganisms. High volatile solids loading in fresh refuse and landfill assays retarded methanogenesis. A comparison of anaerobic and aerobic sample handling techniques showed no significant differences with regard to onset of methanogenesis and total gas production. The technique shows initial promise with regard to replication and reproducibility of results and could be a meaningful addition to landfill site evaluations where commercial gas recovery is anticipated. The BMP technique could also be adapted to assess anaerobic biodegradability of other solid waste materials for conventional anaerobic digestion applications. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control

    DOEpatents

    Bushnell, Calvin L. (Glastonbury, CT); Davis, Christopher L. (Tolland, CT)

    1991-01-01

    A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

  12. Onsite survey on the mechanism of passive aeration and air flow path in a semi-aerobic landfill.

    PubMed

    Matsuto, Toshihiko; Zhang, Xin; Matsuo, Takayuki; Yamada, Shuhei

    2015-02-01

    The semi-aerobic landfill is a widely accepted landfill concept in Japan because it promotes stabilization of leachates and waste via passive aeration without using any type of mechanical equipment. Ambient air is thought to be supplied to the landfill through a perforated pipe network made of leachate collection pipe laid along the bottom and a vertically erected gas vent. However, its underlying air flow path and driving forces are unclear because empirical data from real-world landfills is inadequate. The objective of this study is to establish scientific evidence about the aeration mechanisms and air flow path by an on-site survey of a full-scale, semi-aerobic landfill. First, all passive vents located in the landfill were monitored with respect to temperature level and gas velocity in different seasons. We found a linear correlation between the outflow rate and gas temperature, suggesting that air flow is driven by a buoyancy force caused by the temperature difference between waste in the landfill and the ambient temperature. Some vents located near the landfill bottom acted as air inflow vents. Second, we conducted a tracer test to determine the air flow path between two vents, by injecting tracer gas from an air sucking vent. The resulting slowly increasing gas concentration at the neighboring vent suggested that fresh air flow passes through the waste layer toward the gas vents from leachate collection pipes, as well as directly flowing through the pipe network. Third, we monitored the temperature of gas flowing out of a vent at night. Since the temperature drop of the gas was much smaller than that of the environment, the air collected at the gas vents was estimated to flow mostly through the waste layer, i.e., the semi-aerobic landfill has considerable aeration ability under the appropriate conditions. PMID:25443098

  13. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, Raymond J. (Mt. Prospect, IL); Kurek, Paul R. (Schaumburg, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  14. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

    1988-07-19

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  15. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Hidehiko

    2009-09-15

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  16. MCO gas composition for low reactive surface areas

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, M.J.

    1998-07-23

    This calculation adjusts modeled output (HNF-SD-SNF-TI-040, Rev. 2) by considering lower reactive fuel surface areas and by increasing the input helium backfill overpressure from 0.5 to 1.5 atm (2.5 atm abs) to verify that MCO gas-phase oxygen concentrations can remain below 4 mole % over a 40 year interim period under a worst case condition of zero reactive surface area. Added backfill gas will dilute any gases generated during interim storage and is a strategy within the current design capability. The zero reactive surface area represents a hypothetical worst case example where there is no fuel scrap and/or damaged spent fuel rods in an MCO. Also included is a hypothetical case where only K East fuel exists in an MCO with an added backfill overpressure of 0.5 atm (1.5 atm abs).

  17. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  18. Characterization of uncertainty in estimation of methane collection from select U.S. landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Nagpure, Ajay S; DeCarolis, Joseph F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2015-02-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste in landfills. If captured, methane can be beneficially used to generate electricity. To inventory emissions and assist the landfill industry with energy recovery projects, the U.S. EPA developed the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) that includes two key parameters: the first-order decay rate (k) and methane production potential (L0). By using data from 11 U.S. landfills, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify the effect of uncertainty in gas collection efficiency and municipal solid waste fraction on optimal k values and collectable methane. A dual-phase model and associated parameters were also developed to evaluate its performance relative to a single-phase model (SPM) similar to LandGEM. The SPM is shown to give lower error in estimating methane collection, with site-specific best-fit k values. Most of the optimal k values are notably greater than the U.S. EPA's default of 0.04 yr(-1), which implies that the gas generation decreases more rapidly than predicted at the current default. We translated the uncertainty in collectable methane into uncertainty in engine requirements and potential economic losses to demonstrate the practical significance to landfill operators. The results indicate that landfill operators could overpay for engine capacity by $30,000-780,000 based on overestimates of collectable methane. PMID:25604252

  19. Composition of matter useful in flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, D.

    1983-05-03

    Flue gas having a content of sulfur dioxide is passed upwardly through a scrubbing tower against a descending flow of recycled aqueous sodium aluminate-sodium hydroxide liquor. The sulfur dioxide in the gas is converted to sodium and aluminum sulfates and sulfites and the liquor removes any fly ash present in the gas. Underflow is continuously discharged from the tower and is sent to an evaporator for removal of excess water. Make-up solutions of sodium sulfate and aluminum sulfate are added, as necessary. Carbonaceous reducing agent is added to the discharge from the evaporator. The mixture is continuously fed into a reducing furnace where the sulfates and sulfites are reduced to sulfides. The product of the furnace (Molten sodium and aluminum sulfides) is charged into a continuous hydrolyzer. Hydrogen sulfide is evolved and collected, and, if desired, its sulfur content is converted to elementary sulfur. The underflow from the hydrolyzer is filtered. The filtrate is aqueous sodium aluminate sodium hydroxide solution which is recycled to the scrubbing tower.

  20. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24?h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12?h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  1. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  2. Determination of gas composition in a biogas plant using a Raman-based sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, S. C.; Kiefer, J.; Benz, J.; Kempf, T.; Leipertz, A.; Seeger, T.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a gas sensor, based on spontaneous Raman scattering, for the compositional analysis of typical biogas mixtures and present a description of the sensor, as well as of the calibration procedure, which allows the quantification of condensable gases. Moreover, we carry out a comprehensive characterization of the system, in order to determine the measurement uncertainty, as well as influences of temperature and pressure fluctuation. Finally, the sensor is applied at different locations inside a plant in which biogas is produced from renewable raw materials. The composition is monitored after fermenting, after purification and after the final conditioning, where natural gas is added. The Raman sensor is able to detect all the relevant gas components, i.e. CH4, CO2, N2 and H2O, and report their individual concentrations over time. The results were compared to reference data from a conventional gas analyzer and good agreement was obtained.

  3. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Xianying; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Guangping

    2014-08-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature.

  4. Optimization and analysis of mixed refrigerant composition for the PRICO natural gas liquefaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiongwen; Liu, Jinping; Cao, Le

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the energy optimization of the PRICO natural gas liquefaction (LNG) process was performed with the genetic algorithm (GA) and the process simulation software Aspen Plus. Then the characteristics of the heat transfer composite curves of the cold box were obtained and analyzed. Based on it, the heat exchange process in the cold box was divided into three regions. At last, in order to find the relationship between the energy consumption and the composition of the mixed refrigerant, the effects of the refrigerant flow composition on the temperature difference and the pinch point location were deeply investigated, which would be useful to guide the refrigerant charging.

  5. Stable volcanic gas composition during a variety of activities at the persistently degassing Asama volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Ohminato, Takao; Takeo, Minoru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2015-04-01

    Asama volcano at central Japan is a persistently degassing andesitic volcano and repeated eruptions every several years. The recent eruptions occurred in September 2004, August 2008 and February 2009 and are followed by increase of the volcanic gas emission during several months. The SO2 flux is typically 1,000-4,000 t/d during the high flux period after the eruption, whereas the flux is around 100 t/d during the low gas flux periods. This study aims to understand the controlling process of volcano degassing based on the volcanic gas composition data. In particular, we focus to evaluate the gas composition contrast between the high and low gas flux periods. Since 2004, we repeated manual measurements of Multi-GAS and alkali-filters at the summit crater of the volcano and installed an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station for a daily measurement at the western rim of the summit crater in 2010. During our observation, the high flux period occurred twice, 2004-2006 and 2008-2010, both with eruptive activities. In spite of the large SO2 flux variation and eruptions, we did not see any clear variation in the gas compositions during these periods. The typical CO2/SO2 ratios of 0.8 and H2O/SO2 ratios of 30 were measured both during the high flux periods and the low flux periods. A manual gas measurement was conducted on 13 Sept. 2004, after a small vulcanian eruption on 1st Sept. and just before the continuous ash emission started on 15 Sept, however, the measured gas compositions are similar with those during other periods. The HCl/SO2 ratios measured with the alikali-filters agree well with those obtained by FT-IR on 15 and 16th Sept, as well as those by leachates of ashes erupted during this period. The constant gas composition suggests a stable degassing conditions regardless of the variety of the activity. The similar HCl/SO2 ratios obtained during both the eruptive period and the persistent degassing stage indicate a low pressure gas degassing, suggesting the conduit magma convection.

  6. LANDFILL OPERATOR APPLICATION FOR RECERTIFICATION

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    a copy of your certificate) Employed By: Job Title: Facility Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Phone: Fax by retaking the Landfill Operator Certification Training Course at The University of Georgia Center: _____________________________Certification No: Date of Original Certification: ______________ Date of Last Recertification: (Please provide

  7. Characterization of H2S removal and microbial community in landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Su, Yao; He, Ruo

    2015-12-01

    H2S is a source of odors at landfills and poses a threat to the surrounding environment and public health. In this work, compared with a usual landfill cover soil (LCS), H2S removal and biotransformation were characterized in waste biocover soil (WBS), an alternative landfill cover material. With the input of landfill gas (LFG), the gas concentrations of CH4, CO2, O2, and H2S, microbial community and activity in landfill covers changed with time. Compared with LCS, lower CH4 and H2S concentrations were detected in the WBS. The potential sulfur-oxidizing rate and sulfate-reducing rate as well as the contents of acid-volatile sulfide, SO4 (2-), and total sulfur in the WBS and LCS were all increased with the input of LFG. After exposure to LFG for 35 days, the sulfur-oxidizing rate of the bottom layer of the WBS reached 82.5 ?mol g dry weight (d.w.)(-1)?day(-1), which was 4.3-5.4 times of that of LCS. H2S-S was mainly deposited in the soil covers, while it escaped from landfills to the atmosphere. The adsorption, absorption, and biotransformation of H2S could lead to the decrease in the pH values of landfill covers; especially, in the LCS with low pH buffer capacity, the pH value of the bottom layer dropped to below 4. Pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene showed that the known sulfur-metabolizing bacteria Ochrobactrum, Paracoccus, Comamonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter dominated in the WBS and LCS. Among them, Comamonas and Acinetobacter might play an important role in the metabolism of H2S in the WBS. These findings are helpful to understand sulfur bioconversion process in landfill covers and to develop techniques for controlling odor pollution at landfills. PMID:26206130

