Science.gov

Sample records for lanthanide shift reagents

  1. Features of the reaction of heterocyclic analogs of chalcone with lanthanide shift reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Turov, A.V.; Khilya, V.P.

    1994-10-01

    The PMR spectra of heterocyclic analogs of 2-hydroxychalcone containing thiazole, benzofuran, triazole, imidazole, benzodioxane, or pyridine rings in the presence of lanthanide shift reagents are studied. It is found that the most effective reagent for modifying the spectra of these compounds is Yb(fod)3. The broadening of the spectra of 2-hydroxy chalcones in the presence of lanthanide shift reagents is explained by the dynamic effects of complex formation. An example is given of the determination of the conformation of molecules of 2-hydroxychalcone by the simultaneous use of lanthanide shift reagents and the homonuclear Overhauser effect. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Multiplexed Analysis of Peptide Functionality Using Lanthanide-based Structural Shift Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas J.; Gant-Branum, Randi L.; McLean, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Functionally selective lanthanide-based ion mobility shift reagents are presented as a method to elucidate protein or peptide structural information as well as relative quantitation of protein expression profiles. Sequence information and site localization of primary amines (n-terminus and lysine), phosphorylation sites, and cysteine residues can be obtained in a data dependent manner using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The high mass of the incorporated lanthanide ensures a significant shift of where the signal occurs in IM-MS conformation space. Peptide sequence information provided by the use of IM-MS shift reagents allows for both a more confident identification of peptides from complex mixtures and site localization following tandem MS experiments. Stable isotopes of the lanthanide series may also be used as relative quantitation labels since several lanthanides can be utilized in differential sample analyses. PMID:21966243

  3. Diamagnetic lanthanide tris beta-diketonates as organic-soluble chiral NMR shift reagents.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Thomas J; Wenzel, Bradford T

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic lanthanium(III) and lutetium(III) tris beta-diketonate complexes of 3-(trifluoroacetyl)-d-camphor, 3-(heptafluorobutyryl)-d-camphor, and d,d-dicampholylmethane are shown to be effective chiral NMR shift reagents for determining the enantiomeric purity of compounds with hard Lewis base functional groups. These include substrates with amine, alcohol, epoxide, sulfoxide, and oxaxolidine moieties. Enantiomeric discrimination is observed in the (1)H NMR spectrum. Diamagnetic lanthanide complexes represent an alternative to paramagnetic varieties that often cause too much line broadening in the NMR spectra. The choice of which metal to use varies with substrate. Similarly, there is no consistent trend with ligand as not one of the complexes is consistently better than the others for all substrates. The enantiomeric discrimination also varies with solvent. Comparisons show that the chiral recognition was usually larger in benzene-d(6) than in chloroform-d or cyclohexane-d(12). PMID:18506837

  4. Synthesis and Multinuclear Lanthanide Shift Reagent NMR Analysis of 1- and 2-Adamantanol: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Charles D., Jr.; Yoder, Claude H.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a project used in a junior-level laboratory in which students prepare two alcohols, characterize these compounds, and use a shift reagent for structure determination and peak assignment. Background information, materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Shift Reagents: Abnormal 13C Shifts Produced by Complexation of Lanthanide Chelates with Saturated Amines and n-Butyl Isocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Claude; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Roberts, John D.

    1973-01-01

    Lanthanide-induced shfits of 13C nuclear magnetic resonances are reported for several amines and n-butyl isocyanide. Contact contributions to such shifts, especially of β carbons, are clearly important for the chelates of Eu+3 and Pr+3. The importance of contact terms is shown to change in a rather predictable manner with the structure of the amine. PMID:16592062

  6. Lanthanide complexes of aminophosphonates as shift reagents for 7Li and 23Na NMR studies in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, R; Castro, M M; de Freitas, D M; Geraldes, C F

    1992-01-01

    A systematic NMR characterization of various Dy(III) complexes of linear and macrocyclic aminophosphonates as 7Li and 23Na NMR shift reagents for biological systems was undertaken. Their efficacy as shift reagents (SR) was tested under constant aqueous solution ionic strength conditions at pH 7.5 as a function of rho = [SR]/[M+]. Further characterization of the two best SRs, Dy(PcPcP)2(7-) and Dy(DOTP)5-, led to the conclusion that, although quite sensitive to solution pH and the presence of alkali metal ions and Mg2+ and Ca2+, these complexes were stable towards hydrolysis by phosphatases. The lack of precipitation of its solutions in the presence of Ca2+, allowed the choice of Dy(DOTP)5- as the best overall SR for biological studies. Other SRs, like Dy(TTHA)3-, although less sensitive to pH and to divalent ions, require significantly higher concentrations to yield the same shifts, leading to large bulk susceptibility artifacts in perfused tissues and organs. PMID:1467337

  7. Selectivity enhancement of Arsenazo(III) reagent towards heavier lanthanides using polyaminocarboxylic acids: A spectrophotometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, Komal; Mittal, Susheel K.; Ashok Kumar, S. K.; Sahoo, Suban K.

    2015-06-01

    A new study has been conducted to quantify lanthanide(III) ions using Arsenazo III-polyaminocarboxylic acid (PACA) system. The study disclosed two different analytically important information: (i) λmax of lanthanide-Arsenazo III complexes for lighter lanthanides like Ce(III) and Nd(III) did not shift from its original position on addition of PACA and (ii) for heavier lanthanides like Dy(III), Tm(III) and Lu(III) a new λmax at 538 nm was observed, while wavelengths at 610 nm and 654 nm were disappeared in presence of ethylenediaminetertracetic acid (EDTA) and trans-1,2-Diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (DCTA), further the intensity of peak decreased with increase in lanthanide(III) ion concentration. Effect of ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine-N,N‧,N‧-triacetic acid (EDTA-OH) on Arsenzo(III)-Ln(III) complex is very weak and there is no analytically importance of such interaction. Moreover, this work confirms that Nd(III) and heavy lanthanides can be successfully determined with high accuracy in the working range of concentration of these metal ions.

  8. Ready to use dry-reagent PCR assays for the four common bacterial pathogens using switchable lanthanide luminescence probe system.

    PubMed

    Lehmusvuori, A; Soikkeli, M; Tuunainen, E; Seppä, T; Spangar, A; Rantakokko-Jalava, K; von Lode, P; Karhunen, U; Soukka, T; Wittfooth, S

    2015-11-01

    Ready to use dry-reagent PCR assays for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and for broad-range bacteria detection were developed. The assays were based on novel switchable lanthanide probes that provide sensitive target DNA detection with exceptionally high signal-to-background ratio, thus enabling clear discrimination between positive and negative results. For example, sensitivity of three S. aureus and two S. pneumonia bacteria (colony forming units) per PCR assay was measured with fluorescence signal more than 30 times over the background signal level. The rapid and easy-to-use assays are suitable for routine clinical diagnostics without molecular biology expertise and facilities. PMID:26342433

  9. A caged lanthanide complex as a paramagnetic shift agent for protein NMR.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Miguel; Rohovec, Jan; Peters, Joop A; Tocheva, Elitza; Boulanger, Martin J; Murphy, Michael E P; Hupkes, Hermen-Jan; Kosters, Walter; Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2004-07-01

    A lanthanide complex, named CLaNP (caged lanthanide NMR probe) has been developed for the characterisation of proteins by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. The probe consists of a lanthanide chelated by a derivative of DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) with two thiol reactive functional groups. The CLaNP molecule is attached to a protein by two engineered, surface-exposed, Cys residues in a bidentate manner. This drastically limits the dynamics of the metal relative to the protein and enables measurements of pseudocontact shifts. NMR spectroscopy experiments on a diamagnetic control and the crystal structure of the probe-protein complex demonstrate that the protein structure is not affected by probe attachment. The probe is able to induce pseudocontact shifts to at least 40 A from the metal and causes residual dipolar couplings due to alignment at a high magnetic field. The molecule exists in several isomeric forms with different paramagnetic tensors; this provides a fast way to obtain long-range distance restraints. PMID:15224334

  10. Synthesis and optical properties of macrocyclic lanthanide(III) chelates as new reagents for luminescent biolabeling.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Sébastien; Galaup, Chantal; Poole, Robert; Mestre-Voegtlé, Béatrice; Soldevila, Stéphanie; Leygue, Nadine; Bazin, Hervé; Lamarque, Laurent; Picard, Claude

    2012-11-14

    The convenient and efficient synthesis of two macrocyclic ligands (15- and 18-membered) based on a dipyrido-6,7,8,9-tetrahydrophenazine (dpqc) or 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (tpy) heterocycle and a DTTA (diethylenetriaminetriacetic acid) skeleton is described. In these ligands the DTTA skeleton contains an additional extracyclic functionality (NH(2) group) suitable for covalent attachment to bioactive molecules. These octa- and nonadentate ligands form very stable and luminescent neutral lanthanide complexes in aqueous solutions at physiological pH. The corresponding Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes are characterized by a maximum absorption wavelength compatible with nitrogen laser excitation (337 nm) and attractive lifetimes and quantum yields. Further introduction of a maleimide bioconjugatable handle in the Eu(III) complexes was investigated and a valuable luminescence brightness above 1500 dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1) at 337 nm was obtained with the corresponding Eu(III) tpy-derivative. Finally, these two luminescent chelates were grafted onto thiol residues of a model antibody (Mab GSS11) without loss of their luminescent properties. PMID:23011114

