Sample records for landfill gas composition

  1. Characterization of landfill gas composition at the Fresh Kills municipal solid-waste landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

    1998-01-01

    The most common disposal method in the US for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. Until recently, air emissions from these landfills were not regulated. Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and\\/or measurements. This paper

  2. MUNICIPAL LANDFILL GAS CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New regulations relative to air emissions from municipal landfills may require the installation of gas collection systems at landfills. As landfill gas (LFG) is collected, water and other vapors in the gas condense in the system or are purposely removed in the normal treatment of...

  3. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill - project data (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  4. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 1. Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  5. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 2. Appendices to project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  6. Sour landfill gas problem solved

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, G.; Cantrall, R. [Wheelabrator Clean Air Systems, Inc., Schaumburg, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In Broward County, Fla., near Pompano Beach, Waste Management of North America (WMNA, a subsidiary of WMX Technologies, Oak Brook, IL) operates the Central Sanitary Landfill and Recycling Center, which includes the country`s largest landfill gas-to-energy plant. The landfill consists of three collection sites: one site is closed, one is currently receiving garbage, and one will open in the future. Approximately 9 million standard cubic feet (scf) per day of landfill gas is collected from approximately 300 wells spread over the 250-acre landfill. With a dramatic increase of sulfur-containing waste coming to a South Florida landfill following Hurricane Andrew, odors related to hydrogen sulfide became a serious problem. However, in a matter of weeks, an innovative desulfurization unit helped calm the landfill operator`s fears. These very high H{sub 2}S concentrations caused severe odor problems in the surrounding residential area, corrosion problems in the compressors, and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission problems in the exhaust gas from the turbine generators.

  7. Migrating landfill gas proves challenging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Dobrowolski; A. S. Dellinger

    1994-01-01

    Located in the San Fernando Valley at the foothills of the San Gabriel mountains, the 41-acre Sheldon-Arleta Landfill originated as one of many gravel pits in the area and was operated by CalMat as a gravel quarry pit from the mid 1950s until 1962. In 1967, methane gas was detected in the residential dwellings located across from the landfill along

  8. Landfill Gas Effects on Evapotranspirative Landfill Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, M. A.; Mattson, E.; Ankeny, M.; Kelsey, J.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of an evapotranspirative landfill cover can be adversely affected by transport of landfill gases to the plant root zone. Healthy plant communities are critical to the success and effectiveness of these vegetated landfill covers. Poor vegetative cover can result in reduced transpiration, increased percolation, and increased erosion regardless of the thickness of the cover. Visual inspections of landfill covers indicate that vegetation-free areas are not uncommon at municipal waste landfills. Data from soil profiles beneath these areas suggest that anaerobic conditions in the plant-rooting zone are controlling plant distribution. On the same landfill, aerobic conditions exist at similar depths beneath well-vegetated areas. The movement of methane and carbon dioxide, generated by degradation of organic wastes, into the overlying soil cover displaces oxygen in the root zone. Monitoring data from landfills in semi-arid areas indicate that barometric pumping can result in hours of anaerobic conditions in the root zone. Microbial consumption of oxygen in the root zone reduces the amount of oxygen available for plant root respiration but consumption of oxygen and methane also produce water as a reaction byproduct. This biogenic water production can be on the order of centimeters of water per year which, while increasing water availability, also has a negative feedback on transport of landfill gases through the cover. Accounting for these processes can improve evapotranspirative landfill cover design at other sites.

  9. Landfill gas to electricity demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, A. J.; Cagliostro, L. A.

    1982-03-01

    Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring by product of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10 percent of the natural gas used annually in the State. The 18-month Landfill Gas to Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

  10. Appointment in Sonzay: Landfill gas fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Balbo, M.E. [SITA Group, Paris (France)

    1997-05-01

    The SITA Group (Paris, France) an international waste management company, wanted to research and develop a means to economically and environmentally reuse the inherent value of its landfill gas. As the owner of more than 100 landfills in France alone--both hazardous and non-hazardous--SITA felt that it had a responsibility to research innovative gas treatment and/or reuse options, particularly as public scrutiny of landfill management practices was on the rise. In a successful pilot program initiated by SITA, landfill gas was reused as biofuel for vehicles in a way that was economically viable and environmentally sound.

  11. Migration and atmospheric emission of landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fadel, M.; Findikakis, A.N.; Leckie, J.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Gas generation due primarily to microbial decomposition is an inevitable consequence of the practice of solid waste disposal in landfills. Subsequent gas migration within the landfill and its potential emission to the atmosphere are dependent on the pressure and concentration gradients of the gas inside the landfill as well as many factors related to transport properties of the gas itself (viscosity, diffusivity) and the physical characteristics of the waste (permeability, moisture content, porosity). Temperature plays an important role in defining the gas movement because it strongly influences the gas transport properties as well as biochemical processes controlling gas production within the landfill. This paper presents a one-dimensional numerical gas flow model which predicts the time development of the pressure and gas concentration profiles, and the time variation of the total gas emission from landfills. The model accounts for effects of temperature variations with time on gas transport properties and biochemical processes. It was used to simulate gas emission data form the Mountain View Controlled Landfill Project, California. 120 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. LANDFILL GAS PRETREATMENT FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the U.S. EPA's program, underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation, to demonstrate landfill methane control and the fuel cell energy recovery concept. In this program, two critical issues are being addressed: (1) a landfill gas cleanup method that would ...

  13. Implementation guide for landfill gas utilization

    SciTech Connect

    McGuigan, M.J.; Conrad, E.T. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Handley, R.L. [Northeast Regional Biomass Program, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The technology for recovering and converting landfill gas (LFG) to energy has been known for sometime, and implementation of projects have been occurring over the past 15 years. This paper describes the evolution of LFG utilization development, the barriers that exist for this form of biomass, and technical and economic factors regarding LFG utilization. The basis of this paper is the authors` experience in successful and unsuccessful LFG projects and two projects sponsored by NRBP: (1) Implementation Guide to Landfill Gas Recovery in the Northeast and, (2) Comparative Analysis of Landfill Gas Utilization Technologies. This paper presents the findings of the first study and an introduction to the second study.

  14. Composition and source identification of deposits forming in landfill gas (LFG) engines and effect of activated carbon treatment on deposit composition.

    PubMed

    Sevimo?lu, Orhan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    Compositions of deposits forming on engines parts operated with landfill gas (LFG) were analyzed. The deposit compositions were compared before and after the installation of activated carbon system for treatment of LFG. Deposits forming on the spark plugs had significantly higher levels of calcium, chromium, and nickel in comparison to those forming on the engine heads. The LFG contained about 9.5 ± 0.4 mg/m(3) total siloxanes, majority of which were octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) (5.0 ± 0.2 mg/m(3)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) (2.9 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) (1.6 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)). The samples collected from the engine heads before the activated carbon treatment of LFG had significantly high levels of silicon (149,400 ± 89,900 mg/kg) as well as calcium (70,840 ± 17,750 mg/kg), sulfur (42,500 ± 11,500 mg/kg), and zinc (22,300 ± 7200 mg/kg). After the activated carbon treatment, silicon levels decreased significantly; however, deposits had higher sulfur content (104,560 ± 68,100 mg/kg) indicating that the activated carbon released some sulfur during treatment. The analyses indicate that zinc and calcium originated from the additives in the lube oil while lead, aluminum, copper, nickel, iron, chromium were due to the engine wear. PMID:23770437

  15. Experience with landfill gas monitoring and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenness, S.R.; Wilcox, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    Landfills have recently come under additional environmental scrutiny for their potential as air emission sources. This paper discusses an air monitoring program that was performed in 1997 for the landfill located at US Army Fort Dix, New Jersey. Results of the program are presented as well as conclusions that were drawn from the sampling data and the sampling techniques employed. The Fort Dix Landfill air monitoring program consisted of quarterly measurements of gas vent (more than 50) flow rates. Flow rates were measured twice per day (morning and afternoon) with vane anemometers in order to assess diurnal effects. Measurements of ambient pressure and temperature were also taken for correlation with the gas vent flow rates. Additional gas sampling was performed on selected vents at the landfill to ascertain fixed gases (methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen) content, total non-methane organic compounds (NMOC), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) content, mercury content, and over sixty individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  16. Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, G. Y. S.; Wong, M. H.; Whitton, B. A.

    1991-05-01

    An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at Gin Drinkers' Bay (GDB) landfill, Hong Kong, and in the laboratory. Ten species ( Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea glutinosa, Machilus breviflora, Pinus elliottii, and Tristania conferta), belonging to eight families, were transplanted to two sites, one with a high concentration of landfill gas in the cover soil (high-gas site, HGS) and the other with a relatively low concentration of gas (low-gas site, LGS). Apart from the gaseous composition, the general soil properties were similar. A strong negative correlation between tree growth and landfill gas concentration was observed. A laboratory study using the simulated landfill gas to fumigate seedlings of the above species showed that the adventitious root growth of Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Machilus breviflora, and Tristania confera was stimulated by the gas, with shallow root systems being induced. Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, and Litsea glutinosa were gas-tolerant, while root growth of Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, and Pinus elliottii was inhibited. In most cases, shoot growth was not affected, exceptions being Bombax malabaricum, Liquidambar formosana, and Tristania conferta, where stunted growth and/or reduced foliation was observed. A very high CO2 concentration in cover soil limits the depth of the root system. Trees with a shallow root system become very susceptible to water stress. The effects of low O2 concentration in soil are less important than the effects of high CO2 concentration. Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, and Tristania conferta are suited for growth on subtropical completed landfills mainly due to their gas tolerance and/or drought tolerance.

  17. Gaseous methyl- and inorganic mercury in landfill gas from landfills in Florida, Minnesota, Delaware, and California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Lindberg; G. Southworth; E. M. Prestbo; D. Wallschläger; M. A. Bogle; J. Price

    2005-01-01

    Municipal waste landfills contain numerous sources of mercury which could be emitted to the atmosphere. Their generation of methane by anaerobic bacteria suggests that landfills may act as bioreactors for methylated mercury compounds. Since our previous study at a single Florida landfill, gaseous inorganic and methylated mercury species have now been identified and quantified in landfill gas at nine additional

  18. Landfill gas boosted to pipeline quality

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The world's largest landfill recovery facility, located on Staten Island, went on stream in 1982 and is expected to produce 1.3 billion CF/yr of pipeline gas. Containing 45% carbon dioxide, the gas is compressed and cooled in stages to meet the requirements of the Selexol purification plant. Two 1120-kW (1500-hp) Copper Bessemer GMVS-8C integral gas engine-compressors, fueled by the landfill gas, provide the compression needed from the wells to the final solvent-contact stage.

  19. Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

  20. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  1. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

  2. FUEL CELL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    International Fuel Cells Corporation is conducting a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored program to demonstrate energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The US EPA is interested in fuel cells for this application b...

  3. LANDFILL GAS RECOVERY/UTILIZATION - OPTIONS AND ECONOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the options and economics for landfill gas utilization. (NOTE: The decomposition of landfilled waste results in a gas that can be either a source of pollution or a resource. f the more than 6000 active municipal solid waste landfills in the U. S., there are 11...

  4. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  5. Evaluation of landfill gas as an energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    The benefits and problems associated with landfill gas recovery were considered by the City of Baltimore, resulting in the structuring and testing of a realistic gas recovery evaluation procedure for use by local governments. The Baltimore methodology is summarized and results of its application to a large landfill in the Baltimore area are presented. The landfill gas generation process potential uses for the recovered gas, and treatment requirements are covered.

  6. Landfill Gas: From Rubbish to Resource

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent S. Knaebel; Herbert E. Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    The prospects of using landfill gas (LFG) as a high-grade fuel in the immediate future, in view of environmental regulations, the Kyoto Protocols, and energy prices, are discussed. Adsorption cycles suggested in the late 1980s by Sircar and co-workers for treating LFG are reviewed: one produced CO2-free methane and the other produced both CO2-free methane and methane-free CO2. Neither of

  7. Largest landfill gas plant supplying Staten Island users

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, A.J.

    1983-05-01

    The $20 million landfill methane recovery and processing facility at New York's Fresh Kills site on Staten Island, the first on the East Coast, with a capacity of 10 million cu ft per day of raw landfill gas, is a joint venture of Getty Synthetic Fuels, Inc. and Methane Development Corp., a subsidiary of Brooklyn Union Gas Co. The landfill gas (LFG) has long plagued landfill operators who have had to devise various means through the years to contend with this potentially hazardous by-product. The microprocessor-assisted Flo-Cal, gas-fueled angle enginecompressors, the metering station, and the high-speed calorimeter are discussed. Raw landfill gas is withdrawn via 100 wells from the 400-acre section. Water is removed from the gas in an underground separation unit.

  8. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  9. Methanol from landfill gas: technology and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollomon, J.B.

    1982-12-01

    The study consists of a detailed conceptual process design for an integrated facility, including cost estimates and financial analysis; the results of a laboratory investigation of the composition of gas from the Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island; and a market analysis of potential methanol uses and plant sites in New York State. The report addresses the conditions under which operation of a methanol plant would be economical, as well as strategies for introducing methanol into the marketplace. In addition, the report includes details on the extensive chemical data developed during the project concerning contaminants which might affect process performance or economics.

  10. BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRETREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Creighton

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set.

  11. Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Y. S. Chan; M. H. Wong; B. A. Whitton

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at Gin Drinkers' Bay (GDB) landfill, Hong Kong, and in the laboratory. Ten species ( Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea glutinosa, Machilus breviflora, Pinus elliottii, and Tristania conferta), belonging to eight families, were transplanted to two

  12. Gas production by accelerated in situ bioleaching of landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    A process for improved gas production and accelerated stabilization of landfills by accelerated in situ bioleaching of organic wastes by acid forming bacteria in substantially sealed landfills, passing the leachate of hydrolysis and liquefaction products of microbial action of the microorganisms with the organic material to an acid phase digester to regenerate the activated culture of acid forming microorganisms for

  13. LANDFILL-GAS-TO-ENERGY PROJECTS: AN ANALYSIS OF NET PRIVATE AND SOCIAL BENEFITS

    E-print Network

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Materials Table A1: Model Results for West Lake Landfill WEST LAKE IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Landfill WEST COUNTY IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average Landfill Gas Generation (mmcf/yr) 1,075 1,735 $1,250 Table A3: Model Results for Modern Landfill MODERN IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average

  14. Creative financing of landfill gas utilization projects

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.P. Jr.; Laughlin, M.F.; McGuigan, M.J.

    1996-11-01

    The landfill gas utilization industry has gone through profound change in the last ten years and is in for further changes in the coming years. The first change is the probable expiration of Section 29 tax credits for newly developed projects and the second is the upcoming NSPS mandate to capture fugitive LFG emission from our nations larger landfills. In order to provide for the capital needs of LFG utilization project developers, lenders and investors must adapt to the changing nature of the industry as well. Lyon Credit Corporation has provided senior and subordinated financing as well as lease financing for the LFG utilization industry for the last three years. During this time, LCC has had to adapt its product offerings to meet the continuing needs of the borrowers in this industry. This presentation will focus on the changing nature of the industry and its effect on the economics, capital and financing requirements of newly developed LFG utilization projects. The two fundamental changes which have drastically altered the way projects are structured and financed include the changing nature of the LFG project product end-user and various regulatory and legislative measures which have significantly impacted the responsibilities of the project owner/developer and the future profitability of all LFG utilization projects. The successful LFG utilization project developers will be those who recognize that these changes are permanent departures from past practices, and those who will seek to exploit opportunities created by these changes. The lenders and investors to this industry will likewise have to adapt with these changes in order to continue to provide needed capital to this growing industry.

  15. Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1981-01-01

    In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

  16. Gas production by accelerated in situ bioleaching of landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.

    1982-04-06

    A process for improved gas production and accelerated stabilization of landfills by accelerated in situ bioleaching of organic wastes by acid forming bacteria in substantially sealed landfills, passing the leachate of hydrolysis and liquefaction products of microbial action of the microorganisms with the organic material to an acid phase digester to regenerate the activated culture of acid forming microorganisms for recirculation to the landfill, passing the supernatant from the acid phase digester to a methane phase digester operated under conditions to produce methane rich gas. The supernatant from the methane phase digester containing nutrients for the acid forming microorganisms and added sewage sludge or other desired nutrient materials are circulated through the landfill. Low Btu gas is withdrawn from the acid phase digester while high Btu gas is withdrawn from the methane phase digester and may be upgraded for use as SNG. The process of this invention is applicable to small as well as large organic waste landfills, provides simultaneous disposal of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge or other aqueous organic waste in a landfill which may be stabilized much more quickly than an uncontrolled landfill as presently utilized.

  17. LANDFILL GAS AND THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper is an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. There appears to be a consensus in the international co...

  18. LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION: TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technical issues associated with the use of landfill gas (LFG) compared with natural gas--which is the primary fuel used for energy conversion equipment such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and fuel cells. FG is a medium-heating-value fuel contai...

  19. Effects of landfill gas on subtropical woody plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Y. S. Chan; M. H. Wong; B. A. Whitton

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the influence of landfill gas on tree growth in the field at Gin Drinkers' Bay (GDB) landfill, Hong\\u000a Kong, and in the laboratory. Ten species (Acacia confusa, Albizzia lebbek, Aporusa chinensis, Bombax malabaricum, Castanopsis fissa, Liquidambar formosana, Litsea glutinosa,\\u000a Machilus breviflora, Pinus elliottii, andTristania conferta), belonging to eight families, were transplanted to two sites, one

  20. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

  1. Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative.

  2. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT THE GROTON, CT, LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results from a seminal assessment conducted on a fuel cell technology which generates electrical power from waste landfill gas. This assessment/ demonstration was the second such project conducted by the EPA, the first being conducted at the Penrose Power...

  3. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-07-01

    Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0.013 PE and 0.002 to 0.003 PE respectively). The reason for this is that even if the leachate is treated, slight amounts of contaminants are released through emissions of treated wastewater to surface waters. The largest environmental improvement with regard to the direct cost of the landfill was the capping and leachate treatment system. The capping, though very cheap to establish, gave a huge benefit in lowered impacts, the leachate collection system though expensive gave large benefits as well. The other gas measures were found to give further improvements, for a minor increase in cost. PMID:21435856

  4. Barrier to landfill gas utilization in the northeast

    SciTech Connect

    McGuigan, M.J.; Conrad, E.T.; Handley, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The technology for recovering and converting landfill gas (LFG) to energy has been known for sometime, and implementation of projects have been occurring over the past 15 years. This paper describes the evolution of LFG utilization development, the barriers that exist, and technical and economic factors regarding LFG utilization. The bases of this paper are the authors` experience in successful and unsuccessful LFG projects and a project sponsored by the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP), Implementation Guide to Landfill Gas Recovery in the Northeast. The Guidebook has been published by the NRBP and can be obtained by calling the NRBP at (202) 624-8454.

  5. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION OF LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3) for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the ...

  6. LANDFILL GAS UTILIZATION - DATABASE OF NORTH AMERICAN PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes data in an updated and expanded database for North American landfill-gas (LFG)-to-energy projects. t provides summary statistics, including a list of current projects, trends in conversion technologies, and a list of major developers, energy equipment supplie...

  7. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

  8. Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1983-09-01

    The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

  9. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  10. U.S. EPA'S RESEARCH TO UPDATE GUIDANCE FOR QUANTIFYING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, tropospheric ozone, and urban smog. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting research to help update EPA's landfill gas emission factors. The last update to EPA's landfill gas emiss...

  11. Landfill gas (LFG) processing via adsorption and alkanolamine absorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ankur Gaur; Jin-Won Park; Sanjeev Maken; Ho-Jun Song; Jong-Jin Park

    2010-01-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) was upgraded to pure methane using the adsorption and absorption processes. Different toxic compounds like aromatics and chlorinated compounds were removed using granular activated carbon. The activated carbon adsorbed toxic trace components in the following order: carbon tetrachloride>toluene>chloroform>xylene>ethylbenzene>benzene>trichloroethylene?tetrachloroethylene. After removing all trace components, the gas was fed to absorption apparatus for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2).

  12. Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan; Zhang, Mengqun; Wu, Weili; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jin

    2011-05-01

    Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term. PMID:21232931

  13. Remote Real-Time Monitoring of Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R.; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M.; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O’Connor, Noel E.; Smeaton, Alan F.; Diamond, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

  14. Passive landfill gas emission - Influence of atmospheric pressure and implications for the operation of methane-oxidising biofilters.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A passively vented landfill site in Northern Germany was monitored for gas emission dynamics through high resolution measurements of landfill gas pressure, flow rate and composition as well as atmospheric pressure and temperature. Landfill gas emission could be directly related to atmospheric pressure changes on all scales as induced by the autooscillation of air, diurnal variations and the passage of pressure highs and lows. Gas flux reversed every 20 h on average, with 50% of emission phases lasting only 10h or less. During gas emission phases, methane loads fed to a connected methane oxidising biofiltration unit varied between near zero and 247 g CH4 h(-1)m(-3) filter material. Emission dynamics not only influenced the amount of methane fed to the biofilter but also the establishment of gas composition profiles within the biofilter, thus being of high relevance for biofilter operation. The duration of the gas emission phase emerged as most significant variable for the distribution of landfill gas components within the biofilter. PMID:16387238

  15. Solid waste characteristics and their relationship to gas production in tropical landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Chiemchaisri; W. Chiemchaisri; Sunil Kumar; J. P. A. Hettiaratchi

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste characteristics and landfill gas emission rate in tropical landfill was investigated in this study. The experiment\\u000a was conducted at a pilot landfill cell in Thailand where fresh and two-year-old wastes in the cell were characterized at various\\u000a depths of 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 m. Incoming solid wastes to the landfill were mainly composed of plastic and foam (24.05%).

  16. Comparison of green-house gas emission reductions and landfill gas utilization between a landfill system and an incineration system.

    PubMed

    Haibin Han; Jisheng Long; Shude Li; Guangren Qian

    2010-04-01

    Electricity generation and greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions were researched by making comparisons between municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill and incineration systems with three different electricity generation efficiencies - 10%, 21%, and 24.7%. For MSW landfill systems, it is shown that the total electricity generation is 198,747 MWh, and the total GHG emission reduction is 1,386,081 tonne CO( 2) during a 21-year operation period. For incineration systems, the total electricity generation is 611,801 MWh, and the total GHG emission reduction is 1,339,158 tonne CO(2) during a 10-year operation period even if the electricity generation efficiency is only 10%. It is also shown that electricity generation increases quicker than the GHG emission reductions with the increase of electricity generation efficiency. However, incineration systems show great superiority in LFG utilisation and GHG emission reductions. PMID:20124321

  17. Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas

    E-print Network

    Gokhale, Bhushan

    2007-04-25

    truck operations. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a methodology that can be used to evaluate the use of LFG generated at landfills as a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel source for refuse trucks in Texas. The methodology simulates the gas...

  18. Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks

    E-print Network

    Sprague, Stephen M.

    2011-02-22

    better air quality. This research focused on six scenarios: converting landfill gas (LFG) to liquefied natural gas (LNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG to compressed natural gas (CNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG...

  19. LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL (LANDGEM) VERSION 3.02 USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) is an automated estimation tool with a Microsoft Excel interface that can be used to estimate emission rates for total landfill gas, methane, carbon dioxide, nonmethane organic compounds, and individual air pollutants from municipal soli...

  20. Invisible threat: Odors and landfill gas from construction and demolition waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    It once was thought that construction and demolition (C and D) waste used as clean fill and landfill cover would generate little or no gas or odors. Previous experience with municipal solid waste (MSW) traditionally generated odors of a few parts per million (ppm) up to maybe 100 ppm of hydrogen sulfide (HâS) in the landfill gas formed. However, people

  1. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 1. Development of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical gas extraction systems for degassing landfills. To this end, approaches to modeling the main processes occurring in the landfill's porous medium are considered. The considered approaches served as a basis for elaborating a thermophysical gas and heat transport model that takes into account variation in the hydrodynamic properties of wastes resulting from their secondary settlement. The adequacy of the results obtained using the developed model is confirmed by the data of classic works. The effect the secondary settlement of wastes has on the distribution of pressure and temperature in the landfill body is determined. It is shown that compaction of wastes due to their secondary settlement results in a growth of pressure by 40% on the average.

  2. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Crest, Marion, E-mail: marion.crest@suez-env.com [Suez Environnement, 38 rue du President Wilson, 78230 Le Pecq (France); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Spokas, Kurt A., E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, 439 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Akerman, Anna, E-mail: anna.akerman@sita.fr [SITA France, Tour CB 21, 16 Place de l'Iris, 92040 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Yuan, Lei, E-mail: lyuan@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  3. LANDFILL GAS AND ITS INFLUENCE ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes the relative importance of landfills to global warming and identifies the major sources of uncertainty with current emission estimates. t also provides an overview of EPA's research program on global landfill methane, including developing more reliable estim...

  4. Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores in a bench-scale enclosed landfill gas flare

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenia A. McBrian Tufts; Jacky A. Rosati

    2012-01-01

    A bench-scale landfill flare system was designed and built to test the potential for landfilled biological spores that migrate from the waste into the landfill gas to pass through the flare and exit into the environment as viable. The residence times and temperatures of the flare were characterized and compared to full-scale systems.Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus atrophaeus, nonpathogenic spores that

  5. Linking landfill hydrology and leachate chemical composition at a controlled municipal landfill (Kåstrup, Denmark) using state-space analysis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Moldrup, Per; Sørensen, Kirsten; Hansen, Jens Aa

    2002-10-01

    Leachate production and composition data for a municipal landfill measured over a 25-year period was used to investigate important processes and parameters. Long-term leachate production could be satisfactorily predicted from a simple top-layer landfill hydrology model while short-term predictions were less accurate, likely due to water storage in the waste. State-space and multiple regression modelling were used to identify relations between different parameters. State-space models proved most accurate in fitting measured data, likely because temporal correlation between measurements is accounted for unlike multiple regression. State-space modelling showed that temporal correlation in leachate production must be taken into account and confirmed that water storage inside the landfill is important. Temporal correlation is also important when predicting pH and chloride concentrations but less so for BOD5 and NH3/NH4+concentrations. Leachate flow did in general not have a strong impact upon leachate composition, small effects were observed for Cl-, and NH3/NH4+ concentrations. It was also observed that the mass load of nitrogen from the landfill was strongly dependent upon leachate nitrogen (ammonia/ammonium) concentrations and to a lesser degree upon leachate flow rates. This study introduces state-space modelling in solid waste management as a powerful tool to identify governing parameters for hydrological and bio-chemical processes. PMID:12498481

  6. U.S. EPA'S FIELD TEST PROGRAMS TO UPDATE DATA ON LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a field test program in which the EPA is currently engaged to improve data on landfill gas (LFG) emissions. LFG emissions data in use at this time are based on determinations made in the late 1980s and early 1990s; changes in landfill operations, such as using...

  7. Control of gas from landfills and/or marsh areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, E.H. [E.H. Hanson Engineering Group Ltd., Delta, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Landfills are the most well known source of methane formed by decomposition of organic material, but the authors have found that marsh gas generated by peat deposits also contain large quantities of methane and often become a formidable hazard. This is particularly true when small amounts of refuse or ground wood fill (hog fuel) has been placed on the marsh area to raise the ground elevation. It is well known that there is a natural propensity for methane generation and explosion from municipal solid waste landfills and marshlands. Despite this fact, in the Vancouver area, large, high value land development projects are taking place adjacent to methane generation areas and directly upon them. This is due to rapid growth and the consequent high demand for serviced building lots. Consequently, it became necessary to develop soils gas eradication systems which totally eliminate any danger of methane accumulation in buildings, in waste water and land drainage piping, and in underground electrical and telephone conduits. This was accomplished for a high caliber industrial/commercial site in Coquitlam, B.C. known as Pacific Reach Business Park. The site consists of about 180 acres and is underlain by peat and silt. It then became the recipient of municipal solid waste and ground wood waste (hog fuel), all of which produce methane. Finally it was topped with clay and dredged sand from the Fraser River. The biodegradation of carbon from the refuse plus the cellulose from the wood waste generated high volumes of methane. All of the underground municipal, telephone, and electrical conduits are protected from methane intrusion by a city-owned methane eradication system funded by the developer. The buildings each have built-in, custom designed, protection systems. Development is about 75% completed.

  8. Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores in a bench-scale enclosed landfill gas flare.

    PubMed

    Tufts, Jenia A McBrian; Rosati, Jacky A

    2012-02-01

    A bench-scale landfill flare system was designed and built to test the potential for landfilled biological spores that migrate from the waste into the landfill gas to pass through the flare and exit into the environment as viable. The residence times and temperatures of the flare were characterized and compared to full-scale systems. Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus atrophaeus, nonpathogenic spores that may serve as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent for anthrax, were investigated to determine whether these organisms would be inactivated or remain viable after passing through a simulated landfill flare. High concentration spore solutions were aerosolized, dried, and sent through a bench-scale system to simulate the fate of biological weapon (BW)-grade spores in a landfill gas flare. Sampling was conducted downstream of the flare using a bioaerosol collection device containing sterile white mineral oil. The samples were cultured, incubated for seven days, and assessed for viability. Results showed that the bench-scale system exhibited good similarity to the real-world conditions of an enclosed standard combustor flare stack with a single orifice, forced-draft diffusion burner. All spores of G. stearothermophilus and B. atrophaeus were inactivated in the flare, indicating that spores that become re-entrained in landfill gas may not escape the landfill as viable, apparently becoming completely inactivated as they exit through a landfill flare. PMID:22442931

  9. LEACHATE COLLECTION AND GAS MIGRATION AND EMISSION PROBLEMS AT LANDFILLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clogging of leachate systems and gas migration and emission problems were evaluated at hazardous waste landfills and surface impoundments. Collective and preventive measures were identified along with research and development needs. The analysis used literature and information ob...

  10. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  11. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of the waste composition and water content parameters on the biogas production models on solid waste landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Segura-Sobrino, Francisco; Rodrigo-Clavero, Maria-Elena

    2014-05-01

    Landfills are commonly used as the final deposit of urban solid waste. Despite the waste is previously processed on a treatment plant, the final amount of organic matter which reaches the landfill is large however. The biodegradation of this organic matter forms a mixture of greenhouse gases (essentially Methane and Carbon-Dioxide as well as Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulfide). From the environmental point of view, solid waste landfills are therefore considered to be one of the main greenhouse gas sources. Different mathematical models are usually applied to predict the amount of biogas produced on real landfills. The waste chemical composition and the availability of water in the solid waste appear to be the main parameters of these models. Results obtained when performing a sensitivity analysis over the biogas production model parameters under real conditions are shown. The importance of a proper characterizacion of the waste as well as the necessity of improving the understanding of the behaviour and development of the water on the unsaturated mass of waste are emphasized.

  13. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING U.S. EPA GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--BUSH VALLEY LANDFILL, HARFORD COUNTY, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  14. BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Creighton

    2012-03-13

    The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

  15. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  16. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  17. The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

    2001-12-01

    The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

  18. Determination of siloxanes and VOC in landfill gas and sewage gas by canister sampling and GC-MS\\/AES analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Schweigkofler; Reinhard Niessner

    1999-01-01

    Biogases such as landfill gas and sewage gas undergo a combustion process which is generating electric energy. Since several trace compounds such as siloxanes (also halogenated and sulfur compounds) are known to cause severe problems to these gas combustion engines, they are of particular interest. In this work, a new technique for sampling, identification, and quantification of siloxanes and volatile

  19. Suitability of Tedlar gas sampling bags for siloxane quantification in landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Ajhar, M; Wens, B; Stollenwerk, K H; Spalding, G; Yüce, S; Melin, T

    2010-06-30

    Landfill or digester gas can contain man-made volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS), usually in the range of a few milligrams per normal cubic metre (Nm(3)). Until now, no standard method for siloxane quantification exists and there is controversy with respect to which sampling procedure is most suitable. This paper presents an analytical and a sampling procedure for the quantification of common VMS in biogas via GC-MS and polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar) bags. Two commercially available Tedlar bag models are studied. One is equipped with a polypropylene valve with integrated septum, the other with a dual port fitting made from stainless steel. Siloxane recovery in landfill gas samples is investigated as a function of storage time, temperature, surface-to-volume ratio and background gas. Recovery was found to depend on the type of fitting employed. The siloxanes sampled in the bag with the polypropylene valve show high and stable recovery, even after more than 30 days. Sufficiently low detection limits below 10 microg Nm(-3) and good reproducibility can be achieved. The method is therefore well applicable to biogas, greatly facilitating sampling in comparison with other common techniques involving siloxane enrichment using sorption media. PMID:20685441

  20. A CASE STUDY OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY PALOS VERDES LANDFILL GAS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the first-ever-attempt to capture sanitary landfill gases and beneficiate them to natural gas pipeline quality--or very nearly so. For this reason the authors must credit the entrepreneurs for a successful first full-scale demonstration of a technology that ...

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  2. LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION EXPERIENCE: DISCUSSION OF TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL ISSUES, SOLUTIONS, AND TRENDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses technical and non-technical considerations associated with the development and operation of landfill gas to energy projects. Much of the report is based on interviews and site visits with the major developers and operators of the more than 110 projects in the...

  3. CRITICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY OF LEACHATE AND GAS PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Cooperative Agreement between the Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory and the Georgia Institute of Technology was established in 1983 to provide an evaluation of the state-of-the-art in municipal waste, landfill leachate and gas management. Summaries of full-scale and e...

  4. Methane oxidation activity and bacterial community composition in a simulated landfill cover soil is influenced by the growth of Chenopodium album L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunlong Wang; Weixiang Wu; Ying Ding; Wei Liu; Anton Perera; Yingxu Chen; Medha Devare

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen availability in landfill cover soil is a major limitation to the growth and activity of methanotrophs as methane oxidation is an aerobic microbial process. Plants tolerant to high concentrations of landfill gas (LFG) may play an important role in improving methane oxidation within landfill cover soil and reducing emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from it. In this study,

  5. Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997July 1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Masemore; S. Piccot

    1998-01-01

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market.

  6. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mintz; J. Han; M. Wang; C. Saricks

    2010-01-01

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft\\/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000

  7. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 2. Verification and application of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical landfill gas collection systems for degassing landfills. To this end, the thermophysical model developed in the first part of this work is considered. The model is constructed using the initial data obtained at real dump and landfill with subsequently comparing the calculation results with the data of experimental measurements. A method for determining the average hydrodynamic properties of wastes is proposed, using which the heterogeneity of wastes can be taken into account. The effect the operating and design parameters of the well have on its performance is investigated on the basis of these properties. It has been determined that increasing the suction pressure, drilling diameter, and perforation height allows the well production rate to be increased by around 10%. The effect the increase of the well production rate has on the landfill gas collection project's payback period is demonstrated taking typical dump and landfill as an example.

  8. TESTING OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: GROTON LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of follow-on tests following a four-phase EPA program. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction of global warming gas emissions (methane and carbon dioxide). The follow-on testing, conducted by N...

  9. Regional prediction of long-term landfill gas to energy potential.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamid R; Reinhart, Debra R

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) potential as a source of renewable energy is difficult due to the challenges involved in modeling landfill gas (LFG) generation. In this paper a methodology is presented to estimate LFGTE potential on a regional scale over a 25-year timeframe with consideration of modeling uncertainties. The methodology was demonstrated for the US state of Florida, as a case study, and showed that Florida could increase the annual LFGTE production by more than threefold by 2035 through installation of LFGTE facilities at all landfills. The estimated electricity production potential from Florida LFG is equivalent to removing some 70 million vehicles from highways or replacing over 800 million barrels of oil consumption during the 2010-2035 timeframe. Diverting food waste could significantly reduce fugitive LFG emissions, while having minimal effect on the LFGTE potential; whereas, achieving high diversion goals through increased recycling will result in reduced uncollected LFG and significant loss of energy production potential which may be offset by energy savings from material recovery and reuse. Estimates showed that the power density for Florida LFGTE production could reach as high as 10 Wm(-2) with optimized landfill operation and energy production practices. The environmental benefits from increased lifetime LFG collection efficiencies magnify the value of LFGTE projects. PMID:21703844

  10. Analysis of microbial community structure and composition in leachates from a young landfill by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Köchling, Thorsten; Sanz, José Luis; Gavazza, Sávia; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for degrading the raw leachate generated in sanitary landfills, extracting the soluble fraction of the landfill waste and biotransforming organic matter and toxic residues. To increase our understanding of these highly contaminated ecosystems, we analyzed the microbial communities in the leachate produced by three landfill cells of different ages. Using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we describe the structure of the leachate communities and present their compositional characteristics. All three communities exhibited a high level of abundance but were undersampled, as indicated by the results of the rarefaction analysis. The distribution of the taxonomic operational units (OTUs) was highly skewed, suggesting a community structure with a few dominant members that are key for the degradation process and numerous rare microorganisms, which could act as a resilient microorganism seeder pool. Members of the phylum Firmicutes were dominant in all of the samples, accounting for up to 62 % of the bacterial sequences, and their proportion increased with increasing landfill age. Other abundant phyla included Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, which together with Firmicutes comprised 90 % of the sequences. The data illustrate a microbial community that degrades organic matter in raw leachate in the early stages, before the methanogenic phase takes place. The genera found fit well into the classical pathways of anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:25652654

  11. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  12. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former hospital landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, Fred W.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former hospital landfill located in a 75-acre study area near the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, from April to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone of a creek adjacent to the landfill and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Results from the hyporheic-zone assessment in the unnamed tributary adjacent to the study area indicated that total petroleum hydrocarbons and octane were the most frequently detected organic compounds in groundwater beneath the creek bed. The highest concentrations for these compounds were detected in the upstream samplers of the hyporheic-zone study area. The effort to delineate landfill activity in the study area focused on the western 14 acres of the 75-acre study area where the hyporheic-zone study identified the highest concentrations of organic compounds. This also is the part of the study area where a debris field also was identified in the southern part of the 14 acres. The southern part of this 14-acre study area, including the debris field, is steeper and not as heavily wooded, compared to the central and northern parts. Fifty-two soil-gas samplers were used for the July 2010 soil-gas survey in the 14-acre study area and mostly detected total petroleum hydrocarbons, and gasoline and diesel compounds. The highest soil-gas masses for total petroleum hydrocarbons, diesel compounds, and the only valid detection of perchloroethene were in the southern part of the study area to the west of the debris field. However, all other detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons greater than 10 micrograms and diesel greater than 0.04 micrograms, and all detections of the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were found down slope from the debris field in the central and northern parts of the study area. Five soil-gas samplers were deployed and recovered from September 16 to 22, 2010, and were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents or explosives. Chloroacetophenones (a tear gas component) were the only compounds detected above a method detection level and were detected at the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbons and diesel detections in the southern part of the 14-acre study area. Composite soil samples collected at five locations were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents. None of the inorganic constituents exceeded the regional screening levels. One surface-water sample collected in the western end of the hyporheic-zone study area had a trichlorofluoromethane concentration above the laboratory reporting level and estimated concentrations of chloroform, fluoranthene, and isophorone below laboratory reporting levels.

