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1

Temporal variability of soil gas composition in landfill covers.  

PubMed

In order to assess the temporal variability of the conditions for the microbial oxidation of methane in landfill cover soils and their driving variables, gas composition at non-emissive and strongly emissive locations (hotspots) was monitored on a seasonal, daily and hourly time scale on an old, unlined landfill in northern Germany. Our study showed that the impact of the various environmental factors varied with the mode of gas transport and with the time scale considered. At non-emissive sites, governed by diffusive gas transport, soil gas composition was subject to a pronounced seasonal variation. A high extent of aeration, low methane concentrations and a high ratio of CO(2) to CH(4) were found across the entire depth of the soil cover during the warm and dry period, whereas in the cool and moist period aeration was less and landfill gas migrated further upward. Statistically, variation in soil gas composition was best explained by the variation in soil temperature. At locations dominated by advective gas transport and showing considerable emissions of methane, this pattern was far less pronounced with only little increase in the extent of aeration during drier periods. Here, the change of barometric pressure was found to impact soil gas composition. On a daily scale under constant conditions of temperature, gas transport at both types of locations was strongly impacted by the change in soil moisture. On an hourly scale, under constant conditions of temperature and moisture, gas migration was impacted most by the change in barometric pressure. It was shown that at diffusion-dominated sites complete methane oxidation was achieved even under adverse wintry conditions, whereas at hotspots, even under favorable dry and warm conditions, aerobic biological activity can be limited to the upper crust of the soil. PMID:21074982

Gebert, Julia; Rachor, Ingke; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

2011-05-01

2

Trace gas measurements in landfill gas from closed landfill sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five closed landfill sites in the urban area of Wolverhampton, UK were investigated in order to identify the trace components in landfill gas emitted from each site. 17 different compounds were identified in the gas samples following analysis by gas chromatography?mass spectrometry.It appeared that concentrations of carbon disulphide, xylene and toluene detected at the landfill sites were related to site

P. Giess; A. Bush; M. Dye

1999-01-01

3

Migrating landfill gas proves challenging  

SciTech Connect

Located in the San Fernando Valley at the foothills of the San Gabriel mountains, the 41-acre Sheldon-Arleta Landfill originated as one of many gravel pits in the area and was operated by CalMat as a gravel quarry pit from the mid 1950s until 1962. In 1967, methane gas was detected in the residential dwellings located across from the landfill along Sharp Street. Three landfill gas wells were installed at the north corner of the landfill to control off-site migration of landfill gas. Landfill gas, through diffusion, saturates soil pores below and around the landfill. Groundwater serves as an effective barrier to landfill gas migration. Thus a rising water table mobilizes landfill gas from soil pores. Where that gas cannot be effectively collected, off-site migration will occur. The solution to ensuring public safety is to collect landfill gas on-site before it escapes the influence of gas collection wells. This may require complete reevaluation of an existing landfill gas collection system and potential renovation to collect greater quantities of land-fill gas. Cost-effective implementation of this strategy calls for two gas collection systems: one for collection of methane-rich landfill gas for electrical generation and resource recovery, and the other to control off-site migration of landfill gas through on-site combustion. Installation/upgrades of the foregoing solutions are long-term options. For the short-term immediate mitigation of high landfill gas migration, installation of a passive vent system was necessary with the option of active extraction. However, one must recognize that the public is ultimately better served by controlling landfill gas on-site before it approaches dangerous off-site levels.

Dobrowolski, J.G.; Dellinger, A.S. [City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, CA (United States)

1994-12-01

4

Landfill gas management in Canada  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas produced from solid waste landfills is one of the most significant sources of anthropogenic methane in Canada. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is 24.5 times more powerful than carbon dioxide by weight in terms of global climate change. Landfill gas recovery plays an important role in Canada`s commitment to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by the year 2000 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Landfill gas is a potentially harmful emission that can be converted into a reliable environmentally-sustainable energy source used to generate electricity, fuel industries and heat buildings. The recovery and utilization of landfill gas is a win-win situation which makes good sense from local, regional and global perspectives. It provides the benefits of (1) reducing the release of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming; (2) limiting odors; (3) controlling damage to vegetation; (4) reducing risks from explosions, fires and asphyxiation; (5) converting a harmful emission into a reliable energy source; and (6) creating a potential source of revenue and profit. Canadian landfills generate about 1 million tons of methane every year; the equivalent energy of 9 million barrels of oil (eight oil super tankers), or enough energy to meet the annual heating needs of more than half a million Canadian homes. Currently, twenty-seven facilities recover and combust roughly 25% of the methane generated by Canadian landfills producing about 3.2 PJ (10{sup 15} Joules) of energy including 80 MW of electricity and direct fuel for nearby facilities (e.g., cement plants, gypsum board manufacturers, recycling facilities, greenhouses). This paper reviews landfill gas characteristics; environmental, health and safety impacts; landfill gas management in Canada; the costs of landfill gas recovery and utilization systems; and on-going projects on landfill gas utilization and flaring.

David, A. [Environment Canada, Hull, Quebec (Canada). Hazardous Waste Branch

1997-12-31

5

Evaluation of the age of landfill gas methane in landfill gas-natural gas mixtures using co-occurring constituents.  

PubMed

At a municipal solid waste landfill in southern California (USA) overlying a natural gas reservoir, methane was detected at concentrations of up to 40% (by volume) in perimeter soil gas probes. Stable isotope and (14)C values of methane together with gas composition (major components and volatile organic compounds) data were evaluated to assess the relative contributions of landfill gas and natural gas to the measured methane concentrations. The data was further used to estimate the residence time of the landfill gas in the probes. Results showed that up to 37% of the measured methane was derived from landfill gas. In addition, the landfill gas in the probe samples has undergone extensive alteration due to dissolution of carbon dioxide in pore water. Data further indicates that the measured methane was released from the waste approximately 1.2 to 9.4 years ago, rather than representing evidence of an ongoing release. PMID:23660592

Kerfoot, Henry B; Hagedorn, Benjamin; Verwiel, Mark

2013-06-01

6

Migrating landfill gas proves challenging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Located in the San Fernando Valley at the foothills of the San Gabriel mountains, the 41-acre Sheldon-Arleta Landfill originated as one of many gravel pits in the area and was operated by CalMat as a gravel quarry pit from the mid 1950s until 1962. In 1967, methane gas was detected in the residential dwellings located across from the landfill along

J. G. Dobrowolski; A. S. Dellinger

1994-01-01

7

Migration and atmospheric emission of landfill gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas generation due primarily to microbial decomposition is an inevitable consequence of the practice of solid waste disposal in landfills. Subsequent gas migration within the landfill and its potential emission to the atmosphere are dependent on the pressure and concentration gradients of the gas inside the landfill as well as many factors related to transport properties of the gas itself

M. El-Fadel; A. N. Findikakis; J. O. Leckie

1995-01-01

8

Evolution on qualities of leachate and landfill gas in the semi-aerobic landfill.  

PubMed

To study the characteristics of stabilization in semi-aerobic landfill, large-scale simulated landfill was constructed based on the semi-aerobic landfill theory. Consequently, the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and nitrite nitrogen, and the pH value in leachate, as well as the component contents of landfill gas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen) in landfill were regularly monitored for 52 weeks. The results showed that COD and ammonia concentrations declined rapidly and did not show the accumulating rule like anaerobic landfill, and remained at about 300 and 100 mg/L, respectively, after 48 weeks. Meanwhile, the descending rate reached 98.9% and 96.9%, respectively. Nitrate concentration increased rapidly after 24 weeks and fluctuated between 220-280 mg/L after 43 weeks. The pH values were below 7 during the first 8 weeks and after that leachates appeared to be alkaline. Carbon dioxide was the main composition in landfill gas and its concentration remained at a high level through the whole stabilization process. The average contents of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane varied between 19 vol.%-28 vol.%, 2 vol.%-8 vol.%, and 5 vol.%-13 vol.%, respectively. A relative equilibrium was reached after 48 weeks. The highest temperature in the landfill chamber could amount to 75.8 degrees centigrade. PMID:18575138

Huang, Qifei; Yang, Yufei; Pang, Xiangrui; Wang, Qi

2008-01-01

9

Demonstration of landfill gas enhancement techniques in landfill simulators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various techniques to enhance gas production in sanitary landfills were applied to landfill simulators. These techniques include (1) accelerated moisture addition, (2) leachate recycling, (3) buffer addition, (4) nutrient addition, and (5) combinations of the above. Results are compiled through on-going operation and monitoring of sixteen landfill simulators. These test cells contain about 380 kg of municipal solid waste. Quantities of buffer and nutrient materials were placed in selected cells at the time of loading. Water is added to all test cells on a monthly basis; leachate is withdrawn from all cells (and recycled on selected cells) also on a monthly basis. Daily monitoring of gas volumes and refuse temperatures is performed. Gas and leachate samples are collected and analyzed on a monthly basis. Leachate and gas quality and quantity reslts are presented for the first 18 months of operation.

Walsh, J. J.; Vogt, W. G.

1982-02-01

10

Composition and source identification of deposits forming in landfill gas (LFG) engines and effect of activated carbon treatment on deposit composition.  

PubMed

Compositions of deposits forming on engines parts operated with landfill gas (LFG) were analyzed. The deposit compositions were compared before and after the installation of activated carbon system for treatment of LFG. Deposits forming on the spark plugs had significantly higher levels of calcium, chromium, and nickel in comparison to those forming on the engine heads. The LFG contained about 9.5 ± 0.4 mg/m(3) total siloxanes, majority of which were octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) (5.0 ± 0.2 mg/m(3)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) (2.9 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) (1.6 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)). The samples collected from the engine heads before the activated carbon treatment of LFG had significantly high levels of silicon (149,400 ± 89,900 mg/kg) as well as calcium (70,840 ± 17,750 mg/kg), sulfur (42,500 ± 11,500 mg/kg), and zinc (22,300 ± 7200 mg/kg). After the activated carbon treatment, silicon levels decreased significantly; however, deposits had higher sulfur content (104,560 ± 68,100 mg/kg) indicating that the activated carbon released some sulfur during treatment. The analyses indicate that zinc and calcium originated from the additives in the lube oil while lead, aluminum, copper, nickel, iron, chromium were due to the engine wear. PMID:23770437

Sevimo?lu, Orhan; Tansel, Berrin

2013-10-15

11

LANDFILL GAS PRETREATMENT FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the U.S. EPA's program, underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation, to demonstrate landfill methane control and the fuel cell energy recovery concept. In this program, two critical issues are being addressed: (1) a landfill gas cleanup method that would ...

12

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial.  

PubMed

In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions. PMID:16540304

Dever, S A; Swarbrick, G E; Stuetz, R M

2007-01-01

13

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

SciTech Connect

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01

14

DEVELOPMENT OF A LANDFILL GAS RISK ASSESSMENT MODEL: GASSIM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emissions of bulk and trace gases from landfills created either directly from waste decomposition or from the combustion of landfill gas (LFG) during flaring and\\/or gas utilisation, have the potential to:

Gary M Attenborough; Robert G Gregory; David H Hall; Louise McGoochan

15

FUEL CELL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

International Fuel Cells Corporation is conducting a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored program to demonstrate energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The US EPA is interested in fuel cells for this application b...

16

FIRST ORDER KINETIC GAS GENERATION MODEL PARAMETERS FOR WET LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Landfill gas is produced as a result of a sequence of physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring within an anaerobic landfill. Landfill operators, energy recovery project owners, regulators, and energy users need to be able to project the volume of gas produced and re...

17

An energy perspective on landfill gas  

SciTech Connect

Globally, one billion metric tons of organic waste in the form of municipal solid waste are placed into solid-waste containment facilities every year. Complete biodegradation of this waste can generate approximately 2.8x10[sup 11] m[sup 3] (9.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) or 1.98x10[sup 8] metric tons) of biogas. Biogas consists of approximately equal proportions of methane and carbon dioxide; thus a year's worth of waste can potentially generate 1.4x10[sup 11] m[sup 3] (5 Tcf or 9.9x10[sup 7] metric tons) of methane. If we assume that landfill-biogas generation began only 20 years ago and has proceeded at a steady rate, then we can estimate that it can contribute 5x10[sup 10] m[sup 3] (1.8 Tcf or 36x10[sup 6] metric tons) of methane to the global atmospheric budget every year. Landfill gas is difficult to recover and use. Exploitation of biogas includes use as a raw product for heat energy, dehydration to produce electric generator fuel, refinement for commercial transportation, and use as a chemical feedstock. Controlled-reactor landfills, called [open quotes]biofills,[close quotes] are designed for optimum methane generation to ensure a steady and consistent rate of gas generation. Biofill mechanisms used to improve gas production include physical and chemical modifications to the modern landfill design. These methods can reduce the gas-generation time from 80 years to 5 years, can reduce the waste mass, and can reduce negative effects on the environment. 134 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hutchinson, P.J. (Hutchinson Group, Ltd., Murrysville, PA (United States))

1993-01-01

18

[Dynamic variation of landfill gas production under different landfill treatment].  

PubMed

Based on the landfill principles, large scale installations of anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills were established, with the concentrations of CH4, O2 and CO2 detected regularly. The results showed that the average CH4 concentration in semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill installations was 7%-13% and 35%-50%, respectively, indicating the better effect of semi-aerobic landfill in reducing CH4 production. The CH4 and O2 concentrations in the two landfill installations all presented obvious spatial layer effect, i.e., under-layer > middle layer > upper layer for CH4, while upper layer > middle level > under-layer for O2. PMID:16515198

Liu, Yuqiang; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei; Yang, Yufei; Dong, Lu

2005-12-01

19

Gas production and migration in landfills and geological materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill gas, originating from the anaerobic biodegradation of the organic content of waste, consists mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, with traces of volatile organic compounds. Pressure, concentration and temperature gradients that develop within the landfill result in gas emissions to the atmosphere and in lateral migration through the surrounding soils. Environmental and safety issues associated with the landfill gas require control of off-site gas migration. The numerical model TOUGH2-LGM (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat-Landfill Gas Migration) has been developed to simulate landfill gas production and migration processes within and beyond landfill boundaries. The model is derived from the general non-isothermal multiphase flow simulator TOUGH2, to which a new equation of state module is added. It simulates the migration of five components in partially saturated media: four fluid components (water, atmospheric air, methane and carbon dioxide) and one energy component (heat). The four fluid components are present in both the gas and liquid phases. The model incorporates gas-liquid partitioning of all fluid components by means of dissolution and volatilization. In addition to advection in the gas and liquid phase, multi-component diffusion is simulated in the gas phase. The landfill gas production rate is proportional to the organic substrate and is modeled as an exponentially decreasing function of time. The model is applied to the Montreal's CESM landfill site, which is located in a former limestone rock quarry. Existing data were used to characterize hydraulic properties of the waste and the limestone. Gas recovery data at the site were used to define the gas production model. Simulations in one and two dimensions are presented to investigate gas production and migration in the landfill, and in the surrounding limestone. The effects of a gas recovery well and landfill cover on gas migration are also discussed.

Nastev, Miroslav; Therrien, René; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre

2001-11-01

20

Characterization of malodorous sulfur compounds in landfill gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to analyze the composition of landfill gas (LFG) with respect to malodorous components, the concentrations of several reduced sulfur compounds (RSC: hydrogen sulfide (H 2S); methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH); dimethyl sulfide ((CH 3) 2S); carbon disulfide (CS 2); and dimethyl disulfide ((CH 3) 2S 2)) were determined from four municipal landfill sites—initialed W, B, H, and N—in Korea. The S gas concentrations measured in these landfill sites were found consistently to be dominated by H 2S, while their absolute mean values tended to change considerably between one inactive site (N) and the others; its mean values were measured from as little as 336 ppb (N site) up to 2340 ppm (H site). Hence, in terms of mass concentration units (mg m -3), H 2S alone generally explained far more than 90% of all S gases determined concurrently. If the relative contribution of RSC to the LFG budget is assessed in relation to major aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene), the RSC emission appears to comprise a significant proportion as trace components of LFG other than major ones like CH 4 and CO 2.

Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, YJ; Jeon, EC; Sunwoo, Young

21

TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

22

LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND  

E-print Network

OF THE MIGRATION 2.1 Site description The landfill site was located in Malleville-sur-le Bec (Eure region, France, Figure 1) have appeared in the vicinity of the site. The landfill was then equipped with a LFG collection in the first years after the deposit of the waste. The study of a landfill site began in 2001

Boyer, Edmond

23

Keeping landfill gas systems in tune  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of LFG recovery systems is influenced by many complex and interrelated factors including atmospheric conditions and LFG dynamics. In order to balance the operation of a LFG system, the factors that influence the system, such as the effects of atmospheric conditions must be understood and taken into consideration. The dynamics include: typical, daily diurnal changes in barometric pressure and the temperature and density of the ambient air due to local meteorological conditions; major changes in barometric pressure and the temperature and density of ambient air due to transient high and low pressure systems related to weather conditions; dynamics of the biochemical activity within the landfill; and dynamics of the LFG flowing through the gas extraction system pipe lines. These factors dramatically influence LFG density, mass flow, quantity, and quality. They also influence the ability of a well designed gas collection system to effectively control gas migration and to provide a reasonably high gas product for energy recovery. Thus, an efficient LFG extraction system must attempt to compensate for these varying and uncontrollable conditions.

Blackman, L.; Myers, L.; Bjerkin, L.; Freemon, P. [County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Whittier, CA (United States)

1998-01-01

24

LANDFILL-GAS-TO-ENERGY PROJECTS: AN ANALYSIS OF NET PRIVATE AND SOCIAL BENEFITS  

E-print Network

Materials Table A1: Model Results for West Lake Landfill WEST LAKE IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Landfill WEST COUNTY IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average Landfill Gas Generation (mmcf/yr) 1,075 1,735 $1,250 Table A3: Model Results for Modern Landfill MODERN IC Engine Gas Turbine Steam Turbine Average

Jaramillo, Paulina

25

Creative financing of landfill gas utilization projects  

SciTech Connect

The landfill gas utilization industry has gone through profound change in the last ten years and is in for further changes in the coming years. The first change is the probable expiration of Section 29 tax credits for newly developed projects and the second is the upcoming NSPS mandate to capture fugitive LFG emission from our nations larger landfills. In order to provide for the capital needs of LFG utilization project developers, lenders and investors must adapt to the changing nature of the industry as well. Lyon Credit Corporation has provided senior and subordinated financing as well as lease financing for the LFG utilization industry for the last three years. During this time, LCC has had to adapt its product offerings to meet the continuing needs of the borrowers in this industry. This presentation will focus on the changing nature of the industry and its effect on the economics, capital and financing requirements of newly developed LFG utilization projects. The two fundamental changes which have drastically altered the way projects are structured and financed include the changing nature of the LFG project product end-user and various regulatory and legislative measures which have significantly impacted the responsibilities of the project owner/developer and the future profitability of all LFG utilization projects. The successful LFG utilization project developers will be those who recognize that these changes are permanent departures from past practices, and those who will seek to exploit opportunities created by these changes. The lenders and investors to this industry will likewise have to adapt with these changes in order to continue to provide needed capital to this growing industry.

Peters, J.P. Jr.; Laughlin, M.F.; McGuigan, M.J.

1996-11-01

26

Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

None

1981-01-01

27

LANDFILL GAS AND THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper is an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. There appears to be a consensus in the international co...

28

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems.  

PubMed

Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?14-15 years) compared to the other two sites (?6-11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7gm(-2)d(-1), respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R=0.827, P<0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils. PMID:24332193

Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Qi; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Wang, Jing; He, Ruo

2014-05-01

29

LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION: TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses technical issues associated with the use of landfill gas (LFG) compared with natural gas--which is the primary fuel used for energy conversion equipment such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and fuel cells. FG is a medium-heating-value fuel contai...

30

Gas production from sanitary landfills as a potential energy resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid increase in the cost of energy has increased interest in the recovery and utilization of sanitary landfill gas at locations throughout the World. These solid waste disposal sites are considered untapped sources of methane gas. If methane is not recovered and utilized, it forms an explosive mixture with oxygen and causes environmental damages. The amount of recoverable gas

Alzuydi

1980-01-01

31

Life cycle assessment as a decision support tool for landfill gas-to energy projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from MSW landfill, and control methods to eliminate or minimize these impacts including energy recovery from landfill gas (LFG) of MSW landfill in Thailand have been evaluated. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used as the analytical tool to evaluate the environmental consequences of landfilling holistically. The economic implications of the control methods are also briefly

Wanida Wanichpongpan; Shabbir H. Gheewala

2007-01-01

32

Removal and determination of trimethylsilanol from the landfill gas.  

PubMed

The removal and determination of trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) in landfill gas has been studied before and after the special E3000-ITC System. The system works according to principle of temperature swing. The performance of TMSOH and humidity removal was 20% and more than 90%, respectively. The six of active carbons and impinger method were tested on the full-scale landfill in Poland for TMSOH and siloxanes determination. The extraction method and absorption in acetone were used. The concentration of TMSOH and siloxanes were found in range from 23.6 to 29.2 mg/m3 and from 18.0 to 38.9 mg/m3, respectively. The content of TMSOH in biogas originating from landfill was 41% out of all siloxanes. Moreover, the used system is alternative to other existing technique of landfill gas purification. PMID:22033372

Piechota, Grzegorz; Hagmann, Manfred; Buczkowski, Roman

2012-01-01

33

Gas emissions from biodegradable waste in United Kingdom landfills.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to predict the effect that the biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) diversion targets in the European Union landfill directive (99/31/EC) would have on landfill gas emissions. This is important for continued mitigation of these emissions. Work was undertaken in three stages using the GasSim model (v1.03) developed by the Environment Agency (England and Wales). The first stage considered the contribution to gas emissions made by each biodegradable component of the waste stream. The second stage considered how gas emissions from a landfill accepting biodegradable wastes with reduced biodegradable content would be affected. The third stage looked at the contribution to gas emissions from real samples of biologically pretreated BMW. For the first two stages, data on the waste components were available in the model. For the third stage samples were obtained from four different biological treatment facilities and the required parameters determined experimentally. The results of stage 1 indicated that in the first 15 years of the landfill the putrescible fraction makes the most significant contribution, after which paper/card becomes the most significant. The second stage found that biodegradability must be reduced by at least 60% to achieve a reduction in overall methane generation. The third stage found that emissions from samples of biologically pretreated BMW would result in a significant reduction in gas emissions over untreated waste, particularly in the early stage of the landfill lifetime; however, low level emissions would continue to occur for the long term. PMID:21088129

Donovan, Sally Maree; Jilang Pan; Bateson, Thomas; Gronow, Jan R; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

2011-01-01

34

Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

2003-12-01

35

Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative.

Wallace, I.P.

1991-01-01

36

Enhancement of landfill gas production Nanticoke landfill, Binghamton, New York. Final report, October 1983August 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination of the effects of landfill gas production enhancement in a field-scale program is presented. The enhancement entailed the use of leachate recycling to promote more conducive environmental conditions for the anaerobic microorganisms so that they would grow more quickly and thus convert the organic fraction of the municipal solid waste to methane at a faster rate. Seven field-scale

G. DiPippo; A. P. Leuschner

1987-01-01

37

TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT THE GROTON, CT, LANDFILL  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper summarizes the results from a seminal assessment conducted on a fuel cell technology which generates electrical power from waste landfill gas. This assessment/ demonstration was the second such project conducted by the EPA, the first being conducted at the Penrose Power...

38

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-print Network

Description This research will evaluate and analyze methods to overcome the technological challenges, pipeline quality natural gas that will be used primarily to fuel the fleet vehicles of Waste Management forth) through onsite electricity generation. Schematic of landfill gas extraction Image credit

39

LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.  

PubMed

Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0.013 PE and 0.002 to 0.003 PE respectively). The reason for this is that even if the leachate is treated, slight amounts of contaminants are released through emissions of treated wastewater to surface waters. The largest environmental improvement with regard to the direct cost of the landfill was the capping and leachate treatment system. The capping, though very cheap to establish, gave a huge benefit in lowered impacts, the leachate collection system though expensive gave large benefits as well. The other gas measures were found to give further improvements, for a minor increase in cost. PMID:21435856

Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

2011-07-01

40

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION OF LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3) for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the ...

41

ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

42

FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT PENROSE POWER STATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This demonstration test successfully demonstrated operation of a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell (FC) on landfill gas (LG) at the Penrose Power Station in Sun Valley, CA. Demonstration output included operation up to 137 kW; 37.1% efficiency at 120 kW; exceptionally low sec...

43

Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

None

1983-09-01

44

NUMERICAL MODELLING OF GENERATION AND TRANSPORT OF GAS AND HEAT IN SANITARY LANDFILLS III. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for the generation and transport of gas and heat in a sanitary landfill is developed based on earlier work on the Mountain View Controlled Landfill Project (MVCLP) in California. The present model incorporates biokinetic model equations describing the dynamics of the microbial landfill ecosystem into a multi-layer, time-dependent gas and heat transport and generation models. It is

M. El-Fadel; A. N. Findikakis; O. Leckie

1997-01-01

45

U.S. EPA'S RESEARCH TO UPDATE GUIDANCE FOR QUANTIFYING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Landfill emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, tropospheric ozone, and urban smog. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting research to help update EPA's landfill gas emission factors. The last update to EPA's landfill gas emiss...

46

Emissions of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC) as a landfill gas (LFG): A comparative study of young and old landfill facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To offer some insights into the processes associated with odor release from a strong source environment, concentrations of reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) in landfill gas (LFG) were measured at two landfill (LF) facilities within a small city boundary through four seasons. The LF sites investigated in this study are distinguished in that the young LF (namely, YLF) was selected to represent a site of active RSC emissions, while the old LF (namely, OLF) was selected for its weak RSC emissions. The LFG composition, when analyzed for a number of RSCs (hydrogen sulfide (H 2S), methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide ((CH 3) 2S), carbon disulfide (CS 2) and dimethyl disulfide ((CH 3) 2S 2)), was consistently predominated by H 2S from both sites. The mean and SD value of H 2S in the YLF were measured to be 139,070±144,340 ppb, while its counterparts in the OLF being 3.86±3.41 ppb. The emission concentration levels of H 2S were found to be distinguished from those of the other RSCs, depending on the LF aging. The H 2S results for both LF sites, when compared across seasons, were generally characterized as notable enhancement during summer relative to other seasons. The comparative analysis of relative composition between RSCs and other LFG constituents (such as CH 4, CO 2, and VOC) consistently indicate that the relative proportion of RSCs is substantially larger during the active LF stage (YLF) than in the inactive one (OLF).

Kim, Ki-Hyun

47

Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction.  

PubMed

Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term. PMID:21232931

Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan; Zhang, Mengqun; Wu, Weili; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jin

2011-05-01

48

Field Practices Installation and operations of a landfill gas collection and flare system  

SciTech Connect

The Sheldon-Arleta Landfill was operated by the City of Los Angeles from 1962 until 1974. Refuse was landfilled in what was formerly a quarry pit and placed prior to development and use of clay and synthetic liner materials. This paper is a continuance of the paper presented at the 17th Annual Landfill Gas Symposium-identifying sources and causes of landfill gas migration hazards, the design for their remediation, and the field construction/implementation of those designs to remediate landfill gas migration hazards.

Dellinger, A.S.; Greeb, K.W. [Bureau of Sanitation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1995-08-01

49

Remote real-time monitoring of subsurface landfill gas migration.  

PubMed

The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O'Connor, Noel E; Smeaton, Alan F; Diamond, Dermot

2011-01-01

50

Remote Real-Time Monitoring of Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration  

PubMed Central

The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months. PMID:22163975

Fay, Cormac; Doherty, Aiden R.; Beirne, Stephen; Collins, Fiachra; Foley, Colum; Healy, John; Kiernan, Breda M.; Lee, Hyowon; Maher, Damien; Orpen, Dylan; Phelan, Thomas; Qiu, Zhengwei; Zhang, Kirk; Gurrin, Cathal; Corcoran, Brian; O’Connor, Noel E.; Smeaton, Alan F.; Diamond, Dermot

2011-01-01

51

Response of tomato plants to simulated landfill gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The roots of tomato plants were fumigated with simulated refuse-generated gas mixtures at levels of methane (CH/sub 4/), carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), and oxygen (O/sub 2/) previously measured in the atmospheres of landfill cover soils associated with poor growth or death of plants. A concentration of 18% CO/sub 2/ or greater, exceeded in almost 30% of thirty-two landfills examined throughout the US, caused reduced growth and visible symptoms on tomato after 1 wk, regardless of O/sub 2/ level. Doubling the CO/sub 2/ level to that encountered in a typical local site (Edgeboro Landfill) resulted in more severe symptom development and the subsequent death of plants. Methane, in concentrations of 20% and above, found in more than 25% of the landfills visited, while not observed to be toxic per se; was associated with drastic O/sub 2/ depletion in the soil atmosphere, which activity was believed to be the cause of the plant decline.

Arthur, J.J.; Leone, I.A.; Flower, F.B.

1985-01-01

52

Non-controlled CO2 and CH4 emission from landfills: a useful parameter to evaluate landfill gas extraction efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfills are important sources of greenhouse gases to the environment like CO2 and CH4 as well as other trace gas components. In order to control the emissions of these contaminant gases, installation of gas extraction systems at landfills is required. However, in spite of the technical efforts to minimize landfill gas emissions, a significant amount of non-controlled emissions are released into the atmosphere in the form of non-controlled emissions through landfill surfaces. The evaluation of non-controlled CO2 and CH4 emissions to the atmosphere by landfills has important technical and environmental implications. It will provide a better estimation of the landfill gas emissions to the atmosphere and to evaluate the efficiency of the landfill gas extraction systems by comparison of non-controlled vs controlled emissions. To understand the dynamics of non-controlled emissions of biogas from landfills, several soil gas surveys were performed at landfill of Arico in Tenerife, Canary Islands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the gas extraction system at landfill of Arico. A non-controlled CO2 and CH4 emission surveys of 355 and 305 sampling sites were carried out during summers of 2007 and 2008, respectively. Surface CO2 and CH4 efflux measurements were performed by means of a double efflux portable NDIR spectrometer and according to the accumulation chamber method. Surface CO2 and CH4 efflux values ranged from negligible to 6413 gm-2d-1 and 175.9 gm-2d-1, respectively. Controlled emission rates of CO2 and CH4 were estimated by the operating company of the landfill. The spatial distributions of CO2 and CH4 effluxes at landfill of Arico showed a different distribution pattern for each component and a relationship with the present use of the landfill. Taking into consideration the spatial distribution of the CO2 and CH4 efflux values as well as the extension of the landfill, the non-controlled emission of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere during the survey of 2007 was estimated in 3167.4 t y-1 and 74.1 t y-1, respectively. During the summer of 2008, the non-controlled emission rates were 2842 t y-1 of CO2 and 1.30 t y-1 of CH4. The controlled emissions of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere during 2007 survey were estimated on 5599 t y-1 and 2360 t y-1, respectively, whereas during 2008 survey the controlled emissions were 5631 t y-1 and 2360 t y-1 of CO2 and CH4. Comparing both controlled and non-controlled gas emission rates, the calculated efficiency of the landfill gas extraction system for 2007 and 2008 gas surveys were 71.1% and 73.8%, respectively. These values show that the efficiency of landfill of Arico gas extraction system is quite high and has gradually improving, with a decreasing of the non-controlled gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Nolasco, D.; Mora Fernández, N.; de Paz Carmona, H.; Padilla, G.; Melian, G.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Perez, N.

2009-12-01

53

Estimating methane gas generation from Devil's swamp landfill using greenhouse gas emission models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) has been a key issue in the study, design, and management of landfills. Landfill gas (LFG) is considered either as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly) or significant source of pollution and risk (if not mitigated or processed). A municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill emits a significant amount of methane, a potent GHG. Thus, quantification and mitigation of GHG emissions is an important area of study in engineering and other sciences related to landfill technology and management. The present study will focus on estimating methane generation from Devils swamp landfill (DSLF), a closed landfill in Baton Rouge, LA. The landfill operated for 53 years (1940-1993) and contains both industrial and municipal waste products. Since the Clean Air Act of 1963, landfills are now classified as New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) waste (i.e., waste that will decompose to generate LFG). Currently, the DSLF is being used as source of renewable energy through the "Waste to Energy" program. For this study, to estimate the methane potential in the DSLF, it is important to determine the characteristics and classification of the landfill's wastes. The study uses and compares different GHG modeling tools---LandGEM, a multiphase model, and a simple first-order model---to estimate methane gas emission and compare results with the actual emissions from the DSLF. The sensitivity of the methane generation rate was analyzed by the methane generation models to assess the effects of variables such as initial conditions, specific growth rate, and reaction rate constants. The study concludes that methane (L0) and initial organic concentration in waste (k) are the most important parameters when estimating methane generation using the models.

Adeyemi, Ayodeji Thompson

54

NUMERICAL MODELLING OF GENERATION AND TRANSPORT OF GAS AND HEAT IN LANDFILLS I. MODEL FORMULATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for the generation and transport of gas and heat in a sanitary landfill was developed based on earlier work on the Mountain View Controlled Landfill Project (MVCLP) in California, U.S.A. The present model incorporates biokinetic model equations describing the dynamics of the microbial landfill ecosystem into multi-layer, time-dependent transport and generation of gas and heat models. It

M. El-Fadel; A. N. Findikakis; J. O. Leckie

1996-01-01

55

NUMERICAL MODELLING OF GENERATION AND TRANSPORT OF GAS AND HEAT IN SANITARY LANDFILLS II. MODEL APPLICATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for the generation and transport of gas and heat in a sanitary landfill was developed based on earlier work on the Mountain View Controlled Landfill Project (MVCLP) in California, U.S.A. The present model incorporates biokinetic model equations describing the dynamics of the microbial landfill ecosystem into multi-layer, time-dependent transport and generation of gas and heat models. It

M. El-Fadel; A. N. Findikakis; J. O. Leckie

1996-01-01

56

Feasibility of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel source for refuse trucks.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology to evaluate the feasibility of using landfill gas (LFG) as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel source for heavy-duty refuse trucks operating on landfills. Using LFG as a vehicle fuel can make the landfills more self-sustaining, reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, and reduce emissions and greenhouse gases. Acrion Technologies Inc. in association with Mack Trucks Inc. developed a technology to generate LNG from LFG using the CO2 WASH process. A successful application of this process was performed at the Eco Complex in Burlington County, PA. During this application two LNG refuse trucks were operated for 600 hr each using LNG produced from gases from the landfill. The methodology developed in this paper can evaluate the feasibility of three LFG options: doing nothing, electricity generation, and producing LNG to fuel refuse trucks. The methodology involved the modeling of several components: LFG generation, energy recovery processes, fleet operations, economic feasibility, and decision-making. The economic feasibility considers factors such as capital, maintenance, operational, and fuel costs, emissions and tax benefits, and the sale of products such as surplus LNG and food-grade carbon dioxide (CO2). Texas was used as a case study. The 96 landfills in Texas were prioritized and 17 landfills were identified that showed potential for converting LFG to LNG for use as a refuse truck fuel. The methodology was applied to a pilot landfill in El Paso, TX. The analysis showed that converting LFG to LNG to fuel refuse trucks proved to be the most feasible option and that the methodology can be applied for any landfill that considers this option. PMID:18512437

Zietsman, Josias; Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul; Rand, Aaron J; Gokhale, Bhushan; Lord, Dominique; Kumar, Sunil

2008-05-01

57

Feasibility of direct on-site conversion of landfill gas to electrical energy at Scholl Canyon landfill, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The technical and economic feasibility of direct onsite conversion of landfill gas into electrical energy for distribution through the municipal company's distribution grid is described. The various approaches are evaluated. Each system looked at the preliminary collection system layout, type of processing, and conversion equipment required, conversion efficiencies, total system costs, total energy output per input landfill gas, and overall economic comparisons between alternatives. This led to the selection of the internal combustion engine. The legal constraints on interdepartmental transfers of money and resources, city procedures for coordination between the public works department and public services, procedures for facility operation, and an environmental assessment of each alternative were investigated.