  11. Pulse EPR-enabled interpretation of scarce pseudocontact shifts induced by lanthanide binding tags.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Elwy H; Yao, Xuejun; Feintuch, Akiva; Adams, Luke A; Aurelio, Luigi; Graham, Bim; Goldfarb, Daniella; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCS) induced by tags loaded with paramagnetic lanthanide ions provide powerful long-range structure information, provided the location of the metal ion relative to the target protein is known. Usually, the metal position is determined by fitting the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) tensor to the 3D structure of the protein in an 8-parameter fit, which requires a large set of PCSs to be reliable. In an alternative approach, we used multiple Gd(3+)-Gd(3+) distances measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) experiments to define the metal position, allowing Δχ-tensor determinations from more robust 5-parameter fits that can be performed with a relatively sparse set of PCSs. Using this approach with the 32 kDa E. coli aspartate/glutamate binding protein (DEBP), we demonstrate a structural transition between substrate-bound and substrate-free DEBP, supported by PCSs generated by C3-Tm(3+) and C3-Tb(3+) tags attached to a genetically encoded p-azidophenylalanine residue. The significance of small PCSs was magnified by considering the difference between the chemical shifts measured with Tb(3+) and Tm(3+) rather than involving a diamagnetic reference. The integrative sparse data approach developed in this work makes poorly soluble proteins of limited stability amenable to structural studies in solution, without having to rely on cysteine mutations for tag attachment. PMID:26597990

  12. The solution structure of Ln (DOTP) 5- complexxes. A comparison of lanthanide-induced paramagnetic shifts with the MMX energy-minimized structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.; Sherry, A. Dean; Kiefer, Garry E.

    Complexes between the trivalent lanthanide ions and the macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- N,N',N″,N‴-tetra(methylene phosphonate) (DOTP) have been examined by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The proton spectra of the diamagnetic La(DOTP) 5- and Lu(DOTP) 5- complexes provide evidence for very rigid chelate structures with the ethylenediamine-containing chelate rings essentially locked into a single conformation at room temperature. The activation energy for ethylenediamine chelate ring interconversions in these complexes is approximately 100 kJ mol -1, considerably higher than that reported previously for the corresponding Ln(DOTA) - complexes (DOTA is the tetraacetate analog of DOTP). Lanthanide-induced shifts are reported for all 1H, 13C, and 31P nuclei in 11 Ln(DOTP) 5- complexes. The proton spectra of these complexes display unusually large lanthanide-induced shifts, one showing a spectrum in which the 1H resonances span 900 ppm. The contact and pseudocontact contributions to these shifts were separated using Reilley's temperature-independent method and the resulting pseudocontact lanthanide-induced NMR shifts were in excellent agreement with those calculated for a structure derived using MMX molecular modeling methods. The pseudocontact shifts provide evidence for Ln (DOTP) 5- chelates which have virtually identical structures along the lanthanide series, with the possible exception of Tm(DOTP) 5-.

  13. Highly Emitting Near-Infrared Lanthanide “Encapsulated Sandwich” Metallacrown Complexes with Excitation Shifted Toward Lower Energy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent lanthanide complexes hold great promise for practical applications, as their optical properties have several complementary advantages over organic fluorophores and semiconductor nanoparticles. The fundamental challenge for lanthanide luminescence is their sensitization through suitable chromophores. The use of the metallacrown (MC) motif is an innovative strategy to arrange several organic sensitizers at a well-controlled distance from a lanthanide cation. Herein we report a series of lanthanide “encapsulated sandwich” MC complexes of the form Ln3+[12-MCZn(II),quinHA-4]2[24-MCZn(II),quinHA-8] (Ln3+[Zn(II)MCquinHA]) in which the MC framework is formed by the self-assembly of Zn2+ ions and tetradentate chromophoric ligands based on quinaldichydroxamic acid (quinHA). A first-generation of luminescent MCs was presented previously but was limited due to excitation wavelengths in the UV. We report here that through the design of the chromophore of the MC assembly, we have significantly shifted the absorption wavelength toward lower energy (450 nm). In addition to this near-visible inter- and/or intraligand charge transfer absorption, Ln3+[Zn(II)MCquinHA] exhibits remarkably high quantum yields, long luminescence lifetimes (CD3OD; Yb3+, QLnL = 2.88(2)%, τobs = 150.7(2) μs; Nd3+, QLnL = 1.35(1)%, τobs = 4.11(3) μs; Er3+, QLnL = 3.60(6)·10–2%, τobs = 11.40(3) μs), and excellent photostability. Quantum yields of Nd3+ and Er3+ MCs in the solid state and in deuterated solvents, upon excitation at low energy, are the highest values among NIR-emitting lanthanide complexes containing C–H bonds. The versatility of the MC strategy allows modifications in the excitation wavelength and absorptivity through the appropriate design of the ligand sensitizer, providing a highly efficient platform with tunable properties. PMID:24432702

  14. Peptide-lanthanide cation equilibria in aqueous phase. I. Bound shifts for L-carnosine-praseodymium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossoyan, J.; Asso, M.; Benlian, D.

    L-Carnosine complexes of Pr 3+ were characterized in aqueous solution by 1H NMR and potentiometric titration. A rigorous treatment of chemical shifts and pH variation data with lanthanide concentration is presented. Two different forms of the peptide ligand, forming simultaneously two complexes, were taken into account. At low pH values the cation is only coordinated at the carboxylate site of the ligand in a weak complex ( β2 = 6) whereas in neutral solution a stronger complex ( β1 = 37) is present as a consequence of the deprotonation of the imidazole ring. The computation of induced bound shifts † 2 and Δ1 for resonating nuclei of the peptide in both forms yields consistent figures. These provide the experimental basis for a conformational model which is usually not obtainable for labile complexes with low stability constants.

  15. Strategies for the uses of lanthanide NMR shift probes in the determination of protein structure in solutio. Application to the EF calcium binding site of carp parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Sykes, B D

    1980-10-01

    The homologous sequences observed for many calcium binding proteins such as parvalbumin, troponin C, the myosin light chains, and calmodulin has lead to the hypothesis that these proteins have homologous structures at the level of their calcium binding sites. This paper discusses the development of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique which will enable us to test this structural hypothesis in solution. The technique involves the substitution of a paramagnetic lanthanide ion for the calcium ion which results in lanthanide induced shifts and broadening in the 1H NMR spectrum of the protein. These shifts are sensitive monitors of the precise geometrical orientation of each proton nucleus relative to the metal. The values of several parameters in the equation relating the NMR shifts to the structure are however known as priori. We have attempted to determine these parameters, the orientation and principal elements of the magnetic susceptibility tensor of the protein bound metal, by studying the lanthanide induced shifts for the protein parvalbumin whose structure has been determined by x-ray crystallographic techniques. The interaction of the lanthanide ytterbium with parvalbumin results in high resolution NMR spectra exhibiting a series of resonances with shifts spread over the range 32 to -19 ppm. The orientation and principal elements of the ytterbium magnetic susceptibility tensor have been determined using three assigned NMR resonances, the His-26 C2 and C4 protons and the amino terminal acetyl protons, and seven methyl groups; all with known geometry relative to the EF calcium binding site. The elucidation of these parameters has allowed us to compare the observed spectrum of the nuclei surrounding the EF calcium binding site of parvalbumin with that calculated from the x-ray structure. A significant number of the calculated shifts are larger than any of the observed shifts. We feel that a refinement of the x-ray based proton coordinates will be possible

  16. A Cobalt(III) Chiroporphyrin and Its Amine Adducts. A Potential Chiral NMR Shift Reagent for Amines.

    PubMed

    Toronto, Dawn; Sarrazin, Françoise; Pécaut, Jacques; Marchon, Jean-Claude; Shang, Maoyu; Scheidt, W. Robert

    1998-02-01

    The chlorocobalt(III) complex of alphabetaalphabeta-tetramethylchiroporphyrin, CoCl(TMCP), has been prepared as a potential enantioselective host or chiral NMR shift reagent for optically active amines. The X-ray structure of CoCl(OHCH(2)CH(3))(TMCP) shows the six-coordinate cobalt(III) ion at the center of a strongly ruffled porphyrin. The 2-fold-disordered ethanol ligand interacts with the chiroporphyrin host by two C-H.O hydrogen bonds to the carbonyl groups of two ester substituents. Primary amines bind to this diamagnetic cobalt(III) center to form cationic 2:1 complexes in which the (1)H NMR resonances of the axial ligands are shifted upfield of tetramethylsilane by the porphyrin ring current. Coordinated enantiopure 2-alkylamines exhibit NMR signals for the protons of the amine group which are characteristic of their (R or S) absolute configuration. The bis-complexes of the same amines in racemic form exist as three different species, (R,R), (S,S), and (R,S), in 1:1:2 relative ratios. Negligible enantioselection by the chiral host suggests kinetic control of bis(amine) complex formation on cobalt(III). The X-ray structure of the bis((S)-2-butylamine) complex [Co((S)-NH(2)CH(CH(3))CH(2)CH(3))(2)(TMCP)][CoCl(4)](0.5) shows a 2-fold-disordered amine on one face of the porphyrin only. The unique amine on the other face is held within the porphyrin groove by a network of weak interactions including N-H.O and C-H.O hydrogen bonds. With its ability to induce good resolution of axial ligand (1)H NMR resonances and slow dissociation kinetics of its bis-adducts, CoCl(TMCP) may be useful as a chiral NMR shift reagent for conformational studies of chiral amines and as an analytical reagent for the determination of their enantiomer composition. PMID:11670304

  17. Potential lanthanide ion selective reagents. 3. Metal complex formation with 1,7-diaza-4,10-13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.A.; Ochaya, V.O.