  13. Characterization of trichloroethylene adsorption onto waste biocover soil in the presence of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Su, Yao; Kong, Jiaoyan

    2015-09-15

    Waste biocover soils (WBS) have been demonstrated to have great potential in mitigating trichloroethylene (TCE) emission from landfills, due to the relatively high TCE-degrading capacity. In this study, the characteristics of TCE adsorption on WBS in the presence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were investigated in soil microcosms. The adsorption isotherm of TCE onto WBS was fitted well with linear model within the TCE concentrations of 7000ppmv. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto WBS was affected by temperature, soil moisture content and particle size, of which, temperature was the dominant factor. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto the experimental materials increased with the increasing organic matter content. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the adsorption capacity of TCE and the organic matter content of experimental materials that had relatively higher organic content (r=0.988, P=0.044). To better understand WBS application in practice, response surface methodology was developed to predict TCE adsorption capacity and emissions through WBS in different landfills in China. These results indicated that WBS had high adsorption capacity of TCE in LFG and temperature should be paid more attention to manipulate WBS to reduce TCE emissions from landfills. PMID:25909498

  14. Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ho-Myung Chang; Myung Jin Chung; Seong Bum Park

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the

  15. Comparison between landfill gas and waste incineration for power generation in Astana, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Rojas-Solórzano, Luis; Kim, Jong; Aitbekova, Aisulu; Ismailova, Aizada

    2015-05-01

    The city of Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan, which has a population of 804,474, and has been experiencing rapid growth over the last 15 years, generates approximately 1.39 kg capita(-1) day(-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW). Nearly 700 tonnes of MSW are collected daily, of which 97% is disposed of at landfills. The newest landfill was built using modern technologies, including a landfill gas (LFG) collection system.The rapid growth of Astana demands more energy on its path to development, and the viability analysis of MSW to generate electricity is imperative. This paper presents a technical-economic pre-feasibility study comparing landfill including LFG utilization and waste incineration (WI) to produce electricity. The performance of LFG with a reciprocating engine and WI with steam turbine power technologies were compared through corresponding greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction, cost of energy production (CEP), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) from the analyses. Results demonstrate that in the city of Astana, WI has the potential to reduce more than 200,000 tonnes of GHG per year, while LFG could reduce slightly less than 40,000 tonnes. LFG offers a CEP 5.7% larger than WI, while the latter presents a BCR two times higher than LFG. WI technology analysis depicts a NPV exceeding 280% of the equity, while for LFG, the NPV is less than the equity, which indicates an expected remarkable financial return for the WI technology and a marginal and risky scenario for the LFG technology. Only existing landfill facilities with a LFG collection system in place may turn LFG into a viable project. PMID:25819927

  16. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests.

    PubMed

    Gómez, K E; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Lazzaro, A; Schroth, M H

    2009-09-01

    Methane (CH(4)) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH(4) to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH(4) oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH(4), O(2) and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH(4) with either Ar or CH(4) itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH(4) oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8+/-0.8 h(-1) at location 1 and 18.9+/-0.6 h(-1) at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH(4) concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH(4) concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH(4) in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH(4) oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH(4) oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH(4) concentrations were low. PMID:19525106

  17. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: gomezke@hotmail.com; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Lazzaro, A. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schroth, M.H. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch

    2009-09-15

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH{sub 4} to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH{sub 4} with either Ar or CH{sub 4} itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH{sub 4} oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 {+-} 0.8 h{sup -1} at location 1 and 18.9 {+-} 0.6 h{sup -1} at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH{sub 4} concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH{sub 4} concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH{sub 4} in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH{sub 4} oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH{sub 4} concentrations were low.

  18. Estimation of water movement in a closed landfill based on tracer tests in gas vents and changes in leachate quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Endo, D; Sato, M; Matsuo, T; Matsuto, T

    2009-08-01

    Leachate accumulated at the Nakazono Landfill in Asahikawa, Japan due to an inadequate leachate collection and drainage system. To reduce the level of leachate in the landfill and promote the stabilization of waste, many passive gas vents were installed in addition to leachate collection vaults. This study evaluated the distribution and movement of leachate in the landfill by measuring leachate levels and conducting tracer tests in the gas vents. Water levels varied widely among gas vents and depended mainly on the vent's original ground level and depth. Leachate velocity varied greatly; it was high in the upper layers of the saturated zone in a gas vent, but this was only a superficial velocity caused by inflow from unsaturated layers. A sharp decrease in total organic carbon observed in most gas vents after installation was likely due to the effect of aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated waste layer. This effect was limited to a small aerobic zone around the gas vent. PMID:19356917

  19. Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: investigation of effects of air inclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    A combustible gas mixture composed of methane and carbon dioxide is generated in municipal solid waste landfills. A practical consequence of the collection of this fuel gas is the inclusion of some air in the collected product. The effects of such included nitrogen and oxygen on landfill gas operations are discussed. The effects include increased collection and purification costs, reduction in the quality of the fuel gas produced, corrosion, explosion hazards, and interference with odorant systems. The scope of such effects was determined using data and experience from the Mountain View, California, landfill gas recovery site as a basis. Useful supplemental fuel gas may be recovered despite the inclusion of air. Recommendations are given for establishing limits for nitrogen and oxygen content and minimizing the costs associated with their presence.

  20. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-?) where ? is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values increased rather linearly with increasing soil air content (?) for both compacted and repacked samples using different size fractions and compaction levels in Japanese and Sri Lankan soils. This suggests that the gas diffusion was controlled primarily by the air-filled pore space and was less affected by the pore structure variations such as tortuosity and connectivity. On the other hand, measured ka values showed nonlinear relations with ? and were highly affected by compaction levels and water blockage effects. For the compacted soils at high energy level, peak values in ka appeared at drier conditions than optimum water contents in the compaction curves. This would be partially caused by the pore structure changes at different water conditions under compaction. Combined effects of soil compaction and water reduction will be further discussed taking pore structure characteristics derived from measured Dp and ka into account.

  1. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  2. Determination of siloxanes and VOC in landfill gas and sewage gas by canister sampling and GC-MS/AES analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigkofler, M.; Niessner, R.

    1999-10-15

    Biogases such as landfill gas and sewage gas undergo a combustion process which is generating electric energy. Since several trace compounds such as siloxanes (also halogenated and sulfur compounds) are known to cause severe problems to these gas combustion engines, they are of particular interest. In this work, a new technique for sampling, identification, and quantification of siloxanes and volatile organic carbon (VOC) in landfill gas and sewage gas is presented. After sample collection using evacuated stainless steel canisters biogas was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy (GC-MS/AES). Using gas canisters, the sampling process was simplified (no vacuum pump needed), and multiple analysis was possible. The simultaneous application of MSD and AED allowed a rapid screening of silicon compounds in the complex biogases. Individual substances were identified independently both by MSD analysis and by determination of their elemental constitution. Quantification of trace compounds was achieved using a 30 component external standard containing siloxanes, organochlorine and organosulfur compounds, alkanes, terpenes, and aromatic compounds. Precision, linearity, and detection limits have been studied. In real samples, concentrations of silicon containing compounds (trimethylsilanol, hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethyltetrasiloxane, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane, octamethylcyclotetrasilioxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane) in the mg/m{sub 3} range have been observed.

  3. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Namhoon, E-mail: nhlee@anyang.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  4. 65 FR 66672 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-11-07

    ...demonstrated for landfill gas or landfill gas combustion technologies. Therefore, the MACT...million by volume (ppmv) if an enclosed combustion device is used. These reduction efficiencies...for landfill gas or for landfill gas combustion technologies. For this reason,...

  5. Fatal flaws in measuring landfill gas generation rates by empirical well testing.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gary R

    2003-04-01

    Well testing procedures, such as the Tier 3 methodology specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Subtitle D, are commonly used for directly estimating landfill gas (LFG) emissions at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Similar procedures are also used to estimate LFG generation rates for the design of LFG-to-energy projects. These methodologies assume that the LFG generation rate equals the extraction rate of a test gas well within its radius of influence (ROI). The ROI is defined as the distance from the extraction well at which the induced pressure drop is immeasurable by some standard of precision. Based on fluid dynamic principles, Tier 3 and similar methodologies are demonstrated to be incapable of providing reliable estimates of the LFG generation rate. These tests may either over- or underestimate the LFG generation rate depending on the precision with which the ROI is determined, but they will only coincidentally produce an estimate that accurately represents the actual LFG generation rate. Fluid dynamic principles dictate that the actual LFG generation rate can only be estimated if the pneumatic properties of the refuse and cover materials as well as the excess pressure in the refuse caused by LFG generation are known or can be estimated. PMID:12708510

  6. Assessment of soil-gas and groundwater contamination at the Gibson Road landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Soil-gas and groundwater assessments were conducted at the Gibson Road landfill in 201 to provide screening-level environmental contamination data to supplement the data collected during previous environmental studies at the landfill. Passive samplers were used in both assessments to detect volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil gas and groundwater. A total of 56 passive samplers were deployed in the soil in late July and early August for the soil-gas assessment. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at masses greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram in all samplers and masses greater than 2.0 micrograms in 13 samplers. Three samplers located between the landfill and a nearby wetland had TPH masses greater than 20 micrograms. Diesel was detected in 28 of the 56 soil-gas samplers. Undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane were detected, but undecane was the most common diesel compound with 23 detections. Only five detections exceeded a combined diesel mass of 0.10 microgram, including the highest mass of 0.27 microgram near the wetland. Toluene was detected in only five passive samplers, including masses of 0.65 microgram near the wetland and 0.85 microgram on the southwestern side of the landfill. The only other gasoline-related compound detected was octane in two samplers. Naphthalene was detected in two samplers in the gully near the landfill and two samplers along the southwestern side of the landfill, but had masses less than or equal to 0.02 microgram. Six samplers located southeast of the landfill had detections of chlorinated compounds, including one perchloroethene detections (0.04 microgram) and five chloroform detections (0.05 to0.08 microgram). Passive samplers were deployed and recovered on August 8, 2011, in nine monitoring wells along the southwestern, southeastern and northeastern sides of the landfill and down gradient from the eastern corner of the landfill. Six of the nine samplers had TPH concentrations greater than 100 micrograms per liter. TPH concentrations declined from 320 micrograms per liter in a sampler near the landfill to 18 micrograms in a sampler near the wetland. Five of the samplers had detections of one or more diesel compounds but detections of individual diesel compounds had concentrations below a method detection level of 0.01 microgram per liter. Benzene was detected in three samplers and exceeded the national primary drinking-water standard of 5 micrograms per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The concentrations of benzene, and therefore BTEX, were 6.1 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the eastern corner of the landfill, 27 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the wetland, and 37 micrograms per liter in the sampler at the southern corner of the landfill. Nonfuel-related compounds were detected in the four wells that are aligned between the eastern corner of the landfill and the wetland. The sampler deployed nearest the eastern corner of the landfill had the greatest number of detected organic compounds and had the only detections of two trimethylbenzene compounds, naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. The two up gradient samplers had the greatest number of chlorinated compounds with five compounds each, compared to detections of four compounds and one compound in the two down gradient samplers. All four samplers had detections of 1,1-dichloroethane which ranged from 42 to 1,300 micrograms per liter. Other detections of chlorinated compounds included trichloroethene, perchloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

  7. Assessment of soil-gas contamination at the 17th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Assessments of contaminants in soil gas were conducted in two study areas at Fort Gordon, Georgia, in July and August of 2011 to supplement environmental contaminant data for previous studies at the 17th Street landfill. The two study areas include northern and eastern parts of the 17th Street landfill and the adjacent wooded areas to the north and east of the landfill. These study areas were chosen because of their close proximity to the surface water in Wilkerson Lake and McCoys Creek. A total of 48 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the July 28 to August 3, 2011, assessment in the eastern study area. The assessment mostly identified detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gasoline- and diesel-range compounds, but also identified the presence of chlorinated solvents in six samplers, chloroform in three samplers, 2-methyl naphthalene in one sampler, and trimethylbenzene in one sampler. The TPH masses exceeded 0.02 microgram (?g) in all 48 samplers and exceeded 0.9 ?g in 24 samplers. Undecane, one of the three diesel-range compounds used to calculate the combined mass for diesel-range compounds, was detected in 17 samplers and is the second most commonly detected compound in the eastern study area, exceeded only by the number of TPH detections. Six samplers had detections of toluene, but other gasoline compounds were detected with toluene in three of the samplers, including detections of ethylbenzene, meta- and para-xylene, and octane. All detections of chlorinated organic compounds had soil-gas masses equal to or less than 0.08 ?g, including three detections of trichloroethene, three detections of perchloroethene, three chloroform detections, one 1,4-dichlorobenzene detection, and one 1,1,2-trichloroethane detection. Three methylated compounds were detected in the eastern study area, but were detected at or below method detection levels. A total of 32 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the August 11–24, 2011, assessment in the northern study area. All samplers in the survey had detections of TPH, but only eight of the samplers had detections of TPH greater than 0.9 mg. Four samplers had TPH detections greater than 9 mg; the only other fuel-related compounds detected in these four samplers included toluene in three of the samplers and undecane in the fourth sampler. Three samplers deployed along the western margin of the northern landfill had detections of both diesel-and gasoline-related compounds; however, the diesel-related compounds were detected at or below method detection levels. Seven samplers in the northern study area had detections of chlorinated compounds, including three perchloroethene detections, three chloroform detections, and one 1,4-dichloro-benzene detection. One sampler on the western margin of the landfill had detections of 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-tr-methylbenene below method detection levels.

  8. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  9. Methylated mercury species in municipal waste landfill gas sampled in Florida, USA1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Lindberga; D. Wallschl; E. M. Prestbob; D. Reinhartd; Frontier Geosciences

    Mercury-bearing material has been placed in municipal landfills from a wide array of sources including fluorescent lights, batteries, electrical switches, thermometers, and general waste. Despite its known volatility, persistence, and toxicity in the environment, the fate of mercury in landfills has not been widely studied. The nature of landfills designed to reduce waste through generation of methane by anaerobic bacteria

  10. Hydrogen enrichment effects on the second law analysis of natural and landfill gas combustion in engine cylinders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. D. Rakopoulos; D. C. Kyritsis

    2006-01-01

    The availability (exergy) balance during combustion of hydrogen-enriched natural and landfill gas, which are used as fuels in combustion engine cylinders, is studied computationally using a zero-dimensional model of the closed part of the cycle. The main focus is on the demonstration of a fundamental difference in the generation of irreversibility during combustion between hydrogen and hydrocarbons. This difference relates

  11. Hydraulic permeability of bentonite-polymer composites for application in landfill technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, Hanna; Haase, Hanna; Schanz, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Bentonites are often used as barrier materials in landfill technology to prevent infiltration of leachates to the natural environment. Since decades, geoenvironmental engineering aims at improving the hydro-mechanical performance of landfill liners. Various studies on the permeability performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) show effects of non-standard liquids on behaviour of Na+-bentonite regarding its sealing capacity. With increasing concentration of chemical aggressive solutions the sealing capacity decreases (Shackelford et al. 2000). An opportunity to improve the hydraulic permeability of the bentonites is the addition of polymers. The changes in hydraulic permeability performance of polymer treated and untreated bentonites while adding chemical aggressive solutions were studied by several authors. Results obtained by Scalia et al. (2014) illustrate that an increase in permeability can be prevented by adding polymer to Na+-bentonite. On the other hand, Ashmawy et al. (2002) presented results on the incapability of several commercial bentonite-polymer-products. The objective of this study is to characterize the influence of polymer addition on hydraulic performance of Na+-bentonite systematically. Therefore, the influence of 1% polymer addition of cationic and anionic polyacrylamide on the swelling pressure and hydraulic permeability of MX 80 bentonite was investigated. Preparation of bentonite-polymer composites was conducted (1) in dry conditions and (2) using solution-intercalation method. Experiments on hydraulic permeability were carried out using distilled water as well as CaCl2-solution. References Ashmawy, A. K., El-Hajji, D., Sotelo, N. & Muhammad, N. (2002), `Hydraulic Performance of Untreated and Polymer-treated Bentonite in Inorganic Landfill Leachates', Clays and Clay Minerals 50(5), 546-552. Scalia, J., Benson, C., Bohnhoff, G., Edil, T. & Shackelford, C. (2014), 'Long-Term Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bentonite-Polymer Composite Permeated with Aggressive Inorganic Solutions', Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering 140(3). Shackelford, C. D., Benson, C. H., Katsumi, T., Edil, T. B. & Lin, L. (2000), 'Evaluating the hydraulic conductivity of GCLs permeated with non-standard liquids', Geotextiles and Geomembranes 18, 133-161.

  12. Acceleration of landfill stabilization using leachate recycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. G. Townsend; W. L. Miller; Hyung-Jib Lee; J. F. K. Earle

    1996-01-01

    A leachate recycle system was constructed and operated at an existing lined landfill in North-Central Florida to observe the effects of leachate recycle on landfill stabilization. Samples of leachate, landfill gas, and landfilled solid waste were collected and analyzed throughout a four-year period, before and after the start of leachate recycle. The settlement of landfilled waste was also measured in

  13. Fluorescence excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for characterizing composition and transformation of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao-Song He; Bei-Dou Xi; Zi-Min Wei; Yong-Hai Jiang; Yu Yang; Da An; Jin-Ling Cao; Hong-Liang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from landfill leachates was separated into hydrophobic base, hydrophilic matter (HIM), hydrophobic acid (HOA), and hydrophobic neutral fractions. The composition and transformation of the DOM and its fractions were investigated. The results show that the DOM isolated from young, intermediate, and old landfill leachates were mainly composed of tyrosine-, tryptophan-, and humic- and fulvic-like substances,

  14. Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former 19th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former 19th Street landfill at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from February to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of a creek and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. The passive soil-gas samplers deployed in the water-saturated hyporheic zone and flood plain of the creek adjacent to the former landfill indicated the presence of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and octane above method detection levels in groundwater beneath the creek bed and flood plain at all 12 soil-gas sampler locations. The TPH concentrations ranged from 51.4 to 81.4 micrograms per liter. Octane concentrations ranged from 1.78 to 2.63 micrograms per liter. These detections do not clearly identify specific source areas in the former landfill; moreover, detections of TPH and octane in a soil-gas sampler installed at a seep on the western bank of the creek indicated the potential for these constituents to be derived from source areas outside the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. A passive soil-gas sampler survey was conducted in the former landfill from June 30 to July 5, 2010, and involved 56 soil-gas samplers that were analyzed for petroleum and halogenated compounds not classified as chemical agents or explosives. The TPH soil-gas mass exceeded 2.0 micrograms in 21 samplers. Most noticeable are the two sites with TPH detections which are located in and near the hyporheic zone and are likely to affect the creek. However, most TPH detections were located in and immediately adjacent to a debris field located within the former landfill and in areas where debris was not visible, including the northwestern and southeastern parts of the study area. Two of the four soil-gas samplers installed within a former military training area adjacent to the landfill also had TPH detections above the method detection level. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (as combined BTEX mass) were detected at 0.02 microgram or greater in three soil-gas samplers installed at the northwestern boundary and in five samplers installed in the southeastern part of the study area. There was no BTEX mass detected above the method detection level in samplers installed in the debris field. Toluene was the most frequently detected BTEX compound. Compounds indicative of diesel-range organics were detected above 0.04 microgram in 12 soil-gas samplers and had a distribution similar to that of TPH, including being detected in the debris field. Undecane was the most frequently detected diesel compound. Chloroform and naphthalene were detected in eight and two soil-gas samplers, respectively. Five soil-gas samplers deployed during September 2010 were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents and explosives, but none exceeded the method detection levels. Five composite soil samples collected from within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents, but none of the constituents detected exceeded regional screening levels for industrial soils. The sample collected in the debris field exceeded background levels for aluminum, barium, calcium, chromium, lead, nickel, potassium, sodium, and zinc. Three surface-water samples were collected in September 2010 from a stormwater outfall culvert that drains to the creek and from the open channel of the creek at upstream and downstream locations relative to the outfall. Toluene was detected at 0.661 mi

  15. Removal characteristics of trace compounds of landfill gas by activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Park, Jin-Won; Park, Kwinam; Song, Ho-Cheol

    2002-01-01

    The removal characteristics of trace compounds and moisture in raw landfill gas (LFG) were studied. The LFG from the extraction well was saturated with water and moisture was eliminated by physical methods including cyclone-type dehydrator and compressor. The moisture removal efficiency of dehydrator and compressor was above 80%. As the moisture contents of LFG decreased, the toxic compounds like aromatics and chlorinated compounds were effectively removed by using the granular activated carbon. The breakthrough time and adsorption capacity of benzene, toluene, and ethyl benzene decreased rapidly when the relative humidity is over 60%. The effect of moisture was more pronounced at lower adsorbate concentrations tested than at higher concentrations. The breakthrough curves for multi-component mixtures show displacement effects. In the course of competing adsorption, adsorbates with strong interaction force to displace weakly bounded substances. Adsorption by activated carbon is in descending order of xylene, ethylbenzene, toluene, tri or tetrachloroethylene, benzene, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform in LFG, respectively. PMID:12152829

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions from two-stage landfilling of municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-08-01

    Simulations were conducted to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic pretreatment and subsequent landfilling. The flows in carbon balance, such as gas, leachate, and solid phases, were considered in the simulations. The total amount of CO2 eq. decreased as organic removal efficiency (ORE) increased. At ORE values of 0, 0.30, 0.41, and 0.54, the total amounts of CO2 eq. were 2614, 2326, 2075, and 1572 kg CO2 eq. per one ton dry matter, respectively; gas accounted for the main contribution to the total amount. The reduction in CO2 eq. from leachate was the primary positive contribution, accounting for 356%, 174%, and 100% of total reduction at ORE values of 0.30, 0.41, and 0.54, respectively. The CO2 eq. from energy consumption was the negative contribution to total reduction, but this contribution is considerably lower than that from gas. Aerobic pretreatment shortened the lag time of biogas production by 74.1-97.0%, and facilitated the transfer of organic carbon in solid waste from uncontrolled biogas and highly polluting leachate to aerobically generated CO2.

  17. Environmental assessment of gas management options at the Old Ammässuo landfill (Finland) by means of LCA-modeling (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Simone; Niskanen, Antti; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    The current landfill gas (LFG) management (based on flaring and utilization for heat generation of the collected gas) and three potential future gas management options (LFG flaring, heat generation and combined heat and power generation) for the Old Ammässuo landfill (Espoo, Finland) were evaluated by life-cycle assessment modeling. The evaluation accounts for all resource utilization and emissions to the environment related to the gas generation and management for a life-cycle time horizon of 100 yr. The assessment criteria comprise standard impact categories (global warming, photo-chemical ozone formation, stratospheric ozone depletion, acidification and nutrient enrichment) and toxicity-related impact categories (human toxicity via soil, via water and via air, eco-toxicity in soil and in water chronic). The results of the life-cycle impact assessment show that disperse emissions of LFG from the landfill surface determine the highest potential impacts in terms of global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and human toxicity via soil. Conversely, the impact potentials estimated for other categories are numerically-negative when the collected LFG is utilized for energy generation, demonstrating that net environmental savings can be obtained. Such savings are proportional to the amount of gas utilized for energy generation and the gas energy recovery efficiency achieved, which thus have to be regarded as key parameters. As a result, the overall best performance is found for the heat generation option - as it has the highest LFG utilization/energy recovery rates - whereas the worst performance is estimated for the LFG flaring option, as no LFG is here utilized for energy generation. Therefore, to reduce the environmental burdens caused by the current gas management strategy, more LFG should be used for energy generation. This inherently requires a superior LFG capture rate that, in addition, would reduce fugitive emissions of LFG from the landfill surface, bringing further environmental benefits. PMID:19081238

  18. Seasonal alterations of landfill leachate composition and toxic potency in semi-arid regions.

    PubMed

    Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Kamilari, Maria; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2012-09-30

    The present study investigates seasonal variations of leachate composition and its toxic potency on different species, such as the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana (formerly Artemia salina), the fairy shrimp Thamnocephalus platyurus, the estuarine rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and the microalgal flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta. In specific, leachate regularly collected from the municipal landfill site of Aigeira (Peloponissos, Greece) during the year 2011, showed significant alterations of almost all its physicochemical parameters with time. Further analysis showed that seasonal alterations of leachate composition are related with the amount of rainfall obtained throughout the year. In fact, rainfall-related parameters, such as conductivity (Cond), nitrates (NO(3)(-)), total nitrogen (TN), ammonium (NH(4)-N), total dissolved solids (TDS) and the BOD(5)/NH(4)-N ratio could merely reflect the leachate strength and toxicity, as verified by the significant correlations occurred among each of them with the toxic endpoints, 24 h LC(50) and/or 72 h IC(50), obtained in all species tested. According to the result of the present study, it could be suggested that the aforementioned leachate parameters could be used independently, or in combination as a low-cost effective tools for estimating leachate strength and toxic potency, at least in the case of semi-arid areas such as the most of the Mediterranean countries. PMID:22819480

  19. Comparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux

    E-print Network

    , Seoul, Republic of Korea ABSTRACT: Performance of four different municipal solid waste landfill liner to evaluate the performance of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner systems. A liner system that allows system is estimated and compared with the flux from the other liner systems to evaluate the relative

  20. Present and Long-Term Composition of MSW Landfill Leachate: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Kjeldsen; Morton A. Barlaz; Alix P. Rooker; Anders Baun; Anna Ledin; Thomas H. Christensen

    2002-01-01

    The major potential environmental impacts related to landfill leachate are pollution of groundwater and surface waters. Landfill leachate contains pollutants that can be categorized into four groups (dissolved organic matter, inorganic macrocomponents, heavy metals, and xenobiotic organic compounds). Existing data show high leachate concentrations of all components in the early acid phase due to strong decomposition and leaching. In the

  1. Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

    2000-10-20

    This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

  2. Geophysical-geochemical investigation of fire-prone landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Frid; Dmitri Doudkinski; Gady Liskevich; Efim Shafran; Arie Averbakh; Nikolay Korostishevsky; Larisa Prihodko

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the integration of electrical resistivity tomography and geochemical methods for studying four different\\u000a fire-prone landfills. Landfill gas composition (CH4, H2S, O2, CO, CO2) and subsurface temperature were measured with the constant net 50 × 50 m from the depth 10–60 cm. 28 electrical resistivity\\u000a tomography lines were surveyed, while Wenner and Sclumberger electrode arrays were employed for all measurements. At

  3. Geobacteraceae Community Composition Is Related to Hydrochemistry and Biodegradation in an Iron-Reducing Aquifer Polluted by a Neighboring Landfill

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Braster, Martin; van Breukelen, Boris M.; van Verseveld, Henk W.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between community composition of the iron-reducing Geobacteraceae, pollution levels, and the occurrence of biodegradation were established for an iron-reducing aquifer polluted with landfill leachate by using cultivation-independent Geobacteraceae 16S rRNA gene-targeting techniques. Numerical analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles and sequencing revealed a high Geobacteraceae diversity and showed that community composition within the leachate plume differed considerably from that of the unpolluted aquifer. This suggests that pollution has selected for specific species out of a large pool of Geobacteraceae. DGGE profiles of polluted groundwater taken near the landfill (6- to 39-m distance) clustered together. DGGE profiles from less-polluted groundwater taken further downstream did not fall in the same cluster. Several individual DGGE bands were indicative of either the redox process or the level of pollution. This included a pollution-indicative band that dominated the DGGE profiles from groundwater samples taken close to the landfill (6 to 39 m distance). The clustering of these profiles and the dominance by a single DGGE band corresponded to the part of the aquifer where organic micropollutants and reactive dissolved organic matter were attenuated at relatively high rates. PMID:16204512

  4. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  5. Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Gokhale, Bhushan

    2007-04-25

    the end of this process and result in the development of methanogens. 14 Phase 4: Methane Generation Phase In this phase the methanogens convert the acetic acid and H2 gas into CH4 and CO2. Since the acids are converted into CH4 and CO2, the p...

  6. Leaky Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda L. Cronin

    1992-01-01

    Provides background information on landfills and describes an activity where students learn how a modern landfill is constructed and develop an understanding of the reasons for several regulations regarding modern landfill construction. Students design and construct working models of three types of landfills. (PR)

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Ripon City Landfill, Fond du Lac County, Ripon, WI, March 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Ripon FF/LN landfill Superfund site is located at the intersection of Highways FF and NN in the Town of Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. The selected source control remedy is Alternative O, Composite Landfill Cap and Passive Gas Venting in conjunction with a groundwater monitoring plan.

  8. Thermodynamic stability, spectroscopic identification, and gas storage capacity of CO2-CH4-N2 mixture gas hydrates: implications for landfill gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Hoon; Ahn, Sook-Hyun; Nam, Byong-Uk; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Gang-Woo; Moon, Donghyun; Shin, Hyung Joon; Han, Kyu Won; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Landfill gas (LFG), which is primarily composed of CH(4), CO(2), and N(2), is produced from the anaerobic digestion of organic materials. To investigate the feasibility of the storage and transportation of LFG via the formation of hydrate, we observed the phase equilibrium behavior of CO(2)-CH(4)-N(2) mixture hydrates. When the specific molar ratio of CO(2)/CH(4) was 40/55, the equilibrium dissociation pressures were gradually shifted to higher pressures and lower temperatures as the mole fraction of N(2) increased. X-ray diffraction revealed that the CO(2)-CH(4)-N(2) mixture hydrate prepared from the CO(2)/CH(4)/N(2) (40/55/5) gas mixture formed a structure I clathrate hydrate. A combination of Raman and solid-state (13)C NMR measurements provided detailed information regarding the cage occupancy of gas molecules trapped in the hydrate frameworks. The gas storage capacity of LFG hydrates was estimated from the experimental results for the hydrate formations under two-phase equilibrium conditions. We also confirmed that trace amounts of nonmethane organic compounds do not affect the cage occupancy of gas molecules or the thermodynamic stability of LFG hydrates. PMID:22380606

  9. Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process--upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Mostbauer, P; Lombardi, L; Olivieri, T; Lenz, S

    2014-01-01

    Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 65-90 kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 500-1000 kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2 Nm(3)/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7 Nm(3)/(htBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.5-99%. PMID:24120459

  10. USING LANDFILL GAS IN FUEL CELLS - A STEP CLOSER TO COMMERICAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses Phase II and Phase III results of a U.S. EPA program underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation. The program involves controlling methane emissions from landfills using a fuel cell. The fuel cell would reduce air emissions affecting global warming, aci...

  11. Performance and bacterial compositions of aged refuse reactors treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Xiong, Shunzi; Liang, Shaobo; Hu, Chong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Aged landfill leachates become more refractory over time and difficulty to treat. Recently, aged refuse bioreactors show great promise in treating leachates. In this study, aged refuse bioreactors were constructed to simulate landfill leachate degradation process. The characteristics of leachate were: CODcr, ?2200 mg/L; BOD5, ?280 mg/L; total nitrogen, ?2030 mg/L; and ammonia, ?1900 mg/L. Results showed that bioreactor could remove leachate pollutants effectively at hydraulic loading of 20 L/m3 d. The removal rate reduced when hydraulic loading doubled or temperature lowered. Effluent recirculation could alleviate the temperature effect. Combining aged refuse and slag biofilters could treat leachate more efficiently. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that bacteria from Pseudomonas, Lysobacter, Bacillus and ?-proteobacter, Flexibacteraceae were more abundant in the samples. The Shannon index decreased at lower temperature, while evenness and equitability increased with recirculation. We suggest that filter medium and temperature may be the main factors for shaping bacterial community structure. PMID:22023964

  12. Wastewater disposal to landfill-sites: a synergistic solution for centralized management of olive mill wastewater and enhanced production of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Vasileios; Erguder, Tuba H; Aivasidis, Alexandros; Verstraete, Willy; Voudrias, Evangelos

    2013-10-15

    The present paper focuses on a largely unexplored field of landfill-site valorization in combination with the construction and operation of a centralized olive mill wastewater (OMW) treatment facility. The latter consists of a wastewater storage lagoon, a compact anaerobic digester operated all year round and a landfill-based final disposal system. Key elements for process design, such as wastewater pre-treatment, application method and rate, and the potential effects on leachate quantity and quality, are discussed based on a comprehensive literature review. Furthermore, a case-study for eight (8) olive mill enterprises generating 8700 m(3) of wastewater per year, was conceptually designed in order to calculate the capital and operational costs of the facility (transportation, storage, treatment, final disposal). The proposed facility was found to be economically self-sufficient, as long as the transportation costs of the OMW were maintained at ?4.0 €/m(3). Despite that EU Landfill Directive prohibits wastewater disposal to landfills, controlled application, based on appropriately designed pre-treatment system and specific loading rates, may provide improved landfill stabilization and a sustainable (environmentally and economically) solution for effluents generated by numerous small- and medium-size olive mill enterprises dispersed in the Mediterranean region. PMID:23792820

  13. Impact of gas composition on natural gas storage by adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José P. B. Mota

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption storage is the most promising low-pressure alternative for storing natural gas, but some operational difficulties hinder the success of this technology. From a modeling perspective, this article addresses the impact of gas composition on the cyclic behavior of adsorptive natural gas storage systems. The cyclic operation of an onboard storage reservoir is modeled as a series of consecutive two-step

  14. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  15. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  16. Mobile robots for localizing gas emission sources on landfill sites: is bio-inspiration the way to go?

    PubMed

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Neumann, Patrick P; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully "translated" into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms. PMID:22319493

  17. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  18. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

  19. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  20. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    PubMed

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  1. Barometric pressure and gas composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkin, V. B.

    1975-01-01

    Many factors affecting artificial gas atmosphere, which is used to maintain life during space flight, are considered. The wide variability of barometric pressure in spacecraft, due in large measure to spacecraft design is discussed. Explosive decompression is described; this develops from instantaneous depressurization of the cabin. Decompression sickness is reviewed, including bubble growth and evolution of gas bubbles in organisms. Dysbarism, hypoxia, and hypercapnia are also discussed.

  2. Acceleration of landfill stabilization using leachate recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, T.G.; Miller, W.L.; Lee, H.J.; Earle, J.F.K. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A leachate recycle system was constructed and operated at an existing lined landfill in North-Central Florida to observe the effects of leachate recycle on landfill stabilization. Samples of leachate, landfill gas, and landfilled solid waste were collected and analyzed throughout a four-year period, before and after the start of leachate recycle. The settlement of landfilled waste was also measured in wetted and dry areas of the landfill. Leachate quality was not dramatically impacted by leachate recycle. Moisture content was significantly greater in the area of the landfill subjected to leachate recycle. Waste temperature and pH measurements indicated that conditions suitable for anaerobic decomposition were present in both the treated and untreated areas. Measurements of solid waste biochemical methane potential and subsidence showed that a greater degree of landfill stabilization had occurred in the leachate recycle area relative to the untreated area.

  3. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

  4. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.wimmer@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20‰ to ?25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation–reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

  5. Trends in landfill leachate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Akyurek, M. [Rust Environment and Infrastructure, Sheboygan, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Leachate may be defined as the water or other liquid that has been contaminated by dissolved or suspended materials due to contact with solid waste or gases within the landfill. Research shows that leachate composition is a function of various factors such as rainfall, refuse permeability, refuse depth, and landfill age. Of these factors, landfill age has been found to have the greatest effect on leachate composition. Generally, leachate from new landfills will be higher in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and will show a steady decline leveling off at about 10 years. Traditionally, leachate treatment methods have been based on the leachate`s metals, COD, and ammonia concentrations. A different approach based on mass of contaminant released from the landfill may be more appropriate. This paper presents data from a landfill (Landfill A) showing mass of contaminant release over a period of time. This paper also presents a different design approach based on leachate mass contaminant release in lieu of a design approach based on leachate concentrations.

  6. Engineered Municipal Waste Landfills: Climate Significance, Benefits, and some Landfill "Geophysics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenstein, D.; Yazdani, R.

    2002-12-01

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills have unique features: Wastes worldwide emit biogenic methane to the atmosphere of magnitude comparable to the total atmospheric buildup between 1980 and 1990. Carbon sequestered in landfills is large in geologic terms Management of decomposition in landfilled waste is desirable: (a) Control of waste decomposition and methane promises over tenfold cheaper greenhouse gas abatement compared to most other greenhouse gas abatement strategies. This is due in part to carbon sequestration and landfill gas energy offset of fossil fuel consumption (b) Landfill gas energy potential worldwide, is up to 1% of world energy. Use of landfill gas conserves a resource otherwise wasted (c) Monetary benefits of landfill life extension from decomposition and rapid volume reduction can be quite attractive This is a benefit for the US, where landfills are increasingly difficult and expensive to site. (d) Landfills containing mixed waste can be significant sources of atmospheric and groundwater pollutants needing control. Control is possible from advancing landfill management approaches (e) The stabilization of waste lessens pollutant risk and needs for costly long-term landfill aftercare. Greater control of landfill decomposition has been advocated in the form of "controlled" or "bioreactor" landfills. (SWANA, 1999; Reinhart and Townsend, 1996). Field trials are encouraging by several environmental/monetary criteria. Control of moisture and temperature have given fivefold or more acceleration of methane generation (Augenstein et al, 1998, 2000). There has been rapid volume loss of the landfilled waste as well, with conversion of waste organics to gas. Many trials over years have shown potential for abatement of pollutants in landfill leachate. Demonstration work by the solid waste management community attests to the benefits potential. Increasing field demonstrations, have been accompanied by observation and/or solution of several issues. As noted the heat generation in landfills may become controlling, Heat can be dissipated, but at energy and monetary cost. Increased waste liquid content, required for biological activity has been a concern. Offsetting risk is the accelerated treatment of many dissolved contaminants in landfill liquid with time. It has proven possible to manage liquid flows within environmental and regulatory constraints. There have been concerns about containment by chemosynthetic lining of leachate liquids draining from landfills. Yet molecular bonds of lining under anaerobic conditions could be expected to last for centuries (and in fact up to millenia). There is of course no landfill experience over millenia but analogous compounds of geologic relevance have shown very desirable long term stability. Two other areas being investigated are waste slope stability and the precipitation of carbonate salts The climate significance and geophysical issues with landfills will be discussed, and some experimental findings leading to conclusions will be reviewed

  7. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 2. Field investigations.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to determine the gas composition, attenuation, and emission of fluorocarbons in a monofill shredder residue landfill cell by field investigation. Landfill gas generated within the shredder waste primarily consisted of CH(4) (27%) and N(2) (71%), without CO(2), indicating that the gas composition was governed by chemical reactions in combination with anaerobic microbial reactions. The gas generated also contained different fluorocarbons (up to 27 ?g L(-1)). The presence of HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 indicated that anaerobic degradation of CFC-11 occurred in the landfill cell, as neither of these compounds has been produced for industrial applications. This study demonstrates that a landfill cell containing shredder waste has a potential for attenuating CFC-11 released from polyurethane (PUR) insulation foam in the cell via aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. In deeper, anaerobic zones of the cell, reductive dechlorination of CFCs to HCFCs was evident, while in the shallow, oxic zones, there was a high potential for biooxidation of both methane and lesser chlorinated fluorocarbons. These findings correlated well with both laboratory results (presented in a companion paper) and surface emission measurements that, with the exception from a few hot spots, indicated that surface emissions were negative or below detection. PMID:20444588

  8. Impacts of landfill New Source Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, W.G.; McGuigan, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    On May 30, 1991, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a Rule to control landfill gas (LFG) emissions under the authority of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Since that time the Rule has been modified significantly, with an emphasis on regulating large US landfills. To date, landfill owners and operators have not been affected by this new CAA regulation. However, with the Rule promulgated in early 1996 and its subsequent implementation by the states to follow by the end of the year, landfill owners and operators need to understand these new requirements and their associated costs. To this end, the goal of this paper is to provide insight into the impacts of the Rule on individual landfill sites. By performing the emission analyses specified in the Rule on actual landfills, and comparing these sites to others, an understanding can be gained on the potential impacts of the NSPS Rule`s requirements on individual landfills.