Lofy, R. J.

1981-06-01

58

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: Effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, California landfill gas-recovery plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

1982-10-01

59

Greenhouse gas emissions from landfill leachate treatment plants: a comparison of young and aged landfill.  

PubMed

With limited assessment, leachate treatment of a specified landfill is considered to be a significant source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In our study, the cumulative GHG emitted from the storage ponds and process configurations that manage fresh or aged landfill leachate were investigated. Our results showed that strong CH4 emissions were observed from the fresh leachate storage pond, with the fluxes values (2219-26,489 mg Cm(-2)h(-1)) extremely higher than those of N2O (0.028-0.41 mg Nm(-2)h(-1)). In contrast, the emission values for both CH4 and N2O were low for the aged leachate tank. N2O emissions became dominant once the leachate entered the treatment plants of both systems, accounting for 8-12% of the removal of N-species gases. Per capita, the N2O emission based on both leachate treatment systems was estimated to be 7.99 g N2O-N capita(-1)yr(-1). An increase of 80% in N2O emissions was observed when the bioreactor pH decreased by approximately 1 pH unit. The vast majority of carbon was removed in the form of CO2, with a small portion as CH4 (<0.3%) during both treatment processes. The cumulative GHG emissions for fresh leachate storage ponds, fresh leachate treatment system and aged leachate treatment system were 19.10, 10.62 and 3.63 Gg CO(2) eq yr(-1), respectively, for a total that could be transformed to 9.09 kg CO(2) eq capita(-1)yr(-1). PMID:24594255

Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, Mingsheng; Chen, Xiaohai; Xu, Ying; Lin, Xiangyu; Kao, Chih Ming; Chen, Shaohua

2014-07-01

60

Spatial variability of soil gas concentration and methane oxidation capacity in landfill covers.  

PubMed

In order to devise design criteria for biocovers intended to enhance the microbial oxidation of landfill methane it is critical to understand the factors influencing gas migration and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. On an old municipal solid waste landfill in north-western Germany soil gas concentrations (10, 40, 90 cm depth), topsoil methane oxidation capacity and soil properties were surveyed at 40 locations along a 16 m grid. As soil properties determine gas flow patterns it was hypothesized that the variability in soil gas composition and the subsequent methanotrophic activity would correspond to the variability of soil properties. Methanotrophic activity was found to be subject to high spatial variability, with values ranging between 0.17 and 9.80 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1)(.) Considering the current gas production rate of 0.03 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1), the oxidation capacity at all sampled locations clearly exceeded the flux to the cover, and can be regarded as an effective instrument for mitigating methane fluxes. The methane concentration in the cover showed a high spatial heterogeneity with values between 0.01 and 0.32 vol.% (10 cm depth), 22.52 vol.% (40 cm), and 36.85 vol.% (90 cm). The exposure to methane raised the oxidation capacity, suggested by a statistical correlation to an increase in methane concentration at 90 cm depth. Methane oxidation capacity was further affected by the methanotroph bacteria pH optimum and nutrient availability, and increased with decreasing pH towards neutrality, and increased with soluble ion concentration). Soil methane and carbon dioxide concentration increased with lower flow resistance of the cover, as represented by the soil properties of a reduced bulk density, increase in air capacity and in relative ground level. PMID:20943363

Röwer, Inga Ute; Geck, Christoph; Gebert, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

2011-05-01

61

U.S. EPA'S FIELD TEST PROGRAMS TO UPDATE DATA ON LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a field test program in which the EPA is currently engaged to improve data on landfill gas (LFG) emissions. LFG emissions data in use at this time are based on determinations made in the late 1980s and early 1990s; changes in landfill operations, such as using...

62

Carbon dioxide removal and capture for landfill gas up-grading  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the frame of an EC financially supported project - LIFE05 ENV\\/IT\\/000874 GHERL (Greenhouse Effect Reduction from Landfill)–a pilot plant was set up in order to demonstrate the feasibility of applying chemical absorption to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas. After proper upgrading - basically removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and other trace gas compound–the gas might be

Lidia Lombardia; Andrea Corti; Ennio Carnevale; Renato Baciocchi; Daniela Zingaretti

2011-01-01

63

Effects of a temporary HDPE cover on landfill gas emissions: multiyear evaluation with the static chamber approach at an Italian landfill.  

PubMed

According to the European Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC and the related Italian Legislation ("D. Lgs. No. 36/2003"), monitoring and control procedures of landfill gas emissions, migration and external dispersions are clearly requested. These procedures could be particularly interesting in the operational circumstance of implementing a temporary cover, as for instance permitted by the Italian legislation over worked-out landfill sections, awaiting the evaluation of expected waste settlements. A possible quantitative approach for field measurement and consequential evaluation of landfill CO(2), CH(4) emission rates in pairs consists of the static, non-stationary accumulation chamber technique. At the Italian level, a significant and recent situation of periodical landfill gas emission monitoring is represented by the sanitary landfill for non-hazardous waste of the "Fano" town district, where monitoring campaigns with the static chamber have been annually conducted during the last 5 years (2005-2009). For the entire multiyear monitoring period, the resulting CO(2), CH(4) emission rates varied on the whole up to about 13,100g CO(2) m(-2)d(-1) and 3800 g CH(4) m(-2)d(-1), respectively. The elaboration of these landfill gas emission data collected at the "Fano" case-study site during the monitoring campaigns, presented and discussed in the paper, gives rise to a certain scientific evidence of the possible negative effects derivable from the implementation of a temporary HDPE cover over a worked-out landfill section, notably: the lateral migration and concentration of landfill gas emissions through adjacent, active landfill sections when hydraulically connected; and consequently, the increase of landfill gas flux velocities throughout the reduced overall soil cover surface, giving rise to a flowing through of CH(4) emissions without a significant oxidation. Thus, these circumstances are expected to cause a certain increase of the overall GHG emissions from the given landfill site. PMID:21051216

Capaccioni, Bruno; Caramiello, Cristina; Tatàno, Fabio; Viscione, Alessandro

2011-05-01

64

Thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores in a bench-scale enclosed landfill gas flare.  

PubMed

A bench-scale landfill flare system was designed and built to test the potential for landfilled biological spores that migrate from the waste into the landfill gas to pass through the flare and exit into the environment as viable. The residence times and temperatures of the flare were characterized and compared to full-scale systems. Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus atrophaeus, nonpathogenic spores that may serve as surrogates for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent for anthrax, were investigated to determine whether these organisms would be inactivated or remain viable after passing through a simulated landfill flare. High concentration spore solutions were aerosolized, dried, and sent through a bench-scale system to simulate the fate of biological weapon (BW)-grade spores in a landfill gas flare. Sampling was conducted downstream of the flare using a bioaerosol collection device containing sterile white mineral oil. The samples were cultured, incubated for seven days, and assessed for viability. Results showed that the bench-scale system exhibited good similarity to the real-world conditions of an enclosed standard combustor flare stack with a single orifice, forced-draft diffusion burner. All spores of G. stearothermophilus and B. atrophaeus were inactivated in the flare, indicating that spores that become re-entrained in landfill gas may not escape the landfill as viable, apparently becoming completely inactivated as they exit through a landfill flare. PMID:22442931

Tufts, Jenia A McBrian; Rosati, Jacky A

2012-02-01

65

GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

This document provides guidance to Superfund remedial project managers, on scene coordinators, facility owners, and potentially responsible parties for conducting an air pathway analysis for landfill gas (LFG) emissions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation...

66

LEACHATE COLLECTION AND GAS MIGRATION AND EMISSION PROBLEMS AT LANDFILLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Clogging of leachate systems and gas migration and emission problems were evaluated at hazardous waste landfills and surface impoundments. Collective and preventive measures were identified along with research and development needs. The analysis used literature and information ob...

67

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15

68

No pain-no gain, the evolution of a landfill gas project  

SciTech Connect

After the City`s utility department closed down an on-site landfill gas (LFG) fired electrical generating facility for permitting problems, and shortly thereafter suffered a traumatic experience with a leaking and inefficient gas collection system, the development of another landfill gas project in the City of Glendale was not a safe thought to harbor. Yet, in 1990, Glendale was approached by several persistent developers who convinced the City to explore another, but larger gas project. Scholl Canyon Landfill, owned principally by the City of Glendale, is a moderately sized facility with 22 million tons of refuse in place and a 12 million ton remaining capacity. The site is comprised of two separate adjoining canyons totalling 410 acres. The smaller canyon is no longer active and today supports a privately operated golf course and driving range. While the active site is within Glendale, the landfill has split ownership with Glendale retaining an 83 percent share, Los Angeles County 10 percent and Southern California Edison 7 percent. Landfill operations are managed by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts (LACSD) in accordance with a joint powers agreement that originated in the early 1960`s. Generating approximately 9 million cubic feet of landfill gas per day with a heating value about one-third that of natural gas, private developers could envision a lucrative project, particularly considering the availability of Federal tax credits for producing fuel from a non-conventional source. The evolution of the Glendale project is described in this paper.

Morford, K.L. [Public Works, Glendale, CA (United States)

1995-08-01

69

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15

70

Sensitivity analysis of the waste composition and water content parameters on the biogas production models on solid waste landfills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfills are commonly used as the final deposit of urban solid waste. Despite the waste is previously processed on a treatment plant, the final amount of organic matter which reaches the landfill is large however. The biodegradation of this organic matter forms a mixture of greenhouse gases (essentially Methane and Carbon-Dioxide as well as Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulfide). From the environmental point of view, solid waste landfills are therefore considered to be one of the main greenhouse gas sources. Different mathematical models are usually applied to predict the amount of biogas produced on real landfills. The waste chemical composition and the availability of water in the solid waste appear to be the main parameters of these models. Results obtained when performing a sensitivity analysis over the biogas production model parameters under real conditions are shown. The importance of a proper characterizacion of the waste as well as the necessity of improving the understanding of the behaviour and development of the water on the unsaturated mass of waste are emphasized.

Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Segura-Sobrino, Francisco; Rodrigo-Clavero, Maria-Elena

2014-05-01

71

Reduced sulfur compounds in gas from construction and demolition debris landfills.  

PubMed

The biological conversion of sulfate from disposed gypsum drywall to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the anaerobic environment of a landfill results in odor problems and possible health concerns at many disposal facilities. To examine the extent and magnitude of such emissions, landfill gas samples from wells, soil vapor samples from the interface of the waste and cover soil, and ambient air samples, were collected from 10 construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills in Florida and analyzed for H(2)S and other reduced sulfur compounds (RSC). H(2)S was detected in the well gas and soil vapor at all 10 sites. The concentrations in the ambient air above the surface of the landfill were much lower than those observed in the soil vapor, and no direct correlation was observed between the two sampling locations. Methyl mercaptan and carbonyl sulfide were the most frequently observed other RSC, though they occurred at smaller concentrations than H(2)S. This research confirmed the presence of H(2)S at C&D debris landfills. High concentrations of H(2)S may be a concern for employees working on the landfill site. These results indicate that workers should use proper personal protection at C&D debris landfills when involved in excavation, landfill gas collection, or confined spaces. The results indicate that H(2)S is sufficiently diluted in the atmosphere to not commonly pose acute health impacts for these landfill workers in normal working conditions. H(2)S concentrations were extremely variable with measurements occurring over a very large range (from less than 3 ppbv to 12,000 ppmv in the soil vapor and from less than 3 ppbv to 50 ppmv in ambient air). Possible reasons for the large intra- and inter-site variability observed include waste and soil heterogeneities, impact of weather conditions, and different site management practices. PMID:16403620

Lee, Sue; Xu, Qiyong; Booth, Matthew; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel

2006-01-01

72

Methane mass balance at three landfill sites: what is the efficiency of capture by gas collection systems?  

PubMed

Many developed countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings and the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. This paper presents the results of extensive field campaigns at three landfill sites to elucidate the total methane balance and provide field measurements to quantify these pathways. We assessed the overall methane mass balance in field cells with a variety of designs, cover materials, and gas management strategies. Sites included different cell configurations, including temporary clay cover, final clay cover, geosynthetic clay liners, and geomembrane composite covers, and cells with and without gas collection systems. Methane emission rates ranged from -2.2 to >10,000 mg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1). Total methane oxidation rates ranged from 4% to 50% of the methane flux through the cover at sites with positive emissions. Oxidation of atmospheric methane was occurring in vegetated soils above a geomembrane. The results of these studies were used as the basis for guidelines by the French environment agency (ADEME) for default values for percent recovery: 35% for an operating cell with an active landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, 65% for a temporary covered cell with an active LFG recovery system, 85% for a cell with clay final cover and active LFG recovery, and 90% for a cell with a geomembrane final cover and active LFG recovery. PMID:16198554

Spokas, K; Bogner, J; Chanton, J P; Morcet, M; Aran, C; Graff, C; Golvan, Y Moreau-Le; Hebe, I

2006-01-01

73

A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING U.S. EPA GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--BUSH VALLEY LANDFILL, HARFORD COUNTY, MARYLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

74

Fatal Flaws in Measuring Landfill Gas Generation Rates by Empirical Well Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Well testing procedures, such as the Tier 3 methodology specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Subtitle D, are commonly used for directly estimating landfill gas (LFG) emissions at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Similar procedures are also used to estimate LFG generation rates for the design of LFG-to-energy projects. These methodologies assume that the LFG generation rate

Gary R. Walter

2003-01-01

75

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31

76

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30

77

The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

2001-12-01

78

Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery. Work was done in the following areas: (1) production of natural gas pipeline methane for liquefaction at an existing LNG facility, (2) production of LNG from sewage digester gas, (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling in the production of LNG, liquid CO{sub 2} and pipeline methane, (4) cost estimates for an LNG production facility at the Arden Landfill in Washington PA.

Brown, W.R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L.A.

2000-10-20

79

Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the coarser (< 35 mm) fraction became larger than finer (< 2 mm) for the given soil-air content. Further, compaction effort was much significant for ka than Dp for both fractions. We suggest this is because of compaction effects caused to create well-aligned macropore networks that are available for gas transport through the porous material. Then, the famous predictive models, the water induced linear reduction (WLR) model for Dp and the reference point law (RPL) model for ka were modified with reference point measurements (dry conditions) and model parameters and they correlated linearly to dry bulk density values for both fractions of landfill final cover soil.

Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

2011-12-01

80

DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

81

DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes-Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. his phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impur...

82

Life-cycle-assessment of fuel-cells-based landfill-gas energy conversion technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfill-gas (LFG) is produced as result of the biological reaction of municipal solid waste (MSW). This gas contains about 50% of methane, therefore it cannot be released into the atmosphere as it is because of its greenhouse effect consequences. The high percentage of methane encouraged researchers to find solutions to recover the related energy content for electric energy production. The

P. Lunghi; R. Bove; U. Desideri

2004-01-01

83

Terrestrial laser scanning for detection of landfill gas: a pilot study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane built up in landfills as a result of breaking down of organic materials can be a renewable energy source if it is taken advantage of. The aim of research presented in this paper is to detect landfill gas (that contains methane) by means of terrestrial laser scanning. The hypothesis is that where no surface leakage has been reported, the landfill gas will expand or migrate. Therefore, it is possible to detect it through repeated scanning of the same area and comparison of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) generated from the point clouds. Only the most significant movements, i.e. vertical, are of interest in this case. During September-November 2011, a small area at Forsbacka landfill in the vicinity of Gävle was scanned 10 times. Epoch-to-epoch comparisons of the resulting DTMs have shown two significant changes (-27 and +19 mm) in elevation of the surface, and it is not impossible that they are caused by migrating landfill gas. The method tested in this study is deemed to be rigorous and accurate for detecting small-scale swell-shrink behaviour of the ground surface (in our case a landfill surface). However, both data processing and interpretation of the results have been considerably complicated by presence of low vegetation (weeds) on the study site, which was dificult to filter away completely from the data. Based on our pilot study, we recommend that a larger area and a longer period of time are chosen to give basis for more grounded conclusions about presence of landfill gas.

Reshetyuk, Yuriy; Mårtensson, Stig-Göran

2014-04-01

84

Demonstration of fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas: Conceptual study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discussed here are the results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. A conceptual design of the project demonstration was established from the commercial system conceptual design. Key demonstration issues facing commercialization of the concept are addressed. Candidate demonstration sites were evaluated, which led to selection and EPA approval of the demonstration site. A plan is discussed for the construction and testing of a landfill gas pretreatment system which will render landfill gas suitable for use in the fuel cell. The final phase of the study will be a demonstration of the energy recovery concept.

Sandelli, G. J.

1992-01-01

85

Evaluation test on a landfill gas-fired flare at the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's Puente Hills Landfill Facility  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative test program was conducted from February 18 through February 21, 1986, by Air Resources Board (ARB) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) staff to evaluate the gaseous constituents from untreated landfill gas used to fuel a flare at the County of Los Angeles Sanitation District's Puente Hills Landfill. The flare was fueled with gases generated by the anaerobic decomposition of buried refuse. Emissions of criteria pollutants as determined from ARB test data and mass flow rates and Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DRE) of non-criteria pollutant compounds determined at the stack from SCAQMD test data are presented. Mass-flow rates and DREs for chlorinated and aromatic compounds determined from data from ARB resin samples are presented. Destruction and removal efficiencies based on mass flow rates for chlorinated compounds ranged from 35 to 99+ percent and for aromatic compounds ranged from four to 99+ percent. Dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls were not detected in the inlet nor the outlet gas-stream samples.

Not Available

1986-07-01

86

ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

87

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15

88

DATABASE OF LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses factors influencing the increase of landfill gas to energy (LFG-E) projects in the U.S. and presents recent statistics from a database,. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of LFG-E projects in the U.S., due to such factors as implementation of t...

89

Analysis of Indirect Emissions Benefits of Wind, Landfill Gas, and Municipal Solid Waste Generation  

EPA Science Inventory

Techniques are introduced to calculate the hourly indirect emissions benefits of three types of green power resources: wind energy, municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion, and landfill gas (LFG) combustion. These techniques are applied to each of the U.S. EPA's eGRID subregions i...

90

A CASE STUDY OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY PALOS VERDES LANDFILL GAS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents the first-ever-attempt to capture sanitary landfill gases and beneficiate them to natural gas pipeline quality--or very nearly so. For this reason the authors must credit the entrepreneurs for a successful first full-scale demonstration of a technology that ...

91

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-print Network

EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

92

LANDFILL GAS ENERGY UTILIZATION EXPERIENCE: DISCUSSION OF TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL ISSUES, SOLUTIONS, AND TRENDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report discusses technical and non-technical considerations associated with the development and operation of landfill gas to energy projects. Much of the report is based on interviews and site visits with the major developers and operators of the more than 110 projects in the...

93

DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

94

Development of correction factors for landfill gas emission model suiting Indian condition to predict methane emission from landfills.  

PubMed

Methane emission from landfill gas emission (LandGEM) model was validated through the results of laboratory scale biochemical methane potential assay. Results showed that LandGEM model over estimates methane (CH4) emissions; and the true CH4 potential of waste depends on the level of segregation. Based on these findings, correction factors were developed to estimate CH4 emission using LandGEM model especially where the level of segregation is negligible or does not exist. The correction factors obtained from the study were 0.94, 0.13 and 0.74 for food waste, mixed un-segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and vegetable wastes, respectively. PMID:24685512

Sil, Avick; Kumar, Sunil; Wong, Jonathan W C

2014-09-01

95

Methane oxidation activity and bacterial community composition in a simulated landfill cover soil is influenced by the growth of Chenopodium album L  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxygen availability in landfill cover soil is a major limitation to the growth and activity of methanotrophs as methane oxidation is an aerobic microbial process. Plants tolerant to high concentrations of landfill gas (LFG) may play an important role in improving methane oxidation within landfill cover soil and reducing emission of methane, a greenhouse gas, from it. In this study,

Yunlong Wang; Weixiang Wu; Ying Ding; Wei Liu; Anton Perera; Yingxu Chen; Medha Devare

2008-01-01

96

TESTING OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: GROTON LANDFILL  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes the results of follow-on tests following a four-phase EPA program. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction of global warming gas emissions (methane and carbon dioxide). The follow-on testing, conducted by N...

97

A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

98

Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former hospital landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former hospital landfill located in a 75-acre study area near the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, from April to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone of a creek adjacent to the landfill and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Results from the hyporheic-zone assessment in the unnamed tributary adjacent to the study area indicated that total petroleum hydrocarbons and octane were the most frequently detected organic compounds in groundwater beneath the creek bed. The highest concentrations for these compounds were detected in the upstream samplers of the hyporheic-zone study area. The effort to delineate landfill activity in the study area focused on the western 14 acres of the 75-acre study area where the hyporheic-zone study identified the highest concentrations of organic compounds. This also is the part of the study area where a debris field also was identified in the southern part of the 14 acres. The southern part of this 14-acre study area, including the debris field, is steeper and not as heavily wooded, compared to the central and northern parts. Fifty-two soil-gas samplers were used for the July 2010 soil-gas survey in the 14-acre study area and mostly detected total petroleum hydrocarbons, and gasoline and diesel compounds. The highest soil-gas masses for total petroleum hydrocarbons, diesel compounds, and the only valid detection of perchloroethene were in the southern part of the study area to the west of the debris field. However, all other detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons greater than 10 micrograms and diesel greater than 0.04 micrograms, and all detections of the combined mass of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were found down slope from the debris field in the central and northern parts of the study area. Five soil-gas samplers were deployed and recovered from September 16 to 22, 2010, and were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents or explosives. Chloroacetophenones (a tear gas component) were the only compounds detected above a method detection level and were detected at the same location as the highest total petroleum hydrocarbons and diesel detections in the southern part of the 14-acre study area. Composite soil samples collected at five locations were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents. None of the inorganic constituents exceeded the regional screening levels. One surface-water sample collected in the western end of the hyporheic-zone study area had a trichlorofluoromethane concentration above the laboratory reporting level and estimated concentrations of chloroform, fluoranthene, and isophorone below laboratory reporting levels.

Falls, Fred W.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

2011-01-01

99

Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

Karen Koslow

2009-08-31

100

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30

101

Composition of the Landfill Microbial Community as Determined by Application of Domain- and Group-Specific 16S and 18S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes?  

PubMed Central

The microbial community composition of colonized cotton and leachate samples from a landfill was quantified using small subunit (SSU) rRNA probes (quantitative rRNA hybridization). Relative quantification of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea revealed variations in the landfill microbial community between samples from different areas of the landfill site and indicated the presence of potentially novel archaea. Anaerobic fungi were quantified in rumen fluid samples but were not sufficiently abundant for direct detection in the landfill samples. PMID:20023104

McDonald, James E.; Allison, Heather E.; McCarthy, Alan J.

2010-01-01

102

Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.  

PubMed

Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

2013-10-01

103

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: Investigation of effects of air inclusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of nitrogen and oxygen on landfill gas operations are discussed. A combustible gas mixture composed of methane and carbon dioxide is generated in municipal solid waste landfills. A consequence of the collection of this fuel gas is the inclusion of some air in the collected product. The effects include increased collected and purification costs, reduction in the quality of the fuel gas produced, corrosion, explosion hazards, and interference with odorant systems. The scope of such effects was determined by using landfill data of a gas recovery site as a basis. Useful supplemental fuel gas may be recovered despite the inclusion of air. Recommendations are made for establishing limits for nitrogen and oxygen content and minimizing the costs associated with their presence.

1983-01-01

104

Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01

105

The estimation of methane emissions from landfills with different cover systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas, second only to CO2 as an anthropogenic contributor to global warming. Landfills are important anthropogenic source in the CH4 emissions. Microbially mediated CH4 oxidation in landfills with conventional soil covers can serve as an efficient biological sink. Methane from modern sanitary landfills equipped with composite covers and gas collection system is vented directly to the atmosphere, except for some of the largest landfills at which it is collected and burned. However, previous laboratory research has shown that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills with modern composite covers. In this study a CH4 emission model was developed. The model used the calculated CH4 oxidation rates to estimate CH4 emissions from landfills constructed with conventional soil covers, modern composite covers, and modern composite covers plus biofilters. According to the CH4 emission rates predicted by CH4 emission model, it was estimated that 90% of the generated CH4 was emitted to the atmosphere for landfills with modern composite cover. For landfills with modern composite cover plus biofilters, an average of only 9% of the generated CH4 was estimated to be emitted. For landfills with conventional covers, an average of 83% of the generated CH4 was estimated to be emitted. By comparing the CH4 emission rates from three different landfill types, the use of a properly managed biofilter should be an effective technique to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills.

Park, S.; Lee, K.; Sung, K.

2006-12-01

106

Natural attenuation and characterization of contaminants composition in landfill leachate under different disposing ages.  

PubMed

Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) composition in landfill leachate would vary as the disposal time extended. Leachates with different ages were collected from Laogang Refuse Landfill of Shanghai, the largest landfill in China with a placement scale of 7600 t refuse per day. To characterize COD composition in leachate, samples were size-fractioned into suspended fractions (>0.45 microm), colloid fraction (0.45 micromlandfill leachate treatment process should be modified according to the leachate characterization. The results obtained in this study might provide the important information for modeling, design, and operation of landfill leachate treatment systems. PMID:19217144

Ziyang, Lou; Youcai, Zhao; Tao, Yuan; Yu, Song; Huili, Chen; Nanwen, Zhu; Renhua, Huan

2009-05-01

107

Non-Controlled Emission of Inorganic Toxic gas Components (CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0) to the atmosphere from Arico's landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill gas is mainly constituted by CO2 and CH4. However, other inorganic toxic gas components such as CO, NH3, H2S and Hg0, are also present. Reduced gas species are produced and released during the anaerobic decomposition of urban waste, while Hg0 is originally present in the waste and it is released as a volatile. Significant amounts of non-controlled emission of these components could be released to the atmosphere in the form of diffuse degassing, The goal of this study is to evaluate the "non-controlled" emissions of these inorganic toxic gas components from Arico's landfill, Tenerife. Arico's landfill (0.35 Km2) holds about 1,200 t/d of urban solid waste with an average organic matter content of 48%. Diffuse CO2 emission has been measured at the surface of Arico's landfill by means of a NDIR according with the accumulation chamber method. Landfill gases were also collected at 40 cm depth using a metallic probe and analyzed within 24 hours for CO2 and CO composition by means of a VARIAN micro-GC QUAD. H2S and Hg0 were analyzed by means of a Polytron-II electrochemical sensor and a JEROME 431-X mercury analyzer, respectively. NH3 was fixed in a boric acid solution and determined by means of a selective electrode. CO concentration ranged from non-detectable to 2,531 ppmv, with a median of 24.3 ppmv. The highest observed Hg0 concentration in the surface landfill gas is 0.004 ppbv, while H2S concentration reached levels up to 12 ppmv. NH3 contents were lower than 1 ppmv. CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3 fluxes have been estimated by multiplying CO2 efflux times (Tox.I.C.)i/CO2 where (Tox.I.C.)i is the concentration of CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3. The highest efflux values for CO, Hg0, H2S and NH3 were 6.8 gm-2d-1, 0.04 µ gm-2d-1, 1.7 mgm-2d-1 and 0.23 gm-2d-1, respectively.

Echeita, A.; Perez, C.; Hernandez, C.; Fariña, L.; Lima, R.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Perez, N.

2001-12-01

108

Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill af...

109

Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Namhoon, E-mail: nhlee@anyang.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15

110

Characterization of wood plastic composites made from landfill-derived plastic and sawdust: volatile compounds and olfactometric analysis.  

PubMed

Application of wood plastic composites (WPCs) obtained from recycled materials initially intended for landfill is usually limited by their composition, mainly focused on release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which could affect quality or human safety. The study of the VOCs released by a material is a requirement for new composite materials. Characterization and quantification of VOCs of several WPC produced with low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate (PE/EVA) films and sawdust were carried out, in each stage of production, by solid phase microextraction in headspace mode (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). An odor profile was also obtained by HS-SPME and GC-MS coupled with olfactometry analysis. More than 140 compounds were observed in the raw materials and WPC samples. Some quantified compounds were considered WPC markers such as furfural, 2-methoxyphenol, N-methylphthalimide and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. Hexanoic acid, acetic acid, 2-methoxyphenol, acetylfuran, diacetyl, and aldehydes were the most important odorants. None of the VOCs were found to affect human safety for use of the WPC. PMID:23259974

Félix, Juliana S; Domeño, Celia; Nerín, Cristina

2013-03-01

111

Ionic composition and greenhouse gases evaluation in Tietê River sediment and mud landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are 39 cities composing the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP) which has grown seven times during the last sixty years, reaching, in 2011, 19.3 million inhabitants. This fact associated with a strong industrial development provoked, among other consequences, a disordered urbanization along the most important river of the region: Tietê. About 100 Km of its 1,150 Km full extension crosses MASP and, during the 60's, Marginal Tietê roadway was constructed, occupying the river banks as access routes. Tietê River was straightened and several landfills were created with its deposit (sediment and mud). EACH-USP (46.50 W, 23.48 S) lies nowadays in one of these areas, where this work has been developed. Therefore, the goal is to evaluate the chemical composition (ionic and gases) and its variability in function of the depth levels using three wells, from 0.60 to 9.0 m of depth. The wells were perforated in September 2011, end of the dry weather. Each well owns a homemade multiport sampling device (HMSD), being possible to push gas and/or water up from 15 available ports. The gases measurements were carried out using a GEM-2000 plus (Landtec) portable analyzer. Aqueous samples containing solid material were taken at each level depth from ports of the HMSD. However, no water was found in some levels. All samples were kept cooled until analysis procedures. After decantation of the solid material, the supernatant liquid was divided in two portions, being its conductivity (Micronal conductimeter) and pH (pH-meter Metrohm 654 with combined glass electrode) measured with the former and ionic analysis with the latter, in which all samples were filtered (Millex 0.22 micrometer pores) before each ionic chromatographic analysis, using Metrohm 850 System, for the ions: sodium, ammonium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate. The first sampling stage was carried out during November and December 2011 in the beginning of rainy season in the mid Spring. From all the analysis performed, a large variability of the results may be observed for both gases and ionic composition not only among the wells, but also among the different depth levels. Vertically, one of the wells (W2) showed the same percentage of gases, methane 55% and carbon dioxide 45%, at all depth levels, while the other two wells (W1 and W3) presented these gases percentages only under 5.0 m deep. Concerning oxygen, 25% of this gas was detected at 1.0 m under the surface in W1 and W3. In relation to aqueous samples, the most acidity was observed near the surface (0.60 m deep, W1), pH 4.65, while pH 7.88 was obtained under 5.0 m deep (W3). For ionic concentrations a large range was observed considering all wells, being the lowest values for sulfate, from 0.60 to 20 mg/l, and the highest values for ammonium, between 14 and 53 mg/l. These results variability can be associated to the different soil composition layers, as well as to the biodegradation process and the time confinement of the river material deposit.

La-Scalea, M. A.; Fornaro, A.; Abreu, E. L.; Mendonça, C. A.

2012-04-01

112

Electrical power obtained from burning landfill gas into a gas turbine generator: Experience after one year of operation  

SciTech Connect

A typical example of a ``waste to energy'' concept can be found also in the landfill environment. The biogas derived by fermentation process is usually burnt into gas engines. This choice is usually due to the electric efficiency that is normally higher than gas turbine application and to the size that usually, almost in Italian landfill size, does not allow power higher than 1,000 kW. On the other side gas turbine applications, typically based on generator sets greater than 1,000 kW do not require special biogas pre-treatment; require less maintenance and have an extremely higher reliability. The paper describes an application of a gas turbine generator of 4,800 kW outlining the experiences collected after one year of operation. During this period, the system fulfilled the target of a total operating time greater than 8,000 hours. Description is done of the biogas compression system feeding the turbine and also of the subsystem adopted to reach the above mentioned target reliability.

Fabbri, R.; Mignani, N.

1998-07-01

113

PRESENT AND LONG-TERM COMPOSITION OF MSW LANDFILL LEACHATE: A REVIEW. (R827580)  

EPA Science Inventory

The major potential environmental impacts related to landfill leachate are pollution of groundwater and surface waters. Landfill leachate contains pollutants that can be categorized into four groups (dissolved organic matter, inorganic macrocomponents, heavy metals, and xenobi...

114

Assessment of soil-gas and groundwater contamination at the Gibson Road landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Soil-gas and groundwater assessments were conducted at the Gibson Road landfill in 201 to provide screening-level environmental contamination data to supplement the data collected during previous environmental studies at the landfill. Passive samplers were used in both assessments to detect volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil gas and groundwater. A total of 56 passive samplers were deployed in the soil in late July and early August for the soil-gas assessment. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at masses greater than the method detection level of 0.02 microgram in all samplers and masses greater than 2.0 micrograms in 13 samplers. Three samplers located between the landfill and a nearby wetland had TPH masses greater than 20 micrograms. Diesel was detected in 28 of the 56 soil-gas samplers. Undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane were detected, but undecane was the most common diesel compound with 23 detections. Only five detections exceeded a combined diesel mass of 0.10 microgram, including the highest mass of 0.27 microgram near the wetland. Toluene was detected in only five passive samplers, including masses of 0.65 microgram near the wetland and 0.85 microgram on the southwestern side of the landfill. The only other gasoline-related compound detected was octane in two samplers. Naphthalene was detected in two samplers in the gully near the landfill and two samplers along the southwestern side of the landfill, but had masses less than or equal to 0.02 microgram. Six samplers located southeast of the landfill had detections of chlorinated compounds, including one perchloroethene detections (0.04 microgram) and five chloroform detections (0.05 to0.08 microgram). Passive samplers were deployed and recovered on August 8, 2011, in nine monitoring wells along the southwestern, southeastern and northeastern sides of the landfill and down gradient from the eastern corner of the landfill. Six of the nine samplers had TPH concentrations greater than 100 micrograms per liter. TPH concentrations declined from 320 micrograms per liter in a sampler near the landfill to 18 micrograms in a sampler near the wetland. Five of the samplers had detections of one or more diesel compounds but detections of individual diesel compounds had concentrations below a method detection level of 0.01 microgram per liter. Benzene was detected in three samplers and exceeded the national primary drinking-water standard of 5 micrograms per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The concentrations of benzene, and therefore BTEX, were 6.1 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the eastern corner of the landfill, 27 micrograms per liter in the sampler near the wetland, and 37 micrograms per liter in the sampler at the southern corner of the landfill. Nonfuel-related compounds were detected in the four wells that are aligned between the eastern corner of the landfill and the wetland. The sampler deployed nearest the eastern corner of the landfill had the greatest number of detected organic compounds and had the only detections of two trimethylbenzene compounds, naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. The two up gradient samplers had the greatest number of chlorinated compounds with five compounds each, compared to detections of four compounds and one compound in the two down gradient samplers. All four samplers had detections of 1,1-dichloroethane which ranged from 42 to 1,300 micrograms per liter. Other detections of chlorinated compounds included trichloroethene, perchloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

2012-01-01

115

Assessment of internal condition of waste in a roofed landfill.  