    1986-01-29

    Stability constants for the ligand 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (dapda or K21DA) with the lanthanides and several other metal ions have been determined at 25 /sup 0/C in aqueous 0.1 M (CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/NCl medium by a potentiometric method. The results obtained are compared to those obtained for a similar ligand of large cavity size, 1,20-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (dacda or K22DA), which has been previously studied and reported. The stability of dapda is found to reach a peak at Eu(III) with the lanthanide series and is rationalized in terms of the matching of the ligand properties with metal ion characteristics. The transition-metal ions Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) all form stronger dapda (as compared to dacda) complexes due to a better match of the ligand cavity size and metal ion radius. 18 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Secret lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Sturza, C M

    2014-09-15

    Lanthanides are a group of 15 chemical elements which, together with their salts, have come to be used in the last decade as homoeopathic remedies. The effective introduction of lanthanides and their salts into the clinical use, as homoeopathic remedies was based on the idea of Jan Scholten, MD to relate their physicochemical properties shown in the periodic table of elements to their homoeopathic potential. The lanthanides and their salts were prepared as homoeopathic remedies by Pharmacist Robert Münz. PMID:25408760

  19. Shift reagents in ion mobility spectrometry: the effect of the number of interaction sites, size and interaction energies on the mobilities of valinol and ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-05-01

    Overlapping peaks interfere in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), but they are separated introducing mobility shift reagents (SR) in the buffer gas forming adducts with different collision cross-sections (size). IMS separations using SR depend on the ion mobility shifts which are governed by adduct's size and interaction energies (stabilities). Mobility shifts of valinol and ethanolamine ions were measured by electrospray-ionization ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MS). Methyl-chloro propionate (M) was used as SR; 2-butanol (B) and nitrobenzene (N) were used for comparison. Density functional theory was used for calculations. B produced the smallest mobility shifts because of its small size. M and N have two strong interaction sites (oxygen atoms) and similar molecular mass, and they should produce similar shifts. For both ethanolamine and valinol ions, stabilities were larger for N adducts than those of M. With ethanolamine, M produced a 68% shift, large compared to that using N, 61%, because M has a third weak interaction site on the chlorine atom and, therefore, M has more interaction possibilities than N. This third site overrode the oxygen atoms' interaction energy that favored the adduction of ethanolamine with N over that with M. On the contrary, with valinol mobility shifts were larger with N than with M (21 vs 18%) because interaction energy favored even more adduction of valinol with N than with M; that is, the interaction energy difference between adducts of valinol with M and N was larger than that between those adducts with ethanolamine, and the third M interaction could not override this larger difference. Mobility shifts were explained based on the number of SR's interaction sites, size of ions and SR, and SR-ion interaction energies. This is the first time that the number of interaction sites is used to explain mobility shifts in SR-assisted IMS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194523

  20. Secret Lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Sturza, CM

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lanthanides are a group of 15 chemical elements which, together with their salts, have come to be used in the last decade as homoeopathic remedies. The effective introduction of lanthanides and their salts into the clinical use, as homoeopathic remedies was based on the idea of Jan Scholten, MD to relate their physicochemical properties shown in the periodic table of elements to their homoeopathic potential. The lanthanides and their salts were prepared as homoeopathic remedies by Pharmacist Robert Münz. PMID:25408760

  1. An encodable lanthanide binding tag with reduced size and flexibility for measuring residual dipolar couplings and pseudocontact shifts in large proteins.

    PubMed

    Barb, Adam W; Subedi, Ganesh P

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions serve important roles in structural biology applications from long-range perturbations seen in magnetic resonance experiments to electron-dense signatures in X-ray crystallography data; however, the metal ion must be secured in a molecular framework to achieve the maximum benefit. Polypeptide-based lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) represent one option that can be directly encoded within a recombinant protein expression construct. However, LBTs often exhibit significant mobility relative to the target molecule. Here we report the characterization of improved LBTs sequences for insertion into a protein loop. These LBTs were inserted to connect two parallel alpha helices of an immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding Z domain platform. Variants A and B bound Tb(3+) with high affinity (0.70 and 0.13 μM, respectively) and displayed restricted LBT motion. Compared to the parent construct, the metal-bound A experienced a 2.5-fold reduction in tag motion as measured by magnetic field-induced residual dipolar couplings and was further studied in a 72.2 kDa complex with the human IgG1 fragment crystallizable (IgG1 Fc) glycoprotein. The appearance of both pseudo-contact shifts (-0.221 to 0.081 ppm) and residual dipolar couplings (-7.6 to 14.3 Hz) of IgG1 Fc resonances in the IgG1 Fc:(variant A:Tb(3+))2 complex indicated structural restriction of the LBT with respect to the Fc. These studies highlight the applicability of improved LBT sequences with reduced mobility to probe the structure of macromolecular systems. PMID:26728077

  2. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  3. 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance studies of perfused rat hearts. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular ions using a shift reagent.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, M M; Frazer, J C; Dedrick, D F; Ingwall, J S; Allen, P D; Springer, C S; Smith, T W

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution 23Na and 39K nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of perfused, beating rat hearts have been obtained in the absence and presence of the downfield shift reagent Dy(TTHA)3- in the perfusing medium. Evidence indicates that Dy(TTHA)3- enters essentially all extracellular spaces but does not enter intracellular spaces. It can thus be used to discriminate the resonances of the ions in these spaces. Experiments supporting this conclusion include interventions that inhibit the Na+/K+ pump such as the inclusion of ouabain in and the exclusion of K+ from the perfusing medium. In each of these experiments, a peak corresponding to intracellular sodium increased in intensity. In the latter experiment, the increase was reversed when the concentration of K+ in the perfusing medium was returned to normal. When the concentration of Ca2+ in the perfusing medium was also returned to normal, the previously quiescent heart resumed beating. In the beating heart where the Na+/K+ pump was not inhibited, the intensity of the intracellular Na+ resonance was less than 20% of that expected. Although the data are more sparse, the NMR visibility of the intracellular K+ signal appears to be no more than 20%. PMID:4016206

  4. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance determination of metal-protn distances in the EF site of carp parvalbumin using the susceptibility contribution to the line broadening of lanthanide-shifted resonances.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Sykes, B D

    1980-07-01

    The substitution of the paramagnetic lanthanide ion ytterbium for the calcium ion in the EF calcium binding site of carp parvalbumin results in a series of 1H NMR resonances which are shifted well outside of the envelope of the 1H NMR spectrum of the diamagnetic form of the protein. The line broadening of these shifted resonances has been measured as a function of 1H NMR frequency between 200 and 400 MHz, and the spin-lattice relaxation rates have been measured at 270 MHz. The analysis of the relaxation rates based upon the theories of Vega & Fiat [Vega, A. J., & Fiat, D. (1976) Mol. Phys. 31, 347-355] and Guéron [Guéron, M. (1975) J. Magn. Reson. 19, 58-66] indicates that a major contribution to the line widths comes from the novel susceptibility relaxation mechanism and that the metal to proton distances can be directly calculated from this contribution. PMID:7407042

  6. Comparison of Crystal Field Dependent and Independent Methods to Analyse Lanthanide Induced NMR Shifts in Axially Symmetric Complexes. Part II: Systems with a C4 Symmetry Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanrong; Sherry, A. Dean

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the LIS data for several series of Ln3+ complexes of C4 symmetry in terms of structural changes, crystal-field effects and/or variation of hyperfine constants along the lanthanide series was undertaken using a combination of the two-nuclei and three-nuclei techniques together with the classical onenucleus technique. Isostructurality of whole series of complexes, with changes of the Fi, and B02 parameters, was clearly defined for the complexes of L by the combination of the two first methods. Small changes, involving the three Fi, Gi and B02 parameters, are observed for the series of complexes of L-L4, using the three data plotting methods. Some of the plots according to the two- and three-nuclei methods are accidentally linear, without necessarily implying isostructurality of the complexes, as they involve parameters, which may be insensitive to any small structural changes occurring in these systems. These parameter variations could result from a magnification, by the present graphical analysis, of the breaks expected from the gradual structural changes along the series due to the lanthanide contraction. The α and β parameters of the three-nuclei method are not diagnostic of the type of structures the complexes have in solution, due to their very indirect dependence on the geometric factors. PMID:18365039

  7. Lanthanide-containing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1987-01-01

    The preparation of a variety of lanthanide-containing polyimide films is described, and results of their characterization are presented. The properties investigated include the glass transition temperature, thermooxidative stability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity of the polymer. Films containing lanthanide chlorides, fluorides, and sulfides are flexible, but those containing lanthanide nitrates are extremely brittle. The addition of lanthanide acetates and acetylacetonates caused immediate gelation of two of the synthesis-mixture ingredients. It was found that, in general, the addition of lanthanide to the polyimide increases the density and glass transition temperature of the polymer but slightly decreases the thermooxidative stability.