  8. Variation of Volcanic Gas Composition at a Persistently Degassing Asama Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Ohminato, T.; Takeo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Asama volcano at central Japan is a persistently degassing andesitic volcano and repeated eruptions every several years. The recent eruptions occurred in September 2004, August 2008 and February 2009 and are followed by increase of the volcanic gas emission during several months. The SO2 flux is typically 1,000-4,000 t/d during the high flux period after the eruption, whereas the flux is around 100 t/d during the low gas flux periods (JMA, 2013; Ohwada et al., in review). This study aims to understand the controlling process of volcano degassing based on the volcanic gas composition data. In particular, we focus to evaluate the gas composition contrast between the high and low gas flux periods. As the fumaroles and degassing vent locate in the summit crater of 500-m-diamter and are inaccessible, we estimated the gas composition by plume measurements with the Multi-GAS at the crater rim. The HCl/SO2 ratios are obtained by the alkali-filter trap. We started the repeat Multi-GAS measurements in 2004 and installed an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station for a daily measurement at the western rim of the summit crater in 2010. The gas compositions obtained by the Multi-GAS measurements are often scattered even during the day of measurements, in particular during the low flux period and the scatter is likely due to variable contamination of gases from low-temperature fumaroles locating along the crater rim because the low-temperature fumaroles locate closer to the measurement site that the major degassing vent at the bottom of the crater. If we plot the gas concentration ratio, such as CO2/SO2 against SO2 concentration, the ratio commonly converges to a certain value at high SO2 concentration and this ratio is considered as representative of the major gas emission. The estimated molar ratios are CO2/SO2=1×0.5, HCl/SO2=0.2×0.1 and H2O/SO2=60×30 without clear contrast during the high and low flux periods. The CO2/SO2 ratios obtained based on a single day data tend to be higher than the average, however, the analyses with a larger data set, e.g., for a month, results in the average value. The HCl/SO2 ratios agree well with those obtained during the 2004 eruptive period by FT-IR and ash-leachate analyses with the range of 0.15-0.2 and 0.1-0.2, respectively (Mori and Notsu, 2005; Nogami et al., 2004). The H2O/SO2 ratios also tend to be higher during the low flux period and this can be due to a larger contribution of meteoric water during the low flux period. The constant gas composition regardless of the large variation of the gas flux suggests that the degassing process and its condition remains the same for the high and low flux periods. The similar HCl/SO2 ratio obtained during both the eruptive period by FT-IR and ash leachate and the persistent degassing stage in this study indicates that persistent degassing is fed by low pressure gas separation from continuously ascending magmas, consistent with the conduit magma convection model (Ohwada et al., in review; Shinohara, 2008). Based on the conduit magma convection model, the large flux changes without variation of the gas composition can be caused by the change of the magma convection rate with similar degassing pressure and magma composition.

  9. Temperature dependence of gas sensing behaviour of TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Subodh Sharma, Preetam; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, S. S.; Sharma, Vinay; Rajura, Rajveer Singh

    2014-04-24

    In the present work we have reported the effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin film based chemiresistor type gas sensors for hydrogen gas sensing application. PANI and TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline at low temperature. The electrical properties of these composite thin films were characterized by I-V measurements as function of temperature. The I-V measurement revealed that conductivity of composite thin films increased as the temperature increased. The changes in resistance of the composite thin film sensor were utilized for detection of hydrogen gas. It was observed that at room temperature TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite sensor shows higher response value and showed unstable behavior as the temperature increased. The surface morphology of these composite thin films has also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement.

  10. Ceramic composite liner material for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercegovic, D. B.; Walker, C. L.; Norgren, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced commercial and military gas turbine engines may operate at combustor outlet temperatures in excess of 1920 K (3000 F). At these temperatures combustors liners experience extreme convective and radiative heat fluxes. The ability of a plasma sprayed ceramic coating to reduce liner metal temperature has been recognized. However, the brittleness of the ceramic layer and the difference in thermal expansion with the metal substrate has caused cracking, spalling and some separation of the ceramic coating. Research directed at turbine tip seals (or shrouds) has shown the advantage of applying the ceramic to a compliant metal pad. This paper discusses recent studies of applying ceramics to combustor liners in which yttria stabilized zirconia plasma sprayed on compliant metal substrates which were exposed to near stoichiometric combustion, presents performance and durability results, and describes a conceptual design for an advanced, small gas turbine combustor. Test specimens were convectively cooled or convective-transpiration cooled and were evaluated in a 10 cm square flame tube combustor at inlet air temperatures of 533 K (500 F) and at a pressure of 0.5 MPa (75 psia). The ceramics were exposed to flame temperatures in excess of 2000 K (3320 F). Results appear very promising with all 30 specimens surviving a screening test and one of two specimens surviving a cyclic durability test.

  11. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  12. Acceleration of aged-landfill stabilization by combining partial nitrification and leachate recirculation: a field-scale study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinwook; Kim, Seungjin; Baek, Seungcheon; Lee, Nam-Hoon; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Heechang; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-03-21

    Leachate recirculation for rapid landfill stabilization can result in the accumulation of high-strength ammonium. An on-site sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was therefore, applied to oxidize the ammonium to nitrite, which was then recirculated to the landfill for denitrification to nitrogen gas. At relatively higher ammonium levels, nitrite accumulated well in the SBR; the nitrite was denitrified stably in the landfill, despite an insufficient biodegradable carbon source in the leachate. As the leachate was recirculated, the methane and carbon dioxide contents produced from the landfill fluctuated, implying that the organic acids and hydrogen produced in the acid production phase acted as the carbon source for denitrification in the landfill. Leachate recirculation combined with ex-situ partial nitrification of the leachate may enhance the biodegradation process by: (a) removing the nitrogen that is contained with the leachate, and (b) accelerating landfill stabilization, because the biodegradation efficiency of landfill waste is increased by supplying sufficient moisture and its byproducts are used as the carbon source for denitrification. In addition, partial nitrification using an SBR has advantages for complete denitrification in the landfill, since the available carbon source is in short supply in aged landfills. PMID:25531070

  13. Venus lower atmospheric composition - Analysis by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen (69.3 ppm), argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfur dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the cloud tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these results, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors.

  14. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Gharabaghi, B. Singh, M.K.; Inkratas, C. Fleming, I.R. McBean, E.

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  15. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills.

    PubMed

    Gharabaghi, B; Singh, M K; Inkratas, C; Fleming, I R; McBean, E

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use "generic" published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects. PMID:17897819

  16. A new economic instrument for financing accelerated landfill aftercare.

    PubMed

    Beaven, R P; Knox, K; Gronow, J R; Hjelmar, O; Greedy, D; Scharff, H

    2014-07-01

    The key aspects of landfill operation that remain unresolved are the extended timescale and uncertain funding of the post-closure period. This paper reviews the topic and proposes an economic instrument to resolve the unsustainable nature of the current situation. Unsustainability arises from the sluggish degradation of organic material and also the slow flushing of potential pollutants that is exacerbated by low-permeability capping. A landfill tax or aftercare provision rebate is proposed as an economic instrument to encourage operators to actively advance the stabilization of landfilled waste. The rebate could be accommodated within existing regulatory and tax regimes and would be paid for: (i) every tonne of nitrogen (or other agreed leachate marker) whose removal is advanced via the accelerated production and extraction of leachate; (ii) every tonne of non-commercially viable carbon removed via landfill gas collection and treatment. The rebates would be set at a level that would make it financially attractive to operators and would encourage measures such as leachate recirculation, in situ aeration, and enhanced flushing. Illustrative calculations suggest that a maximum rebate of up to ?€50/tonne MSW would provide an adequate incentive. PMID:24768257

  17. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Ayalon, O. . E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N.; Shani, E.

    2006-07-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

  18. Landfills in Jiangsu province, China, and potential threats for public health: Leachate appraisal and spatial analysis using geographic information system and remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Kun; Zhou Xiaonong Yan Weian; Hang Derong; Steinmann, Peter

    2008-12-15

    Waste disposal is of growing environmental and public health concern in China where landfilling is the predominant method of disposal. The assessment of potential health hazards posed by existing landfills requires sound information, and processing of a significant amount of spatial data. Geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) are valuable tools for assessing health impacts due to landfills. The aims of this study were: (i) to analyze the leachate and gas emissions from landfills used for domestic waste disposal in a metropolitan area of Jiangsu province, China, (ii) to investigate remotely-sensed environmental features in close proximity to landfills, and (iii) to evaluate the compliance of their location and leachate quality with the relevant national regulations. We randomly selected five landfills in the metropolitan areas of Wuxi and Suzhou city, Jiangsu province, established a GIS database and examined whether data were in compliance with national environmental and public health regulations. The leachates of the sampled landfills contained heavy metals (Pb, As, Cr{sup 6+} and Hg) and organic compounds in concentrations considered harmful to human health. Measured methane concentrations on landfill surfaces were low. Spatial analysis of the location of landfills with regard to distance from major water bodies, sensible infrastructure and environmental conditions according to current national legislation resulted in the rejection of four of the five sites as inappropriate for landfills. Our results call for rigorous evaluation of the spatial location of landfills in China that must take into consideration environmental and public health criteria.

  19. Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D.

    2006-04-15

    We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

  20. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO2 Composite

    PubMed Central

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO2 composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO2 in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO2 and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO2 composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  1. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO? Composite.

    PubMed

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C; Biris, Alexandru S; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO? composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO? in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO?. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO? and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO? composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  2. A performance-based system for the long-term management of municipal waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-04-01

    Landfills have been the dominant alternative for disposal of solid waste and there are tens of thousands of closed landfills throughout the world that require a long-term management strategy. In contrast to approaches based on time or target values, this paper describes a performance-based methodology for evaluation of post-closure care (PCC). Using the methodology, critical components of PCC at a landfill, including leachate and gas management, groundwater monitoring and cover integrity, are considered to determine whether a landfill meets defined conditions for functional stability and can transition from regulated PCC to a post-regulatory custodial care program representing de minimus care activities only. The methodology is predicated on understanding the biological, chemical, and physical behavior of a landfill and the presence of sufficient data to verify expected trends in landfill behavior. If an evaluation suggests that a change can be made to PCC, the landfill owner must perform confirmation monitoring and then surveillance monitoring at a decreasing frequency to verify that the change is protective of human health and the environment. A hypothetical case study showed that using the methodology to evaluate site-specific PCC requirements could result in increased environmental protection at comparable cost by spending available funds where they are most needed. PMID:21186115

  3. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  4. Geotechnical hazards associated with closed municipal solid waste landfill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powrie, W.; Richards, D.; Beaven, R.

    2015-09-01

    As pressure for new infrastructure and development grows, it is inevitable that building projects will encounter some of the c20,000 closed former solid waste landfills in the UK, many of which will have accepted municipal solid wastes (MSW). Construction on or across these sites brings a special set of geohazards associated with the potential for large and difficult to predict settlements, gas (and odour) release or generation, contaminated leachate and the breach of containment systems and other environmental controls. The presentation will discuss these issues with reference to recent research into understanding and predicting settlements in municipal solid waste landfills; assessing the total, current and residual gas potential of biodegradable wastes; the role of the hydraulic regime in the flushing of contaminants from the waste and the quality of leachate; and the need or otherwise for the long term integrity of engineered barriers and controls.

  5. Thermal performance of multilayer insulations. [gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. W.; Cunnington, G. R.; Glassford, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted in order to extend previous knowledge of the thermal performance and gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation (MLI) composites. Flat plate calorimeter heat flux measurements were obtained for 20- and 80- shield specimens using three representative layer densities over boundary temperatures ranging from 39 K (70 R) to 389 K (700 R). Laboratory gas evacuation tests were performed on representative specimens of each MLI composite after initially purging them with helium, nitrogen, or argon gases. In these tests, the specimens were maintained at temperatures between 128 K (230 R) and 300 K (540 R). Based on the results of the laboratory-scale tests, a composite MLI system consisting of 112 unperforated, double-aluminized Mylar reflective shields and 113 water preconditioned silk net spacer pairs was fabricated and installed on a 1.22-m-(4-ft-) diameter calorimeter tank.