PubMed

Recently, roofed landfills have been gaining popularity in Japan. Roofed landfills have several advantages over non-roofed landfills such as eliminating the visibility of waste and reducing the spread of offensive odours. This study examined the moisture balance and aeration conditions, which promote waste stabilisation, in a roofed landfill that included organic waste such as food waste. Moisture balance was estimated using waste characterization and the total amount of landfilled waste. Internal conditions were estimated based on the composition, flux, and temperature of the landfill gas. Finally, in situ aeration was performed to determine the integrity of the semi-aerobic structure of the landfill. With the effects of rainfall excluded, only 15% of the moisture held by the waste was discharged as leachate. The majority of the moisture remained in the waste layer, but was less than the optimal moisture level for biodegradation, indicating that an appropriate water spray should be administered. To assess waste degradation in this semi-aerobic landfill, the concentration and flow rate of landfill gas were measured and an in situ aeration test was performed. The results revealed that aerobic biodegradation had not occurred because of the unsatisfactory design and operation of the landfill. PMID:22989405

Zhang, Xin; Matsuto, Toshihiko

2013-01-01

116

Assessment of soil-gas contamination at the 17th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Assessments of contaminants in soil gas were conducted in two study areas at Fort Gordon, Georgia, in July and August of 2011 to supplement environmental contaminant data for previous studies at the 17th Street landfill. The two study areas include northern and eastern parts of the 17th Street landfill and the adjacent wooded areas to the north and east of the landfill. These study areas were chosen because of their close proximity to the surface water in Wilkerson Lake and McCoys Creek. A total of 48 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the July 28 to August 3, 2011, assessment in the eastern study area. The assessment mostly identified detections of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and gasoline- and diesel-range compounds, but also identified the presence of chlorinated solvents in six samplers, chloroform in three samplers, 2-methyl naphthalene in one sampler, and trimethylbenzene in one sampler. The TPH masses exceeded 0.02 microgram (?g) in all 48 samplers and exceeded 0.9 ?g in 24 samplers. Undecane, one of the three diesel-range compounds used to calculate the combined mass for diesel-range compounds, was detected in 17 samplers and is the second most commonly detected compound in the eastern study area, exceeded only by the number of TPH detections. Six samplers had detections of toluene, but other gasoline compounds were detected with toluene in three of the samplers, including detections of ethylbenzene, meta- and para-xylene, and octane. All detections of chlorinated organic compounds had soil-gas masses equal to or less than 0.08 ?g, including three detections of trichloroethene, three detections of perchloroethene, three chloroform detections, one 1,4-dichlorobenzene detection, and one 1,1,2-trichloroethane detection. Three methylated compounds were detected in the eastern study area, but were detected at or below method detection levels. A total of 32 soil-gas samplers were deployed for the August 11–24, 2011, assessment in the northern study area. All samplers in the survey had detections of TPH, but only eight of the samplers had detections of TPH greater than 0.9 mg. Four samplers had TPH detections greater than 9 mg; the only other fuel-related compounds detected in these four samplers included toluene in three of the samplers and undecane in the fourth sampler. Three samplers deployed along the western margin of the northern landfill had detections of both diesel-and gasoline-related compounds; however, the diesel-related compounds were detected at or below method detection levels. Seven samplers in the northern study area had detections of chlorinated compounds, including three perchloroethene detections, three chloroform detections, and one 1,4-dichloro-benzene detection. One sampler on the western margin of the landfill had detections of 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-tr-methylbenene below method detection levels.

Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

2012-01-01

117

A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes a case study that applies EPA/600/R-05/123a, the guidance for conducting air pathway analyses of landfill gas emissions that are of interest to superfund remedial project managers, on-scene coordinators, facility owners, and potentially responsible parties. T...

118

Geobacteraceae community composition is related to hydrochemistry and biodegradation in an iron-reducing aquifer polluted by a neighboring landfill  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between community composition of the iron-reducing Geobacteraceae, pollution levels, and the occurrence of biodegradation were established for an iron-reducing aquifer polluted with landfill leachate by using cultivation-independent Geobacteraceae 16S rRNA gene-targeting techniques. Numerical analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles and sequencing revealed a high Geobacteraceae diversity and showed that community composition within the leachate plume differed considerably

Bin Lin; Martin Braster; Breukelen van B. M; Verseveld van H. W; Hans V. Westerhoff; Wilfred F. M. Roling

2005-01-01

119

Assessment of soil-gas, soil, and water contamination at the former 19th Street landfill, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Soil gas, soil, and water were assessed for organic and inorganic constituents at the former 19th Street landfill at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from February to September 2010. Passive soil-gas samplers were analyzed to evaluate organic constituents in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of a creek and soil gas within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. Soil and water samples were analyzed to evaluate inorganic constituents in soil samples, and organic and inorganic constituents in the surface water of a creek adjacent to the landfill, respectively. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental constituent data to Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. The passive soil-gas samplers deployed in the water-saturated hyporheic zone and flood plain of the creek adjacent to the former landfill indicated the presence of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and octane above method detection levels in groundwater beneath the creek bed and flood plain at all 12 soil-gas sampler locations. The TPH concentrations ranged from 51.4 to 81.4 micrograms per liter. Octane concentrations ranged from 1.78 to 2.63 micrograms per liter. These detections do not clearly identify specific source areas in the former landfill; moreover, detections of TPH and octane in a soil-gas sampler installed at a seep on the western bank of the creek indicated the potential for these constituents to be derived from source areas outside the estimated boundaries of the former landfill. A passive soil-gas sampler survey was conducted in the former landfill from June 30 to July 5, 2010, and involved 56 soil-gas samplers that were analyzed for petroleum and halogenated compounds not classified as chemical agents or explosives. The TPH soil-gas mass exceeded 2.0 micrograms in 21 samplers. Most noticeable are the two sites with TPH detections which are located in and near the hyporheic zone and are likely to affect the creek. However, most TPH detections were located in and immediately adjacent to a debris field located within the former landfill and in areas where debris was not visible, including the northwestern and southeastern parts of the study area. Two of the four soil-gas samplers installed within a former military training area adjacent to the landfill also had TPH detections above the method detection level. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (as combined BTEX mass) were detected at 0.02 microgram or greater in three soil-gas samplers installed at the northwestern boundary and in five samplers installed in the southeastern part of the study area. There was no BTEX mass detected above the method detection level in samplers installed in the debris field. Toluene was the most frequently detected BTEX compound. Compounds indicative of diesel-range organics were detected above 0.04 microgram in 12 soil-gas samplers and had a distribution similar to that of TPH, including being detected in the debris field. Undecane was the most frequently detected diesel compound. Chloroform and naphthalene were detected in eight and two soil-gas samplers, respectively. Five soil-gas samplers deployed during September 2010 were analyzed for organic compounds classified as chemical agents and explosives, but none exceeded the method detection levels. Five composite soil samples collected from within the estimated boundaries of the former landfill were analyzed for 35 inorganic constituents, but none of the constituents detected exceeded regional screening levels for industrial soils. The sample collected in the debris field exceeded background levels for aluminum, barium, calcium, chromium, lead, nickel, potassium, sodium, and zinc. Three surface-water samples were collected in September 2010 from a stormwater outfall culvert that drains to the creek and from the open channel of the creek at upstream and downstream locations relative to the outfall. Toluene was detected at 0.661 mi

Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

2011-01-01

120

Integrated Cryogenic System for CO2 Separation and Lng Production from Landfill Gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An integrated cryogenic system to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and produce LNG from landfill gas is investigated and designed. The main objective of this design is to eliminate the requirement of a standard CO2 removal process in the liquefaction system such distillation or (temperature or pressure) swing adsorption, and to directly separate carbon dioxide as frost at the liquefying channel of methane. Two identical sets of heat exchangers are installed in parallel and switched alternatively with a time period so that one is in separation-liquefaction mode while the other is in CO2 clean-up mode. A thermal regeneration scheme is presented for the purpose of saving energy and avoiding the stoppage of LNG production followed by the flow switching. The switching period is determined from results of a combined heat and mass transfer analysis on the CO2 freeze-out process.

Chang, H. M.; Chung, M. J.; Park, S. B.

2010-04-01

121

Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test  

SciTech Connect

Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

Han, Byunghyun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, 301 DuPont Hall, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Jafarpour, Behnam [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, 301 DuPont Hall, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Gallagher, Victoria N. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, 301 DuPont Hall, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, 301 DuPont Hall, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)]. E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, 301 DuPont Hall, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Fluman, Daniel A. [Delaware Solid Waste Authority, 1128 S. Bradford St. Dover, DE 19903-0455 (United States)

2006-07-01

122

Evaluation test on a landfill gas-fired turbine at the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's Puente Hill Landfill Electric Generation Station. Air pollution test report  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative test program was conducted from February 25 through February 27, 1986 by Air Resources Board (ARB) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) staff to evaluate the gaseous constituents from untreated landfill gas used to fuel a turbine and the emissions from that turbine located at the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's Puente Hills Electric Generating Station. The turbine was fueled with gases generated by the anaerobic decomposition of buried refuse at the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's Puente Hills Landfill. Emissions of criteria pollutant as determined from ARB test data are reported. Mass flow rates and destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) of non-criteria pollutant compounds determined at the stack from SCQAMD bag-sample test data and mass-flow rates and DRE's for chlorinated and aromatic compounds determined from data from ARB resin samples are presented. Destruction and removal efficiencies based on mass-flow rates for chlorinated compounds ranged from 17 to 99+ percent and for aromatic compounds ranged from negative to 99+ percent. The possible formation of the compounds - chlorinated dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls - was considered and samples were taken for analyses for these compounds. Dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls were not detected in the inlet nor the outlet gas stream samples.

Not Available

1986-07-01

123

Seasonal alterations of landfill leachate composition and toxic potency in semi-arid regions.  

PubMed

The present study investigates seasonal variations of leachate composition and its toxic potency on different species, such as the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana (formerly Artemia salina), the fairy shrimp Thamnocephalus platyurus, the estuarine rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and the microalgal flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta. In specific, leachate regularly collected from the municipal landfill site of Aigeira (Peloponissos, Greece) during the year 2011, showed significant alterations of almost all its physicochemical parameters with time. Further analysis showed that seasonal alterations of leachate composition are related with the amount of rainfall obtained throughout the year. In fact, rainfall-related parameters, such as conductivity (Cond), nitrates (NO(3)(-)), total nitrogen (TN), ammonium (NH(4)-N), total dissolved solids (TDS) and the BOD(5)/NH(4)-N ratio could merely reflect the leachate strength and toxicity, as verified by the significant correlations occurred among each of them with the toxic endpoints, 24 h LC(50) and/or 72 h IC(50), obtained in all species tested. According to the result of the present study, it could be suggested that the aforementioned leachate parameters could be used independently, or in combination as a low-cost effective tools for estimating leachate strength and toxic potency, at least in the case of semi-arid areas such as the most of the Mediterranean countries. PMID:22819480

Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Kamilari, Maria; Dailianis, Stefanos

2012-09-30

124

Present and Long-Term Composition of MSW Landfill Leachate: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major potential environmental impacts related to landfill leachate are pollution of groundwater and surface waters. Landfill leachate contains pollutants that can be categorized into four groups (dissolved organic matter, inorganic macrocomponents, heavy metals, and xenobiotic organic compounds). Existing data show high leachate concentrations of all components in the early acid phase due to strong decomposition and leaching. In the

Peter Kjeldsen; Morton A. Barlaz; Alix P. Rooker; Anders Baun; Anna Ledin; Thomas H. Christensen

2002-01-01

125

Laboratory and field screening strategies for measuring volatile organic compounds in landfill gas  

SciTech Connect

Distinct patterns often exist in the presence and absence of hazardous contaminants in the environment. These patterns can be used to select efficient screening tools, or groups of compounds that provide the most information on overall occurrences of a larger target group of compounds. By using these screens to indicate whether a sample is contaminated with detectable amounts of the compounds of interest, attention can be focused on those samples considered most likely to contain measurable concentrations of targeted compounds. The cost savings that result from eliminating samples that are most likely uncontaminated can be applied to obtaining additional samples that more accurately characterize the spatial or temporal variability of the environmental problem. In a retrospective application of screening techniques to the State of California's database of volatile organic compounds in landfill gas, two laboratory screening compounds, perchloroethylene and methylene chloride, represent over 95% of the total number of positive detections of a target group of 10 volatile organic compounds. Benzene and vinyl chloride, two field screening compounds that were selected using the characteristics of commercially available colorimetric detector tubes, recorded 74% of the total contaminant detections and a 52% savings in analytical costs as compared to an exhaustive analysis of every sample for all 10 volatile organic compounds. The number of detections recorded could have been improved if more sensitive and less selective field screening devices were available.

Emerson, C.W.

1999-11-01

126

Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the surface wall along the cooling passage in a liquefying heat exchanger and to install two identical heat exchangers in parallel for alternative switching. As a first step of feasibility study, combined heat and mass transfer analysis is performed on the freeze-out process of CO2 in a counterflow heat exchanger, where CH4-CO2 mixture is cooled below its frost temperature in thermal contact with cold refrigerant. Engineering correlations for the analogy of heat and mass transfer are incorporated into numerical heat exchanger analysis with detailed fluid properties. The developed analytical model is used to estimate the distribution of CO2 accumulation and the required heat exchanger size with latent thermal load for the cryogenic CO2 removal in various operating conditions.

Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Seong Bum

127

Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOEpatents

A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01

128

A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.  

PubMed

Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

2015-03-01

129

Energy potential of modern landfills  

SciTech Connect

Methane produced by refuse decomposition in a sanitary landfill can be recovered for commercial use. Landfill methane is currently under-utilized, with commercial recovery at only a small percentage of US landfills. New federal regulations mandating control of landfill gas migration and atmospheric emissions are providing impetus to methane recovery schemes as a means of recovering costs for increased environmental control. The benefits of landfill methane recovery include utilization of an inexpensive renewable energy resource, removal of explosive gas mixtures from the subsurface, and mitigation of observed historic increases in atmospheric methane. Increased commercial interest in landfill methane recovery is dependent on the final form of Clean Air Act amendments pertaining to gaseous emissions from landfills; market shifts in natural gas prices; financial incentives for development of renewable energy resources; and support for applied research and development to develop techniques for increased control of the gas generation process in situ. This paper will discuss the controls on methane generation in landfills. In addition, it will address how landfill regulations affect landfill design and site management practices which, in turn, influence decomposition rates. Finally, future trends in landfilling, and their relationship to gas production, will be examined. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.

1990-01-01

130

Research, development and demonstration in the design of sanitary landfill to optimize the generation and capture of compressible gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influences of selected factors on the generation and recovery of methane gas from sanitary landfills were investigated. The factors included encapsulation, shredding, air classifying, moisture, and pH. Facilities consisting of six model sanitary landfill cells, each with a capacity of approximately 450 cubic yards of municipal waste, and auxiliary subsystems were constructed. Municipal waste in each cell is contained in a 30-mil thick polyvinly chloride plastic sheeting forming a virtually gas-tight envelope. Two cells were filled with as-collected urban waste, two with shredded waste, and two with shredded and air classified waste, constituting three pairs of cells. One of each pair is a control cell with the other used as an experimental variable. Systems were provided for adding measured amounts of water, removing and recirculating leachate, and for extracting gas and measuring gas flow. During testing, gas production and internal cell characteristics were measured to determine the effects of mechanical processing, moisture content, and leachate pH.

Nosanov, M. E.; Teeple, F. E.; Buesch, S. C.

1982-02-01

131

Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications.  

PubMed

Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO(2), CH(4), H(2), NH(3), CO and NO(2) has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO(2) presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO(2) gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO(2) concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO(2) gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 degrees C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 microm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array demonstrates high sensitivity by providing minimal sub-ppm level detection, e.g., download up to 100 ppb NO(2), at the sensor temperature of 150 degrees C. The gas sensitivity of the CNT sensor array depends on operating temperature, showing a lower optimal temperature of maximum sensitivity for the metal-decorated CNT sensors compared to unmodified CNT sensors. Results indicate that the recovery mechanisms in the CNT chemiresistors can be altered by a rapid heating pulse from room temperature to about 110 degrees C. A comparison of the NO(2) gas sensitivity for the chemiresistors based on disorderly networked CNTs and vertically aligned CNTs is also reported. Cross-sensitivity towards relative humidity of the CNT sensors array is investigated. Finally, the sensing properties of the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor arrays are promising to monitor gas events in the LFG for practical applications with low power consumption and moderate sensor temperature. PMID:20154374

Penza, M; Rossi, R; Alvisi, M; Serra, E

2010-03-12

132

BIOREACTOR LANDFILL DESIGN  

EPA Science Inventory

Modern landfill design entails many elements including foundations, liner systems, leachate collection systems, stormwater control systems, slope stability considerations, leachate management systems, gas extraction systems, and capping and closure. The use of bioreactor technolo...

133

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30

134

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Ripon City Landfill, Fond du Lac County, Ripon, WI, March 27, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Ripon FF/LN landfill Superfund site is located at the intersection of Highways FF and NN in the Town of Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. The selected source control remedy is Alternative O, Composite Landfill Cap and Passive Gas Venting in conjunction with a groundwater monitoring plan.

NONE

1996-06-01

135

Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process--upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash.  

PubMed

Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 65-90 kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 500-1000 kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2 Nm(3)/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7 Nm(3)/(htBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.5-99%. PMID:24120459

Mostbauer, P; Lombardi, L; Olivieri, T; Lenz, S

2014-01-01

136

USING LANDFILL GAS IN FUEL CELLS - A STEP CLOSER TO COMMERICAL REALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The article discusses Phase II and Phase III results of a U.S. EPA program underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation. The program involves controlling methane emissions from landfills using a fuel cell. The fuel cell would reduce air emissions affecting global warming, aci...

137

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-print Network

. Some of the modern regulated landfills attempt to capture and utilize landfill biogas, a renewable collecting landfill biogas worldwide. The landfills that capture biogas in the US collect about 2.6 million. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

138

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil.  

PubMed

Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, ?(b), and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D(p)/D(o), ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k(a)) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting ?(b) values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm(-3). Results showed that D(p) and k(a) values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content (?), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D(p)/D(f), the ratio of measured D(p) to D(p) in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k(a)/k(a)(,pF4.1), the ratio of measured k(a) to k(a) at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content (?) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D(p)(?/f) and k(a)(?/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D(p) and P for k(a)). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to ?(b) values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models. PMID:21813272

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

2011-12-01

139

Hydrogen sulfide generation in simulated construction and demolition debris landfills: impact of waste composition.  

PubMed

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation in construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills has been associated with the biodegradation of gypsum drywall. Laboratory research was conducted to observe H2S generation when drywall was codisposed with different C&D debris constituents. Two experiments were conducted using simulated landfill columns. Experiment 1 consisted of various combinations of drywall, wood, and concrete to determine the impact of different waste constituents and combinations on H2S generation. Experiment 2 was designed to examine the effect of concrete on H2S generation and migration. The results indicate that decaying drywall, even alone, leached enough sulfate ions and organic matter for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to generate large H2S concentrations as high as 63,000 ppmv. The codisposed wastes show some effect on H2S generation. At the end of experiment 1, the wood/drywall and drywall alone columns possessed H2S concentrations > 40,000 ppmv. Conversely, H2S concentrations were < 1 ppmv in those columns containing concrete. Concrete plays a role in decreasing H2S by increasing pH out of the range for SRB growth and by reacting with H2S. This study also showed that wood lowered H2S concentrations initially by decreasing leachate pH values. Based on the results, two possible control mechanisms to mitigate H2S generation in C&D debris landfills are suggested. PMID:16933645

Yang, Kenton; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

2006-08-01

140

Wastewater disposal to landfill-sites: a synergistic solution for centralized management of olive mill wastewater and enhanced production of landfill gas.  

PubMed

The present paper focuses on a largely unexplored field of landfill-site valorization in combination with the construction and operation of a centralized olive mill wastewater (OMW) treatment facility. The latter consists of a wastewater storage lagoon, a compact anaerobic digester operated all year round and a landfill-based final disposal system. Key elements for process design, such as wastewater pre-treatment, application method and rate, and the potential effects on leachate quantity and quality, are discussed based on a comprehensive literature review. Furthermore, a case-study for eight (8) olive mill enterprises generating 8700 m(3) of wastewater per year, was conceptually designed in order to calculate the capital and operational costs of the facility (transportation, storage, treatment, final disposal). The proposed facility was found to be economically self-sufficient, as long as the transportation costs of the OMW were maintained at ?4.0 €/m(3). Despite that EU Landfill Directive prohibits wastewater disposal to landfills, controlled application, based on appropriately designed pre-treatment system and specific loading rates, may provide improved landfill stabilization and a sustainable (environmentally and economically) solution for effluents generated by numerous small- and medium-size olive mill enterprises dispersed in the Mediterranean region. PMID:23792820

Diamantis, Vasileios; Erguder, Tuba H; Aivasidis, Alexandros; Verstraete, Willy; Voudrias, Evangelos

2013-10-15

141

Non-Controlled Emission of Inorganic Toxic gas Components (CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0) to the atmosphere from Arico's landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfill gas is mainly constituted by CO2 and CH4. However, other inorganic toxic gas components such as CO, NH3, H2S and Hg0, are also present. Reduced gas species are produced and released during the anaerobic decomposition of urban waste, while Hg0 is originally present in the waste and it is released as a volatile. Significant amounts of non-controlled emission of

A. Echeita; C. Perez; C. Hernandez; L. Fariña; R. Lima; J. Salazar; P. Hernandez; N. Perez

2001-01-01

142

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOEpatents

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

Gross, Kenny C. (1433 Carriage La., Bolingbrook, IL 60440)

1995-01-01

143

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

144

Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ? 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water was 29%, while the moisture content, the mass of water divided by total wet mass of solid waste, was 28%. Near the sloped sides of the landfill, PTT results indicated that only 7.1% of the pore space was filled with water, while the moisture content was estimated to be 6.9%. These measurements are in close agreement with gravimetric measurements made on solid waste samples collected after each PTT: moisture content of 27% in the center of the landfill and only 6% near the edge of the landfill. We discuss these measurements in detail, the limitations of the PTT method for landfills, and operational guidelines for achieving unbiased measurements of moisture content in landfills using the PTT method.

Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

2004-12-01

145

Influence of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill operation with leachate recirculation on stabilization processes.  

PubMed

To investigate the influence of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill operation on stabilization processes of landfill sites with leachate recirculation, in situ simulated semi-aerobic landfill sites with leachate recirculation (SLR) and anaerobic landfill sites with leachate recirculation (ALR) were constructed. Refuse properties and landfill settlement were determined. Leachate quality and landfill gas compositions were monitored regularly. Based on the data obtained, leachate quality, landfill gas and final refuse characteristics were adopted as assessment factors to quantitatively evaluate stabilization of landfill sites. The results showed that volatile solids (VS), total organic carbon (TOC) and biologically degradable matter (BDM) of aged refuse in SLR (15.8, 7.3 and 9.9%, respectively) were lower than those in ALR, which were 19.1, 9.2 and 11.3%, respectively. Settlement and reduction ratio of SLR were 1.71 m and 30.91%, respectively, and 1.40?m and 25.45% in the case of ALR. Concentrations of organic pollutants, especially ammonia, were reduced in SLR, and variation in leachate quality was also smoother than ALR. Throughout the experiment the average concentration of CH4 in ALR was higher than that in SLR (36.7 and 14.5%, respectively). At the end of the experiment, SLR was moderately stable, while ALR was moderately unstable. The comprehensive assessment index (I) for SLR and ALR was 200 and 355, respectively. PMID:21930516

Yang, Yangfei; Yue, Bo; Yang, Yu; Huang, Qifei

2012-03-01

146

OUTER LOOP LANDFILL CASE STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation will describe the interim data reaulting from a CRADA between USEPA and Waste Management, Inc. at the outer Loop Landfill Bioreactor research project located in Louisville, KY. Recently updated data will be presented covering landfill solids, gas being collecte...

147

LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

148

Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils.  

PubMed

Compared with natural ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, engineered landfills represent a highly managed soil system for which there has been no systematic quantification of emissions from coexisting daily, intermediate, and final cover materials. We quantified the seasonal variability of CH, CO, and NO emissions from fresh refuse (no cover) and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at northern and southern California landfill sites with engineered gas extraction systems. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m d [± SD]) averaged CH 0.053 (± 0.03), CO 135 (± 117), and NO 0.063 (± 0.059). Average CH emissions across all cover types and wet/dry seasons ranged over more than four orders of magnitude (<0.01-100 g m d) with most cover types, including both final covers, averaging <0.1 g m d with 10 to 40% of surface areas characterized by negative fluxes (uptake of atmospheric CH). The northern California intermediate cover (50 cm) had the highest CH fluxes. For both the intermediate (50-100 cm) and final (>200 cm) cover materials, below which methanogenesis was well established, the variability in gaseous fluxes was attributable to cover thickness, texture, density, and seasonally variable soil moisture and temperature at suboptimal conditions for CH oxidation. Thin daily covers (30 cm local soil) and fresh refuse generally had the highest CO and NO fluxes, indicating rapid onset of aerobic and semi-aerobic processes in recently buried refuse, with rates similar to soil ecosystems and windrow composting of organic waste. This study has emphasized the need for more systematic field quantification of seasonal emissions from multiple types of engineered covers. PMID:21546687

Bogner, Jean E; Spokas, Kurt A; Chanton, Jeffrey P

2011-01-01

149

Methane emissions from MBT landfills  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

Heyer, K.-U., E-mail: heyer@ifas-hamburg.de; Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

2013-09-15

150

Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R{sup 2} ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year{sup ?1}) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year{sup ?1} and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m{sup 3}/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions.

Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

2013-11-15

151

MSW LANDFILL BIOREACTOR RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

MSW bioreactors offer an innovative way of optimizing existing landfill volume by actively degrading the waste mass within a waste containment system. Bioreactor leachate, gas, and solids monitoring is part of a 5 year CRADA between US EPA and Waste Mgt., Inc. at the Outer Loop ...

152

Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)  

SciTech Connect

The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

2010-01-07

153

Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

2014-06-03

154

Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20‰ to ?25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation–reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

Wimmer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.wimmer@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

2013-10-15

155

Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically-biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery.  

PubMed

The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R(2)), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year(-1)) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308year(-1) and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12Nm(3)/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90kWh per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions. PMID:23910244

Di Maria, Francesco; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

2013-11-01

156

Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for characterizing composition and transformation of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachates.  

PubMed

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from landfill leachates was separated into hydrophobic base, hydrophilic matter (HIM), hydrophobic acid (HOA), and hydrophobic neutral fractions. The composition and transformation of the DOM and its fractions were investigated. The results show that the DOM isolated from young, intermediate, and old landfill leachates were mainly composed of tyrosine-, tryptophan-, and humic- and fulvic-like substances, respectively. The primary fractions of the DOM in leachates were HOA and HIM. The HOA and HIM fractions from young leachates predominantly contained tryptophan- and tyrosine-like materials, respectively. The HOA fractions in intermediate and old leachates were mainly composed of humic- and fulvic-like materials, whereas the HIM fractions were dominated by tryptophan-like materials and humic- and fulvic-like substances. The hydrophobic organic fractions and humic- and fulvic-like substances increased with time, whereas the HIM and the tyrosine-like materials decreased during the landfill process, rendering biological processing of leachates ineffective. PMID:21470772

He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Wei, Zi-Min; Jiang, Yong-Hai; Yang, Yu; An, Da; Cao, Jin-Ling; Liu, Hong-Liang

2011-06-15

157

Engineered Municipal Waste Landfills: Climate Significance, Benefits, and some Landfill "Geophysics"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills have unique features: Wastes worldwide emit biogenic methane to the atmosphere of magnitude comparable to the total atmospheric buildup between 1980 and 1990. Carbon sequestered in landfills is large in geologic terms Management of decomposition in landfilled waste is desirable: (a) Control of waste decomposition and methane promises over tenfold cheaper greenhouse gas abatement compared to most other greenhouse gas abatement strategies. This is due in part to carbon sequestration and landfill gas energy offset of fossil fuel consumption (b) Landfill gas energy potential worldwide, is up to 1% of world energy. Use of landfill gas conserves a resource otherwise wasted (c) Monetary benefits of landfill life extension from decomposition and rapid volume reduction can be quite attractive This is a benefit for the US, where landfills are increasingly difficult and expensive to site. (d) Landfills containing mixed waste can be significant sources of atmospheric and groundwater pollutants needing control. Control is possible from advancing landfill management approaches (e) The stabilization of waste lessens pollutant risk and needs for costly long-term landfill aftercare. Greater control of landfill decomposition has been advocated in the form of "controlled" or "bioreactor" landfills. (SWANA, 1999; Reinhart and Townsend, 1996). Field trials are encouraging by several environmental/monetary criteria. Control of moisture and temperature have given fivefold or more acceleration of methane generation (Augenstein et al, 1998, 2000). There has been rapid volume loss of the landfilled waste as well, with conversion of waste organics to gas. Many trials over years have shown potential for abatement of pollutants in landfill leachate. Demonstration work by the solid waste management community attests to the benefits potential. Increasing field demonstrations, have been accompanied by observation and/or solution of several issues. As noted the heat generation in landfills may become controlling, Heat can be dissipated, but at energy and monetary cost. Increased waste liquid content, required for biological activity has been a concern. Offsetting risk is the accelerated treatment of many dissolved contaminants in landfill liquid with time. It has proven possible to manage liquid flows within environmental and regulatory constraints. There have been concerns about containment by chemosynthetic lining of leachate liquids draining from landfills. Yet molecular bonds of lining under anaerobic conditions could be expected to last for centuries (and in fact up to millenia). There is of course no landfill experience over millenia but analogous compounds of geologic relevance have shown very desirable long term stability. Two other areas being investigated are waste slope stability and the precipitation of carbonate salts The climate significance and geophysical issues with landfills will be discussed, and some experimental findings leading to conclusions will be reviewed

Augenstein, D.; Yazdani, R.

2002-12-01

158

Bringing new life to old landfills  

SciTech Connect

On the West Coast, Waste Management, Inc. is bringing new life to old landfills. The Bradley Landfill in Sun Valley, CA, just outside of Los Angeles, is being transformed into a recycling park, while a few hundred miles north, in the San Francisco Bay Area, an old landfill is now home to a transfer station and recycling center. WMI began transforming the landfill in the early 1990s.The first change was to process wood and green waste rather than landfilling it. In 1993, WMI added a sorting facility, and in 1994, after the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, the company added a construction and demolition debris (C and D) facility. There also is a landfill gas collection facility on the site. In the future, WMI hopes to add the following facilities: composting, railhaul, alternative fuels production, tire processing, and soil remediation. WMI also hopes several companies that use recycled materials as feedstock will build their plants at the landfill.

Rabasca, L.

1996-01-01

159

Quantifying Uncontrolled Air Emissions from Two Florida Landfills  

EPA Science Inventory

Landfill gas emissions, if left uncontrolled, contribute to air toxics, climate change, trospospheric ozone, and urban smog. Measuring emissions from landfills presents unique challenges due to the large and variable source area, spatial and temporal variability of emissions, and...

160

Exhaust gas composition measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design, installation, checkout, and operation of an exhaust gas composition measurement system for collecting and analyzing the exhaust gas from a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are described. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an exhaust gas composition measurement which meets the performance criteria specified.

1979-01-01

161

Evaluation of interface shear strength of composite liner system and stability analysis for a landfill lining system in Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the case history of laboratory evaluation of the interface shear strength properties of various interfaces encountered in a modern day landfill with emphasis on proper simulation of field conditions and subsequent use of these results in the stability analyses of liner system. Over 70 large direct shear tests were systematically conducted to evaluate the interface shear strength

D. T. Bergado; G. V. Ramana; H. I. Sia; Varun

2006-01-01

162

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas  

E-print Network

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system recovery for municipal solid waste management: a case study', Int. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 15,No results in increasing environmental pollution. The state of an economy, to a large extent, influences

Columbia University

163

Emissions of C&D refuse in landfills: a European case.  

PubMed

A field study was developed in a new landfill for refuse from construction and demolition (C&D) material recovery plants of small size (4 Ha.) in Europe, with the aim of evaluating the liquid and gas emissions in this type of facility at a large scale. It included characterization of the materials, monitoring leachate and gas quantity and composition. Besides thermometers, piezometers and sampling ports were placed in several points within the waste. This paper presents the data obtained for five years of the landfill life. The materials disposed were mainly made up of wood and concrete, similar to other C&D debris sites, but the amount of gypsum drywall (below 3% of the waste) was significantly smaller than other available studies, where percentages above 20% had been reported. Leachate contained typical C&D pollutants, such as different inorganic ions and metals, some of which exceeded other values reported in the literature (conductivity, ammonium, lead and arsenic). The small net precipitation in the area and the leachate recirculation into the landfill surface help explain these higher concentrations, thus highlighting the impact of liquid to solid (L/S) ratio on leachate characteristics. In contrast to previous studies, neither odor nuisances nor significant landfill gas over the surface were detected. However, gas samples taken from the landfill inside revealed sulfate reducing and methanogenic activity. PMID:24824964

López, Ana; Lobo, Amaya

2014-08-01

164

The Application Of Biofilter System For Reduction Of Methane Emissions From Modern Sanitary Landfills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) caused by anthropogenic activities has been related to global climate change. Methane, the second most important GHG after CO2, is 21 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2. Therefore, methane emission control is of utmost importance for global warming reduction. To minimize leachate production and protect groundwater resources, modern sanitary landfills are equipped with composite covers and gas collection systems. Methane from modern sanitary landfills is vented directly to the atmosphere, except for some of the largest landfills where it is recovered as energy and burned at the site. However, the efficiency of energy recovery systems in larger landfills is reduced as the amount of CH4 generated from landfill begins to decrease. In this study, the performance of a lab-scale model biofilter system was investigated to treat CH4 gas emitted from modern sanitary landfills by conducting batch and column experiments using landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast as the filter bed medium. From the batch experiments to measure the influence of moisture content and temperature of the filter medium on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system, the optimum moisture content and temperature were found to be 10-15% by weight and 25-35°C, respectively. The column experiment was conducted to measure the influence of inlet CH4 concentration and CH4 loading rate on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system. As the inlet CH4 concentration decreased, the percentage of CH4 oxidized increased. Up to a CH4 loading rate of 2785 g CH4 m3 h- 1 (EBRT = 7.7 min), the CH4 removal efficiency of the biofilter was able to reach 100%. Based on the results of the study, the installation of a properly managed biofilter system should be capable of achieving a reduction in atmospheric CH4 emissions from modern sanitary landfills at low CH4 generation stage.

Sung, K.; Park, S.

2007-12-01

165

Metal oxides remove hydrogen sulfide from landfill gas produced from waste mixed with plaster board under wet conditions.  

PubMed

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a major odorant in landfills. We have studied H2S production from landfill residual waste with and without sulfur-containing plaster board, including the influence of the water content in the waste. The laboratory experiments were conducted in 30-L polyethylene containers with a controlled water level. We also studied how different materials removed H2S in reactive layers on top of the waste. The organic waste produced H2S in concentrations of up to 40 parts per million (ppm) over a period of 80 days. When plaster board was added, the H2S concentration increased to 800 ppm after a lag period of approximately 40 days with a high water level, and to approximately 100 ppm after 50 days with a low water level. The methane (CH4) concentration in the initial experiment was between 5 and 70% after 80 days. The CH4 concentration in the second experiment increased to nearly 70% in the container with a high water level, slowly declining to approximately 60% between days 20 and 60. The CH4 concentrations during the experiments resembled normal landfill concentrations. Metallic filter materials were very efficient in removing H2S, whereas organic filter materials showed poor H2S removal. PMID:18720651

Bergersen, Ove; Haarstad, Ketil

2008-08-01

166

Comparative Landfills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan from ATEEC will explain solid and hazardous waste management. The activity would be most appropriate for technology studies or high school science classes. In all, it would require about two hours of class time, plus a few minutes a day for several weeks. The purpose of the lesson is to demonstrate what happens to garbage in landfills, and compare it to the process of burying trash. The activity is explained in depth in this lesson plan handout. The lesson plan is available for download as a PDF; users must create a free, quick login with ATEEC to access the materials.