  8. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  9. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  10. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  11. The Lanthanide Contraction Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Oliver, Allen G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-04-19

    A complete, isostructural series of lanthanide complexes (except Pm) with the ligand TREN-1,2-HOIQO has been synthesized and structurally characterized by means of single-crystal X-ray analysis. All complexes are 1D-polymeric species in the solid state, with the lanthanide being in an eight-coordinate, distorted trigonal-dodecahedral environment with a donor set of eight unique oxygen atoms. This series constitutes the first complete set of isostructural lanthanide complexes with a ligand of denticity greater than two. The geometric arrangement of the chelating moieties slightly deviates across the lanthanide series, as analyzed by a shape parameter metric based on the comparison of the dihedral angles along all edges of the coordination polyhedron. The apparent lanthanide contraction in the individual Ln-O bond lengths deviates considerably from the expected quadratic decrease that was found previously in a number of complexes with ligands of low denticity. The sum of all bond lengths around the trivalent metal cation, however, is more regular, showing an almost ideal quadratic behavior across the entire series. The quadratic nature of the lanthanide contraction is derived theoretically from Slater's model for the calculation of ionic radii. In addition, the sum of all distances along the edges of the coordination polyhedron show exactly the same quadratic dependency as the Ln-X bond lengths. The universal validity of this coordination sphere contraction, concomitant with the quadratic decrease in Ln-X bond lengths, was confirmed by reexamination of four other, previously published, almost complete series of lanthanide complexes. Due to the importance of multidentate ligands for the chelation of rare-earth metals, this result provides a significant advance for the prediction and rationalization of the geometric features of the corresponding lanthanide complexes, with great potential impact for all aspects of lanthanide coordination.

  12. Citrate-based {open_quotes}Talspeak{close_quotes} actinide-lanthanide separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.; Bond, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Lanthanide elements are produced in relatively high yield by fission of {sup 235}U. Almost all the lanthanide isotopes decay to stable nonradioactive lanthanide isotopes in a relatively short time. Consequently, it is highly advantageous to separate the relatively small actinide fraction from the relatively large quantities of lanthanide isotopes. The TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. Previous work based on the use of lactic or glycolic acid has shown deleterious effects of some impurity ions such as zirconium(IV), even at concentrations on the order of 10{sup {minus}4} M. Other perceived problems were the need to maintain the pH and reagent concentrations within a narrow range and a significant solubility of the organic phase at high carboxylic acid concentrations. The authors` cold experiments showed that replacing the traditional extractants glycolic or lactic acid with citric acid eliminates or greatly reduces the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium. An extensive series of batch tests was done using a wide range of reagent concentrations at different pH values, temperatures, and contact times. The results demonstrated that the citrate-based TALSPEAK can tolerate appreciable changes in pH and reagent concentrations while maintaining an adequate lanthanide extraction. Experiments using a three-stage glass mixer-settler showed a good lanthanide extraction, appropriate phase disengagement, no appreciable deleterious effects due to the presence of impurities such as zirconium, excellent pH buffering, and no significant loss of organic phase.

  13. Thermolysis of lanthanide dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Boncher, William L.; Regulacio, Michelle D.; Stoll, Sarah L.

    2010-01-15

    Polycrystalline lanthanide sulfide materials were formed at low temperatures using a single-source precursor based on the lanthanide dithiocarbamate complex. The synthesis temperatures are generally lower than standard solid state preparations, avoid toxic sulfurizing gases and provide a convenient route to prepare lanthanide chalcogenide nanoparticles. Depending on the reaction conditions and oxophilicity of the lanthanide, the sulfide material was formed with oxidized products including oxysulfides, oxysulfates and the oxide. - Graphical abstract: Polycrystalline lanthanide sulfide materials were formed at low temperatures using a single-source precursor based on the lanthanide dithiocarbamate complex.

  14. Solvent extraction of lanthanides with N-m-nitrobenzoyl- and N-m-cyanobenzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Sadanobu

    1995-03-01

    The solvent extraction of lanthanides (Ln) with N-m-nitrobenzoyl- and N-m-cyanobenzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine, was investigated. The representative lanthanides (Yb, Ho, Eu, Pr and La) were all found to extract with compounds as self-adducts of the form, LnL{sub 3}(HL){sub 3}, where L and HL denote the ligand anion and neutral ligand, respectively. The extraction constant and separation factor were compared with those of the N-p-octyloxy derivative bof N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine previously reported. The correlation between extractability, mutual separability of lanthanides and acidity of the reagent were discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Handling Pyrophoric Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Haynie, Todd O.

    2009-08-14

    Pyrophoric reagents are extremely hazardous. Special handling techniques are required to prevent contact with air and the resulting fire. This document provides several methods for working with pyrophoric reagents outside of an inert atmosphere.

  16. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  17. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  18. Lanthanide ion (III) complexes of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate (DOTA-4AmP8−) for dual biosensing of pH with CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Ali, Meser M.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Relaxivity based magnetic resonance of phosphonated ligands chelated with gadolinium (Gd3+) shows promise for pH imaging. However instead of monitoring the paramagnetic effect of lanthanide complexes on the relaxivity of water protons, biosensor (or molecular) imaging with magnetic resonance is also possible by detecting either the non-exchangeable or the exchangeable protons on the lanthanide complexes themselves. The non-exchangeable protons (e.g., –CHx, where 3≥x≥1) are detected using a three-dimensional chemical shift imaging method called Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), whereas the exchangeable protons (e.g., –OH or –NHy, where 2≥y≥1) are measured with Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) contrast. Here we tested the feasibility of BIRDS and CEST for pH imaging of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate (DOTA-4AmP8−) chelated with thulium (Tm3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+). BIRDS and CEST experiments show that both complexes are responsive to pH and temperature changes. Higher pH and temperature sensitivities are obtained with BIRDS for either complex when using the chemical shift difference between two proton resonances vs. using the chemical shift of a single proton resonance, thereby eliminating the need to use water resonance as reference. While CEST contrast for both agents is linearly dependent on pH within a relatively large range (i.e., 6.3-7.9), much stronger CEST contrast is obtained with YbDOTA-4AmP5− than with TmDOTA-4AmP5−. In addition, we demonstrate the prospect of using BIRDS to calibrate CEST as new platform for quantitative pH imaging. PMID:24801742

  19. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  20. Bifunctional organophosphorus liquid-liquid extraction reagents: development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, W.W.; Navratil, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    American and Russian workers have evidenced great interest in the last decade in the potential application of certain neutral and acidic bifunctional organophosphorus compounds in solvent extraction processes. Triggering this interest is the ability of some carbamoylmethylenephosphorus (CMP) and carbamoylmethylenephosphine oxide (CMPO) compounds to extract trivalent actinides and lanthanides from strong HNO/sub 3/ (>1 M) solutions, a property which distinguishes them from monofunctional organophosphorus reagents. Investigators at several US Department of Energy laboratories have concentrated on synthesis of novel CMP and CMPO reagents and on reactions and mechanisms involved in extraction of metal ions from aqueous nitrate media; application of selected CMP and CMPO reagents in solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane recovery of metal values from nuclear waste solutions have been proposed. This paper, based upon a book now in preparation, provides a brief overview of the current status of the development and application of bifunctional organophosphorus extractants. 44 references, 4 tables.

  1. Bifunctional organophosphorus liquid-liquid extraction reagents: development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, W.W.; Navratil, J.D.

    1984-03-13

    American and Russian workers have evidenced great interest in the last decade in the potential application of certain neutral and acidic bifunctional organophosphorus compounds in solvent extraction processes. Triggering this interest is the ability of some carbamoylmethylenephosphorus (CMP) and carbamoylmethylenephosphine oxide (CMPO) compounds to extract trivalent actinides and lanthanides from strong HNO/sub 3/ (>1M) solutions, a property which distinguishes them from monofunctional organophosphorus reagents. Investigators at several US Department of Energy laboratories have concentrated on synthesis of novel CMP and CMPO reagents and on reactions and mechanisms involved in extraction of metal ions from aqueous nitrate media; application of selected CMP and CMPO reagents in solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane recovery of metal values from nuclear waste solutions have been proposed. This paper, based upon a book now in preparation, provides a brief overview of the current status of the development and application of bifunctional organophosphorus extractants. 42 references, 4 tables.