  9. The development of sampling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical procedures to identify and determine the minor organic components of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Brookes, B I; Young, P J

    1983-09-01

    Modified drive-in piezometers provided quick and inexpensive probes to give access to the undiluted landfill gas below ground level. Samples collected on Tenax GC and Porapak Q adsorption tubes were thermally desorbed and injected into a gas Chromatograph through a cold trap. Aqueous condensate samples were injected directly by syringe. Chromosorb 101, Tenax GC and Triton X100/KOH packed columns, and an SE30 capillary column were used, together with full-scan and selective-ion mass spectrometry. Limits of detection, all less than 1 mg m (3), and calibration correlation coefficients were determined for the least tractable components, i.e., free acids, amines and alcohols. A detection limit of 0.1 mg m (3), based on anisole as internal standard, was estimated for all other compounds. The standard deviation for the whole procedure, with full-scan mass spectrometry, was +/-55% of the mean. A large part of this was due to an instrumental error, standard deviation = 33% of the mean, that was inherent in the manual operation of the mass-spectrum chart-recorder. These procedural errors were insignificant in comparison with the variations caused by the type of site and the age of the fill. PMID:18963441

  10. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for characterizing composition and transformation of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Wei, Zi-Min; Jiang, Yong-Hai; Yang, Yu; An, Da; Cao, Jin-Ling; Liu, Hong-Liang

    2011-06-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from landfill leachates was separated into hydrophobic base, hydrophilic matter (HIM), hydrophobic acid (HOA), and hydrophobic neutral fractions. The composition and transformation of the DOM and its fractions were investigated. The results show that the DOM isolated from young, intermediate, and old landfill leachates were mainly composed of tyrosine-, tryptophan-, and humic- and fulvic-like substances, respectively. The primary fractions of the DOM in leachates were HOA and HIM. The HOA and HIM fractions from young leachates predominantly contained tryptophan- and tyrosine-like materials, respectively. The HOA fractions in intermediate and old leachates were mainly composed of humic- and fulvic-like materials, whereas the HIM fractions were dominated by tryptophan-like materials and humic- and fulvic-like substances. The hydrophobic organic fractions and humic- and fulvic-like substances increased with time, whereas the HIM and the tyrosine-like materials decreased during the landfill process, rendering biological processing of leachates ineffective. PMID:21470772

  11. Quantifying Uncontrolled Air Emissions from Two Florida Landfills

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, trospospheric ozone, and urban smog. Measuring emissions from landfills presents unique challenges due to the large and variable source area, spatial and temporal variability of emissions, and...

  12. The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion.

    PubMed

    Assamoi, Bernadette; Lawryshyn, Yuri

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered. PMID:22099926

  13. Compositional effects on leaching of stain-guarded (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substance-treated) carpet in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Li, Loretta Y; Grace, John R; Benskin, Jonathan P; Ikonomou, Michael G

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from stain-guard treated carpets in landfills continue to be released into the environment. To understand the leaching of PFASs from carpets to landfill leachate as a function of environmental factors, leaching concentrations of ten perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids and four perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids were quantified for different pHs, contact times, mixing speeds, and temperatures. Partitioning from carpet to leachate and distilled water at different pHs showed negligible differences. The total concentration of leaching PFASs in distilled water was approximately 1 ng L(-1) higher than in landfill leachate, indicating that the presence of multivalent cations in leachate could have a negative effect on leaching of PFASs. For all PFASs monitored, leaching increased with increasing contact time and temperature. Perfluorohexanoic and perfluoroheptanoic acids experienced the largest increases with contact time and temperature. Gibbs free energy (?G > 0), enthalpy (?H > 0), and entropy energy (?S < 0) indicated that PFAS leaching from carpet was dominantly controlled by entropy-driven processes and did not differ significantly among individual PFASs. PFAS concentrations in leachate with rotation of an end-over-end contactor were higher than under static conditions, but otherwise, varying the rotation speed had negligible influence. The results provide useful information for management of discarded stain-guard carpets in landfills. PMID:25985932

  14. Emissions of C&D refuse in landfills: a European case.

    PubMed

    López, Ana; Lobo, Amaya

    2014-08-01

    A field study was developed in a new landfill for refuse from construction and demolition (C&D) material recovery plants of small size (4 Ha.) in Europe, with the aim of evaluating the liquid and gas emissions in this type of facility at a large scale. It included characterization of the materials, monitoring leachate and gas quantity and composition. Besides thermometers, piezometers and sampling ports were placed in several points within the waste. This paper presents the data obtained for five years of the landfill life. The materials disposed were mainly made up of wood and concrete, similar to other C&D debris sites, but the amount of gypsum drywall (below 3% of the waste) was significantly smaller than other available studies, where percentages above 20% had been reported. Leachate contained typical C&D pollutants, such as different inorganic ions and metals, some of which exceeded other values reported in the literature (conductivity, ammonium, lead and arsenic). The small net precipitation in the area and the leachate recirculation into the landfill surface help explain these higher concentrations, thus highlighting the impact of liquid to solid (L/S) ratio on leachate characteristics. In contrast to previous studies, neither odor nuisances nor significant landfill gas over the surface were detected. However, gas samples taken from the landfill inside revealed sulfate reducing and methanogenic activity. PMID:24824964

  15. Exhaust gas composition measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, installation, checkout, and operation of an exhaust gas composition measurement system for collecting and analyzing the exhaust gas from a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are described. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an exhaust gas composition measurement which meets the performance criteria specified.

  16. In situ denitrification in controlled landfill systems

    SciTech Connect

    Onay, T.T.; Pohland, F.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfill disposal sites vary according to the operational stage of the landfill. Leachates from old landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable refuse substrates. The relative concentration accumulating as stabilization progresses is also influenced by washout as leachate is collected and removed for external treatment. However, in landfills operated as bioreactors with leachate containment, collection and in situ recirculation to accelerate decomposition of readily available organic fractions of the refuse, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to much higher levels. High leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations in landfill leachate have been reported, resulting in separate treatment challenges if direct discharge to either land or receiving waters is practiced. External treatment options for landfill leachate may involve complex physical-chemical and/or biological processes for removal of both high-strength organic and inorganic fractions, including nitrogen. Such separate leachate treatment systems are often costly and difficult to control on a continuum. Therefore, this study focused on the investigation of landfill ammonia nitrogen generation patterns, and the potential for its in situ attenuation and conversion in landfills constructed to permit sequential nitrification and denitrification using leachate recirculation. Accordingly, the landfill is constructed and operated as a controlled bioreactor system, with opportunity to convert ammonia to nitrate by nitrification and nitrate to nitrogen gas by denitrification. The results presented in this paper focus on in situ landfill denitrification of nitrified ammonia.

  17. Landfill leachate treatment: Review and opportunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Renou; J. G. Givaudan; S. Poulain; F. Dirassouyan; P. Moulin

    2008-01-01

    In most countries, sanitary landfilling is nowadays the most common way to eliminate municipal solid wastes (MSW). In spite of many advantages, generation of heavily polluted leachates, presenting significant variations in both volumetric flow and chemical composition, constitutes a major drawback. Year after year, the recognition of landfill leachate impact on environment has forced authorities to fix more and more

  18. Movement of unlined landfill under preloading surcharge.

    PubMed

    Al-Yaqout, Anwar F; Hamoda, Mohamed F

    2007-01-01

    As organic solid waste is decomposed in a landfill and mass is lost due to gas and leachate formation, the landfill settles. Settlement of a landfill interferes with the rehabilitation and subsequent use of the landfill site after closure. This study examined the soil/solid waste movement at the Al-Qurain landfill in Kuwait after 15 years of closure as plans are underway for redevelopment of the landfill site that occupies about a km(2) with an average depth of 8-15m. Field experiments were conducted for 6 mo to measure soil/solid waste movement and water behavior within the landfill using two settlement plates with a level survey access, Casagrande-type piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, and magnetic probe extensometers. Previous results obtained indicated that biological decomposition of refuse continued after closure of the landfill site. The subsurface water rise enhanced the biological activities, which resulted in the production of increasing quantities of landfill gas. The refuse fill materials recorded a high movement rate under the imposed preloading as a result of an increase in the stress state. Up to 55% of the total movement was observed during the first 2 weeks of fill placement and increased to 80% within the first month of the 6-mo preloading test. Pneumatic piezometers showed an increase in water head, which is attributed to the developed pressure of gases escaping during the preloading period. PMID:16574394

  19. Tunable composite membranes for gas separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1999-05-01

    The use of membrane technology for gas separations offers significant thermodynamic and economic advantages over distillation processes. Target separations of importance to the coal and energy fields include N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S/syngas and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}. Current strategies for improving these separations are largely directed towards processable polymers with thin (< 500 {angstrom}) skins. Unfortunately most polymeric materials that provide commercially viable permeation rates exhibit poor selectivities and vice versa and there are inherent limitations in gas permeability/permselectivity for pure polymers. The strategy relies on modification of composite membranes, preferably in situ, to enhance the permselectivity while maintaining acceptable permeabilities. The composites consist of electroactive polymers (which can be switched from rubbery to glassy), filled with selective absorbents (zeolites) which are impregnated with metals or catalysts to effect facilitated transport. The project is multifaceted and involves the efforts of a polymer synthesis group, a microporous materials group, a microscopy group and a permeability measurements group, all working in concert. This final report summarizes the results of the efforts on the project.

  20. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix combined with regional integration analysis to characterize the composition and transformation of humic and fulvic acids from landfill at different stabilization stages.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Guixiang, Liu; Xin, Zhao; Yongxia, Hao; Youcai, Zhao

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) analysis was used to investigate the composition and transformation of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) from landfill. The EEMs of HAs at different landfill ages were characterized by two typical fluorescence chromophores with Ex/Em pairs at Ex=420-470 nm/Em=490-530 nm and Ex=345-375 nm/Em=450-465 nm. EEMs of FA were featured by other two distinctly different fluorophores with Ex/Em pairs at Ex=315-335 nm/Em=420-440 nm and Ex=255-275 nm/Em=425-455 nm. The results show that HA extracted from the refuse disposed in the year of 1989 was formed by connecting small-condensed aromatic structures with protein-like chains. Compared with HA extracted from the refuse disposed in the year of 1992, HA extracted from the refuse of 1996 had a higher fluorescence intensity and lower r(()(B)(,)(A)()) (the ratio of the fluorescence intensities of peak B and peak A) value. It contained low molar mass components, low aromatic condensation degree, and more easily oxidized substituents. This indicates that the landfill time strongly affects the EEMs characteristics of HA, and that the humification degree of HA increases with the landfill time. A red shift to a longer wavelength region and an increase of fluorescence intensity were observed when the concentration of HA was increased, suggesting that concentration had a great influence on the fluorescence characteristics of HAs. pH (2-12) also had significant effects on the fluorescence intensity, although it exerted no effect on the peak position of fluorescence of HA and FA. The results of FRI show that increasing concentration lead to more interactions among various structure components and that small molecular weight units tend to aggregate or be masked into more complicated and larger structures. The pH influence on the fluorescence intensity of HA seems mainly through molecular configuration, while the fluorescence intensity change with pH may be due to various substituents of FA. PMID:22104617

  1. Characteristics of landfill leachates and alternatives for their treatment: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Lema; R. Mendez; R. Blazquez

    1988-01-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the most common way to eliminate solid urban wastes. An important problem associated to landfills is the production of leachates. The factors determining the characteristics of leachates from solid urban waste landfills are reviewed together with the reported compositions of leachates from various countries and origins. New data obtained from two landfills of different age in the

  2. Geochemical processes in landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstner, Ulrich; Kersten, Michael; Wienberg, Reinhard

    The present review focusses on the qualitative long-term perspectives of processes and mechanisms controlling the interactions of critical pollutants with organic and inorganic substrates both in "reactor landfills" and in deposits, which already consist of rock-like material ("final storage quality"). The behavior of pollutants in landfills is determined by the chemistry of interstitial solutions, i.e. by pH and redox conditions, and concentration of inorganic and organic ligands; in "reactor landfills" these conditions are widely variable as a result of biochemical reactions, while "final storage quality" implies less variations of chemical interactions. In both alternatives, however, prediction of short- and long-term effects on groundwater quality should be based on the proportion of "active species" of compounds ("mobility concept"). Qualitative assessment of potentially mobile pollutants may involve a controlled significative intensivation of important parameters such as pH-values. Using sequential extraction rearrangements of specific solid "phases" can be evaluated prior to the actual remobilisation of the pollutant into the dissolved phase. From a geochemical point of view the "reactor landfill" is characterized by labile conditions during the initial aerobic and acid anaerobic phases, the former mainly due to uncontrolled interactions with organic solutes. On the other hand, final storage quality, which is defined by the composition of earth crust material, in most cases is not attained by simple incineration of municipal waste, i.e. by reduction of organic fractions only. There is, in particular, the problem of easily soluble minerals, such as chlorides. Nonetheless the type of inorganic residue deposits will increasingly receive prevalence as a method of final storage for municipal wastes in the future.

  3. Theory for a gas composition sensor based on acoustic properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Phillips; Yefim Dain; Richard M. Lueptow

    2003-01-01

    Sound travelling through a gas propagates at different speeds and its intensity attenuates to different degrees depending upon the composition of the gas. Theoretically, a real-time gaseous composition sensor could be based on measuring the sound speed and the acoustic attenuation. To this end, the speed of sound was modelled using standard relations, and the acoustic attenuation was modelled using

  4. The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

  5. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1998-07-01

    Smooth, dense, uniformly thick membranes were solution cast from poly(3-octylthiophene) (POT) and their permeability properties were investigated for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} (P{sub N{sub 2}} = 5.8 {+-} 0.4, P{sub O{sub 2}} = 15.6 {+-} 0.8, P{sub CH{sub 4}} = 17.8 {+-} 1.4, P{sub CO{sub 2}} = 63.6 {+-} 2.2 Barrers), and selectivity properties were calculated ({alpha}{sub O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 2.7 {+-} 0.2, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 11.2 {+-} 0.8, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}} = 3.6 {+-} 0.2). NaY/POT composite membranes (20, 30, and 40% w/w zeolite) were prepared by stirring the polymer into a zeolitic suspension. Facilitated transport of gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2}) was observed for each of the zeolite loadings, the magnitude of which depended on the chemical nature of the gas and polymer/zeolite-penetrant interaction. Maximum facilitation was observed for 40% NaY/POT composite membranes (Facilitation ratio of N{sub 2} = 0.38 {+-} 0.03, O{sub 2} = 0.56 {+-} 0.02, CH{sub 4} = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, CO{sub 2} = 0.71 {+-} 0.02). An increase in the selectivity of gases was also observed for all zeolite loadings.

  6. Tunable Composite Membranes for Gas Separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1997-07-01

    Solution cast membranes of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (PDDT) were studied for the room temperature separation of N{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}, and C0{sub 2} procedure for fabricating reproducible, smooth, uniformly thick (-35-pm), defect-free membranes was established. Permeability values were measured for as-cast PDDT membranes (PO{sub 2} = 9.4, PN{sub 2} = 20.2, PCO{sub 2} = 88. 2 Barrers) and selectivity values were calculated (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.2, XC0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 9.4). Chemically induced doping (-23%) with SbCI5 resulte in a decrease in permeability (PN{sub 2} = 3.5, P0{sub 2} =10.5, PCO{sub 2} = 48.5 Barrers) and a corresponding increase in permselectivity (X 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 0, (xCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =14.0)). Membrane undoping with hydrazine partially reversed these trends (PN{sub 2} = 5.4, P0{sub 2} = 15.1, PCO{sub 2} = 62.9 Barrers), (XO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 2.8), (XCO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} =I 1. 6). The chemical composition cast, doped, and undoped PDDT membranes were determined using elemental analysis and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Membrane microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy, TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The composition and microscopy results were correlated with changes in gas-transport properties. Two papers were presented at the Meeting of the North American Membranes Society, (June 2-4,1997, Baltimore, MD).

  7. Development of a perimeter odor monitoring system for landfill sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krishna C. Persaud; N. C. P. Woodyatt; R. W. Sneath

    2008-01-01

    A need exists for instrumentation capable of continuous measurement of gas and odor emission from the perimeter of a landfill site. Current practice is to manually use a flame ionization detector. Instruments based on an array of MOS gas sensors were developed and placed on the perimeter of a landfill site, functioning as point monitoring systems, using methane as a

  8. Gas compositions in a well column

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reitsema

    1985-01-01

    An onsite mud-logging system was developed to avoid possible alterations in gas samples during shipment to laboratories. Compensation was made for the large gas contribution of the drilling mud entering the hole, for the rate of drilling, and for lag time of the drilling mud. Location of gas anomalies is more apparent with the modified system. Several wells in the

  9. Corrosion inhibition by control of gas composition during mist drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Snyder, T.L.

    1981-05-01

    Chemical compositional specifications have been generated for inert gases which reduce drill string corrosion when used in conjunction with mist drilling processes. These specifications are based on the assumption that the corrosion rate is dependent on the dissolved gaseous species concentrations. Data taken both from the literature and from a mist drilling field test with nitrogen in Valle Grande, NM, relate corrosion rates to fluid compositions. These solution compositions are then associated with gas phase compositions using equilibrium data available from the literature and material balances. Two sources of gas were considered: cryogenically purified nitrogen from air and exhaust gas from a diesel engine, which contain (in addition to N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/) CO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, and CO. A maximum concentration of 50 ppM O/sub 2/ in the gas phase is recommended to alleviate pitting corrosion.

  10. Learning from Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project in which students developed an all-class laboratory activity called "The Decomposition of Organic and Inorganic Substances in a Landfill". Explores what conditions are necessary to facilitate decomposition in a landfill. (SAH)

  11. LANDFILL GAS CONVERSION TO LNG AND LCO{sub 2}. PHASE 1, FINAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 1998-FEBRUARY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    COOK,W.J.; NEYMAN,M.; SIWAJEK,L.A.; BROWN,W.R.; VAN HAUWAERT,P.M.; CURREN,E.D.

    1998-02-25

    Process designs and economics were developed to produce LNG and liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas (LFG) using the Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process. The patented Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process uses liquid CO{sub 2} to absorb contaminants from the LFG. The process steps are compression, drying, CO{sub 2} wash contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery, residual CO{sub 2} removal and methane liquefaction. Three flowsheets were developed using different residual CO{sub 2} removal schemes. These included physical solvent absorption (methanol), membranes and molecular sieves. The capital and operating costs of the flowsheets were very similar. The LNG production cost was around ten cents per gallon. In parallel with process flowsheet development, the business aspects of an eventual commercial project have been explored. The process was found to have significant potential commercial application. The business plan effort investigated the economics of LNG transportation, fueling, vehicle conversion, and markets. The commercial value of liquid CO{sub 2} was also investigated. This Phase 1 work, March 1998 through February 1999, was funded under Brookhaven National laboratory contract 725089 under the research program entitled ``Liquefied Natural Gas as a Heavy Vehicle Fuel.'' The Phase 2 effort will develop flowsheets for the following: (1) CO{sub 2} and pipeline gas production, with the pipeline methane being liquefied at a peak shaving site, (2) sewage digester gas as an alternate feedstock to LFG and (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling. Phase 2 will also study the modification of Acrion's process demonstration unit for the production of LNG and a market site for LNG production.

  12. Hydrological and geochemical factors affecting leachate composition in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Part I: The hydrology of Landfill Lostorf, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. Annette; Richner, Gérald A.; Vitvar, Tomas; Schittli, Nina; Eberhard, Mark

    1998-10-01

    The objective of the investigation of the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash landfill, Landfill Lostorf, was to determine the residence time of water in the landfill and the flow paths through the landfill. Over a period of 22 months, measurements of rainfall, landfill discharge and leachate electrical conductivity were recorded and tracer experiments made. Over the yearly period 1995, approximately 50% of the incident rainfall was measured in the discharge. An analysis of single rain events showed that in winter, 90-100% of rainfall was expressed in the landfill discharge, whereas in summer months, the value was between 9 and 40% depending on the intensity of the rain event. The response to rainfall was rapid. Within 30-100 h, approximately 50% of water discharged in response to a rain event had left the landfill. The discharge was less than 4 l/min for approximately 50% of the measurement periods. Qualitative tracer studies with fluorescein, pyranine and iodide clearly showed the existence of preferential flow paths. This was further substantiated by quantitative tracer studies of single rain events using 18O/ 16O ratios and electrical conductivity measurements. The proportion of rainwater passing directly through the landfill was found to be between 20 and 80% in summer months and around 10% in winter months. The difference has been ascribed to the water content in the landfill. The average residence time of the water within the landfill has been estimated to be roughly 3 years and this water is the predominant component in the discharge over a yearly period.

  13. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Janus T; Birgisdottir, Harpa; Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael; Christensen, Thomas H

    2007-01-01

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion. PMID:17382531

  14. Efficient computation of the compositional model for gas condensate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jifu; Li, Jiachun; Ye, Jigen

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a direct method, unsymmetric-pattern multifrontal factorization, for a large sparse system of linear equations is applied in the compositional reservoir model. The good performances of this approach are shown by solving the Poisson equation. And then the numerical module is embedded in the compositional model for simulating X1/5 (3) gas condensate reservoir in KeKeYa gas field, Northwest China. The results of oil/gas reserves, variations of stratum pressure and oil/gas production, etc. are compared with the observation. Good agreement comparable to COMP4 model is achieved, suggesting that the present model is both efficient and powerful in compositional reservoir simulations.

  15. Environmental assessment of Ammässuo Landfill (Finland) by means of LCA-modelling (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Antti; Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H; Anderson, Reetta

    2009-08-01

    The Old Ammässuo Landfill (Espoo, Finland) covers an area of 52 hectares and contains about 10 million tonnes of waste that was landfilled between 1987 and 2007. The majority of this waste was mixed, of which about 57% originated from households. This paper aims at describing the management of the Old Ammässuo Landfill throughout its operational lifetime (1987-2007), and at developing an environmental evaluation based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) using the EASEWASTE-model. The assessment criteria evaluate specific categories of impact, including standard impact categories, toxicity-related impact categories and an impact categorized as spoiled groundwater resources (SGR). With respect to standard and toxicity-related impact categories, the LCA results show that substantial impact potentials are estimated for global warming (GW), ozone depletion (OD), human toxicity via soil (HTs) and ecotoxicity in water chronic (ETwc). The largest impact potential was found for SGR and amounted to 57.6 person equivalent (PE) per tonne of landfilled waste. However, the SGR impact may not be viewed as a significant issue in Finland as the drinking water is mostly supplied from surface water bodies. Overall, the results demonstrate that gas management has great importance to the environmental performance of the Old Ammässuo Landfill. However, several chemicals related to gas composition (especially trace compounds) and specific emissions from on-site operations were not available or were not measured and were therefore taken from the literature. Measurement campaigns and field investigations should be undertaken in order to obtain a more robust and comprehensive dataset that can be used in the LCA-modelling, before major improvements regarding landfill management are finalized. PMID:19423588

  16. Gas composition sensing using carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and system for estimating one, two or more unknown components in a gas. A first array of spaced apart carbon nanotubes (''CNTs'') is connected to a variable pulse voltage source at a first end of at least one of the CNTs. A second end of the at least one CNT is provided with a relatively sharp tip and is located at a distance within a selected range of a constant voltage plate. A sequence of voltage pulses {V(t.sub.n)}.sub.n at times t=t.sub.n (n=1, . . . , N1; N1.gtoreq.3) is applied to the at least one CNT, and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of a curve I(t.sub.n) for current or a curve e(t.sub.n) for electric charge transported from the at least one CNT to the constant voltage plate. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas.

  17. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze, E-mail: gvarank@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Demir, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetd@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Yetilmezsoy, Kaan, E-mail: yetilmez@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Bilgili, M. Sinan, E-mail: mbilgili@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Top, Selin, E-mail: stop@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Sekman, Elif, E-mail: esekman@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors, dispersion coefficients of Cu, ranging from 3.47 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s to 5.37 x 10{sup -2} m{sup 2}/s, was determined to be higher than others obtained for Zn and Fe. Average molecular diffusion coefficients of phenolic compounds were estimated to be about 5.64 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 5.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 2.69 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s and 3.29 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s for R1, R2, R3 and R4 systems, respectively. The findings of this study clearly indicated that about 35-50% of transport of phenolic compounds to the groundwater is believed to be prevented with the use of zeolite and bentonite materials in landfill liner systems.

  18. COMPOSITION OF LOW-REDSHIFT HALO GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen Renyue, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    Halo gas in low-z (z < 0.5) {>=}0.1 L{sub *} galaxies in high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is examined with respect to three components: cold, warm, and hot with temperatures of <10{sup 5}, 10{sup 5-6}, and >10{sup 6} K, respectively. Utilizing O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 absorption lines, the warm component is compared to observations, and agreement is found with respect to the galaxy-O VI line correlation, the ratio of the O VI line incidence rate in blue to red galaxies, and the amount of O VI mass in star-forming galaxies. A detailed account of the sources of warm halo gas (stellar feedback heating, gravitational shock heating, and accretion from the intergalactic medium), inflowing and outflowing warm halo gas metallicity disparities, and their dependencies on galaxy types and environment is also presented. With the warm component securely anchored, our simulations make the following additional predictions. First, cold gas is the primary component in inner regions with its mass comprising 50% of all gas within galactocentric radius r = (30, 150) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies. Second, at r > (30, 200) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies the hot component becomes the majority. Third, the warm component is a perpetual minority, with its contribution peaking at {approx}30% at r = 100-300 kpc in blue galaxies and never exceeding 5% in red galaxies. The significant amount of cold gas in low-z early-type galaxies, which was found in simulations and in agreement with recent observations (Thom et al.), is intriguing, as is the dominance of hot gas at large radii in blue galaxies.

  19. Improving the gas-chromatographic determination of the composition of the gas liberated from a battery

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, V.V.; Zubov, M.S.; Baulov, V.I.; Toguzov, B.M.

    1992-07-10

    Normally, gas chromatography is used for analyzing the gas composition that is liberated when batteries operate. Earlier work describes a gas-chromatographic technique for determining the composition of gas liberated from a battery. According to this reference, the gas is collected in an inverted burette over water. The gas is either sampled with a batching valve or with a medical syringe, which pierces the connecting vacuum hoses. The gas sample is injected into the chromatographic evaporator, and is separated on the chromatographic column into its individual components, each of which is analyzed on the detector. The method described was used to study gas liberation during the storage of charged nickel-zinc batteries. In the method described above, a high proportion of the gas specimen that accumulates and is collected in the measuring system occurs in the dead space volume. In this situation, it is very difficult to determine the liberated gas composition with a high degree of accuracy when the gas is liberated at low rates. Moreover, this method does not provide reliable system air tightness during long term operation of the batteries. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Stabilized landfill leachate treatment by combined physicochemical–nanofiltration processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Trebouet; J. P Schlumpf; P Jaouen; F Quemeneur

    2001-01-01

    Landfill leachate is a complex wastewater which the composition and concentration of contaminants are influenced by the type of waste deposited and the age of landfill. In the last years, several processes or process combinations were developed and tested to reach requirements for the discharge of leachate. Among the new processes, membrane processes are considered as promising: reverse osmosis is

  1. Composition dependence of ion-transport coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, J. H.; Mason, E. A.; Robson, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Simple momentum-transfer theory for the composition dependence of ion mobilities and diffusion coefficients in gas mixtures at arbitrary field strengths is corrected and extended, and compared with a similar theory based on momentum and energy transfer, and with results based on direct solution of the Boltzmann equation by Kihara's method. Final equations are recommended for predicting composition dependences, given only results on ion mobilities and diffusion coefficients in the pure component gases.

  2. Composition dependence of ion transport coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, J. H.; Mason, E. A.; Robson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A simple momentum-transfer theory for the composition dependence of ion mobilities and diffusion coefficients in gas mixtures at arbitrary field strengths is corrected, extended, and compared with a similar theory based on momentum and energy transfer, and with results based on direct solution of the Boltzmann equation by Kihara's method. Final equations are recommended for predicting composition dependences, given only results on ion mobilities and diffusion coefficients in the pure component gases.

  3. Risk Based Post Closure Care Analysis for Florida Landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Banu Sizirici Yildiz

    2009-01-01

    Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires a post closure period of 30 years for non hazardous wastes in landfills. Post closure care (PCC) activities under Subtitle D include leachate collection and treatment, groundwater monitoring, inspection and maintenance of the final cover, and monitoring to ensure that landfill gas does not migrate off site or into

  4. Risk based post closure care analysis for Florida landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Banu Sizirici Yildiz

    2009-01-01

    Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires a post closure period of 30 years for non hazardous wastes in landfills. Post closure care (PCC) activities under Subtitle D include leachate collection and treatment, groundwater monitoring, inspection and maintenance of the final cover, and monitoring to ensure that landfill gas does not migrate off site or into

  5. ESTIMATE OF GLOBAL METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS AND OPEN DUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an empirical model to estimate global methane (CH4) emissions from landfills and open dumps based on EPA data from landfill gas (LFG) recovery projects. The EPA CH4 estimates for 1990 range between 19 and 40 teragrams (10 to the 12th power) per year (Tg/yr), w...

  6. AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - LANDFILLS (COMBUSTION CONTROLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project develops emission factors, etc., for landfills, in particular for combustion devices fed by landfill gas, for incorporation into AP-42. AP-42 is a massive collection of information concerning processes which generate air emissions and presents emission factors and co...

  7. LANDFILLS EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS GUIDELINES DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: This resource served as the main information source for national characteristics of landfills for the landfills effluent guidelines. The database was developed based on responses to the "1994 Waste Treatment Industry Questionnaire: Phase II Landfills" and...

  8. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  9. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  10. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  11. Landfill disposal systems

    PubMed Central

    Slimak, Karen M.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated. A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual inspections and any repairs can be made without disturbing the waste. The surface seal landfill does not employ a subsurface barrier. The surface seal landfill successfully addresses each of the four environmental problems listed above, provided that this landfill design is utilized for dry wastes only and is located at a site which provides protection from groundwater and temporary perched water tables. ImagesFIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 7.FIGURE 7. PMID:738247

  12. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method.

    PubMed

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Whole-site methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills were assessed using a mobile tracer dispersion method with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), using nitrous oxide as a tracer gas, or cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS), using acetylene as a tracer gas. The landfills were chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2)d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was 154 tons y(-1). This average was obtained from a few measurement campaigns conducted at each of the 15 landfills and extrapolating to annual emissions requires more measurements. Assuming that these landfills are representative of the average Danish landfill, the total emission from Danish landfills were calculated at 20,600 tons y(-1), which is significantly lower than the 33,300 tons y(-1) estimated for the national greenhouse gas inventory for 2011. PMID:25442105

  13. Tunable Composite Membranes for Gas Separations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, J.P.; Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Musselman, I.H.

    1997-10-01

    Poly(3-dodecylthiophene) films were solution cast and subsequently subjected to chemical oxidation (doping), followed by chemical undoping. The microstructure of each form of the membrane was determined by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TappingMode Atomic Force Microscopy (TMAFM). Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) was used to elucidate the chemical composition of the membranes. Changes in microstructure after exposure to or protection from the laboratory atmosphere, and after permeability measurements, were assessed by these same techniques to estimate the environmental stability of the membranes. Although dramatic changes in topology occur for films exposed to the laboratory atmosphere, these are greatly reduced when the films are stored in containers that limit the access of moisture. Films exposed to dry gases in the permeameter exhibit essentially no change to their original microstructures.

  14. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H. [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Liao, S. M. [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tsai, H. L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  15. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1999-01-01

    Poly 2-(3-thienyl)ethylacetate (PAET) was synthesized and solution cast as thin films to form dense membranes. These membranes are mechanically robust and are redox active, holding out promise as gas separation materials. The permeability properties of PAET membranes were evaluated for N{sub 2} (0.048 {+-} 0.008 Barrers), O{sub 2} (0.24 {+-} 0.02 Barrers), CH{sub 4} (0.081 {+-} 0.005 Barrers), and CO{sub 2} (1.4 {+-} 0.1 Barrers). The corresponding selectivity values ({alpha}) were: O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 5.1, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 29, and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} = 18.

  16. Geothermal gas compositions in yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheppard, D.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Janik, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Gas samples collected between 1974 and 1986 have been analysed for the ten major components. Samples have been collected almost exclusively from the tops of pools, which has degraded the value of the data, and limited inter-comparisons to the relatively insoluble components, Ar, N2, CH4, H2 and He. A general gas distribution pattern in the park, in terms of these components, shows the major heat source(s) to underlie the Gibbon and Mud Volcano areas with all other geothermal areas having gas compositions consistent with a general north-south water flow. Shoshone Basin gases show a large range of compositions and these are analysed in detail. The patterns conform to that which would be expected from an east-west flow or fluid with progressive boiling and subsequent dilution. ?? 1992.

  17. Geothermal gas compositions in yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. S.; Truesdell, A. H.; Janik, C. J.

    1992-06-01

    Gas samples collected between 1974 and 1986 have been analysed for the ten major components. Samples have been collected almost exclusively from the tops of pools, which has degraded the value of the data, and limited inter-comparisons to the relatively insoluble components, Ar, N 2, CH 4, H 2 and He. A general gas distribution pattern in the park, in terms of these components, shows the major heat source(s) to underlie the Gibbon and Mud Volcano areas with all other geothermal areas having gas compositions consistent with a general north-south water flow. Shoshone Basin gases show a large range of compositions and these are analysed in detail. The patterns conform to that which would be expected from an east-west flow or fluid with progressive boiling and subsequent dilution.

  18. [Dispersion and analysis of odor pollution in landfill area under the enclosed operation condition].

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Wu, Shi-Xing; Dai, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Su, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Fei; Dai, Zhan-Guo; Lu, Xu-Fei; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Kai; Wei, Pan-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Odor pollution of landfill site is a serious problem accompanied with the urbanization process that influences city life. Generally, odor emission points in landfill boundary are detected by experience, but the pollution intensity, distribution and variation in the scope of landfill boundary are difficulty to describe. In this research, odor emission points were disclosed with equal odor concentration curves that were delineated using electric nose and GPS instrument. The leakage of landfill gas and exhaust emission from biogas incineration torch was the main cause of the odor pollution in landfill area. Gas production evaluation suggested that the improvement of landfill gas consumption is the key point to control the odor pollution at the landfill site. PMID:23745385

  19. Initial results of detected methane emissions from landfills in the Los Angeles Basin during the COMEX campaign by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a greenhouse gas in-situ analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Kolyer, Richard; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Sam; Buchwitz, Michael; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas beside carbon dioxide (CO2). Significant contributors to the global methane budget are fugitive emissions from landfills. Due to the growing world population, it is expected that the amount of waste and, therefore, waste disposal sites will increase in number and size in parts of the world, often adjacent growing megacities. Besides bottom-up modelling, a variety of ground based methods (e.g., flux chambers, trace gases, radial plume mapping, etc.) have been used to estimate (top-down) these fugitive emissions. Because landfills usually are large, sometimes with significant topographic relief, vary temporally, and leak/emit heterogeneously across their surface area, assessing total emission strength by ground-based techniques is often difficult. In this work, we show how airborne based remote sensing measurements of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4 can be utilized to estimate fugitive emissions from landfills in an urban environment by a mass balance approach. Subsequently, these emission rates are compared to airborne in-situ horizontal cross section measurements of CH4 taken within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) upwind and downwind of the landfill at different altitudes immediately after the remote sensing measurements were finished. Additional necessary parameters (e.g., wind direction, wind speed, aerosols, dew point temperature, etc.) for the data inversion are provided by a standard instrumentation suite for atmospheric measurements aboard the aircraft, and nearby ground-based weather stations. These measurements were part of the CO2 and Methane EXperiment (COMEX), which was executed during the summer 2014 in California and was co-funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remote sensing measurements were taken by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) developed and operated by the University of Bremen and the German Research Center for Geoscience (GFZ) in Potsdam. The in-situ measurements were obtained by a greenhouse gas (GHG) in-situ analyser operated by NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC). Both instruments were installed aboard a DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). Initial results - including estimated fugitive emission rates - will be presented for the landfill Olinda Alpha in Brea, Orange County, Los Angeles Basin, California, which was overflown on four different days during the COMEX field campaign in late summer 2014.

  20. Estimation of waste component-specific landfill decay rates using laboratory-scale decomposition data.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-06-15

    The current methane generation model used by the U.S. EPA (Landfill Gas Emissions Model) treats municipal solid waste (MSW) as a homogeneous waste with one decay rate. However, component-specific decay rates are required to evaluate the effects of changes in waste composition on methane generation. Laboratory-scale rate constants, k(lab), for the major biodegradable MSW components were used to derive field-scale decay rates (k(field)) for each waste component using the assumption that the average of the field-scale decay rates for each waste component, weighted by its composition, is equal to the bulk MSW decay rate. For an assumed bulk MSW decay rate of 0.04 yr(-1), k(field) was estimated to be 0.298, 0.171, 0.015, 0.144, 0.033, 0.02, 0.122, and 0.029 yr(-1), for grass, leaves, branches, food waste, newsprint, corrugated containers, coated paper, and office paper, respectively. The effect of landfill waste diversion programs on methane production was explored to illustrate the use of component-specific decay rates. One hundred percent diversion of yard waste and food waste reduced the year 20 methane production rate by 45%. When a landfill gas collection schedule was introduced, collectable methane was most influenced by food waste diversion at years 10 and 20 and paper diversion at year 40. PMID:20496890

  1. TUNABLE COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR GAS SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Ferraris; K.J. Balkus, Jr.; I.H. Musselman

    1998-10-01

    Poly(3-octylthiophene), POT, membranes were selectively oxidized on one side using SbCl{sub 5} solutions (15, 20, and 25% w/w in CH{sub 3}CN). Oxidation with a 25% SbCl{sub 5} solution resulted in maximum decreases in permeability and increases in selectivity (P{sub N{sub 2}} = 3.1 {+-} 0.2, P{sub O{sub 2}} = 9.9 {+-} 0.1, P{sub CH{sub 4}} = 9.0 {+-} 0.1, P{sub CO{sub 2}} = 47.5 {+-} 0.3 Barrers, and {alpha}{sub O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 3.2 {+-} 0.2, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 15.3 {+-} 0.9, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}} = 5.3 {+-} 0.3). Oxidation of a 30% NaY/POT composite membrane with a 17% w/w SbCl{sub 5} solution resulted in permeability values between the unmodified and oxidized POT membranes and selectivities similar to those of oxidized POT membranes (P{sub N{sub 2}} = 5.3 {+-} 0.6, P{sub O{sub 2}} = 16.7 {+-} 1.8, P{sub CH{sub 4}} = 15.3 {+-} 1.2, P{sub CO{sub 2}} = 80.1 {+-} 3.7 Barrers, {alpha}{sub O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 3.2 {+-} 0.1, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}} = 15.2 {+-} 0.8, {alpha}{sub CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}} = 5.3 {+-} 0.2).

  2. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke, E-mail: i.rachor@ifb.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  3. Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design

    E-print Network

    ,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving leachate recirculation. Other failures of lesser magnitude also of gas and leachate systems, relocation of access roads, temporary routing of storm water, and phase

  4. Influence of gas composition of the modulus of elasticity of gas-impregnated anthracites

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokurova, E.B.; Ketslakh, A.I.

    1986-07-01

    A study of the elastic properties of anthracites under strain and high gas pressure is described. The tests were made on Class I and II anthracites after exposure to helium, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and a mixture of these gases similar in composition to that of natural gas in worked anthracite strata. Each test sample was loaded in air at atmospheric pressure, and then subjected to vacuum treatment and impregnated with gas. Tables show strain on samples in air at atmospheric pressure in helium, nitrogen, methane and gas mixtures, and values of modulus of elasticity for anthracite in various gases. It was shown that impregnation with carbon dioxide under pressure has a destructive influence on the anthracite. The presence of 1.5% of carbon dioxide in a gas is sufficient to cause a reduction in the modulus of elasticity. During the working of a stratum, the consequential change in the gas content also alters the mechanical properties of the anthracite.