Wishart, Ray

167

Cleaner Landfills  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Osmotek, Inc. developed the Direct Osmosis treatment system through SBIR funding from Ames Research Center. Using technology originally developed for flight aboard the Space Station, the company brought it to their commercial water purification treatment system, Direct Osmosis. This water purification system uses a direct osmosis process followed by a reverse osmosis treatment. Because the product extracts water from a waste product, Osmotek is marketing the unit for use in landfills. The system can treat leachate (toxic chemicals leached into a water source), by filtering the water and leaving behind the leahcate. The leachate then becomes solidified into substance that can not seep into water.

2000-01-01

168

Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste.  

PubMed

Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?(13)C, ?(2)H and ?(18)O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?(13)C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?(13)C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?(13)C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?(13)C-DIC of -20‰ to -25‰. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?(13)C-DIC up to values of +10‰ and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?(13)C-DIC of about -20‰. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidation-reduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration. PMID:23540355

Wimmer, Bernhard; Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G

2013-10-01

169

Field application of nitrogen and phenylacetylene to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from landfill cover soils: effects on microbial community structure.  

PubMed

Landfills are large sources of CH(4), but a considerable amount of CH(4) can be removed in situ by methanotrophs if their activity can be stimulated through the addition of nitrogen. Nitrogen can, however, lead to increased N(2)O production. To examine the effects of nitrogen and a selective inhibitor on CH(4) oxidation and N(2)O production in situ, 0.5 M of NH(4)Cl and 0.25 M of KNO(3), with and without 0.01% (w/v) phenylacetylene, were applied to test plots at a landfill in Kalamazoo, MI from 2007 November to 2009 July. Nitrogen amendments stimulated N(2)O production but had no effect on CH(4) oxidation. The addition of phenylacetylene stimulated CH(4) oxidation while reducing N(2)O production. Methanotrophs possessing particulate methane monooxygenase and archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOAs) were abundant. The addition of nitrogen reduced methanotrophic diversity, particularly for type I methanotrophs. The simultaneous addition of phenylacetylene increased methanotrophic diversity and the presence of type I methanotrophs. Clone libraries of the archaeal amoA gene showed that the addition of nitrogen increased AOAs affiliated with Crenarchaeal group 1.1b, while they decreased with the simultaneous addition of phenylacetylene. These results suggest that the addition of phenylacetylene with nitrogen reduces N(2)O production by selectively inhibiting AOAs and/or type II methanotrophs. PMID:20809077

Im, Jeongdae; Lee, Sung-Woo; Bodrossy, Levente; Barcelona, Michael J; Semrau, Jeremy D

2011-01-01

170

Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

2012-01-01

171

Fluid-induced vibration of composite natural gas pipelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advancements in materials bonding techniques have led to the use of reinforced composite pipelines. The use of steel pipe with a fiber-reinforced composite over-wrap together has produced an exceptionally strong pipe with positive advantages in weight and corrosion resistively. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of this kind of sub-sea composite pipelines, which often accommodate axial flow of gas, and prediction of

G. P. Zou; N. Cheraghi; F. Taheri

2005-01-01

172

Determination of nonylphenol isomers in landfill leachate and municipal wastewater using steam distillation extraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

4-Nonylphenols (4-NPs) are known endocrine disruptors and by-products of the microbial degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylate surfactants. One of the challenges to understanding the toxic effects of nonylphenols is the large number of isomers that may exist in environmental samples. In order to attribute toxic effects to specific compounds, a method is needed for the separation and quantitation of individual nonylphenol isomers. The pre-concentration methods of solvent sublimation, solid-phase extraction or liquid–liquid extraction prior to chromatographic analysis can be problematic because of co-extraction of thousands of compounds typically found in complex matrices such as municipal wastewater or landfill leachate. In the present study, steam distillation extraction (SDE) was found to be an effective pre-concentration method for extraction of 4-NPs from leachate and wastewater, and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled with fast mass spectral data acquisition by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) enhanced the resolution and identification of 4-NP isomers. Concentrations of eight 4-NP isomers were determined in leachate from landfill cells of different age and wastewater influent and effluent samples. 4-NP isomers were about 3 times more abundant in leachate from the younger cell than the older one, whereas concentrations in wastewater effluent were either below detection limits or <1% of influent concentrations. 4-NP isomer distribution patterns were found to have been altered following release to the environment. This is believed to reflect isomer-specific degradation and accumulation of 4-NPs in the aquatic environment.

Zhang, Caixiang; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Pontolillo, James; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Wang, Yanxin

2012-01-01

173

COMPOSITION OF LOW-REDSHIFT HALO GAS  

SciTech Connect

Halo gas in low-z (z < 0.5) {>=}0.1 L{sub *} galaxies in high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is examined with respect to three components: cold, warm, and hot with temperatures of <10{sup 5}, 10{sup 5-6}, and >10{sup 6} K, respectively. Utilizing O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 absorption lines, the warm component is compared to observations, and agreement is found with respect to the galaxy-O VI line correlation, the ratio of the O VI line incidence rate in blue to red galaxies, and the amount of O VI mass in star-forming galaxies. A detailed account of the sources of warm halo gas (stellar feedback heating, gravitational shock heating, and accretion from the intergalactic medium), inflowing and outflowing warm halo gas metallicity disparities, and their dependencies on galaxy types and environment is also presented. With the warm component securely anchored, our simulations make the following additional predictions. First, cold gas is the primary component in inner regions with its mass comprising 50% of all gas within galactocentric radius r = (30, 150) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies. Second, at r > (30, 200) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies the hot component becomes the majority. Third, the warm component is a perpetual minority, with its contribution peaking at {approx}30% at r = 100-300 kpc in blue galaxies and never exceeding 5% in red galaxies. The significant amount of cold gas in low-z early-type galaxies, which was found in simulations and in agreement with recent observations (Thom et al.), is intriguing, as is the dominance of hot gas at large radii in blue galaxies.

Cen Renyue, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-06-20

174

Emissions of organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway from two differently pre-treated municipal waste materials -- A landfill reactor study.  

PubMed

Due to their broad industrial production and use as PVC-stabilisers, agro-chemicals and anti-fouling agents, organo-metal compounds are widely distributed throughout the terrestrial and marine biogeosphere. Here, we focused on the emission dynamics of various organo-metal compounds (e.g., di,- tri-, tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) from two different kinds of pre-treated mass waste, namely mechanically-biologically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MBP MSW) and municipal waste incineration ash (MWIA). In landfill simulation reactors, the emission of the organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway was observed over a period of 5 months simulating different environmental conditions (anaerobic with underlying soil layer/aerated/anaerobic). Both waste materials differ significantly in their initial amounts of organo-metal compounds and their environmental behaviour with regard to the accumulation and depletion rates within the solid material during incubation. For tri-methyl tin, the highest release rates in leachates were found in the incineration ash treatments, where anaerobic conditions in combination with underlying soil material significantly promoted its formation. Concerning the gas pathway, anaerobic conditions considerably favour the emission of organo-metal compounds (tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) in both the MBP material and especially in the incineration ash. PMID:16714103

Michalzik, B; Ilgen, G; Hertel, F; Hantsch, S; Bilitewski, B

2007-01-01

175

Degradability of Chlorinated Solvents in Landfill Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of landfills as an in situ remediation system represents a cost-effective alternative for groundwater remediation in the source area. This research was conducted to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). This research, using excavated refuse samples, studied how the reductive dechlorination of CAHs is linked to the decomposition of solid waste in landfills. Most research effort in groundwater remediation has focused on the contaminant plumes beneath and downgradient from landfills, while the source area remediation has received increasing attention. Bioreactor landfill and leachate recirculation projects have been planned and implemented by the USEPA and some states. However, the use of bioreactor landfill has primarily been considered only to expedite refuse decomposition. This research provides an understanding of the biological fate of CAHs in landfills, an understanding that can lead to the bioreactor landfill system designed to promote the degradation of pollutants right at the source. The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples were excavated from a municipal solid waste landfill located in Wayland, Massachusetts, USA. Bioreactors were designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. For each reactor, leachate was collected and recirculated back to the reactor and gas was collected into a gas bag and the methane production rate was monitored. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at about 20 uM each in leachate. The design is to study the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. Changes of biochemical conditions in bioreactors, including leachate pH, leachate COD, and methane production, were monitored throughout the refuse decomposition process. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Complementary to the bioreactor experiment, the serum bottle experiment was designed to investigate specific conditions that potentially control or limit the reductive dechlorination of CAHs in landfills. The conditions tested include 1) inhibited refuse methanogenesis, 2) enhanced methanogenic refuse decomposition, 3) presence of other organic carbons commonly found in landfills such as cellulose, lactate, ethanol, and acetate and 4) presence of yeast extract and humic acids which are commonly found in aged landfills. This research investigated the degradability, the degradation rate, and the extent of dechlorination of CAHs in a landfill ecosystem as the refuse decomposition progresses. The results can lead to a broader application of the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of landfills. An in situ remedial strategy directly tackling the contaminant source can minimize the risk of future impact and achieve a significant saving in remediation cost. The information of contaminant fate in landfills can also help regulatory agencies formulate risk-based guidelines for post-closure monitoring programs and potential re-development projects.

Wang, J. Y.; Litman, M.

2002-12-01

176

Learning from Landfills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a project in which students developed an all-class laboratory activity called "The Decomposition of Organic and Inorganic Substances in a Landfill". Explores what conditions are necessary to facilitate decomposition in a landfill. (SAH)

Galus, Pamela

2000-01-01

177

Bisphenol A in hazardous waste landfill leachates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The levels of bisphenol A in hazardous waste landfill leachates collected in Japan in 1996 were determined by gas chromatograph\\/mass spectrometer (GC\\/MS). Bisphenol A was found in seven of 10 sites investigated. All the hazardous waste landfills with leachates contaminated by bisphenol A were controlled. The concentrations of bisphenol A ranged from 1.3 to 17,200 ?g\\/l with a median concentration

Takashi Yamamoto; Akio Yasuhara; Hiroaki Shiraishi; Osami Nakasugi

2001-01-01

178

2-Liter Landfill  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners gain a better understanding of how household/school waste breaks down in a landfill. Learners collect trash and then create miniature landfills in 2-liter bottles. Learners record observations about their landfills at least once a week for a month. This activity is part of a larger curriculum related to amphibians and conservation.

Aquarium, Omaha'S H.

2009-01-01

179

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

SciTech Connect

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01

180

Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors, dispersion coefficients of Cu, ranging from 3.47 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s to 5.37 x 10{sup -2} m{sup 2}/s, was determined to be higher than others obtained for Zn and Fe. Average molecular diffusion coefficients of phenolic compounds were estimated to be about 5.64 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 5.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, 2.69 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s and 3.29 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s for R1, R2, R3 and R4 systems, respectively. The findings of this study clearly indicated that about 35-50% of transport of phenolic compounds to the groundwater is believed to be prevented with the use of zeolite and bentonite materials in landfill liner systems.

Varank, Gamze, E-mail: gvarank@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Demir, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmetd@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Yetilmezsoy, Kaan, E-mail: yetilmez@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Bilgili, M. Sinan, E-mail: mbilgili@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Top, Selin, E-mail: stop@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Sekman, Elif, E-mail: esekman@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-11-15

181

Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

{C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

1994-09-01

182

Geothermal gas compositions in yellowstone National Park, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gas samples collected between 1974 and 1986 have been analysed for the ten major components. Samples have been collected almost exclusively from the tops of pools, which has degraded the value of the data, and limited inter-comparisons to the relatively insoluble components, Ar, N2, CH4, H2 and He. A general gas distribution pattern in the park, in terms of these components, shows the major heat source(s) to underlie the Gibbon and Mud Volcano areas with all other geothermal areas having gas compositions consistent with a general north-south water flow. Shoshone Basin gases show a large range of compositions and these are analysed in detail. The patterns conform to that which would be expected from an east-west flow or fluid with progressive boiling and subsequent dilution. ?? 1992.

Sheppard, D.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Janik, C.J.

1992-01-01

183

AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - LANDFILLS (COMBUSTION CONTROLS)  

EPA Science Inventory

This project develops emission factors, etc., for landfills, in particular for combustion devices fed by landfill gas, for incorporation into AP-42. AP-42 is a massive collection of information concerning processes which generate air emissions and presents emission factors and co...

184

DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. Site-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (...

185

DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMPIRICAL MODEL OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. ite-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (r...

186

LANDFILLS EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS GUIDELINES DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: This resource served as the main information source for national characteristics of landfills for the landfills effluent guidelines. The database was developed based on responses to the "1994 Waste Treatment Industry Questionnaire: Phase II Landfills" and...

187

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-print Network

in Cataluña More than 600,000 tons per year Municipal solid waste and industrial waste 910m 700m #12;Coll and settlements of sanitary landfills. Proc. Of world congress on waste management ISWA'95, Wien. Long) Analytical solution for gas extraction from a vertical well 2) Numerical simulation of composite gas flow

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

188

Landfill disposal systems  

PubMed Central

The current status of landfill disposal of hazardous wastes in the United States is indicated by presenting descriptions of six operating landfills. These landfills illustrate the variety of techniques that exist in landfill disposal of hazardous wastes. Although some landfills more effectively isolate hazardous waste than others, all landfills must deal with the following problems. Leachate from hazardous waste landfills is generally highly polluted. Most landfills attempt to contain leachate at the site and prevent its discharge to surface or groundwaters. To retain leachate within a disposal area, subsurface barriers of materials such as concrete, asphalt, butyl rubber, vinyl, and clay are used. It is difficult to assure that these materials can seal a landfill indefinitely. When a subsurface barrier fails, the leachate enters the groundwater in a concentrated, narrow band which may bypass monitoring wells. Once a subsurface barrier has failed, repairs are time-consuming and costly, since the waste above the repair site may have to be removed. The central problem in landfill disposal is leachate control. Recent emphasis has been on developing subsurface barriers to contain the wastes and any leachate. Future emphasis should also be on techniques for removing water from hazardous wastes before they are placed in landfills, and on methods for preventing contact of the wastes with water during and after disposal operations. When leachate is eliminated, the problems of monitoring, and subsurface barrier failure and repair can be addressed, and a waste can be effectively isolated. A surface seal landfill design is recommended for maintaining the dry state of solid hazardous wastes and for controlling leachate. Any impervious liner is utilized over the top of the landfill to prevent surface water from seeping into the waste. The surface barrier is also the site where monitoring and maintenance activities are focused. Barrier failure can be detected by visual inspections and any repairs can be made without disturbing the waste. The surface seal landfill does not employ a subsurface barrier. The surface seal landfill successfully addresses each of the four environmental problems listed above, provided that this landfill design is utilized for dry wastes only and is located at a site which provides protection from groundwater and temporary perched water tables. ImagesFIGURE 3.FIGURE 4.FIGURE 7.FIGURE 7. PMID:738247

Slimak, Karen M.

1978-01-01

189

Effects of gas composition on the performance and emissions of compressed natural gas engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural gas is considered to be a promising alternative fuel for passenger cars, truck transportation and stationary engines\\u000a providing positive effects both on the environment and energy security. However, since the composition of natural gas fuel\\u000a varies with location, climate and other factors, it is anticipated that such changes in fuel properties will affect emission\\u000a characteristics and performance of CNG

Byung Hyouk Min; Jin Taek Chung; Ho Young Kim

2002-01-01

190

Gas content and composition of gas hydrate from sediments of the southeastern North American continental margin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gas hydrate samples were recovered from four sites (Sites 994, 995, 996, and 997) along the crest of the Blake Ridge during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 164. At Site 996, an area of active gas venting, pockmarks, and chemosynthetic communities, vein-like gas hydrate was recovered from less than 1 meter below seafloor (mbsf) and intermittently through the maximum cored depth of 63 mbsf. In contrast, massive gas hydrate, probably fault filling and/or stratigraphically controlled, was recovered from depths of 260 mbsf at Site 994, and from 331 mbsf at Site 997. Downhole-logging data, along with geochemical and core temperature profiles, indicate that gas hydrate at Sites 994, 995, and 997 occurs from about 180 to 450 mbsf and is dispersed in sediment as 5- to 30-m-thick zones of up to about 15% bulk volume gas hydrate. Selected gas hydrate samples were placed in a sealed chamber and allowed to dissociate. Evolved gas to water volumetric ratios measured on seven samples from Site 996 ranged from 20 to 143 mL gas/mL water to 154 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 994, and to 139 mL gas/mL water in one sample from Site 997, which can be compared to the theoretical maximum gas to water ratio of 216. These ratios are minimum gas/water ratios for gas hydrate because of partial dissociation during core recovery and potential contamination with pore waters. Nonetheless, the maximum measured volumetric ratio indicates that at least 71% of the cages in this gas hydrate were filled with gas molecules. When corrections for pore-water contamination are made, these volumetric ratios range from 29 to 204, suggesting that cages in some natural gas hydrate are nearly filled. Methane comprises the bulk of the evolved gas from all sites (98.4%-99.9% methane and 0%-1.5% CO2). Site 996 hydrate contained little CO2 (0%-0.56%). Ethane concentrations differed significantly from Site 996, where they ranged from 720 to 1010 parts per million by volume (ppmv), to Sites 994 and 997, which contained much less ethane (up to 86 ppmv). Up to 19 ppmv propane and other higher homologues were noted; however, these gases are likely contaminants derived from sediment in some hydrate samples. CO2 concentrations are less in gas hydrate than in the surrounding sediment, likely an artifact of core depressurization, which released CO2 derived from dissolved organic carbon (DIC) into sediment. The isotopic composition of methane from gas hydrate ranges from ??13C of -62.5??? to -70.7??? and ??D of -175??? to -200??? and is identical to the isotopic composition of methane from surrounding sediment. Methane of this isotopic composition is mainly microbial in origin and likely produced by bacterial reduction of bicarbonate. The hydrocarbon gases here are likely the products of early microbial diagenesis. The isotopic composition of CO2 from gas hydrate ranges from ??13C of -5.7 to -6.9, about 15??? lighter than CO2 derived from nearby sediment.

Lorenson, T.D.; Collett, T.S.

2000-01-01

191

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30

192

Effect of gas composition on octane number of natural gas fuels. Topical report, December 1991-March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Variations in the composition of natural gas fuels are recognized to have a significant impact on the performance of internal combustion engines. In particular, the knock resistance of the fuel is governed by its gas composition. The octane number is a standard measure of the knock resistance of a fuel, and several gas blends were tested to determine their octane numbers. Octane number of natural gas fuels was found to be dependent on gas composition. Several correlations were found between gas composition and the octane number of a fuel, which allow prediction of the motor octane number if gas composition is known. In particular, a good correlation was found between the hydrogen-carbon ratio of the fuel and the octane number. Correlations were also found between measured motor octane numbers and measured methane numbers, as well as between motor octane numbers and predicted methane numbers.

Kubesh, J.T.

1992-05-01

193

Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOEpatents

A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

1988-01-01

194

40 CFR Table Tt-1 to Subpart Tt of... - Default DOC and Decay Rate Values for Industrial Waste Landfills  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills Pt. 98...and Decay Rate Values for Industrial Waste Landfills Industry... 0 0 0 0 Other Industrial Solid Waste (not otherwise...recirculated from company records or engineering estimates and...

2013-07-01

195

40 CFR Table Tt-1 to Subpart Tt - Default DOC and Decay Rate Values for Industrial Waste Landfills  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills Pt. 98...and Decay Rate Values for Industrial Waste Landfills Industry... 0 0 0 0 Other Industrial Solid Waste (not otherwise...recirculated from company records or engineering estimates and...

2012-07-01

196

Hydrological and geochemical factors affecting leachate composition in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Part II. The geochemistry of leachate from Landfill Lostorf, Switzerland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The leachate composition of the Landfill Lostorf, Buchs, Switzerland has been examined as a function rain events and dry periods between November 1994 and November 1996. Discharge and electrical conductivity of the central drainage discharge were monitored continuously, whilst samples for chemical analysis were taken at discrete intervals. The average total concentrations of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca and SO 4 are 44.5, 47.1, 11.8, 0.63, 8.2 and 12.4 mM, respectively. During rain events, the leachate is diluted by the preferential flow of rainwater into the drainage discharge. Drainage discharge pH values range between 8.68 and 11.28, the latter under dry conditions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that CaSO 4, ettringite (3CaOAl 2O 3CaSO 4·32H 2O) and Al(OH) 3 may control the concentrations of the components Ca, SO 4 and Al. Dissolved Si may be in thermodynamic equilibrium with either Ca silicate hydrate or imogolite. Cadmium, Mo, V, Mn and Zn are also diluted during rain events and concentration changes agree with those of conductivity (representing the major constituents). Average concentrations are 0.012, 5.4, 2.3, 0.085, and 0.087 ?M, respectively. Components such as Al, Cu, Sb and Cr increase in concentration with increased discharge. Average concentrations are 1.6, 0.27 and 0.21 ?M, respectively. For Cu, the explanation lies in its affinity for total organic carbon (TOC). Thermodynamic calculations indicate that whilst dissolution/precipitation reactions with metal hydroxides and carbonates can explain the observed concentrations of Cd, sorption and complexation reactions probably influence the concentrations of Cu, Pb (average measurable concentration 0.013 ?M), Zn and Mn. For the oxyanion species such as MoO 4 and WO 4 (average concentration 0.61 ?M), it is probable that Ca metallate formation plays a dominant role in determining concentration ranges. Geochemical processes appear to determine concentration ranges and the hydrological factors, the fluctuations in concentration.

Johnson, C. Annette; Kaeppeli, Michael; Brandenberger, Sandro; Ulrich, Andrea; Baumann, Werner

1999-12-01

197

Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.  

PubMed

The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material. PMID:21067907

Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

2011-05-01

198

Attenuation of landfill leachate pollutants in aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfill leachate contains a variety of pollutants that may potentially contaminate the ground water and affect the quality of surface waters and well waters. The literature has been critically reviewed in order to assess the attenuation processes governing the contaminants in leachate?affected aquifers. After an introductory section on leachate composition, the physical and chemical frameworks for the attenuation processes are

Thomas H. Christensen; Peter Kjeldsen; Gorm Heron; Per H. Nielsen; Poul L. Bjerg; Peter E. Holm

1994-01-01

199

Non-Controlled Emission of Light Hydrocarbons (C2-C6) to the Atmosphere From Arico's Landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Light hydrocarbons play a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry because some of them act as precursors of photochemical smog production. Landfill gas is constituted by a large number of hydrocarbons and their oxidation products, as well as others organic compounds. In order to control the migration and emission of landfill gas through the landfill surface and adjacent rock, gas

S. Dionis; Y. Bernardos; C. Estevez; R. Lima; J. Salazar; P. Hernandez; N. Perez

2001-01-01

200

Risk assessment of an old landfill regarding the potential of gaseous emissions--a case study based on bioindication, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis.  

PubMed

Risk assessment of two sections (I and II) of an old landfill (ALH) in Styria (Austria) in terms of reactivity of waste organic matter and the related potential of gaseous emissions was performed using conventional parameters and innovative tools to verify their effectiveness in practice. The ecological survey of the established vegetation at the landfill surface (plant sociological relevés) indicated no relevant emissions over a longer period of time. Statistical evaluation of conventional parameters reveals that dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respiration activity (RA(4)), loss of ignition (LOI) and total inorganic carbon (TIC) mostly influence the variability of the gas generation sum (GS(21)). According to Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data and the results of the classification model the reactivity potential of the investigated sections is very low which is in accordance with the results of plant sociological relevés and biological tests. The interpretation of specific regions in the FT-IR spectra was changed and adapted to material characteristics. Contrary to mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) materials, where strong aliphatic methylene bands indicate reactivity, they are rather assigned to the C-H vibrations of plastics in old landfill materials. This assumption was confirmed by thermal analysis and the characteristic heat flow profile of plastics containing landfill samples. Therefore organic carbon contents are relatively high compared to other stable landfills as shown by a prediction model for TOC contents based on heat flow profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). The stability of the landfill samples, expressed by the relation of CO(2) release and enthalpies, was compared to unreactive landfills, archeological samples, earthlike materials and hardly degradable organic matter. Due to the material composition and the aging process the landfill samples are located between hardly degradable, but easily combustible materials and thermally resistant materials with acquired stability. PMID:22902203

Tintner, Johannes; Smidt, Ena; Böhm, Katharina; Matiasch, Lydia

2012-12-01

201

Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

Doehler, Joachim (Union Lake, MI)

1994-12-20

202

Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOEpatents

There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01

203

Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOEpatents

There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

1989-04-25

204

The importance of shale composition and pore structure upon gas storage potential of shale gas reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of shale composition and fabric upon pore structure and CH4 sorption is investigated for potential shale gas reservoirs in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). Devonian–Mississippian (D–M) and Jurassic shales have complex, heterogeneous pore volume distributions as identified by low pressure CO2 and N2 sorption, and high pressure Hg porosimetry. Thermally mature D–M shales (1.6–2.5%VRo) have Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R)

Daniel J. K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2009-01-01

205

Sanitary landfill leachate  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews landfill leachate treatment methods. Contamination of groundwater, streams, and ponds by noxious materials from landfills in particular, leachate is a problem going back to the first dump''. However, it has only relatively recently received the attention it deserves. Leachate, soluble chemical compounds removed from degrading solid waste materials, is produced when water (usually from precipitation) passes through a landfill. Its quality varies with its source, among other factors, and reported values of leachate constituents vary over a wide range. The quantity produced is primarily a function of climate, but it is also affected by landfill cover and the collection system's configuration. Because uncollected leachate may contaminate ground-water or surface water, current regulations require containment, collection, treatment, and leachate disposal.

Shams-Khorzani, R.; Knox, T.D.; Brockway, R.C. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States))

1994-06-01

206

Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system.  

PubMed

Methane generated at landfills contributes to global warming and can be mitigated by biocover systems relying on microbial methane oxidation. As part of a closure plan for an old unlined landfill without any gas management measures, an innovative biocover system was established. The system was designed based on a conceptual model of the gas emission patterns established through an initial baseline study. The study included construction of gas collection trenches along the slopes of the landfill where the majority of the methane emissions occurred. Local compost materials were tested as to their usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux chamber based emission measurements and logging of compost temperatures) proved that the biocover system had an average mitigation efficiency of approximately 80%. The study showed that the system also had a high efficiency during winter periods with temperatures below freezing. An economic analysis indicated that the mitigation costs of the biocover system were competitive to other existing greenhouse gas mitigation options. PMID:24755356

Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broe; Petersen, Per Haugsted; Jørgensen, Jørgen Henrik Bjerre; Ucendo, Inmaculada Maria Buendia; Mønster, Jacob G; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

2014-07-01

207

Modelling biogas production of solid waste: application of the BGP model to a synthetic landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Production of biogas as a result of the decomposition of organic matter included on solid waste landfills is still an issue to be understood. Reports on this matter are rarely included on the engineering construction projects of solid waste landfills despite it can be an issue of critical importance while operating the landfill and after its closure. This paper presents an application of BGP (Bio-Gas-Production) model to a synthetic landfill. The evolution in time of the concentrations of the different chemical compounds of biogas is studied. Results obtained show the impact on the air quality of different management alternatives which are usually performed in real landfills.

Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Segura-Sobrino, Francisco

2013-04-01

208

RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SELECTED INDUSTRIAL WASTES ON MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE STABILIZATION IN SIMULATED LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report is a retrospective evaluation of ten years of leachate and gas data collected from 19 simulated landfills (landfill cells) containing municipal solid waste codisposed with sewage sludge or industrial wastes. Physical and chemical parameters from each landfill cell are ...

209

Quantification of landfill emissions to air: a case study of the Ano Liosia landfill site in the greater Athens area.  

PubMed

Fugitive pollutant emissions from municipal solid waste landfills have the potential to cause annoyance and health impacts in the surrounding residential areas. The overall objective of this research was to perform an assessment of fugitive pollutant emissions and a dispersion analysis downwind of a specific landfill site. The study was performed at the closed Ano Liosia landfill site which is located in the greater Athens area. The human exposure from priority to health-risk pollutants emitted from landfill, such as vinyl chloride and benzene, was estimated by the landfill gas emission LandGEM 2.01 software combined with the atmospheric long-term dispersion model ISC3-LT. The emission and meteorological conditions under which the models were applied referred to the worst-case scenario. This scenario was used for the evaluation of the maximum human exposure assessed beyond the Ano Liosia landfill towards the residential areas. The above scenario provides the minimum downwind distance of the health-risk zone which is calculated to be equal to 1.5 km from the landfill. Within this distance the assessed air pollutant concentration for several air pollutants was significantly above the World Health Organization reference lifetime exposure health criteria. Finally, the applied methodology was used in the Ano Liosia landfill, where atmospheric concentrations of pollutants measured in the field were compared with model predictions. PMID:15997481

Paraskaki, Ioanna; Lazaridis, Mihalis

2005-06-01

210

Controlled landfill project: Mountain View, California. Annual report, January-December 1982  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project studied the effects of leachate recirculation and added water, buffer and sludge on enhancing the generation and improving the recovery of landfill gas. It evaluated the various techniques by providing individual control cells for the demonstration of enhancement methods. The study also documents landfill gas productions from a controlled volume at field scale. Results from this study provide

T. A. Bonham; R. E. Van Heuit; W. M. Carroll; M. Donch

1984-01-01

211

Quantifying Methane Abatement Efficiency at Three Municipal Solid Waste Landfills; Final Report  

EPA Science Inventory

Measurements were conducted at three municipal solid waste landfills to compare fugitive methane emissions from the landfill cells to the quantity of collected gas (i.e., gas collection efficiency). The measurements were conducted over a multi-week sampling campaign using EPA Oth...

212

Elimination of methane generated from landfills by biofiltration: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of biogas in landfills, its composition and the problems resulting from its generation are all reviewed. Biofiltration\\u000a is a promising option for the control of emissions to atmosphere of the methane contained in biogas issued from the smaller\\u000a and\\/or older landfills. A detailed review of the methane biofiltration literature is presented. The microorganisms, mainly\\u000a the methanotrophs, involved in

J. Nikiema; R. Brzezinski; M. Heitz

2007-01-01

213

Gas composition and isotopic geochemistry of cuttings, core, and gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Molecular and isotopic composition of gases from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well demonstrate that the in situ gases can be divided into three zones composed of mixtures of microbial and thermogenic gases. Sediments penetrated by the well are thermally immature; thus the sediments are probably not a source of thermogenic gas. Thermogenic gas likely migrated from depths below 5000 m. Higher concentrations of gas within and beneath the gas hydrate zone suggest that gas hydrate is a partial barrier to gas migration. Gas hydrate accumulations occur wholly within zone 3, below the base of permafrost. The gas in gas hydrate resembles, in part, the thermogenic gas in surrounding sediments and gas desorbed from lignite. Gas hydrate composition implies that the primary gas hydrate form is Structure I. However, Structure II stabilizing gases are more concentrated and isotopically partitioned in gas hydrate relative to the sediment hosting the gas hydrate, implying that Structure II gas hydrate may be present in small quantities.

Lorenson, T.D.

1999-01-01

214

Generating CO{sub 2}-credits through landfill in situ aeration  

SciTech Connect

Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO{sub 2-eq}. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

Ritzkowski, M., E-mail: m.ritzkowski@tu-harburg.d [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Hamburg University of Technology, Harburger Schlossstr. 36, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany); Stegmann, R. [Consultants for Waste Management, Prof. R. Stegmann and Partner, Schellerdamm 19-21, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-04-15

215

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOEpatents

A catalyst composition is described for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, H.; Targos, W.M.

1987-12-22

216

Microemulsion impregnated catalyst composite and use thereof in a synthesis gas conversion process  

DOEpatents

A catalyst composition for synthesis gas conversion comprising a ruthenium metal component deposited on a support carrier wherein the average metal particle size is less than about 100 A. The method of manufacture of the composition via a reverse micelle impregnation technique and the use of the composition in a Fischer-Tropsch conversion process is also disclosed.

Abrevaya, Hayim (Chicago, IL); Targos, William M. (Palatine, IL)

1987-01-01

217

Landfill modelling in LCA - a contribution based on empirical data.  

PubMed

Landfills at various stages of development, depending on their age and location, can be found throughout Europe. The type of facilities goes from uncontrolled dumpsites to highly engineered facilities with leachate and gas management. In addition, some landfills are designed to receive untreated waste, while others can receive incineration residues (MSWI) or residues after mechanical biological treatment (MBT). Dimension, type and duration of the emissions from landfills depend on the quality of the disposed waste, the technical design, and the location of the landfill. Environmental impacts are produced by the leachate (heavy metals, organic loading), emissions into the air (CH(4), hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons) and from the energy or fuel requirements for the operation of the landfill (SO(2) and NO(x) from the production of electricity from fossil fuels). To include landfilling in an life-cycle assessment (LCA) approach entails several methodological questions (multi-input process, site-specific influence, time dependency). Additionally, no experiences are available with regard to mid-term behaviour (decades) for the relatively new types of landfill (MBT landfill, landfill for residues from MSWI). The present paper focuses on two main issues concerning modelling of landfills in LCA: Firstly, it is an acknowledged fact that emissions from landfills may prevail for a very long time, often thousands of years or longer. The choice of time frame in the LCA of landfilling may therefore clearly affect the results. Secondly, the reliability of results obtained through a life-cycle assessment depends on the availability and quality of Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data. Therefore the choice of the general approach, using multi-input inventory tool versus empirical results, may also influence the results. In this paper the different approaches concerning time horizon and LCI will be introduced and discussed. In the application of empirical results, the presence of data gaps may limit the inclusion of several impact categories and therefore affect the results obtained by the study. For this reason, every effort has been made to provide high-quality empirical LCI data for landfills in Central Europe. PMID:17433660

Obersteiner, Gudrun; Binner, Erwin; Mostbauer, Peter; Salhofer, Stefan

2007-01-01

218

Composite nuclear fuel fabrication methodology for gas fast reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An advanced fuel form for use in Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) was investigated. Criteria for the fuel includes operation at high temperature (˜1400°C) and high burnup (˜150 MWD/MTHM) with effective retention of fission products even during transient temperatures exceeding 1600°C. The GFR fuel is expected to contain up to 20% transuranics for a closed fuel cycle. Earlier evaluations of reference fuels for the GFR have included ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion type composite fuels of mixed carbide or nitride microspheres coated with SiC in a SiC matrix. Studies have indicated that ZrC is a potential replacement for SiC on account of its higher melting point, increased fission product corrosion resistance and better chemical stability. The present work investigated natural uranium carbide microspheres in a ZrC matrix instead of SiC. Known issues of minor actinide volatility during traditional fabrication procedures necessitated the investigation of still high temperature but more rapid fabrication techniques to minimize these anticipated losses. In this regard, fabrication of ZrC matrix by combustion synthesis from zirconium and graphite powders was studied. Criteria were established to obtain sufficient matrix density with UC microsphere volume fractions up to 30%. Tests involving production of microspheres by spark erosion method (similar to electrodischarge machining) showed the inability of the method to produce UC microspheres in the desired range of 300 to 1200 mum. A rotating electrode device was developed using a minimum current of 80A and rotating at speeds up to 1500 rpm to fabricate microspheres between 355 and 1200 mum. Using the ZrC process knowledge, UC electrodes were fabricated and studied for use in the rotating electrode device to produce UC microspheres. Fabrication of the cercer composite form was studied using microsphere volume fractions of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The macrostructure of the composite and individual components at various stages were characterized to understand the required fabrication techniques and at the same time meet the necessary GFR fuel characteristics.

Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

219

Landfills: Building Them Better  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Waste disposal has been an ongoing societal problem since medieval times. In this lesson, students learn about the three methods of waste disposal in use by modern communities. They also investigate how engineers design sanitary landfills to prevent leachate from polluting the underlining groundwater.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

220

Effect of corona discharge on the gas composition of the sample flow in a Gas Particle Partitioner.  