  6. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Yochim, April; Zytner, Richard G.; McBean, Edward A.; Endres, Anthony L.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  7. Synthesis and analysis of nanostructured composite particles from gas-saturated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil'mutdinov, I. I.; Gil'mutdinov, I. M.; Kuznetsova, I. V.; Sabirzyanov, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Ibuprofen/polyethylene glycol 4000 and methylparaben/polyethylene glycol 4000 nanostructured composite particles are synthesized from gas-saturated solutions (PGSS, particles from gas saturated solution). The dependences of the mean size of composite particles on pressure, temperature, and the expansion channel diameter are revealed. The studies are conducted in the pressure range of 10 to 30 MPa, at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80°C, and for expansion channel diameters in the range of 200 to 500 ?m. The physicochemical properties of the composite particles are investigated using a differential scanning calorimeter and phase analysis is performed by means of X-ray diffraction. The composition of composite particles is determined via mass spectrometric analysis. Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electronic ionization is used for the quantitative analysis of ibuprofen, while mass spectrometry of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is used in the analysis of polyethylene glycol 4000. The dependence of the concentration of components in composite particles on pressure is obtained.

  8. Fundamental processes and implications during in situ aeration of old landfills.

    PubMed

    Ritzkowski, M; Heyer, K-U; Stegmann, R

    2006-01-01

    Results of investigations from many old landfills in Germany and Europe indicate that significant emissions occur under conventional landfill operating conditions (i.e., anaerobic conditions). Significant emissions via the gas phase are predicted to last at least three decades after landfill closure, while leachate emissions are predicted to continue for many decades, potentially even lasting for centuries. When considering the specific type and quality, and quite often lack of, protection barriers associated with old landfills, these leachate and gas emissions may result in a significant negative impact on the environment. However, complete sealing of the landfill only temporarily reduces emissions because dry-conservation of the biodegradable waste fraction results, thus not allowing any severe reduction in the emission and hazardous potential of the landfill to occur. If noticeable damage of the surface capping system occurred in these landfills, infiltrating water would restart the interrupted emission formation. In contrast, aerobic in situ stabilization by means of low pressure aeration attempts to stabilize and modify the inventory of organic matter inside the landfill, acting to reduce the emission potential in a more sustainable manner. By enabling faster and more extensive aerobic degradation processes in the landfill (compared with anaerobic processes), the organics (e.g., hydrocarbons) are degraded significantly faster, resulting in an increased carbon discharge via the gas phase, as well as reduced leachate concentrations. Because carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the main compound in the extracted off-gas (instead of methane (CH(4)), which dominated under anaerobic landfill conditions), the negative impact of diffuse LFG emissions towards an increased global warming effect may be significantly lowered. With respect to leachate quality, a reduction of organic compounds as well as ammonia-nitrogen can be expected. In addition to these positive ecological effects, aerobic in situ stabilization is associated with significant cost savings potential due to both quantitative and qualitative reductions in the aftercare period. This paper describes the fundamental processes and implications of in situ landfill aeration. Additionally, possible criteria for defining an endpoint of the active aeration process are presented and discussed. PMID:16442789

  9. Ceramic composite liner material for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercegovic, D. B.; Walker, C. L.; Norgren, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramics to gas turbine combustor liners to reduce liner metal temperature was studied in an experiment in which yttria-stabilized zirconia plasma was sprayed on compliant metal substrates exposed to near stoichiometric combustion. The strain isolation pad materials chosen were Hoskins Alloy 875 and BRUNSLLOY 534 Fiber Metal of 0.25 and 0.38 cm thicknesses and 35 and 45 percent density levels. Combustor screening tests of all specimens showed no evidence of deterioration or failure. Specimens exposed to flame temperatures in excess of 2100 K were convectively or convective-transpiration cooled and were evaluated in a 10 cm sq flame tube at inlet air temperature of 533 K and pressure of 0.5 MPa. The results suggest the superiority of a system composed of the Hoskins Alloy 875 compliant pad with 0.25 cm thickness and 35 percent density coupled with a NiCrAlY bond coat and a 8 percent Y2O3-ZrO2 ceramic top coat of 0.19 cm thickness.

  10. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  11. Sanitary landfills. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning refuse disposal in sanitary landfills. Among the topics reviewed are site selection criteria, leachate analysis and treatment, and economic and management aspects. Hydrologic studies pertaining to contaminant transport, and the use of liners and covers are discussed. Considerable attention is given to gas generation and recovery, and specific operations are described. Citations pertaining specifically to hazardous and industrial waste materials are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  13. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scharff, Heijo

    2014-11-01

    Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the continued operation of a 'safety net' in waste management. Regulations have created a financial incentive to pass on the burden of monitoring and controlling the impact of waste to future generations. To prevent this, it is necessary to revise regulations on aftercare and create incentives to actively stabilise landfills. PMID:24999096

  14. Issues with, and suggested improvements to, Method 25C -- Determination of nonmethane organic compounds in MSW landfill gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, C.S.; Curro, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    The US EPA issued a new sampling and test method for landfill gas with the promulgation, on March 12, 1996, of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills (40 CFR 60 Subparts WWW and Cc). Method 25C was developed for collecting landfill gas samples through probes driven into the waste, and then having the gas sample analyzed in a laboratory by a gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) for the concentration of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC). The NSPS require that the NMOC emission rate be calculated for landfills affected by the rule. The NMOC emission rate can be calculated with a formula in the rule, and either very conservative Tier 1 default values, or with actual site-specific NMOC concentration data collected and analyzed in accordance with Method 25C. The use of site-specific NMOC concentration data is referred to as Tier 2.

  15. Quantifying factors limiting aerobic degradation during aerobic bioreactor landfilling.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Mostafid, M Erfan; Han, Byunghyun; Imhoff, Paul T; Chiu, Pei; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2010-08-15

    A bioreactor landfill cell at Yolo County, California was operated aerobically for six months to quantify the extent of aerobic degradation and mechanisms limiting aerobic activity during air injection and liquid addition. The portion of the solid waste degraded anaerobically was estimated and tracked through time. From an analysis of in situ aerobic respiration and gas tracer data, it was found that a large fraction of the gas-filled pore space was in immobile zones where it was difficult to maintain aerobic conditions, even at relatively moderate landfill cell-average moisture contents of 33-36%. Even with the intentional injection of air, anaerobic activity was never less than 13%, and sometimes exceeded 65%. Analyses of gas tracer and respiration data were used to quantify rates of respiration and rates of mass transfer to immobile gas zones. The similarity of these rates indicated that waste degradation was influenced significantly by rates of oxygen transfer to immobile gas zones, which comprised 32-92% of the gas-filled pore space. Gas tracer tests might be useful for estimating the size of the mobile/immobile gas zones, rates of mass transfer between these regions, and the difficulty of degrading waste aerobically in particular waste bodies. PMID:20704218

  16. Indirect measurements of field-scale hydraulic conductivity of waste from two landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Fleming, I R

    2011-12-01

    Management and prediction of the movement and distribution of fluids in large landfills is important for various reasons. Bioreactor landfill technology shows promise, but in arid or semi-arid regions, the natural content of landfilled waste may be low, thus requiring addition of significant volumes of water. In more humid locations, landfills can become saturated, flooding gas collection systems and causing sideslope leachate seeps or other undesirable occurrences. This paper compares results from two different approaches to monitoring water in waste. At the Brock West Landfill in eastern Canada, positive pore pressures were measured at various depths in saturated waste. The downward seepage flux through the waste is known, thus the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity of the waste at this landfill was determined to be 3 × 10(-7)cm/s. By comparison, the Spadina Landfill in western Canada is predominantly unsaturated. The infiltration of moisture into the waste was measured using moisture sensors installed in boreholes which determined arrival time for moisture fronts resulting from major precipitation events as well as longer-term change in moisture content resulting from unsaturated drainage during winter when frozen ground prevented infiltration. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from these data ranged from approximately 10(-6)cm/s for the slow winter drainage in the absence of significant recharge to 10(-2)cm/s or higher for shallow waste subject to high infiltration through apparent preferential pathways. These two very different approaches to field-scale measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity provide insight into the nature of fluid movement in saturated and unsaturated waste masses. It is suggested that the principles of unsaturated seepage apply reasonably well for landfilled waste and that the hydraulic behavior of waste is profoundly influenced by the nature and size of voids and by the degree of saturation prevailing in the landfill. PMID:21903374

  17. Airborne emissions of mercury from municipal solid waste. II: potential losses of airborne mercury before landfill.

    PubMed

    Southworth, George R; Lindberg, Steve E; Bogle, Mary Anna; Zhang, Hong; Kuiken, Todd; Price, Jack; Reinhart, Debra; Sfeir, Hala

    2005-07-01

    Waste distribution and compaction at the working face of municipal waste landfills releases mercury vapor (Hg(o)) to the atmosphere, as does the flaring of landfill gas. Waste storage and processing before its addition to the landfill also has the potential to release Hg(o) to the air if it is initially present or formed by chemical reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(o) within collected waste. We measured the release of Hg vapor to the atmosphere during dumpster and transfer station activities and waste storage before landfilling at a municipal landfill operation in central Florida. We also quantified the potential contribution of specific Hg-bearing wastes, including mercury (Hg) thermometers and fluorescent bulbs, and searched for primary Hg sources in sorted wastes at three different landfills. Surprisingly large fluxes were estimated for Hg losses at transfer facilities (approximately 100 mg/hr) and from dumpsters in the field (approximately 30 mg/hr for 1000 dumpsters), suggesting that Hg emissions occurring before landfilling may constitute a significant fraction of the total emission from the disposal/landfill cycle and a need for more measurements on these sources. Reducing conditions of landfill burial were obviously not needed to generate strong Hg(o) signals, indicating that much of the Hg was already present in a metallic (Hg(o)) form. Attempts to identify specific Hg sources in excavated and sorted waste indicated few readily identifiable sources; because of effective mixing and diffusion of Hg(o), the entire waste mass acts as a source. Broken fluorescent bulbs and thermometers in dumpsters emitted Hg(o) at 10 to >100 microg/hr and continued to act as near constant sources for several days. PMID:16111126

  18. Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber composite hot gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Charles A. (Lynchburg, VA); Wagner, Richard A. (Lynchburg, VA); Komoroski, Ronald G. (Lynchburg, VA); Gunter, Greg A. (Lynchburg, VA); Barringer, Eric A. (Lynchburg, VA); Goettler, Richard W. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic fiber composite structure particularly suitable for use as a hot gas cleanup ceramic fiber composite filter and method of making same from ceramic composite material has a structure which provides for increased strength and toughness in high temperature environments. The ceramic fiber composite structure or filter is made by a process in which a continuous ceramic fiber is intimately surrounded by discontinuous chopped ceramic fibers during manufacture to produce a ceramic fiber composite preform which is then bonded using various ceramic binders. The ceramic fiber composite preform is then fired to create a bond phase at the fiber contact points. Parameters such as fiber tension, spacing, and the relative proportions of the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fibers can be varied as the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fiber are simultaneously formed on the porous vacuum mandrel to obtain a desired distribution of the continuous ceramic fiber and the chopped ceramic fiber in the ceramic fiber composite structure or filter.