  5. The new Waste Law: Challenging opportunity for future landfill operation in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Meidiana, Christia; Gamse, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Waste Law No. 18/2008 Article 22 and 44 require the local governments to run environmentally sound landfill. Due to the widespread poor quality of waste management in Indonesia, this study aimed to identify the current situation by evaluating three selected landfills based on the ideal conditions of landfill practices, which are used to appraise the capability of local governments to adapt to the law. The results indicated that the local governments have problems of insufficient budget, inadequate equipment, uncollected waste and unplanned future landfill locations. All of the selected landfills were partially controlled landfills with open dumping practices predominating. In such inferior conditions the implementation of sanitary landfill is not necessarily appropriate. The controlled landfill is a more appropriate solution as it offers lower investment and operational costs, makes the selection of a new landfill site unnecessary and can operate with a minimum standard of infrastructure and equipment. The sustainability of future landfill capacity can be maintained by utilizing the old landfill as a profit-oriented landfill by implementing a landfill gas management or a clean development mechanism project. A collection fee system using the pay-as-you-throw principle could increase the waste income thereby financing municipal solid waste management. PMID:20935025

  6. Hydrological and geochemical factors affecting leachate composition in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Part II. The geochemistry of leachate from Landfill Lostorf, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. Annette; Kaeppeli, Michael; Brandenberger, Sandro; Ulrich, Andrea; Baumann, Werner

    1999-12-01

    The leachate composition of the Landfill Lostorf, Buchs, Switzerland has been examined as a function rain events and dry periods between November 1994 and November 1996. Discharge and electrical conductivity of the central drainage discharge were monitored continuously, whilst samples for chemical analysis were taken at discrete intervals. The average total concentrations of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca and SO 4 are 44.5, 47.1, 11.8, 0.63, 8.2 and 12.4 mM, respectively. During rain events, the leachate is diluted by the preferential flow of rainwater into the drainage discharge. Drainage discharge pH values range between 8.68 and 11.28, the latter under dry conditions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that CaSO 4, ettringite (3CaOAl 2O 3CaSO 4·32H 2O) and Al(OH) 3 may control the concentrations of the components Ca, SO 4 and Al. Dissolved Si may be in thermodynamic equilibrium with either Ca silicate hydrate or imogolite. Cadmium, Mo, V, Mn and Zn are also diluted during rain events and concentration changes agree with those of conductivity (representing the major constituents). Average concentrations are 0.012, 5.4, 2.3, 0.085, and 0.087 ?M, respectively. Components such as Al, Cu, Sb and Cr increase in concentration with increased discharge. Average concentrations are 1.6, 0.27 and 0.21 ?M, respectively. For Cu, the explanation lies in its affinity for total organic carbon (TOC). Thermodynamic calculations indicate that whilst dissolution/precipitation reactions with metal hydroxides and carbonates can explain the observed concentrations of Cd, sorption and complexation reactions probably influence the concentrations of Cu, Pb (average measurable concentration 0.013 ?M), Zn and Mn. For the oxyanion species such as MoO 4 and WO 4 (average concentration 0.61 ?M), it is probable that Ca metallate formation plays a dominant role in determining concentration ranges. Geochemical processes appear to determine concentration ranges and the hydrological factors, the fluctuations in concentration.

  7. Effects of gas composition on the performance and emissions of compressed natural gas engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung Hyouk Min; Jin Taek Chung; Ho Young Kim

    2002-01-01

    Natural gas is considered to be a promising alternative fuel for passenger cars, truck transportation and stationary engines\\u000a providing positive effects both on the environment and energy security. However, since the composition of natural gas fuel\\u000a varies with location, climate and other factors, it is anticipated that such changes in fuel properties will affect emission\\u000a characteristics and performance of CNG

  8. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-05-10

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying operations. The problems were evaluated to answer specific design questions. The document is formatted as a topical report with each section representing a specific problem solution. The problem solutions are reported in the calculation format specified in HNF-1613, Rev. 0, EP 7.6.

  9. Comet Halley - The gas composition derived from space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.

    1987-09-01

    Important results have been obtained by the Vega and Giotto missions concerning Comet Halley's gas composition. Water vapor and CO2 have been identified with respective production rates of about 10 to the 30th/s and 10 to the 28th/s. In addition, there is evidence for the presence of hydrocarbons and/or carbonaceous material in large amounts in the immediate vicinity of the nucleus.

  10. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  11. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  12. Landfill in a Bottle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-10-04

    In this activity, learners discover how landfills affect the natural environment. By observing a 2-liter bottle filled with household garbage over a month, learners can estimate how long it takes for average household garbage takes to break down.

  13. Quantifying Spatial and Temporal Variability of Methane Emissions from a Complex Area Source: Case Study of a Central Indiana Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Bogner, J. E.; Green, R. B.; Shepson, P. B.; Thoma, E. D.; Foster-wittig, T. A.; Spokas, K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that is responsible for about 17% of the total direct radiative forcing from long-lived greenhouse gases (IPCC 2013). While the global emission of methane is relatively well quantified, the temporal and spatial variability of methane emissions from individual area or point sources are still poorly understood. Using 4 field methods (aircraft-based mass balance, tracer correlation, vertical radial plume mapping, and static chambers) and a new field-validated process-based model (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model, CALMIM 5.4), we investigated both the total emissions from a central Indiana landfill as well as the partitioned emissions inclusive of methanotrophic oxidation for the various cover soils. This landfill is an upwind source for the city of Indianapolis, so the resolution of m2 to km2 scale emissions, as well as understanding the temporal variability for this complex area source, contributes to improved regional inventory calculations. Emissions for the site as a whole were measured using both an aircraft-based mass balance approach as well as a ground-based tracer correlation method, permitting direct comparison of the strengths, limitations, and uncertainties of these two approaches. Because US landfills are highly-engineered and composed of daily, intermediate, and final cover areas with differing thicknesses, composition, and implementation of gas recovery, we also expected different emission signatures and strengths from the various cover areas. Thus we also deployed static chambers and vertical radial plume mapping to quantify the spatial variability of emissions from the thinner daily and intermediate cover areas. Understanding the daily, seasonal and annual emission rates from a landfill is not trivial, and usually requires a combination of measurement and modeling approaches. Thus, our unique data set provides an opportunity to gain an improved understanding of the emissions from a complex area source, an essential requirement for developing improved urban-scale greenhouse gas inventories relevant for addressing mitigation strategies. We report on the results here.

  14. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOEpatents

    Doehler, Joachim (Union Lake, MI)

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  15. Controlled landfill project: Mountain View, California. Annual report, January-December 1982

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. A. Bonham; R. E. Van Heuit; W. M. Carroll; M. Donch

    1984-01-01

    This project studied the effects of leachate recirculation and added water, buffer and sludge on enhancing the generation and improving the recovery of landfill gas. It evaluated the various techniques by providing individual control cells for the demonstration of enhancement methods. The study also documents landfill gas productions from a controlled volume at field scale. Results from this study provide

  16. Quantifying Methane Abatement Efficiency at Three Municipal Solid Waste Landfills; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements were conducted at three municipal solid waste landfills to compare fugitive methane emissions from the landfill cells to the quantity of collected gas (i.e., gas collection efficiency). The measurements were conducted over a multi-week sampling campaign using EPA Oth...

  17. The composition of circumstellar gas and dust in 51 Oph

    E-print Network

    M. E. van den Ancker; G. Meeus; J. Cami; L. B. F. M. Waters; C. Waelkens

    2001-02-15

    We analyze ISO archive data of the nearby bright emission-line star 51 Oph, previously classified as a proto-planetary system similar to beta Pic. The infrared spectrum reveals the presence of gas-phase emission bands of hot (approx 850 K) CO, CO_2, H_2O and NO. In addition to this, partially crystalline silicate dust is present. The solid-state bands and the energy distribution are indicative of dust that has formed recently, rather than of debris dust. The presence of hot molecular gas and the composition of the circumstellar dust are highly unusual for a young star and are reminiscent of what is found around evolved (AGB) stars, although we exclude the possibility of 51 Oph belonging to this group. We suggest several explanations for the nature of 51 Oph, including a recent episode of mass loss from a Be star, and the recent destruction of a planet-sized body around a young star.

  18. Gas chromatographic determination of the composition of coal pyridine products

    SciTech Connect

    Nabivach, V.M.; Berlizov, Yu.S.; Degtyareva, L.V.; Mariich, L.I.; Markus, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The coking industry produces a wide range of products of the pyridine group from the crude light pyridine bases extracted from the coke oven gas. They include pure pyridine, pyridine solvent, ..cap alpha..-picoline, and the ..beta..-picoline and 2,4-lutidine fractions. The specifications for quality of these products are becoming increasingly stringent. The present methods of determining the quality indices are complex and laborious and do not always reflect the true component composition of the pyridine products. This paper describes the testing of a capillary gas chromatograph for the monitoring and analysis of pyridine products at all stages of their refining. The proposed method permits quantitative identification and adequately accurate determination of the concentraton of pyridine products. 15 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  20. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  1. Impact of Australian natural gas and coal bed methane composition on PEM fuel cell performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Dicks; Tom Connor; John Bradley; Anna Lashtabeg

    2009-01-01

    Several PEM fuel cell systems are currently being marketed or developed as natural gas fuelled stationary power generation or cogeneration systems. Whilst each of these may perform adequately when fuelled with methane, the composition of natural gas varies widely around the world, according to the source and even the season. This study investigated the variation in composition of fuel gas

  2. Municipal landfill leachate management

    SciTech Connect

    Kusterer, T.; Willson, R. [Montgomery County Div. of Solid Waste Services, Rockville, MD (United States); Bruce, S.C.; Tissue, E. Lou, P.J. [Roy F. Weston Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    From 1995 to 1997, the Montgomery County Leachate Pretreatment Facility (MCLPF) has successfully pretreated in excess of 18,000,000 gallons of leachate generated by the county`s municipal solid waste landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill. The collection system directs leachate from the original landfill, the new lined section, and the ash cell to the leachate pump station. The leachate, prior to being pumped to the leachate pretreatment system, is equalized in two storage lagoons with a combined capacity of more than 5,000,000 gallons. The innovative leachate treatment system, incorporating a biological reactor system equipped with a submerged fixed-film reactor using a patented Matrix Biological Film (MBF) media, continues to provide excellent pretreatment results for the leachate generated at the Oaks Landfill in Montgomery County, Maryland. In 1995 and 1996, the system responded to the substantial challenges imposed by the changing characteristics of the material being landfilled and by the significant amounts of incinerator ash, received in 1995 from the county`s resource recovery facility (RRF), which influenced the influent leachate characteristics.

  3. Elimination of methane generated from landfills by biofiltration: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Nikiema; R. Brzezinski; M. Heitz

    2007-01-01

    The production of biogas in landfills, its composition and the problems resulting from its generation are all reviewed. Biofiltration\\u000a is a promising option for the control of emissions to atmosphere of the methane contained in biogas issued from the smaller\\u000a and\\/or older landfills. A detailed review of the methane biofiltration literature is presented. The microorganisms, mainly\\u000a the methanotrophs, involved in

  4. Improvement of gas sensing performance of carbon black\\/waterborne polyurethane composites: Effect of crosslinking treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Guo Chen; Ji Wen Hu; Ming Qiu Zhang; Min Zhi Rong; Qiang Zheng

    2006-01-01

    When carbon black (CB) filled waterborne polyurethane (WPU) composites are exposed to organic solvent vapors, electrical resistance of the materials increases rapidly. They can thus serve as gas sensors. To improve the composites’ performance for practical applications, crosslinking agent was added to the composite latexes, forming intra-molecular crosslinked networks among the matrix polymer of the composites. The method greatly increased

  5. Low carbon black filled polyurethane composite as candidate for wide spectrum gas-sensing element

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji Wen Hu; Shi Guo Chen; Ming Qiu Zhang; Ming Wei Li; Min Zhi Rong

    2004-01-01

    To reduce the amount of carbon black and to broaden the applicability of conductive polymer composites serving as gas sensors, polyurethane-based composite was prepared by latex blending. The composite has very low electrical threshold and hence provides improved processability. In the environment of organic solvent vapors, the composite with 3.5 wt.% of carbon black exhibits significant increase of its electrical

  6. Did state renewable portfolio standards induce technical change in methane mitigation in the U.S. landfill sector?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Casey Delhotal

    2007-01-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) projects use the gas created from decomposing waste, which is approximately 49% methane, and substitute it for natural gas in engines, boilers, turbines, and other technologies to produce energy or heat. The projects are beneficial in terms of increased safety at the landfill, production of a cost-effective source of energy or heat, reduced odor, reduced air pollution

  7. Landfills: Building Them Better

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Waste disposal has been an ongoing societal problem since medieval times. In this lesson, students learn about the three methods of waste disposal in use by modern communities. They also investigate how engineers design sanitary landfills to prevent leachate from polluting the underlining groundwater.

  8. Utilizing coal fly ash as a landfill barrier material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Nhan; J. W. Graydon; D. W. Kirk

    1996-01-01

    The chemical barrier properties of a composite of coal fly ash, lime dust and bentonite were studied as a potential barrier material for a landfill. An experimental study was performed to measure the hydraulic and chemical barrier properties of the material using both water and a synthetic municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate. The composite material was found to have a

  9. 3-D woven ceramic composite hot gas filter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Jay E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); LeCostaouec, Jean-Francois [Techniweave, Inc., Rochester, NH (United States); LeCostaouec, J.F., Westinghouse

    1998-01-01

    Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1997 pilot-scale demonstration in one of the two hot- gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and 11) goal is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/ Techniweave next- generation, composite, candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized- Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase 111, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect, and ship to Wilsonville 50 advanced candle filters for pilot-scale testing.

  10. Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

  11. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

    2015-02-01

    According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH4 produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH4/CO2 ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3-1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0-2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH4+CO2% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills. PMID:25488731

  12. Goal-based waste management strategy to reduce persistence of contaminants in leachate at municipal solid waste landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berrin Tansel; Banu Sizirici Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    The required minimum 30-year post-closure care period for municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills can be shortened by reducing\\u000a or eliminating of MSW components with long-terms effect in gas and leachate. The objectives of this study were to evaluate\\u000a the relative persistence of landfill gas, leachate quantity, and selected leachate parameters using post-closure monitoring\\u000a data from a case study landfill in

  13. Attenuation of methane and volatile organic compounds in landfill soil covers.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mosbaek, Hans; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The potential for natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in landfill covers was investigated in soil microcosms incubated with methane and air, simulating the gas composition in landfill soil covers. Soil was sampled at Skellingsted Landfill at a location emitting methane. In total, 26 VOCs were investigated, including chlorinated methanes, ethanes, ethenes, fluorinated hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons. The soil showed a high capacity for methane oxidation resulting in very high oxidation rates of between 24 and 112 microg CH4 g(-1) h(-1). All lower chlorinated compounds were shown degradable, and the degradation occurred in parallel with the oxidation of methane. In general, the degradation rates of the chlorinated aliphatics were inversely related to the chlorine to carbon ratios. For example, in batch experiments with chlorinated ethylenes, the highest rates were observed for vinyl chloride (VC) and lowest rates for trichloroethylene (TCE), while tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was not degraded. Maximal oxidation rates for the halogenated aliphatic compounds varied between 0.03 and 1.7 microg g(-1) h(-1). Fully halogenated hydrocarbons (PCE, tetrachloromethane [TeCM], chlorofluorocarbon [CFC]-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) were not degraded in the presence of methane and oxygen. Aromatic hydrocarbons were rapidly degraded giving high maximal oxidation rates (0.17-1.4 microg g(-1) h(-1)). The capacity for methane oxidation was related to the depth of oxygen penetration. The methane oxidizers were very active in oxidizing methane and the selected trace components down to a depth of 50 cm below the surface. Maximal oxidation activity occurred in a zone between 15 and 20 cm below the surface, as this depth allowed sufficient supply of both methane and oxygen. Mass balance calculations using the maximal oxidation rates obtained demonstrated that landfill soil covers have a significant potential for not only methane oxidation but also cometabolic degradation of selected volatile organics, thereby reducing emissions to the atmosphere. PMID:14964359

  14. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. (Hydrologic Consultants, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. (P.E. LaMoreaux and Associates, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing Application of GRAPHENE/Y2O3 Quantum Dots Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemade, K. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    Graphene/Y2O3 quantum dots (QDs) composite was investigated towards the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas at room temperature. Graphene synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite. The composite prepared by mixing 20-wt% graphene into the 1 g Y2O3 in organic medium (acetone). The chemiresistor of composite prepared by screen-printing on glass substrate. The optimum value of sensing response (1.08) was showed by 20-wt% graphene/Y2O3 QDs composite. The excellent stability with optimum sensing response evidenced for the composite. The gas sensing mechanism discussed on the basis of electron transfer reaction.

  16. Optical probing of composite fermions in a two-dimensional electron gas

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Optical probing of composite fermions in a two-dimensional electron gas M. BYSZEWSKI1 *, B states, and the associated fractionally charged excitations, suggest the existence of composite fermions--electrons in a composite fermion interacting with an exciton (a bound state of an electron and a hole) lead to filling

  17. Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, H.; Targos, W.M.

    1987-12-22

    A catalyst composition is described for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

  18. Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim (Chicago, IL); Targos, William M. (Palatine, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A catalyst composition for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

  19. Precipitates in landfill leachate mediated by dissolved organic matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenze; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei; Li, Jiangshan

    2015-04-28

    Clogging of landfill leachate collection system is so ubiquitous that it causes problems to landfills. Although precipitations of calcite and other minerals have been widely observed, the mechanism of precipitation remains obscure. We examined the clog composition, dissolved organic matters, leachate chemical compositions and the correlation of these variables in view of the precipitation process. It is shown that Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) inhibits precipitation of landfill leachate. Using the advanced NICA-Donnan model, the analysis of aqueous chemical reactions between Mg-Ca-DOC-CO2 suggests a good agreement with experimental observations. Calcite and dolomite are both found to be oversaturated in most of the landfill leachate samples. DOC is found to preferentially bind with Mg than Ca, leading to more likely precipitation of Calcite than dolomite from landfill leachate. The NICA-Donnan model gives a reasonable estimation of dolomite saturation index in a wide range of DOC. Modeling confirms the major precipitation mechanism in terms of alkaline earth metal carbonate. Uncertainties in model parameters are discussed with particular focus on DOC composition, functional group types and density concentration and the influential factors. PMID:25661175

  20. Numerical studies of gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation: An application to the IODP site 1327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structure I methane hydrate is the most common type found in nature. Structure I gas hydrate has two types of cages that gas molecules may be hosted. Because the larger cavities filled with ethane would be more stable than those filled by methane (Sloan and Koh, 2008), the larger cavities preferentially enclose ethane during the formation of gas hydrate, which results gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation. Based on the principle of gas composition differentiation, we establish a numerical model for the gas composition differentiation between methane and ethane during gas hydrate accumulation and applied the model to IODP site 1327. The simulation shows that the gas composition differentiation only occurs at the interval where gas hydrate presents. The lowest methane/ethane (C1/C2) point indicates the bottom of hydrate zone, and the composition differentiation produces the upward increase of C1/C2 within the gas hydrate zone. The C1/C2 reaches the largest value at the top occurrence of gas hydrate and keeps relative stable above the top occurrence of gas hydrate. The top and bottom occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the inflection points of the C1/C2 profile are similar to those indicated by the negative anomalies of measured chloride concentrations (Riedel et al., 2006). By comparing with the measured C1/C2, the differentiation coefficient (kh=Xe,h/Xe,w, Xe,h is C1/C2 of the formed gas hydrate, Xe,w [mol/kg] is the concentration of ethane in water ) is calculated to 70 kg/mol. The top occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the C1/C2 profile also confines the water flux to be 0.4kg/m2-year, similar to that confined by the chloride profile. To best fit the measured C1/C2 profile, the methane flux is calculated to 0.04mol/m2-year. Therefore, the C1/C2 profile could be used to obtain the gas hydrate accumulation information. Acknowledgments:This study was supported by Chinese National Science Foundation (grant 41303044, 91228206 ) ReferencesRiedel M, Collett T S, Malone, M J, et al. (2006), Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling, Volume 311. Sloan D E, Koh C A. (2008), Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases. Third edition. CRC Press, New York,USA

  1. Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan F. Clark; Libe Washburn; Katherine Schwager Emery

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between surface bubble composition and gas flux to the atmosphere was examined at five large seeps from the Coal Oil Point seep field (Santa Barbara Channel, CA, USA). The field research was conducted using a flux buoy designed to simultaneously measure the surface bubbling gas flux and the buoy's position with differential GPS, and to collect gas samples.

  2. Process for dissolving coke oven deposits comprising atomizing a composition containing N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone into the gas lines

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, M.L.; Nicholson, G.M.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for cleaning gas lines in coke oven batteries comprising atomizing a composition into the gas lines of coke oven batteries, where the composition comprises N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone.

  3. Correlating phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in a landfill leachate polluted aquifer with biogeochemical factors by multivariate statistical methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Ludvigsen; H.-J Albrechtsen; H Holst; T. H Christensen

    1997-01-01

    Different multivariate statistical analyses were applied to phospholipid fatty acids representing the biomass composition and to different biogeochemical parameters measured in 37 samples from a landfill contaminated aquifer at Grindsted Landfill (Denmark). Principal component analysis and correspondence analysis were used to identify groups of samples showing similar patterns with respect to biogeochemical variables and phospholipid fatty acid composition. The principal

  4. Construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rafizul, Islam M; Howlader, Milon Kanti; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This research concentrates the design, construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter at KUET campus, Khulna, Bangladesh. Both the aerobic and anaerobic conditions having a base liner and two different types of cap liner were simulated. After the design of a reference cell, the construction of landfill lysimeter was started in January 2008 and completed in July 2008. In all construction process locally available civil construction materials were used. The municipal solid waste (MSW) of 2800-2985 kg having the total volume of 2.80 m(3) (height 1.6 m) and moisture content of 65% was deposited in each lysimeter by applying required compaction energy. In contrast, both the composition in terms of methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and oxygen (O(2)) as well as the flow rate of landfill gas (LFG) generated from MSW in landfill lysimeter were measured and varied significantly in relation to the variation of lysimeter operational condition. Moreover, anaerobic lysimeter-C shows the highest composition of LFG in compare to the anaerobic lysimeter-B due to the providing of lower compaction of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-C. Here, it is interesting to note that in absence of compacted clay liner (CCL) and hence percolation of rainwater that facilitates rapid degradation of MSW in aerobic lysimeter-A has resulted in the highest settlement than that of anaerobic landfill lysimeter-B and C. Moreover, in case of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, the leachate generation was lower than that of aerobic lysimeter-A due to the providing of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, played an important role to reduce the percolation of rainwater. The study also reveals that the leachate pollution index (LPI) has decreased in relation to the increasing of elapsed period as well as the LPI for collection system of aerobic lysimeter-A was higher than that of the collection system of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C. Finally, it can be depicted that LPI for lysimeter was significantly high and proper treatment will be necessary before discharging the lysimeter leachate into the water bodies. PMID:22464865

  5. Gas generation at a municipal waste combustor ash monofill - Franklin, New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, C.N.; Straub, W.A. [CMA Engineers, Inc., Portsmouth, NH (United States); Bidwell, J.N. [Rex Technical Services, Bloomfield, CT (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    The characterization of landfill gas generated at municipal solid waste landfills has received significant attention in the United States in recent years. Generation of gas at municipal waste combustor (MWC) ash monofills is, however, generally assumed to be negligible and there is little, if any, published information available concerning such gases. As ash landfills move towards closure in the future, and as progress continues in utilizing certain components of MWC ash residue in construction applications, it is important to identify the mechanisms by which gases may be generated in MWC ash so that appropriate design and material management decisions can be made. This information is based upon the analysis of gas samples from leachate collection system cleanout pipes at one lined MWC ash landfill. The data were gathered because site operating staff had posed questions as to the contents of the gaseous emissions. The gas characteristics indicated the effects of exothermic chemical reactions in the landfilled ash which affected gas composition in ways which were unexpected, and not widely known.

  6. Composite hubs for low cost gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed stress analysis was performed using NASTRAN to demonstrate theoretically the adequacy of composite hubs for low cost turbine engine applications. Composite hubs are adequate for this application from the steady state stress view point.

  7. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC RETENTION PARAMETERS DATABASE FOR REFRIGERANT MIXTURE COMPOSITION MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composition management of mixed refrigerant systems is a challenging problem in the laboratory, manufacturing facilities, and large refrigeration machinery. Ths issue of composition management is especially critical for the maintenance of machinery that utilizes zeotropic mixture...

  8. Near Vent Volcanic Plume Measurement by a Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System to Estimate Volcanic Gas Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.

    2006-12-01

    Near vent plume measurement technique by the use of the Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System was developed to obtain volcanic gas composition of the major components including H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S and H2. By the combination with the Alkaline Filter Technique, the near vent plume measurement can provide almost full set of the volcanic gas composition including also HCl and HF. The Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System measures concentration of the volcanic gas species by pumping the atmosphere (plume) through IR H2O-CO2 gas analyzer, SO2, H2S and H2 chemical sensors. The full system weight including battery and data logger is about 5 kg and can be easily carried in a backpack to the volcano summit. Among the various advantages and disadvantages of this techniques to other techniques such as the FT-IR measurements and the air-borne plume measurements with various gas analyzers, the most important advantage of the Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System is the ability of the near vent measurement which enables the quantitative estimate of the H2O content in the volcanic gas. Since H2O content in the atmosphere is large and variable, a large mixing ratio of the volcanic gas in the plume is necessary to quantify the H2O excess over the atmospheric content. The atmospheric H2O content commonly ranges 5,000-20,000 ppm often with about 10% fluctuation whereas the CO2 content is about 370 ppm with minor (1 ppm) changes. Therefore we can quantify the excess CO2 content even at <1 ppm level, but we need at least 500 times larger excess H2O content derived from the volcanic gas for the quantification. By the near vent plume measurements, we could obtain the volcanic gas compositions of various volcanoes including Miyakejima, Asama and Villarrica as well as Etna whose gas composition is quite H2O-poor of H2O/CO2=1. Since H2O is commonly the most abundant volatile components both in the volcanic gases and magmas, and its solubility is quantitatively well constrained, the measured composition can provide important constraints to model the degassing processes.

  9. Gas sensitivity of carbon black\\/waterborne polyurethane composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Guo Chen; Ji Wen Hu; Ming Qiu Zhang; Ming Wei Li; Min Zhi Rong

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of conductive composites consisting of waterborne polyurethane (WPU) and carbon black (CB) is reported. Besides the low percolation threshold (0.7–0.95 wt%), the composites are quite sensitive to organic solvent vapors regardless of their polarities as characterized by the drastic changes in conductivity. In the case of polar solvents, negative and positive vapor coefficient phenomena of the composites were

  10. Perpetual landfilling through aeration of the waste mass; lessons from test cells in Georgia (USA).

    PubMed

    Read, A D; Hudgins, M; Phillips, P

    2001-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills worldwide are experiencing the consequences of conventional landfilling techniques, whereby anaerobic conditions are created within the landfilled waste. Under anaerobic conditions within a landfill site slow stabilization of the waste mass occurs, producing methane, (an explosive 'green house' gas) and leachate (which can pollute groundwater) over long periods of time. As a potential solution, it was demonstrated that the aerobic degradation of MSW within a landfill can significantly increase the rate of waste decomposition and settlement, decrease the methane production and leachate leaving the system, and potentially increase the operational life of the site. Readily integrated into the existing landfill infrastructure, this approach can safely and cost-effectively convert a MSW landfill from anaerobic to aerobic degradation processes, thereby effectively composting much of the organic portions (one of the potentially polluting elements in a conventional landfill site) of the waste. This paper summarizes the successful results of two separate aerobic landfill projects located in Georgia (USA) and discusses the potential economic and environmental impacts to worldwide solid waste management practices. PMID:11530917

  11. Composition of matter useful in flue gas desulfurization process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1983-01-01

    Flue gas having a content of sulfur dioxide is passed upwardly through a scrubbing tower against a descending flow of recycled aqueous sodium aluminate-sodium hydroxide liquor. The sulfur dioxide in the gas is converted to sodium and aluminum sulfates and sulfites and the liquor removes any fly ash present in the gas. Underflow is continuously discharged from the tower and

  12. Overburden effects on waste compaction and leachate generation in municipal landfills 

    E-print Network

    Mehevec, Adam Wade

    1994-01-01

    to the force of material placed above it. The leachate model is based on a mass balance on water, expressed within finite elements constructed throughout the landfill. It incorporates the effects of gas generation, field capacity, and precipitation...

  13. Sorption model of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benezene in municipal landfill materials 

    E-print Network

    Chuang, Yuh-Lin

    1995-01-01

    This research is intended to establish a mathematical model describing the mass transfer of trace gas in landfill. Experimental data used for calibration were reported by Stiegler et al. [ 1989]. Transfer mechanisms of TCE and benzene (trace gases...

  14. Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Studyreatment Study continued on p

    E-print Network

    Update on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate TUpdate on Hilo Landfill Leachate Treatment Studyreatment to include an under- liner system to collect and remove leachate water that soaks through the waste pile

  15. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  16. A Study of Hybrid Insulation Composition Joint using Gas and Solid Insulator for Gas Insulated Power Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkai, Hiroyuki; Goshima, Hisashi; Yashima, Masafumi

    SF6 is used as the main insulation gas for gas-insulated switchgear (GIS), but it has recently become a gas that must be restricted because of its greenhouse effect. To date, we have studied the insulation characteristics of compressed N2 and CO2 as a possible alternative for SF6. We have reported that N2 or CO2 must be pressurized up to 2.0MPa when it is used as a substitute for SF6 of 0.5MPa. Therefore, we have proposed a hybrid insulation composition that uses the gas and solid insulators. Because the central conductor of GIS is the covered by solid insulator in this composition, the high-pressure gas of 2.0MPa is not needed. However, the joint of the solid insulator becomes the weak point for discharge development. In this paper, we describe the effective configuration for the improvement of withstand voltage on the basis of the experiment. As a result, the most effective connector was made of resin without an implanted electrode and the configuration was the case without the solid-solid interface between the solid insulator of the central conductor and the resin connector. In this experiment, the improvement of the breakdown electric field of the hybrid composition was 44% or more compared with the case of only gas insulation (conventional method). In addition, a further improvement can be expected by optimizing the insulation creepage distance and configuration.

  17. Melt-infiltrated Sic Composites for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay V.

    2004-01-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) manufactured by the slurry -cast melt-infiltration (MI) process are leading candidates for many hot-section turbine engine components. A collaborative program between Goodrich Corporation and NASA-Glenn Research Center is aimed at determining and optimizing woven SiC/SiC CMC performance and reliability. A variety of composites with different fiber types, interphases and matrix compositions have been fabricated and evaluated. Particular focus of this program is on the development of interphase systems that will result in improved intermediate temperature stressed-oxidation properties of this composite system. The effect of the different composite variations on composite properties is discussed and, where appropriate, comparisons made to properties that have been generated under NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program.

  18. Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

  19. Relationships between organic vapor adsorption behaviors and gas sensitivity of carbon black filled waterborne polyurethane composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Guo Chen; Xian Lei Hu; Jing Hu; Ming Qiu Zhang; Min Zhi Rong; Qiang Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Vapor adsorption behavior and its influence on the gas sensitivity of conductive carbon black filled waterborne polyurethane composites were studied. It was found that the traditional swelling model that was applicable for the reversible variation in the composites electrical resistance induced by the solvent uptake was challenged. That is, the higher adsorption quantity was not bound to result in higher

  20. Field validation of composite repair of gas transmission pipelines. Annual report, January-December 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Stephens; T. J. Kilinski

    1994-01-01

    To help in controlling pipeline maintenance costs, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in supporting development of Clock Spring(R), a low cost fiberglass composite alternative to conventional steel sleeves for transmission line reinforcement and repair. Application of Clock Spring as a repair for blunt corrosion defects has been demonstrated. The objective of this investigation is to instal Clock Spring composite reinforcements

  1. Gas storage cylinder formed from a composition containing thermally exfoliated graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A gas storage cylinder or gas storage cylinder liner, formed from a polymer composite, containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m(exp 2)/g to 2600 m(exp 2)2/g.

  2. Composite wrap approved for U.S. gas-pipeline repairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1995-01-01

    The US agency that oversees pipeline safety has taken the unusual step of waiving certain natural-gas pipeline maintenance regulations and permitted a group of gas-pipeline operators to perform repairs with a patented composite wrap formerly used only on liquids lines. The waivers ar subject to conditions and to future performance evaluations. The wrap is made of polyester resin reinforced by

  3. Treating landfill leachate by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Job; Villarroel, Mario; Navia, Rodrigo; Teutli, Margarita

    2009-08-01

    The determination of the optimal conditions for using electrocoagulation as a treatment for landfill leachate was carried out using surface response methodology. A central composite design was applied to investigate the effect of four control factors, namely current density, pH, time and fluid conductivity, as well as the interaction among (between) them to get an optimal turbidity removal. The independent variables were each coded at three levels and their values were selected on the basis of preliminary experimental results. The central composite design consisted of 29 experimental points with five replications at the centre point. A second order polynomial model was used for predicting the response. Regression analysis showed that more than 95% of the variation was explained by the model wherein current density with a 60.1% contribution turned out to be the factor with the most significant influence. Analysis of variance showed that time, pH, current density and the interaction time/current density had a significant influence on the turbidity removal, The optimal conditions obtained for the removal of turbidity were time 38.8 min, pH 7.6, current density 109.9 A m(-2) and NaCl 2.9 g L(- 1). Experimental results showed that for a 96.9% turbidity removal, similar reduction in Al (97.0%) and Fe (99.5%) concentrations; as well as 66% total Kjeldahl nitrogen removal were obtained. Furthermore, the sludge formed exhibited a good floc size, which separated in less than 10 min by classical sedimentation. The results analysis provided evidence of reduction of chemical pollutants, although the electrocoagulated leachate could not satisfy regulations for the maximum Total Kjeldahl nitrogen leachate discharge level to public wastewater collection systems in the town of Freire, Chile. PMID:19470548

  4. Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan F. Clark; Libe Washburn; Katherine Schwager Emery

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between surface bubble composition and gas flux to the atmosphere was examined at five large seeps from the\\u000a Coal Oil Point seep field (Santa Barbara Channel, CA, USA). The field research was conducted using a flux buoy designed to\\u000a simultaneously measure the surface bubbling gas flux and the buoy’s position with differential GPS, and to collect gas samples.

  5. Novel composite hollow fibre gas separation membranes with high selectivity and improved solvent resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Tasselli; Raffaella Aloe; Johannes C. Jansen; Enrico Drioli

    2006-01-01

    Composite gas separation membranes with a 0.1–3 ?m thick film of Hyflon AD 60X on a porous hollow fibre ultrafiltration membrane support of amorphous poly(ether ether ketone), were prepared. The influence of the coating conditions on the film thickness and on the pure gas transport properties was studied. The gas transport properties were related to the film thickness and to

  6. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

    2008-07-01

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  7. Analysis of odorous compounds at municipal landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Rociek, Anna; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Szczepaniec-Cieciak, Elzbieta; Riesenmey, Caroline; Vaillant, Hervé; Batton-Hubert, Mireille; Piejko, Krzysztof

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine odorous compounds in the air over the landfill sites in France and Poland. Air samples were collected by passive and dynamic methods of preconcentration analytes and analysed by GC-MS and GC-FID. The coupling microTD-microGC-MS was also used for on-site analysis of odorous compounds. The achieved results indicated that the concentrations of odorants in the air varied and strongly depended on the sampling site. The highest concentrations were observed at the points situated near biogas wells and above the fresh waste layer. The concentrations were influenced by landfill activities such as failures of the landfill gas collection system, heavy truck traffic, machinery operations and compacting fresh waste. PMID:19710115

  8. Compositional discrimination of decompression and decomposition gas bubbles in bycaught seals and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Greer, Bill; Niemeyer, Misty; Bogomolni, Andrea L; Moore, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Gas bubbles in marine mammals entangled and drowned in gillnets have been previously described by computed tomography, gross examination and histopathology. The absence of bacteria or autolytic changes in the tissues of those animals suggested that the gas was produced peri- or post-mortem by a fast decompression, probably by quickly hauling animals entangled in the net at depth to the surface. Gas composition analysis and gas scoring are two new diagnostic tools available to distinguish gas embolisms from putrefaction gases. With this goal, these methods have been successfully applied to pathological studies of marine mammals. In this study, we characterized the flux and composition of the gas bubbles from bycaught marine mammals in anchored sink gillnets and bottom otter trawls. We compared these data with marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Fresh animals or with moderate decomposition (decomposition scores of 2 and 3) were prioritized. Results showed that bycaught animals presented with significantly higher gas scores than stranded animals. Gas composition analyses indicate that gas was formed by decompression, confirming the decompression hypothesis. PMID:24367623

  9. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is composed of the original 32-acre landfill, plus expansion areas to the north and south that added 16 and 22 acres, respectively, to the facility. The landfill is subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and currently operates under South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Domestic Waste Permit 87A. Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor the groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (formerly Aquifer Zone I/IIC[sub 2]) (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill. These wells are sampled quarterly for certain indicator parameters, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, volatile organics, and other constituents as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the SCDHEC domestic waste permit. This report reviews the 1992 activities of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  10. Where Should the Landfill Go?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Rosario P.; McFaden, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project where students were involved in finding the most suitable site for a landfill in their community. This two-month project was conducted using team teaching. Two twelfth grade geoscience classes were involved. (PR)

  11. Behavior of stabilized fly ashes in solid waste landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Shimaoka, Takayuki; Hanashima, Masataka [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-12-31

    In Japan, the fly ash generated by incineration of municipal solid waste has come to be handled as general waste under special management in recent years. At the same time, direct landfilling or ocean dumping of fly ash is legally prohibited. To avoid the possibility of causing damages affecting human health or life environment, fly ash must be subjected to intermediate treatment, and must be stabilized, encapsulated and made hygienic by removing pollutants. Four methods can be given for fly ash intermediate treatment: (1) cement solidification, (2) treatment by chemicals, (3) acid and other solvents and (4) melting and solidification. On the other hand, various phenomena affecting fly ash occur on the landfilled waste layer, such as generation of organic acid and carbon dioxide gas due to decomposition of solid waste. Fly ash solidified by cement is deteriorated by water-soluble sulfate and organic acid and carbon dioxide gas produced by decomposition of organic substances in the municipal solid waste. This may result in a reduced strength of hazardous substances and re-melting of fly ash solidified by cement. Furthermore, encapsulated hazardous heavy metals may be eluted from fly ash treated by chemicals due to the change in chemical environments in the landfilled solid waste layer according to stabilization of the landfilled solid waste. In this present study, the large-sized landfill model lysimeter is filled with cement-solidified fly ash or chemically treated fly ash treated together with municipal solid waste to obtain correct information on the changes in the physical and chemical properties of the cement-solidified fly ash, and temporal concentration of hazardous substances contained in seepage leachate or leachate in the landfilled solid waste layer, thereby clarifying the long-term stability of the disposed fly ash.

  12. Hazardous waste landfill leachate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelka, C. (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Maryland Heights, MO (United States)); Loehr, R.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Program); Haikola, B. (Remediation Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Leachate data from 18 commercial hazardous waste landfills or cells were evaluated to determine overall leachate characteristics and parameters that may affect leachate generation and characteristics. The landfills studied have a wide range of practices, none of which are necessarily representative of the most current landfill design, operating or closure practice in the United States. The leachate samples were from landfills that represented varying waste types, waste age, geographic locations and climate. The parameters evaluated included chemical properties, co-disposal of hazardous and municipal solid wastes, climatic conditions, and waste age in the landfills. The leachate samples had been analyzed for 62 volatiles, 107 semi-volatiles, 16 metals, 28 pesticides, herbicides and insecticides, and 17 other chemicals. The results indicate that: (a) the organics in the leachate with high concentrations had high solubilities and low octanol-water coefficients, (b) landfills in arid climates produced less leachate than those in temperate and sub-tropical climates, and (c) leachate production appeared to be related to use of a cap or cover.