  2. Advancing the scientific basis of trivalent actinide-lanthanide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.

    2013-07-01

    For advanced fuel cycles designed to support transmutation of transplutonium actinides, several options have been demonstrated for process-scale aqueous separations for U, Np, Pu management and for partitioning of trivalent actinides and fission product lanthanides away from other fission products. The more difficult mutual separation of Am/Cm from La-Tb remains the subject of considerable fundamental and applied research. The chemical separations literature teaches that the most productive alternatives to pursue are those based on ligand donor atoms less electronegative than O, specifically N- and S-containing complexants and chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). These 'soft-donor' atoms have exhibited usable selectivity in their bonding interactions with trivalent actinides relative to lanthanides. In this report, selected features of soft donor reagent design, characterization and application development will be discussed. The roles of thiocyanate, aminopoly-carboxylic acids and lactate in separation processes are detailed. (authors)

  3. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Petoud, Stephane; Xu, Jide

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  4. Citrate based ``TALSPEAK`` lanthanide-actinide separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Bond, W.D.; Toth, L.M.; Davis, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The potential hazard posed to future generations by long-lived radionuclides such as the transuranic elements (TRU) is perceived as a major problem associated with the use of nuclear power. TRU wastes have to remain isolated from the environment for ``geological`` periods of time. The costs of building, maintaining, and operating a ``geological TRU repository`` can be very high. Therefore, there are significant economical advantages in segregating the relatively low volume of TRU wastes from other nuclear wastes. The chemical behavior of lanthanides and actinides, 4f and 5f elements respectively, is rather similar. As a consequence, the separation of these two groups is difficult. The ``TALSPEAK`` process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. The method is based on the preferential complexation of the trivalent actinides by an aminopolyacetic acid. Cold experiments showed that by using citric acid the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium are greatly reduced.

  5. Tropomyosin isoforms and reagents

    PubMed Central

    Schevzov, Galina; Whittaker, Shane P; Fath, Thomas; Lin, Jim JC

    2011-01-01

    Tropomyosins are rod-like dimers which form head-to-tail polymers along the length of actin filaments and regulate the access of actin binding proteins to the filaments.1 The diversity of tropomyosin isoforms, over 40 in mammals, and their role in an increasing number of biological processes presents a challenge both to experienced researchers and those new to this field. The increased appreciation that the role of these isoforms expands beyond that of simply stabilizing actin filaments has lead to a surge of reagents and techniques to study their function and mechanisms of action. This report is designed to provide a basic guide to the genes and proteins and the availability of reagents which allow effective study of this family of proteins. We highlight the value of combining multiple techniques to better evaluate the function of different tm isoforms and discuss the limitations of selected reagents. Brief background material is included to demystify some of the unfortunate complexity regarding this multi-gene family of proteins including the unconventional nomenclature of the isoforms and the evolutionary relationships of isoforms between species. Additionally, we present step-by-step detailed experimental protocols used in our laboratory to assist new comers to the field and experts alike. PMID:22069507

  6. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  7. Use of soft heterocyclic N-donor ligands to separate actinides and lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Michael J; Harwood, Laurence M; Laventine, Dominic M; Lewis, Frank W

    2013-04-01

    The removal of the most long-lived radiotoxic elements from used nuclear fuel, minor actinides, is foreseen as an essential step toward increasing the public acceptance of nuclear energy as a key component of a low-carbon energy future. Once removed from the remaining used fuel, these elements can be used as fuel in their own right in fast reactors or converted into shorter-lived or stable elements by transmutation prior to geological disposal. The SANEX process is proposed to carry out this selective separation by solvent extraction. Recent efforts to develop reagents capable of separating the radioactive minor actinides from lanthanides as part of a future strategy for the management and reprocessing of used nuclear fuel are reviewed. The current strategies for the reprocessing of PUREX raffinate are summarized, and some guiding principles for the design of actinide-selective reagents are defined. The development and testing of different classes of solvent extraction reagent are then summarized, covering some of the earliest ligand designs right through to the current reagents of choice, bis(1,2,4-triazine) ligands. Finally, we summarize research aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the underlying reasons for the excellent extraction capabilities and high actinide/lanthanide selectivities shown by this class of ligands and our recent efforts to immobilize these reagents onto solid phases. PMID:22867058

  8. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    SciTech Connect

    Anstey, Mitchell; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves %22Click%22 chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  9. The Lanthanide Contraction beyond Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ferru, Geoffroy; Reinhart, Benjamin; Bera, Mrinal K; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Qiao, Baofu; Ellis, Ross J

    2016-05-10

    The lanthanide contraction is conceptualized traditionally through coordination chemistry. Here we break this mold in a structural study of lanthanide ions dissolved in an amphiphilic liquid. The lanthanide contraction perturbs the weak interactions between molecular aggregates that drive mesoscale assembly and emergent behavior. The weak interactions correlate with lanthanide ion transport properties, suggesting new strategies for rare-earth separation that exploit forces outside of the coordination sphere. PMID:27060294

  10. Lanthanides: New life metals?

    PubMed

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanides (Ln(3+)) that are Rare Earth Elements, until recently thought to be biologically inert, have recently emerged as essential metals for activity and expression of a special type of methanol dehydrogenase, XoxF. As XoxF enzyme homologs are encoded in a wide variety of microbes, including microbes active in important environmental processes such as methane and methanol metabolism, Ln(3+) may represent some of the key biogeochemical drivers in cycling of carbon and other elements. However, significant gaps in understanding the role of Ln(3+) in biological systems remain as the functions of most of the proteins potentially dependent of Ln(3+) and their roles in specific metabolic networks/respective biogeochemical cycles remain unknown. Moreover, enzymes dependent on Ln(3+) but not related to XoxF enzymes may exist, and these so far have not been recognized. Through connecting the recently uncovered genetic divergence and phylogenetic distribution of XoxF-like enzymes and through elucidation of their activities, metal and substrate specificities, along with the biological contexts of respective biochemical pathways, most parsimonious scenarios for their evolution could be uncovered. Generation of such data will firmly establish the role of Ln(3+) in the biochemistry of Life inhabiting this planet. PMID:27357406

  11. Magnetic susceptibility tensor anisotropies for a lanthanide ion series in a fixed protein matrix.

    PubMed

    Bertini, I; Janik, M B; Lee, Y M; Luchinat, C; Rosato, A

    2001-05-01

    The full series of lanthanide ions (except the radioactive promethium and the S-state gadolinium) has been incorporated into the C-terminal calcium binding site of the dicalcium protein calbindin D(9k). A fairly constant coordination environment is maintained throughout the series. At variance with several lanthanide complexes with small chelating ligands investigated in the past, the large protein moiety provides a large number of NMR signals whose hyperfine shifts can be exclusively ascribed to pseudocontact shifts (PCS). The chemical shifts of 1H and 15N backbone and side chain amide NH groups were accurately measured through HSQC experiments. 1097 PCS were estimated from these by subtracting the diamagnetic contributions measured on HSQC spectra of either the 4f(0) lanthanum(III) or the 4f(14) lutetium(III) derivatives and used to define a quality factor for the structure. The differences in diamagnetic chemical shifts between the two diamagnetic blanks were relatively small, although some were not negligible especially for the nuclei closest to the metal center. These differences were used as a tolerance for the PCS. The magnetic susceptibility tensor anisotropies for each paramagnetic lanthanide ion were obtained as the result of the solution structure determination performed by using the NOEs of the cerium(III) derivative and the PCS of all lanthanides simultaneously. This set of reliable magnetic data permits an experimental assessment of Bleaney's theory relative to the magnetic properties for an extended series of lanthanide complexes in solution. All of the obtained tensors show some rhombicity, as could be expected from the lack of symmetry of the protein environment. The directions of the largest magnetic susceptibility component for Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb, Dy, and Ho and of the smallest magnetic susceptibility component for Eu, Er, Tm, and Yb were found to be all within 15 degrees from their average (within 20 degrees for Sm), confirming the essential

  12. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  13. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. PMID:20547408

  14. US Veterinary Immune Reagents Network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease control is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for ruminants, swine, poultry, equine and aquaculture species". Sets of reagents, i.e., monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies, that can identify the major leukocy...

  15. US Veterinary Immune Reagents Network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease control is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for ruminants, swine, poultry, equine, and aquaculture species. Sets of reagents, i.e. monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies (Ab), that can identify the major leu...

  16. Investigation of Gravity Lanthanide Separation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rosara F.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Farmer, Orville T.; Finn, Erin C.

    2011-03-01

    Lanthanides are common fission products and the ability to separate and quantify these elements is critical to rapid radiochemistry applications. Published lanthanide separations using Eichrom Ln Spec resin utilize an HCl gradient. Here it is shown that the efficacy and resolution of the separation is improved when a nitric acid gradient is used instead. The described method allows parallel processing of many samples in 1.5 hours followed by 60 minute counting for quantification of 9 isotopes of 7 lanthanide elements.