  19. Landfill methane oxidation response to vegetation, fertilization, and liming

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, H.A.; Wollum, A.G.; Barlaz, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Landfills are the fourth largest global source and the largest US source (USDOE, 1997) of anthropogenic CH{sub 4} emissions. Since gram-for-gram, CH{sub 4} has 21 times the 100-yr global-warming potential of CO{sub 2} (USEPA, 1990). CH{sub 4} release into the atmosphere has important implications for global climate change. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetation, N fertilizers, and lime addition on landfill CH{sub 4} oxidation. Columns filled with compacted sandy loam and sparged with synthetic landfill gas were used to simulate a landfill cover. Grass-topped and bare-soil columns reduced inlet CH{sub 4} by 47 and 37%, respectively, at peak uptake; but the rate for both treatments was about 18% at steady state. Nitrate and NH{sub 4} amendments induced a more rapid onset of CH{sub 4} oxidation relative to KCl controls. However, at steady state, NH{sub 4} inhibited CH{sub 4} oxidation in bare columns but not in grassed columns. Nitrate addition produced no inhibitory effects. Lime addition to the soil consistently enhanced CH{sub 4} oxidation. In all treatments, CH{sub 4} consumption increased to a peak value, then declined to a lower steady-state value; and all gassed columns developed a pH gradient. Neither nutrient depletion nor protozoan grazing could explain the decline from peak oxidation levels. Ammonium applied to grassed cover soil can cause transient reductions in CH{sub 4} uptake, but there is no evidence that the inhibition persists. The ability of vegetation to mitigate NH{sub 4} inhibition indicates that results from bare-soil tests may not always generalize to vegetated landfill caps.

  20. Noble gas composition of the solar wind as collected by the Genesis mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Wieler, Rainer; Baur, Heinrich; Olinger, Chad; Friedmann, Tom A.; Burnett, Donald S.

    2009-12-01

    We present the elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases in the bulk solar wind collected by the NASA Genesis sample return mission. He, Ne, and Ar were analyzed in diamond-like carbon on a silicon substrate (DOS) and 84,86Kr and 129,132Xe in silicon targets by UV laser ablation noble gas mass spectrometry. Solar wind noble gases are quantitatively retained in DOS and with exception of He also in Si as shown by a stepwise heating experiment on a flown DOS target and analyses on other bulk solar wind collector materials. Solar wind data presented here are absolutely calibrated and the error of the standard gas composition is included in stated uncertainties. The isotopic composition of the light noble gases in the bulk solar wind is as follows: 3He/ 4He: (4.64 ± 0.09) × 10 -4, 20Ne/ 22Ne: 13.78 ± 0.03, 21Ne/ 22Ne: 0.0329 ± 0.0001, 36Ar/ 38Ar 5.47 ± 0.01. The elemental composition is: 4He/ 20Ne: 656 ± 5, and 20Ne/ 36Ar 42.1 ± 0.3. Genesis provided the first Kr and Xe data on the contemporary bulk solar wind. The preliminary isotope and elemental composition is: 86Kr/ 84Kr: 0.302 ± 0.003, 129Xe/ 132Xe: 1.05 ± 0.02, 36Ar/ 84Kr 2390 ± 150, and 84Kr/ 132Xe 9.5 ± 1.0. The 3He/ 4He and the 4He/ 20Ne ratios in the Genesis DOS target are the highest solar wind values measured in exposed natural and artificial targets. The isotopic composition of the other noble gases and the Kr/Xe ratio obtained in this work agree with data from lunar samples containing "young" (˜100 Ma) solar wind, indicating that solar wind composition has not changed within at least the last 100 Ma. Genesis could provide in many cases more precise data on solar wind composition than any previous experiment. Because of the controlled exposure conditions, Genesis data are also less prone to unrecognized systematic errors than, e.g., lunar sample analyses. The solar wind is the most authentic sample of the solar composition of noble gases, however, the derivation of solar noble gas abundances and isotopic composition using solar wind data requires a better understanding of fractionation processes acting upon solar wind formation.

  1. Influences of operational practices on municipal solid waste landfill storage capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chao; Liu, Hai-Long; Cleall, Peter John; Ke, Han; Bian, Xue-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The quantitative effects of three operational factors, that is initial compaction, decomposition condition and leachate level, on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill settlement and storage capacity are investigated in this article via consideration of a hypothetical case. The implemented model for calculating landfill compression displacement is able to consider decreases in compressibility induced by biological decomposition and load dependence of decomposition compression for the MSW. According to the investigation, a significant increase in storage capacity can be achieved by intensive initial compaction, adjustment of decomposition condition and lowering of leachate levels. The quantitative investigation presented aims to encourage landfill operators to improve management to enhance storage capacity. Furthermore, improving initial compaction and creating a preferential decomposition condition can also significantly reduce operational and post-closure settlements, respectively, which helps protect leachate and gas management infrastructure and monitoring equipment in modern landfills. PMID:23381972

  2. Y-12 Industrial Landfill V. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This report contains the modifications in operations and design to meet the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conversation (TDEC) July 10, 1993, amendments to the regulations for Class 2 landfills. These modifications, though extensive in design and construction cost, are considered minor revisions and should not require a processing fee. Area 1 of ILF V, comprising approximately 20% of the ILF V footprint, was designed and submitted to TDEC prior to the implementation of current regulations. This initial area was constructed with a compacted clay liner and leachate collection system, and became operational in April 1994. The current regulations require landfills to have a composite liner with leachate collection system and closure cap. Modifications to upgrade Areas 2 and 3 of ILF V to meet the current TDEC requirements are included.

  3. Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

    2006-05-03

    The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

  4. Room temperature gas sensing properties of porous silicon/V2O5 nanorods composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenjun; Hu, Ming; Wang, Dengfeng; Li, Changqing

    2015-08-01

    Here we prepare a composite of porous silicon (PS)/V2O5 nanorods synthesized by a heating process of pure vanadium film on PS. Vanadium films were deposited on PS by DC magnetron sputtering, and then long striped V2O5 nanorods were synthesized with subsequent annealing process in air. Numerous analytical techniques, such as field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), have been employed to characterize their feature. The as-prepared composite structure of PS/V2O5 nanorods shows favorable microstructure features for gas sensing application. The gas sensing properties of PS/V2O5 nanorods sensors were investigated at 25 °C up to 250 °C toward NO2 gas of 0.25-3 ppm, and ethanol over concentration of 50-250 ppm. The results indicated that the PS/V2O5 structure exhibits perfect reversibility, high response value and good selectivity to NO2 at room temperature (25 °C). In addition, we propose a qualitative explanation for the low operating temperature (25 °C) of the composite structure. These results are significant from the standpoint of applications requiring room temperature gas sensing.

  5. Short Mountain Landfill gas recovery project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a Federal power marketing agency, has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. BPA's latest load/resource balance forecast, projects the capability of existing resources to satisfy projected Federal system loads. The forecast indicates a potential resource deficit. The underlying need for action is to satisfy BPA customers' demand for electrical power.

  6. Composite fan exit guide vanes for high bypass ratio gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecherman, S. S.; Stankunas, T. N.

    1981-01-01

    Various composite materials were identified for reduced weight applications as fan exit guide vanes in high bypass ratio gas turbine engines. Candidate materials, airfoil geometry and ply orientation were evaluated using NASTRAN finite element analysis. A vane core and shell design approach utilizing several different fiber orientation concepts was selected and variations in bending and torsional stiffness were documented. Material suppliers and airfoil fabricators were selected to provide panels and airfoils which were inspected, environmentally conditioned and tested. Static and dynamic airfoil tests established durability characteristics for a range of composite material/design approaches.

  7. EVALUATION PLAN FOR TWO LARGE-SCALE LANDFILL BIOREACTOR TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract - Waste Management, Inc., is operating two long-term bioreactor studies at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, including facultative landfill bioreactor and staged aerobic-anaerobic landfill bioreactor demonstrations. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) was p...

  8. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  9. Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

    2006-08-29

    A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

  10. [Analysis of composition and structure of sulfur compounds in residual oils by pyrolysis-gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaolin; Shi, Quan; Xu, Chunming; Zhao, Suoqi; Ke, Ming

    2004-03-01

    Flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography has been used to investigate macromolecular sulphur in heavy oil. The influences of pyrolysis time and pyrolysis temperature have been studied and the analytical methods of pyrolysis were set up. Sulfur-containing products were identified by comparing with reference data and semi-quantified by a pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD). The investigation conducted on Dagang, Gudao, Qianguo, Russia and mixed Russia-Daqing residual oils using pyrolysis-gas chromatography showed that the contents and composition of sulphur compounds demonstrated various characters in different pyrolysates of residual oils. PMID:15712878

  11. Environmental assessment of low-organic waste landfill scenarios by means of life-cycle assessment modelling (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H; Scharff, Heijo; Jacobs, Joeri

    2010-02-01

    The environmental performance of two low-organic waste landfill scenarios ('low-organic-energy' and 'low-organic-flare') was developed and compared with two household waste landfill scenarios ('household-energy' and 'household-flare') by means of LCA-modelling. The LCA-modelling was made for 1 tonne of wet waste landfilled and the environmental aspects were evaluated for a 100-year period after disposal. The data utilized in the LCA-calculations to model the first 10-20 years of landfilling of the two low-organic waste scenarios make extensive use of site-specific data from the Nauerna Landfill (The Netherlands), but average data from other comparable, existing landfills were used too. As data from full-scale landfills do not cover more than 30-40 years of landfilling, data from laboratory simulations and accelerated tests of limited scale were also utilized. The life-cycle impact assessments show that the low-organic waste scenarios achieved better environmental performance than the household waste scenarios with regard to both ordinary and toxicity-related environmental impact categories. This indicates that the reduction of organic matter accepted at landfills (as prescribed by the European Union Landfill Directive: Council Directive 1999/31/EC, EU, Brussels, 1999) can be a successful approach to decrease the environmental loads in several impact categories in comparison with landfilling of waste with significant organic content. However, when utilization of landfill gas is accounted for in the life-cycle impact assessment calculation, the small gas generation in low-organic waste landfills reduced the actual potential for energy generation and therefore the environmental savings obtained were reduced proportionally. Groundwater pollution from input of leachate was also evaluated and the WHO (Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality; WHO, Geneva, 2006) guideline for drinking water quality was assumed as reference. The results show that low-organic waste landfills pose a smaller risk of groundwater contamination, but the impact potentials estimated still remain a lot higher than estimated in other categories. PMID:19710111

  12. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-07-15

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  13. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  14. Application of far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Xu, Anping

    2010-03-01

    Far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials were prepared by the coprecipitation method using tourmaline, cerium acetate, and lanthanum acetate as raw materials. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy show that tourmaline modified with the rare earths La and Ce has a better far infrared emitting performance. Through XRD analysis, we attribute the improved far infrared emission properties of the tourmaline to the unit cell shrinkage of the tourmaline arising from La enhancing the redox properties of nano-CeO2. The effect of the composite materials on the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied by the flue gas analysis and water boiling test. Based on the results, it was found that the composite materials could accelerate the combustion of LPG, and that the higher the emissivity of the rare earth mineral composite materials, the better the effects on combustion of LPG. In all activation styles, both air and LPG to be activated has a best effect, indicating the activations having a cumulative effect. PMID:20355556

  15. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  16. TiO{sub 2}/PANI And MWNT/PANI Composites Thin Films For Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Subodh; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Shweta; Saxena, Arpita; Choudhary, B. L.; Mathur, Shubhra; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2010-12-01