  13. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  14. Integrating remediation and resource recovery: On the economic conditions of landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Frändegård, Per; Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes the economic potential of integrating material separation and resource recovery into a landfill remediation project, and discusses the result and the largest impact factors. The analysis is done using a direct costs/revenues approach and the stochastic uncertainties are handled using Monte Carlo simulation. Two remediation scenarios are applied to a hypothetical landfill. One scenario includes only remediation, while the second scenario adds resource recovery to the remediation project. Moreover, the second scenario is divided into two cases, case A and B. In case A, the landfill tax needs to be paid for re-deposited material and the landfill holder does not own a combined heat and power plant (CHP), which leads to disposal costs in the form of gate fees. In case B, the landfill tax is waived on the re-deposited material and the landfill holder owns its own CHP. Results show that the remediation project in the first scenario costs about €23/ton. Adding resource recovery as in case A worsens the result to -€36/ton, while for case B the result improves to -€14/ton. This shows the importance of landfill tax and the access to a CHP. Other important factors for the result are the material composition in the landfill, the efficiency of the separation technology used, and the price of the saleable material. PMID:25962826

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Hechimovich Sanitary Landfill Site, Williamstown, Dodge County, WI, September 6, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This document presents the decision of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) on the final source control and groundwater remedy that is necessary at the Land and Gas Reclamation Landfill site in the Town of Williamstown, Dodge County, Wisconsin. The final remedial action for this site consists of the existing NR 504 Wis. Adm. Code clay cap and, if necessary, an expansion of the current operating gas extraction system. The additional actions proposed in this Record of Decision (ROD) will increase the landfill gas extraction rate. The increased gas extraction rate will be accomplished either by adding additional gas extraction wells in the waste or by increasing the gas flow rate through the existing well system. The intent will be to, as rapidly as possible, reduce the volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentration in the landfill wastes and consequently reduce the VOC loading from the landfill to groundwater.

  16. Background Information Document for Updating AP42 Section 2.4 for Estimating Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revised draft document was prepared for U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development, and describes the data analysis undertaken to update the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfill section of AP-42. This 2008 update includes the addition of data from 62 landfill gas emission...

  17. Onsite survey on the mechanism of passive aeration and air flow path in a semi-aerobic landfill.

    PubMed

    Matsuto, Toshihiko; Zhang, Xin; Matsuo, Takayuki; Yamada, Shuhei

    2015-02-01

    The semi-aerobic landfill is a widely accepted landfill concept in Japan because it promotes stabilization of leachates and waste via passive aeration without using any type of mechanical equipment. Ambient air is thought to be supplied to the landfill through a perforated pipe network made of leachate collection pipe laid along the bottom and a vertically erected gas vent. However, its underlying air flow path and driving forces are unclear because empirical data from real-world landfills is inadequate. The objective of this study is to establish scientific evidence about the aeration mechanisms and air flow path by an on-site survey of a full-scale, semi-aerobic landfill. First, all passive vents located in the landfill were monitored with respect to temperature level and gas velocity in different seasons. We found a linear correlation between the outflow rate and gas temperature, suggesting that air flow is driven by a buoyancy force caused by the temperature difference between waste in the landfill and the ambient temperature. Some vents located near the landfill bottom acted as air inflow vents. Second, we conducted a tracer test to determine the air flow path between two vents, by injecting tracer gas from an air sucking vent. The resulting slowly increasing gas concentration at the neighboring vent suggested that fresh air flow passes through the waste layer toward the gas vents from leachate collection pipes, as well as directly flowing through the pipe network. Third, we monitored the temperature of gas flowing out of a vent at night. Since the temperature drop of the gas was much smaller than that of the environment, the air collected at the gas vents was estimated to flow mostly through the waste layer, i.e., the semi-aerobic landfill has considerable aeration ability under the appropriate conditions. PMID:25443098

  18. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24?h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12?h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO(2), suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  19. [Pathways of mercury emissions to atmosphere from closed municipal landfills].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Gen; Feng, Xin-Bin; Tang, Shun-Lin; Wang, Shao-Feng

    2006-01-01

    Using the automated mercury vapor analyzer and dynamic flux chamber (DFC) method, the pathways of mercury emissions to atmosphere were measured at a closed landfill in Wuhan, China. The results show that the mainly pathway is by the surface cover, and emissions from vent pipes is negligible. Average Hg fluxes during the observation period was (192.5 +/- 245.3) ng x (m2 x h)(-1), which was 1 - 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from background zone. Hg flux exhibited a clearly diurnal pattern, reaching the maximum near midday and the lowest during night. Solar radiation was the environmental factor that has highest relationship with Hg flux, with coefficient of 0.77, this indicated that photo-reduction of Hg(II) being a prominent process in the production of volatile elemental mercury (Hg(0)). Mercury concentrations in landfill gas (LFG) at different vent pipes averaged from 7.0 - 68.9 ng x m(-3), which was much lower than that of operational landfills, and the flow rate of landfill gas was very slow. PMID:16599114

  20. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Landfill to Learning Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-05-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in scientific exploration and discovery is the main goal of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will bring hands-on scientific experiences to the 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Our programs adhere to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and are modified for accessibility for the underserved communities that visit us, specifically those individuals that have mobility, sensory, and/or cognitive ability differences. The programs are conducted in a classroom setting and are designed to nourish the individual's inquisitive nature and provide an opportunity to function as a scientist by, making observations, performing experiments and recording data. We have an $850,000, three year NSF grant that targets adults with disabilities and older adults with age related limitations in vision, hearing, cognition and/or mobility. From dip netting in the marsh to astronomical investigation of the cosmos, the MEC/CESE remains committed to reaching the largest audience possible and leaving them with a truly exceptional scientific experience that serves to educate and inspire.

  2. Landfills as sources of polyfluorinated compounds, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and musk fragrances to ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Ingo; Dreyer, Annekatrin; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2011-02-01

    In order to investigate landfills as sources of polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and synthetic musk fragrances to the atmosphere, air samples were simultaneously taken at two landfills (one active and one closed) and two reference sites using high volume air samplers. Contaminants were accumulated on glass fiber filters (particle phase) and PUF/XAD-2/PUF cartridges (gas phase), extracted by methyl-tert butyl ether/acetone (neutral PFCs), methanol (ionic PFCs) or hexane/acetone (PBDEs, musk fragrances), and detected by GC-MS (neutral PFCs, PBDEs, musk fragrances) or HPLC-MS/MS (ionic PFCs). Total concentrations ranged from 84 to 706 pg m -3 (volatile PFCs, gas phase), from gas + particle phase) and from 1 to 11 pg m -3 (PBDEs, gas + particle phase). Observed sum concentrations of PFCs and synthetic musk fragrances and partly PBDE concentrations were elevated at landfill sites compared to corresponding reference sites. Concentrations determined at the active landfill were higher than those of the inactive landfill. Overall, landfills can be regarded as a source of synthetic musk fragrances, several PFCs and potentially of PBDEs to ambient air.

  3. Gas composition in the annealing zone and glass working properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Gorokhovskii; K. V. Polyakov

    1991-01-01

    The composition of the atmosphere in the glass shaping zone has a marked effect on the surface-layer structure and properties. The various gases have individual effects in reducing the excess energy. One can vary the ratios or introduce new gases or vapor to suppress or activate various surface processes [i]. However, structure formation does not cease below the vitrification temperature,

  4. Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.

    1999-07-28

    This report summarizes the performance of the Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test data, an evaluation of applicability, conclusions, recommendations, and related information for implementation of this remediation technology at the SRS Sanitary Landfill.

  5. Long-Range Radar Station and Landfill

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This oblique aerial photograph from 2006 shows the Barter Island long-range radar station landfill threatened by coastal erosion. The landfill was subsequently relocated further inland, however, the coastal bluffs continue to retreat. ...

  6. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock-581-3468 Garfield City of Enid Landfill 580-249-4917 Garvin Foster Waste Disposal Landfill 405-238-2012 Jackson City American Environmental Landfill 918-245-7786 Call ahead Pontotoc City of Ada Municipal Landfill 580

  7. Stable volcanic gas composition during a variety of activities at the persistently degassing Asama volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Ohminato, Takao; Takeo, Minoru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2015-04-01

    Asama volcano at central Japan is a persistently degassing andesitic volcano and repeated eruptions every several years. The recent eruptions occurred in September 2004, August 2008 and February 2009 and are followed by increase of the volcanic gas emission during several months. The SO2 flux is typically 1,000-4,000 t/d during the high flux period after the eruption, whereas the flux is around 100 t/d during the low gas flux periods. This study aims to understand the controlling process of volcano degassing based on the volcanic gas composition data. In particular, we focus to evaluate the gas composition contrast between the high and low gas flux periods. Since 2004, we repeated manual measurements of Multi-GAS and alkali-filters at the summit crater of the volcano and installed an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station for a daily measurement at the western rim of the summit crater in 2010. During our observation, the high flux period occurred twice, 2004-2006 and 2008-2010, both with eruptive activities. In spite of the large SO2 flux variation and eruptions, we did not see any clear variation in the gas compositions during these periods. The typical CO2/SO2 ratios of 0.8 and H2O/SO2 ratios of 30 were measured both during the high flux periods and the low flux periods. A manual gas measurement was conducted on 13 Sept. 2004, after a small vulcanian eruption on 1st Sept. and just before the continuous ash emission started on 15 Sept, however, the measured gas compositions are similar with those during other periods. The HCl/SO2 ratios measured with the alikali-filters agree well with those obtained by FT-IR on 15 and 16th Sept, as well as those by leachates of ashes erupted during this period. The constant gas composition suggests a stable degassing conditions regardless of the variety of the activity. The similar HCl/SO2 ratios obtained during both the eruptive period and the persistent degassing stage indicate a low pressure gas degassing, suggesting the conduit magma convection.

  8. Infrared single wavelength gas composition monitoring for metalorganic vapour-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, S. P.; Pinnington, T.; Hu, J.; Yeo, P.; Kluth, M.; Mason, N. J.; Nicholas, R. J.; Walker, P. J.

    2000-12-01

    We discuss the use of fixed wavelength infrared absorption measurements as a means for observing compositional changes in MOVPE process gas mixtures using relatively simple instrumentation consisting of an incandescent lamp, a narrow bandpass filter matched to the CH stretch modes of the alkyl precursors, and an infrared detector. An advantage of this setup is that the low energy of the infrared radiation does not induce photolysis reactions on the analyser cell windows in contrast to ultraviolet-based techniques. We present preliminary data on gas composition measurements obtained in the alkyl lines of an MOVPE reactor and show that useful information can readily be obtained on absolute gas concentrations, gas switching transients, and reactor line memory effects.

  9. Real-time Multi-GAS sensing of volcanic gas composition: experiences from the permanent Etna and Stromboli networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Gurrieri, S.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the composition of volcanic gases released from active volcanoes brings profound insights into our understanding of volcanic processes and, when combined with other methods, contributes to volcano monitoring. Volcanic gases can now be measured with a large variety of highly sophisticated techniques, but high-resolution routine measurements are possible with only a few of them (e.g., FTIR), and typically for only a few compounds. The Multi-GAS (Multi-component Gas Analyser System) technique has recently been demonstrated as a powerful method for the real-time high-resolution measurement of volcanic gas plumes, as has been used for discrete measurement surveys at several volcanoes including, among others, Etna, Stromboli and Vulcano in Italy, Villarica in Chile, Masaya in Nicaragua, Yasur and Ambrym in Vanuatu Republic, Miyakejima and Asama in Japan, and Soufriere Hill volcano on Montserrat. More recently, permanent Multi-GAS devices have been installed for the first on an active volcano at Etna (in 2004) and Stromboli (in 2006), allowing for the acquisition of unprecedented accurate time-series of volcanic gas compositions (for the three major components CO2-SO2-H2O) at both volcanoes. Here, we review the results of such permanent MultiGAS networks, and we demonstrate their implications for the comprehension of volcanic degassing processes. We also show that cycles of increase of Multi-GAS-sensed CO2/SO2 ratios preceded the most recent eruptive episodes on Etna in 2006-2008 and Stromboli in 2007, providing us with valuable precursor information on magma ascent within the shallow plumbing systems of these very active volcanoes, and thus deeply contributing to volcano hazard mitigation.

  10. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; Turner, M; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited. PMID:23822381

  11. Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, S.; King, F.G.; Su, N.

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates and then characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane fabrication; Characterization of composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. The experimental procedures are described.

  12. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  13. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  14. Gas7-Deficient Mouse Reveals Roles in Motor Function and Muscle Fiber Composition during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Tsang; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Su, Ching-Hua; Chao, Chuck C.-K.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background Growth arrest-specific gene 7 (Gas7) has previously been shown to be involved in neurite outgrowth in vitro; however, its actual role has yet to be determined. To investigate the physiological function of Gas7 in vivo, here we generated a Gas7-deficient mouse strain with a labile Gas7 mutant protein whose functions are similar to wild-type Gas7. Methodology/Principal Findings Our data show that aged Gas7-deficient mice have motor activity defects due to decreases in the number of spinal motor neurons and in muscle strength, of which the latter may be caused by changes in muscle fiber composition as shown in the soleus. In cross sections of the soleus of Gas7-deficient mice, gross morphological features and levels of myosin heavy chain I (MHC I) and MHC II markers revealed significantly fewer fast fibers. In addition, we found that nerve terminal sprouting, which may be associated with slow and fast muscle fiber composition, was considerably reduced at neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) during aging. Conclusions/Significance These findings indicate that Gas7 is involved in motor neuron function associated with muscle strength maintenance. PMID:22662195

  15. Variation of Volcanic Gas Composition at a Persistently Degassing Asama Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Ohminato, T.; Takeo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Asama volcano at central Japan is a persistently degassing andesitic volcano and repeated eruptions every several years. The recent eruptions occurred in September 2004, August 2008 and February 2009 and are followed by increase of the volcanic gas emission during several months. The SO2 flux is typically 1,000-4,000 t/d during the high flux period after the eruption, whereas the flux is around 100 t/d during the low gas flux periods (JMA, 2013; Ohwada et al., in review). This study aims to understand the controlling process of volcano degassing based on the volcanic gas composition data. In particular, we focus to evaluate the gas composition contrast between the high and low gas flux periods. As the fumaroles and degassing vent locate in the summit crater of 500-m-diamter and are inaccessible, we estimated the gas composition by plume measurements with the Multi-GAS at the crater rim. The HCl/SO2 ratios are obtained by the alkali-filter trap. We started the repeat Multi-GAS measurements in 2004 and installed an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station for a daily measurement at the western rim of the summit crater in 2010. The gas compositions obtained by the Multi-GAS measurements are often scattered even during the day of measurements, in particular during the low flux period and the scatter is likely due to variable contamination of gases from low-temperature fumaroles locating along the crater rim because the low-temperature fumaroles locate closer to the measurement site that the major degassing vent at the bottom of the crater. If we plot the gas concentration ratio, such as CO2/SO2 against SO2 concentration, the ratio commonly converges to a certain value at high SO2 concentration and this ratio is considered as representative of the major gas emission. The estimated molar ratios are CO2/SO2=1×0.5, HCl/SO2=0.2×0.1 and H2O/SO2=60×30 without clear contrast during the high and low flux periods. The CO2/SO2 ratios obtained based on a single day data tend to be higher than the average, however, the analyses with a larger data set, e.g., for a month, results in the average value. The HCl/SO2 ratios agree well with those obtained during the 2004 eruptive period by FT-IR and ash-leachate analyses with the range of 0.15-0.2 and 0.1-0.2, respectively (Mori and Notsu, 2005; Nogami et al., 2004). The H2O/SO2 ratios also tend to be higher during the low flux period and this can be due to a larger contribution of meteoric water during the low flux period. The constant gas composition regardless of the large variation of the gas flux suggests that the degassing process and its condition remains the same for the high and low flux periods. The similar HCl/SO2 ratio obtained during both the eruptive period by FT-IR and ash leachate and the persistent degassing stage in this study indicates that persistent degassing is fed by low pressure gas separation from continuously ascending magmas, consistent with the conduit magma convection model (Ohwada et al., in review; Shinohara, 2008). Based on the conduit magma convection model, the large flux changes without variation of the gas composition can be caused by the change of the magma convection rate with similar degassing pressure and magma composition.

  16. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janus T. Kirkeby; Harpa Birgisdottir; Gurbakash Singh Bhander; Michael Hauschild; Thomas H. Christensen

    2007-01-01

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order

  17. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  18. Noble gas isotopic composition as a key reference parameter in a planetary atmospheric evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.

    2010-12-01

    The isotopic composition of noble gases is a key reference parameter in discussing the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Currently, two widely occurring noble gas components are identified in the early solar system, one is the Solar Wind noble gas (SW-noble gas, hereafter) and another is the Q-noble gas in unaltered meteorites: both noble gases are characterized by their ubiquitous occurrence and high isotopic homogeneity. Since the SW-noble gas is directly ejected from the Sun, it has been assumed to be a good proxy of the average noble gas isotopic composition in the Sun, namely the solar noble gas. The systematic enrichment of the heavier isotopes in the Q-noble gas relative to the SW-noble gas is then commonly attributed to its isotopic fractionation from the SW-noble gas. However, the isotopic compositions of the SW-noble gas either implanted on lunar soils or trapped by artificial targets show considerable isotopic variation depending on the velocity of the Solar Wind. Therefore, it is important to examine how closely the SW-noble gas represents the indigenous solar noble gas component or the mean isotopic composition of noble gases of the Sun. Here we show that the isotopic composition of the SW-noble gas is substantially fractionated relative to the solar value, and therefore should not be used as a reference parameter. We further suggest that the post D-burning Q-noble gas (see below) is the better proxy of the solar noble gas, and this should be used as a reference of the Solar noble gas isotopic composition in discussing the planetary atmospheric evolution. The most distinct difference between the Q- and the SW-noble gas is apparent in a 3He/4He isotopic ratio: 4.64e-4 in Q-He [1], but 1.23e-4 in SW-He[2]. The difference is attributed to the conversion of deuteron (D) to 3He in the Sun, namely the D-burning [3], due to high temperature during the pre-main sequence stage of the Sun. With the use of recent data on D/H ratios from helio-seismology [4] and spectroscopic observation of the inter-stellar cloud [5], we estimated that the 3He/4He ratio in the post D-burning He in the Sun is 3.98e-4. The latter value is considerably smaller than the recent estimate of the SW-He ratio by the GENESIS mission of 3He/4He = 4.64e-4 [2]. We conclude that this difference is due to isotopic fractionation during the ejection of the Solar Wind from the solar atmosphere. The further interesting implication of this conclusion is that the marked difference in 3He/4He between the SW- and Q-noble gases can be used as an unique chronological marker in the planetary atmospheric evolution. [1] Busemann H. et al., Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 35, 949-973, 2000. [2] Heber V. et al. Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta, 73, 7414-7432, 2009. [3] Geiss J. and Reeve H. Astronomy Astrophysics, 18, 126-132, 1972. [4] Basu S. and Antia H.M. Astrophysical J. , 606:L85-L88, 2004. [5] Linsky J.L. et al. Astrophysical J., 647:1106-1124, 2006.

  19. Estimation of municipal solid waste landfill settlement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hoe I. Ling; Dov Leshchinsky; Yoshiyuki Mohri; Toshinori Kawabata

    1998-01-01

    The municipal solid waste landfill suffers from large postclosure settlement that occurs over an extended period of time. A large differential settlement may impair foundations, utilities, and other associated facilities constructed on top of a landfill. It may also lead to breakage of the geomembrane and damage of the cover system in a modern municipal solid waste landfill. The waste

  20. Organic compounds in municipal landfill leachates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Paxéus

    2000-01-01

    Leachates from three municipal landfills in the Göteborg area of western Sweden were characterised in terms of their content of individual organic compounds. Two of the investigated landfills were still in use during the time of this study. The third landfill was closed down in the mid-seventies. More than 200 individual organic compounds and classes of compounds were identified in

  1. FIELD VERIFICATION OF HELP MODEL FOR LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term simulations of 17 landfill cells from six sites are performed using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer model. esults are compared with field data from a variety of landfills to verify the model and to identify shortcomings. he sites are lo...

  2. APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING GLOBAL LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an overview of available country-specific data and modeling approaches for estimating global landfill methane. Current estimates of global landfill methane indicate that landfills account for between 4 and 15% of the global methane budget. The report describes an ap...

  3. The decomposition of forest products in landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Micales; K. E. Skog

    1997-01-01

    Large quantities of forest products are disposed of in landfills annually. The fate of this vast pool of carbon is important since carbon sequestration and the generation of landfill gases have important implications for global warming. Published estimates of methane yields were used to estimate the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from landfilled forest products. These calculations suggest

  4. Landfill alternative offers powerful case.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    With many of Europe's landfill sites now close to capacity, and the EU Landfill Directive requiring that, by 2020, the amount of waste sent to landfill should be just 35% of the volume similarly disposed of in 1995, pressure is mounting to find environmentally acceptable waste disposal alternatives. At a recent IHEEM waste seminar, Gary Connelly, a technical consultant at environmental technology consultancy the Cameron Corporation, described a technology which he explained can effectively convert 85% of the European Waste Catalogue of materials into an inert residue, is "cleaner and cheaper" than incineration, and can generate both electricity an waste heat. As HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports, a key target market is healthcare facilities. PMID:21585140

  5. The heavy noble gas composition of the depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and1 its implications for the origin of heterogeneities in the upper mantle2

    E-print Network

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    1 The heavy noble gas composition of the depleted MORB mantle (DMM) and1 its implications of the ubiquitous presence of atmospheric contamination, the heavy noble gas14 composition of mid ocean ridge compositions in MORBs from the equatorial Mid-Atlantic16 Ridge to characterize the heavy noble gas composition

  6. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  7. Determination of breath gas composition of lung cancer patients using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with monolithic material sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen; Gao, Peng; Fan, Jun; Hashi, Yuki; Chen, Zilin

    2015-06-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method with monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE) pretreatment was developed to determine the breath gas composition in lung cancer patients. MonoTrap silica monolithic and hybrid adsorbent was selected as the extraction medium during MMSE, given its strong capacity to extract volatile organic compounds (VOC) from exhaled gas. Under the appropriate conditions, high extraction efficiency was achieved. Using the selected ion-monitoring mode, the limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio 3) for the benzene series was 0.012-2.172?ng?L(-1) . The limit of quantitation (signal-to-noise ratio, 10) was 0.042-7.24?ng?L(-1) . The linearity range of the method was 4-400?ng?L(-1) . Average recovery of the benzene series at lower concentrations was 65-74% (20?ng?L(-1) ). The relative standard deviation of benzene series contents determined within the linear range of detection was <10% of the mean level determined. Our proposed method is simple, rapid and sensitive, and can be competently applied to determine the breath gas composition of lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25421853

  8. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

    1988-07-19

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  9. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, Raymond J. (Mt. Prospect, IL); Kurek, Paul R. (Schaumburg, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  10. Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D. [Tesseract Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

  11. Gas production during refuse decomposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Farquhar; F. A. Rovers

    1973-01-01

    Gas production in sanitary landfills is a subject of much concern because of the potential hazards of CH4 combustion and of groundwater contamination by CO2. This study investigated the pattern of sanitary landfill gas production and the factors which affect it.

  12. Mass Spectrometric Measurements of the Neutral Gas Composition of the Thermosphere and Exosphere of Venus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. B. Niemann; W. T. Kasprzak; A. E. Hedin; D. M. Hunten; N. W. Spencer

    1980-01-01

    The neutral gas composition and density in the thermosphere of Venus is being measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Pioneer Venus orbiter. Data are obtained near periapsis once per day approximately 150-250 km above the surface. The principal gases in the thermosphere are CO2, CO, N2, O, N, and He. Atomic oxygen is the major constituent above 155

  13. Eukaryotic diversity in an anaerobic aquifer polluted with landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Traian Brad; Martin Braster; Breukelen van B. M; Straalen van N. M; Wilfred F. M. Roling

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes may influence pollutant degradation processes in groundwater ecosystems by activities such as predation on bacteria and recycling of nutrients. Culture-independent community profiling and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA gene fragments, as well as culturing, were employed to obtain insight into the sediment- associated eukaryotic community composition in an anaerobic sandy aquifer polluted with landfill leachate (Ban- isveld, The Netherlands).

  14. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, O; Becker, N; Shani, E

    2006-01-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park. PMID:16376068

  15. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Ayalon, O. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Economics and Management, Tel Hai College and NRERC, University of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Shani, E. [Dan Region Association of Towns, Sanitation and Waste Disposal (Israel)

    2006-07-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

  16. A performance-based system for the long-term management of municipal waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-04-01

    Landfills have been the dominant alternative for disposal of solid waste and there are tens of thousands of closed landfills throughout the world that require a long-term management strategy. In contrast to approaches based on time or target values, this paper describes a performance-based methodology for evaluation of post-closure care (PCC). Using the methodology, critical components of PCC at a landfill, including leachate and gas management, groundwater monitoring and cover integrity, are considered to determine whether a landfill meets defined conditions for functional stability and can transition from regulated PCC to a post-regulatory custodial care program representing de minimus care activities only. The methodology is predicated on understanding the biological, chemical, and physical behavior of a landfill and the presence of sufficient data to verify expected trends in landfill behavior. If an evaluation suggests that a change can be made to PCC, the landfill owner must perform confirmation monitoring and then surveillance monitoring at a decreasing frequency to verify that the change is protective of human health and the environment. A hypothetical case study showed that using the methodology to evaluate site-specific PCC requirements could result in increased environmental protection at comparable cost by spending available funds where they are most needed. PMID:21186115

  17. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  18. Thermal performance of multilayer insulations. [gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. W.; Cunnington, G. R.; Glassford, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted in order to extend previous knowledge of the thermal performance and gas evacuation characteristics of three selected multilayer insulation (MLI) composites. Flat plate calorimeter heat flux measurements were obtained for 20- and 80- shield specimens using three representative layer densities over boundary temperatures ranging from 39 K (70 R) to 389 K (700 R). Laboratory gas evacuation tests were performed on representative specimens of each MLI composite after initially purging them with helium, nitrogen, or argon gases. In these tests, the specimens were maintained at temperatures between 128 K (230 R) and 300 K (540 R). Based on the results of the laboratory-scale tests, a composite MLI system consisting of 112 unperforated, double-aluminized Mylar reflective shields and 113 water preconditioned silk net spacer pairs was fabricated and installed on a 1.22-m-(4-ft-) diameter calorimeter tank.

  19. Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to fullsize, 60-mm OD by 1.5-meter-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are underway. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

  20. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  1. Chemically designed Pt/PPy nano-composite for effective LPG gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Namrata; Bhanoth, Sreenu; More, Priyesh V.; Jain, G. H.; Khanna, P. K.

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous in situ reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid by the amine group in the pyrrole monomer and oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole (PPy) was examined. The reactions were performed at various temperatures to understand the degree of reduction of platinum precursor as well as doping of polypyrrole with Pt(ii) chloro-complex. Spectroscopic images revealed different morphologies for the Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at various temperatures. The as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite samples were tested for their ability to sense liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) which resulted in excellent sensing at relatively low temperature. The porous nature and ohmic contact between the PPy and platinum nanoparticles makes the as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite highly useful for sensors as well as electronic applications.Simultaneous in situ reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid by the amine group in the pyrrole monomer and oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole (PPy) was examined. The reactions were performed at various temperatures to understand the degree of reduction of platinum precursor as well as doping of polypyrrole with Pt(ii) chloro-complex. Spectroscopic images revealed different morphologies for the Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at various temperatures. The as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite samples were tested for their ability to sense liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) which resulted in excellent sensing at relatively low temperature. The porous nature and ohmic contact between the PPy and platinum nanoparticles makes the as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite highly useful for sensors as well as electronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FT-IR spectra of Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at 150 °C (NB). Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) of Pt/PPy composite prepared at 150 °C (NB) and EDAX analysis of NA, NB and NC samples to deduce the elemental composition of the samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05375j

  2. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  3. Predicting Chemical Fingerprints of Vadose Zone Soil Gas and Indoor Air from NonAqueous Phase Liquid Composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen D. Uhler; Kevin J. McCarthy; Stephen D. Emsbo-Mattingly; Scott A. Stout; Gregory S. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Complex mixtures of volatile organic chemical (VOC) vapors can exist over subsurface accumulations of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and contaminated soils. The ability to predict the relative soil gas chemical composition arising from such NAPLs is relevant to studies of the sources and fate of soil gas, and in assessing the possible intrusion of soil gas chemical constituents to indoor

  4. Composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the CassiniHuygens probe gas

    E-print Network

    Atreya, Sushil

    Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment H. B. Niemann,1 S. K. Atreya,2 J. E. Demick,3 D] The CassiniHuygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) determined the composition of the Titan as measured by the CassiniHuygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res., 115

  5. Development of fiberglass composite systems for natural gas pipeline service. Final report, January 1987-March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, N.C.

    1994-03-01

    Fiberglass composites suitable for use in the repair and reinforcement of natural gas transmission line pipe were developed and evaluated. Three types of composite systems were studied: (1) a nonintrusive system for on-line field of corrosion and mechanical damage, (2) line pipe reinforced with filament wound composite, and (3) low-cost systems suitable for over-the-ditch rehabilitation of long pipeline sections. Effort during this program concentrated on the first two areas. A unique fiberglass/polyester device, called Clock Spring, was developed and successfully tested both as a means of terminating rapidly propagating cracks and for on-line repair of metal loss defects. Composite reinforced pipe was produced and hydrotested, and subsequently installed in an operating pipeline to evaluate its long-term behavior in pipeline service.

  6. Did state renewable portfolio standards induce technical change in methane mitigation in the U.S. landfill sector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhotal, Katherine Casey

    Landfill gas (LFG) projects use the gas created from decomposing waste, which is approximately 49% methane, and substitute it for natural gas in engines, boilers, turbines, and other technologies to produce energy or heat. The projects are beneficial in terms of increased safety at the landfill, production of a cost-effective source of energy or heat, reduced odor, reduced air pollution emissions, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, landfills sometimes face conflicting policy incentives. The theory of technical change shows that the diffusion of a technology or groups of technologies increases slowly in the beginning and then picks up speed as knowledge and better understanding of using the technology diffuses among potential users. Using duration analysis, data on energy prices, State and Federal policies related to landfill gas, renewable energy, and air pollution, as well as control data on landfill characteristics, I estimate the influence and direction of influence of renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The analysis found that RPS positively influences the diffusion of landfill gas technologies, encouraging landfills to consider electricity generation projects over direct sales of LFG to another facility. Energy price increases or increased revenues for a project are also critical. Barriers to diffusion include air emission permits in non-attainment areas and policies, such as net metering, which promote other renewables over LFG projects. Using the estimates from the diffusion equations, I analyze the potential influence of a Federal RPS as well as the potential interaction with a Federal, market based climate change policy, which will increase the revenue of a project through higher energy sale prices. My analysis shows that a market based climate change policy such as a cap-and-trade or carbon tax scheme would increase the number of landfill gas projects significantly more than a Federal RPS.

  7. Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

    2006-05-03

    The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

  8. Room temperature gas sensing properties of porous silicon/V2O5 nanorods composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenjun; Hu, Ming; Wang, Dengfeng; Li, Changqing

    2015-08-01

    Here we prepare a composite of porous silicon (PS)/V2O5 nanorods synthesized by a heating process of pure vanadium film on PS. Vanadium films were deposited on PS by DC magnetron sputtering, and then long striped V2O5 nanorods were synthesized with subsequent annealing process in air. Numerous analytical techniques, such as field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), have been employed to characterize their feature. The as-prepared composite structure of PS/V2O5 nanorods shows favorable microstructure features for gas sensing application. The gas sensing properties of PS/V2O5 nanorods sensors were investigated at 25 °C up to 250 °C toward NO2 gas of 0.25-3 ppm, and ethanol over concentration of 50-250 ppm. The results indicated that the PS/V2O5 structure exhibits perfect reversibility, high response value and good selectivity to NO2 at room temperature (25 °C). In addition, we propose a qualitative explanation for the low operating temperature (25 °C) of the composite structure. These results are significant from the standpoint of applications requiring room temperature gas sensing.

  9. Landfill methane oxidation response to vegetation, fertilization, and liming

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, H.A.; Wollum, A.G.; Barlaz, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Landfills are the fourth largest global source and the largest US source (USDOE, 1997) of anthropogenic CH{sub 4} emissions. Since gram-for-gram, CH{sub 4} has 21 times the 100-yr global-warming potential of CO{sub 2} (USEPA, 1990). CH{sub 4} release into the atmosphere has important implications for global climate change. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetation, N fertilizers, and lime addition on landfill CH{sub 4} oxidation. Columns filled with compacted sandy loam and sparged with synthetic landfill gas were used to simulate a landfill cover. Grass-topped and bare-soil columns reduced inlet CH{sub 4} by 47 and 37%, respectively, at peak uptake; but the rate for both treatments was about 18% at steady state. Nitrate and NH{sub 4} amendments induced a more rapid onset of CH{sub 4} oxidation relative to KCl controls. However, at steady state, NH{sub 4} inhibited CH{sub 4} oxidation in bare columns but not in grassed columns. Nitrate addition produced no inhibitory effects. Lime addition to the soil consistently enhanced CH{sub 4} oxidation. In all treatments, CH{sub 4} consumption increased to a peak value, then declined to a lower steady-state value; and all gassed columns developed a pH gradient. Neither nutrient depletion nor protozoan grazing could explain the decline from peak oxidation levels. Ammonium applied to grassed cover soil can cause transient reductions in CH{sub 4} uptake, but there is no evidence that the inhibition persists. The ability of vegetation to mitigate NH{sub 4} inhibition indicates that results from bare-soil tests may not always generalize to vegetated landfill caps.

  10. Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber composite hot gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Charles A. (Lynchburg, VA); Wagner, Richard A. (Lynchburg, VA); Komoroski, Ronald G. (Lynchburg, VA); Gunter, Greg A. (Lynchburg, VA); Barringer, Eric A. (Lynchburg, VA); Goettler, Richard W. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic fiber composite structure particularly suitable for use as a hot gas cleanup ceramic fiber composite filter and method of making same from ceramic composite material has a structure which provides for increased strength and toughness in high temperature environments. The ceramic fiber composite structure or filter is made by a process in which a continuous ceramic fiber is intimately surrounded by discontinuous chopped ceramic fibers during manufacture to produce a ceramic fiber composite preform which is then bonded using various ceramic binders. The ceramic fiber composite preform is then fired to create a bond phase at the fiber contact points. Parameters such as fiber tension, spacing, and the relative proportions of the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fibers can be varied as the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fiber are simultaneously formed on the porous vacuum mandrel to obtain a desired distribution of the continuous ceramic fiber and the chopped ceramic fiber in the ceramic fiber composite structure or filter.

  11. Development of New-type Outdoor Termination using Composite Insulator with SF6 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuda, Yusuke; Fukuda, Kinya; Matsumura, Masao; Hagisawa, Kazuhisa; Okamoto, Gaku; Nakanishi, Tatsuo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    Recently, composite insulators have been increasingly employed mainly from the economic viewpoint. We have been developed new type outdoor termination with composite insulator, which can be installed horizontally on the steel tower, in order to reduce the construction cost. In this outdoor termination, SF6 gas is filled in the composite insulator and a cold shrinkable pre-molded rubber unit is applied instead of the combinational use of rubber-molded stress relief cone, epoxy resin insulator and spring unit. The application of composite insulator, SF6 gas and cold shrinkable pre-molded rubber unit lights the total weight and makes it possible to install horizontally on the tower. The composite insulator type outdoor termination for 77kV XLPE cable has already applied as commercial use and enabled to reduce the construction cost of power transmission lines. A 154kV new type outdoor termination has been developed and successfully completed the initial electrical test. This paper describes the design and performance of both 77kV and 154kV new type outdoor termination, and the follow-up survey of 77kV outdoor termination in the commercial power transmission line.

  12. Y-12 Industrial Landfill V. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This report contains the modifications in operations and design to meet the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conversation (TDEC) July 10, 1993, amendments to the regulations for Class 2 landfills. These modifications, though extensive in design and construction cost, are considered minor revisions and should not require a processing fee. Area 1 of ILF V, comprising approximately 20% of the ILF V footprint, was designed and submitted to TDEC prior to the implementation of current regulations. This initial area was constructed with a compacted clay liner and leachate collection system, and became operational in April 1994. The current regulations require landfills to have a composite liner with leachate collection system and closure cap. Modifications to upgrade Areas 2 and 3 of ILF V to meet the current TDEC requirements are included.

  13. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  14. Noble gas composition of the solar wind as collected by the Genesis mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veronika S. Heber; Rainer Wieler; Heinrich Baur; Chad Olinger; Tom A. Friedmann; Donald S. Burnett

    2009-01-01

    We present the elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases in the bulk solar wind collected by the NASA Genesis sample return mission. He, Ne, and Ar were analyzed in diamond-like carbon on a silicon substrate (DOS) and 84,86Kr and 129,132Xe in silicon targets by UV laser ablation noble gas mass spectrometry. Solar wind noble gases are quantitatively retained in

  15. MWCNT-polymer composites as highly sensitive and selective room temperature gas sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raghu Mangu; Suresh Rajaputra; Vijay P. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-polymer composite-based hybrid sensors were fabricated and integrated into a resistive sensor design for gas sensing applications. Thin films of MWCNTs were grown onto Si\\/SiO2 substrates via xylene pyrolysis using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Polymers like PEDOT:PSS and polyaniline (PANI) mixed with various solvents like DMSO, DMF, 2-propanol and ethylene glycol were used to synthesize the

  16. Ceramic Matrix Composite Vane Subelement Testing in a Gas Turbine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael; Calomino, Anthony; Robinson, R. Craig; Thomas, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Vane subelements were fabricated from a silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite and were coated with an environmental barrier coating (EBC). A test configuration for the vanes in a gas turbine environment was designed and fabricated. Prior to testing, finite element analyses were performed to predict the temperatures and stress conditions present in vane during rig testing. This paper discusses the test configuration, the finite element analysis predictions, and results of the vane testing.

  17. Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate 

    E-print Network

    Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

  18. Proximity of Louisiana sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats. Data on individual landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. W. Lambou; R. C. Herndon; J. E. Moerlins; R. L. Gebhard

    1989-01-01

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. This report documents the proximity of sanitary landfills included in the study in Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams, bays, etc.). The sanitary landfills were identified on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory maps. The nearness

  19. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  20. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  1. Field validation of composite repair of gas transmission pipelines. Annual report, January-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.; Kilinski, T.J.

    1994-03-01

    To help in controlling pipeline maintenance costs, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in supporting development of Clock Spring(R), a low cost fiberglass composite alternative to conventional steel sleeves for transmission line reinforcement and repair. Application of Clock Spring as a repair for blunt corrosion defects has been demonstrated. The objective of this investigation is to instal Clock Spring composite reinforcements on operating pipelines and validate their long-term performance as a pipeline reinforcement for corrosion defects under actual field operating conditions. This program will contribute significantly to the understanding of the long-term performance of these composites and increase confidence in their use by both the pipeline industry and regulators.

  2. Application of far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Xu, Anping

    2010-03-01

    Far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials were prepared by the coprecipitation method using tourmaline, cerium acetate, and lanthanum acetate as raw materials. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy show that tourmaline modified with the rare earths La and Ce has a better far infrared emitting performance. Through XRD analysis, we attribute the improved far infrared emission properties of the tourmaline to the unit cell shrinkage of the tourmaline arising from La enhancing the redox properties of nano-CeO2. The effect of the composite materials on the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied by the flue gas analysis and water boiling test. Based on the results, it was found that the composite materials could accelerate the combustion of LPG, and that the higher the emissivity of the rare earth mineral composite materials, the better the effects on combustion of LPG. In all activation styles, both air and LPG to be activated has a best effect, indicating the activations having a cumulative effect. PMID:20355556

  3. Evolution of volcanic gas composition during repeated culmination of volcanic activity at Kuchinoerabujima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Hirabayashi, J.; Nogami, K.; Iguchi, M.