  17. Energy level modeling of lanthanide materials: review and uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed

    Joos, Jonas J; Poelman, Dirk; Smet, Philippe F

    2015-07-15

    Energy level schemes are an essential tool for the description and interpretation of atomic spectra. During the last 40 years, several empirical methods and relationships were devised for constructing energy level schemes of lanthanide defects in wide band gap solids, culminating in the chemical shift model by Thiel and Dorenbos. This model allows us to calculate the electronic and optical properties of the considered materials. However, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of the obtained values of the calculated parameters is still lacking to a large extent. In this paper, error margins for calculated electronic and optical properties are deduced. It is found that optical transitions can be predicted within an acceptable error margin, while the description of phenomena involving conduction band states is limited to qualitative interpretation due to the large error margins for physical observables such as thermal quenching temperature, corresponding to standard deviations in the range 0.3-0.5 eV for the relevant energy differences. As an example, the electronic structure of lanthanide doped calcium thiogallate (CaGa2S4) is determined, taking the experimental spectra of CaGa2S4:Ln(Q+) (Ln(Q+) = Ce(3+), Eu(2+), Tm(3+)) as input. Two different approaches to obtain the shape of the zig-zag curves connecting the 4f levels of the different lanthanides are explored and compared. PMID:26129935

  18. Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides in an Acetate Buffer Solution Using Cyanex 301

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd; Richard D. Tillotson

    2006-05-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides from the lanthanides using the active extractant in the Cyanex 301 reagent, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid, was studied. Specifically, the extractant was studied for an ammonium acetate/acetic acid buffered feed that would result from a transuranic separation process utilizing an ammonium acetate strip solution. Separation factors of 241Am from 154Eu with this extractant, as a function of total acetate concentration and pH, have been measured. Additionally, the extraction behavior of stable La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu was measured. Separation factors were typically very high for Am from Eu at a pH ranging from 3.8 to 5.8 and a total acetate concentration ranging from 0.2 M to 1.0 M. However, separation factors across the lanthanide series varied considerably and resulted in separation of the lighter lanthanides from the heavier lanthanides at the higher pH’s.

  19. Lanthanide mixed ligand chelates for DNA profiling and latent fingerprint detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. R.; Allred, Clay

    1997-02-01

    It is our aim to develop a universally applicable latent fingerprint detection method using lanthanide (rare-earth) complexes as a source of luminescence. Use of these lanthanide complexes offers advantages on several fronts, including benefits from large Stokes shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, narrow emissions, ability of sequential assembly of complexes, and chemical variability of the ligands. Proper exploitation of these advantages would lead to a latent fingerprint detection method superior to any currently available. These same characteristics also lend themselves to many of the problems associated with DNA processing in the forensic science context.

  20. ITP of lanthanides in microfluidic PMMA chip.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yongzheng; Bottenus, Danny; Liu, Bingwen; Clark, Sue B; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2014-03-01

    An ITP separation of eight lanthanides on a serpentine PMMA microchip with a tee junction and a 230-mm-long serpentine channel is described. The cover of the PMMA chip is 175 μm thick so that a C(4) D in microchip mode can be used to detect the lanthanides as they migrate through the microchannel. Acetate and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid are used as complexing agents to increase the electrophoretic mobility difference between the lanthanides. Eight lanthanides are concentrated within ∼ 6 min by ITP in the microchip using 10 mM ammonium acetate at pH 4.5 as the leading electrolyte and 10 mM acetic acid at ∼ pH 3.0 as the terminating electrolyte. In addition, a 2D numerical simulation of the lanthanides undergoing ITP in the microchip is compared with experimental results using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.3a. PMID:24258617

  1. Toxicological and cytophysiological aspects of lanthanides action.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, A; Czekaj, P

    2000-01-01

    Lanthanides, also called rare-earth elements, are an interesting group of 15 chemically active, mainly trivalent, f-electronic, silvery-white metals. In fact, lanthanides are not as rare as the name implies, except for promethium, a radioactive artificial element not found in nature. The mean concentrations of lanthanides in the earth's crust are comparable to those of life-important elements like iodine, cobalt and selenium. Many lanthanide compounds show particular magnetic, catalytic and optic properties, and that is why their technical applications are so extensive. Numerous industrial sources enable lanthanides to penetrate into the human body and therefore detailed toxicological studies of these metals are necessary. In the liver, gadolinium selectively inhibits secretion by Kupffer cells and it decreases cytochrome P450 activity in hepatocytes, thereby protecting liver cells against toxic products of xenobiotic biotransformation. Praseodymium ion (Pr3+) produces the same protective effect in liver tissue cultures. Cytophysiological effects of lanthanides appear to result from the similarity of their cationic radii to the size of Ca2+ ions. Trivalent lanthanide ions, especially La3+ and Gd3+, block different calcium channels in human and animal cells. Lanthanides can affect numerous enzymes: Dy3+ and La3+ block Ca2+-ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase, while Eu3+ and Tb3+ inhibit calcineurin. In neurons, lanthanide ions regulate the transport and release of synaptic transmitters and block some membrane receptors, e.g. GABA and glutamate receptors. It is likely that lanthanides significantly and uniquely affect biochemical pathways, thus altering physiological processes in the tissues of humans and animals. PMID:11996100

  2. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  3. Separation of actinides from lanthanides

    DOEpatents

    Smith, B.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1988-03-31

    An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form is described. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4- dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  4. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  5. Lanthanides in the frame of Molecular Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatteschi, D.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular magnetism is producing new types of materials which cover up to date aspects of basic science together with possible applications. This article highlights recent results from the point of view of lanthanides which are now intensively used to produce single molecule magnets, single chain and single ion magnets. After a short introduction reminding the main steps of development of molecular magnetism, the basic properties of lanthanides will be covered highlighting important features which are enhanced by the electronic structure of lanthanides, like spin frustration and chirality, anisotropy and non collinear axes in zero and one dimensional materials. A paragraph of conclusions will discuss what has been done and theperspectives to be expected.

  6. The role of lanthanides in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the lanthanides as chemical components in transmitting optical materials and as activators in materials for luminescent, electro-optic, magneto-optic, and various photosensitive applications.

  7. Lanthanides: Applications in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ruijie D; Termini, John; Gray, Harry B

    2016-07-14

    Lanthanide complexes are of increasing importance in cancer diagnosis and therapy, owing to the versatile chemical and magnetic properties of the lanthanide-ion 4f electronic configuration. Following the first implementation of gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging in the 1980s, lanthanide-based small molecules and nanomaterials have been investigated as cytotoxic agents and inhibitors, in photodynamic therapy, radiation therapy, drug/gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. As the potential utility of lanthanides in these areas continues to increase, this timely review of current applications will be useful to medicinal chemists and other investigators interested in the latest developments and trends in this emerging field. PMID:26862866

  8. Synergism of trivalent actinides and lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The synergism of trivalent actinides and lanthanides has been reviewed critically. Different systems including ..beta..-di-ketones and several other chelating agents with various neutral donors have been discussed. The thermodynamic parameters, effect of diluents, auto-synergism and synergism with eutectic mixtures have been discussed in the case of trivalent actinides and lanthanides. Also the mechanism of synergism and the various possible uses of this phenomenon have been referred to with the possible data available. 160 references, 4 tables.

  9. Photoacoustic spectral studies on lanthanide amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-tao; Zhao, Gui-wen; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2003-01-01

    Several kinds of lanthanide complexes with glycine, alanine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were synthesized and their photoacoustic (PA) spectra were measured. For the complexes of weakly fluorescent lanthanide ions with amino acids, the PA spectra reflect the influences of the ligands on the energy levels of lanthanide ions, whereas for the complexes of fluorescent lanthanide ions with amino acids, the PA spectra can be used to study the energy transfer from aromatic amino acids to lanthanide ions. At last, separating the overlapping peaks of lanthanide complex with tryptophan using the PA phase resolved method is introduced.

  10. New phosphonate reagents for aldehyde homologation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New phosphonate reagents were developed for the two-carbon homologation of aldehydes to unbranched- or methyl-branched unsaturated aldehydes. The phosphonate reagents, diethyl methylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone and diethyl ethylformyl-2-phosphonate dimethylhydrazone, contained a protected...

  11. US Veterinary Immune Reagent Network: Prioritization & Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Veterinary Immune Reagent Network represents a broad community plan to begin to systematically address the immunological reagent gap for the US veterinary immunology research community including for the following groups: ruminants (concentrating on cattle), swine, poultry (primarily chickens)...

  12. Rapid separation of beryllium and lanthanide derivatives by capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Lucke, Richard B.; Douglas, Matt

    2012-09-04

    Previous studies describe derivatization of metal ions followed by analysis using gas chromatography, usually on packed columns. In many of these studies, stable and volatile derivatives were formed using fluorinated β-diketonate reagents. This paper extends previous work by investigating separations of the derivatives on small-diameter capillary gas chromatography columns and exploring on-fiber, solid-phase microextraction derivatization techniques for beryllium. The β-diketonate used for these studies was 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Derivatization of lanthanides also required addition of a neutral donor, dibutyl sulfoxide, in addition to 1,1,1,2,2,6,6,7,7,7-decafluoro-3,5-heptanedione. Unoptimized separations on a 100-μm i.d. capillary column proved capable of rapid separations (within 15 min) of lanthanide derivatives that are adjacent to one another in the periodic table. Full-scan mass spectra were obtained from derivatives containing 5 ng of each lanthanide. Studies also developed a simple on-fiber solid-phase microextraction derivatization of beryllium. Beryllium could be analyzed in the presence of other alkali earth elements (Ba(II) and Sr(II)) without interference. Finally, extension of the general approach was demonstrated for several additional elements (i.e. Cu(II), Cr(III), and Ga(III)).