    The MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped Polyaniline (PANI) composites were synthesized by In-situ chemical oxidative polymerization method at low temperature. The MWNT/PANI and TiO{sub 2}/PANI composite thin films were prepared using spin coating method onto finger type interdigited electrodes to develop the chemiresistor type gas sensor for hydrogen gas sensing application. It was observed that the MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin films show a higher response in comparision to neat PANI. The structural and morphological properties of these composite films were characterized by X-Ray differaction (XRD) pattern and sccaning electrone microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  17. Emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous mercury at the largest active landfill in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Li, Zhonggen; Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Lin, Che-Jen; Sommar, Jonas; Feng, Xinbin

    2013-11-01

    The emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) at Laogang landfill in Shanghai, China, the largest active landfill in Asia, has been investigated during two intensive field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. The mercury (Hg) content in municipal solid waste (MSW) varied widely from 0.19 to 1.68 mg kg-1. Over the closed cell in the landfill, the mean ambient air GEM concentration was virtually indistinguishable from the hemispherical background level (1.5-2.0 ng m-3) while the concentration downwind of ongoing landfill operation (e.g. dumping, burying and compacting of MSW) was clearly elevated. GEM emission through landfill gas (LFG) was identified as a significant source. GEM concentrations in LFGs collected from venting pipes installed in different landfill cells varied widely from 3.0 to 1127.8 ng m-3. The GEM concentrations were found negatively correlated to the age of LFG cells, suggesting GEM released through LFG declined readily with time. The GEM emission from this source alone was estimated to be 1.23-1.73 mg h-1. GEM emission from cover soil surfaces was considerably lower and at a scale comparable to that of background soil surfaces. This is in contrast to earlier reports showing enhanced GEM emissions from landfill surfaces in Southern China, probably due to the difference in soil Hg content and gas permeability characteristics of soils at different sites. Vertical concentration profiles of GEM in the interstitial gas of buried MSW were sampled, perhaps for the first time, which exhibited a wide spatial variability (4.9-713.1 ng m-3) in the 3-year-old landfill cell investigated. GEM emission from landfill operation was estimated to be 290-525 mg h-1 using a box model. This suggests that GEM degassing from Laogang landfill is quantitatively largely dominated by emissions from daily landfilling operations with a much smaller contribution from LFG venting and insignificant (bi-directional fluxes near zero) contribution from surfaces capped with a soil layer. This study reveals divergent GEM emission patterns among landfill cells of different ages, and provides essential emission estimates for formulating Hg emission reduction strategies for a large landfill.

  18. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SPECIAL TYPES OF LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality was monitored for one year at a hillfill, a balefill, a millfill, a strip mine landfill, and a permitted sanitary landfill to determine the impact of each on water quality. The leachate generated by the hillfill was the strongest during initial decomposition. Howeve...

  20. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  1. Best Management Practices to Prevent and Control Hydrogen Sulfide and Reduced Sulfur Compound Emissions at Landfills That Dispose of Gypsum Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas can be emitted from both construction and demolition (C&D) debris and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. H2S emissions may be problematic at a landfill as they can cause odor, impact surrounding communities, cause wear or dama...

  2. Characterization of methanogenic and methanotrophic assemblages in landfill samples.

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Ilker; Rasche, M E; Townsend, T; Ogram, A V; Lindner, A S

    2003-01-01

    A greater understanding of the tightly linked trophic groups of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria residing in municipal solid waste landfills will increase our ability to control methane emissions and pollutant fate in these environments. To this end, we characterized the composition of methanogenic and methanotrophic bacteria in samples taken from two regions of a municipal solid waste landfill that varied in age. A method combining polymerase chain reaction amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and phylogenetic analysis was used for this purpose. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed a rich assemblage of methanogens in both samples, including acetoclasts, H2/CO2-users and formate-users in the newer samples and H2/CO2-users and formate-users in the older samples, with closely related genera including Methanoculleus, Methanofollis, Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. Fewer phylotypes of type 1 methanotrophs were observed relative to type 2 methanotrophs. Most type 1 sequences clustered within a clade related to Methylobacter, whereas type 2 sequences were broadly distributed among clades associated with Methylocystis and Methylosinus species. This genetic characterization tool promises rapid screening of landfill samples for genotypes and, therefore, degradation potentials. PMID:14667383

  3. Toxicity Assessment of Contaminated Soils of Solid Domestic Waste Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, O. A.; Mochalova, T. N.

    2014-08-01

    The paper delivers the analysis of an 18-year dynamic pattern of land pollutants concentration in the soils of a solid domestic waste landfill. It also presents the composition of the contaminated soils from different areas of the waste landfill during its operating period. The authors calculate the concentrations of the following pollutants: chrome, nickel, tin, vanadium, lead, cuprum, zinc, cobalt, beryllium, barium, yttrium, cadmium, arsenic, germanium, nitrate ions and petrochemicals and determine a consistent pattern of their spatial distribution within the waste landfill area as well as the dynamic pattern of their concentration. Test-objects are used in experiments to make an integral assessment of the polluted soil's impact on living organisms. It was discovered that the soil samples of an animal burial site are characterized by acute toxicity while the area of open waste dumping is the most dangerous in terms of a number of pollutants. This contradiction can be attributed to the synergetic effect of the polluted soil, which accounts for the regularities described by other researchers.

  4. State of the art design: A closure system for the largest hazardous waste landfill at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S.F.; Serrato, M.G.; McMullin, S.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses the cover system proposed for a 55-acre, hazardous waste closure of the sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed cover system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of post-closure settlement while maintaining a permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s or less throughout its 30-year, regulatory lifetime. A composite cover consisting of a geomembrane (GM) underlain by a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) was selected because of its extremely low permeability, ability to elongate without tearing, and capacity to ``self-heal`` if punctured. These characteristics will enable the cover system to accommodate differential settlement without cracking or tearing, this providing long-term protection with minimal maintenance. Also, to improve the ability of the cover system to span voids that may develop in the underlying waste, a geogrid has been included in the foundation layer. A gas vent layer has been included to allow for the safe collection and venting of landfill gases.

  5. State of the art design: A closure system for the largest hazardous waste landfill at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S.F.; Serrato, M.G.; McMullin, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the cover system proposed for a 55-acre, hazardous waste closure of the sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed cover system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of post-closure settlement while maintaining a permeability of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] cm/s or less throughout its 30-year, regulatory lifetime. A composite cover consisting of a geomembrane (GM) underlain by a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) was selected because of its extremely low permeability, ability to elongate without tearing, and capacity to self-heal'' if punctured. These characteristics will enable the cover system to accommodate differential settlement without cracking or tearing, this providing long-term protection with minimal maintenance. Also, to improve the ability of the cover system to span voids that may develop in the underlying waste, a geogrid has been included in the foundation layer. A gas vent layer has been included to allow for the safe collection and venting of landfill gases.

  6. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills.

    PubMed

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-01

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance. PMID:21324663

  7. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  9. Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  10. Using multivariate regression modeling for sampling and predicting chemical characteristics of mixed waste in old landfills.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Prantl, Roman; Fellner, Johann

    2014-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills pose a threat on environment and human health, especially old landfills which lack facilities for collection and treatment of landfill gas and leachate. Consequently, missing information about emission flows prevent site-specific environmental risk assessments. To overcome this gap, the combination of waste sampling and analysis with statistical modeling is one option for estimating present and future emission potentials. Optimizing the tradeoff between investigation costs and reliable results requires knowledge about both: the number of samples to be taken and variables to be analyzed. This article aims to identify the optimized number of waste samples and variables in order to predict a larger set of variables. Therefore, we introduce a multivariate linear regression model and tested the applicability by usage of two case studies. Landfill A was used to set up and calibrate the model based on 50 waste samples and twelve variables. The calibrated model was applied to Landfill B including 36 waste samples and twelve variables with four predictor variables. The case study results are twofold: first, the reliable and accurate prediction of the twelve variables can be achieved with the knowledge of four predictor variables (Loi, EC, pH and Cl). For the second Landfill B, only ten full measurements would be needed for a reliable prediction of most response variables. The four predictor variables would exhibit comparably low analytical costs in comparison to the full set of measurements. This cost reduction could be used to increase the number of samples yielding an improved understanding of the spatial waste heterogeneity in landfills. Concluding, the future application of the developed model potentially improves the reliability of predicted emission potentials. The model could become a standard screening tool for old landfills if its applicability and reliability would be tested in additional case studies. PMID:25218084

  11. Application of carbon nanotube hold-off voltage for determining gas composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F. (Inventor); Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for determining chemical composition of a single-component or multiple-component gas, using a discharge holdoff mechanism. A voltage difference V between two spaced apart electrodes is brought to a selected value and held, the holdoff time interval .DELTA.t(V;ho) required before gas discharge occurs is measured, and the associated electrical current or cumulative electrical charge is measured. As the voltage difference V increases, the time interval length .DELTA.t(V;ho) decreases monotonically. Particular voltage values, V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0, correspond to initial appearance of discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq..infin.) and prompt discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq.0). The values V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0 and the rate of decrease of .DELTA.t(V;ho) and/or the rate of increase of current or cumulative charge with increasing V are characteristic of one or more gas components present.

  12. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  13. A simulation analysis of the migration and transformation of pollutants contained in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-qi; Tian, Kai-ming; Qi, Yong-qiang; Chen, Jia-jun; Wang, Ya-nan

    2003-11-01

    A dynamic composite model for a soil-water system that can be used to simulate the movement of leachate from a landfill. The composite model includes nine sub-models that trace water movement and the migration and transformation of five pollutants (organic N, NH4-, NO3-, NO2-, and Cl-) in saturated and unsaturated soil. The model to simulate the movement of leachate from a landfill in Laogang Town, Shanghai City was used. In this application, the values for the model parameters were obtained by performing a laboratory simulation experiment of water movement and pollutant migration and transformation in soil columns. Soil and leachate obtained from the landfill site and its vicinity were used in the laboratory experiments. The model was then used to simulate leachate movement and pollutant activity during the ten-year period when the landfill was in operation and in the twenty-year period following its closure. The simulation results revealed that the leachate migrated into the groundwater at the rate of 90-100 meters per year. This model can be applied in the design of future landfills in China for the purpose of assessing and forecasting leachate plumes. PMID:14758904

  14. The dependence of the methylation of mercury on the landfill stabilization process and implications for the landfill management.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Li, Zhonggen; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Wentao

    2015-01-01

    Mercury species and other chemical characteristics of the leachate from anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills were analyzed to investigate the factors that control mercury methylation during the landfill stabilization process. At the early landfill stage, the total mercury (THg) and the monomethyl mercury (MMHg) released rapidly and significantly, the THg concentration of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate was obviously higher than that of the anaerobic landfill leachate, while compared with the semi-aerobic landfill, the MMHg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was higher. As the landfill time increased, both of THg and MMHg concentration decreased quickly, the THg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was much higher than that in semi-aerobic landfill, while the MMHg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was lower than that in the semi-aerobic landfill. Generally, the concentrations of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in the anaerobic landfill leachate were slightly higher than in the semi-aerobic landfill leachate during the stabilization process. A significant positive correlation was found between the DMHg concentrations and the pH value in anaerobic landfill leachate, but this correlation was opposite in the semi-aerobic landfill. The oxidative-reductive potential (ORP) condition was found to be the controlling factor of the methylation process during the early stage. However, the chemical characteristics, especially the TOC concentration, appeared to be the dominant factor affecting the methylation process as the landfill time increased. PMID:25218981