    2011-04-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of low to medium temperature fumarolic gasses were measured at various fumaroles of Kuchinoerabujima volcano from 1993 to 2009 by the combination of fumarolic gas sampling and Multi-GAS measurement of volcanic plumes. Repeated culmination of the volcanic activity was observed as contemporaneous occurrence of seismic swarms, summit inflation and demagnetization, almost every two years after 1999. Fumarolic activity also increased parallel with these activities; new fumarolic fields of low-temperature fumaroles at boiling point formed at the southern and western rims of the summit crater in 2003 and intense degassing activity started at medium-temperature fumaroles inside the summit crater in 2008. The low-temperature fumarolic gasses have peculiar composition with high H 2/H 2O, CO/CO 2 and SO 2/H 2S ratios, typical features of high-temperature volcanic gasses, but also with low HCl and total S contents, typical features of low-temperature gasses. These features indicate that the gasses are formed by low-temperature differentiation of high-temperature gasses. Variation of H and O isotopic ratios of the low-temperature gasses indicates that the gasses are formed by isoenthalpic processes of vapor-liquid separation at 100 °C of a high-temperature gas and meteoric water mixture, implying that the high-temperature gas was injected into a shallow aquifer without cooling. Temperatures of the high-temperature gasses were estimated as 550-700 °C based on the equilibrium temperature calculation with considering the low-temperature differentiation. The medium-temperature fumarolic gasses from the summit crater have typical compositions of high-temperature volcanic gasses and are estimated as the source gas of the boiling point fumaroles. The H 2/H 2O and CO 2/S t ratios of the low-temperature fumaroles increased from 2004 to 2009, which is interpreted to be caused by the evolution of thermal structure of a shallow gas storage region of a few hundred meters deep. Increase of magmatic gas supply caused enlargement of a high-temperature zone of the gas storage region widening the surrounding temperature transit zone with smaller temperature gradient. The enlargement of the high-temperature zone also reduces the overlying low-temperature aquifer, which caused the decrease of CO 2/S t ratio by reduction of sulfur removal reaction. The enlargement of the high-temperature zone resulted in the leakage of the high-temperature gasses directly to the surface as the medium-temperature gasses from the summit crater.

  4. Methylated mercury species in municipal waste landfill gas sampled in Florida, USA 1 1 Research sponsored by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Waste Management Division under contract with ORNL. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the US Department of Energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E Lindberg; D Wallschläger; E. M Prestbo; N. S Bloom; J Price; D Reinhart

    2001-01-01

    Mercury-bearing material has been placed in municipal landfills from a wide array of sources including fluorescent lights, batteries, electrical switches, thermometers, and general waste. Despite its known volatility, persistence, and toxicity in the environment, the fate of mercury in landfills has not been widely studied. The nature of landfills designed to reduce waste through generation of methane by anaerobic bacteria

  5. Synthesis and application of graphene–silver nanowires composite for ammonia gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quang Trung; Hoa Huynh, Tran My; Tong, Duc Tai; Tam Tran, Van; Dinh Nguyen, Nang

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, consisting of a single carbon layer in a two-dimensional (2D) lattice, has been a promising material for application to nanoelectrical devices in recent years. In this study we report the development of a useful ammonia (NH3) gas sensor based on graphene–silver nanowires ‘composite’ with planar electrode structure. The basic strategy involves three steps: (i) preparation of graphene oxide (GO) by modified Hummers method; (ii) synthesis of silver nanowires by polyol method; and (iii) preparation of graphene and silver nanowires on two electrodes using spin and spray-coating of precursor solutions, respectively. Exposure of this sensor to NH3 induces a reversible resistance change at room temperature that is as large as ?R/R0 ˜ 28% and this sensitivity is eight times larger than the sensitivity of the ‘intrinsic’ graphene based NH3 gas sensor (?R/R0 ˜ 3,5%). Their responses and the recovery times go down to ˜200 and ˜60 s, respectively. Because graphene synthesized by chemical methods has many defects and small sheets, it cannot be perfectly used for gas sensor or for nanoelectrical devices. The silver nanowires are applied to play the role of small bridges connecting many graphene islands together to improve electrical properties of graphene/silver nanowires composite and result in higher NH3 gas sensitivity.

  6. On the temperature and gas composition in the region of comet formation.

    PubMed

    Bar-Nun, A; Kleinfeld, I

    1989-01-01

    The findings of the Giotto and Vega spacecrafts on the gas composition of comet Halley, together with an experimental study on the trapping of gas mixtures in amorphous water ice, enable estimation of the gas composition and temperature in the region of comet Halley's formation: If Halley was formed in the solar nebula by condensation of water vapor in the presence of gas, in the region of its formation the CO/CH4 ratio had to be at least 100 and the temperature about 48 K. The ice particles that formed the comet could not have condensed at a higher temperature and subsequently cool down because then the 7% CO found as a parent molecule could not have been trapped in the ice. A approximately 48 K formation implies that the ice was in amorphous form. This temperature is surprisingly close to the temperatures observed by IRAS for the circumstellar dust shells around alpha PsA (55 K) and epsilon Eri (45 K) and supports the suggestion that short-period comets were formed outside the region of planet formation. The CO content of comet Halley and sensitivity to explosion of irradiated, ice-coated, interstellar grains seem to exclude the possibility of their direct incorporation into comets. Yet, they might have provided the condensed organics--the "CHON" materials. PMID:11538677

  7. Application of carbon nanotube hold-off voltage for determining gas composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F. (Inventor); Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for determining chemical composition of a single-component or multiple-component gas, using a discharge holdoff mechanism. A voltage difference V between two spaced apart electrodes is brought to a selected value and held, the holdoff time interval .DELTA.t(V;ho) required before gas discharge occurs is measured, and the associated electrical current or cumulative electrical charge is measured. As the voltage difference V increases, the time interval length .DELTA.t(V;ho) decreases monotonically. Particular voltage values, V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0, correspond to initial appearance of discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq..infin.) and prompt discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq.0). The values V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0 and the rate of decrease of .DELTA.t(V;ho) and/or the rate of increase of current or cumulative charge with increasing V are characteristic of one or more gas components present.

  8. Acute toxicity test of leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills using luminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pivato, Alberto [IMAGE Department, University of Padua, Via Loredan 20, 35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: alberto.pivato@libero.it; Gaspari, Lorenzo [IMAGE Department, University of Padua, Via Loredan 20, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Landfilling is a fundamental step in any waste management strategy, but it can constitute a hazard for the environment for a long time. The need to protect the environment from potential landfill emissions makes risk assessment a decision tool of extreme necessity. The heterogeneity of wastes and the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in the body of a landfill need specific procedures in order to evaluate the groundwater risk for the environment. Given the complexity of the composition of landfill leachates, the exact contribution of each potential toxic substance cannot be known precisely. Some reference contaminants that constitute the hazard (toxicity) of leachate have to be found to perform the risk assessment. A preliminary ecotoxicological investigation with luminescent bacteria has been carried out on different leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills in order to rank the chemicals that better characterize the leachate (heavy metals, ammonia and dissolved organic content). The attention has been focused on ammonia because it is present in high concentration and can last for centuries and can seriously contaminate the groundwater. The results showed that the toxicity of the leachate might reliably depend on the ammonia concentration and that the leachate toxicity is considerably lower in sustainable landfills where the ammonia had been degraded. This has an important consequence because if the containment system fails (as usually occur within 30-50 yr), the risk of groundwater contamination will be calculated easier only in terms of the probability that the ammonia concentration is higher than a reference concentration.

  9. Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs

    E-print Network

    Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

    2000-01-01

    Around the world, volatile oil and retrograde gas reservoirs are considered as complex thermodynamic systems and even more when they exhibit vertical composition variations. Those systems must be characterized by an equation of state (EOS...

  10. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  11. Using multivariate regression modeling for sampling and predicting chemical characteristics of mixed waste in old landfills.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Prantl, Roman; Fellner, Johann

    2014-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills pose a threat on environment and human health, especially old landfills which lack facilities for collection and treatment of landfill gas and leachate. Consequently, missing information about emission flows prevent site-specific environmental risk assessments. To overcome this gap, the combination of waste sampling and analysis with statistical modeling is one option for estimating present and future emission potentials. Optimizing the tradeoff between investigation costs and reliable results requires knowledge about both: the number of samples to be taken and variables to be analyzed. This article aims to identify the optimized number of waste samples and variables in order to predict a larger set of variables. Therefore, we introduce a multivariate linear regression model and tested the applicability by usage of two case studies. Landfill A was used to set up and calibrate the model based on 50 waste samples and twelve variables. The calibrated model was applied to Landfill B including 36 waste samples and twelve variables with four predictor variables. The case study results are twofold: first, the reliable and accurate prediction of the twelve variables can be achieved with the knowledge of four predictor variables (Loi, EC, pH and Cl). For the second Landfill B, only ten full measurements would be needed for a reliable prediction of most response variables. The four predictor variables would exhibit comparably low analytical costs in comparison to the full set of measurements. This cost reduction could be used to increase the number of samples yielding an improved understanding of the spatial waste heterogeneity in landfills. Concluding, the future application of the developed model potentially improves the reliability of predicted emission potentials. The model could become a standard screening tool for old landfills if its applicability and reliability would be tested in additional case studies. PMID:25218084

  12. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  13. Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  14. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer.

    PubMed

    Amore, Ricardo; Pagani, Clóvis; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, has been impossible to avoid. Using a gas pycnometry, this research investigated the polymerization shrinkage of three packable composite resins: Filtek P60 (3M), Prodigy Condensable (Kerr), and SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk), varying the distance from the light source to the surface of the resins (2 mm or 10 mm). The pycnometer Accupyc 1330 (Micromeritics, USA) precisely records helium displacement, allowing fast and reliable measurements of the volume of composite resin immediately before and after polymerization, without interference of temperature or humidity. Results were not found to be statistically different for the three tested resins, either for 2 mm or 10 mm-distance from the light source to the composite surface. PMID:14762507

  15. Proximity of Louisiana sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats. Data on individual landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. This report documents the proximity of sanitary landfills included in the study in Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams, bays, etc.). The sanitary landfills were identified on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory maps. The nearness or proximity of the sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats was determined by drawing three concentric regions around the point representing the location of each landfill. The radii of the concentric regions were: 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, and 1 mile. A companion report summarizes the statewide results. The data on individual landfills include general facility/site data and wetlands/deepwater habitat data. These facilities have the potential to adversely affect sensitive ecosystems, such as wetlands and deepwater habitats, either through habitat alterations or through the migration of contaminants from sanitary landfills.

  16. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 ?m, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  17. Gas bubbles in fossil amber as possible indicators of the major gas composition of ancient air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berner, R.A.; Landis, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    Gases trapped in Miocene to Upper Cretaceous amber were released by gently crushing the amber under vacuum and were analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. After discounting the possibility that the major gases N2, O2, and CO2 underwent appreciable diffusion and diagenetic exchange with their surroundings or reaction with the amber, it has been concluded that in primary bubbles (gas released during initial breakage) these gases represent mainly original ancient air modified by the aerobic respiration of microorganisms. Values of N2/(CO2+O2) for each time period give consistent results despite varying O2/CO2 ratios that presumably were due to varying degrees of respiration. This allows calculation of original oxygen concentrations, which, on the basis of these preliminary results, appear to have changed from greater than 30 percent O2 during one part ofthe Late Cretaceous (between 75 and 95 million years ago) to 21 percent during the Eocene-Oligocene and for present-day samples, with possibly lower values during the Oligocene-Early Miocene. Variable O2 levels over time in general confirm theoretical isotope-mass balance calculations and suggest that the atmosphere has evolved over Phanerozoic time.

  18. Binary gas adsorption\\/desorption isotherms: effect of moisture and coal composition upon carbon dioxide selectivity over methane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Clarkson; R. M. Bustin

    2000-01-01

    The effect of coal moisture content and composition upon methane\\/carbon dioxide mixed gas adsorption characteristics is investigated. Separation factors are used to quantify the relative adsorption of carbon dioxide and methane. Experimental data indicate that carbon dioxide separation factors vary slightly between coal lithotypes, but the effects of variable coal composition and moisture upon selective adsorption are difficult to isolate.

  19. PROCESS DESIGN MANUAL: MUNICIPAL SLUDGE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides general guidance and a source of information to be used in the planning, design, and operation of a landfill receiving municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge. Major alternative sludge landfilling methods are identified and described. Guidance is given on...

  20. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  1. SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION

    E-print Network

    #12;SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN DOE FRAP 1997-07\\TOC.DOC SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT RICHMOND LANDFILL 1996 POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS.0 POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES 6-1 6.1 Pollution Prevention Opportunities 6-1 6.2 P2 Options Screening

  2. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  3. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of Reduction Gas Composition and Temperature on the Quality of Sponge Iron Product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bayu Alamsari; Shuichi Torii; Yazid Bindar; Azis Trianto

    2010-01-01

    Reduction zone of iron ore reactor have been simulated. This is a part of counter current gas-solid reactor for producing sponge iron. The aim of this research is to study the effect of reduction gas composition and temperature on quality and product capacity of sponge iron products through mathematical modeling arrangement and simulation. Simultaneous mass and energy balances along the

  4. Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor: Experimental measurements, model

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor 13 April 2000; accepted 23 October 2000 Experimental measurements of wafer temperature in a single-wafer, lamp-heated chemical vapor deposition system were used to study the wafer temperature response to gas

  5. Metal–organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenas, Tania; Luz, Ignacio; Prieto, Gonzalo; Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés I Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices have potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of freestanding nanosheets has proved challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometre lateral dimensions and nanometre thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increase in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared with isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF–polymer composites for various applications.

  6. Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation.

    PubMed

    Rodenas, Tania; Luz, Ignacio; Prieto, Gonzalo; Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices have potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of freestanding nanosheets has proved challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometre lateral dimensions and nanometre thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increase in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared with isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications. PMID:25362353

  7. Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés i Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices hold potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of free standing nanosheets has proven challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometer lateral dimensions and nanometer thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increment in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused-ion-beam scanning-electron-microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared to isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications. PMID:25362353

  8. Lantana landfill: A history of environmental management 1965--96

    SciTech Connect

    Statom, R.A. [Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Lantana Sanitary Landfill (LSL) is located in central Palm Beach County, Florida. The history of this landfill is a case study of the changes in environmental law, demography, solid waste management, hydrogeology, and public opinion in south Florida in the last 30 years. In 1983 Palm Beach County transferred ownership of the LSL to the Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority (SWA). Environmental regulation enacted by Florida in the mid 1980`s resulted in negotiations to close the LSL. Closure was completed in 1988 utilizing a synthetic top liner, a landfill gas extraction/flare system, and a stormwater management system. In 1990 a groundwater mitigation system was installed to remediate the eastern plume. Closure of the LSL, extension of municipal water to local residents, and extensive public education by the SWA all served to answer most of the complaints of the local residents. In 1996 the LSL fell under a new series of air regulations and was required to apply for a Title V permit.

  9. Highly sensitive thin film NH 3 gas sensor operating at room temperature based on SnO 2\\/MWCNTs composite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Luong Thi Bich Thuy; Nguyen Duc Chien

    2008-01-01

    A SnO2\\/MWCNTs composite-based NH3 sensor working at room temperature was fabricated by thin film microelectronic technique. The gas-sensitive composite thin film was prepared by using both commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanosized SnO2 dispersion. Microstructure and surface morphology of the composite were investigated and they revealed that the MWCNTs were still present and well embedded by SnO2 particles

  10. Gas composition and hydrochemistry of non-volcanic thermal springs in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuh Terng, Lim; Tsanyao F, Yang; Hsuan-Wen, Chen; Yusoff, Ismail Bin

    2015-04-01

    Peninsular Malaysia is located on Sunda Plate which situated between two major boundaries of tectonic plates, Australian Plate and Eurasian Plate. Over sixty thermal springs have been reported in Peninsular Malaysia, a non-volcanic country, but their water and gas geochemistry characteristic have not been reported yet. The aim of this study is to identify the geochemical characteristics of water and gas samples from selected sixteen thermal springs. This is the first time to study the thermal springs in Peninsular Malaysia in terms of dissolved gas. Due to the chemical inertness, the concentration and isotopic composition of dissolved gas can always become a good indicators of mantle degassing, geothermal circulation and the condition of water-rock interaction. Other parameters such as pH, temperature, electric conductivity, and water radon values will be also recorded. The surface temperature of studied thermal springs range from 40.1° C to 88.7° C, the pH values range from 6.6 to 9.1, and the conductivity varies between 200 ?s/cm and 3700 ?s/cm. Meanwhile, the water radon analysis which been carried out in the field by using RAD7 Radon Detector. The water radon values of selected thermal springs in Peninsular Malaysia vary from 111,866 Bq/cm3 to 200 Bq/cm3, indicating various radon sources which mainly controlled by the permeability and lithology of host rocks in studied areas. Analysed results show that the constituent of dissolved gas in thermal springs is major in nitrogen and minor in other compositions such as argon, carbon dioxides and oxygen. Isotopic composition of hydrogen (D/H) and oxygen (18O/16O) mostly fall along the MWL, indicating the meteoric water is the major fluid source for those hot springs. However, the helium isotopic ratios of most samples show consistently low value, less than 0.1 Ra (Ra is the 3He/4He ratio of the air). It implies that crust component is the major helium gas source for those hot springs.

  11. Nanostructured Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite Coating Production by Pulsed Gas Dynamic Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandouzi, M.; Bu, H.; Brochu, M.; Jodoin, B.

    2012-06-01

    The advantage of combining cryomilling and pulsed gas dynamic spraying (PGDS) processes in order to produce a nanostructured, dense and wear resistant coating was demonstrated. Cryomilling was successfully employed to synthesize particulate B4C reinforced Al matrix nanocomposite feedstock powders, while the PGDS process shows the ability of preserving the microstructure of the starting material. In this study, nanocrystalline and conventional Al5356 + 20%B4C composite as well as the unreinforced Al5356 alloy feedstock powders were used. The influence of the nature of the feedstock material on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings was studied. The PGDS process provides an opportunity to preserve the phase of the starting material, to produce hard and dense coatings with good cohesion between deformed particles and good adhesion to the substrate. High dry sliding wear resistance was observed when cryomilled composite material was used.

  12. The influence of liquefied natural gas composition on its behavior as a coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbano, A.; Nasuti, F.

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a suitable propellant to be used, together with liquid oxygen as oxidizer, in a liquid rocket engine, because of possible advantages with respect to hydrogen in specific applications. Often approximated as pure methane, LNG is a mixture of methane, other heavier hydrocarbons and nitrogen. If LNG is to be used in a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine, the knowledge of the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics when it flows in the cooling channels is of primary importance. The aim of the present work is to understand how the composition of LNG can influence the flow in the cooling channels. A parametric study is carried out considering different LNG compositions and heat flux levels. Attention is devoted to the pressure drop and cooling capabilities, which are the aspects that have to be controlled in a regenerative cooling system.

  13. Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio and Chemical Composition of the Diffuse ISM near the Sun.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Understanding elemental abundances in the interstellar medium (ISM) is an elusive problem, complicated by the inability to observe many ionization states, inadequate data, difficulties in interpreting saturated absorption lines in high column density sightlines, radiative transfer effects in low column density sightlines, and component blending in nearly all sightlines. Radiative transfer models of the nearby ISM (less than 50 pc), constrained with observations of the ISM in stars close to the solar system and inside of the heliosphere, provide a new look at the abundances in diffuse interstellar clouds and allow determination of the gas-to-dust mass ratio providing the ISM reference abundance pattern is known (Slavin and Frisch 2002, Frisch and Slavin 2003). The implications of these models for the chemical composition of the diffuse ISM is discussed, along with the grain models and compositions implied by these data.

  14. Choosing Tree Genotypes for Phytoremediation of Landfill Leachate Using Phyto-Recurrent Selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr; Adam H. Wiese; Richard B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Information about the response of poplar (Populus spp.) genotypes to landfill leachate irrigation is needed, along with efficient methods for choosing genotypes based on leachate composition. Poplar clones were irrigated during three cycles of phyto-recurrent selection to test whether genotypes responded differently to leachate and water, and to test whether the methodology had merit as a tool for plant selection

  15. Thermally Induced Desiccation of Geosynthetic Clay Liners in Landfill Basal Liner Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Southen; R. K. Rowe

    High temperatures may be encountered at the base of a landfill due to exothermic dec omposition occurring in the overlying waste mass or hydration of ash. The corresponding thermal gradients create a risk of outward moisture movement and desiccation of the mineral component of composite lining system. This paper examines the potential ef fects of this thermally driven moisture movement

  16. Effect of gas environment on the properties of silver–glass composite powders with core–shell structure prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hye Young Koo; Jang Heui Yi; Jung Hyun Kim; You Na Ko; Yun Chan Kang

    2010-01-01

    Silver–glass composite powders were directly prepared by using spray pyrolysis in various gas environments. The composite powders with a core–shell structure and a crystal structure of silver had a spherical shape and submicron size irrespective of the gas environments. The silver conducting thick films formed from the composite powders prepared using spray pyrolysis in air and Ar environments had dense

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Sauk County Landfill Site, Excelsior, WI, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Sauk County landfill is located in the Town of Excelsior, Sauk County, Wisconsin. The selected source control remedy is Alternative B, Construction of a Gas Extraction System, as listed in the Focused Feasibility Study. The selected remedy is an operable unit that meets the solid waste disposal requirements of NR 500 to 520, Wis. Adm. Code.

  18. Barometric pumping of burial trench soil gases into the atmosphere at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    In 1991, a soil gas survey was performed at the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill as part of the characterization efforts required under the integrated Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation and Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) program. This report details the findings of this survey, which identified several areas of the landfill that were releasing volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere at levels exceeding regulatory standards. Knowledge of the rates of VOC outgassing is necessary to protect site workers, provide input into the human health and environmental risk assessment documents and provide input into the remedial design scenario.

  19. Electrochemical oxidation for landfill leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yang [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, McArthur Building, Room 325, 1251 Memorial Dr., University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)], E-mail: dengyang7@yahoo.com; Englehardt, James D. [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, McArthur Building, Room 325, 1251 Memorial Dr., University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper aims at providing an overview of electrochemical oxidation processes used for treatment of landfill leachate. The typical characteristics of landfill leachate are briefly reviewed, and the reactor designs used for electro-oxidation of leachate are summarized. Electrochemical oxidation can significantly reduce concentrations of organic contaminants, ammonia, and color in leachate. Pretreatment methods, anode materials, pH, current density, chloride concentration, and other additional electrolytes can considerably influence performance. Although high energy consumption and potential chlorinated organics formation may limit its application, electrochemical oxidation is a promising and powerful technology for treatment of landfill leachate.

  20. Reverse osmosis module successfully treats landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    By law, modern landfills are to be constructed with double liners to prevent contaminants from leaching into surface and ground water. Despite this design feature, however, both hazardous and non-hazardous compounds do leach from the waste disposed in landfills. The resulting contaminated water, or leachate, must be collected and treated. Rochem Environmental, Inc. (Houston, Texas) has developed a new membrane process, known as the Disc Tube{trademark} system, to remove a variety of contaminants from landfill leachate. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Conformational composition, molecular structure and decomposition of difluorophosphoryl azide in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Hongmin; Zhu, Bifeng; Zeng, Xiaoqing; Hayes, Stuart A; Mitzel, Norbert W; Beckers, Helmut; Berger, Raphael J F

    2015-04-14

    The conformational composition, molecular structure and decomposition of difluorophosphoryl azide F2P(O)N3 in the gas phase were studied using gas electron diffraction (GED), matrix isolation IR spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations, respectively. While computational methods predict only minor differences in the total energy between the two possible conformers (syn and anti), the analysis of electron diffraction data reveals the dominating abundance of the syn conformer in the gas phase at room temperature. Ab initio frequency analyses suggest that a low-frequency large-amplitude motion of the N3 group with respect to the P-N-N-N torsion is to be expected for the syn conformer. The large amplitude motion was included explicitly into the GED structure refinement procedure. It presumably contributes to a thermodynamic stabilization of the syn-conformer with respect to the anti-conformer in the gas phase at ambient temperature. Upon flash vacuum pyrolysis, this syn conformer undergoes a stepwise decomposition via the difluorophosphoryl nitrene, F2P(O)N, which features as the first experimentally observed phosphoryl nitrene that can be thermally produced in the gas phase. To reveal the reaction mechanism, quantum-chemical calculations on the potential energy surface (PES) of F2P(O)N3 were performed. Both B3LYP/6-311+G(3df) and CBS-QB3 calculation results strongly support a stepwise decomposition into the singlet F2P(O)N, which prefers intersystem crossing to the thermally persistent triplet ground state instead of a Curtius rearrangement into FP(O)NF. PMID:25740559

  2. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Lauer 1 Sanitary Landfill (Boundary road), Menomonee Falls, WI, March 11, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Boundary Road Landfill (formerly known as the Lauer 1 Landfill) is located in the northeastern portion of the Village of Menomonee Falls. Construction of a new multi-layer soil cover system over the landfill; installation of leachate extraction measures in the northeastern portion of the site; installation of an active landfill gas extraction system; construction of a new leachate conveyance, likely a forcemain (pressure pipe), to transmit all extracted leachate from the site to the local sanitary sewer system; continued operation and maintenance of an existing slurry cut-off wall and leachate collection system, including conveyance of leachate from the collection system to the new forcemain; implementation of proper institutional controls; installation of new fencing and improvement of existing fencing to restrict site access; long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and landfill gas; supplementary studies of groundwater quality and internal landfill leachate elevations; and implementation of additional remedial actions found to be necessary under the additional studies of groundwater quality and internal leachate elevations.

  3. Evaluation of Y-12 landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, G.A. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Daugherty, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hutzler, C.W.; Smith, C.M. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA)); Wylie, A.N. (Adams, Craft, Herz, Walker, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-12-12

    The purpose of this project was to provide team members with practical experience in application of Civil Engineering 555, Solid Waste Management principles. Team members chose to evaluate the functional elements of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's (Y-12's) solid waste management system. The following factors contributed to selection of Y-12'system for evaluation: team members' familiarity with the Y-12 system; knowledge that the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was nearing capacity; and presence of the unique issues posed by special national security and potential radioactive contamination considerations. This report was limited to evaluation of the solid waste management system for conventional solid waste; hazardous radioactive, and radioactive mixed waste were not addressed. The report: (1) describes each functional element including waste generation, storage, collection, transport, processing, recovery, and disposal; (2) identifies and evaluates alternatives for each element and (3) identifies system strengths and recommends opportunities for improvement. 34 figs.

  4. Monitoring and modeling of long-term settlements of an experimental landfill in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simões, Gustavo Ferreira; Catapreta, Cícero Antônio Antunes

    2013-02-01

    Settlement evaluation in sanitary landfills is a complex process, due to the waste heterogeneity, time-varying properties and influencing factors and mechanisms, such as mechanical compression due to load application and creep, and physical-chemical and biological processes caused by the wastes decomposition. Many empirical models for the analysis of long-term settlement in landfills are reported in the literature. This paper presents the results of a settlement monitoring program carried out during 6 years in Belo Horizonte experimental landfill. Different sets of field data were used to calibrate three long-term settlement prediction models (rheological, hyperbolic and composite). The parameters obtained in the calibration were used to predict the settlements and to compare with actual field data. During the monitoring period of 6 years, significant vertical strains were observed (of up to 31%) in relation to the initial height of the experimental landfill. The results for the long-term settlement prediction obtained by the hyperbolic and rheological models significantly underestimate the settlements, regardless the period of data used in the calibration. The best fits were obtained with the composite model, except when 1 year field data were used in the calibration. The results of the composite model indicate settlements stabilization at larger times and with larger final settlements when compared to the hyperbolic and rheological models. PMID:23177019

  5. Relationship Between the Composition and Interfacial Tension of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    Former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars pose significant environmental hazards and present a challenge to regulators and industry professionals. The tars, which were produced as a byproduct of the gas manufacturing process, were frequently released into the environment through improper disposal or leaks in plant infrastructure. The interfacial tension (IFT) is a primary factor controlling the mobility of tars in porous media, and is therefore important to understand for both predicting the migration of tars and designing remediation strategies. In this study, we characterized nine field-collected FMGP tars and a commercially available coal tar by means of chemical extractions (asphaltenes, resins, acids, and bases), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additionally, the IFT and contact angle of each tar was determined for a pH range of 3-11. The IFT was found to be similar for all tars at pH 5 and 7 regardless of composition. Slight decreases in IFT at lower pH were correlated with higher concentrations of extractable bases, which consisted primarily of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Much greater reductions of IFT were observed at high pH. These reductions were found to be associated with the presence of carbonyl or carboxyl groups in the asphaltenes. It is likely that the larger size of the asphaltene molecules (as compared to the extractable compounds) resulted in species with greater surface activity when ionized.

  6. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  7. Air bells of water spiders are an extended phenotype modified in response to gas composition.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Dolores; Taborsky, Michael; Drapela, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    The water spider Argyroneta aquatica (Clerck) is the only spider that spends its whole life under water. Water spiders keep an air bubble around their body for breathing and build under-water air bells, which they use for shelter and raising offspring, digesting and consuming prey, moulting, depositing eggs and sperm, and copulating. It is unclear whether these bells are an important oxygen reservoir for breathing under water, or whether they serve mainly to create water-free space for feeding and reproduction. In this study, we manipulated the composition of the gas inside the bell of female water spiders to test whether they monitor the quality of this gas, and replenish oxygen if required. We exchanged the entire gas in the bell either with pure O2, pure CO2, or with ambient air as control, and monitored behavioural responses. The test spiders surfaced and replenished air more often in the CO2 treatment than in the O2 treatment, and they increased bell building behaviour. In addition to active oxygen regulation, they monitored and adjusted the bells by adding silk. These results show that water spiders use the air bell as an oxygen reservoir, and that it functions as an external lung, which renders it essential for living under water permanently. A. aquatica is the only animal that collects, transports, and stores air, and monitors its property for breathing, which is an adaptive response of a terrestrial animal to the colonization of an aquatic habitat. PMID:17674350

  8. Benthic macroinvertebrate and periphyton community responses to a complex mixture in landfill leachate seep discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.A.; Kusnier, J. Jr. [Midwest Environmental Consultants, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States); Lowe, R.L. [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Typically, the composition of sanitary landfill leachate is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals. The existence of landfill facilities which operated prior to current solid waste disposal regulations, has resulted in the need for evaluation of potential risks/hazards to the environment, due to leaching of this complex mixture of contaminants to surface and/or subsurface media. Evaluation an a chemical specific basis is tedious at best, and gives little information about the effects of the mixture of chemicals present. Therefore, an evaluation of in-situ community response was conducted. This paper focuses on the response of the macroinvertebrate and periphyton communities, in terms of dominant taxa and community structure, in a small pond adjacent to a former sanitary landfill facility, which receives leachate seep discharge via groundwater flow from an unconfined aquifer. The pond, created during use of the landfill, is actually an area where cover material was obtained for landfill construction. Macroinvertebrate and periphyton community structure was assessed at three shallow, sandy locations in the pond, at varying distances from the areas of known leachate seeps. General water quality and laboratory toxicity testing with Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Chironomus tentans was also conducted using ambient water and sediment from the three locations. Differences between locations are distinct in both the periphyton and macroinvertebrate communities, and in the results of the aquatic toxicity testing. No difference between locations was observed, however, in terms of toxicity testing with chironomids.

  9. Impact of MSWI Bottom Ash Codisposed with MSW on Landfill Stabilization with Different Operational Modes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Bing; Yao, Jun; Zhou, Gen-Di; Dong, Ming; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) codisposed with municipal solid waste (MSW) on landfill stabilization according to the leachate quality in terms of organic matter and nitrogen contents. Six simulated landfills, that is, three conventional and three recirculated, were employed with different ratios of MSWI BA to MSW. The results depicted that, after 275-day operation, the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1 :?10 (V?:?V) in the landfill was still not enough to provide sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity for a high organic matter composition of MSW over 45.5% (w/w), while the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V) could act on it. Among the six experimental landfills, leachate quality only was improved in the landfill operated with the BA addition (the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V)) and leachate recirculation. PMID:24779006

  10. Impact of MSWI bottom ash codisposed with MSW on landfill stabilization with different operational modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bing; Yao, Jun; Malik, Zaffar; Zhou, Gen-Di; Dong, Ming; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) codisposed with municipal solid waste (MSW) on landfill stabilization according to the leachate quality in terms of organic matter and nitrogen contents. Six simulated landfills, that is, three conventional and three recirculated, were employed with different ratios of MSWI BA to MSW. The results depicted that, after 275-day operation, the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1 :?10 (V?:?V) in the landfill was still not enough to provide sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity for a high organic matter composition of MSW over 45.5% (w/w), while the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V) could act on it. Among the six experimental landfills, leachate quality only was improved in the landfill operated with the BA addition (the ratio of MSWI BA to fresh refuse of 1?:?5 (V?:?V)) and leachate recirculation. PMID:24779006

  11. Pilot-scale experiment on anaerobic bioreactor landfills in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianguo; Yang, Guodong; Deng, Zhou; Huang, Yunfeng; Huang, Zhonglin; Feng, Xiangming; Zhou, Shengyong; Zhang, Chaoping

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This paper describes the impacts of leachate recirculation and recirculation loadings on waste stabilization, landfill gas (LFG) generation and leachate characteristics. Four simulated anaerobic columns, R1-R4, were each filled with about 30 tons of waste and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2m(3) leachate and 0.1m(3) tap water. The results indicated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) half-time of leachate from R1 was about 180 days, which was 8-14 weeks shorter than that of R2-R4. A large amount of LFG was first produced in R1, and its generation rate was positively correlated to the COD or volatile fatty acid concentrations of influent leachates after the 30th week. By the 50th week of recirculation, the waste in R1 was more stabilized, with 931.2 kg COD or 175.6 kg total organic carbon released and with the highest landfill gas production. However, this contributed mainly to washout by leachate, which also resulted in the reduction of LFG generation potential and accumulation of ammonia and/or phosphorus in the early stage. Therefore, the regimes of leachate recirculation should be adjusted to the phases of waste stabilization to enhance efficiency of energy recovery. Integrated with the strategy of in situ leachate management, extra pre-treatment or post-treatment methods to remove the nutrients are recommended. PMID:17015005

  12. Flux measurements of benzene and toluene from landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Morandi, Andrea; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Nisi, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and CH(4), C(6)H(6) and C(7)H(8) fluxes from the soil cover of Case Passerini landfill site (Florence, Italy) were measured using the accumulation and static closed chamber methods, respectively. Results show that the CH(4)/CO(2), CH(4)/C(6)H(6) and CH(4)/C(7)H(8) ratios of the flux values are relatively low when compared with those of the 'pristine' biogas produced by degradation processes acting on the solid waste material disposed in the landfill. This suggests that when biogas transits through the cover soil, CH(4) is affected by degradation processes activated by oxidizing bacteria at higher extent than both CO(2) and mono-aromatics. Among the investigated hydrocarbons, C(6)H(6) has shown the highest stability in a wide range of redox conditions. Toluene behaviour only partially resembles that of C(6)H(6), possibly because de-methylation processes require less energy than that necessary for the degradation of C(6)H(6), the latter likely occurring via benzoate at anaerobic conditions and/or through various aerobic metabolic pathways at relatively shallow depth in the cover soil where free oxygen is present. According to these considerations, aromatics are likely to play an important role in the environmental impact of biogas released into the atmosphere from such anthropogenic emission sites, usually only ascribed to CO(2) and CH(4). In this regard, flux measurements using accumulation and static closed chamber methods coupled with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis may properly be used to obtain a dataset for the estimation of the amount of volatile organic compounds dispersed from landfills. PMID:21041416

  13. Pilot-scale experiment on anaerobic bioreactor landfills in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianguo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, PR China (China)], E-mail: jianguoj@tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Guodong; Deng, Zhou; Huang, Yunfeng [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, PR China (China); Huang, Zhonglin; Feng, Xiangming; Zhou, Shengyong; Zhang, Chaoping [Xiaping Solid Waste Landfill, Shenzhen 518019, PR China (China)

    2007-07-01

    Developing countries have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This paper describes the impacts of leachate recirculation and recirculation loadings on waste stabilization, landfill gas (LFG) generation and leachate characteristics. Four simulated anaerobic columns, R1-R4, were each filled with about 30 tons of waste and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2 m{sup 3} leachate and 0.1 m{sup 3} tap water. The results indicated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) half-time of leachate from R1 was about 180 days, which was 8-14 weeks shorter than that of R2-R4. A large amount of LFG was first produced in R1, and its generation rate was positively correlated to the COD or volatile fatty acid concentrations of influent leachates after the 30th week. By the 50th week of recirculation, the waste in R1 was more stabilized, with 931.2 kg COD or 175.6 kg total organic carbon released and with the highest landfill gas production. However, this contributed mainly to washout by leachate, which also resulted in the reduction of LFG generation potential and accumulation of ammonia and/or phosphorus in the early stage. Therefore, the regimes of leachate recirculation should be adjusted to the phases of waste stabilization to enhance efficiency of energy recovery. Integrated with the strategy of in situ leachate management, extra pre-treatment or post-treatment methods to remove the nutrients are recommended.

  14. Achieving "Final Storage Quality" of municipal solid waste in pilot scale bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Valencia, R; van der Zon, W; Woelders, H; Lubberding, H J; Gijzen, H J

    2009-01-01

    Entombed waste in current sanitary landfills will generate biogas and leachate when physical barriers fail in the future, allowing the intrusion of moisture into the waste mass contradicting the precepts of the sustainability concept. Bioreactor landfills are suggested as a sustainable option to achieve Final Storage Quality (FSQ) status of waste residues; however, it is not clear what characteristics the residues should have in order to stop operation and after-care monitoring schemes. An experiment was conducted to determine the feasibility to achieve FSQ status (Waste Acceptance Criteria of the European Landfill Directive) of residues in a pilot scale bioreactor landfill. The results of the leaching test were very encouraging due to their proximity to achieve the proposed stringent FSQ criterion after 2 years of operation. Furthermore, residues have the same characteristics of alternative waste stabilisation parameters (low BMP, BOD/COD ratio, VS content, SO4(2-)/Cl- ratio) established by other researchers. Mass balances showed that the bioreactor landfill simulator was capable of practically achieving biological stabilisation after 2 years of operation, while releasing approximately 45% of the total available (organic and inorganic) carbon and nitrogen into the liquid and gas phases. PMID:18406126

  15. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3?ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4+) was calculated as 222?ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7?vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3?vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  16. Analysis of ammonia toxicity in landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3?ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4 (+) ) was calculated as 222?ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7?vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3?vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  17. DETECTING LANDFILL LEACHATE CONTAMINATION USING REMOTE SENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for using remote sensing to detect landfill leachate contamination of ground and surface water is described. Among the topics covered are leachate indicators, spatial and temporal aspects of leachate detection, sensor selection, flight design and data interpretation...

  18. Modelling flow to leachate wells in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Beaven, R.P.; White, J.K

    2004-07-01

    Vertical wells are frequently used as a means of controlling leachate levels in landfills. They are often the only available dewatering option for both old landfills without any basal leachate collection layer and for newer sites where the installed drainage infrastructure has failed. When the well is pumped, a seepage face develops at the entry into the well so that the drawdown in the surrounding waste will not be as great as might be expected. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW-SURFACT, which contains the functionality to model seepage surfaces, has been used to investigate the transient dewatering of a landfill. The study concludes that the position of the seepage face and information about the characteristics of the induced seepage flow field are important and should not be neglected when designing wells in landfills.