PubMed

A Gas Particle Partitioner (GPP) that allows highly efficient separation of gas and particles with no effect on the thermodynamic conditions and substantially no change of the gas composition has been developed. The GPP is a coaxial arrangement with inner and outer electrodes and utilizes a corona discharge to electrically charge the particles and a strong electric field to remove them from the sample flow. Several measures were taken to avoid an influence of the corona discharge on the gas composition. The GPP can be applied for various applications. This paper focuses on the use of the GPP as a pre-filter for gas analyzers, where zero pressure drop and a minimization of the influence of the corona discharge on the gas composition are the main objective. Due to its design, the GPP introduces no changes to the thermodynamic conditions. However, corona discharge is known to produce significant amounts of ozone and oxides of nitrogen. The effect of the corona on the gas composition of the sample flow was determined under various conditions. The gas concentrations strongly depended on several aspects, such as material and diameter of the corona wire and polarity of the corona voltage. Due to the measures taken to minimize an effect on the gas composition, the concentrations of these gases could effectively be reduced. Along with the maximum gas-particle separation efficiency of near 100%, the additional O3 concentration was 42 ppbV and the additional NO2 concentration 15 ppbV. If an efficiency of 95% is acceptable, the added concentrations can be as low as 2.5 ppbV (O3) and 0.5 ppbV (NO2), respectively. PMID:16121267

Asbach, Christof; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Fissan, Heinz

2005-09-01

221

Microbial oxidation of methane from old landfills in biofilters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfill gas emissions are among the largest sources of the greenhouse gas methane. For this reason, the possibilities of microbial methane degradation in biofilters were investigated. Different filter materials were tested in two experimental plants, a bench-scale plant (total filter volume 51 l) and a pilot plant (total filter volume 4 m3). Three months after the beginning of the experiment,

J. Streese; R. Stegmann

2003-01-01

222

Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

1981-12-01

223

Detailed internal characterisation of two Finnish landfills by waste sampling.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to characterise the internal structure and composition of landfilled waste at two Finnish landfills to provide information for active and post-landfill operations. The two sites, Ammässuo and Kujala, have been in operation for 17 and 48 years, respectively. Waste was sampled (total 68 samples) and analysed for total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), biological methane potential (BMP) and leaching of organic material (determined as chemical oxygen demand, COD) and ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)-N). The results showed high vertical and horizontal variability, which indicated that both the waste composition and state of degradation varied greatly in both landfills. Ammässuo was characterised by 2- to 4-fold higher BMP, NH(4)-N and COD leaching than Kujala. Moreover, the ratio of VS to TS was higher at Ammässuo, while TS content was lower. The highest mean BMPs (68 and 44 m(3)/t TS), TKN content (4.6 and 5.2 kg/t dry weight) and VS/TS ratio (65% and 59%) were observed in the middle and top layers; and the lowest mean BMP (21 and 8 m(3)/t TS), TKN content (2.4 kg/t dry weight, in both landfills) and VS/TS ratio (55% and 16% in Ammässuo and Kujala, respectively) in the bottom layers. In conclusion, waste sampling is a feasible way of characterising the landfill body, despite the high variation observed and the fact that the minimum number and size of samples cannot easily be generalized to other landfills due to different methods of waste management and different landfilling histories. PMID:17350245

Sormunen, Kai; Ettala, Matti; Rintala, Jukka

2008-01-01

224

Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines.  

PubMed

According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH4 produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH4/CO2 ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3-1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0-2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH4+CO2% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills. PMID:25488731

Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

2014-12-01

225

Composite hubs for low cost gas turbine engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed stress analysis was performed using NASTRAN to demonstrate theoretically the adequacy of composite hubs for low cost turbine engine applications. Composite hubs are adequate for this application from the steady state stress view point.

Chamis, C. C.

1977-01-01

226

[Physical and chemical properties of land-filling pile and aged refuse in 5-year-old semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills].  

PubMed

This paper studied the surface settlement, temperature, and gas production of land-filling pile, and the physical and chemical properties of aged refuse in 5-year-old semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills. The pile's surface settlement and its volume reduction rate were significantly higher in semi-aerobic than in anaerobic landfill; and the treatment with leachate recycling brought larger uneven settlement than the treatment with water recycling. The temperature of anaerobic landfill pile (25.6 degrees C) was slightly higher than that of semi-aerobic landfill file (24.8 degrees C), but the difference was not significant. During land-filling period, the O2 concentration in semi-aerobic landfill pile was significantly higher than that in anaerobic one, while the CH4 concentration was in reverse. After 5 years land-filling, the contents of easily degradable organic matters in aged refuse, such as kitchen refuses and papers, decreased dramatically, while the contents of plastics, glasses, bricks, and woods increased. In addition, the contents of organic matters and nutrients in aged refuse were higher than those in typical southern China soils, and the concentrations of heavy metals except chromium in anaerobic landfill aged refuse were not beyond the grade three of Environmental Quality Standards for Soils (GB 15618-1995). PMID:20560336

Zhang, Wei; Yue, Bo; Huang, Qi-Fei; Huang, Ze-Chun; Zhang, Zeng-Qiang; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ye; Wang, Jin-An

2010-03-01

227

Effect of Aeration on Fresh and Aged Municipal Solid Waste in a Simulated Landfill Bioreactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is slow to stabilize under conventional anaerobic landfill conditions, demanding long-term monitoring and pollution control. Provision of aerobic conditions offers several advantages including accelerated leachate stabilization, increased landfill airspace recovery and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Air injection was applied over 130 days to bench-scale bioreactors containing fresh and aged MSW representative of newly constructed

Mostafa A. Warith; Graham J. Takata

228

THE USEPA'S LANDFILL RESEARCH AND REGULATORY STRATEGY  

EPA Science Inventory

The priorities and initiatives of Environmental Protection Agency's landfill research and regulatory program over the next five years will be described. This will include municipal solid waste landfills as well as abandoned hazardous waste landfills. Regarding municipals s...

229

Non-Controlled Biogenic Emission of CO, H2S, NH3 and Hg0 from Lazareto's Landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfills are important sources of contaminant gases to the surrounding environment and a significant amount of them could be released to the atmosphere through the surface environment in a diffuse form, also known as non-controlled emission of landfill gases. CH4 and CO2 are major components in landfill gases and other gas species are only present in minor amounts. Trace compounds

D. Nolasco; R. Lima; J. Salazar; P. A. Hernández; N. M. Pérez

2002-01-01

230

Phytoremediation of landfill leachate  

SciTech Connect

Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios.

Jones, D.L. [School of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, Wales (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.jones@bangor.ac.uk; Williamson, K.L. [School of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, Wales (United Kingdom); Owen, A.G. [School of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, Wales (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01

231

[Aerogenesis evolution of the anaerobic-semiaerobic bioreactor landfill].  

PubMed

A novel bioreactor landfill, the anaerobic-semiaerobic bioreactor landfill (AN-SABL), was devised by combining an anaerobic bioreactor landfill (ANBL) with a semi-aerobic aged refuse biofilter (SAARB). Meanwhile, relevant parameters such as gas production volume and rate, and gas constituents were investigated to provide a theoretical foundation for the collection, utilization and treatment of landfill gas. Results indicated that the gas production of the anaerobic units was inhibited in the AN-SABLs. The gas production rates in the ANBL2 unit and the ANBL3 unit were 49 L x kg(-1) and 39 L x kg(-1) respectively, which were only 94.2% and 75.0% of that in the ANBL1. However, the gas production in the anaerobic unit could be accelerated by increasing the recirculation frequency. The maximum methane content could reach up to 62.67%. Moreover, the gas production volume and velocity in the ANBL were much higher in summer than those in winter, and the gas production peak could be observed with a 12-hour cycle. Besides, the nitrification and the denitrification in the anaerobic units would be enhanced remarkably in the AN-SABLs. It resulted that the content of N2O, which fluctuated between 0.0017% and 4.0179%, was influenced obviously by the seasonal variation and the landfill types. Based on the mathematical model of aerogenesis, the cumulative gas volume of the ANBL increased logarithmically in the initial aerobic phase, then increased linearly in the anaerobic acid phase, and increased exponentially in the methane production of acid phase afterwards. PMID:22946204

Han, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Dan; Li, Qi-Bin

2012-06-01

232

Closed landfills to solar energy power plants: Estimating the solar potential of closed landfills in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar radiation is a promising source of renewable energy because it is abundant and the technologies to harvest it are quickly improving. An ongoing challenge is to find suitable and effective areas to implement solar energy technologies without causing ecological harm. In this regard, one type of land use that has been largely overlooked for siting solar technologies is closed or soon to be closed landfills. Utilizing Geographic Information System (GIS) based solar modeling; this study makes an inventory of solar generation potential for such sites in the state of California. The study takes account of various site characteristics in relation to the siting needs of photovoltaic (PV) geomembrane and dish-Stirling technologies (e.g., size, topography, closing date, solar insolation, presence of landfill gas recovery projects, and proximity to transmission grids and roads). This study reaches the three principal conclusions. First, with an estimated annual solar electricity generation potential of 3.7 million megawatt hours (MWh), closed or soon to be closed landfill sites could provide an amount of power significantly larger than California's current solar electric generation. Secondly, the possibility of combining PV geomembrane, dish-Stirling, and landfill gas (LFG) to energy technologies at particular sites deserves further investigation. Lastly, there are many assumptions, challenges, and limitations in conducting inventory studies of solar potential for specific sites, including the difficulty in finding accurate data regarding the location and attributes of potential landfills to be analyzed in the study. Furthermore, solar modeling necessarily simplifies a complex phenomenon, namely incoming solar radiation. Additionally, site visits, while necessary for finding details of the site, are largely impractical for a large scale study.

Munsell, Devon R.

233

Applying guidance for methane emission estimation for landfills  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of methane emission from landfills is important to evaluate measures for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Both the United Nations and the European Union have adopted protocols to ensure quantification of methane emission from individual landfills. The purpose of these protocols is to disclose emission data to regulators and the general public. Criteria such as timeliness, completeness, certainty, comparability, consistency and transparency are set for inclusion of emission data in a publicly accessible database. All methods given as guidance to landfill operators to estimate landfill methane emissions are based on models. In this paper the consequences of applying six different models for estimates of three landfills are explored. It is not the intention of this paper to criticise or validate models. The modelling results are compared with whole site methane emission measurements. A huge difference in results is observed. This raises doubts about the accuracy of the models. It also indicates that at least some of the criteria previously mentioned are not met for the tools currently available to estimate methane emissions from individual landfills. This will inevitably lead to compiling and comparing data with an incomparable origin. Harmonisation of models is recommended. This may not necessarily reduce uncertainty, but it will at least result in comparable, consistent and transparent data.

Scharff, Heijo [NV Afvalzorg, Postbus 2, 1566 ZG Assendelft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: h.scharff@afvalzorg.nl; Jacobs, Joeri [NV Afvalzorg, Postbus 2, 1566 ZG Assendelft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.jacobs@afvalzorg.nl

2006-07-01

234

Use of high temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites in gas turbines  

DOEpatents

A ceramic composition for insulating components, made of ceramic matrix composites, of gas turbines is provided. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere and the arrangement of spheres is such that the composition is dimensionally stable and chemically stable at a temperature of approximately 1600.degree. C. A stationary vane of a gas turbine comprising the composition of the present invention bonded to the outer surface of the vane is provided. A combustor comprising the composition bonded to the inner surface of the combustor is provided. A transition duct comprising the insulating coating bonded to the inner surface of the transition is provided. Because of abradable properties of the composition, a gas turbine blade tip seal comprising the composition also is provided. The composition is bonded to the inside surface of a shroud so that a blade tip carves grooves in the composition so as to create a customized seal for the turbine blade tip.

Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL); Merrill, Gary Brian (Pittsburgh, PA); Ludeman, Evan McNeil (New Boston, NH); Lane, Jay Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

2001-01-01

235

Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

2014-11-01

236

Method and apparatus for off-gas composition sensing  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for non-intrusive collection of off-gas data in a steelmaking furnace includes structure and steps for transmitting a laser beam through the off-gas produced by a steelmaking furnace, for controlling the transmitting to repeatedly scan the laser beam through a plurality of wavelengths in its tuning range, and for detecting the laser beam transmitted through the off-gas and converting the detected laser beam to an electrical signal. The electrical signal is processed to determine characteristics of the off-gas that are used to analyze and/or control the steelmaking process.

Ottesen, David Keith (Livermore, CA); Allendorf, Sarah Williams (Fremont, CA); Hubbard, Gary Lee (Richmond, CA); Rosenberg, David Ezechiel (Columbia, MD)

1999-01-01

237

Fabrication of multi-layer composite hollow fiber membranes for gas separation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using multilayer composite hollow fiber membranes consisting of a sealing layer (silicone rubber), a selective layer (poly(4-vinylpyridine)), and a support substrate (polysulfone), we have determined the key parameters for fabricating high-performance multilayer hollow fiber composite membranes for gas separation. Surface roughness and surface porosity of the support substrate play two crucial roles in successful membrane fabrication. Substrates with smooth surfaces

Tai-Shung Chung; Jyh-Jeng Shieh; Wayne W. Y. Lau; M. P. Srinivasan; D. R. Paul

1999-01-01

238

Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems  

E-print Network

299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic composition in substrates, which are used in closed hydroponic systems. For analyses of carbon dioxide (CO2, in the in the nutrient solution, and in the drain solution. To analyze the root zone, a hydroponic system

Lieth, J. Heinrich

239

Leachate recirculation at the Nanticoke sanitary landfill using a bioreactor trench. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A one-year landfill leachate recirculation demonstration project was conducted in a 20-acre cell at the Broome County, NY, Nanticoke Landfill using a retrofit bioreactor trench design concept to introduce landfill leachate to the surrounding refuse mass. Over the course of the project, 1.1 million gallons of landfill leachate were distributed through the bioreactor trench, substantially increasing the moisture content (approaching 70%) of the surrounding municipal solid waste. Experimental results also indicate that the bioreactor trench functioned as an in-situ anaerobic bioreactor, effectively treating landfill leachate retained within the trench due to decreasing refuse permeability and enhanced leachate hydraulic retention time. A significant and steady decline was noted in landfill leachate chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA), and total organic carbon (TOC), suggesting that the rapid biological stabilization of the refuse within the 20-acre demonstration area was influenced by the bioreactor trench. Characterization of the resulting landfill gas indicated that optimum methane:carbon dioxide ratios were measured in all experimental gas wells and in the bioreactor trench. No apparent enhancement of landfill gas production was noted in promixity to the bioreactor trench.

Pagano, J.J.; Scrudato, R.J.; Sumner, G.M.

1998-02-01

240

The isotopic compositions of molecular nitrogen: implications on their origins in natural gas accumulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isotopic compositions of N2 (?15N, ‰, atm) imply the geochemical origins of molecular nitrogen in natural gas accumulations, but the irregular variation of ?15NN2 for most petroliferous basins puzzles scientists. We believe that this is due to multiple origins of N2 which are often mixed together and leads to the irregularities in gas pools. The four petroliferous basins, the

Yuenian Zhu; Buqing Shi; Chaobin Fang

2000-01-01

241

Gas storage cylinder formed from a composition containing thermally exfoliated graphite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gas storage cylinder or gas storage cylinder liner, formed from a polymer composite, containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m(exp 2)/g to 2600 m(exp 2)2/g.

Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

2012-01-01

242

Emissions and efficiency of a domestic gas stove burning natural gases with various compositions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heating value of a fuel, which depends on its composition, strongly affects burner performance. Using the same gas stove to burn natural gas with various heating values is inappropriate and hazardous due to the possible occurrence of incomplete combustion (i.e. a great increase of CO emissions and\\/or soot formation), liftoff, flashback and inadequate heat input. In this study, we

Yung-Chang Ko; Ta-Hui Lin

2003-01-01

243

Purification of synthesis gas and correction of its composition for obtaining liquid hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results from calculated and design works on elaborating stages through which synthesis gas used for producing liquid synthetic hydrocarbons is purified and refined are presented. Two stages of high-temperature desulfurization are used for removing sulfur from gas, and steam conversion is used for correcting its composition.

Epikhin, A. N.; Somov, A. A.

2011-06-01

244

Study on multi-layer composite hollow fiber membranes for gas separation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Novel multi-layer composite hollow fiber membranes were prepared using silicone rubber, poly(4-vinylpyridine) and polysulfone as sealing layer, selective layer and support layer, respectively. The resultant composite membranes possess a different structural configuration from the conventional multilayer composite membranes, i.e. (sealing layer)\\/(selective layer)\\/(support layer) versus (selective layer)\\/(gutter layer) \\/(support layer). The new membrane structure lead to high performance membranes for gas

Jyh-Jeng Shieh; Tai-Shung Chung; D. R. Paul

1999-01-01

245

Effect of sputtering gas on the surface composition of an Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate the effects of different inert sputtering gases on the surface composition of icosahedral (i-) Al–Pd–Mn. The sputtering gases used include He, Ne, Ar, Xe, and Kr. We demonstrate that the steady-state composition is independent of the inert gas chosen. This steady-state composition falls outside of the quasicrystalline region of the Al–Pd–Mn phase diagram. However, the fluence (ions\\/cm2) to

Cynthia J Jenks; Joseph W Burnett; Drew W Delaney; Thomas A Lograsso; Patricia A Thiel

2000-01-01

246

ODOUR TRAILS FROM LANDFILL SITES  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY: The emission of offensive odour from landfill sites is a nuisance that generates public opposition to the existence of these facilities. The aim of our research is to develop technology for an effective management system for landfill operations that minimizes the negative impacts of odour on the surrounding communities. The key requirements of the system are reviewed. We highlight

Derek Stretch; Guy Laister; Lindsay Strachan; Margot Saner

247

Compositional Discrimination of Decompression and Decomposition Gas Bubbles in Bycaught Seals and Dolphins  

PubMed Central

Gas bubbles in marine mammals entangled and drowned in gillnets have been previously described by computed tomography, gross examination and histopathology. The absence of bacteria or autolytic changes in the tissues of those animals suggested that the gas was produced peri- or post-mortem by a fast decompression, probably by quickly hauling animals entangled in the net at depth to the surface. Gas composition analysis and gas scoring are two new diagnostic tools available to distinguish gas embolisms from putrefaction gases. With this goal, these methods have been successfully applied to pathological studies of marine mammals. In this study, we characterized the flux and composition of the gas bubbles from bycaught marine mammals in anchored sink gillnets and bottom otter trawls. We compared these data with marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Fresh animals or with moderate decomposition (decomposition scores of 2 and 3) were prioritized. Results showed that bycaught animals presented with significantly higher gas scores than stranded animals. Gas composition analyses indicate that gas was formed by decompression, confirming the decompression hypothesis. PMID:24367623

Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Greer, Bill; Niemeyer, Misty; Bogomolni, Andrea L.; Moore, Michael J.

2013-01-01

248

LANDFILL GAS CONSUMPTION IN RHIZOSPHERE OF ALTERNATIVE LANDFILL COVERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The two identical 12 ft by 12 ft by 12 ft, polished stainless steel, insulated Environmental Chambers, located within the Testing and Evaluation (T&E) Facility, incorporate unique design features. Each chamber is equipped with 16 light fixtures containing a total of 32 light bulb...

249

Landfill to Learning Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engaging ``K-to-Gray'' audiences (children, families, and older adults) in scientific exploration and discovery is the main goal of the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC) Center for Environmental and Scientific Education (CESE) and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ and operated by Ramapo College of New Jersey. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED--certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory brings hands-on scientific experiences to the ˜25,000 students and ˜15,000 visitors that come to our site from the NY/NJ region each year.

Venner, L.; Lewicki, S.

2008-11-01

250

Gas sensors based on carbon nanoflake/tin oxide composites for ammonia detection.  

PubMed

Carbon nanoflake (CNFL) was obtained from graphite pencil by using the electrochemical method and the CNFL/SnO2 composite material assessed its potential as an ammonia gas sensor. A thin film resistive gas sensor using the composite material was manufactured by the drop casting method, and the sensor was evaluated to test in various ammonia concentrations and operating temperatures. Physical and chemical characteristics of the composite material were assessed using SEM, TEM, SAED, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The composite material having 10% of SnO2 showed 3 times higher sensor response and better repeatability than the gas sensor using pristine SnO2 nano-particle at the optimal temperature of 350°C. PMID:24473403

Lee, Soo-Keun; Chang, Daeic; Kim, Sang Wook

2014-03-15

251

Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup ?1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than previously reported.

Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: xwang25@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Padgett, Jennifer M. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Powell, John S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Campus Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

2013-11-15

252

IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL  

E-print Network

List of Figures Site Location/Legal Boundary Old Quesnel Landfill#12;IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1995-05 Prepared for .....................................2 Schematic of Source Pathway Receptor Model at Old Quesnel Landfill .......4 Landfill Extent

253

The impact of Mpererwe landfill in Kampala Uganda, on the surrounding environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mpererwe landfill site receives solid wastes from the city of Kampala, Uganda. This study was carried out to assess and evaluate the appropriateness of the location and operation of this landfill, to determine the composition of the solid waste dumped at the landfill and the extent of contamination of landfill leachate to the neighbouring environment (water, soil and plants). Field observations and laboratory measurements were carried out to determine the concentration of nutrients, metals and numbers of bacteriological indicators in the landfill leachate. The landfill is not well located as it is close to a residential area (<200 m) and cattle farms. It is also located upstream of a wetland. The landfill generates nuisances like bad odour; there is scattering of waste by scavenger birds, flies and vermin. Industrial and hospital wastes are disposed of at the landfill without pre-treatment. The concentration of variables (nutrients, bacteriological indicators, BOD and heavy metals) in the leachate were higher than those recommended in the National Environment Standards for Discharge of Effluent into Water and on Land. A composite sample that was taken 1500 m down stream indicated that the wetland considerably reduced the concentration of the parameters that were measured except for sulfides. Despite the fact that there was accumulation of metals in the sediments, the concentration has not reached toxic levels to humans. Soil and plant analyses indicated deficiencies of zinc and copper. The concentration of these elements was lowest in the leachate canal.

Mwiganga, M.; Kansiime, F.

254

USE OF LANDFILL BIOREACTORS IN ACCELERATING WASTE DEGRADATION  

EPA Science Inventory

MSW bioreactors offer an innovative way of optimizing existing landfill volume by actively degrading the waste mass within a waste containment system. Bioreactor leachate, gas, and solids monitoring is part of a 5 year CRADA between US EP A and Waste Mgt., Inc. at the Outer Loop ...

255

Correlation between gas molecular weight, heating value and sonic speed under variable compositions of natural gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simulation study of likely uncertainties in molecular weight and heating value of the gas mixture as predicted from measured or calculated sonic speed. The sonic speed, molecular weight and heating value of natural gas were studied as a function of random fluctuation of the gas fractions. A method of sonic speed prediction was developed and used for over 50,000

L. Burstein; D. Ingman; Y. Michlin

1999-01-01

256

Constraints on the origins of hydrocarbon gas from compositions of gases at their site of origin  

PubMed

It is widely accepted that natural gas is formed from thermal decomposition of both oil in reservoirs and, to a lesser extent, the organic matter in shales from which the oil was derived. But laboratory pyrolysis experiments on shales do not reproduce the methane-rich composition typical of most gas reservoirs, leading to suggestions that other mechanisms, such as transition-metal catalysis, may be important. The discrepancy might, however, instead arise because gas (and oil) deposits have migrated from their source rocks, so that the reservoir composition might not be representative of the composition in the source rocks where the hydrocarbons were generated. To address this question, we have analysed gas samples coproduced with oils directly from a source rock (the Bakken shales, North Dakota, USA) where the local geology has prevented significant hydrocarbon migration. The methane contents of these Bakken-shale gases are much lower than that of conventional gas reservoirs, but are consistent with that from pyrolysis experiments on these shales. Thus, because these Bakken gases form with (rather than from) oils, we argue that compositional differences between gases from source rocks and conventional gas deposits result from fractionation processes occurring after hydrocarbon expulsion from the source rock. PMID:11536709

Price, L C; Schoell, M

1995-11-23

257

Constraints on the origins of hydrocarbon gas from compositions of gases at their site of origin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

IT is widely accepted that natural gas is formed from thermal decomposition of both oil in reservoirs and, to a lesser extent, the organic matter in shales from which the oil was derived1-6. But laboratory pyrolysis experiments on shales do not reproduce the methane-rich composition typical of most gas reservoirs7, leading to suggestions7 that other mechanisms, such as transition-metal catalysis, may be important. The discrepancy might, however, instead arise because gas (and oil) deposits have migrated from their source rocks, so that the reservoir composition might not be representative of the composition in the source rocks where the hydrocarbons were generated. To address this question, we have analysed gas samples coproduced with oils directly from a source rock (the Bakken shales, North Dakota, USA) where the local geology has prevented significant hydrocarbon migration. The methane contents of these Bakken-shale gases are much lower than that of conventional gas reservoirs, but are consistent with that from pyrolysis experiments8,9 on these shales. Thus, because these Bakken gases form with (rather than from) oils, we argue that compositional differences between gases from source rocks and conventional gas deposits result from fractionation processes occurring after hydrocarbon expulsion from the source rock.

Price, L.C.; Schoell, M.

1995-01-01

258

Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)  

SciTech Connect

The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

White, Steven

2012-11-15

259

Use of lightweight composites for GAS payload structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A key element in the design of a small self-contained payload is the supporting structure. This structure must support the experiments and other components while using as little space and weight as possible. Hence, the structure material must have characteristics of being both strong and light. Aluminum was used for the structure on the first Purdue University payload, but consumed a relatively large percentage of the total payload weight. The current payload has a larger power supply requirement than did the previous payload. To allow additional weight for the batteries, a composite material has been chosen for the structure which has the required strength while being considerably lighter than aluminum. A radial fin design has been chosen for ease of composite material lay-up and its overall strength of design. A composite plate will connect the free ends of the fins and add strength and reduce vibration. The physical characteristics of the composite material and the method of open lay-up construction is described. Also discussed are the testing, modifications, and problems encountered during assembly of the experiments to the structure.

Spencer, Mark B.

1987-01-01

260

Gas composition in the annealing zone and glass working properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of the atmosphere in the glass shaping zone has a marked effect on the surface-layer structure and properties. The various gases have individual effects in reducing the excess energy. One can vary the ratios or introduce new gases or vapor to suppress or activate various surface processes [i]. However, structure formation does not cease below the vitrification temperature,

A. V. Gorokhovskii; K. V. Polyakov

1991-01-01

261

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

SciTech Connect

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15

262

Hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging in young and mature landfill leachates.  

PubMed

The final discharge point for collected landfill leachates is frequently the local municipal wastewater treatment facility. The salinity, color, nutrient, and anthropogenic organics contamination of leachates often necessitate some form of pre-treatment. When advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are considered for pre-treatment, the unique composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the relatively high concentrations of some inorganic solutes in leachate will inhibit treatment efficiency. The most important benchmark for design of AOPs is the expected steady-state production of free radical (OH). Without a quantitative assessment of total OH consumption in high-strength waste water, like a landfill leachate, efficient AOP treatment is uncertain. For this reason, two landfill leachates, distinct in color, DOM, and age of landfill, were characterized for OH-scavenging using an established competition kinetics method. After stripping the samples of inorganic carbon, the DOM in leachate from mature (stabilized) landfill was found to react with OH at a rate of 9.76 × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1). However, DOM in leachate from newer landfill was observed to scavenge available OH at a faster rate (8.28 × 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)). The combination of fast rate of reaction with OH and abundance of DOM in the sampled leachate severely limited the contribution of OH to degradation of an O3- and OH-labile organic probe compound (bisphenol-a) in oxidized mature leachate (fOH = 0.03). Substantial dosing of both O3 and H2O2 (>70 mg/L and >24 mg/L, respectively) may be required to see at least 1-log-removal (>90%) of an OH-selective leachate contaminant (i.e., parachlorobenzoic acid) in a mature landfill leachate. PMID:24675270

Ghazi, Niloufar M; Lastra, Andres A; Watts, Michael J

2014-06-01

263

Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals  

PubMed Central

Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24?h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12?h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

2012-01-01

264

Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

Bushnell, Calvin L. (Glastonbury, CT); Davis, Christopher L. (Tolland, CT)

1991-01-01

265

Astronomy on a Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engaging ``K-to-Gray'' audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission Center for Environmental and Scientific Education (CESE) and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ, operated by Ramapo College of New Jersey. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED--certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) to the ˜25,000 students and ˜15,000 visitors that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year.

Venner, L.

2008-11-01

266

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01

267

Gas permeation through a synthesized composite PDMS\\/PES membrane  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a defect-free polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based composite membrane was synthesized and characterized. The membrane consisted of a thin PDMS film (4?m) and polyethersulfone (PES) as a support material. At first, a macroporous PES support was prepared by phase inversion method and its thickness, porosity, pore size distribution and surface porosity were determined. PES characterization results confirmed suitability of the

Mohtada Sadrzadeh; Mohammad Amirilargani; Kazem Shahidi; Toraj Mohammadi

2009-01-01

268

Chemical composition of gas and grains in dense interstellar clouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that dense, molecular interstellar clouds contain most of their carbon, magnesium and heavier elements in the form of grains, as silicates, silicon carbide, graphite and ices. Most hydrogen and noble gases are in the gaseous phase, with oxygen and nitrogen being probably distributed between gas and grains. It is suggested that grains form in the expanding atmospheres of cool stars, then survive in the denser parts of the diffuse medium. Ice mantles grow from molecules in the gas phase in the interior of dense clouds and seem to be destroyed outside them, perhaps due to the effect of UV radiation. It is noted that grain mantles are potential sources of complex organic molecules in the early solar system.

Lequeux, J.

1982-05-01

269

Bioassays for the evaluation of landfill leachate toxicity.  

PubMed

This article reviews the application of bioassays for assessing the toxicity hazard posed by landfill leachate discharged to an aquatic environment. Landfill leachate is a complex mixture of chemicals; thus it is difficult to assess the risk posed to aquatic wildlife using standard chemical identification techniques, such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). From this review it is clear that toxicity testing, using species that represent the different trophic levels, is a superior way to predict the risk posed by discharge than chemical analysis. Previous studies assessed leachate toxicity using bacteria, algae, plants, invertebrates, fish, and genotoxicity. Studies showed that leachate exhibits a wide range of toxicities to the species tested. Ammonia, alkalinity, heavy metals, and recalcitrant organics were identified to be the cause of adverse responses from the test organisms. Concentrations of these chemicals were found to depend upon the types of waste landfilled. As part of this review, Slooff analysis was applied to published results to calculate the sensitivity of test species. It was concluded that Lemna minor and Thamnocephalus platyurus were the most sensitive tests and, Vibrio fischeri (Microtox) was the least sensitive test available. Little is known about the sensitivity of each species to the different types of waste that might have been landfilled. A battery of tests needed for a more accurate assessment of landfill leachate is proposed. Some of the more common tests have been replaced by more sensitive tests that produce more relevant results for the industry and regulators. PMID:19117211

Thomas, David John Lawrence; Tyrrel, Sean Ferguson; Smith, Richard; Farrow, Steve

2009-01-01

270

Characterization of thermal properties of municipal solid waste landfills.  

PubMed

Municipal waste landfills represent not only a source of landfill gases, but a source of thermal energy as well. The heat in landfills is generated by physical, chemical and microbiological processes. The goal of our study was to characterize the thermal properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) samples of the given landfill. A new apparatus was designed and constructed to measure heat flow. A systematic test series of 17 discrete measurements was carried out with municipal waste samples of 1.0-1.7m(3). The thermal conductivity, heat diffusivity and specific heat capacity of the samples were determined. Analysing the results of the sampling and our experiments it was realized that the theoretical fundaments should be clarified. Two theories were developed for the serial and for the parallel heat flow in three phase disperse systems. The serial and parallel models resulted in different theoretical estimations. The measured thermal conductivity and heat diffusivity were better characterized by the parallel heat flow estimations. The results show that heat can flow parallel in solid, liquid and gas phases. Characterization of thermal properties serves to establish the fundament of heat extraction from municipal waste landfills. PMID:25464944

Faitli, József; Magyar, Tamás; Erdélyi, Attila; Murányi, Attila

2015-02-01

271

Methanogenesis acceleration of fresh landfilled waste by micro-aeration.  

PubMed

When municipal solid waste (MSW) with high content of food waste is landfilled, the rapid hydrolysis of food waste results in the imbalance of anaerobic metabolism in the landfill layer, indicated by accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and decrease of pH value. This occurrence could lead to long lag time before the initiation of methanogenesis and to the production of strong leachate. Simulated landfill columns with forced aeration, with natural ventilation, and with no aeration, were monitored regarding their organics degradation rate with leachate recirculation. Hydrolysis reactions produced strong leachate in the column with no aeration. With forced aeration, the produced VFA could be effectively degraded, leading to the reduction in COD of the leachate effluent since the week 3. The CH4 in the landfill gas from the column with aeration rate of 0.39 m3/(m3 x d) and frequency of twice/d, leachate recirculation rate of 12.2 mm/d and frequency of twice/d, could amount to 40% (v/v) after only 20 weeks. This amount had increased up to 50% afterward even with no aeration. Most of COD in the recirculated leachate was removed. Using natural ventilation, CH4 could also be produced and the COD of the leachate effluent be reduced after 10 weeks of operation. However, the persistent existence of oxygen in the landfill layer yielded instability in methanogenesis process. PMID:16083105

Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Xiao-Hua; Li, Guo-Jian

2005-01-01

272

Real-time Multi-GAS sensing of volcanic gas composition: experiences from the permanent Etna and Stromboli networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measuring the composition of volcanic gases released from active volcanoes brings profound insights into our understanding of volcanic processes and, when combined with other methods, contributes to volcano monitoring. Volcanic gases can now be measured with a large variety of highly sophisticated techniques, but high-resolution routine measurements are possible with only a few of them (e.g., FTIR), and typically for only a few compounds. The Multi-GAS (Multi-component Gas Analyser System) technique has recently been demonstrated as a powerful method for the real-time high-resolution measurement of volcanic gas plumes, as has been used for discrete measurement surveys at several volcanoes including, among others, Etna, Stromboli and Vulcano in Italy, Villarica in Chile, Masaya in Nicaragua, Yasur and Ambrym in Vanuatu Republic, Miyakejima and Asama in Japan, and Soufriere Hill volcano on Montserrat. More recently, permanent Multi-GAS devices have been installed for the first on an active volcano at Etna (in 2004) and Stromboli (in 2006), allowing for the acquisition of unprecedented accurate time-series of volcanic gas compositions (for the three major components CO2-SO2-H2O) at both volcanoes. Here, we review the results of such permanent MultiGAS networks, and we demonstrate their implications for the comprehension of volcanic degassing processes. We also show that cycles of increase of Multi-GAS-sensed CO2/SO2 ratios preceded the most recent eruptive episodes on Etna in 2006-2008 and Stromboli in 2007, providing us with valuable precursor information on magma ascent within the shallow plumbing systems of these very active volcanoes, and thus deeply contributing to volcano hazard mitigation.

Liuzzo, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Gurrieri, S.

2009-04-01

273

Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature.

Zhang, Lei; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Xianying; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Guangping

2014-08-01

274

Determination of gas composition in a biogas plant using a Raman-based sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a gas sensor, based on spontaneous Raman scattering, for the compositional analysis of typical biogas mixtures and present a description of the sensor, as well as of the calibration procedure, which allows the quantification of condensable gases. Moreover, we carry out a comprehensive characterization of the system, in order to determine the measurement uncertainty, as well as influences of temperature and pressure fluctuation. Finally, the sensor is applied at different locations inside a plant in which biogas is produced from renewable raw materials. The composition is monitored after fermenting, after purification and after the final conditioning, where natural gas is added. The Raman sensor is able to detect all the relevant gas components, i.e. CH4, CO2, N2 and H2O, and report their individual concentrations over time. The results were compared to reference data from a conventional gas analyzer and good agreement was obtained.