  15. Gas composition of the main volatile elements in protoplanetary discs and its implication for planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiabaud, A.; Marboeuf, U.; Alibert, Y.; Leya, I.; Mezger, K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Direct observations of gaseous exoplanets reveal that their gas envelope has a higher C/O ratio than that of the host star (e.g., Wasp 12-b). This has been explained by considering that the gas phase of the disc could be inhomogeneous, exceeding the stellar C/O ratio in regions where these planets formed; but few studies have considered the drift of the gas and planet migration. Aims: We aim to derive the gas composition in planets through planet formation to evaluate if the formation of giant planets with an enriched C/O ratio is possible. The study focusses on the effects of different processes on the C/O ratio, such as the disc evolution, the drift of gas, and planet migration. Methods: We used our previous models for computing the chemical composition, together with a planet formation model, to which we added the composition and drift of the gas phase of the disc, which is composed of the main volatile species H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, N2, CH3OH, CH4, and H2S, H2 and He. The study focusses on the region where ice lines are present and influence the C/O ratio of the planets. Results: Modelling shows that the condensation of volatile species as a function of radial distance allows for C/O enrichment in specific parts of the protoplanetary disc of up to four times the solar value. This leads to the formation of planets that can be enriched in C/O in their envelope up to three times the solar value. Planet migration, gas phase evolution and disc irradiation enables the evolution of the initial C/O ratio that decreases in the outer part of the disc and increases in the inner part of the disc. The total C/O ratio of the planets is governed by the contribution of ices accreted, suggesting that high C/O ratios measured in planetary atmospheres are indicative of a lack of exchange of material between the core of a planet and its envelope or an observational bias. It also suggests that the observed C/O ratio is not representative of the total C/O ratio of the planet.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of the effect of aerobic conditions on the chemical characteristics of humic acid in landfill leachate and its implication for the environment.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Yongxia, Hao; Guixiang, Liu; Xin, Zhao; Youcai, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) that extracted from leachates from semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills test field at different stabilization times were characterized by elemental composition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Carbon-13 Cross-Polarization Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP/MAS NMR). The higher sulfur (S) content of HA in the anaerobic landfill leachate after a short stabilization time showed that the S released from the organic matter degradation was more easily stabilized under anaerobic conditions, which indicate that HA from anaerobic landfill leachate was more chemically reactive and played a more important role in mobilizing heavy metal, especially mercury, at early landfill stabilization times. However, the S content of HA from the semi-aerobic landfill increased over time, suggesting that more S was stabilized in HA as the landfill stabilization time was extended. The analytical results for the FTIR and NMR showed that the HA from the anaerobic landfill contained more aromatic groups, while HA from the semi-aerobic landfill had more oxygen-containing groups. The aromatic components of the HA from both the anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills increased over time, suggesting that the maturity and humification degree of HA increased during the stabilization process. PMID:23461837

  17. Wear behavior of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed Zr-based metallic glass composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Suresh, K.; Rao, K. P.; Subramanian, B.

    2012-09-01

    Gas tunnel type plasma spraying is a prospective method to produce metallic glass composite coatings with high quality due to its noteworthy feature of process controllability. In this study, Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 metallic glass composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimum spraying conditions with selected plasma currents. The formation mechanism, sliding, and erosive wear behaviors of the coatings with respect to plasma current was examined. The phase and thermal analyses as well as microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings produced at different plasma currents were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques. The sliding and erosive wear behaviors of the coatings were studied using a pin-on-disc and a specially designed erosive wear tester, respectively. The results showed that an increase in plasma current increased the crystalline content in the metallic glass composite coatings, which enhanced the hardness and wear resistance of the coatings.

  18. Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices hold potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of free standing nanosheets has proven challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometer lateral dimensions and nanometer thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increment in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused-ion-beam scanning-electron-microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared to isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications. PMID:25362353

  19. Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design

    E-print Network

    on geotechnical and stability analyses for the design of landfills and remedial closures. It is the mostLandfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100

  20. Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    2007-01-01

    , the reported rate of generation of methane in industrial anaerobic digestion reactors ranges from 40 to 80 Nm3. Some of the modern regulated landfills attempt to capture and utilize landfill biogas, a renewable collecting landfill biogas worldwide. The landfills that capture biogas in the US collect about 2.6 million

  1. Monitoring of volcanic gas composition at Asama volcano, Japan, during 2004-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Ohminato, Takao; Takeo, Minoru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2015-09-01

    The composition of the volcanic gases discharged from the summit crater of Asama volcano has been monitored since 2004 by Multi-GAS and alkaline-filter techniques. The persistent degassing activity at Asama volcano is characterized by large variation of SO2 flux. The CO2/SO2 and H2O/SO2 ratios did not show clear variation irrespective of the SO2 flux variation and a few eruptions that occurred during active degassing periods. The estimated ratios have large uncertainty due to variable contribution of the different fumaroles in the summit crater to the volcanic plume and lack of a systematic variation can be due to the large uncertainty. The SO2/Cl ratio showed a systematic decrease after the eruption to the inactive period, suggesting that degassing pressure did not significantly increase after the eruption. Low-pressure degassing along with the continuous and intensive gas discharge suggests that the degassing is due to conduit magma convection. The apparently stable CO2/SO2 ratios imply a lack of significant volatile differentiation in the magma reservoir, such as CO2-rich bubble accumulation. The large variation of the SO2 flux along with stable gas composition implies that the large changes in magma convection rate are caused by changes in the radius of the convecting magma conduit.

  2. Relationship between fumarole gas composition and eruptive activity at Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.P.; Williams, S.N.; Arehart, G.B.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1996-06-01

    Forecasting volcanic eruptions is critical to the mitigation of hazards for the millions of people living dangerously close to active volcanoes. Volcanic gases collected over five years from Galeras Volcano, Colombia, and analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition show the effects of long-term degassing of the magma body and a gradual decline in sulfur content of the gases. In contrast, short-term (weeks), sharp variations are the precursors to explosive eruptions. Selective absorption of magmatic SO{sub 2} and HCl due to interaction with low-temperature geothermal waters allows the gas emissions to become dominated by CO{sub 2}. Absorption appears to precede an eruption because magmatic volatiles are slowed or retained by a sealing carapace, reducing the total flux of volatiles and allowing the hydrothermal volatiles to dominate gas emissions. Temporal changes in gas compositions were correlated with eruptive activity and provide new evidence bearing on the mechanism of this type of `pneumatic` explosive eruptions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis

    E-print Network

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu UNIVERSIDAD POLITÉCNICA DE CATALUÑA April, 2007 GEOMODELS #12;Introduction to Coll Cardús landfill Prediction of settlement in Coll Cardús landfill 1) Settlement prediction by empirical method 2) Settlement prediction

  4. Bioreactor landfills: experimental and field results.

    PubMed

    Warith, Mostafa

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to determine the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation and nutrient balance on the rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation. Higher rates of MSW biodegradation eventually cause a reduction of the contaminant life span of the landfill and decrease in the cost of long term monitoring. The study indicated that the smaller the size of the MSW the faster the biodegradation rate of the waste. In addition, the paper presents the results of leachate recirculation on solid waste biodegradation in a full-scale landfill site, which is located in Nepean, Ontario, Canada. The leachate was recirculated into the landfilled solid waste for 8 years through infiltration lagoons. Similar results to those obtained in the laboratory scale experiments were noted. The average pH of the leachate in the early stages of recirculation was on the acidic range of the pH scale, however, the pH value was in the range of 7-8 after 2 years of leachate recirculation. The concentration of chloride remained fairly constant at about 1000 mg/l during the leachate recirculation period. A decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was observed. Recovery of landfill air space was also noted because of the enhanced subsidence and decomposition of the solid waste. PMID:11942706

  5. Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Brook, C.; Godley, A.; Lewin, K.; Young, C. P.

    Landfill leachate emanating from old "dilute and disperse" sites represents a potential (and in many cases actual) threat to the integrity of groundwater. Indeed, this concern has been included in EU legislation (80/86/EEC), where key contaminants (e.g. ammonia, various toxic organic compounds and heavy metals) are explicitly highlighted in terms of their impact on groundwater. In the UK, whilst there are a substantial number of unlined landfills sited on major aquifers, many of these are in locations where there is a substantial unsaturated zone. Thus, there exists the opportunity for the modification and attenuation of contaminants prior to it encountering the water table. An understanding of likely changes in leachate content and concentrations at such sites will enable a more comprehensive assessment of the potential risks and liabilities posed by such sites to be evaluated. The Burntstump landfill, situated 8 km north of Nottingham (UK), is sited on an outcrop of Sherwood sandstone. The fine friable sand has been quarried since the 1960s and the excavated volume used to store municipal waste. Filling at the site commenced in the mid 1970s and originally was unlined. In 1978 the first of what was to become a series of boreholes was installed within an area of roughly 5 m radius over one of the original waste cells. Cores of the waste and underlying sandstone were extracted and analysed for a range of physical and chemical parameters. The most recent set of analyses were obtained in 2000. The series of investigations therefore provide an important record of leachate migration and modification through the unsaturated zone for over twenty years. The progression of the leachate front is clearly delineated by the chloride concentration profile with an average velocity of around 1.6 m.yr-1. Combining this value with an average (and reasonably uniform) measured moisture content of about 7% gives a mean inter-granular specific discharge of 110 mm.yr-1. An interesting feature of the sequences of porewater concentration profiles is the sharp leading front of the Cl plume. Thus indicating that very little solute dispersion appears to be occurring. This is probably to be due to the relatively uniform particle size of the sand matrix combined with the low moisture content, which has greatly constrained the available pore sizes in which flow occurs. A marked reduction in the mass of the chloride plume has been observed over the last 13 years. Analyses of core sample taken in 2000 show that the Cl profile has continued to lose mass and has now also separated into two peaks. The leading peak was located at a depth of 36 m below ground level (28 m below the base of the landfill) and in line with model predictions. The trailing peak was at a depth of 27 m bgl and was associated with a 0.3 m layer of marl and clay bands. Thus there is an indication that the changes in chloride mass are possibly due to the effects of heterogeneity, although other processes which could account for chloride removal from solution are also under consideration. The location of the TOC front up to 1992 was commensurate with that of Cl, indicating no effective retardation. This is consistent with the very low levels of organic carbon present in the sandstone. However, marked reductions in contaminant mass (substantially greater than those of Cl) have been observed. Analyses of volatile fatty acids has indicated a progressive breakdown of VFA components leading to simpler products so that by 1991 the dominant component was ethanoic acid (56% by mass). By 2000 the entire leading front of the TOC was absent. TOC was only found to be present at relatively low concentrations ( 100 mg.l-1) above the marl/clay band. Analyses of gas concentrations at the site have indicated that there has been a change in the redox potential in the volume of contaminated unsaturated sandstone below the waste cells during the last 10 years. With predominantly anaerobic conditions giving way to aerobic. This change appears to be related to the introduction of a landfill gas ex

  6. The influence of liquefied natural gas composition on its behavior as a coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbano, A.; Nasuti, F.

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a suitable propellant to be used, together with liquid oxygen as oxidizer, in a liquid rocket engine, because of possible advantages with respect to hydrogen in specific applications. Often approximated as pure methane, LNG is a mixture of methane, other heavier hydrocarbons and nitrogen. If LNG is to be used in a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine, the knowledge of the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics when it flows in the cooling channels is of primary importance. The aim of the present work is to understand how the composition of LNG can influence the flow in the cooling channels. A parametric study is carried out considering different LNG compositions and heat flux levels. Attention is devoted to the pressure drop and cooling capabilities, which are the aspects that have to be controlled in a regenerative cooling system.