  13. LANTHANIDE ENHANCE LUMINESCENCE (LEL) WITH ONE AND TWO PHOTON EXCITATION OF QUANTUM DYES LANTHANIDE (III) - MACROCYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: Lanthanide Enhance Luminescence (LEL) with one and two photon excitation of Quantum Dyes? Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles
    Principal Author:
    Robert C. Leif, Newport Instruments
    Secondary Authors:
    Margie C. Becker, Phoenix Flow Systems
    Al Bromm, Virginia Commonw...

  14. Review Article: The Effects of Radiation Chemistry on Solvent Extraction 3: A Review of Actinide and Lanthanide Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; Giuseppe Modolo; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2009-12-01

    The partitioning of the long-lived ?-emitters and the high-yield fission products from dissolved nuclear fuel is a key component of processes envisioned for the safe recycling of nuclear fuel and the disposition of high-level waste. These future processes will likely be based on aqueous solvent extraction technologies for light water reactor fuel and consist of four main components for the sequential separation of uranium, fission products, group trivalent actinides and lanthanides, and then trivalent actinides from lanthanides. Since the solvent systems will be in contact with highly radioactive solutions, they must be robust toward radiolytic degradation in an irradiated mixed organic, aqueous acidic environment. Therefore, an understanding of their radiation chemistry is important to the design of a practical system. In the first paper in this series we reviewed the radiation chemistry of irradiated aqueous nitric acid and the tributyl phosphate ligand for uranium extraction in the first step of these extractions. In the second, we reviewed the radiation chemistry of the ligands proposed for use in the extraction of cesium and strontium fission products. Here, we review the radiation chemistry of the ligands that might be used in the third step in the series of separations, for the group extraction of the lanthanides and actinides. This includes traditional organophosphorous reagents such as CMPO and HDEHP, as well as novel reagents such as the amides and diamides currently being investigated.

  15. Multicolor tuning of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles by single wavelength excitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiaogang

    2014-04-15

    Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles exhibit unique luminescent properties, including large Stokes shift, sharp emission bandwidth, high resistance to optical blinking, and photobleaching, as well as the unique ability to convert long-wavelength stimulation into short-wavelength emission. These attributes are particularly needed for developing luminescent labels as alternatives to organic fluorophores and quantum dots. In recent years, the well-recognized advantages of upconversion nanocrystals as biomarkers have been manifested in many important applications, such as highly sensitive molecular detection and autofluorescence-free cell imaging. However, their potential in multiplexed detection and multicolor imaging is rarely exploited, largely owing to the research lagging on multicolor tuning of these particles. Lanthanide doping typically involves an insulating host matrix and a trace amount of lanthanide dopants embedded in the host lattice. The luminescence observed from these doped crystalline materials primarily originates from electronic transitions within the [Xe]4f(n) configuration of the lanthanide dopants. Thus a straightforward approach to tuning the emission is to dope different lanthanide activators in the host lattice. Meanwhile, the host lattice can exert a crystal field around the lanthanide dopants and sometimes may even exchange energy with the dopants. Therefore, the emission can also be modulated by varying the host materials. Recently, the advance in synthetic methods toward high quality core-shell nanocrystals has led to the emergence of new strategies for emission modulation. These strategies rely on precise control over either energy exchange interactions between the dopants or energy transfer involving other optical entities. To provide a set of criteria for future work in this field, we attempt to review general and emerging strategies for tuning emission spectra through lanthanide doping. With significant progress made over the past several

  16. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol.

  17. Lanthanide-Catalyzed Reversible Alkynyl Exchange by Carbon-Carbon Single-Bond Cleavage Assisted by a Secondary Amino Group.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yinlin; Zhang, Fangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Xigeng

    2016-09-12

    Lanthanide-catalyzed alkynyl exchange through C-C single-bond cleavage assisted by a secondary amino group is reported. A lanthanide amido complex is proposed as a key intermediate, which undergoes unprecedented reversible β-alkynyl elimination followed by alkynyl exchange and imine reinsertion. The in situ homo- and cross-dimerization of the liberated alkyne can serve as an additional driving force to shift the metathesis equilibrium to completion. This reaction is formally complementary to conventional alkyne metathesis and allows the selective transformation of internal propargylamines into those bearing different substituents on the alkyne terminus in moderate to excellent yields under operationally simple reaction conditions. PMID:27510403

  18. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  19. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  20. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  1. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-03-01

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10-4 M, and then at concentrations higher than 10-3 M, the ``aggregation-induced emission'' (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable.

  2. Curvature of the Lanthanide Contraction: An Explanation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth; Wellman, Daniel; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Hill, Aru

    2009-12-21

    A number of studies have shown that for isostructural series of the lanthanides (elements La through Lu), a plot of equivalent metal-ligand bond lengths versus atomic number differs significantly from linearity and can be better fit as a quadratic equation. However, for hydrogen type wave functions, it is the inverse of the average distance of the electron from the nucleus (an estimate of size) that varies linearly with effective nuclear charge. This generates an apparent quadratic dependence of radius with atomic number. Plotting the inverse of lanthanide ion radii (the observed distance minus the ligand size) as a function of effective nuclear charge gives very good linear fits for a variety of lanthanide complexes and materials. Parameters obtained from this fit are in excellent agreement with the calculated Slater shielding constant, k.

  3. Separations of actinides, lanthanides and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ensor, Dale D.

    1995-01-01

    An organic extracting solution comprised of a bis(acylpyrazolone or a substituted bis(acylpyrazolone) and an extraction method useful for separating certain elements of the actinide series of the periodic table having a valence of four from one other, and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of hexavalent actinides, trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals and also useful for separating hexavalent actinides from one or more of the substances in a group consisting of trivalent actinides, trivalent lanthanides, trivalent iron, trivalent aluminum, divalent metals, and monovalent metals.

  4. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10(-4) M, and then at concentrations higher than 10(-3) M, the "aggregation-induced emission" (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable. PMID:25791467

  5. Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2014-01-29

    Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

  6. Recovery system containing lanthanide-crosslinked polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Dovan, H.T.; Hutchins, R.D.

    1993-07-13

    A recovery system is described comprising: (a) a subterranean formation; (b) a well bore penetrating at least a portion of the subterranean formation; and (c) a composition capable of forming a gel present in at least a portion of the well bore, wherein the composition comprises: (i) a crosslinkable polymer (CP) selected from the group consisting of heteropolysaccharides obtained by the fermentation of starch-derived sugar, ammonium salts, and alkali metal salts; (ii) a lanthanide; and (iii) an ingredient selected from the group consisting of gel breakers, sequestering agents, proppants for use in hydraulically fracturing, particulate agents for forming a gravel pack, and base precursors selected from the group consisting of ammonium slats, urea, thiourea, and mixtures of these. A second recovery system is described in which the gel composition comprises: (i) a CP selected from the group consisting of acrylic acid-acrylamide copolymers, acrylic acid-methacrylamide copolymers, polyacrylamides, polymethacrylamides, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides, partially hydrolyzed polymethacrylamides, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, polyalkyleneoxides, lignosulfonates, ammonium salts, alkali metal salts, and alkaline earth salts of lignosulfonates; and (ii) a crosslinking agent selected from the group consisting of lanthanides, sequestered lanthanides, and mixtures thereof. A third system is described in which the gel composition comprises: (i) a CP, hydroxyethylcellulose; and (ii) a crosslinking agent selected from the group consisting of lanthanides, sequestered lanthanides, and mixtures thereof. A fourth system is described in which the gel composition comprises: (i) a CP selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, polyalkyleneoxides, lignosulfonates, ammonium salts, alkali metal salts, and alkaline earth salts of lignosulfonates; and (ii) a lanthanide.