Eichmann, S. C.; Kiefer, J.; Benz, J.; Kempf, T.; Leipertz, A.; Seeger, T.

2014-07-01

275

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01

276

High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

Dicarlo, J. A.

1984-01-01

277

Enhanced Landfill Mining case study: Innovative separation techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2011, a corporate vision on Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM)1 was approved by the OVAM Board of directors, which resulted in an operational programme over the period 2011-2015. OVAM (Public Waste Agency of Flanders) is the competent authority in charge of waste, Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) and contaminated soil management in Flanders. The introduction of the ELFM concept needs to be related with the concept of SMM and the broader shift to a circular economy. Within the concept of ELFM, landfills are no longer considered to be a final and static situation, but a dynamic part of the materials cycle. The main goal of this research programme is to develop a comprehensive policy on resource management to deal with the issue of former landfills. In order to investigate the opportunities of ELFM, the OVAM is applying a three step approach including mapping, surveying and mining of these former landfills. As a result of the mapping part over 2,000 landfill sites, that will need to be dealt with, were revealed. The valorisation potential of ELFM could be assigned to different goals, according to the R³P-concept : Recycling of Materials, Recovery of Energy, Reclamation of Land and Protection of drinking water supply. . On behalf of the OVAM, ECOREM was assigned to follow-up a pilot case executed on a former landfill, located in Zuienkerke, Flanders. Within this case study some technical tests were carried out on the excavated waste material to investigate the possibilities for a waste to resource conversion. The performance of both on site and off site techniques were evaluated. These testings also contribute to the mapping part of OVAM's research programme on ELFM and reveal more information on the composition of former landfills dating from different era's. In order to recover as many materials as possible, five contractors were assigned to perform separation tests on the bulk material from the Zuienkerke landfill. All used techniques were described, resulting in a separate flowsheet for every contractor. The resulting fractions and materials were described in detail to obtain an inventory of the bulk material. Based on the characteristics from the obtained fractions, all possible valorisation pathways are listed, suggesting a Waste to Material (WtM) or a Waste to Energy (WtE) valorisation pathway. Fractions that needed further treatment were also discussed. The results of the separation tests proved to be very promising and delivered well sorted waste streams. The composition of the waste material, on the other hand, proved to be less beneficial to be economically feasible. Due to the high amount of sand and clay (up to 90wt%) in the Zuienkerke landfill the share of instant recoverable materials proved to be very limited. Due to the limited number of tests concerning the separation and valorisation of landfilled waste, the feasibility of ELFM in the short term is not fully described yet. Based on the first experiences, the main drivers to introduce the ELFM concept on these type of landfills are the necessity of urgent remediation actions and the reclamation of land. The added value of land reuse for the future might close the financial gap in a significant way, making the implementation of ELFM feasible on former landfills. 1 Jones et al.,2010: "the safe conditioning, excavation and integrated valorisation of landfilled waste streams as both materials and energy, using innovative transformation technologies and respecting the most stringent social and ecological criteria".

Cuyvers, Lars; Moerenhout, Tim; Helsen, Stefan; Van de Wiele, Katrien; Behets, Tom; Umans, Luk; Wille, Eddy

2014-05-01

278

Variation of Volcanic Gas Composition at a Persistently Degassing Asama Volcano, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asama volcano at central Japan is a persistently degassing andesitic volcano and repeated eruptions every several years. The recent eruptions occurred in September 2004, August 2008 and February 2009 and are followed by increase of the volcanic gas emission during several months. The SO2 flux is typically 1,000-4,000 t/d during the high flux period after the eruption, whereas the flux is around 100 t/d during the low gas flux periods (JMA, 2013; Ohwada et al., in review). This study aims to understand the controlling process of volcano degassing based on the volcanic gas composition data. In particular, we focus to evaluate the gas composition contrast between the high and low gas flux periods. As the fumaroles and degassing vent locate in the summit crater of 500-m-diamter and are inaccessible, we estimated the gas composition by plume measurements with the Multi-GAS at the crater rim. The HCl/SO2 ratios are obtained by the alkali-filter trap. We started the repeat Multi-GAS measurements in 2004 and installed an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station for a daily measurement at the western rim of the summit crater in 2010. The gas compositions obtained by the Multi-GAS measurements are often scattered even during the day of measurements, in particular during the low flux period and the scatter is likely due to variable contamination of gases from low-temperature fumaroles locating along the crater rim because the low-temperature fumaroles locate closer to the measurement site that the major degassing vent at the bottom of the crater. If we plot the gas concentration ratio, such as CO2/SO2 against SO2 concentration, the ratio commonly converges to a certain value at high SO2 concentration and this ratio is considered as representative of the major gas emission. The estimated molar ratios are CO2/SO2=1×0.5, HCl/SO2=0.2×0.1 and H2O/SO2=60×30 without clear contrast during the high and low flux periods. The CO2/SO2 ratios obtained based on a single day data tend to be higher than the average, however, the analyses with a larger data set, e.g., for a month, results in the average value. The HCl/SO2 ratios agree well with those obtained during the 2004 eruptive period by FT-IR and ash-leachate analyses with the range of 0.15-0.2 and 0.1-0.2, respectively (Mori and Notsu, 2005; Nogami et al., 2004). The H2O/SO2 ratios also tend to be higher during the low flux period and this can be due to a larger contribution of meteoric water during the low flux period. The constant gas composition regardless of the large variation of the gas flux suggests that the degassing process and its condition remains the same for the high and low flux periods. The similar HCl/SO2 ratio obtained during both the eruptive period by FT-IR and ash leachate and the persistent degassing stage in this study indicates that persistent degassing is fed by low pressure gas separation from continuously ascending magmas, consistent with the conduit magma convection model (Ohwada et al., in review; Shinohara, 2008). Based on the conduit magma convection model, the large flux changes without variation of the gas composition can be caused by the change of the magma convection rate with similar degassing pressure and magma composition.

Shinohara, H.; Ohminato, T.; Takeo, M.

2013-12-01

279

Temperature dependencies of sensitivity and surface chemical composition of SnO x gas sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electrical resistivity response to CO gas exposure versus temperature has been measured for different types of SnOx-based gas sensors. The chemical composition of the sensor surfaces and the electronic structure of the valence band are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning Auger microscopy technique, with the aim of explaining resistivity changes in terms of the surface oxidation\\/reduction mechanism.

G. Gaggiotti; A. Galdikas; G. Mattogno

1995-01-01

280

Recirculation of municipal landfill leachate  

E-print Network

RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKO4ISKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering RECIRCULATION OF MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LEACHATE A Thesis by BRIAN JUDE PINKOWSKI Approved as to style and content by: Charles P. Giammona (Chair of Committee) Roy . Harm, (Member) Kirk W. Brown (Member) Donald A. Maxwel...

Pinkowski, Brian Jude

2012-06-07

281

Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

Roman-Colon, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

2015-01-01

282

Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites  

DOEpatents

Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

1988-07-19

283

Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites  

DOEpatents

Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

Swedo, Raymond J. (Mt. Prospect, IL); Kurek, Paul R. (Schaumburg, IL)

1988-01-01

284

Noble gas isotopic composition as a key reference parameter in a planetary atmospheric evolution model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The isotopic composition of noble gases is a key reference parameter in discussing the evolution of planetary atmospheres. Currently, two widely occurring noble gas components are identified in the early solar system, one is the Solar Wind noble gas (SW-noble gas, hereafter) and another is the Q-noble gas in unaltered meteorites: both noble gases are characterized by their ubiquitous occurrence and high isotopic homogeneity. Since the SW-noble gas is directly ejected from the Sun, it has been assumed to be a good proxy of the average noble gas isotopic composition in the Sun, namely the solar noble gas. The systematic enrichment of the heavier isotopes in the Q-noble gas relative to the SW-noble gas is then commonly attributed to its isotopic fractionation from the SW-noble gas. However, the isotopic compositions of the SW-noble gas either implanted on lunar soils or trapped by artificial targets show considerable isotopic variation depending on the velocity of the Solar Wind. Therefore, it is important to examine how closely the SW-noble gas represents the indigenous solar noble gas component or the mean isotopic composition of noble gases of the Sun. Here we show that the isotopic composition of the SW-noble gas is substantially fractionated relative to the solar value, and therefore should not be used as a reference parameter. We further suggest that the post D-burning Q-noble gas (see below) is the better proxy of the solar noble gas, and this should be used as a reference of the Solar noble gas isotopic composition in discussing the planetary atmospheric evolution. The most distinct difference between the Q- and the SW-noble gas is apparent in a 3He/4He isotopic ratio: 4.64e-4 in Q-He [1], but 1.23e-4 in SW-He[2]. The difference is attributed to the conversion of deuteron (D) to 3He in the Sun, namely the D-burning [3], due to high temperature during the pre-main sequence stage of the Sun. With the use of recent data on D/H ratios from helio-seismology [4] and spectroscopic observation of the inter-stellar cloud [5], we estimated that the 3He/4He ratio in the post D-burning He in the Sun is 3.98e-4. The latter value is considerably smaller than the recent estimate of the SW-He ratio by the GENESIS mission of 3He/4He = 4.64e-4 [2]. We conclude that this difference is due to isotopic fractionation during the ejection of the Solar Wind from the solar atmosphere. The further interesting implication of this conclusion is that the marked difference in 3He/4He between the SW- and Q-noble gases can be used as an unique chronological marker in the planetary atmospheric evolution. [1] Busemann H. et al., Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 35, 949-973, 2000. [2] Heber V. et al. Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta, 73, 7414-7432, 2009. [3] Geiss J. and Reeve H. Astronomy Astrophysics, 18, 126-132, 1972. [4] Basu S. and Antia H.M. Astrophysical J. , 606:L85-L88, 2004. [5] Linsky J.L. et al. Astrophysical J., 647:1106-1124, 2006.

Ozima, M.

2010-12-01

285

Determination of breath gas composition of lung cancer patients using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with monolithic material sorptive extraction.  

PubMed

A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method with monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE) pretreatment was developed to determine the breath gas composition in lung cancer patients. MonoTrap silica monolithic and hybrid adsorbent was selected as the extraction medium during MMSE, given its strong capacity to extract volatile organic compounds (VOC) from exhaled gas. Under the appropriate conditions, high extraction efficiency was achieved. Using the selected ion-monitoring mode, the limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio 3) for the benzene series was 0.012-2.172?ng?L(-1) . The limit of quantitation (signal-to-noise ratio, 10) was 0.042-7.24?ng?L(-1) . The linearity range of the method was 4-400?ng?L(-1) . Average recovery of the benzene series at lower concentrations was 65-74% (20?ng?L(-1) ). The relative standard deviation of benzene series contents determined within the linear range of detection was <10% of the mean level determined. Our proposed method is simple, rapid and sensitive, and can be competently applied to determine the breath gas composition of lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25421853

Ma, Wen; Gao, Peng; Fan, Jun; Hashi, Yuki; Chen, Zilin

2014-11-25

286

Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

2014-02-01

287

Optimization and analysis of mixed refrigerant composition for the PRICO natural gas liquefaction process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the energy optimization of the PRICO natural gas liquefaction (LNG) process was performed with the genetic algorithm (GA) and the process simulation software Aspen Plus. Then the characteristics of the heat transfer composite curves of the cold box were obtained and analyzed. Based on it, the heat exchange process in the cold box was divided into three regions. At last, in order to find the relationship between the energy consumption and the composition of the mixed refrigerant, the effects of the refrigerant flow composition on the temperature difference and the pinch point location were deeply investigated, which would be useful to guide the refrigerant charging.

Xu, Xiongwen; Liu, Jinping; Cao, Le

2014-01-01

288

Temperature dependence of gas sensing behaviour of TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin films  

SciTech Connect

In the present work we have reported the effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin film based chemiresistor type gas sensors for hydrogen gas sensing application. PANI and TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline at low temperature. The electrical properties of these composite thin films were characterized by I-V measurements as function of temperature. The I-V measurement revealed that conductivity of composite thin films increased as the temperature increased. The changes in resistance of the composite thin film sensor were utilized for detection of hydrogen gas. It was observed that at room temperature TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite sensor shows higher response value and showed unstable behavior as the temperature increased. The surface morphology of these composite thin films has also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement.

Srivastava, Subodh, E-mail: subodhphy@gmail.com; Sharma, Preetam; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K. [Thin Film and Membrane Science Lab, Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur- 302004 (India); Sharma, S. S. [Department of Physics, Govt. Women Engineering College, Ajmer-305002 (India); Sharma, Vinay; Rajura, Rajveer Singh [Centre for Converging Technology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India)

2014-04-24

289

Uncontrolled methane emissions from a MSW landfill surface: influence of landfill features and side slopes.  

PubMed

Sanitary landfills for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal have been identified as one of the most important anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4) emissions; in order to minimize its negative effects on the environment, landfill gas (LFG) recovery is a suitable tool to control CH4 emissions from a landfill site; further, the measurement of CH4 emissions can represent a good way to evaluate the effectiveness of LFG recovering systems. In general, LFG will escape through any faults in the landfill capping or in the LFG collection system. Indeed, some areas of the capping can be more permeable than others (e.g. portions of a side slope), especially when considering a temporarily capped zone (covered area that is not expected to receive any further waste for a period of at least 3 months, but for engineering reasons does not have a permanent cap yet). These areas, which are characterized by abnormal emissions, are usually defined as "features": in particular, a feature is a small, discrete area or an installation where CH4 emissions significantly differ from the surrounding zones. In the present study, the influence that specific features have on CH4 emissions has been investigated, based on direct measurements carried out in different seasons by means of a flux chamber to the case study of Palermo (IT) landfill (Bellolampo). The results showed that the flux chamber method is reliable and easy to perform, and the contoured flux maps, obtained by processing the measured data were found to be a suitable tool for identifying areas with abnormal (high) emissions. Further, it was found that a relationship between methane emission rates and landfill side slope can be established. Concerning the influence of the temporary HDPE cover system on CH4 recovery efficiency, it contributed to a significant decrease of the free surface area available for uncontrolled emissions; this aspect, coupled to the increase of the CH4 volumes collected by the LFG recovery system, led to a significant increase of the recovery efficiency. PMID:23465313

Di Trapani, Daniele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Viviani, Gaspare

2013-10-01

290

Onsite survey on the mechanism of passive aeration and air flow path in a semi-aerobic landfill.  

PubMed

The semi-aerobic landfill is a widely accepted landfill concept in Japan because it promotes stabilization of leachates and waste via passive aeration without using any type of mechanical equipment. Ambient air is thought to be supplied to the landfill through a perforated pipe network made of leachate collection pipe laid along the bottom and a vertically erected gas vent. However, its underlying air flow path and driving forces are unclear because empirical data from real-world landfills is inadequate. The objective of this study is to establish scientific evidence about the aeration mechanisms and air flow path by an on-site survey of a full-scale, semi-aerobic landfill. First, all passive vents located in the landfill were monitored with respect to temperature level and gas velocity in different seasons. We found a linear correlation between the outflow rate and gas temperature, suggesting that air flow is driven by a buoyancy force caused by the temperature difference between waste in the landfill and the ambient temperature. Some vents located near the landfill bottom acted as air inflow vents. Second, we conducted a tracer test to determine the air flow path between two vents, by injecting tracer gas from an air sucking vent. The resulting slowly increasing gas concentration at the neighboring vent suggested that fresh air flow passes through the waste layer toward the gas vents from leachate collection pipes, as well as directly flowing through the pipe network. Third, we monitored the temperature of gas flowing out of a vent at night. Since the temperature drop of the gas was much smaller than that of the environment, the air collected at the gas vents was estimated to flow mostly through the waste layer, i.e., the semi-aerobic landfill has considerable aeration ability under the appropriate conditions. PMID:25443098

Matsuto, Toshihiko; Zhang, Xin; Matsuo, Takayuki; Yamada, Shuhei

2015-02-01

291

Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure  

SciTech Connect

We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D. [Tesseract Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-04-15

292

Development of ceramic composite hot-gas filters  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix was developed and extended to fullsize, 60-mm OD by 1.5-meter-long, candle filters. A commercially viable process for producing the filters was developed, and the filters are undergoing testing and demonstration throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company, and testing at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC) are presented. Demonstration tests at the Tidd PFBC are underway. Issues identified during the testing and demonstration phases of the development are discussed. Resolution of the issues and the status of commercialization of the filters are described.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.; Eaton, J.H.; Weaver, B.L.; Kahnke, J.L.; Pysher, D.J. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-04-01

293

Venus lower atmospheric composition - Analysis by gas chromatography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen (69.3 ppm), argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfur dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the cloud tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these results, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors.

Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.

1979-01-01

294

Comparison of air dispersion modeling results with ambient air sampling data: A case study at Tacoma Landfill, a National Priorities List Site  

SciTech Connect

Air dispersion modeling, ambient air sampling, and emissions testing of landfill sources have been performed to evaluate the effects of remedial activities on ambient air surrounding the Tacoma Landfill. In 1983, the Tacoma Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) as part of the Commencement Bay/South Tacoma Channel Superfund site. Remedial activities completed, or near completion, at the 190 acre (768,903 m[sup 2]) Tacoma Landfill include a groundwater extraction system and air stripping units used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater, landfill gas extraction and flare system to control gas migration from the landfill, landfill liner and leachate collection system for an active section of the landfill, and a landfill cap that covers the inactive portions of the landfill. Dispersion modeling was performed with measured stack emission data using Industrial Source Complex (ISC) to determine the groundlevel concentrations of VOCs from the air stripper, flares, and active portion of the landfill for comparison with the measured ambient air data collected during 1992. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Griffin, L.R. (Parametrix, Inc., Bremerton, WA (United States)); Rutherford, T.L. (Black Veatch Waste Science Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States))

1994-08-01

295

Incubation of chicken eggs at altitude theoretical consideration of optimal gas composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Eggs from sea level which are transferred to higher altitude for incubation require changes in incubator gas composition if they are to develop normally.2. This not only requires compensation for the reduced O2 partial pressure but, and of equal importance, recognition of the increased diffusivity of gases at altitude.3. Equations are developed for predicting the required changes in O2,

A. H. J. Visschedijk; H. Rahn

1981-01-01

296

Composite thermochemistry of gas phase U(VI)-containing molecules.  

PubMed

Reaction energies have been calculated for a series of reactions involving UF6, UO3, UO2(OH)2, and UO2F2 using coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples, CCSD(T), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets, including newly developed pseudopotential (PP)- and all-electron (AE) Douglas-Kroll-Hess-based sets for the U atom. The energies were calculated using a Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite approach in which CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limits were combined with a series of additive contributions for spin-orbit coupling, outer-core correlation, and quantum electrodynamics effects. The calculated reaction enthalpies (both PP and AE) were combined with the accurately known heat of formation of UF6 to determine the enthalpies of formation of UO3, UO2(OH)2, and UO2F2. The contribution to the reaction enthalpies due to correlation of the 5s5p5d electrons of U was observed to be very slowly convergent with basis set and at the CBS limit their impact on the final enthalpies was on the order of 1 kcal/mol or less. For these closed shell molecules, spin-orbit effects contributed about 1 kcal/mol to the final enthalpies. Interestingly, the PP and AE approaches yielded quite different spin-orbit contributions (similar magnitude but opposite in sign), but the total scalar plus spin-orbit results from the two approaches agreed to within ?1 kcal/mol of each other. The final composite heat of formation for UO2F2 was in excellent agreement with experiment, while the two results obtained for UO3 were just outside the ±2.4 kcal/mol error bars of the currently recommended experimental value. An improved enthalpy of formation (298 K) for UO2(OH)2 is predicted from this work to be -288.7 ± 3 kcal/mol, compared to the currently accepted experimental value of -292.7 ± 6 kcal/mol. PMID:25554152

Bross, David H; Peterson, Kirk A

2014-12-28

297

Composite thermochemistry of gas phase U(VI)-containing molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reaction energies have been calculated for a series of reactions involving UF6, UO3, UO2(OH)2, and UO2F2 using coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples, CCSD(T), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets, including newly developed pseudopotential (PP)- and all-electron (AE) Douglas-Kroll-Hess-based sets for the U atom. The energies were calculated using a Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite approach in which CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limits were combined with a series of additive contributions for spin-orbit coupling, outer-core correlation, and quantum electrodynamics effects. The calculated reaction enthalpies (both PP and AE) were combined with the accurately known heat of formation of UF6 to determine the enthalpies of formation of UO3, UO2(OH)2, and UO2F2. The contribution to the reaction enthalpies due to correlation of the 5s5p5d electrons of U was observed to be very slowly convergent with basis set and at the CBS limit their impact on the final enthalpies was on the order of 1 kcal/mol or less. For these closed shell molecules, spin-orbit effects contributed about 1 kcal/mol to the final enthalpies. Interestingly, the PP and AE approaches yielded quite different spin-orbit contributions (similar magnitude but opposite in sign), but the total scalar plus spin-orbit results from the two approaches agreed to within ˜1 kcal/mol of each other. The final composite heat of formation for UO2F2 was in excellent agreement with experiment, while the two results obtained for UO3 were just outside the ±2.4 kcal/mol error bars of the currently recommended experimental value. An improved enthalpy of formation (298 K) for UO2(OH)2 is predicted from this work to be -288.7 ± 3 kcal/mol, compared to the currently accepted experimental value of -292.7 ± 6 kcal/mol.

Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.

2014-12-01

298

Functionalized low defect graphene nanoribbons and polyurethane composite film for improved gas barrier and mechanical performances.  

PubMed

A thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite film containing hexadecyl-functionalized low-defect graphene nanoribbons (HD-GNRs) was produced by solution casting. The HD-GNRs were well distributed within the polyurethane matrix, leading to phase separation of the TPU. Nitrogen gas effective diffusivity of TPU was decreased by 3 orders of magnitude with only 0.5 wt % HD-GNRs. The incorporation of HD-GNRs also improved the mechanical properties of the composite films, as predicted by the phase separation and indicated by tensile tests and dynamic mechanical analyses. The improved properties of the composite film could lead to potential applications in food packaging and lightweight mobile gas storage containers. PMID:24102568

Xiang, Changsheng; Cox, Paris J; Kukovecz, Akos; Genorio, Bostjan; Hashim, Daniel P; Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Ruan, Gedeng; Samuel, Errol L G; Sudeep, Parambath M; Konya, Zoltan; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Tour, James M

2013-11-26

299

Characterization of uncertainty in estimation of methane collection from select u.s. Landfills.  

PubMed

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste in landfills. If captured, methane can be beneficially used to generate electricity. To inventory emissions and assist the landfill industry with energy recovery projects, the U.S. EPA developed the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) that includes two key parameters: the first-order decay rate (k) and methane production potential (L0). By using data from 11 U.S. landfills, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify the effect of uncertainty in gas collection efficiency and municipal solid waste fraction on optimal k values and collectable methane. A dual-phase model and associated parameters were also developed to evaluate its performance relative to a single-phase model (SPM) similar to LandGEM. The SPM is shown to give lower error in estimating methane collection, with site-specific best-fit k values. Most of the optimal k values are notably greater than the U.S. EPA's default of 0.04 yr(-1), which implies that the gas generation decreases more rapidly than predicted at the current default. We translated the uncertainty in collectable methane into uncertainty in engine requirements and potential economic losses to demonstrate the practical significance to landfill operators. The results indicate that landfill operators could overpay for engine capacity by $30,000-780,000 based on overestimates of collectable methane. PMID:25604252

Wang, Xiaoming; Nagpure, Ajay S; DeCarolis, Joseph F; Barlaz, Morton A

2015-02-01

300

Landfill to Learning Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in scientific exploration and discovery is the main goal of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will bring hands-on scientific experiences to the 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Our programs adhere to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and are modified for accessibility for the underserved communities that visit us, specifically those individuals that have mobility, sensory, and/or cognitive ability differences. The programs are conducted in a classroom setting and are designed to nourish the individual's inquisitive nature and provide an opportunity to function as a scientist by, making observations, performing experiments and recording data. We have an $850,000, three year NSF grant that targets adults with disabilities and older adults with age related limitations in vision, hearing, cognition and/or mobility. From dip netting in the marsh to astronomical investigation of the cosmos, the MEC/CESE remains committed to reaching the largest audience possible and leaving them with a truly exceptional scientific experience that serves to educate and inspire.

Venner, Laura

2008-05-01

301

Chemically designed Pt/PPy nano-composite for effective LPG gas sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simultaneous in situ reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid by the amine group in the pyrrole monomer and oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole (PPy) was examined. The reactions were performed at various temperatures to understand the degree of reduction of platinum precursor as well as doping of polypyrrole with Pt(ii) chloro-complex. Spectroscopic images revealed different morphologies for the Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at various temperatures. The as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite samples were tested for their ability to sense liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) which resulted in excellent sensing at relatively low temperature. The porous nature and ohmic contact between the PPy and platinum nanoparticles makes the as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite highly useful for sensors as well as electronic applications.Simultaneous in situ reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid by the amine group in the pyrrole monomer and oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole (PPy) was examined. The reactions were performed at various temperatures to understand the degree of reduction of platinum precursor as well as doping of polypyrrole with Pt(ii) chloro-complex. Spectroscopic images revealed different morphologies for the Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at various temperatures. The as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite samples were tested for their ability to sense liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) which resulted in excellent sensing at relatively low temperature. The porous nature and ohmic contact between the PPy and platinum nanoparticles makes the as-prepared Pt/PPy nano-composite highly useful for sensors as well as electronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FT-IR spectra of Pt/PPy nano-composite prepared at 150 °C (NB). Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) of Pt/PPy composite prepared at 150 °C (NB) and EDAX analysis of NA, NB and NC samples to deduce the elemental composition of the samples. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05375j

Gaikwad, Namrata; Bhanoth, Sreenu; More, Priyesh V.; Jain, G. H.; Khanna, P. K.

2014-02-01

302

Non-controlled biogenic emissions to the atmosphere from Lazareto landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal, Scope and Backgound  Historically, landfills have been the simplest form of eliminating urban solid waste with the minimum cost. They have been\\u000a the most usual method for discarding solid waste. However, landfills are considered authentic biochemical reactors that introduce\\u000a large amounts of contaminants into the environment in the form of gas and leachates. The dynamics of generation and the movement

Dácil Nolasco; R. Noemí Lima; Pedro A. Hernández; Nemesio M. Pérez

2008-01-01

303

Composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the CassiniHuygens probe gas  

E-print Network

Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment H. B. Niemann,1 S. K. Atreya,2 J. E. Demick,3 D] The CassiniHuygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) determined the composition of the Titan as measured by the CassiniHuygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res., 115

Atreya, Sushil

304

APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING GLOBAL LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report is an overview of available country-specific data and modeling approaches for estimating global landfill methane. Current estimates of global landfill methane indicate that landfills account for between 4 and 15% of the global methane budget. The report describes an ap...

305

BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS, THEORETICAL ADVANTAGES AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioreactor landfills are municipal solid waste landfills that utilize bulk liquids in an effort to accelerate solid waste degradation. There are few potential benefits for operating a MSW landfill as a bioreactor. These include leachate treatment and management, increase in the s...

306

Aerobic Biostabilization of Old MSW Landfills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many years after the end of the cultivation phase, landfills may generate intense odours, toxic and explosive gases and heavily-polluted leac hate. A wide-spreading trend in the management of MSW landfills is represented by the forced aeration of wastes in order to achieve the stabilization, reducing the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled sites (old landfills which can be definitel y

M. C. Zanetti

307

RECLAMATION EFFORTS AT THE LOCKWOOD LANDFILL STATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The reclamation of disturbed arid rangelands is a monumental task under the best of conditions. The Lockwood Landfill located 17 km east of Reno, Nevada is a Regional Landfill of some 8800 ha in area. This landfill services all of northern Nevada as well as much of northern California. Returning la...

308

The decomposition of forest products in landfills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large quantities of forest products are disposed of in landfills annually. The fate of this vast pool of carbon is important since carbon sequestration and the generation of landfill gases have important implications for global warming. Published estimates of methane yields were used to estimate the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from landfilled forest products. These calculations suggest

J. A. Micales; K. E. Skog

1997-01-01

309

Astronomy on a Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

Venner, Laura

2008-09-01

310

Astronomy on a Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 3,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

Venner, Laura

2008-05-01

311

Sustainable treatment of landfill leachate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill leachate is a complex liquid that contains excessive concentrations of biodegradable and non-biodegradable products including organic matter, phenols, ammonia nitrogen, phosphate, heavy metals, and sulfide. If not properly treated and safely disposed, landfill leachate could be an impending source to surface and ground water contamination as it may percolate throughout soils and subsoils, causing adverse impacts to receiving waters. Lately, various types of treatment methods have been proposed to alleviate the risks of untreated leachate. However, some of the available techniques remain complicated, expensive and generally require definite adaptation during process. In this article, a review of literature reported from 2008 to 2012 on sustainable landfill leachate treatment technologies is discussed which includes biological and physical-chemical techniques, respectively.

Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yusoff, Mohd. Suffian; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Hung, Yung-Tse

2014-03-01

312

Geosynthetics conquer the landfill law  

SciTech Connect

Los Angeles' last operating landfill is undergoing a 4 million m[sup 3] expansion using innovative materials in the liner system to overcome difficult site conditions. The design represents the first approved alternative in California -- and perhaps in the nation -- to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act's Subtitle D regulations for liner systems. This article examines the regulatory journey that led to approval and the liner's design and construction. Steep slopes at Los Angeles' only operating municipal solid-waste landfill (MSW) forced designers to use an innovative geosynthetic liner and leachate collection system. Its use sets a precedent for alternatives to the prescriptive regulations for liner systems present in Subtitle D of the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). To provide uninterrupted service at the landfill, design and construction proceeded concurrently with regulatory approval.

Derian, L.; Gharios, K.M. (Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, CA (United States). Solid Waste Management Div.); Kavazanjian, E. Jr.; Snow, M.S. (GeoSyntec Consultants, Huntington Beach, CA (United States))

1993-12-01

313

Dynamics of Non-Controlled Emission of Methane from Arico's landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfills are one of the largest anthropogenic source of methane emissions to the atmosphere. In order to achieve CH4 emission control at landfills, avoiding gas migration into the near surroundings and reducing gas emission through its surface, landfill gas has to be collected and either flared or utilized by means of gas extraction systems. However, these systems might not reach a high efficiency and non-controlled biogenic CH4 emissions to the atmosphere could be an important fraction of the CH4 produced by a landfill. The goal of this study is to evaluate the non-controlled biogenic CH4 emission from Arico's landfill (0.33 Km2; Tenerife, Canary Islands) where urban solid waste disposal rate is about 1,500 td-1. In order to estimate the temporal evolution of non-controlled biogenic CH4 emissions from Arico's landfill, two surface flux surveys of about 500 sampling sites were performed in 1999 and 2001. Non-controlled biogenic CO2 emission rate measurements were performed by means of a NDIR spectrophotometer according to the accumulation chamber method. At each sampling site, landfill gases were also collected at 40 cm deep using a metallic probe. Samples were analyzed within 24 hours for major, minor and trace gas components using a VARIAN microGC QUAD. Non-controlled biogenic CH4 emission rate was estimated by multiplying surface CO2 efflux times CO2/CH4 weight ratio at each sampling site, respectively. Surface CH4 efflux rates for the 1999 and 2001 surveys ranged from negligible values up to 1,647.3 and 103.2 gm-2d-1, respectively. Spatial distribution of the surface CH4 efflux rate showed a non-uniform pattern in the landfill for both surveys. This observation is related to the actual use of the landfill, which is still operative, as well as to the evolution of the landfill's heterogeneity and anisotropy through time. For the 1999 and 2001 surveys, the total output of non-controlled biogenic CH4 emission from Arico's landfill were estimated about 15.7 and 1.2 td-1, respectively.

Pérez, C.; Echeita, A.; Lima, R.; Nolasco, D.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.

2002-12-01

314

Non-Controlled Emissión of VOCs from Arico's Landfill, Tenerife, Canary Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfills are important sources of CH4 as well as other trace gas components to the environment. A large number of organic volatile components (VOCs) are present as tracers in landfill gases, and they are considered to be carcinogenic and toxic. In order to control the emissions of these contaminants to the atmosphere, extraction systems to recover biogas are installed in landfills. However, a significant amount of these emissions could be released to the atmosphere through the surface environment in a diffuse form, also known as a non-controlled emission of landfill gases. The aim of this study is evaluate the non-controlled emission of VOCs from Arico's landfill. The Arico landfill has an extension of 0.35 km2, and about 1,546 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) is daily deposited. A biogas extraction system was installed at the Arico landfill between 1998 and 1999. A non-controlled VOCs emission survey of 133 sampling sites was carried out during August, 2002. Surface CO2 efflux measurements were performed by means of a portable NDIR spectrometer and according to the accumulation chamber method. Surface CO2 efflux ranged from 1 to 10,580 gm-2d-1. At each sampling site, surface landfill gas samples were collected at 40 cm deep using a metallic probe. These gas samples were analyzed within 24 hours by means of GC-MS. Non-controlled emission rate of VOCs were estimated by multiplying surface CO2 efflux times (VOCs)i/CO2 weight ratio at each sampling site, respectively. The spatial distributions of VOCs at the Arico's landfill showed a different distribution pattern for each volatile component and it is related to actual use of the landfill. Taking into consideration the spatial distribution of the VOCs efflux values as well as the extension of the landfill, the non-controlled emission of VOCs to the atmosphere by Arico's landfill was estimated about 2108 Kgd-1 of which 1638 Kgd-1 are BTEX emissions.

Dionis, S.; de La Rosa, D. N.; Lima, R. N.; Nolasco, D.; Salazar, J. L.; Hernández, P. A.; Pérez, N. M.

2003-12-01

315

Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber composite hot gas filter  

DOEpatents

A ceramic fiber composite structure particularly suitable for use as a hot gas cleanup ceramic fiber composite filter and method of making same from ceramic composite material has a structure which provides for increased strength and toughness in high temperature environments. The ceramic fiber composite structure or filter is made by a process in which a continuous ceramic fiber is intimately surrounded by discontinuous chopped ceramic fibers during manufacture to produce a ceramic fiber composite preform which is then bonded using various ceramic binders. The ceramic fiber composite preform is then fired to create a bond phase at the fiber contact points. Parameters such as fiber tension, spacing, and the relative proportions of the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fibers can be varied as the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fiber are simultaneously formed on the porous vacuum mandrel to obtain a desired distribution of the continuous ceramic fiber and the chopped ceramic fiber in the ceramic fiber composite structure or filter.

Hill, Charles A. (Lynchburg, VA); Wagner, Richard A. (Lynchburg, VA); Komoroski, Ronald G. (Lynchburg, VA); Gunter, Greg A. (Lynchburg, VA); Barringer, Eric A. (Lynchburg, VA); Goettler, Richard W. (Lynchburg, VA)

1999-01-01

316

Feasibility of SiC composite structures for 1644 deg gas turbine seal applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of silicon carbide composite structures was evaluated for 1644 K gas turbine seal applications. The silicon carbide composites evaluated consisted of Si/SiC Silcomp (Trademark) - and sintered silicon carbide as substrates, both with attached surface layers containing BN as an additive. A total of twenty-eight candidates with variations in substrate type and density, and layer chemistry, density, microstructure, and thickness were evaluated for abradability, cold particle erosion resistance, static oxidation resistance, ballistic impact resistance, and fabricability. The BN-free layers with variations in density and pore size were later added for evaluation. The most promising candidates were evaluated for Mach 1.0 gas oxidation/erosion resistance from 1477 K to 1644 K. The as-fabricated rub layers did not perform satisfactorily in the gas oxidation/erosion tests. However, preoxidation was found to be beneficial in improving the hot gas erosion resistance. Overall, the laboratory and rig test evaluations show that material properties are suitable for 1477 K gas turbine seal applications.