  19. Contaminants of emerging concern in fresh leachate from landfills in the conterminous United States.

    PubMed

    Masoner, Jason R; Kolpin, Dana W; Furlong, Edward T; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Gray, James L; Schwab, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the composition of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in landfill leachate, fresh leachate from 19 landfills was sampled across the United States during 2011. The sampled network included 12 municipal and 7 private landfills with varying landfill waste compositions, geographic and climatic settings, ages of waste, waste loads, and leachate production. A total of 129 out of 202 CECs were detected during this study, including 62 prescription pharmaceuticals, 23 industrial chemicals, 18 nonprescription pharmaceuticals, 16 household chemicals, 6 steroid hormones, and 4 plant/animal sterols. CECs were detected in every leachate sample, with the total number of detected CECs in samples ranging from 6 to 82 (median = 31). Bisphenol A (BPA), cotinine, and N,N-diethyltoluamide (DEET) were the most frequently detected CECs, being found in 95% of the leachate samples, followed by lidocaine (89%) and camphor (84%). Other frequently detected CECs included benzophenone, naphthalene, and amphetamine, each detected in 79% of the leachate samples. CEC concentrations spanned six orders of magnitude, ranging from ng L(-1) to mg L(-1). Industrial and household chemicals were measured in the greatest concentrations, composing more than 82% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Maximum concentrations for three household and industrial chemicals, para-cresol (7?020?000 ng L(-1)), BPA (6?380?000 ng L(-1)), and phenol (1?550?000 ng L(-1)), were the largest measured, with these CECs composing 70% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Nonprescription pharmaceuticals represented 12%, plant/animal sterols 4%, prescription pharmaceuticals 1%, and steroid hormones <1% of the total measured CEC concentrations. Leachate from landfills in areas receiving greater amounts of precipitation had greater frequencies of CEC detections and concentrations in leachate than landfills receiving less precipitation. PMID:25111596

  20. Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group

    2009-09-15

    HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Landfill leachates pretreatment by coagulation-flocculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Amokrane; C. Comel; J. Veron

    1997-01-01

    After biological and\\/or physico-chemical treatment of stabilised landfill leachates, COD and salinity content are often larger than reject requirements. In this case, reverse osmosis can be used to treat effectively these residual COD and salinity. However, reverse osmosis feasibility is limited by the membrane fouling. In order to reduce the landfill leachates high fouling power, coagulation-flocculation is examined in this

  2. Landfill leachate treatment methods: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wiszniowski; D. Robert; J. Surmacz-Gorska; K. Miksch; J. V. Weber

    2006-01-01

    Landfilling of municipal waste is still a major issue of the waste management system in Europe. The generated leachate must\\u000a be appropriately treated before being discharged into the environment. Technologies meant for leachate treatment can be classified\\u000a as follows (i) biological methods, (ii) chemical and physical methods. Here we review briefly the main processes currently\\u000a used for the landfill leachates

  3. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at high temperatures of high environmental resistance and high creep resistance, which in turn will result in long component life. Data are presented from a variety of laboratory tests on simple two-dimensional panels that examine these properties and compare the performance of the optimized full PIP system with those of the full CVI and CVI + PIP hybrid systems. Underlying mechanisms for performance differences in the various systems are discussed. Remaining issues for further property enhancement and for application of the full PIP approach for engine components are also discussed, as well as on-going approaches at NASA to solve these issues.

  4. Transpiration as landfill leachate phytotoxicity indicator.

    PubMed

    Bia?owiec, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    An important aspect of constructed wetlands design for landfill leachate treatment is the assessment of landfill leachate phytotoxicity. Intravital methods of plants response observation are required both for lab scale toxicity testing and field examination of plants state. The study examined the toxic influence of two types of landfill leachate from landfill in Zakurzewo (L1) and landfill in Wola Paw?owska (L2) on five plant species: reed Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud, manna grass Glyceria maxima (Hartm.) Holmb., bulrush Schoenoplectus lacustris (L.) Palla, sweet flag Acorus calamus L., and miscanthus Miscanthus floridulus (Labill) Warb. Transpiration measurement was used as indicator of plants response. The lowest effective concentration causing the toxic effect (LOEC) for each leachate type and plant species was estimated. Plants with the highest resistance to toxic factors found in landfill leachate were: sweet flag, bulrush, and reed. The LOEC values for these plants were, respectively, 17%, 16%, 9% in case of leachate L1 and 21%, 18%, 14% in case of L2. Leachate L1 was more toxic than L2 due to a higher pH value under similar ammonia nitrogen content, i.e. pH 8.74 vs. pH 8.00. PMID:25708408

  5. Sanitary Landfill 1991 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.; Norrell, G.T.; Bennett, C.B.

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Sanitary Landfill is an approximately seventy acre site located just south of SRS Road C between the Savannah River Site`s B-Area and Upper Three Runs Creek. Results from the first through third quarter 1991 groundwater monitoring date continue to show evidence of elevated levels of several hazardous constituents beneath the Sanitary Landfill: tritium, vinyl chloride, total radium, cadmium, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,4 dichlorobenzene, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1 dichloroethylene in excess of the primary drinking water standards were observed in at least one well monitoring the Sanitary Landfill during the third quarter of 1991. All of these constituents, except radium, were observed in the lower half of the original thirty-two acre site or the southern expansion site. Trichloroethylene and vinyl chloride are the primary organic contaminants in groundwater beneath the Sanitary Landfill. Vinyl chloride has become the primary contaminant during 1991. Elevated levels of benzene were consistently detected in LFW 7 in the past, but were not present in any LFW wells during the third quarter of 1991. A minor tritium plume is present in the central part of original thirty-two acre landfill. Elevated levels of tritium above the PDWS were consistently present in LFW 10A through 1991. This well has exhibited elevated tritium activities since the second quarter of 1989. Contaminant concentrations in the Sanitary Landfill are presented and discussed in this report.

  6. Sanitary Landfill 1991 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.; Norrell, G.T.; Bennett, C.B.

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Sanitary Landfill is an approximately seventy acre site located just south of SRS Road C between the Savannah River Site's B-Area and Upper Three Runs Creek. Results from the first through third quarter 1991 groundwater monitoring date continue to show evidence of elevated levels of several hazardous constituents beneath the Sanitary Landfill: tritium, vinyl chloride, total radium, cadmium, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,4 dichlorobenzene, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1 dichloroethylene in excess of the primary drinking water standards were observed in at least one well monitoring the Sanitary Landfill during the third quarter of 1991. All of these constituents, except radium, were observed in the lower half of the original thirty-two acre site or the southern expansion site. Trichloroethylene and vinyl chloride are the primary organic contaminants in groundwater beneath the Sanitary Landfill. Vinyl chloride has become the primary contaminant during 1991. Elevated levels of benzene were consistently detected in LFW 7 in the past, but were not present in any LFW wells during the third quarter of 1991. A minor tritium plume is present in the central part of original thirty-two acre landfill. Elevated levels of tritium above the PDWS were consistently present in LFW 10A through 1991. This well has exhibited elevated tritium activities since the second quarter of 1989. Contaminant concentrations in the Sanitary Landfill are presented and discussed in this report.

  7. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S. [Hirschhorn and Associates, Wheaton, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  8. Flow Investigation for Landfill Leachate (FILL)

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbilvardi, R.M.; Ahmed, S. (City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Gleason, P.J. (New City Dept. of Sanitation, New York, NY (United States))

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional un-steady-state moisture flow model has been developed in order to describe the leachate flow process in a landfill. The unsteady variation of leachate mound head has also been considered in the saturated zone of the landfill to compute the time-varying leachate flow rates in both the lateral and vertical directions. The contribution of precipitation to the landfill leachate has been investigated by computing evapotranspiration and surface runoff due to side slope. The model was used to simulate the leachate flow rates in section 6/7 of Fresh Kills landfill, situated in Staten Island, New York. A comparison of the results was made with the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, which is based on a quasi-two-dimensional approach. Comparisons were also made with the results obtained from previous studies using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water-balance model and investigating the real field condition. An underestimate of the surface runoff was observed in the case of the results obtained by the HELP model. The simulated leachate flow rates by the new model were found to be less than those obtained by other methods. The effects of the variation of the boundary condition, which depends on surface runoff and evapotranspiration, were examined to arrive at the better representation of the two-dimensional unsteady mechanism of leachate flow process in a landfill.

  9. Environmental diagnosis methodology for municipal waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Moreno, B; Zamorano, M; Szanto, M

    2005-01-01

    A large number of countries are involved in a process of transformation with regard to the management of municipal solid waste. This process is a consequence of environmental requirements that occasionally materialise in legislation, such as the European Council Directive 31/99/EC on waste release in the European Union. In some cases, the remediation of old landfills can be carried out in compliance with environmental requirements; in other cases, it is necessary to proceed with the closure of the landfill and to assimilate it into its own environment. In both cases, it is necessary to undertake a diagnosis and characterisation of the impacted areas in order to develop an adequate action plan. This study presents a new methodology by which environmental diagnosis of landfill sites may be carried out. The methodology involves the formulation of a series of environmental indeces which provide information concerning the potential environmental problems of the landfills and the particular impact on different environmental elements, as well as information related to location, design and operation. On the basis of these results, it would be possible to draw up action plans for the remediation or closure of the landfill site. By applying the methodology to several landfills in a specific area, it would be possible to prioritize the order of actions required. PMID:15905084

  10. The effect of multiwalled carbon nanotube doping on the CO gas sensitivity of TiO2 xerogel composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Ha, Tae-Jung; Hong, Min-Hee; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2013-03-01

    A simple sol-gel method was applied for the synthesis of 0.01 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-doped TiO2 xerogel composite film. The film's CO gas sensing properties were then evaluated. Doped MWCNTs were coated with TiO2 and distributed on a TiO2 xerogel matrix. The TiO2 xerogel showed an anatase structure after heat treatment at 450 °C under vacuum. The specific surface area of the composite material was larger than the pure TiO2 xerogel material. The CO gas sensitivity of the MWCNTs(0.01 wt%)-doped TiO2 xerogel composite film was found to be seven times higher than that of pure TiO2 xerogel film and to have good stability. This higher gas-sensing property of the composite film was due to both an increase of specific surface area and the n-p junction structure of the TiO2 xerogel coated on MWCNTs. The electrons generated from TiO2 after adsorption of CO gas induces electron transfer from the TiO2 to the MWCNTs. This induces a characteristic change in the MWCNTs from p-type to n-type, and the resistance of MWCNTs-doped TiO2 xerogel composite sensor is therefore decreased.

  11. Dissolved Gas Composition of Groundwater in Taipei Basin and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Nga-Chi; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Chen, Ai-Ti; Chen, Wen-Fu; Wang, Yun-Shuen

    2015-04-01

    This study is the first comprehensive analysis for dissolved gases of groundwater in Taipei Basin, northern Taiwan. In addition to conventional water chemistry, the dissolved-gas compositions of groundwater from 34 observation wells have been systematically analyzed. The relationship between dissolved gases and geological environment, and probable sources of the gases are discussed in this study. According to the water chemistry data of Piper plot, most of the groundwater samples in this study can be classified as Ca(HCO3)2 and NaHCO3 types. Several samples exhibit NaCl type characteristic which reveals the mix with seawater. Isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen for groundwater, surface water and meteoric water in Taipei Basin are aligned with Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL), which indicates that they are influenced by meteoric water. Composition of groundwater in the southern part of the basin has similar characteristics with surface water. However, stratifications occurred in the observation wells from northern part of the basin. It reveals different recharge sources for groundwater samples in northern basin with the southern basin. Based on the major dissolved gases compositions, three major components are identified which are CH4, N2 and CO2. The d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicates microbial activities are dominant in the studied area. Dissolved radon concentrations are in the range of 200 - 20,667 Bq/m3 in the studied area and the deeper well usually exhibits a higher radon value than the shallow one from the same site. Several sites with high radon values are correlated with the locations of fault zones, which may provide the conduit for deeper gas migrate to shallower aquifers. The groundwater samples from northern part of the basin exhibit unexpectedly high helium isotopic ratios (RA >2, where RA is the 3He/4He ratio of air). Samples from five observation wells have RA values more than 3 RA and the highest one is 4.2 RA, which probably the highest 3He/4He values ever reported in groundwater samples from basin area. The high RA ratios represent signals from mantle and the source of excess 3He may come from Tatun volcanic group (TVG) which located at the north side of Taipei Basin. Alternatively, the nearby active Shanchiao Fault may provide a pathway for mantle fluids invaded into the basin.

  12. GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Masoner, Jason; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Suflita, Joseph; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    The Norman Landfill is a closed municipal solid waste landfill located on an alluvium associated with the Canadian River in Norman, Oklahoma. It has operated as a research site since 1994 because it is typical of many closed landfill sites across the U.S. Leachate from the unlined landfill forms a groundwater plume that extends downgradient approximately 250 m from the landfill toward the Canadian River. To investigate the impact of the landfill leachate on the diversity and functional structure of microbial communities, groundwater samples were taken from eight monitoring wells at a depth of 5m, and analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene array covering about 50,000 genes involved in key microbial processes, such as biogeochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, and bioremediation of organic contaminants and metals. Wells are located within a transect along a presumed flow path with different distances to the center of the leachate plume. Our analyses showed that microbial communities were obviously impacted by the leachate-component from the landfill. The number of genes detected and microbial diversity indices in the center (LF2B) and its closest (MLS35) wells were significantly less than those detected in other more downgradient wells, while no significant changes were observed in the relative abundance (i.e., percentage of each gene category) for most gene categories. However, the microbial community composition or structure of the landfill groundwater did not clearly show a significant correlation with the distance from well LF2B. Burkholderia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were found to be the dominant microbial populations detected in all wells, while Bradyrhizobium sp. and Ralstonia sp. were dominant populations for seven wells except LF2B. In addition, Mantel test and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicate that pH, sulfate, ammonia nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have significant effects on the microbial community structure. The results suggest that the leachate from unlined landfills significantly impact the structures of groundwater microbial communities, and that more distal wells recover by natural attenuation.

  13. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    SciTech Connect

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  14. Verification of chemical composition of commercially available propolis extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Czy?ewska, Urszula; Kono?czuk, Joanna; Teul, Joanna; Dr?gowski, Pawe?; Pawlak-Morka, Renata; Sura?y?ski, Arkadiusz; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    Propolis is a resin that is collected by honeybees from various plant sources. Due to its pharmacological properties, it is used in commercial production of nutritional supplements in pharmaceutical industry. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied for quality control analysis of the three commercial specimens containing aqueous-alcoholic extracts of bee propolis. More than 230 constituents were detected in analyzed products, including flavonoids, chalcones, cinnamic acids and their esters, phenylpropenoid glycerides, and phenylpropenoid sesquiterpenoids. An allergenic benzyl cinnamate ester was also identified in all tested samples. This analytical method allows to evaluate biological activity and potential allergenic components of bee glue simultaneously. Studies on chemical composition of propolis samples may provide new approach to quality and safety control analysis in production of propolis supplementary specimens. PMID:25198412

  15. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leachates from selected landfill sites in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Odusanya, David O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Okonkwo, Jonathan O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: OkonkwoOJ@tut.ac.za; Botha, Ben [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2009-01-15

    The last few decades have seen dramatic growth in the scale of production and the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants. Consequently, PBDEs such as BDE -28, -47, -66, -71, -75, -77, -85, -99, -100, -119, -138, -153, -154, and -183 have been detected in various environmental matrices. Generally, in South Africa, once the products containing these chemicals have outlived their usefulness, they are discarded into landfill sites. Consequently, the levels of PBDEs in leachates from landfill sites may give an indication of the general exposure and use of these compounds. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and concentrations of most common PBDEs in leachates from selected landfill sites. The extraction capacities of the solvents were also tested. Spiked landfill leachate samples were used for the recovery tests. Separation and determination of the PBDE congeners were carried out with a gas chromatograph equipped with Ni{sup 63} electron capture detector. The mean percentage recoveries ranged from 63% to 108% (n = 3) for landfill leachate samples with petroleum ether giving the highest percentage extraction. The mean concentrations of PBDEs obtained ranged from ND to 2670 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 6638 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 7230 pg l{sup -1}, 41 to 4009 pg l{sup -1}, 90 to 9793 pg l{sup -1} for the Garankuwa, Hatherly, Kwaggarsrand, Soshanguve and Temba landfill sites, respectively. Also BDE -28, -47, -71 and BDE-77 were detected in the leachate samples from all the landfill sites; and all the congeners were detected in two of the oldest landfill sites. The peak concentrations were recorded for BDE-47 at three sites and BDE-71 and BDE-75 at two sites. The highest concentration, 9793 {+-} 1.5 pg l{sup -1}, was obtained for the Temba landfill site with the highest BOD value. This may suggest some influence of organics on the level of PBDEs. Considering the leaching characteristics of brominated flame retardants, there is a high possibility that with time these compounds may infiltrate into the groundwater around the sites since most of the sites are not adequately lined.

  16. PROXIMITY OF LOUISIANA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS - DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems i? they are not properly located, designed, and managed. The purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i....

  17. PROXIMITY OF LOUISIANA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitiveecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. he purpose of this report is to summarize the proximity of sanitary landfills in the state of Louisiana to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers,...

  18. MICROBIAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESHLY LANDFILLED WASTE: COMPARISONS TO LANDFILLED WASTES OF DIFFERENT AGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cooperative research and development agreement was initiated between U.S. EPA and Waste Management Inc. for a multi-year study of landfill bioreactors at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY. As part of the agreement a research project is underway to study the microbiolog...

  19. PROXIMITY OF WASHINGTON SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. The purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Washington to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i...

  20. PROXIMITY OF CONNECTICUT SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITAS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfill can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managers. he purpose of these reports are to summarize the Proximity of sanitary landfills in Connecticut to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes,...

  1. PROXIMITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. he purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Pennsylvania to wetlands and deepwater habitats (...

  2. PROXIMITY OF FLORIDA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. The purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in New Jersey to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i...

  3. PROXIMITY OF GEORGIA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfill can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. The purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Georgia to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e. ...

  4. PROXIMITY OF DELAWARE LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. he purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Delaware to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e....

  5. PROXIMITY OF TEXAS SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. he purpose of this report is to summarize the proximity of sanitary landfills in Texas to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams,...

  6. Mesoscale Laboratory Models of the Biodegradation of Municipal Landfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Zawislanski, P. T.

    2001-12-01

    Stabilization of municipal landfills is a critical issue involving land reuse, leachate treatment, and odor control. In an effort to increase landfill stabilization rates and decrease leachate treatment costs, municipal landfills can be operated as active aerobic or anaerobic bioreactors. Rates of settling and biodegradation were compared in three different treatments of municipal landfill materials in laboratory-scale bioreactors. Each of the three fifty-five-gallon clear acrylic tanks was fitted with pressure transducers, thermistors, neutron probe access tubes, a leachate recirculation system, gas vents, and air injection ports. The treatments applied to the tanks were (a) aerobic (air injection with leachate recirculation and venting from the top), (b) anaerobic (leachate recirculation with passive venting from the top), and (c) a control tank (passive venting from the top and no leachate recirculation). All tanks contained a 10-cm-thick layer of pea gravel at the bottom, overlain by a mixture of fresh waste materials on the order of 5-10 cm in size to an initial height of 0.55 m. Concentrations of O2, CO2 and CH4 were measured at the gas vent, and leachate was collected at the bottom drain. The water saturation in the aerobic and anaerobic tanks averaged 17 % and the control tank averaged 1 %. Relative degradation rates between the tanks were monitored by CO2 and CH4 production rates and O2 respiration rates. Respiration tests on the aerobic tank show a decrease in oxygen consumption rates from 1.3 mol/day at 20 days to 0.1 mol/day at 300 days, indicating usable organics are being depleted. The anaerobic tank produced measurable methane after 300 days that increased to 41% by volume after 370 days. Over the test period, the aerobic tank settled 30 %, the anaerobic tank 18.5 %, and the control tank 11.1 %. The concentrations of metals, nitrate, phosphate, and total organic carbon in the aerobic tank leachate are an order of magnitude lower than in the anaerobic tank leachate. This work was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  7. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    PubMed

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels. PMID:22732009

  8. Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

  9. A new technique to estimate volcanic gas composition: plume measurements with a portable multi-sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi

    2005-05-01

    A portable multi-sensor system was developed to measure volcanic plumes in order to estimate the chemical composition and temperature of volcanic gases. The multi-sensor system consists of a humidity-temperature sensor, SO 2 electrochemical sensor, CO 2 IR analyzer, pump and flow control units, pressure sensor, data logger, and batteries; the whole system is light (˜5 kg) and small enough to carry in a medium-size backpack. Volcanic plume is a mixture of atmosphere and volcanic gas; therefore volcanic gas composition and temperature can be estimated by subtracting the atmospheric gas background from the plume data. In order to obtain the contrasting data of the plume and the atmosphere, measurements were repeated in and out of the plume. The multi-sensor technique was applied to measure the plume of Tarumae, Tokachi, and Meakan volcanoes, Hokkaido, Japan. Repeated measurements at each volcano gave a consistent composition with ±10-30% errors, depending on the stability of the background atmospheric conditions. Fumarolic gas samples were also collected at the Tokachi volcano by a conventional method, and we found a good agreement (the difference <10%) between the composition estimated by the multi-sensor technique and conventional method. Those results demonstrated that concentration ratios of major volcanic gas species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, and SO 2) and temperature can be estimated by the new technique without any complicated chemical analyses even for gases emitted from an inaccessible open vent. Estimation of a more detailed gas composition can be also achieved by the combination of alkaline filter techniques to measure Cl/F/S ratios in the plume and other sensors for H 2S and H 2.

  10. Optimization of composite polymer gas sensor arrays for single-analyte multiple-interferent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Denise M.

    2002-02-01

    Results for optimizing an array of composite polymer gas sensors for sensing one of five analytes in the presence of up to four interferents are presented. The optimized array consists of a heterogeneous array of up to ten points (unlike sensors) in multi-dimensional sensor space. The optimization techniques presented here are linear, since the composite polymer sensors in their useful (low concentration) operating range exhibit linear and additive response characteristics. The optimization of these arrays produces maximum separability between analytes, demonstrating the trade-off between the addition of both information and variability induced by increasing the size of the heterogeneous array. Optimization results for sensing acetone, hexane, thf, toluene, and ethanol in the presence of interferents result in array sizes that are significantly less than the maximum available number of sensors (10). This result adds fuel to the argument that fewer sensors are better; the argument for more sensors is also made in the context of the electronic nose systems where significant chemical diversity is required.

  11. Production of ZrC Matrix for Use in Gas Fast Reactor Composite Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Knight, Travis W.; Roberts, Elwyn [Nuclear Materials Laboratory, University of South Carolina 300 Main St, Columbia, SC-29208 (United States); Adams, Thad [Savannah River National Laboratory Materials Technology Division Aiken, SC-29808 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is being considered as a candidate for inert matrix material in composite nuclear fuel for Gas fast reactors due to its favorable characteristics. ZrC can be produced by the direct reaction of pure zirconium and graphite powders. Such a reaction is exothermic in nature. The reaction is self sustaining once initial ignition has been achieved. The heat released during the reaction is high enough to complete the reaction and achieve partial sintering without any external pressure applied. External heat source is required to achieve ignition of the reactants and maintain the temperature close to the adiabatic temperature to achieve higher levels of sintering. External pressure is also a driving force for sintering. In the experiments described, cylindrical compacts of ZrC were produced by direct combustion reaction. External induction heating combined with varying amounts of external applied pressure was employed to achieve varying degrees of density/porosity. The effect of reactant particle size on the product characteristics was also studied. The samples were characterized for density/porosity, composition and microstructure. (authors)

  12. Improved algorithm for quantitative analyses of infrared spectra of multicomponent gas mixtures with unknown compositions.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W

    2009-03-01

    We present a major improvement of an algorithm based on a spectral library search for the quantitative analysis of multicomponent gas samples with unknown compositions. A quantitative spectral database of infrared spectra is used as a training set to compute regression coefficients. Concentrations are computed in the principal component space via principal component regression (PCR). In addition to previous algorithms, we introduce a rating for each candidate substance depending on the concentration found with PCR and a filter that removes candidates that are predicted with negative concentrations if their rating is below a certain threshold. Negative concentrations arise when the measured spectrum contains components that are not contained in the database. The PCR is recomputed until all candidates have a rating above the threshold. Then an adaptive filter "subtracts" the substance with the highest rating from both the measured spectrum and the library and appends it to a hit list. The iteration of this procedure directly produces a list of substances in order of descending importance (i.e., contribution to the measured absorbance) with their corresponding concentrations. The algorithm is tested on spectra of multicomponent surgical smoke samples. The four main components (water, methane, ethane, and ethene) are identified correctly (within the top 5 of the hit list) for an appropriate choice of the rating threshold. The algorithm describes the composition of the smoke sample correctly despite the presence of features in the spectrum that cannot be explained by the spectrum of any single substance present in the database. PMID:19281650

  13. Dissociation enthalpies of synthesized multicomponent gas hydrates with respect to the guest composition and cage occupancy.

    PubMed

    Rydzy, Marisa B; Schicks, Judith M; Naumann, Rudolf; Erzinger, Jörg

    2007-08-16

    This study presents the influences of additional guest molecules such as C2H6, C3H8, and CO2 on methane hydrates regarding their thermal behavior. For this purpose, the onset temperatures of decomposition as well as the enthalpies of dissociation were determined for synthesized multicomponent gas hydrates in the range of 173-290 K at atmospheric pressure using a Calvet heat-flow calorimeter. Furthermore, the structures and the compositions of the hydrates were obtained using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy as well as hydrate prediction program calculations. It is shown that the onset temperature of decomposition of both sI and sII hydrates tends to increase with an increasing number of larger guest molecules than methane occupying the large cavities. The results of the calorimetric measurements also indicate that the molar dissociation enthalpy depends on the guest-to-cavity size ratio and the actual concentration of the guest occupying the large cavities of the hydrate. To our knowledge, this is the first study that observes this behavior using calorimetrical measurements on mixed gas hydrates at these temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:17658742

  14. Change in the chemical composition of infalling gas forming a disk around a protostar.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Demyk, Karine; Vastel, Charlotte; Coutens, Audrey; Taquet, Vianney; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    IRAS?04368+2557 is a solar-type (low-mass) protostar embedded in a protostellar core (L1527) in the Taurus molecular cloud, which is only 140 parsecs away from Earth, making it the closest large star-forming region. The protostellar envelope has a flattened shape with a diameter of a thousand astronomical units (1?AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), and is infalling and rotating. It also has a protostellar disk with a radius of 90?AU (ref. 6), from which a planetary system is expected to form. The interstellar gas, mainly consisting of hydrogen molecules, undergoes a change in density of about three orders of magnitude as it collapses from the envelope into the disk, while being heated from 10?kelvin to over 100?kelvin in the mid-plane, but it has hitherto not been possible to explore changes in chemical composition associated with this collapse. Here we report that the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule cyclic-C3H2 resides in the infalling rotating envelope, whereas sulphur monoxide (SO) is enhanced in the transition zone at the radius of the centrifugal barrier (100?±?20?AU), which is the radius at which the kinetic energy of the infalling gas is converted to rotational energy. Such a drastic change in chemistry at the centrifugal barrier was not anticipated, but is probably caused by the discontinuous infalling motion at the centrifugal barrier and local heating processes there. PMID:24522533

  15. Composition and fate of gas and oil released to the water column during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Christopher M.; Arey, J. Samuel; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Lemkau, Karin L.; Nelson, Robert K.; Carmichael, Catherine A.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Fenwick, Judith; Ventura, G. Todd; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Camilli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the endmember composition of the gas and oil that flowed from the Macondo well during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is essential for determining the oil flow rate, total oil volume released, and trajectories and fates of hydrocarbon components in the marine environment. Using isobaric gas-tight samplers, we collected discrete samples directly above the Macondo well on June 21, 2010, and analyzed the gas and oil. We found that the fluids flowing from the Macondo well had a gas-to-oil ratio of 1,600 standard cubic feet per petroleum barrel. Based on the measured endmember gas-to-oil ratio and the Federally estimated net liquid oil release of 4.1 million barrels, the total amount of C1-C5 hydrocarbons released to the water column was 1.7 × 1011 g. The endmember gas and oil compositions then enabled us to study the fractionation of petroleum hydrocarbons in discrete water samples collected in June 2010 within a southwest trending hydrocarbon-enriched plume of neutrally buoyant water at a water depth of 1,100 m. The most abundant petroleum hydrocarbons larger than C1-C5 were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes at concentrations up to 78 ?g L-1. Comparison of the endmember gas and oil composition with the composition of water column samples showed that the plume was preferentially enriched with water-soluble components, indicating that aqueous dissolution played a major role in plume formation, whereas the fates of relatively insoluble petroleum components were initially controlled by other processes. PMID:21768331

  16. A new approach to estimation of methane emission rates from landfills.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Letzel, Marcus O; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin; Bächlin, Wolfgang; Flassak, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Methane emission monitoring has become increasingly essential for diffusive area sources, especially for landfills, which contribute to a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic methane emission globally. Statutorily, methane emission rate from landfills in Germany shall be examined on a semiannual basis; however, an appropriate approach has yet to be developed and adopted for general use. In this study, a new method is proposed based on experimental results, which utilizes a TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument - GasFinder2.0 system and a dispersion model LASAT (Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol Transport) as the measurement device and calculation model, respectively. Between April 2010 and December 2011, a research project was conducted at a pilot scale landfill in the south of Germany. Drawing on the extensive research into this pilot project, an effective strategy of measurement setup was determined. Methane concentration was measured with GasFinder2.0 system in the upstream and downstream sections of the project site, while wind and turbulence data were measured simultaneously by an ultrasonic anemometer. The average methane emission rate from the source can be calculated by using the results as input data in the dispersion model. With this method, site-specific measurement approaches can be designed for not only landfills, but also different diffusive area sources with less workload and lower cost compared to conventional FID (Flame Ionization Detector) method. PMID:24084101

  17. Preliminary assessment of numerical data requirements TA-73 landfill Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-19

    A numerical model, TOUGH2, was selected for describing liquid- and gas-phase flow in the unsaturated tuff underlying the TA-73 landfill. The model was selected primarily for its ability to simulate the significant mechanisms that may affect transport of contaminants through the vadose zone at the TA-73 landfill, including non-isothermal flow through fractured media. TOUGH2 is the best documented, verified, and validated model capable of performing the required simulations. The sensitivity analyses that were performed and describes in this report identified the input parameters that the selected numerical model is most sensitive to. The input parameters analyzed were saturated hydraulic conductivity, van Genuchten {alpha} and n, residual and saturated moisture contents, infiltration rate, fracture spacing and permeability, atmospheric pressure, and temperature. The sensitivity analyses were performed using a model grid that was designed to incorporate the regions in the landfill vicinity where contaminant transport is likely to occur and where the physical processes affecting flow and transport are the most dynamic. The sensitivity analyses performed suggest that the model is quite sensitive to a number of input parameters, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, the van Genuchten parameters {alpha} and n (for both the tuff matrix and fractures), fracture density and aperture, and atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that additional site-specific hydraulic properties and fracture data should be obtained before attempting to perform predictive, numerical simulations of gas- and liquid-phase flow beneath the landfill.

  18. A combined approach to investigate the toxicity of an industrial landfill's leachate: chemical analyses, risk assessment and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Baderna, D; Maggioni, S; Boriani, E; Gemma, S; Molteni, M; Lombardo, A; Colombo, A; Bordonali, S; Rotella, G; Lodi, M; Benfenati, E

    2011-05-01

    Solid wastes constitute an important and emerging problem. Landfills are still one of the most common ways to manage waste disposal. The risk assessment of pollutants from landfills is becoming a major environmental issue in Europe, due to the large number of sites and to the importance of groundwater protection. Furthermore, there is lack of knowledge for the environmental, ecotoxicological and toxicological characteristics of most contaminants contained into landfill leacheates. Understanding leachate composition and creating an integrated strategy for risk assessment are currently needed to correctly face the landfill issues and to make projections on the long-term impacts of a landfill, with particular attention to the estimation of possible adverse effects on human health and ecosystem. In the present study, we propose an integrated strategy to evaluate the toxicity of the leachate using chemical analyses, risk assessment guidelines and in vitro assays using the hepatoma HepG2 cells as a model. The approach was applied on a real case study: an industrial waste landfill in northern Italy for which data on the presence of leachate contaminants are available from the last 11 years. Results from our ecological risk models suggest important toxic effects on freshwater fish and small rodents, mainly due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. Our results from in vitro data show an inhibition of cell proliferation by leachate at low doses and cytotoxic effect at high doses after 48 h of exposure. PMID:21316652

  19. Attenuation of municipal landfill leachate through land treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of municipal landfill’s leachate is considered as one of the most significant environmental issues. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted through land treatment, achieving an efficient and economical method by using Vetiver plant. Moreover, the effects of land treatment of leachate of municipal landfills on the natural reduction of organic and inorganic contaminants in the leachate after the pre-treatment in the Aradkouh disposal center are invested. Three pilots including the under-investigation region’s soil planted by Vetiver plant, the region’s intact soil pilot and the artificial composition of the region’s soil including the natural region’s soil, sand, and rock stone are used. The leachate, having passed its initial treatment, passed through the soil and to the pilot. It was collected in the end of the pilots and its organic and inorganic contaminants were measured. However, the land treatment of leachate was conducted in a slow rate at various speeds. According to the results, in order to remove COD, BOD5, TDS, TSS, TOC the best result was obtained in the region’s soil planted with Vetiver plant and at the speed of 0.2 ml per minute which resulted 99.1%, 99.7%, 52.4%, 98.8%, 94.9% removal efficiencies, respectively. It also can be concluded that the higher the organic rate load is, the lower the efficiency of the removal would be. In addition, EC & pH were measured and the best result was obtained in the region’s soil planted with Vetiver plant and at the speed of 0.2 ml/min. PMID:24397862

  20. Using fumarolic inert gas composition to investigate magma dynamics at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Caliro, S.; Paonita, A.; Cardellini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000 the Campi Flegrei caldera sited in Neapolitan area (Italy), has showed signs of reactivation, marked by ground uplift, seismic activity, compositional variations of fumarolic effluents from La Solfatara, an increase of the fumarolic activity as well as of soil CO2 fluxes. Comparing long time series of geochemical signals with ground deformation and seismicity, we show that these changes are at least partially caused by repeated injections of magmatic fluid into the hydrothermal system. The frequency of these degassing episodes has increased in the last years, causing pulsed uplift episodes and swarms of low magnitude earthquakes. We focus here in the inert gas species (CO2-He-Ar-N2) of Solfatara fumaroles which displayed in the time spectacular and persistent variation trends affecting all the monitored vents. The observed variations, which include a continuous decrease of both N2/He and N2/CO2 ratios since 1985, paralleled by an increase of He/CO2, can not be explained neither with changes in processes of boiling-condensation in the local hydrothermal system nor with changes in the mixing proportions between a magmatic vapour and hydrothermal fluids. Consequently we investigated the possibility that the trends of inert gas species are governed by changes in the conditions controlling magma degassing at depth. We applied a magma degassing model, with the most recent updates for inert gas solubilities, after to have included petrologic constraints from the ranges of melt composition and reservoir pressure at Campi Flegrei. The model simulations for mafic melts (trachybasalt and shoshonite) show a surprising agreement with the measured data. Both decompressive degassing of an ascending magma and mixing between magmatic fluids exsolved at various levels along the ascent path can explain the long-time geochemical changes. Our work highlights that, in caldera systems where the presence of hydrothermal aquifers commonly masks the magmatic signature of reactive volatiles, inert gases are the preferred species to achieve information on the dynamics and structure of the magma plumbing systems.

  1. The release of As, Cr and Cu from contaminated soil stabilized with APC residues under landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Travar, I; Kihl, A; Kumpiene, J

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of As, Cr and Cu in contaminated soil treated with air pollution control residues under landfill conditions. The influence of landfill gas and temperature on the release of trace elements from stabilized soil was simulated using a diffusion test. The air pollution control residues immobilized As through the precipitation of Ca-As minerals (calcium arsenate (Ca5H2(AsO4)3 × 5H2O), weilite (CaAsO4) and johnbaumite (Ca5(AsO4)3(OH)), incorporation of As into ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 × 26H2O) and adsorption by calcite (CaCO3). The air pollution control residues generally showed a high resistance to pH reduction, indicating high buffer capacity and stability of immobilized As in a landfill over time. Generation of heat in a landfill might increase the release of trace elements. The release of As from stabilized soil was diffusion-controlled at 60 °C, while surface wash-off, dissolution, and depletion prevailed at 20 °C. The air pollution control residues from the incineration of municipal solid waste immobilized Cr, indicating its stability in a landfill. The treatment of soil with air pollution control residues was not effective in immobilization of Cu. Contaminated soils treated with air pollution control residues will probably have a low impact on overall leachate quality from a landfill. PMID:25528268

  2. Compositional changes in natural gas bubble plumes: observations from the Coal Oil Point marine hydrocarbon seep field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan F. Clark; Ira Leifer; Libe Washburn; Bruce P. Luyendyk

    2003-01-01

    Detailed measurements of bubble composition, dissolved gas concentrations, and plume dynamics were conducted during a 9-month period at a very intense, shallow (22-m water depth) marine hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Channel, California. Methane, carbon dioxide, and heavier hydrocarbons were lost from rising seep bubbles, while nitrogen and oxygen were gained. Within the rising seawater bubble plume, dissolved methane

  3. Study of composition change and agglomeration of flue gas cleaning residue from a fluidized bed waste incinerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Lievens; B. Verbinnen; P. Bollaert; N. Alderweireldt; G. Mertens; J. Elsen; C. Vandecasteele

    2011-01-01

    Blocking of the collection hoppers of the baghouse filters in a fluidized bed incinerator for co?incineration of high calorific industrial solid waste and sludge was observed. The composition of the flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR), both from a blocked hopper and from a normal hopper, was investigated by (differential) thermogravimetric analysis, quantitative X?ray powder diffraction and wet chemical analysis. The

  4. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System, Taranaki Basin Assessment Unit, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wandrey, Craig J.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System coincident Taranaki Basin Assessment Unit was recently assessed for undiscovered technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) World Energy Resources Project, World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 487 million barrels of oil, 9.8 trillion cubic feet of gas, and 408 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  5. Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

    2007-01-01

    Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

  6. Martial recycling from renewable landfill and associated risks: A review.

    PubMed

    Ziyang, Lou; Luochun, Wang; Nanwen, Zhu; Youcai, Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Landfill is the dominant disposal choice for the non-classified waste, which results in the stockpile of materials after a long term stabilization process. A novel landfill, namely renewable landfill (RL), is developed and applied as a strategy to recycle the residual materials and reuse the land occupation, aim to reduce the inherent problems of large land occupied, materials wasted and long-term pollutants released in the conventional landfill. The principle means of RL is to accelerate the waste biodegradation process in the initial period, recover the various material resources disposal and extend the landfill volume for waste re-landfilling after waste stabilized. The residual material available and risk assessment, the methodology of landfill excavation, the potential utilization routes for different materials, and the reclamation options for the unsanitary landfill are proposed, and the integrated beneficial impacts are identified finally from the economic, social and environmental perspectives. RL could be draw as the future reservoirs for resource extraction. PMID:25800380

  7. Hydrogeology of a landfill, Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Pinellas County landfill site is on a flat, coastal area characterized by a high water table is subject to tidal flooding. Altitudes within the study area range from 8 to 12 feet above sea level. Three geohydrologic units underlie the landfill site: a surficial aquifer about 19 feet thick composed of sand and shells; a confining bed about 35 feet thick composed of marl and clay; and the Floridan aquifer composed of limestone. The rate of lateral movement of ground water away from the site is about 1.2 feet per year; however, the rate of movement along the boundary of the landfill cells is about 20 feet per year. Vertical movement through the confining layer is about 0.005 foot per year. Landfill operations have not altered surface-water quality. Leachate migration downward into the Floridan aquifer is not indicated, but data do indicate leachate is migrating from the oldest section of the landfill site through the surficial aquifer. Peaks in concentration of selected chemical parameters and flow-rate analysis of water from trenches indicate the possibility of slug-flow leachate. (USGS)

  8. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): New London Submarine Base, Operable Unit 1, Area A Landfill, Groton, CT, September 26, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This decision document presents the selected source control remedial action for Operable unit 1, the Area A Landfill, at the Naval Submarine Base (`NSB`) in Groton, Connecticut. The major components of the selected remedy include: Capping of the site with a RCRA Subtitle C multi-layer cap; Landfill gas control to manage landfill gas migration; Surface controls to minimize erosion and manage runoff; Use of fencing and institutional controls to control site access and future site use; Provisions for conducting additional studies, including determining if additional measures, beyond capping, such as leachate/groundwater collection system, must be taken to further contain contaminants and enhance stability; A leachate/groundwater collection system may be installed to further contain landfill wastes and to stabilize the cap if pre-design studies indicate that one is necessary; and Five-year review.