  7. Landfills as critical infrastructures: synergy between non-invasive monitoring technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzari, Andrea; Raco, Brunella; Battaglini, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system by means of the integration between two different non-invasive technologies. In fact, there is a widespread agreement on the fact that these infrastructures produce about 23% of the total anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Despite that, there's still no internationally accepted protocol to quantify the leakage of biogas from a landfill with a common standard approach. This work proposes an assessment of the performance of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Such evaluation is performed by means of a direct measurement of gas flux with the accumulation chamber method, combined with the detection of thermal anomalies by infrared radiometry. In order to derive flux maps from a set of punctual measurements and calculate an overall quantity of emitted gas, a geostatistical technique is necessarily applied and briefly illustrated. A case study regarding an infrastructure located in Tuscany (Italy) is shown, where a discussion about the evolution of the landfill site through successive campaigns is also suggested. The role played by infrared thermography and its synergy with direct flux measurements is clearly perceivable in this context. The main benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase of the energy recovered from the landfill sites by optimising the collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of wastes released to the atmosphere.

  8. T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2001-05-22

    The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Old Bethpage Landfill, Old Bethpage, New York (first remedial action), March 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-17

    The Old Bethpage landfill, covering approximately 65 acres, is located in Old Bethpage, Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau Country, New York. Two public drinking-water wells, a residential community, an industrial park, and a state park, exist within the site's general vicinity. Beginning in 1958, the Town of Oyster Bay operated the landfill as a municipal landfill. In addition to accepting municipal wastes and garbage, local industrial wastes were disposed of on the landfill during the late 1960s and early 1970s. A system designed to collect, store, treat, and dispose of leachate has been operating at the site since 1983. There are three remedial actions currently underway at the site. They include: leachate collection, methane gas collection, and landfill capping. The primary contaminants of concern affecting ground water include: VOCs, TCE, benzene, toluene, inorganics, chromium, and lead. Air is contaminated with methane gas and VOCs.

  10. Mechanical behavior of ceramic composite hot-gas filters after exposure to severe environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, D.J.; Weaver, B.L.; Smith, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic matrix has been developed, as reported at previous Fossil Energy Materials Conferences, through research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company. Simulated testing has been done at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. This filter technology has been extended to full size, 60 mm OD by 1.5 meter long candle filters and a commercially viable process for producing the filters has been developed filters are undergoing testing and demonstration use throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Demonstration tests of this ceramic composite filter along with other filters are in progress at the Tidd PFBC plant Mechanical tests were performed on the 3 M brand Ceramic Composite Candle Filter after exposure to various corrosive environments in order to assess its ability to function as a hot gas filter in coal-fired applications. Due to the different construction of ceramic composite filters and the thin composite wall versus the typical thick-walled monolithic filter, standard mechanical property tests had to be refined or modified to accurately determine the filters properties. These tests and filter property results will be described Longitudinal tensile and diametral O-ring compression tests were performed on as-produced candle filters as well as on filters which had been exposed to various environments. The exposures were for 1000 hrs at 850{degrees}C in wet air, in wet air containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and in wet air containing NaCl. In addition, a filter which bad been coated with ash (Old Grimethorpe) was exposed to wet air at 850{degrees}C for 1000 hours.

  11. Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor: Experimental measurements, model

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor 13 April 2000; accepted 23 October 2000 Experimental measurements of wafer temperature in a single-wafer, lamp-heated chemical vapor deposition system were used to study the wafer temperature response to gas

  12. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  13. COORDINATED OXYGEN ISOTOPIC AND PETROLOGIC STUDIES OF CAIS RECORD VARYING COMPOSITION OF PROTOSOLAR GAS. J. I. Simon1

    E-print Network

    -rich inclusions (CAIs) re- cord the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High of CAIs reveal systematic variations in 17 O and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular reservoir [6] and a second 16 O-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic

  14. Numerical assessment of a landfill compliance limit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hensel, Bruce R.; Keefer, Donald A.; Griffin, Robert A.; Berg, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    The PLASM and Random Walk ground-water flow and contaminant transport models were used to assess the potential impact of various proposed regulatory compliance distances on landfill siting. Contaminant transport modeling was performed for 16 generalized geological sequences representative of hydrogeological conditions over an estimated 90 to 95 percent of Illinois. Results of this modeling indicate that about 50 percent of the state would be hydrogeologically suitable for landfilling of nonhazardous wastes if the compliance distance was 100 feet. With a compliance distance of 500 feet, about 55 percent of the state would be hydrogeologically suitable. This work demonstrates the utility of computer modeling in the development of regulations governing landfill siting.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation for landfill leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yang Englehardt, James D.

    2007-07-01

    This paper aims at providing an overview of electrochemical oxidation processes used for treatment of landfill leachate. The typical characteristics of landfill leachate are briefly reviewed, and the reactor designs used for electro-oxidation of leachate are summarized. Electrochemical oxidation can significantly reduce concentrations of organic contaminants, ammonia, and color in leachate. Pretreatment methods, anode materials, pH, current density, chloride concentration, and other additional electrolytes can considerably influence performance. Although high energy consumption and potential chlorinated organics formation may limit its application, electrochemical oxidation is a promising and powerful technology for treatment of landfill leachate.

  16. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 ?m, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  17. Preparation of a nanowire-structured polyaniline composite and gas sensitivity studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingfa; Li, Guang; Wang, Mang; Cheng, Yunan; Bai, Ru; Chen, Hongzheng

    2006-04-12

    To obtain organic nanowire sensors with high sensitivity and rapid response times, based on the inducement effect of surfactants during in situ polymerization, nanostructured polyaniline composites are obtained by using a chemical oxidation method by adding a small amount of surfactant. A casting method is employed on interdigitated carbon electrodes. The gas sensitivity to a series of chemical vapors is examined at room temperature. The results indicate that polyaniline with regular nanowire structure is obtained when succinic acid is added. The gas sensitivity and response rates of a film with nanowire structure are much better than those of conventional polyaniline films produced by means of organic solution spin coating methods. The film described in this work shows good selectivity to trimethylamine and other related gases and, the reaction being reversible with the use of high-purity nitrogen. PMID:16456906

  18. Evaluation of Y-12 landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, G.A. ); Daugherty, D.L. ); Hutzler, C.W.; Smith, C.M. ); Wylie, A.N. )

    1990-12-12

    The purpose of this project was to provide team members with practical experience in application of Civil Engineering 555, Solid Waste Management principles. Team members chose to evaluate the functional elements of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's (Y-12's) solid waste management system. The following factors contributed to selection of Y-12'system for evaluation: team members' familiarity with the Y-12 system; knowledge that the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was nearing capacity; and presence of the unique issues posed by special national security and potential radioactive contamination considerations. This report was limited to evaluation of the solid waste management system for conventional solid waste; hazardous radioactive, and radioactive mixed waste were not addressed. The report: (1) describes each functional element including waste generation, storage, collection, transport, processing, recovery, and disposal; (2) identifies and evaluates alternatives for each element and (3) identifies system strengths and recommends opportunities for improvement. 34 figs.

  19. Variations in the O-isotope composition of gas during the formation of chondrules from the CR chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Devin L.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Hellebrand, Eric

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the environment of chondrule formation and constrain the O-isotope composition of the ambient gas in the Renazzo-like carbonaceous (CR) chondrite chondrule-forming region, we studied the mineralogy, petrology, and in situ O-isotope compositions of olivine in 11 barred olivine (BO) chondrules and pyroxene and silica in three type I porphyritic chondrules from the CR chondrites Gao-Guenie (b), Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91082, and Shi?r 033. BO chondrules experienced a higher degree of melting than porphyritic chondrules, and therefore, it has been hypothesized that they more accurately recorded the O-isotope composition of the gas in chondrule-forming regions. We studied the O-isotope composition of silica as it has been hypothesized to have formed via direct condensation from the gas.

  20. Life cycle assessment (LCA) of solid waste management strategies in Tehran: landfill and composting plus landfill.

    PubMed

    Abduli, M A; Naghib, Abolghasem; Yonesi, Mansoor; Akbari, Ali

    2011-07-01

    As circumstances of operating and maintenance activities for landfilling and composting in Tehran metropolis differ from those of cities in developed countries, it was concluded to have an environmental impact comparison between the current solid waste management (MSW) strategies: (1) landfill, and (2) composting plus landfill. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to compare these scenarios for MSW in Tehran, Iran. The Eco-Indicator 99 is applied as an impact assessment method considering surplus energy, climate change, acidification, respiratory effect, carcinogenesis, ecotoxicity and ozone layer depletion points of aspects. One ton of municipal solid waste of Tehran was selected as the functional unit. According to the comparisons, the composting plus landfill scenario causes less damage to human health in comparison to landfill scenario. However, its damages to both mineral and fossil resources as well as ecosystem quality are higher than the landfill scenario. Thus, the composting plus landfill scenario had a higher environmental impact than landfill scenario. However, an integrated waste management will ultimately be the most efficient approach in terms of both environmental and economic benefits. In this paper, a cost evaluation shows that the unit cost per ton of waste for the scenarios is 15.28 and 26.40 US$, respectively. Results show landfill scenario as the preferable option both in environmental and economic aspects for Tehran in the current situation. PMID:20924666

  1. Investigations of natural attenuation in groundwater near a landfill and implications for landfill post-closure.

    PubMed

    Hubé, Daniel; Gourcy, Laurence; Gourry, Jean-Christophe; Guyonnet, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The controlled landfill technology is now adopting passive attenuation techniques as an increasing number of landfill sites reach the post-closure phase. During the post-closure phase, landfill operators need to convince environmental authorities that landfills no longer pose a threat to health or the environment. The demonstration of acceptable risk should rely in particular on data collected during environmental monitoring in addition to modelling of possible future evolutions of environmental concentrations. One difficulty that is typically encountered in France is related to the fact that groundwater monitoring systems around landfills are often insufficiently detailed to provide conclusive evidence of natural attenuation mechanisms. This paper presents data on groundwater quality in the vicinity of an old landfill located in a complex aquifer system. While isotopic data show a signature of the landfill leachate in the groundwater in the vicinity of the landfill, chemical analyses do not suggest a strong influence, which could be indicative of natural attenuation mechanisms in the groundwater. However, the complexity of the groundwater system in this area is such that it cannot be excluded that a pollutant flux is being overlooked. Implications of demonstrating natural attenuation during the landfill post-closure phase, with respect to groundwater monitoring, are discussed. PMID:21078693

  2. Diagnostics of composition and size of clusters formed in supersonic jets of Ar-Kr gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylchenko, O. G.; Kovalenko, S. I.; Konotop, O. P.; Samovarov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The electron diffraction technique is employed to study the component composition of binary Ar-Kr clusters with N ¯=1 ×103-9 ×104 atoms/cluster as a function of cluster size and the composition of the feed gas mixture. A diagram showing the conditions under which homogeneous Kr clusters rather than heterogeneous Ar-Kr clusters are generated in the jet is presented for the first time. It is found that the key parameters to analyze the composition of clusters are the critical cluster radius Rcr and the critical Kr gas concentration Ccr. For the parameter range of heterogeneous cluster formation ( CKrgas < Ccr and R > Rcr), an analytical expression is provided which describes quantitatively the enrichment of such clusters with krypton. The results obtained allow one to predict the composition of clusters produced in experiments with binary jets of noble and simple molecular gases, as well as to control simultaneously their size and composition.