Darolia, R.

1979-01-01

317

Acceleration of aged-landfill stabilization by combining partial nitrification and leachate recirculation: A field-scale study.  

PubMed

Leachate recirculation for rapid landfill stabilization can result in the accumulation of high-strength ammonium. An on-site sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was therefore, applied to oxidize the ammonium to nitrite, which was then recirculated to the landfill for denitrification to nitrogen gas. At relatively higher ammonium levels, nitrite accumulated well in the SBR; the nitrite was denitrified stably in the landfill, despite an insufficient biodegradable carbon source in the leachate. As the leachate was recirculated, the methane and carbon dioxide contents produced from the landfill fluctuated, implying that the organic acids and hydrogen produced in the acid production phase acted as the carbon source for denitrification in the landfill. Leachate recirculation combined with ex-situ partial nitrification of the leachate may enhance the biodegradation process by: (a) removing the nitrogen that is contained with the leachate, and (b) accelerating landfill stabilization, because the biodegradation efficiency of landfill waste is increased by supplying sufficient moisture and its byproducts are used as the carbon source for denitrification. In addition, partial nitrification using an SBR has advantages for complete denitrification in the landfill, since the available carbon source is in short supply in aged landfills. PMID:25531070

Chung, Jinwook; Kim, Seungjin; Baek, Seungcheon; Lee, Nam-Hoon; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Heechang; Bae, Wookeun

2015-03-21

318

Measurements of stable isotope ratios (13CH4/12CH4; 12CH3D/12CH4) in landfill methane using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the isotopic composition (?13C, ?D) of methane produced within a landfill site near Mainz, Germany, were studied using a newly developed tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) method. Additional data on the mixing ratios of CO2, O2, N2, CH4 itself and ?13C of the CO2 in the landfill gas were also acquired. Samples taken from several branches of the landfill biogas collection system had methane isotopic compositions in the range ?13C = -62.3 to -55.3‰ VPDB (n = 23) and ?D = -327 to -287‰ VSMOW (n = 23). Although the variability of the stable isotope ratios is small, several significant correlations were found between these and the other measured parameters, which provide insight into the microbiological processes occurring within the landfill. Several samples showed evidence of admixture of atmospheric air which occurs when the pumping rate in the collection branch exceeds the local methane production rate. A fraction of the atmospheric oxygen is consumed during the passage through the landfill and CO2 is produced in addition to the CO2 associated with methanogenesis. The consumption of oxygen is correlated with the ?13C and ?D of CH4 and the ?13C of CO2. The correlation is consistent with partial bacterial oxidation of CH4 resulting in the progressive enrichment of the remaining CH4 (?(?13C) = 1.008 ± 0.003 and ?(?D) = 1.044 ± 0.020) and in the formation of very depleted CO2. For samples showing no evidence of oxidation, there was a negative correlation between ?D and ?13C(CH4)(r = -0.86, n = 14) and between ?13C(CO2) and ?13C(CH4) (r = -0.95, n = 14), which we interpret as originating from slightly varying contributions from the two methanogenic pathways CO2 reduction and acetate fermentation.

Bergmaschi, Peter; Harris, Geoffrey W.

1995-12-01

319

N 2O emissions at municipal solid waste landfill sites: Effects of CH 4 emissions and cover soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Municipal solid waste landfills are the significant anthropogenic sources of N 2O due to the cooxidation of ammonia by methane-oxidizing bacteria in cover soils. Such bacteria could be developed through CH 4 fumigation, as evidenced by both laboratory incubation and field measurement. During a 10-day incubation with leachate addition, the average N 2O fluxes in the soil samples, collected from the three selected landfill covers, were multiplied by 1.75 ( p < 0.01), 3.56 ( p < 0.01), and 2.12 ( p < 0.01) from the soil samples preincubated with 5% CH 4 for three months when compared with the control, respectively. Among the three selected landfill sites, N 2O fluxes in two landfill sites were significantly correlated with the variations of the CH 4 emissions without landfill gas recovery ( p < 0.001). N 2O fluxes were also elevated by the increase of the CH 4 emissions with landfill gas recovery in another landfill site ( p > 0.05). The annual average N 2O flux was 176 ± 566 ?g N 2O-N m -2 h -1 ( p < 0.01) from sandy soil-covered landfill site, which was 72% ( p < 0.05) and 173% ( p < 0.01) lower than the other two clay soil covered landfill sites, respectively. The magnitude order of N 2O emissions in three landfill sites was also coincident by the results of laboratory incubation, suggesting the sandy soil cover could mitigate landfill N 2O emissions.

Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

320

Eukaryotic Diversity in an Anaerobic Aquifer Polluted with Landfill Leachate?  

PubMed Central

Eukaryotes may influence pollutant degradation processes in groundwater ecosystems by activities such as predation on bacteria and recycling of nutrients. Culture-independent community profiling and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA gene fragments, as well as culturing, were employed to obtain insight into the sediment-associated eukaryotic community composition in an anaerobic sandy aquifer polluted with landfill leachate (Banisveld, The Netherlands). The microeukaryotic community at a depth of 1 to 5 m below the surface along a transect downgradient (21 to 68 m) from the landfill and at a clean reference location was diverse. Fungal sequences dominated most clone libraries. The fungal diversity was high, and most sequences were sequences of yeasts of the Basidiomycota. Sequences of green algae (Chlorophyta) were detected in parts of the aquifer close (<30 m) to the landfill. The bacterium-predating nanoflagellate Heteromita globosa (Cercozoa) was retrieved in enrichments, and its sequences dominated the clone library derived from the polluted aquifer at a depth of 5 m at a location 21 m downgradient from the landfill. The number of culturable eukaryotes ranged from 102 to 103 cells/g sediment. Culture-independent quantification revealed slightly higher numbers. Groundwater mesofauna was not detected. We concluded that the food chain in this polluted aquifer is short and consists of prokaryotes and fungi as decomposers of organic matter and protists as primary consumers of the prokaryotes. PMID:18469120

Brad, Traian; Braster, Martin; van Breukelen, Boris M.; van Straalen, Nico M.; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

2008-01-01

321

Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills.  

PubMed

The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use "generic" published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects. PMID:17897819

Gharabaghi, B; Singh, M K; Inkratas, C; Fleming, I R; McBean, E

2008-01-01

322

Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

Ayalon, O. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Economics and Management, Tel Hai College and NRERC, University of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Shani, E. [Dan Region Association of Towns, Sanitation and Waste Disposal (Israel)

2006-07-01

323

A new economic instrument for financing accelerated landfill aftercare.  

PubMed

The key aspects of landfill operation that remain unresolved are the extended timescale and uncertain funding of the post-closure period. This paper reviews the topic and proposes an economic instrument to resolve the unsustainable nature of the current situation. Unsustainability arises from the sluggish degradation of organic material and also the slow flushing of potential pollutants that is exacerbated by low-permeability capping. A landfill tax or aftercare provision rebate is proposed as an economic instrument to encourage operators to actively advance the stabilization of landfilled waste. The rebate could be accommodated within existing regulatory and tax regimes and would be paid for: (i) every tonne of nitrogen (or other agreed leachate marker) whose removal is advanced via the accelerated production and extraction of leachate; (ii) every tonne of non-commercially viable carbon removed via landfill gas collection and treatment. The rebates would be set at a level that would make it financially attractive to operators and would encourage measures such as leachate recirculation, in situ aeration, and enhanced flushing. Illustrative calculations suggest that a maximum rebate of up to ?€50/tonne MSW would provide an adequate incentive. PMID:24768257

Beaven, R P; Knox, K; Gronow, J R; Hjelmar, O; Greedy, D; Scharff, H

2014-07-01

324

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15

325

Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.  

PubMed

Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

2011-05-01

326

Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well  

PubMed Central

Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

2011-01-01

327

Geophysical identification of leachate levels and refuse characterization in a landfill at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic and electrical geophysical techniques were used to survey the 800 Area landfill at Argonne National Laboratory as part of an environmental site assessment. This landfill was opened in 1966 and has accepted non-radioactive laboratory, office, food service and construction wastes. Magnetic profiles and electrical resistivity surveys using Wenner, Schlumberger and dipole-dipole arrays were made primarily over the northern portion of the landfill and long its margins. Mounding of leachate to within 5 ft. (1.5 m) of the surface was identified within the north-central and northeastern portions of the landfill using resistivity soundings and dipole-dipole surveys. Soundings also suggest refuse thickness varies from 10--30 ft (3--10 m) south to north across the landfill. Both dipole-dipole and magnetic profiles have identified conductive and insulating objects in the refuse. Areas of low resistivity flanking the northeastern and eastern margins of the landfill may represent migration of leachate to the north and east. High resistivity layers detected beneath the landfill suggest little or no downward percolation of mineralized leachate. Such high resistivity layers, however, may indicate the presence of sand and gravel layers/lenses embedded in the drift which are potential contaminant pathways. The geophysical results are presently being used in optimum placement of monitoring wells, soil gas probes and future remediation planning. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Carpenter, P.J.; Xi, Y.; El-Hussain, I.W. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Moos, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01

328

A comparison of the technical sustainability of in situ stabilisation/solidification with disposal to landfill.  

PubMed

Sustainability is becoming a very important issue in contaminated land remediation and should form one of the factors used in future selection of treatment technologies. In situ stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is a remediation technique that is increasingly being applied to the treatment of contaminated sites because of numerous advantages over other remediation techniques. This paper assesses and compares aspects of the technical sustainability of in situ S/S with landfilling. Criteria previously established for the assessment of the technical sustainability of the remediation of contaminated land are employed. The comparison is presented in the form of a case study based on a real remediation project in the UK. The analysis indicated that landfilling had a larger impact than S/S in the majority of areas investigated, such as waste production (1000 kg waste/t soil remediated for landfilling compared to none for S/S), transportation (12.9 km/t for landfilling, 0.4 km/t for S/S) and use of raw materials (1005.5 kg/t for landfilling, 88.9 kg/t for S/S), although S/S had high greenhouse gas emissions (12.6 kg/t for landfilling, 40.9 kg/t for S/S). In addition, a multi-criteria/cost-effectiveness analysis gave cost effectiveness scores of -34.2 to S/S and -138.1 to landfill (where more positive is better). PMID:16839669

Harbottle, M J; Al-Tabbaa, A; Evans, C W

2007-03-15

329

Methane emissions from MSW landfill with sandy soil covers under leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CH 4 emissions and leachate disposal are recognized as the two major concerns in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Recently, leachate recirculation was attempted to accelerate land-filled waste biodegradation and thus enhanced landfill gas generation. Leachate irrigation was also conducted for volume reduction effectively. Nevertheless, the impacts of leachate recirculation and irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions have not been previously reported. A field investigation of landfill CH 4 emissions was conducted on selected sandy soil cover with leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation based on whole year around measurement. The average CH 4 fluxes were 311±903, 207±516, and 565±1460 CH 4 m -2 h -1 from site A without leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, lift B2 with leachate subsurface irrigation, and lift B1 with both leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, respectively. Both gas recovery and cover soil oxidation minimized CH 4 emissions efficiently, while the later might be more pronounced when the location was more than 5 m away from gas recovery well. After covered by additional clay soil layer, CH 4 fluxes dropped by approximately 35 times in the following three seasons compared to the previous three seasons in lift B2. The diurnal peaks of CH 4 fluxes occurred mostly followed with air or soil temperature in the daytimes. The measured CH 4 fluxes were much lower than those of documented data from the landfills, indicating that the influences of leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions might be minimized with the help of a well-designed sandy soil cover. Landfill cover composed of two soil layers (clay soil underneath and sandy soil above) is suggested as a low-cost and effective alternative to minimize CH 4 emissions.

Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

330

A neutral gas mass spectrometer to measure the chemical composition of the stratosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Polar Balloon Atmospheric Composition Experiment (P-BACE) is a new generation of neutral gas mass spectrometer based on the time-of-flight principle. P-BACE is the scientific experiment on the Mars Environment Analog Platform (MEAP) flown successfully on a balloon mission in summer 2008. The MEAP mission was flown with a 334,000m3 helium balloon in the stratosphere on a semicircular trajectory from

D. Abplanalp; P. Wurz; L. Huber; I. Leya; E. Kopp; U. Rohner; M. Wieser; L. Kalla; S. Barabash

2009-01-01

331

Composite fluidization in a circulating fluidized bed for flue gas desulfurization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Circulating fluidized beds (CFBs) for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) are widely used in small- and medium-scale power plants. However, even with multi-venturi tubes and guide plates, several problems, including the flow field deviation, axial velocity non-uniformity in the tower, and bad load adaptability to the boiler, are still encountered. To address these issues, the axial composite fluidization mode (ACFM) and

Xiaowen Hao; Chunyuan Ma; Yong Dong; Jianguo Yang

332

Modeling of Induction Plasma Process for Fullerene Synthesis: Effect of Plasma Gas Composition and Operating Pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model has been developed on the continuous synthesis of fullerenes by direct evaporation of carbon-containing\\u000a materials using induction thermal plasma technology. The main purpose of this study is to numerically investigate the effect\\u000a of plasma gas composition and operating pressure on the fullerene formation. The simulation results confirmed that Ar–He mixture\\u000a plasma is more efficient than argon plasma

K. S. KimA; A. Moradian; J. Mostaghimi; Gervais Soucy

2010-01-01

333

Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2013-10-15

334

Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data  

SciTech Connect

This report for first quarter 1992 contains sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data for the Savannah River Plant. The data tables presented in this report are copies of draft analytical results and therefore do contain errors. These errors will be corrected when the finalized data is received from the laboratory.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-05-01

335

Mechanism of H2S removal during landfill stabilization in waste biocover soil, an alterative landfill cover.  

PubMed

Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is one of the primary contributors to odors at landfills. The mechanism of waste biocover soil (WBS) for H(2)S removal was investigated in simulated landfill systems with the contrast experiment of a landfill cover soil (LCS). The H(2)S removal efficiency was higher than 90% regardless of the WBS or LCS covers. The input of landfill gas (LFG) could stimulate the growth of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, actinomycete, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the WBS cover, while that caused a decrease of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the populations of actinomycete and fungi in the bottom layer of the LCS cover. As H(2)S inputted, the sulfide content in the WBS cover increased and reached the maximum on day 30. In the LCS cover, the highest soil sulfide content was exhibited in the bottom layer during the whole experiment. After exposure to LFG, the lower pH value and higher sulfate content were observed in the top layer of the WBS cover, while there was not a significant difference in different layers of the LCS cover. The results indicated a more rapid biotransformation between sulfide and sulfate occurred in the WBS cover compared to the LCS. PMID:22459970

He, Ruo; Xia, Fang-Fang; Bai, Yun; Wang, Jing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

2012-05-30

336

TiO{sub 2}/PANI And MWNT/PANI Composites Thin Films For Hydrogen Gas Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped Polyaniline (PANI) composites were synthesized by In-situ chemical oxidative polymerization method at low temperature. The MWNT/PANI and TiO{sub 2}/PANI composite thin films were prepared using spin coating method onto finger type interdigited electrodes to develop the chemiresistor type gas sensor for hydrogen gas sensing application. It was observed that the MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin films show a higher response in comparision to neat PANI. The structural and morphological properties of these composite films were characterized by X-Ray differaction (XRD) pattern and sccaning electrone microscopy (SEM) respectively.

Srivastava, Subodh; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Shweta; Saxena, Arpita; Choudhary, B. L.; Mathur, Shubhra; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India)

2010-12-01

337

Evolution of volcanic gas composition during repeated culmination of volcanic activity at Kuchinoerabujima volcano, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chemical and isotopic compositions of low to medium temperature fumarolic gasses were measured at various fumaroles of Kuchinoerabujima volcano from 1993 to 2009 by the combination of fumarolic gas sampling and Multi-GAS measurement of volcanic plumes. Repeated culmination of the volcanic activity was observed as contemporaneous occurrence of seismic swarms, summit inflation and demagnetization, almost every two years after 1999. Fumarolic activity also increased parallel with these activities; new fumarolic fields of low-temperature fumaroles at boiling point formed at the southern and western rims of the summit crater in 2003 and intense degassing activity started at medium-temperature fumaroles inside the summit crater in 2008. The low-temperature fumarolic gasses have peculiar composition with high H 2/H 2O, CO/CO 2 and SO 2/H 2S ratios, typical features of high-temperature volcanic gasses, but also with low HCl and total S contents, typical features of low-temperature gasses. These features indicate that the gasses are formed by low-temperature differentiation of high-temperature gasses. Variation of H and O isotopic ratios of the low-temperature gasses indicates that the gasses are formed by isoenthalpic processes of vapor-liquid separation at 100 °C of a high-temperature gas and meteoric water mixture, implying that the high-temperature gas was injected into a shallow aquifer without cooling. Temperatures of the high-temperature gasses were estimated as 550-700 °C based on the equilibrium temperature calculation with considering the low-temperature differentiation. The medium-temperature fumarolic gasses from the summit crater have typical compositions of high-temperature volcanic gasses and are estimated as the source gas of the boiling point fumaroles. The H 2/H 2O and CO 2/S t ratios of the low-temperature fumaroles increased from 2004 to 2009, which is interpreted to be caused by the evolution of thermal structure of a shallow gas storage region of a few hundred meters deep. Increase of magmatic gas supply caused enlargement of a high-temperature zone of the gas storage region widening the surrounding temperature transit zone with smaller temperature gradient. The enlargement of the high-temperature zone also reduces the overlying low-temperature aquifer, which caused the decrease of CO 2/S t ratio by reduction of sulfur removal reaction. The enlargement of the high-temperature zone resulted in the leakage of the high-temperature gasses directly to the surface as the medium-temperature gasses from the summit crater.

Shinohara, H.; Hirabayashi, J.; Nogami, K.; Iguchi, M.

2011-04-01

338

Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes  

PubMed Central

A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

2014-01-01

339

Short Mountain Landfill gas recovery project  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a Federal power marketing agency, has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. BPA's latest load/resource balance forecast, projects the capability of existing resources to satisfy projected Federal system loads. The forecast indicates a potential resource deficit. The underlying need for action is to satisfy BPA customers' demand for electrical power.

Not Available

1992-05-01

340

Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas  

E-print Network

estimated6 that biomass materials such as paper, food and wood, constitute about 70% of the MSW to biodegradation for lack of moisture that is required to sustain bacte- rial growth; this would reduce the amount

Columbia University

341

Does the gas content of amber reveal the composition of palaeoatmospheres?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A combined study of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen in amber is described which makes it possible to distinguish bubble gas from matrix gas in amber by considering N2/Ar and O2/Ar ratios of the first gas released during the crushing of individual amber samples. Crushing experiments do not indicate high oxygen levels in Cretaceous amber as have been recently reported. Neither Baltic nor Cretaceous amber has even the amount of oxygen expected for equilibration with the modern atmosphere. Successive crushings of individual amber pieces show that the first crush has the highest oxygen content and that both bubble and matrix oxygen is consumed as crushing continues. These results suggest that the oxygen content of amber does not have a bearing on the composition of the palaeoatmosphere.

Cerling, Thure E.

1989-06-01

342

Application of carbon nanotube hold-off voltage for determining gas composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Method and system for determining chemical composition of a single-component or multiple-component gas, using a discharge holdoff mechanism. A voltage difference V between two spaced apart electrodes is brought to a selected value and held, the holdoff time interval .DELTA.t(V;ho) required before gas discharge occurs is measured, and the associated electrical current or cumulative electrical charge is measured. As the voltage difference V increases, the time interval length .DELTA.t(V;ho) decreases monotonically. Particular voltage values, V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0, correspond to initial appearance of discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq..infin.) and prompt discharge (.DELTA.t.apprxeq.0). The values V.sub..infin. and V.sub.0 and the rate of decrease of .DELTA.t(V;ho) and/or the rate of increase of current or cumulative charge with increasing V are characteristic of one or more gas components present.

Schipper, John F. (Inventor); Li, Jing (Inventor)

2009-01-01

343

Indirect measurements of field-scale hydraulic conductivity of waste from two landfill sites.  

PubMed

Management and prediction of the movement and distribution of fluids in large landfills is important for various reasons. Bioreactor landfill technology shows promise, but in arid or semi-arid regions, the natural content of landfilled waste may be low, thus requiring addition of significant volumes of water. In more humid locations, landfills can become saturated, flooding gas collection systems and causing sideslope leachate seeps or other undesirable occurrences. This paper compares results from two different approaches to monitoring water in waste. At the Brock West Landfill in eastern Canada, positive pore pressures were measured at various depths in saturated waste. The downward seepage flux through the waste is known, thus the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity of the waste at this landfill was determined to be 3 × 10(-7)cm/s. By comparison, the Spadina Landfill in western Canada is predominantly unsaturated. The infiltration of moisture into the waste was measured using moisture sensors installed in boreholes which determined arrival time for moisture fronts resulting from major precipitation events as well as longer-term change in moisture content resulting from unsaturated drainage during winter when frozen ground prevented infiltration. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from these data ranged from approximately 10(-6)cm/s for the slow winter drainage in the absence of significant recharge to 10(-2)cm/s or higher for shallow waste subject to high infiltration through apparent preferential pathways. These two very different approaches to field-scale measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity provide insight into the nature of fluid movement in saturated and unsaturated waste masses. It is suggested that the principles of unsaturated seepage apply reasonably well for landfilled waste and that the hydraulic behavior of waste is profoundly influenced by the nature and size of voids and by the degree of saturation prevailing in the landfill. PMID:21903374

Fleming, I R

2011-12-01

344

Did state renewable portfolio standards induce technical change in methane mitigation in the U.S. landfill sector?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill gas (LFG) projects use the gas created from decomposing waste, which is approximately 49% methane, and substitute it for natural gas in engines, boilers, turbines, and other technologies to produce energy or heat. The projects are beneficial in terms of increased safety at the landfill, production of a cost-effective source of energy or heat, reduced odor, reduced air pollution emissions, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, landfills sometimes face conflicting policy incentives. The theory of technical change shows that the diffusion of a technology or groups of technologies increases slowly in the beginning and then picks up speed as knowledge and better understanding of using the technology diffuses among potential users. Using duration analysis, data on energy prices, State and Federal policies related to landfill gas, renewable energy, and air pollution, as well as control data on landfill characteristics, I estimate the influence and direction of influence of renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The analysis found that RPS positively influences the diffusion of landfill gas technologies, encouraging landfills to consider electricity generation projects over direct sales of LFG to another facility. Energy price increases or increased revenues for a project are also critical. Barriers to diffusion include air emission permits in non-attainment areas and policies, such as net metering, which promote other renewables over LFG projects. Using the estimates from the diffusion equations, I analyze the potential influence of a Federal RPS as well as the potential interaction with a Federal, market based climate change policy, which will increase the revenue of a project through higher energy sale prices. My analysis shows that a market based climate change policy such as a cap-and-trade or carbon tax scheme would increase the number of landfill gas projects significantly more than a Federal RPS.

Delhotal, Katherine Casey

345

Impact of changes in barometric pressure on landfill methane emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

methane emissions were measured continuously using the eddy covariance method from June to December 2010. The study site was located at the Bluff Road Landfill in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Our results show that landfill methane emissions strongly depended on changes in barometric pressure; rising barometric pressure suppressed the emission, while falling barometric pressure enhanced the emission, a phenomenon called barometric pumping. There was up to a 35-fold variation in day-to-day methane emissions due to changes in barometric pressure. Wavelet coherence analysis revealed a strong spectral coherency between variations of barometric pressure and methane emission at periodicities ranging from 1 day to 8 days. Power spectrum and ogive analysis showed that at least 10 days of continuous measurements was needed in order to capture 90% of the total variance in the methane emission time series at our landfill site. From our results, it is clear that point-in-time measurements taken at monthly or longer time intervals using techniques such as the trace plume method, the mass balance method, or the closed-chamber method will be subject to large variations in measured emission rates because of the barometric pumping phenomenon. Estimates of long-term integrated methane emissions from landfills based on such measurements could yield uncertainties, ranging from 28.8% underestimation to 32.3% overestimation. Our results demonstrate a need for continuous measurements to quantify annual total landfill emissions. This conclusion may apply to the study of methane emissions from wetlands, peatlands, lakes, and other environmental contexts where emissions are from porous media or ebullition. Other implications from the present study for hazard gas monitoring programs are also discussed.

Xu, Liukang; Lin, Xiaomao; Amen, Jim; Welding, Karla; McDermitt, Dayle

2014-07-01

346

Modeling of H2S migration through landfill cover materials.  

PubMed

The emission of H2S from landfills in the United States is an emergent problem because measured concentrations within the waste mass and in ambient air have been observed at potentially unsafe levels for on-site workers and at levels that can cause a nuisance and potentially deleterious health impacts to surrounding communities. Though recent research has provided data on H2S concentrations that may be observed at landfills, facility operators and landfill engineers have limited predictive tools to anticipate and plan for potentially harmful H2S emissions. A one-dimensional gas migration model was developed to assist engineers and practitioners better evaluate and predict potential emission levels of H2S based on four factors: concentration of H2S below the landfill surface (C0), advection velocity (v), H2S effective diffusion coefficient (D), and H2S adsorption coefficient of landfill cover soil (?). Model simulations indicated that H2S migration into the atmosphere can be mitigated by reducing H2S diffusion and advection or using alternative cover soils with a high H2S adsorption coefficient. Laboratory column experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the four parameters on H2S migration in cover soils and to calculate the adsorption coefficient of different cover materials. The model was validated by comparing results with laboratory column experiments. Based on the results, the laboratory column provides an effective way to estimate the H2S adsorption coefficient, which can then be incorporated into the developed model to predict the depth of cover soil required to reduce emitted H2S concentrations below a desired level. PMID:24316799

Xu, Qiyong; Powell, Jon; Jain, Pradeep; Townsend, Timothy

2014-01-15

347

Gas composition of the main volatile elements in protoplanetary discs and its implication for planet formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Direct observations of gaseous exoplanets reveal that their gas envelope has a higher C/O ratio than that of the host star (e.g., Wasp 12-b). This has been explained by considering that the gas phase of the disc could be inhomogeneous, exceeding the stellar C/O ratio in regions where these planets formed; but few studies have considered the drift of the gas and planet migration. Aims: We aim to derive the gas composition in planets through planet formation to evaluate if the formation of giant planets with an enriched C/O ratio is possible. The study focusses on the effects of different processes on the C/O ratio, such as the disc evolution, the drift of gas, and planet migration. Methods: We used our previous models for computing the chemical composition, together with a planet formation model, to which we added the composition and drift of the gas phase of the disc, which is composed of the main volatile species H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, N2, CH3OH, CH4, and H2S, H2 and He. The study focusses on the region where ice lines are present and influence the C/O ratio of the planets. Results: Modelling shows that the condensation of volatile species as a function of radial distance allows for C/O enrichment in specific parts of the protoplanetary disc of up to four times the solar value. This leads to the formation of planets that can be enriched in C/O in their envelope up to three times the solar value. Planet migration, gas phase evolution and disc irradiation enables the evolution of the initial C/O ratio that decreases in the outer part of the disc and increases in the inner part of the disc. The total C/O ratio of the planets is governed by the contribution of ices accreted, suggesting that high C/O ratios measured in planetary atmospheres are indicative of a lack of exchange of material between the core of a planet and its envelope or an observational bias. It also suggests that the observed C/O ratio is not representative of the total C/O ratio of the planet.

Thiabaud, A.; Marboeuf, U.; Alibert, Y.; Leya, I.; Mezger, K.

2015-02-01

348

Stable isotopic signatures (?13C, ?D) of methane from European landfill sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stable isotopic signatures (?13C, ?D) of CH4 from four German and Dutch landfill sites have been characterized using different techniques for isotope analysis (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Samples taken directly from the gas collection systems show fairly uniform, biogenic ?13C-?D isotopic signatures [?13C = (-59.0±2.2)‰ VPDB (n = 104); ?D = (-304±10)‰ VSMOW (n = 46)]. In contrast, emission samples taken with static chambers on soil-covered landfill areas exhibit a considerable ?13C-?D variability, mainly due to the influence of aerobic bacterial CH4 oxidation, which occurs when the biogas CH4 encounters atmospheric oxygen available in the uppermost region of the cover soil. Soil gas samples from the landfill covers clearly show the progressive isotopic enrichment within the aerobic regions of the soil. Isotope fractionation factors due to CH4 oxidation were determined to be ?(?13C) = 1.008±0.004 and ?(?D) = 1.039±0.026. On average, about 80% (70-97%) of CH4 is oxidized during the transport through cover soils, while no significant CH4 oxidation was found in uncovered areas consisting of freshly dumped waste. Area-integrated ?13C values of total emissions were derived from upwind-downwind measurements around the landfill and show very little temporal and site-to-site variation (?13C = (-55.4±1.4)‰ VPDB (n = 13; four different landfills)). CH4 budgets were established for two landfill sites, indicating that projected CH4 surface emissions from uncovered and covered areas are significantly lower compared to total CH4 production (for a landfill without gas collection) or compared to the difference between CH4 production and recovery (for a landfill with a gas collection system). For these two landfill sites the overall fraction of CH4 oxidation is estimated to be 46 and 39% (53%) of total CH4 production (minus recovery). Furthermore, the ?13C balance (comparing the ?13C values of the different emission pathways with the area-integrated ?13C results) implies that direct CH4 emissions via cracks or leakages constituted the major transport pathway (˜70%) into the atmosphere in both landfills.

Bergamaschi, P.; Lubina, C.; KöNigstedt, R.; Fischer, H.; Veltkamp, A. C.; Zwaagstra, O.

1998-04-01

349

Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 ?m, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, Thomas D.

2014-01-01

350

Metal-organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation.  

PubMed

Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices have potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of freestanding nanosheets has proved challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometre lateral dimensions and nanometre thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increase in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared with isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF-polymer composites for various applications. PMID:25362353

Rodenas, Tania; Luz, Ignacio; Prieto, Gonzalo; Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés I Xamena, Francesc X; Gascon, Jorge

2015-01-01

351

Metal–organic framework nanosheets in polymer composite materials for gas separation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Composites incorporating two-dimensional nanostructures within polymeric matrices have potential as functional components for several technologies, including gas separation. Prospectively, employing metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) as versatile nanofillers would notably broaden the scope of functionalities. However, synthesizing MOFs in the form of freestanding nanosheets has proved challenging. We present a bottom-up synthesis strategy for dispersible copper 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate MOF lamellae of micrometre lateral dimensions and nanometre thickness. Incorporating MOF nanosheets into polymer matrices endows the resultant composites with outstanding CO2 separation performance from CO2/CH4 gas mixtures, together with an unusual and highly desired increase in the separation selectivity with pressure. As revealed by tomographic focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, the unique separation behaviour stems from a superior occupation of the membrane cross-section by the MOF nanosheets as compared with isotropic crystals, which improves the efficiency of molecular discrimination and eliminates unselective permeation pathways. This approach opens the door to ultrathin MOF–polymer composites for various applications.

Rodenas, Tania; Luz, Ignacio; Prieto, Gonzalo; Seoane, Beatriz; Miro, Hozanna; Corma, Avelino; Kapteijn, Freek; Llabrés I Xamena, Francesc X.; Gascon, Jorge

2015-01-01

352

Environmental assessment of solid waste landfilling technologies by means of LCA-modeling.  

PubMed

By using life cycle assessment (LCA) modeling, this paper compares the environmental performance of six landfilling technologies (open dump, conventional landfill with flares, conventional landfill with energy recovery, standard bioreactor landfill, flushing bioreactor landfill and semi-aerobic landfill) and assesses the influence of the active operations practiced on these performances. The environmental assessments have been performed by means of the LCA-based tool EASEWASTE, whereby the functional unit utilized for the LCA is "landfilling of 1ton of wet household waste in a 10m deep landfill for 100 years". The assessment criteria include standard categories (global warming, nutrient enrichment, ozone depletion, photo-chemical ozone formation and acidification), toxicity-related categories (human toxicity and ecotoxicity) and impact on spoiled groundwater resources. Results demonstrate that it is crucially important to ensure the highest collection efficiency of landfill gas and leachate since a poor capture compromises the overall environmental performance. Once gas and leachate are collected and treated, the potential impacts in the standard environmental categories and on spoiled groundwater resources significantly decrease, although at the same time specific emissions from gas treatment lead to increased impact potentials in the toxicity-related categories. Gas utilization for energy recovery leads to saved emissions and avoided impact potentials in several environmental categories. Measures should be taken to prevent leachate infiltration to groundwater and it is essential to collect and treat the generated leachate. The bioreactor technologies recirculate the collected leachate to enhance the waste degradation process. This allows the gas collection period to be reduced from 40 to 15 years, although it does not lead to noticeable environmental benefits when considering a 100 years LCA-perspective. In order to more comprehensively understand the influence of the active operations (i.e., leachate recirculation, waste flushing and air injection) on the environmental performance, the time horizon of the assessment has been split into two time periods: years 0-15 and 16-100. Results show that if these operations are combined with gas utilization and leachate treatment, they are able to shorten the time frame that emissions lead to environmental impacts of concern. PMID:18445517

Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H

2009-01-01

353

The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

1994-01-01

354

Y-12 Industrial Landfill V. Permit application modifications  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the modifications in operations and design to meet the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conversation (TDEC) July 10, 1993, amendments to the regulations for Class 2 landfills. These modifications, though extensive in design and construction cost, are considered minor revisions and should not require a processing fee. Area 1 of ILF V, comprising approximately 20% of the ILF V footprint, was designed and submitted to TDEC prior to the implementation of current regulations. This initial area was constructed with a compacted clay liner and leachate collection system, and became operational in April 1994. The current regulations require landfills to have a composite liner with leachate collection system and closure cap. Modifications to upgrade Areas 2 and 3 of ILF V to meet the current TDEC requirements are included.

NONE

1995-09-01

355

EVALUATION PLAN FOR TWO LARGE-SCALE LANDFILL BIOREACTOR TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract - Waste Management, Inc., is operating two long-term bioreactor studies at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, including facultative landfill bioreactor and staged aerobic-anaerobic landfill bioreactor demonstrations. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) was p...

356

Landfill covers for dry environments  

SciTech Connect

A large-scale landfill cover field test is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is intended to compare and document the performance of alternative landfill cover technologies of various costs and complexities for interim stabilization and/or final closure of landfills in arid and semi-arid environments. Test plots of traditional designs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency for both RCRA Subtitle {open_quote}C{close_quote} and {open_quote}D{close_quote} regulated facilities have been constructed side-by-side with the alternative covers and will serve as baselines for comparison to these alternative covers. The alternative covers were designed specifically for dry environments. The covers will be tested under both ambient and stressed conditions. All covers have been instrumented to measure water balance variables and soil temperature. An on-site weather station records all pertinent climatological data. A key to acceptance of an alternative environmental technology is seeking regulatory acceptance and eventual permitting. The lack of acceptance by regulatory agencies is a significant barrier to development and implementation of innovative cover technologies. Much of the effort on this demonstration has been toward gaining regulatory and public acceptance.