  9. The Chemical Composition and Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio of Nearby Interstellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2003-09-01

    We use recent results on interstellar gas toward nearby stars and interstellar by-products within the solar system to select among the equilibrium radiative transfer models of the nearest interstellar material presented in Slavin & Frisch. For the assumption that O/H~400 parts per million, models 2 and 8 are found to yield good fits to available data on interstellar material inside and outside of the heliosphere, with the exception of the Ne abundance in the pickup ion and anomalous cosmic-ray populations. For these models, the interstellar medium (ISM) at the entry point to the heliosphere has n(H0)=0.202-0.208 cm-3, n(He0)=0.0137-0.0152 cm-3, and ionizations ?(H)=0.29-0.30, ?(He)=0.47-0.51. These best models suggest that the chemical composition of the nearby ISM is ~60%-70% subsolar if S is undepleted. Both H0 and H+ need to be included when evaluating abundances of ions found in warm diffuse clouds. Models 2 and 8 yield an H filtration factor of ~0.46. Gas-to-dust mass ratios for the ISM toward ? CMa are Rgd=178-183 for solar abundances of Holweger or Rgd=611-657 for an interstellar abundance standard 70% solar. Direct observations of dust grains in the solar system by Ulysses and Galileo yield Rgd~=115 for models 2 and 8, supporting earlier results (Frisch and coworkers). If the local ISM abundances are subsolar, then gas and dust are decoupled over small spatial scales. The inferred variation in Rgd over parsec length scales is consistent with the fact that the ISM near the Sun is part of a dynamically active cluster of cloudlets flowing away from the Sco-Cen association. Observations toward stars within ~500 pc show that Rgd correlates with the percentage of the dust mass that is carried by iron, suggesting that an Fe-rich grain core (by mass) remains after grain destruction. Evidently large dust grains (>10-13 g) and small dust grains (<10-13 g) are not well mixed over parsec length spatial scales in the ISM. It also appears that very small C-dominated dust grains have been destroyed in the ISM within several parsecs of the Sun, since C appears to be essentially undepleted. However, if gas-dust coupling breaks down over the cloud lifetime, the missing mass arguments applied here to determine Rgd and dust grain mineralogy are not appropriate.

  10. Ni(NiO)/single-walled carbon nanotubes composite: Synthesis of electro-deposition, gas sensing property for NO gas and density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Zhang, Guo; Chen, Lei [Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, College of Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, College of Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Bi, Hong-Mei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Shi, Ke-Ying, E-mail: shikeying2008@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The Ni(NiO)/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes composite collected from the cathode after electro-deposition shows a high sensitivity to low-concentration NO gas at room temperature (18 °C). Display Omitted Highlights: ? Ni(NiO) nanoparticles were deposited on semiconducting SWCNTs by electro-deposition. ? Ni(NiO)/semiconducting SWCNTs film shows a high sensitivity to NO gas at 18 °C. ?Theoretical calculation reveals electron transfer from SWCNTs to NO via Ni. -- Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes which contains metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) and semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) have been obtained under electric arc discharge. Their separation can be effectively achieved by the electro-deposition method. The Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite was found on cathode where Ni was partially oxidized to NiO at ambient condition with Ni(NiO) nanoparticles deposited uniformly on the bundles of SWCNTs. These results were confirmed by Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis–NIR and TG characterizations. Furthermore, investigation of the gas sensing property of Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite film to NO gas at 18 °C demonstrated the sensitivity was approximately 5% at the concentration of 97 ppb. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explore the sensing mechanism which suggested the adsorption of NO molecules onto the composite through N–Ni interaction as well as the proposition of electron transfer mechanisms from SWCNTs to NO via the Ni medium.

  11. The use of strontium and lead isotopes to identify sources of water beneath the Fresh Kills landfill, Staten Island, New York, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. I Siegel; M. E Bickford; S. E Orrell

    2000-01-01

    A study was undertaken to explore whether the isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr are useful to distinguish mixtures of uncontaminated groundwater, seawater, and landfill leachate at the Fresh Kills landfill, Staten Island, New York. Ratios of 87Sr\\/86Sr ranged from 0.7088 to 0.7137 and could be used to distinguish Sr that was derived from seawater from that in uncontaminated groundwater.

  12. PBTS, MERCURY AND OTHER POLLUTANTS FROM MSW LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 60% of municipal solid waste (MSW) is currently sent to a landfill for disposal. In addition, there are over 35,000 closed landfills as well as industrial and Superfund landfills. Concerns have been raised for more than 2 decades about the potential for dioxin/fur...

  13. Flawed Technology of Subtitle D Landfilling of Municipal Solid Waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Fred Lee; Anne Jones-Lee

    This report presents a review of the information available pertinent to public health and environmental quality protection issues for proposed Subtitle D landfills. Based on this review it is concluded that this type of landfill will at most locations cause groundwater pollution by landfill leachate and be adverse to the health, welfare and interests of nearby residents and property owners.

  14. Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O.. Ayalon; N. Becker; E. Shani

    2006-01-01

    The Hiriya landfill, Israel’s largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use

  15. Low-cost treatment of landfill leachate using peat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Heavey

    2003-01-01

    The EU Landfill Directive obliges member states to collect and treat leachate from landfill sites. In regions of high population density, this is commonly achieved through discharge of the leachate to the municipal sewerage system. In Ireland, rural landfills can be a long distance from a suitable sewerage system, resulting in high transportation costs. On-site treatment systems, when used elsewhere,

  16. Cancer Cluster Investigation in Residents Near a Municipal Landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie E. Goodman; Todd C. Hudson; Richard J. Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    While there are several studies of the health status of residents near hazardous waste landfills, relatively few have focused on the health of individuals living near municipal landfills. We assessed whether there were increased incidence rates of 18 cancer types and all cancers combined among residents near the Northampton Regional Landfill in western Massachusetts by conducting analyses for the cities

  17. Dissolved organic matter and estrogenic potential of landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fan Lü; Hua Zhang; Cheng-Hsuan Chang; Duu-Jong Lee; Pin-Jing He; Li-Ming Shao; Ay Su

    2008-01-01

    The estrogenic potentials of leachate samples collected at Laogang Sanitary Landfill in Shanghai, China were measured together with the associated dissolved organic matter (DOM) in leachate samples. Over 99% of the DOM in fresh leachate was removed upon 3–7 years of landfill, leaving only DOM with strong fluorescent activity. Anoxic or aerobic treatment of landfill leachate can further degrade DOM

  18. Acute and genetic toxicity of municipal landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. Schrab; K. W. Brown; K. C. Donnelly

    1993-01-01

    The large number of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills and the many hazardous materials which they contain pose a serious environmental threat to our groundwater reserves. The present study was conducted to assess the environmental hazards that four MSW landfill leachates pose to the groundwater. Genetic toxicities of the landfill leachate and groundwater samples were assessed using the Salmonella\\/microsome (Ames

  19. In situ nitrogen management in controlled bioreactor landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Turgut T. Onay; Frederick G. Pohland

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfills vary according to site-specific conditions. Leachates from “old” landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of the nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable substrates, with decreases in concentration mainly attributable to leachate washout. At landfills where leachate containment, collection and recirculation is practiced to accelerate decomposition of readily biodegradable organic

  20. Groundwater pollution source characterization of an old landfill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Kjeldsen

    1993-01-01

    Only a few landfill investigations have focused on both the quantity and the quality of leachate as a source of groundwater pollution. The investigation of Vejen Landfill in Denmark included an introductionary historical survey (old maps, aerial photographs, interviews, etc.), leachate quality analysis, potential mapping of the groundwater surface below the landfill and leachate flow to surface waters and groundwater.

  1. Purification of landfill leachate with reverse osmosis and nanofiltration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Peters

    1998-01-01

    On many landfill sites the most environmentally friendly and economical way to treat landfill leachate is to reduce its volume by 75 to 80% using reverse osmosis and then return the concentrate to the landfill by controlled reinjection. If this procedure is not yet authorized by local authorities then the treatment process must achieve very high rates of recovery by

  2. GEOSYNTHETIC REINFOR CEMENT IN LANDFILL DESIGN: US PERSPECTIVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge G. Zornberg

    Geosynthetic reinforcement in landfill applications in the US has involved conventional reinforced soil structures and veneer stabilization with re inforcements placed along the landfill slope and anchored at the crest. In addition, i nnovative approaches have been recently implemented in the US to reinforce landfill cover s and base liners. This includes horizontally placed geosyn thetic reinforcements, which are anchored

  3. Atmospheric methane transport near landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P; Pilinis, Christodoulos; Halvadakis, Constantinos P

    2003-02-01

    Methane production rates that have been estimated by a biogas production model (MICROGEN) are combined with an air dispersion model in order to determine the spatial distribution of methane around landfill sites. By utilising dispersion models under extreme atmospheric conditions, a maximum methane concentration around the landfills can be determined. The factors that enhance the maximum methane concentrations, using the meteorological model CALMET in conjunction with the dispersion model CALPUFF, are found to be the wind speed and the percentage of cloud cover. The rates of temperature and pressure variation, as well as the land use category seem to have no effect on the maximum methane concentrations. A rapid reduction of methane concentration is observed a few metres away from the landfill centre while a slower reduction is observed at distances greater than 300 m from it. The performance of this methodology is evaluated by comparing measured concentrations with model predictions. PMID:12667020

  4. Fast gas heating in N2/O2 mixtures under nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge: the effects of gas pressure and composition.

    PubMed

    Nudnova, M M; Kindysheva, S V; Aleksandrov, N L; Starikovskii, A Yu

    2015-08-13

    The fractional electron power quickly transferred to heat in non-equilibrium plasmas was studied experimentally and theoretically in N2/O2 mixtures subjected to high electric fields. Measurements were performed in and after a nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge at various (300-750 Torr) gas pressures and (50-100%) N2 percentages. Observations showed that the efficiency of fast gas heating is almost independent of pressure and becomes more profound when the fraction of O2 in N2/O2 mixtures increases. The processes that contribute towards the fast transfer of electron energy to thermal energy were numerically simulated under the conditions considered. Calculations were compared with measurements and the main channels of fast gas heating were analysed at the gas pressures, compositions and electric fields under study. It was shown that efficient fast gas heating in the mixtures with high fraction of O2 is due to a notable contribution of heat release during quenching of electronically excited N2 states in collisions with O2 molecules and to ion-ion recombination. The effect of hydrocarbon addition to air on fast gas heating was numerically estimated. It was concluded that the fractional electron power transferred to heat in air, as a first approximation, could be used to estimate this effect in lean and stoichiometric hydrocarbon-air mixtures. PMID:26170431

  5. US EPA record of decision review for landfills: Sanitary landfill (740-G), Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Record of Decision System (RODS) database search conducted to identify Superfund landfill sites where a Record of Decision (ROD) has been prepared by EPA, the States or the US Army Corps of Engineers describing the selected remedy at the site. ROD abstracts from the database were reviewed to identify site information including site type, contaminants of concern, components of the selected remedy, and cleanup goals. Only RODs from landfill sites were evaluated so that the results of the analysis can be used to support the remedy selection process for the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  6. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  7. [Effect of operational modes on community structure of type I methanotroph in the cover soil of municipal solid waste landfill].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; He, Pin-Jing; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Type I methanotroph is crucial for methane oxidization and it responses fast to the changes in environment. In this study, 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) gene fingerprint technology was applied to investigate the effect of operational modes, i. e. high-density polyethylene liner (HDPE) isolation or subsurface irrigation of landfill leachate and vegetation, on community structure and diversity of type I methanotroph in soils covering municipal solid waste landfill. 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis reveals type I methanotroph in all tested soils belongs to Methylobacter. According to Shannon-Wiener diversity index and principal component analysis, landfill leachate subsurface irrigation and vegetation have more impact on type I methanotroph community structure and diversity than HDPE liner isolation does, and they reduce type I methanotroph diversity. Leachate irrigation is supposed to inhibit the growth of Methylobacter population. Community structure of type I methanotroph in landfill cover soil isolated by HDPE, i.e. invaded by landfill gas, shifts during long-term gas interference. When cover age is 1.5 years old, Shannon-Wiener diversity index of type I methanotroph reaches its maximum. PMID:19143406

  8. Contribution of individual waste fractions to the environmental impacts from landfilling of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Simone; Tonini, Davide; Christensen, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    A number of LCA-based studies have reported on the environmental performance of landfilling of mixed waste, but little is known about the relative contributions of individual waste fractions to the overall impact potentials estimated for the mixed waste. In this paper, an empirical model has been used to estimate the emissions to the environment from landfilling of individual waste fractions. By means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE, the emissions estimated have been used to quantify how much of the overall impact potential for each impact category is to be attributed to the individual waste fractions. Impact potentials are estimated for 1 tonne of mixed waste disposed off in a conventional landfill with bottom liner, leachate collection and treatment and gas collection and utilization for electricity generation. All the environmental aspects are accounted for 100 years after disposal and several impact categories have been considered, including standard categories, toxicity-related categories and groundwater contamination. Amongst the standard and toxicity-related categories, the highest potential impact is estimated for human toxicity via soil (HTs; 12 mPE/tonne). This is mostly caused by leaching of heavy metals from ashes (e.g. residues from roads cleaning and vacuum cleaning bags), batteries, paper and metals. On the other hand, substantial net environmental savings are estimated for the categories Global Warming (GW; -31 mPE/tonne) and Eco-Toxicity in water chronic (ETwc; -53 mPE/tonne). These savings are mostly determined by the waste fractions characterized by a high content of biogenic carbon (paper, organics, other combustible waste). These savings are due to emissions from energy generation avoided by landfill gas utilization, and by the storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill due to incomplete waste degradation. PMID:19854039

  9. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    SciTech Connect

    Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Fredenslund, Anders M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Chanton, Jeffrey, E-mail: jchanton@fsu.edu [Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, 117 N. Woodward Avenue, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fl 32306-4320 (United States); Pedersen, Gitte Bukh, E-mail: gbp@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, Peter, E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH{sub 4}. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH{sub 4} oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m{sup 2} were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH{sub 4} load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH{sub 4} was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH{sub 4} emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH{sub 4} emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH{sub 4} mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

  10. Degradation of C2-C15 volatile organic compounds in a landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Liccioli, Caterina; Moretti, Sandro; Nisi, Barbara

    2009-07-15

    The composition of non-methane volatile organic compounds (hereafter VOCs) in i) the cover soil, at depths of 30, 50 and 70 cm, and ii) gas recovery wells from Case Passerini landfill site, (Florence, Italy) was determined by GC-MS. The study, based on the analysis of interstitial gases sampled along vertical profiles within the cover soil, was aimed to investigate the VOC behaviour as biogas transits from a reducing to a relatively more oxidizing environment. A total of 48 and 63 different VOCs were identified in the soil and well gases, respectively. Aromatics represent the dominant group (71.5% of total VOC) in soil gases, followed by alkanes (6.8%), ketones (5.7%), organic acids (5.2%), aldehydes (3.0%), esters (2.6%), halogenated compounds (2.1%) and terpenes (1.3%). Cyclics, heterocyclics, S-bearing compounds and phenols are composition is characterized by higher concentrations of cyclic (7.6%) and S-bearing compounds (2%) and lower concentrations of O-bearing compounds. The vertical distribution of VOCs in the cover soil shows significant variations: alkanes, aromatics and cyclics decrease at decreasing depth, whereas an inverse trend is displayed by the O-bearing species. Total VOC and CH(4) concentrations at a depth of 30 cm in the soil are comparable, inferring that microbial activity is likely affecting VOCs at a very minor extent with respect to CH(4). According to these considerations, to assess the biogas emission impact, usually carried out on the sole basis of CO(2) and CH(4) emission rates, the physical-chemical behaviour of VOCs in the cover soil, regulating the discharge of these highly contaminant compounds in ambient air, has to be taken into account. The soil vertical distribution of these species can be used to better evaluate the efficiency of oxidative capability of intermediate and final covers. PMID:19446310

  11. Field test of infrared thermography applied to biogas controlling in landfill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Jaime M.; González, Daniel A.; Tejero, Juan I.; Cobo, Adolfo; Gil, José L.; Conde, Olga M.; López-Higuera, Jose M.

    2007-04-01

    The gases accumulated inside the landfill as result of the fermentation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) known as biogas, are taking into consideration all possible uses as direct transformation into electricity. The system for collecting, regulating and controlling the biogas must include all the necessary safety features where the biogas leakage presents a high impact. Infrared thermography can be use to detect gas leakages due to the differences in temperature between the gas and the immediate surroundings. This method is able to monitor a wide area of landfill sites, quickly. This technology will not be effective if the differences in temperature are not better than five degrees. This paper describes a field test conducted to study the limitations of the infrared thermography caused by weather conditions and the moment of day or/and season when the thermal images was captured. Pipelines, borders, cells, covers, slopes and leakage (hot spots) are studied and optimum conditions are defined.

  12. Environmental impact assessment of leachate recirculation in landfill of municipal solid waste by comparing with evaporation and discharge (EASEWASTE).

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Lu, Wenjing; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Deng, Wenjing; Christensen, Thomas H

    2013-02-01

    In some arid regions where landfill produces minimal amount of leachate, leachate recirculation is suggested as a cost-effective option. However, its long-term impacts to environment remain disputed. For the purpose of revealing the environmental impacts of leachate recirculation in landfill, four scenarios were modeled using EASEWASTE, comparing the strategies of leachate recirculation (with or without gas management), evaporation and discharge. In the current situation (Scenario A), a total of 280 t of waste was generated and then transported to a conventional landfill for disposal. A number of contaminants derived from waste can be stored in the landfill for long periods, with 11.69 person equivalent (PE) for stored ecotoxicity in water and 29.62 PE for stored ecotoxicity in soil, considered as potential risks of releasing to the environment someday. Meanwhile, impacts to ecotoxicity and human toxicity in surface water, and those to groundwater, present relatively low levels. In Scenario B, leachate evaporation in a collecting pool has minimal impacts on surface water. However, this strategy significantly impacts groundwater (1055.16 PE) because of the potential infiltration of leachate, with major contaminants of As, ammonia, and Cd. A number of ions, such as Cl(-), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), may also contaminate groundwater. In Scenario C, the direct discharge of leachate to surface water may result in acidification (2.71 PE) and nutrient enrichment (2.88 PE), primarily attributed to soluble ammonia in leachate and the depositional ammonia from biogas. Moreover, the direct discharge of leachate may also result in ecotoxicity and human toxicity via water contaminated by heavy metals in leachate, with 3.96 PE and 11.64 PE respectively. The results also show that landfill gas is the main contributor to global warming and photochemical ozone formation due to methane emission. In Scenario D, landfill gas flaring was thus be modeled and proven to be efficient for reducing impacts by approximately 90% in most categories, like global warming, photochemical ozone formation, acidification, nutrient enrichment, ecotoxicity, and human toxicity. Therefore, leachate recirculation is considered a cost-effective and environmentally viable solution for the current situation, and landfill gas treatment is urgently required. These results can provide important evidence for leachate and gas management of landfill in arid regions. PMID:23177016

  13. Effect of operating and sampling conditions on the exhaust gas composition of small-scale power generators.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marianne; Vanpachtenbeke, Floris; Horemans, Benjamin; De Wael, Karolien; Hauchecorne, Birger; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Small stationary diesel engines, like in generator sets, have limited emission control measures and are therefore responsible for 44% of the particulate matter (PM) emissions in the United States. The diesel exhaust composition depends on operating conditions of the combustion engine. Furthermore, the measurements are influenced by the used sampling method. This study examines the effect of engine loading and exhaust gas dilution on the composition of small-scale power generators. These generators are used in different operating conditions than road-transport vehicles, resulting in different emission characteristics. Experimental data were obtained for gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and PM mass concentration, elemental composition and nitrate content. The exhaust composition depends on load condition because of its effect on fuel consumption, engine wear and combustion temperature. Higher load conditions result in lower PM concentration and sharper edged particles with larger aerodynamic diameters. A positive correlation with load condition was found for K, Ca, Sr, Mn, Cu, Zn and Pb adsorbed on PM, elements that originate from lubricating oil or engine corrosion. The nitrate concentration decreases at higher load conditions, due to enhanced nitrate dissociation to gaseous NO at higher engine temperatures. Dilution on the other hand decreases PM and nitrate concentration and increases gaseous VOC and adsorbed metal content. In conclusion, these data show that operating and sampling conditions have a major effect on the exhaust gas composition of small-scale diesel generators. Therefore, care must be taken when designing new experiments or comparing literature results. PMID:22442670

  14. Effect of Operating and Sampling Conditions on the Exhaust Gas Composition of Small-Scale Power Generators

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Marianne; Vanpachtenbeke, Floris; Horemans, Benjamin; De Wael, Karolien; Hauchecorne, Birger; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Small stationary diesel engines, like in generator sets, have limited emission control measures and are therefore responsible for 44% of the particulate matter (PM) emissions in the United States. The diesel exhaust composition depends on operating conditions of the combustion engine. Furthermore, the measurements are influenced by the used sampling method. This study examines the effect of engine loading and exhaust gas dilution on the composition of small-scale power generators. These generators are used in different operating conditions than road-transport vehicles, resulting in different emission characteristics. Experimental data were obtained for gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and PM mass concentration, elemental composition and nitrate content. The exhaust composition depends on load condition because of its effect on fuel consumption, engine wear and combustion temperature. Higher load conditions result in lower PM concentration and sharper edged particles with larger aerodynamic diameters. A positive correlation with load condition was found for K, Ca, Sr, Mn, Cu, Zn and Pb adsorbed on PM, elements that originate from lubricating oil or engine corrosion. The nitrate concentration decreases at higher load conditions, due to enhanced nitrate dissociation to gaseous NO at higher engine temperatures. Dilution on the other hand decreases PM and nitrate concentration and increases gaseous VOC and adsorbed metal content. In conclusion, these data show that operating and sampling conditions have a major effect on the exhaust gas composition of small-scale diesel generators. Therefore, care must be taken when designing new experiments or comparing literature results. PMID:22442670

  15. Characterization of Ceramic Matrix Composite Vane Subelements Subjected to Rig Testing in a Gas Turbine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael; Calomino, Anthony; Thomas, David J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    2004-01-01

    Vane subelements were fabricated from a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite. A cross-sectional slice of an aircraft engine metal vane was the basis of the vane subelement geometry. To fabricate the small radius of the vane's trailing edge using stiff Sylramic SiC fibers, a unique SiC fiber architecture was developed. A test configuration for the vanes in a high pressure gas turbine environment was designed and fabricated. Testing was conducted using a pressure of 6 atm and combustion flow rate of 0.5 kg/sec, and consisted of fifty hours of steady state operation followed by 102 2-minute thermal cycles. A surface temperature of 1320 C was obtained for the EBC-coated SiC/SiC vane subelement. This paper will briefly discuss the vane fabrication, test configuration, and results of the vane testing. The emphasis of the paper is on characterization of the post-test condition of the vanes.

  16. Mass spectrometric gas composition measurements associated with jet interaction tests in a high-enthalpy wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Brown, K. G.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Puster, R. L.; Paulin, P. A.; Fishel, C. E.; Ellerbe, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of test gas composition is important in wind-tunnel experiments measuring aerothermodynamic interactions. This paper describes measurements made by sampling the top of the test section during runs of the Langley 7-Inch High-Temperature Tunnel. The tests were conducted to determine the mixing of gas injected from a flat-plate model into a combustion-heated hypervelocity test stream and to monitor the CO2 produced in the combustion. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) measurements yield the mole fraction of N2 or He and CO2 reaching the sample inlets. The data obtained for several tunnel run conditions are related to the pressures measured in the tunnel test section and at the MS ionizer inlet. The apparent distributions of injected gas species and tunnel gas (CO2) are discussed relative to the sampling techniques. The measurements provided significant real-time data for the distribution of injected gases in the test section. The jet N2 diffused readily from the test stream, but the jet He was mostly entrained. The amounts of CO2 and Ar diffusing upward in the test section for several run conditions indicated the variability of the combustion-gas test-stream composition.

  17. Occurrence and removal of organic pollutants in sewages and landfill leachates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanna K Marttinen; Riitta H Kettunen; Jukka A Rintala

    2003-01-01

    Sewages of different composition and the effluents of four sewage treatment plants (STPs), plus sewage sludges were analysed for semivolatile organic priority pollutants. Furthermore, 11 landfill leachates were analysed to evaluate their contribution to sewage pollutants when co-treated. Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was the pollutant occurring at highest concentrations (up to 122 ?g\\/l) and it was present in all sewages and

  18. Liquefied Natural Gas Storage of Variable Composition / Magazynowanie Skroplonego Gazu Ziemnego O Zmiennym Sk?adzie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?aciak, Mariusz

    2015-03-01

    Thanks to the increasing diversification of LNG supply sources, being a result of the growing number of LNG liquefaction installations over the World, increase of short-term trade contracts and general trend to globally liberalize gas markets, reception terminals have to cope with the broad range of qualitatively diversified LNG deliveries from various sources. Different LNG deliveries potentially have different density caused by different gas composition. Although the LNG composition depends on LNG source, it mainly consists of methane, ethane, propane, butane and trace nitrogen. When a new supply of LNG is transported to the tank, the LNG composition and temperature in the tank can be different from LNG as delivered. This may lead to the liquid stratification in the tank, and consequently the rollover. As a result, LNG rapidly evaporates and the pressure in the tank increases. More and more restrictive safety regulations require fuller understanding of the formation and evolution of layers. The paper is focused on the analysis of liquid stratification in the tank which may take place when storing LNG, and which process leads to the rapid evaporation of considerable quantities of LNG. The aim was to attempt modeling of the process of liquid stratification in an LNG tank. The paper is closed with the results of modelling. Dzi?ki rosn?cej dywersyfikacji ?róde? dostaw LNG, spowodowanej zwi?kszaj?c? si? liczb? instalacji skraplania gazu na ca?ym ?wiecie, wzrostem ilo?ci kontraktów krótkoterminowych w handlu i ogólnej tendencji do globalnej liberalizacja rynków gazu, terminale do odbioru musz? radzi? sobie z coraz wi?ksz? gam? ró?nych jako?ciowo dostaw LNG z ró?nych ?róde?. Ró?ne dostawy LNG maj? potencjalnie inn? g?sto?? dzi?ki ró?nym sk?adom gazu. Chocia? kompozycja LNG zale?y od ?ród?a, to przede wszystkim sk?ada si? z metanu, etanu, propanu, butanu i w ?ladowych ilo?ciach z azotu. Gdy nowa dostawa LNG jest doprowadzana do zbiornika, sk?ad i temperatura LNG ju? w zbiorniku mo?e by? inny ni? dostarczanego. Mo?e to prowadzi? do rozwarstwienia cieczy w zbiorniku, a w konsekwencji wyst?pienia zjawiska znanego jako "rollover". W wyniku tego zjawiska nast?puje gwa?towne odparowanie LNG i nag?y wzrost ci?nienia w zbiorniku. Coraz bardziej restrykcyjne przepisy dotycz?ce bezpiecze?stwa wymagaj? pe?niejszego zrozumienia zjawiska tworzenia i ewolucji warstw. W artykule przeprowadzono analiz? procesu rozwarstwienia cieczy w zbiorniku, mog?cego wyst?pi? podczas magazynowania skroplonego gazu ziemnego, a prowadz?cego do gwa?townego odparowania znacznych ilo?ci LNG. Celem by?a próba modelowania procesu powstawania rozwarstwienia si? cieczy w zbiorniku LNG. Przedstawione zosta?y wyniki modelowania tego zjawiska

  19. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Quantification of Emissions from Landfills and Other Large Area Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a recognized need to develop cost effective measurement methods for greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water treatment ponds, open area processing units, agricultural operations, CO2 sequestration fields, and site ...

  20. Development of Mobile Tracer Correlation Method for Quantification of Emissions from Landfills and Other Large Area Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an emerging need to develop cost effective measurement methods for greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water treatment ponds, open area processing units, agricultural operations, CO2 sequestration fields, and site r...

  1. Gas7Deficient Mouse Reveals Roles in Motor Function and Muscle Fiber Composition during Aging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo-Tsang Huang; Pu-Yuan Chang; Ching-Hua Su; Chuck C.-K. Chao; Sue Lin-Chao

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundGrowth arrest-specific gene 7 (Gas7) has previously been shown to be involved in neurite outgrowth in vitro; however, its actual role has yet to be determined. To investigate the physiological function of Gas7 in vivo, here we generated a Gas7-deficient mouse strain with a labile Gas7 mutant protein whose functions are similar to wild-type Gas7.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsOur data show that aged

  2. Hydrolytic enzyme activity in landfilled refuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Palmisano; B. S. Schwab; D. A. Maruscik

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular hydrolytic enzyme activity was assayed in 28 refuse samples excavated from 14 bore holes in Fresh Kills Landfill, Staten Island, N. Y. Esterases, proteases and amylases were present in all of the samples. Enzyme screening assays utilizing the API-ZYM test system showed the incidence of enzymes in the order: specific phosphatases > esterases > glycosyl hydrolases. Measurement of cellulase

  3. Leachate quality from landfilled MBT waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. D. Robinson; K. Knox; B. D. Bone; A. Picken

    2005-01-01

    A research project recently completed on behalf of the UK Environment Agency, has collected data and sampled leachates from EU landfills that have received imports of MSOR and MBT wastes. Results are presented for sanitary analyses, heavy metals, and an extensive range of trace organic substances, from sites containing MBT wastes that have received different degrees of composting pre-treatment. Leachates

  4. Aerobic biological treatment of landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Matthews; M. K. Winson; J. Scullion

    There is an ongoing need to treat leachates from landfills using approaches that avoid expensive installation and operating costs. Faced with such a problem, Powys County Council (Wales, UK) developed a treatment system based on practical experience. Leachate was re-circulated through aeration towers containing a biofilm supported on plastic media before being polished in reed\\/filter beds. Investigations were undertaken to

  5. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills - Water Quality Issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Fred Lee; Anne Jones-Lee

    2005-01-01

    When municipal solid waste (MSW) comes in contact with liquid, leachate is formed. Such leachate contains a myriad hazardous and otherwise deleterious chemicals which if introduced into groundwater would impair or destroy the ability to use the groundwater and aquifer. In an attempt to provide some protection of groundwater quality from adverse impacts from MSW landfill leachate, the US EPA

  6. PHENOXYALKANOIC ACID HERBICIDES IN MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of leachates from six U.S. municipal landfills revealed the presence of chlorinated 2-phenoxypropionic acid herbicides; however, none of the more widely used acetic acid analogues was present at quantifiable levels. ll of the leachates contained MCPP. ,4-DP and silvex we...

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF MODERN MSW LANDFILL PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfills have long been used for the permanent land disposal of municipal, industrial, and hazardous solid wastes. .S. federal and state regulations require that these facilities be designed to function for an active life, plus a post-closure period, typically 30 years. n most c...

  8. FIELD VERIFICATION OF LINERS FROM SANITARY LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liner specimens from three existing landfill sites were collected and examined to determine the changes in their physical properties over time and to validate data being developed through laboratory research. Samples examined included a 15-mil PVC liner from a sludge lagoon in Ne...

  9. Ground water contamination at Finnish landfills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Assmuth; T. Strandberg

    1993-01-01

    In a field study of 43 Finnish landfills, hydrogeological site conditions were characterized, and toxic substances in ground water were analyzed at 16 sites. The concentrations of several main leachate components, harmful substances and AOX in nearfield ground water were elevated above background values. However, the concentrations of most micropollutants were dominated by small values, causing skewed and truncated frequency

  10. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  11. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  12. LEACHATE COLLECTION IN LANDFILLS: STEADY CASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper analyzes the performance of landfill leachate collection systems with low-permeability soil liners under steady-state conditions. lgebraic equations and graphs are presented for predicting the average and maximum saturated depth on the liner, the location of the maximu...

  13. Investigation of the propagation of a gigawatt pulsed electron beam in compositions of high-pressure gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, R. V.; Kholodnaya, G. E.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E. [High Technology Physics Institute, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 2a Lenin Avenue, 634028 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    The paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of pulsed electron beam propagation with a varying current density (electron energy E{sub e}?=?350–400?keV; total current of a diode I{sub e} up to 11?kA; (half-amplitude) pulse duration t?=?60?ns, pulse energy W{sub e} up to 120?J) in two- and three-component gas compositions used in the pulsed plasma chemical synthesis of nanosized oxides. The mean value of the specific absorbed energy within the zone of pulsed electron beam propagation with a current density of 0.05–0.06?kA/cm{sup 2} in gas compositions has been determined.

  14. Preparation and gas separation properties of poly(furfuryl alcohol)-based C\\/CMS composite membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengwen Song; Tonghua Wang; Xiuyue Wang; Jieshan Qiu; Yiming Cao

    2008-01-01

    C\\/CMS composite membranes from poly(furfuryl alcohol) for gas separation were successfully prepared, in which porous coal-based carbon tubes with an average pore diameter of 0.11?m and a porosity of 40.3% were used as support. The tubular support was coated using viscous poly(furfuryl alcohol) liquid to form an organic layer that was transformed into a thin top layer of carbon membrane

  15. Effects of the Headspace Gas Composition on Anaerobic Biotransformation of o-, m-, and p-Toluic Acid in Sediment Slurries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiu-Mei Liu; Wei-Chiung Chi

    2003-01-01

    Composition of the headspace gas affected the biotransformation pattern of toluic acid isomers in anoxic sediment slurries. Under an N2 atmosphere, o- and m-, and p-toluic acid (20–25 mg L) were biotransformed in 100 days, 77 days, and 148 days, respectively, with a lag period of 50 days, 49 days, and 50 days, respectively. Under a CO2 atmosphere, the same toluic acid

  16. SolEx: A model for mixed COHSCl-volatile solubilities and exsolved gas compositions in basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Fred; Blundy, Jonathan; Kohn, Simon C.; Lesne, Priscille; Dixon, Jacqueline; Churakov, Sergey V.; Botcharnikov, Roman

    2012-08-01

    We present a software application, SolEx, to calculate basaltic melt and coexisting vapour compositions in the system C-O-H-S-Cl. Such a model has great utility in interpreting emitted gas and melt inclusion compositions, especially through the incorporation of sulphur and chlorine, the most commonly measured volcanic gas species. We assume that the behaviour of the fluid phase is controlled by the volumetrically dominant volatile species, H2O and CO2, whereas sulphur and chlorine partition between the melt and fluid phases. Melt-fluid partition coefficients for S and Cl were parameterised from measurements by Lesne et al. (2011a, p. 1737). The model of Churakov and Gottschalk (2003a, p. 2415) was applied to calculate fugacity coefficients and the equilibrium constants for the reaction imelt?ifluid were thereby deduced. SO2 dominates at oxidation states of ?NNO>0.5 (Jugo et al., 2010, p. 5926), where this model is applicable. In the forward model, total volatile inventories and melt composition are specified by the user. The parameterisation of Dixon (1997, p. 368) is used to predict the partitioning of CO2 and H2O between vapour and melt phases. An iterative procedure is employed to predict the partitioning of S and Cl components between fluid and melt phases. Melt and gas compositions and gas volume fraction are thereby modelled over pressures in the range 5-4000 bar. This approach satisfactorily reproduces independent literature data on S and Cl behaviour in basalt. SolEx is a user-friendly software package available for OS X and Windows, facilitating modelling of closed- and open-system C-O-H-S-Cl degassing in basalts.

  17. Gas composition and respiration of water oak ( Quercus nigra L.) and green ash ( Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) roots after prolonged flooding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Billy J. Good; William H. Patrick

    1987-01-01

    Summary  We compared the effects of 9.5 months of a continuous flooding treatment with a drained control treatment on one year-old\\u000a seedlings of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and water oak (Quercus nigra L.), two tree species common to the bottomland-hardwood forests of eastern North America. The internal root gas composition\\u000a of the more flood tolerant species, green ash, maintained higher

  18. High-flux composite perfluorinated gas separation membranes of Hyflon® AD on a hollow fibre ultrafiltration membrane support

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Jansen; F. Tasselli; E. Tocci; E. Drioli

    2006-01-01

    Composite membranes were prepared by coating of perfluorinated copolymer Hyfon® AD60x on a support of hollow fibre ultrafiltration membrane. Two types of polymer were used for the support: a glassy amorphous poly(ether ether ketone) and a crystalline partially oxidized acrylonitrile-vinylacetate copolymer. Hollow fibre membranes were prepared by the dry-wet spinning method. The pure gas transport properties of the uncoated and

  19. Contrasting gas compositions and fluxes produced by the Holuhraun 2014/2015 eruption and the Fimmvörðuháls 2010 eruption, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Mike; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; La Spina, Alessandro; Salerno, Giuseppe; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Barsotti, Sara; Pfeffer, Melissa

    2015-04-01

    Basaltic fissure eruptions on Iceland are important for multiple reasons. They shed light on magmatic processes in general, and allow us to gain insight into the larger scale processes that form Earth's crust. In relatively recent history gas emissions from Iceland's basaltic fissure eruptions have produced a major impact to human activities both on Iceland and further afield. In this context, new insights into the nature of these eruptions, and mechanisms driving them are valuable. During the recent Holuhraun eruption we performed detailed open-Path FTIR measurements of the gas compositions emitted by both the erupting vent and erupted lavas. This technique is well-suited to explosive basaltic eruptions, allowing multiple gases to be measured at a safe distance, even in poor weather. We were able to measure the major magmatic gases, including H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl, HF, and CO. These gases typically make up >99% of all gases emitted, allowing a reconstruction of the total gas composition a the moment of eruption. A total of three campaigns were conducted, with a gradually increasing level of difficulty, as the explosive activity waned and lava flow spread around the eruptive fissure, limiting access. We also performed SO2 camera measurements of SO2 flux emissions, the results from which appear to compare favourably with other measurements. We are therefore able to report quantitative fluxes for each of the measured magmatic species. Our results show a dramatic difference in halogen emissions, and richer S content compared with the OP-FTIR measurements of gas emissions during the 2010 eruption at Fimmvörðuháls. Such differences may reflect mantle melting regimes, various degrees of interaction with crustal material, or different eruptive processes. We highlight that the remarkable degree of heterogeneity in the gas compositions in these two eruptions suggests that the impact of Icelandic basaltic eruptions are inherently challenging to predict, and very widely on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Resemblance in gas composition of Ar-N2-O2 plasmas and Ar-NO plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2009-05-01

    We measured the steady-state gas composition of plasmas produced from Ar-N2-O2 mixtures and Ar-NO mixtures with quantitative mass spectrometry. In the former, mainly N2 and O2, but also a significant amount of nitric oxide (NO) was formed, i.e. up to 5% of the background gas was NO. In the inverse experiment, in which NO was admixed to an argon plasma, up to 92% of the NO was converted into N2 and O2. The observed molecules are mostly generated in wall association processes but also by gas phase reactions between N atoms and O2 molecules leading to NO. The two types of plasmas show a strong mutual resemblance in the steady-state gas composition if substantial dissociation can be reached in the residence time of the gases in the plasma, i.e. ?5% NO and ?95% N2 and O2, although the starting conditions are completely different. It seems that in first order the system prefers to produce the most thermodynamically stable molecules.