  3. Impact of MSWI Bottom Ash Codisposed with MSW on Landfill Stabilization with Different Operational Modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Bing; Yao, Jun; Zhou, Gen-Di; Dong, Ming; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) codisposed with municipal solid waste (MSW) on landfill stabilization according to the leachate quality in terms of organic matter and nitrogen contents. Six simulated landfills, that is, three conventional and three recirculated, were employed with different ratios of MSWI BA to MSW. The results depicted that, after 275-day operation, the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1 :?10 (V?:?V) in the landfill was still not enough to provide sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity for a high organic matter composition of MSW over 45.5% (w/w), while the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V) could act on it. Among the six experimental landfills, leachate quality only was improved in the landfill operated with the BA addition (the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V)) and leachate recirculation. PMID:24779006

  4. Impact of MSWI bottom ash codisposed with MSW on landfill stabilization with different operational modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bing; Yao, Jun; Malik, Zaffar; Zhou, Gen-Di; Dong, Ming; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) codisposed with municipal solid waste (MSW) on landfill stabilization according to the leachate quality in terms of organic matter and nitrogen contents. Six simulated landfills, that is, three conventional and three recirculated, were employed with different ratios of MSWI BA to MSW. The results depicted that, after 275-day operation, the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1 :?10 (V?:?V) in the landfill was still not enough to provide sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity for a high organic matter composition of MSW over 45.5% (w/w), while the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V) could act on it. Among the six experimental landfills, leachate quality only was improved in the landfill operated with the BA addition (the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V)) and leachate recirculation. PMID:24779006

  5. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3?ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4+) was calculated as 222?ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7?vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3?vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  6. Modelling flow to leachate wells in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Beaven, R.P.; White, J.K

    2004-07-01

    Vertical wells are frequently used as a means of controlling leachate levels in landfills. They are often the only available dewatering option for both old landfills without any basal leachate collection layer and for newer sites where the installed drainage infrastructure has failed. When the well is pumped, a seepage face develops at the entry into the well so that the drawdown in the surrounding waste will not be as great as might be expected. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW-SURFACT, which contains the functionality to model seepage surfaces, has been used to investigate the transient dewatering of a landfill. The study concludes that the position of the seepage face and information about the characteristics of the induced seepage flow field are important and should not be neglected when designing wells in landfills.

  7. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  8. Developing a New Field-Validated Methodology for Landfill Methane Emissions in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This project was initiated in the US by the California Energy Commission (CEC) in cooperation with the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) to develop improved methods for landfill methane emissions for the California greenhouse gas inventory. This 3-year project (2007-2010) is devel...

  9. From California dreaming to California data: Challenging historic models for landfill CH4 emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved quantification of diverse CH4 sources at the urban scale is needed to guide local greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies in the Anthropocene. Herein, we focus on landfill CH4 emissions in California, challenging the current IPCC methodology which focuses on a climate dependency for land...

  10. Variation in the Deep Gas Composition in Hot Spots on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; de Pater, Imke; Wong, Michael H.; Adamkovics, Mate; Hewagama, Tilak; Hesman, Brigette

    2015-11-01

    We used CSHELL on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility and NIRSPEC on the Keck telescope in the last two years to spectrally resolve line profiles of CH3D, NH3, PH3, and H2O in 5-micron Hot Spots on Jupiter. The profile of the CH3D lines at 4.66 microns is very broad in both NEB and SEB Hot Spots due to collisions with up to 8 bars of H2, where unit optical depth occurs due to collision-induced H2 opacity. The extreme width of these CH3D features implies that the Hot Spots that we observed do not have significant cloud opacity for P > 2 bars. We retrieved NH3, PH3, and gaseous H2O within Hot Spots in both the NEB and SEB. We had dry nights on Mauna Kea and a sufficient Doppler shift to detect H2O. We will compare line wings to derive H2O profiles in the 2 to 6-bar region. NEB Hot Spots are depleted in NH3 with respect to adjacent regions. Interestingly, SEB Hot Spots exhibit stronger NH3 absorption than NEB Hot Spots. In addition, SEB Hot Spots have very similar 5-micron spectra as neighboring longitudes in the SEB, implying similar deep gas composition. The dynamical origin of SEB Hot Spots is much less studied than that of NEB Hot Spots, so our observations of gas composition in both regions may constrain mechanisms for forming Hot Spots.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Poroelastic Composites Undergoing Thermal and Gas Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, N. J. (Principal Investigator); Sullivan, Roy M.; Lee, Sunpyo

    1995-01-01

    A theory for time-dependent thermal and gas diffusion in mechanically time-rate-independent anisotropic poroelastic composites has been developed. This theory advances previous work by the latter two authors by providing for critical transverse shear through a three-dimensional axisymmetric formulation and using it in a new hypothesis for determining the Biot fluid pressure-solid stress coupling factor. The derived governing equations couple material deformation with temperature and internal pore pressure and more strongly couple gas diffusion and heat transfer than the previous theory. Hence the theory accounts for the interactions between conductive heat transfer in the porous body and convective heat carried by the mass flux through the pores. The Bubnov Galerkin finite element method is applied to the governing equations to transform them into a semidiscrete finite element system. A numerical procedure is developed to solve the coupled equations in the space and time domains. The method is used to simulate two high temperature tests involving thermal-chemical decomposition of carbon-phenolic composites. In comparison with measured data, the results are accurate. Moreover unlike previous work, for a single set of poroelastic parameters, they are consistent with two measurements in a restrained thermal growth test.

  12. Redox control of gas compositions in Philippine volcanic-hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Giggenbach, W.F.

    1993-10-01

    Gas samples from five volcanic-hydrothermal systems in the Philippines were analyzed for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO. Even in systems with sulfate minerals as common components of alteration assemblages, indicating highly immature, oxidizing conditions at depth, the redox potential governing the concentrations of the reactive gases CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO approaches closely that expected for attainment of equilibrium with rock in more mature, reduced systems. The finding suggests that overall fluid compositions reflect more closely redox conditions established at the advancing front of interaction with primary rock rather than those of equilibrium with the set of secondary minerals left behind. With the exception of CO and NH{sub 3}, the close agreement in the compositions of gas samples, taken from pools and deep wells indicates that the secondary processes have only a slight effect on the vapors during their rise from drilled depths (1.8 km) to the surface and that samples from natural features may be taken to be representative of redox conditions at drilled depths.

  13. Contaminants of emerging concern in fresh leachate from landfills in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Furlong, Edward T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Gray, James L.; Schwab, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the composition of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in landfill leachate, fresh leachate from 19 landfills was sampled across the United States during 2011. The sampled network included 12 municipal and 7 private landfills with varying landfill waste compositions, geographic and climatic settings, ages of waste, waste loads, and leachate production. A total of 129 out of 202 CECs were detected during this study, including 62 prescription pharmaceuticals, 23 industrial chemicals, 18 nonprescription pharmaceuticals, 16 household chemicals, 6 steroid hormones, and 4 plant/animal sterols. CECs were detected in every leachate sample, with the total number of detected CECs in samples ranging from 6 to 82 (median = 31). Bisphenol A (BPA), cotinine, and N,N-diethyltoluamide (DEET) were the most frequently detected CECs, being found in 95% of the leachate samples, followed by lidocaine (89%) and camphor (84%). Other frequently detected CECs included benzophenone, naphthalene, and amphetamine, each detected in 79% of the leachate samples. CEC concentrations spanned six orders of magnitude, ranging from ng L?1 to mg L?1. Industrial and household chemicals were measured in the greatest concentrations, composing more than 82% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Maximum concentrations for three household and industrial chemicals, para-cresol (7020000 ng L?1), BPA (6380000 ng L?1), and phenol (1550000 ng L?1), were the largest measured, with these CECs composing 70% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Nonprescription pharmaceuticals represented 12%, plant/animal sterols 4%, prescription pharmaceuticals 1%, and steroid hormones <1% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Leachate from landfills in areas receiving greater amounts of precipitation had greater frequencies of CEC detections and concentrations in leachate than landfills receiving less precipitation.

  14. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group 'Landfill Aeration' contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  15. Landfills, nocturnal foraging, and risk to aircraft.

    PubMed

    Burger, J

    2001-10-12

    Open landfills serve as an attractant to birds, with increasing risk of bird-plane collisions. Managers are searching for methods to allow landfilling while reducing potential bird problems near airports. Some municipalities are considering nighttime landfilling as an avian deterrent, particularly where waste management facilities are located near airports. The objective of this report was to evaluate whether nighttime landfilling will result in increased risk to aircraft from birds at the Atlantic County Airport in coastal New Jersey. The risk to nearby aircraft from nighttime landfill is a function of (1) attractiveness of landfills, airports, or other habitats, (2) nocturnal behavior of gulls and other birds, (3) elevations and flight paths of birds, (4) changes in population levels of gulls and other potentially hazardous birds, and (5) harassment techniques that can deter birds from the landfills, adjacent habitat, and airports. The latter, however, can serve to move birds to locations or altitudes that pose an even greater risk to aircraft. The number of strikes is generally increasing. While most air strikes occur during the day at the Atlantic County Airport, over 12% occur at night and nearly 20% occur at dawn when any garbage remaining from nighttime landfilling would be an attractant. The peak of strikes occurs in the early fall, when young birds are learning to forage. Risk data suggests that gulls and a wide variety of other birds are active at night, and if any garbage is available they will be attracted, increasing the risk to aircraft landing at night. Some actual night dumping has been carried out since October 3 1997 without apparently attracting gulls, suggesting that careful operations with appropriate institutional controls can make nighttime dumping feasible. PMID:11594704

  16. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  17. Mass spectrometer measurements of test gas composition in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Shock tunnels afford a means of generating hypersonic flow at high stagnation enthalpies, but they have the disadvantage that thermochemical effects make the composition of the test flow different to that of ambient air. The composition can be predicted by numerical calculations of the nozzle flow expansion, using simplified thermochemical models and, in the absence of experimental measurements, it has been necessary to accept the results given by these calculations. This note reports measurements of test gas composition, at stagnation enthalpies up to 12.5 MJ.kg(exp -1), taken with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Limited results have been obtained in previous measurements. These were taken at higher stagnation enthalpies, and used a quadruple mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight method was preferred here because it enabled a number of complete mass spectra to be obtained in each test, and because it gives good mass resolution over the range of interest with air (up to 50 a.m.a.).

  18. Environmental diagnosis methodology for municipal waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Moreno, B; Zamorano, M; Szanto, M

    2005-01-01

    A large number of countries are involved in a process of transformation with regard to the management of municipal solid waste. This process is a consequence of environmental requirements that occasionally materialise in legislation, such as the European Council Directive 31/99/EC on waste release in the European Union. In some cases, the remediation of old landfills can be carried out in compliance with environmental requirements; in other cases, it is necessary to proceed with the closure of the landfill and to assimilate it into its own environment. In both cases, it is necessary to undertake a diagnosis and characterisation of the impacted areas in order to develop an adequate action plan. This study presents a new methodology by which environmental diagnosis of landfill sites may be carried out. The methodology involves the formulation of a series of environmental indeces which provide information concerning the potential environmental problems of the landfills and the p