Dwyer, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31

357

Investigations of natural attenuation in groundwater near a landfill and implications for landfill post-closure  

E-print Network

is now adopting passive attenuation techniques as an increasing number of landfill sites reach the post data on groundwater quality in the vicinity of an old landfill located in a complex aquifer system, is now adopting passive attenuation techniques, as an increasing number of landfill sites reach the post

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

Emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous mercury at the largest active landfill in Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emission characteristics and air-surface exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) at Laogang landfill in Shanghai, China, the largest active landfill in Asia, has been investigated during two intensive field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. The mercury (Hg) content in municipal solid waste (MSW) varied widely from 0.19 to 1.68 mg kg-1. Over the closed cell in the landfill, the mean ambient air GEM concentration was virtually indistinguishable from the hemispherical background level (1.5-2.0 ng m-3) while the concentration downwind of ongoing landfill operation (e.g. dumping, burying and compacting of MSW) was clearly elevated. GEM emission through landfill gas (LFG) was identified as a significant source. GEM concentrations in LFGs collected from venting pipes installed in different landfill cells varied widely from 3.0 to 1127.8 ng m-3. The GEM concentrations were found negatively correlated to the age of LFG cells, suggesting GEM released through LFG declined readily with time. The GEM emission from this source alone was estimated to be 1.23-1.73 mg h-1. GEM emission from cover soil surfaces was considerably lower and at a scale comparable to that of background soil surfaces. This is in contrast to earlier reports showing enhanced GEM emissions from landfill surfaces in Southern China, probably due to the difference in soil Hg content and gas permeability characteristics of soils at different sites. Vertical concentration profiles of GEM in the interstitial gas of buried MSW were sampled, perhaps for the first time, which exhibited a wide spatial variability (4.9-713.1 ng m-3) in the 3-year-old landfill cell investigated. GEM emission from landfill operation was estimated to be 290-525 mg h-1 using a box model. This suggests that GEM degassing from Laogang landfill is quantitatively largely dominated by emissions from daily landfilling operations with a much smaller contribution from LFG venting and insignificant (bi-directional fluxes near zero) contribution from surfaces capped with a soil layer. This study reveals divergent GEM emission patterns among landfill cells of different ages, and provides essential emission estimates for formulating Hg emission reduction strategies for a large landfill.

Zhu, Wei; Li, Zhonggen; Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Lin, Che-Jen; Sommar, Jonas; Feng, Xinbin

2013-11-01

359

Dependence of phrenic motoneurone output on the oscillatory component of arterial blood gas composition.  

PubMed Central

1. The hypothesis that respiratory oscillations of arterial blood gas composition influence ventilation has been examined. 2. Phrenic motoneurone output recorded in the C5 root of the left phrenic nerve and the respiratory oscillations of arterial pH in the right common carotid artery were measured in vagotomized anaesthetized dogs which had been paralysed and artificially ventilated. 3. The effect of a change in tidal volume for one or two breaths on phrenic motoneurone output was measured with the inspiratory pump set at a constant frequency similar to, and in phase with, the animal's own respiratory frequency. A reduction of tidal volume to zero or an increase by 30% led to a corresponding change of mean carotid artery pH level. The changes of carotid artery pH resulted in a change of phrenic motoneurone output, predominantly of expiratory time (Te) but to a lesser extent of inspiratory time (T1) and also peak amplitude of 'integrated' phrenic motoneurone output (Phr). Denervation of the carotid bifurcation blocked this response. 4. The onset of movement of the inspiratory pump was triggered by the onset of phrenic motoneurone output. When a time delay was interposed between them, the phase relationship between respiratory oscillations of arterial pH and phrenic motoneurone output altered. The dominant effect was to alter Te; smaller and less consistent changes of Phr and T1 were observed. 5. When the inspiratory pump was maintained at a constant frequency but independent of and slightly different from the animal's own respiratory frequency (as judged by phrenic motoneurone output), the phase relationship between phrenic motoneurone output and the respiratory oscillations of pH changed breath by breath over a sequence of 100-200 breaths, without change of the mean level of arterial blood gas composition. Te varied by up to 30% about its mean value depending on the phase relationship. Ti and Phr were also dependent on the phase relationship but varied to a lesser extent. The changes were comparable to the results obtained in paragraph 4. 6. It was concluded that phrenic motoneurone output is dependent in part on its relationship to the respiratory oscillations of arterial blood gas composition. 7. Information concerning a transient ventilatory disturbance is stored in the arterial blood in the form of an altered pattern of the respiratory oscillations of blood gas composition; this in turn can change breathing by an effect on the carotid bodies. Images Fig. 3 PMID:38333

Cross, B A; Grant, B J; Guz, A; Jones, P W; Semple, S J; Stidwill, R P

1979-01-01

360

Some composite bearing and seal materials for gas turbine applications - A review  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is made of the selection and tribological testing of materials for high-temperature bearings and seals. The goal is to achieve good tribological properties over a wide range of temperatures because bearings and seals must be functional from low temperature start-up conditions on up to the maximum temperatures encountered during engine operation. Plasma sprayed composite coatings with favorable tribological properties from 25 to 900 C are discussed. The performance of these coatings in simple tribological bench tests is described. Examples are also given of their performance in high-speed sliding contact seals and as Stirling cylinder liner materials, and as backup lubricants for compliant foil gas bearings.

Sliney, Harold E.

1989-01-01

361

Variations in the O-isotope composition of gas during the formation of chondrules from the CR chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To better understand the environment of chondrule formation and constrain the O-isotope composition of the ambient gas in the Renazzo-like carbonaceous (CR) chondrite chondrule-forming region, we studied the mineralogy, petrology, and in situ O-isotope compositions of olivine in 11 barred olivine (BO) chondrules and pyroxene and silica in three type I porphyritic chondrules from the CR chondrites Gao-Guenie (b), Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91082, and Shi?r 033. BO chondrules experienced a higher degree of melting than porphyritic chondrules, and therefore, it has been hypothesized that they more accurately recorded the O-isotope composition of the gas in chondrule-forming regions. We studied the O-isotope composition of silica as it has been hypothesized to have formed via direct condensation from the gas.

Schrader, Devin L.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Hellebrand, Eric

2014-05-01

362

Preparation, characterization and gas permeation investigation of resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer or carbon xerogels/tubular ceramic composites.  

PubMed

New very stable composites prepared by deposition of resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer (RF-) or carbon (C-) xerogels into walls of commercial porous tubular ceramics (TiO2-ZrO2 and alphaAl2O3-gammaAl203) were obtained by a sol-gel process followed by a drying and a pyrolytic (only for C-xerogel/ceramic composites) step. They were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption, SEM and XRD, and tested for gas (H2, CH4, CO2 and CO) separation applications. Additional morpho-structural information about the open-interconnected ultramicropore structure of composites was found by gas permeation investigation. Interesting results for H2 permeance was obtained especially for RF-polymer/ceramic composites respecting Knudsen diffusion mechanism of gas permeance: H2 > CH4 > CO > CO2. The coexistence of Knudsen and surface diffusion mechanisms were confirmed. PMID:23878938

Cotet, Liviu Cosmin; Briceño, Kelly; Fort, Carmen Ioana; Danciu, Virginia; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Montané, Daniel

2013-01-01

363

Acute toxicity test of leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills using luminescent bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Landfilling is a fundamental step in any waste management strategy, but it can constitute a hazard for the environment for a long time. The need to protect the environment from potential landfill emissions makes risk assessment a decision tool of extreme necessity. The heterogeneity of wastes and the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in the body of a landfill need specific procedures in order to evaluate the groundwater risk for the environment. Given the complexity of the composition of landfill leachates, the exact contribution of each potential toxic substance cannot be known precisely. Some reference contaminants that constitute the hazard (toxicity) of leachate have to be found to perform the risk assessment. A preliminary ecotoxicological investigation with luminescent bacteria has been carried out on different leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills in order to rank the chemicals that better characterize the leachate (heavy metals, ammonia and dissolved organic content). The attention has been focused on ammonia because it is present in high concentration and can last for centuries and can seriously contaminate the groundwater. The results showed that the toxicity of the leachate might reliably depend on the ammonia concentration and that the leachate toxicity is considerably lower in sustainable landfills where the ammonia had been degraded. This has an important consequence because if the containment system fails (as usually occur within 30-50 yr), the risk of groundwater contamination will be calculated easier only in terms of the probability that the ammonia concentration is higher than a reference concentration.

Pivato, Alberto [IMAGE Department, University of Padua, Via Loredan 20, 35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: alberto.pivato@libero.it; Gaspari, Lorenzo [IMAGE Department, University of Padua, Via Loredan 20, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2006-07-01

364

Evaluating biotoxicity variations of landfill leachate as penetrating through the soil column.  

PubMed

Recent studies of leachate-induced ecotoxicity have focused on crude samples, while little attention has been given to changes in biotoxicity resulting from the environmental behavior of landfill leachate. Therefore, we set up a soil column to simulate the underground penetration of leachate into the soil layer, define the rules of migration and transformation of leachate pollutants, and determine the variation in toxicity of landfill leachate during penetration. The results demonstrated that: (1) landfill leachate inhibited the growth and chlorophyll levels, elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and stimulated the antioxidant enzyme activities of barley seedlings. The effects generally displayed a peak value at 12-24 cm, slowly declined at 36-48 cm, and then rapidly decreased with penetrating distance in the column. (2) Statistical correlation analysis of the properties of leachate and the observed biotoxic effects revealed that COD, conductivity and heavy metals (esp. Ni, Mn, Cd) were positively correlated with variations in biotoxicity. (3) The microbial activity of outflowing leachate sampled from the 48 cm port was significantly higher than the activity from succedent ports, and the types of contaminants increased in the leachate outflowing from the same port, implying that microbial behaviors near the 48 cm port could be used to partially evaluate variations in the composition and biotoxicity of landfill leachate. Taken together, the above results illustrate the polluting characteristics of landfill leachate when penetrating a soil column and provide guidance for pollution control and risk assessment of landfill leachate. PMID:23522605

Zhu, Na; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

2013-08-01

365

Mercury air-borne emissions from 5 municipal solid waste landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A detailed study on atmospheric mercury emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in China is necessary to understand mercury behavior in this source category, simply because China disposes of bulk MSW by landfilling and a large quantity of mercury enters into landfills. Between 2003 and 2006, mercury airborne emissions through different pathways, as well as mercury speciation in landfill gas (LFG) were measured at 5 MSW landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China. The results showed that mercury content in the substrate fundamentally affected the magnitude of mercury emissions, resulting in the highest emission rate (as high as 57 651 ng Hg m-2 h-1) at the working face and in un-covered waste areas, and the lowest measured at soil covers and vegetation areas (less than 20 ng Hg m-2 h-1). Meteorological parameters, especially solar radiation, influenced the diurnal pattern of mercury surface-air emissions. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) in LFG varied from 2.0 to 1406.0 ng m-3, monomethyl mercury (MMHg) and dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in LFG averaged at 1.93 and 9.21 ng m-3, and accounted for 0.51% and 1.79% of the TGM in the LFG, respectively. Total mercury emitted from the five landfills ranged from 17 to 3285 g yr-1, with the highest from the working face, then soil covering, and finally the vent pipes.

Li, Z. G.; Feng, X.; Li, P.; Liang, L.; Tang, S. L.; Wang, S. F.; Fu, X. W.; Qiu, G. L.; Shang, L. H.

2010-01-01

366

State of the art design: A closure system for the largest hazardous waste landfill at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the cover system proposed for a 55-acre, hazardous waste closure of the sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed cover system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of post-closure settlement while maintaining a permeability of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] cm/s or less throughout its 30-year, regulatory lifetime. A composite cover consisting of a geomembrane (GM) underlain by a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) was selected because of its extremely low permeability, ability to elongate without tearing, and capacity to self-heal'' if punctured. These characteristics will enable the cover system to accommodate differential settlement without cracking or tearing, this providing long-term protection with minimal maintenance. Also, to improve the ability of the cover system to span voids that may develop in the underlying waste, a geogrid has been included in the foundation layer. A gas vent layer has been included to allow for the safe collection and venting of landfill gases.

Bartlett, S.F.; Serrato, M.G.; McMullin, S.R.

1992-01-01

367

State of the art design: A closure system for the largest hazardous waste landfill at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the cover system proposed for a 55-acre, hazardous waste closure of the sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed cover system has been designed to accommodate a significant amount of post-closure settlement while maintaining a permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s or less throughout its 30-year, regulatory lifetime. A composite cover consisting of a geomembrane (GM) underlain by a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) was selected because of its extremely low permeability, ability to elongate without tearing, and capacity to ``self-heal`` if punctured. These characteristics will enable the cover system to accommodate differential settlement without cracking or tearing, this providing long-term protection with minimal maintenance. Also, to improve the ability of the cover system to span voids that may develop in the underlying waste, a geogrid has been included in the foundation layer. A gas vent layer has been included to allow for the safe collection and venting of landfill gases.

Bartlett, S.F.; Serrato, M.G.; McMullin, S.R.

1992-12-31

368

Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills  

SciTech Connect

Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

2011-06-15

369

Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

None

1992-10-01

370

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills  

SciTech Connect

While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

none,

1992-10-01

371

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Spickler Landfill, Operable Unit 2, Spencer, WI, September 29, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This decision document represents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit (OU) No. 2 at the Spickler Landfill Superfund Site (the Site) in Specer, Wisconsin. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has found that no further action is appropriate due to the effectiveness of the remedial action for the first operable unit. Proper closure of the landfills and mercury brine pit, installation of a landfill gas collection and flare and leachate collection systems and continued operation have eliminated the primary human health risk posed by direct contact with contaminated soils, eliminated the threat to the environment, and mitigated the primary human health risk posed by contaminated Site groundwater and landfill gas. The remedy established by this ROD is the final Remedial Action for this Site.

NONE

1998-11-01

372

Finite Element Analysis of Poroelastic Composites Undergoing Thermal and Gas Diffusion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A theory for time-dependent thermal and gas diffusion in mechanically time-rate-independent anisotropic poroelastic composites has been developed. This theory advances previous work by the latter two authors by providing for critical transverse shear through a three-dimensional axisymmetric formulation and using it in a new hypothesis for determining the Biot fluid pressure-solid stress coupling factor. The derived governing equations couple material deformation with temperature and internal pore pressure and more strongly couple gas diffusion and heat transfer than the previous theory. Hence the theory accounts for the interactions between conductive heat transfer in the porous body and convective heat carried by the mass flux through the pores. The Bubnov Galerkin finite element method is applied to the governing equations to transform them into a semidiscrete finite element system. A numerical procedure is developed to solve the coupled equations in the space and time domains. The method is used to simulate two high temperature tests involving thermal-chemical decomposition of carbon-phenolic composites. In comparison with measured data, the results are accurate. Moreover unlike previous work, for a single set of poroelastic parameters, they are consistent with two measurements in a restrained thermal growth test.

Salamon, N. J. (Principal Investigator); Sullivan, Roy M.; Lee, Sunpyo

1995-01-01

373

A cataluminescence gas sensor for ammonium sulfide based on Fe(3)O(4)-carbon nanotubes composite.  

PubMed

In the present work, Fe(3)O(4)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite was explored as a sensing material candidate for ammonium sulfide. Intense chemiluminescence emission can be observed during the catalytic oxidation of ammonium sulfide on the surface of Fe(3)O(4)-CNTs composite. Based on this phenomenon, a selective and sensitive gas sensor for the determination of ammonium sulfide was demonstrated. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of cataluminescence intensity vs concentration of ammonium sulfide gas was 1.4-115 microg mL(-1) (R = 0.998) with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 0.05 microg mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (n = 5) for 14.3 microg mL(-1) ammonium sulfide was 1.9%. There was no response to common foreign substances, such as sulfur dioxide, toluene, aether, ethanol, acetone, hydrogen sulfide, carbon bisulfide, benzene and ammonia. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for the determination of ammonium sulfide in artificial air samples. PMID:19579262

Xu, Shuxia; Tang, Li; Bi, Chen; Wang, Xianxiang; Lv, Yi

2010-01-01

374

KEY COMPARISON: International Comparison CCQM-K16: Composition of natural gas types IV and V  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural gas is an important energy vector. The determination of its composition is often used as the basis for the calculation of the calorific value. The calorific value in turn is one of the two key parameters used in natural gas trade. In the first series of key comparisons (CCQM-K1e-g), natural gas was already included with three different compositions. These mixtures contained carbon dioxide, nitrogen, ethane, propane and n-butane in methane (matrix) and were only to a limited extent representative of real natural gas. In the past years, national metrology institutes have broadened the range of components by including, e.g., i-butane, neo-pentane, n-pentane, i-pentane and n-hexane. Based on this extended components list, two new mixtures have been defined, one characteristic for a low calorific mixture (type IV) and the other for a high calorific mixture (type V). In the low calorific mixture, helium was also present. Due to presence of the butane and pentane isomers, the mixtures of type IV and V are more demanding with respect to the separation technique than the mixtures used in CCQM-K1e-g. The measurements in this key comparison took place in 2001. There were eight participants and two coordinating laboratories. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) was based on the gravimetric preparation for all components. Even for the heavier hydrocarbons (pentanes and n-hexane) the effects of, e.g., adsorption can be controlled to such an extent that this approach is still valid. The uncertainty evaluation of the KCRVs reflected also the extent to which the preparation data could be demonstrated to be valid. The validity of the preparation data was demonstrated by comparing the composition of the mixtures prepared for this comparison with measurement standards maintained by the coordinating laboratories. The key comparisons demonstrated that the results of the laboratories agreed within 1% relative to the reference value for most components. Even better agreement was obtained for nitrogen in the low calorific mixture (0.5%), carbon dioxide (0.5%), ethane (0,5%), propane (0.5%) and methane (0.1%). In some cases, larger differences were observed, which then also exceeded the associated expanded uncertainty Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

van der Veen, Adriaan M. H.; Heine, Hans-Joachim; Brinkmann, Freek N. C.; Ziel, Paul R.; de Leer, Ed W. B.; Zhen, Wang Lin; Kato, Kenji; Konopelko, Leonid A.; Popova, Tatjana A.; Alexandrov, Yuri I.; Kortchagina, Elena N.; Kustikov, Yuri A.; Musil, Stanislav; Milton, Martin J. T.; Guenther, Franklin; Rhoderick, George

2005-01-01

375

Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1994-08-01

376

Identification of dynamic properties of OII landfill  

SciTech Connect

The performance of landfills during strong earthquake shaking is a matter of considerable concern and deserves to be studied more extensively. This paper investigates the dynamic properties of the OII landfill materials using strong motion recordings, available field measurements, and simplified physical models. Although the earthquakes recorded at the OII landfill generated shear strains as large as 0.08%, the landfill materials behaved as essentially a linear viscoelastic material, showing a negligible reduction in shear modulus with shear strain amplitude. The damping responsible for energy dissipation was found to depend on frequencies between 0.1 and 10 Hz. The physical origins of this frequency-dependent damping are not yet clearly understood. The results of this study are useful in analyzing the dynamic response of landfills and cap systems during small to moderate-size earthquakes. The present analysis is simplified because there were only two recording instruments at the OII landfill. It is recommended that researchers deploy more field instruments at this and other landfills to document their dynamic response during future earthquakes, and develop large-scale laboratory tests to determine landfill material properties under large static and dynamic strains.

Morochnik, V.; Bardet, J.P.; Hushmand, B. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-03-01

377

Methanogenesis in solid-waste landfill bioreactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfills are viewed as solid-substrate batch bioreactors generating biogas (methane and carbon dioxide). Designing landfill bioreactors with the objective of maximizing energy recovery requires predictive knowledge of two fundamental variables: the ultimate quantity of potentially recoverable methane (yield) and the time rate of production. In assessing the above two variables, this dissertation reviews existing information, outlines the needed theoretical framework

Halvadakis

1983-01-01

378

Sanitary Landfill 1991 annual groundwater monitoring report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Sanitary Landfill is an approximately seventy acre site located just south of SRS Road C between the Savannah River Site's B-Area and Upper Three Runs Creek. Results from the first through third quarter 1991 groundwater monitoring date continue to show evidence of elevated levels of several hazardous constituents beneath the Sanitary Landfill: tritium, vinyl chloride,

C. Y. Thompson; G. T. Norrell; C. B. Bennett

1992-01-01

379

Sanitary Landfill 1991 annual groundwater monitoring report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Sanitary Landfill is an approximately seventy acre site located just south of SRS Road C between the Savannah River Site`s B-Area and Upper Three Runs Creek. Results from the first through third quarter 1991 groundwater monitoring date continue to show evidence of elevated levels of several hazardous constituents beneath the Sanitary Landfill: tritium, vinyl chloride,

C. Y. Thompson; G. T. Norrell; C. B. Bennett

1992-01-01

380

Mass spectrometer measurements of test gas composition in a shock tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shock tunnels afford a means of generating hypersonic flow at high stagnation enthalpies, but they have the disadvantage that thermochemical effects make the composition of the test flow different to that of ambient air. The composition can be predicted by numerical calculations of the nozzle flow expansion, using simplified thermochemical models and, in the absence of experimental measurements, it has been necessary to accept the results given by these calculations. This note reports measurements of test gas composition, at stagnation enthalpies up to 12.5 MJ.kg(exp -1), taken with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Limited results have been obtained in previous measurements. These were taken at higher stagnation enthalpies, and used a quadruple mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight method was preferred here because it enabled a number of complete mass spectra to be obtained in each test, and because it gives good mass resolution over the range of interest with air (up to 50 a.m.a.).

Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

1995-01-01

381

A nanostructured composite based on polyaniline and gold nanoparticles: synthesis and gas sensing properties.  

PubMed

Nanostructured composite materials based on polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles have been prepared by means of an osmosis based method. Several morphologies have been obtained for the pristine nanoPANI and for nanoPANI-Au composite, ranging from amorphous to sponge-like and spherical shapes. On the basis of this morphological investigation, different materials with high surface area have been selected and tested as chemical interactive materials for room temperature gas and vapor sensing. The resistive sensor devices have been exposed to different vapor organic compounds (VOCs) of interest in the fields of environmental monitoring and biomedical applications, such as toluene, acetic acid, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, water, ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The effect of doping with H2SO4 has been studied for both nanoPANI and nanoPANI-Au samples. In particular, nanoPANI-Au showed sensitivity to ammonia (up to 10 ppm) higher than that to other VOCs or interfering analytes. The facile preparation method and the improved properties achieved for the polyaniline-gold composite materials are significant in the nanomaterials field and have promise for applications in ammonia vapor monitoring. PMID:23518508

Venditti, Iole; Fratoddi, Ilaria; Russo, Maria Vittoria; Bearzotti, Andrea

2013-04-19

382

A nanostructured composite based on polyaniline and gold nanoparticles: synthesis and gas sensing properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanostructured composite materials based on polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles have been prepared by means of an osmosis based method. Several morphologies have been obtained for the pristine nanoPANI and for nanoPANI-Au composite, ranging from amorphous to sponge-like and spherical shapes. On the basis of this morphological investigation, different materials with high surface area have been selected and tested as chemical interactive materials for room temperature gas and vapor sensing. The resistive sensor devices have been exposed to different vapor organic compounds (VOCs) of interest in the fields of environmental monitoring and biomedical applications, such as toluene, acetic acid, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, water, ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The effect of doping with H2SO4 has been studied for both nanoPANI and nanoPANI-Au samples. In particular, nanoPANI-Au showed sensitivity to ammonia (up to 10 ppm) higher than that to other VOCs or interfering analytes. The facile preparation method and the improved properties achieved for the polyaniline-gold composite materials are significant in the nanomaterials field and have promise for applications in ammonia vapor monitoring.

Venditti, Iole; Fratoddi, Ilaria; Vittoria Russo, Maria; Bearzotti, Andrea

2013-04-01

383

Toxicity Assessment of Contaminated Soils of Solid Domestic Waste Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper delivers the analysis of an 18-year dynamic pattern of land pollutants concentration in the soils of a solid domestic waste landfill. It also presents the composition of the contaminated soils from different areas of the waste landfill during its operating period. The authors calculate the concentrations of the following pollutants: chrome, nickel, tin, vanadium, lead, cuprum, zinc, cobalt, beryllium, barium, yttrium, cadmium, arsenic, germanium, nitrate ions and petrochemicals and determine a consistent pattern of their spatial distribution within the waste landfill area as well as the dynamic pattern of their concentration. Test-objects are used in experiments to make an integral assessment of the polluted soil's impact on living organisms. It was discovered that the soil samples of an animal burial site are characterized by acute toxicity while the area of open waste dumping is the most dangerous in terms of a number of pollutants. This contradiction can be attributed to the synergetic effect of the polluted soil, which accounts for the regularities described by other researchers.

Pasko, O. A.; Mochalova, T. N.

2014-08-01

384

Characterization of methanogenic and methanotrophic assemblages in landfill samples.  

PubMed Central

A greater understanding of the tightly linked trophic groups of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria residing in municipal solid waste landfills will increase our ability to control methane emissions and pollutant fate in these environments. To this end, we characterized the composition of methanogenic and methanotrophic bacteria in samples taken from two regions of a municipal solid waste landfill that varied in age. A method combining polymerase chain reaction amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and phylogenetic analysis was used for this purpose. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed a rich assemblage of methanogens in both samples, including acetoclasts, H2/CO2-users and formate-users in the newer samples and H2/CO2-users and formate-users in the older samples, with closely related genera including Methanoculleus, Methanofollis, Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. Fewer phylotypes of type 1 methanotrophs were observed relative to type 2 methanotrophs. Most type 1 sequences clustered within a clade related to Methylobacter, whereas type 2 sequences were broadly distributed among clades associated with Methylocystis and Methylosinus species. This genetic characterization tool promises rapid screening of landfill samples for genotypes and, therefore, degradation potentials. PMID:14667383

Uz, Ilker; Rasche, M E; Townsend, T; Ogram, A V; Lindner, A S

2003-01-01

385

Renormalization of Fermi Velocity in a Composite Two Dimensional Electron Gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculate the self-energy ?(k, ?) of an electron gas with a Coulomb interaction in a composite 2D system, consisting of metallic layers of thickness d ? a0, where a0 = ?2?1/me2 is the Bohr radius, separated by layers with a dielectric constant ?2 and a lattice constant c perpendicular to the planes. The behavior of the electron gas is determined by the dimensionless parameters kFa0 and kFc ?2/?1. We find that when ?2/?1 is large (?5 or more), the velocity v(k) becomes strongly k-dependent near kF, and v(kF) is enhanced by a factor of 5-10. This behavior is similar to the one found by Lindhard in 1954 for an unscreened electron gas; however here we take screening into account. The peak in v(k) is very sharp (?k/kF is a few percent) and becomes sharper as ?2/?1 increases. This velocity renormalization has dramatic effects on the transport properties; the conductivity at low T increases like the square of the velocity renormalization and the resistivity due to elastic scattering becomes temperature dependent, increasing approximately linearly with T. For scattering by phonons, ? ? T2. Preliminary measurements suggest an increase in vk in YBCO very close to kF.

Weger, M.; Burlachkov, L.

386

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

2011-01-07

387

Relationship Between the Composition and Interfacial Tension of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars pose significant environmental hazards and present a challenge to regulators and industry professionals. The tars, which were produced as a byproduct of the gas manufacturing process, were frequently released into the environment through improper disposal or leaks in plant infrastructure. The interfacial tension (IFT) is a primary factor controlling the mobility of tars in porous media, and is therefore important to understand for both predicting the migration of tars and designing remediation strategies. In this study, we characterized nine field-collected FMGP tars and a commercially available coal tar by means of chemical extractions (asphaltenes, resins, acids, and bases), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additionally, the IFT and contact angle of each tar was determined for a pH range of 3-11. The IFT was found to be similar for all tars at pH 5 and 7 regardless of composition. Slight decreases in IFT at lower pH were correlated with higher concentrations of extractable bases, which consisted primarily of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Much greater reductions of IFT were observed at high pH. These reductions were found to be associated with the presence of carbonyl or carboxyl groups in the asphaltenes. It is likely that the larger size of the asphaltene molecules (as compared to the extractable compounds) resulted in species with greater surface activity when ionized.

Hauswirth, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

2011-12-01

388

Landfills as critical infrastructures: synergy between non-invasive monitoring technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work deals with a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system by means of the integration between two different non-invasive technologies. In fact, there is a widespread agreement on the fact that these infrastructures produce about 23% of the total anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Despite that, there's still no internationally accepted protocol to quantify the leakage of biogas from a landfill with a common standard approach. This work proposes an assessment of the performance of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Such evaluation is performed by means of a direct measurement of gas flux with the accumulation chamber method, combined with the detection of thermal anomalies by infrared radiometry. In order to derive flux maps from a set of punctual measurements and calculate an overall quantity of emitted gas, a geostatistical technique is necessarily applied and briefly illustrated. A case study regarding an infrastructure located in Tuscany (Italy) is shown, where a discussion about the evolution of the landfill site through successive campaigns is also suggested. The role played by infrared thermography and its synergy with direct flux measurements is clearly perceivable in this context. The main benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase of the energy recovered from the landfill sites by optimising the collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of wastes released to the atmosphere.

Scozzari, Andrea; Raco, Brunella; Battaglini, Raffaele

2014-05-01

389

The dependence of the methylation of mercury on the landfill stabilization process and implications for the landfill management.  

PubMed

Mercury species and other chemical characteristics of the leachate from anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills were analyzed to investigate the factors that control mercury methylation during the landfill stabilization process. At the early landfill stage, the total mercury (THg) and the monomethyl mercury (MMHg) released rapidly and significantly, the THg concentration of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate was obviously higher than that of the anaerobic landfill leachate, while compared with the semi-aerobic landfill, the MMHg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was higher. As the landfill time increased, both of THg and MMHg concentration decreased quickly, the THg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was much higher than that in semi-aerobic landfill, while the MMHg concentration in the anaerobic landfill was lower than that in the semi-aerobic landfill. Generally, the concentrations of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in the anaerobic landfill leachate were slightly higher than in the semi-aerobic landfill leachate during the stabilization process. A significant positive correlation was found between the DMHg concentrations and the pH value in anaerobic landfill leachate, but this correlation was opposite in the semi-aerobic landfill. The oxidative-reductive potential (ORP) condition was found to be the controlling factor of the methylation process during the early stage. However, the chemical characteristics, especially the TOC concentration, appeared to be the dominant factor affecting the methylation process as the landfill time increased. PMID:25218981

Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Li, Zhonggen; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Wentao

2015-01-01

390

Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal  

SciTech Connect

HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group

2009-09-15

391

Type Curves for Pressure Transient Analysis of Composite Double-Porosity Gas Reservoirs.  

E-print Network

??Economic production from unconventional gas reservoirs require horizontal drilling with multistage fracturing. These unconventional gas reservoirs include shale, tight gas reservoirs. Since there has been… (more)

Rana, Sachin

2011-01-01

392

Landfill NIMBY and Systems Engineering: A Paradigm for Urban Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solid waste management crisis exists in many parts of the US as a result of the inability to site new landfills to replace the consumed capacity of existing landfills. Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills can, and usually do, have a significant adverse impact on the individuals who own property in, reside in, or otherwise use, areas near the landfill.

G. Fred Lee; Anne Jones-Lee; Frederick Martin

393

Influence of a municipal solid waste landfill in the surrounding environment: toxicological risk and odor nuisance effects.  

PubMed

The large amounts of treated waste materials and the complex biological and physicochemical processes make the areas in the proximity of landfills vulnerable not only to emissions of potential toxic compounds but also to nuisance such as odor pollution. All these factors have a dramatic impact in the local environment producing environmental quality degradation. Most of the human health problems come from the landfill gas, from its non-methanic volatile organic compounds and from hazardous air pollutants. In addition several odorants are released during landfill operations and uncontrolled emissions. In this work we present an integrated risk assessment for emissions of hazard compounds and odor nuisance, to describe environmental quality in the landfill proximity. The study was based on sampling campaigns to acquire emission data for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene and vinyl chloride monomer and odor. All concentration values in the emissions from the landfill were measured and used in an air dispersion model to estimate maximum concentrations and depositions in correspondence to five sensitive receptors located in proximity of the landfill. Results for the different scenarios and cancer and non-cancer effects always showed risk estimates which were orders of magnitude below those accepted from the main international agencies (WHO, US EPA). Odor pollution was significant for a limited downwind area near the landfill appearing to be a significant risk factor of the damage to the local environment. PMID:24685488

Palmiotto, Marinella; Fattore, Elena; Paiano, Viviana; Celeste, Giorgio; Colombo, Andrea; Davoli, Enrico

2014-07-01

394

Public health assessment for Spickler Landfill, Spencer, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Region 5. Cerclis No. WID980902969. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Spickler Landfill is a former landfill located in the southwestern corner of Marathon County, Wisconsin, three miles northwest of the City of Marshfield. Spickler Landfill posed a public health hazard in the past because people who worked on the site or lived nearby probably inhaled asbestos dust particles when waste materials were received at the site. After the site stopped receiving waste the site posed an indeterminate public health hazard because inhalation of asbestos around the site may have continued because poor site maintenance, an inadequate landfill cap, and on-site excavations permitted asbestos-based waste material to come to the surface. Currently the Spickler Landfill poses no public health hazard. Groundwater is contaminated around the site from chemicals in the landfill, but contamination has not reached any nearby private wells. Methane landfill gas is being produced at the site and has been found at explosive levels in some monitoring locations immediately adjacent to the site. Leachate seeped to the surface at one location and flows away from the site. This seep provides a potential surface water pathway for contaminants to be carried from the site.

Not Available

1994-04-19

395

The effect of multiwalled carbon nanotube doping on the CO gas sensitivity of TiO2 xerogel composite film  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple sol-gel method was applied for the synthesis of 0.01 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-doped TiO2 xerogel composite film. The film's CO gas sensing properties were then evaluated. Doped MWCNTs were coated with TiO2 and distributed on a TiO2 xerogel matrix. The TiO2 xerogel showed an anatase structure after heat treatment at 450 °C under vacuum. The specific surface area of the composite material was larger than the pure TiO2 xerogel material. The CO gas sensitivity of the MWCNTs(0.01 wt%)-doped TiO2 xerogel composite film was found to be seven times higher than that of pure TiO2 xerogel film and to have good stability. This higher gas-sensing property of the composite film was due to both an increase of specific surface area and the n-p junction structure of the TiO2 xerogel coated on MWCNTs. The electrons generated from TiO2 after adsorption of CO gas induces electron transfer from the TiO2 to the MWCNTs. This induces a characteristic change in the MWCNTs from p-type to n-type, and the resistance of MWCNTs-doped TiO2 xerogel composite sensor is therefore decreased.

Lee, Jin-Seok; Ha, Tae-Jung; Hong, Min-Hee; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

2013-03-01

396

Quantifying methane oxidation from landfills using stable isotope analysis of downwind plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landfills are major contributors to the atmospheric CHâ budget. A major uncertainty in estimating CHâ emission by methanotrophic bacteria in the aerobic outer portions of the cover soil. These bacteria intercept the gas as it migrates toward the atmosphere. To estimate cover soil oxidation, the authors made seasonal measurements of the difference in the δ¹³C of CHâ within the anoxic

J. P. Chanton; C. M. Rutkowski; B. Mosher

1999-01-01

397

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Sauk County Landfill Site, Excelsior, WI, March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Sauk County landfill is located in the Town of Excelsior, Sauk County, Wisconsin. The selected source control remedy is Alternative B, Construction of a Gas Extraction System, as listed in the Focused Feasibility Study. The selected remedy is an operable unit that meets the solid waste disposal requirements of NR 500 to 520, Wis. Adm. Code.

Not Available

1994-09-01

398

Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection\\/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed

Banu Sizirici; Berrin Tansel; Vivek Kumar

2011-01-01

399

PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

400

Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landfill leachate emanating from old "dilute and disperse" sites represents a potential (and in many cases actual) threat to the integrity of groundwater. Indeed, this concern has been included in EU legislation (80/86/EEC), where key contaminants (e.g. ammonia, various toxic organic compounds and heavy metals) are explicitly highlighted in terms of their impact on groundwater. In the UK, whilst there are a substantial number of unlined landfills sited on majo