  7. Precise Determination of Enantiomeric Excess by a Sensitivity Enhanced Two-Dimensional Band-Selective Pure-Shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Dayaka, Satyanarayana; Vemulapalli, Sahithya Phani Babu; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-07-21

    Unambiguous identification and precise quantification of enantiomers in chiral mixtures is crucial for enantiomer specific synthesis as well as chemical analysis. The task is often challenging for mixtures with high enantiomeric excess and for complex molecules with strong (1)H-(1)H scalar (J) coupling network. The recent advancements in (1)H-(1)H decoupling strategies to suppress the J-interactions offered new possibilities for NMR based unambiguous discrimination and quantification enantiomers. Herein, we discuss a high resolution two-dimensional pure-shift zCOSY NMR method with homonuclear band-selective decoupling in both the F1 and F2 dimensions (F1F2-HOBS-zCOSY). This advanced method shows a sharp improvement in resolution over the other COSY methods and also eliminates the problems associated with the overlapping decoupling sidebands. The efficacy of this method has been exploited for precise quantification of enantiomeric excess (ee) ratio (R/S) up to 99:1 in the presence of very low concentrations of chiral lanthanide shift reagents (CLSR) or chiral solvating agents (CSA). The F1F2-HOBS-zCOSY is simple and can be easily implemented on any modern NMR spectrometers, as a routine analytical tool. PMID:26091767

  8. Pyridine-based lanthanide complexes combining MRI and NIR luminescence activities.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Célia S; Buron, Frédéric; Caillé, Fabien; Shade, Chad M; Drahoš, Bohuslav; Pellegatti, Laurent; Zhang, Jian; Villette, Sandrine; Helm, Lothar; Pichon, Chantal; Suzenet, Franck; Petoud, Stéphane; Tóth, Éva

    2012-01-27

    A series of novel triazole derivative pyridine-based polyamino-polycarboxylate ligands has been synthesized for lanthanide complexation. This versatile platform of chelating agents combines advantageous properties for both magnetic resonance (MR) and optical imaging applications of the corresponding Gd(3+) and near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes. The thermodynamic stability constants of the Ln(3+) complexes, as assessed by pH potentiometric measurements, are in the range log K(LnL)=17-19, with a high selectivity for lanthanides over Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+). The complexes are bishydrated, an important advantage to obtain high relaxivities for the Gd(3+) chelates. The water exchange of the Gd(3+) complexes (k(ex)(298)=7.7-9.3×10(6) s(-1)) is faster than that of clinically used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents and proceeds through a dissociatively activated mechanism, as evidenced by the positive activation volumes (ΔV(≠)=7.2-8.8 cm(3) mol(-1)). The new triazole ligands allow a considerable shift towards lower excitation energies of the luminescent lanthanide complexes as compared to the parent pyridinic complex, which is a significant advantage in the perspective of biological applications. In addition, they provide increased epsilon values resulting in a larger number of emitted photons and better detection sensitivity. The most conjugated system PheTPy, bearing a phenyl-triazole pendant on the pyridine ring, is particularly promising as it displays the lowest excitation and triplet-state energies associated with good quantum yields for both Nd(3+) and Yb(3+) complexes. Cellular and in vivo toxicity studies in mice evidenced the non-toxicity and the safe use of such bishydrated complexes in animal experiments. Overall, these pyridinic ligands constitute a highly versatile platform for the simultaneous optimization of both MRI and optical properties of the Gd(3+) and the luminescent lanthanide complexes, respectively. PMID:22213187

  9. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  10. Electromagnetic susceptibility anisotropy and its importance for paramagnetic NMR and optical spectroscopy in lanthanide coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Octavia A; Edkins, Robert M; Faulkner, Stephen; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Rogers, Nicola J; Shuvaev, Sergey

    2016-04-19

    The importance of the directional dependence of magnetic susceptibility in magnetic resonance and of electric susceptibility in the optical spectroscopy of lanthanide coordination complexes is assessed. A body of more reliable shift, relaxation and optical emission data is emerging for well-defined isostructural series of complexes, allowing detailed comparative analyses to be undertaken. Such work is highlighting the limitations of the current NMR shift and relaxation theories, as well as emphasising the absence of a compelling theoretical framework to explain optical emission phenomena. PMID:26898996

  11. Preparation of Lanthanide-Polymer Composite Material via Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wen, Guian; Wu, Jiajie; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-10-01

    Covalently attaching lanthanide complexes to the polymer backbone can effectively reduce the clustering of lanthanides and thus become an important strategy to fully unleash their potential. In this Communication, a metal-free click reaction is used for the first time to link a lanthanide complex to the polymer matrix. A diene-bearing copolymer with anthracenylmethyl methacrylate as a monomer and a dienophile-bearing lanthanide complex with 5-maleimido-1,10-phenanthroline as the second ligand are synthesized and coupled together through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition (DA). A comparative investigation demonstrates that the composite material prepared by DA click reaction shows the highest quantum yields in the same lanthanide concentration as compared to materials prepared by widely used "directly doping" and "in situ coordinating lanthanide ions with macromolecular ligand" approaches. This work suggests that the "metal-free" DA click reaction can be a promising tool in the synthesis of high efficient lanthanide functionalized polymeric materials. PMID:26248311

  12. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  13. Physical characteristics of lanthanide complexes that act as magnetization transfer (MT) contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanrong; Sherry, A. Dean

    2003-02-01

    Rapid water exchange is normally considered a prerequisite for efficient Gd 3+-based MRI contrast agents. Yet recent measures of exchange rates in some Gd 3+ complexes have shown that water exchange can become limiting when such complexes are attached to larger macromolecular structures. A new class of lanthanide complexes that display unusually slow water exchange (bound water lifetimes ( τM298) > 10 μs) has recently been reported. This apparent disadvantage may be taken advantage of by switching the metal ion from gadolinium(III) to a lanthanide that shifts the bound water resonance substantially away from bulk water. Given appropriate water exchange kinetics, one can then alter the intensity of the bulk water signal by selective presaturation of this highly shifted, Ln3+-bound water resonance. This provides the basis of a new method to alter MR image contrast in tissue. We have synthesized a variety of DOTA-tetra(amide) ligands to evaluate as potential magnetization transfer (MT) contrast agents and found that the bound water lifetimes in these complexes are sensitive to both ligand structure (a series of Eu 3+ complexes have τM298 values that range from 1 to 1300 μs) and the identity of the paramagnetic Ln3+ cation (from 3 to 800 μs for a single ligand). This demonstrates that it may be possible either to fine-tune the ligand structure or to select proper lanthanide cation to create an optimal MT agent for any clinical imaging field.

  14. Sensing lanthanide metal content in biological tissues with magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Dina V; Gonzalez, Sandra I; Li, Jessica F; Pagel, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The development and validation of MRI contrast agents consisting of a lanthanide chelate often requires a determination of the concentration of the agent in ex vivo tissue. We have developed a protocol that uses 70% nitric acid to completely digest tissue samples that contain Gd(III), Dy(III), Tm(III), Eu(III), or Yb(III) ions, or the MRI contrast agent gadodiamide. NMR spectroscopy of coaxial tubes containing a digested sample and a separate control solution of nitric acid was used to rapidly and easily measure the bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift caused by each lanthanide ion and gadodiamide. Each BMS shift was shown to be linearly correlated with the concentration of each lanthanide ion and gadodiamide in the 70% nitric acid solution and in digested rat kidney and liver tissues. These concentration measurements had outstanding precision, and also had good accuracy for concentrations ≥10 mM for Tm(III) Eu(III), and Yb(III), and ≥3 mM for Gd(III), gadodiamide, and Dy(III). Improved sample handling methods are needed to improve measurement accuracy for samples with lower concentrations. PMID:24152931

  15. Optical properties of actinide and lanthanide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.; Carnall, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the recent developments in this area of spectroscopy, emphasizing the optical properties of the tripositive lanthanide and actinide ions. In particular, the single ion properties of line positon, intensity, width, and fluorescence lifetime are discussed. 53 reference, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  16. U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagents Network: Progress with poultry immune reagents development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease research is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for veterinary animal species. In 2006, U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagent Network (VIRN) Consortium (www.vetimm.org) was developed to develop immune reagents against ma...

  17. Lanthanide-based imaging of protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Yapici, Engin; Miller, Lawrence W

    2014-02-17

    In order to deduce the molecular mechanisms of biological function, it is necessary to monitor changes in the subcellular location, activation, and interaction of proteins within living cells in real time. Förster resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-based biosensors that incorporate genetically encoded, fluorescent proteins permit high spatial resolution imaging of protein-protein interactions or protein conformational dynamics. However, a nonspecific fluorescence background often obscures small FRET signal changes, and intensity-based biosensor measurements require careful interpretation and several control experiments. These problems can be overcome by using lanthanide [Tb(III) or Eu(III)] complexes as donors and green fluorescent protein (GFP) or other conventional fluorophores as acceptors. Essential features of this approach are the long-lifetime (approximately milliseconds) luminescence of Tb(III) complexes and time-gated luminescence microscopy. This allows pulsed excitation, followed by a brief delay, which eliminates nonspecific fluorescence before the detection of Tb(III)-to-GFP emission. The challenges of intracellular delivery, selective protein labeling, and time-gated imaging of lanthanide luminescence are presented, and recent efforts to investigate the cellular uptake of lanthanide probes are reviewed. Data are presented showing that conjugation to arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used as a general strategy for the cellular delivery of membrane-impermeable lanthanide complexes. A heterodimer of a luminescent Tb(III) complex, Lumi4, linked to trimethoprim and conjugated to nonaarginine via a reducible disulfide linker rapidly (∼10 min) translocates into the cytoplasm of Maden Darby canine kidney cells from the culture medium. With this reagent, the intracellular interaction between GFP fused to FK506 binding protein 12 (GFP-FKBP12) and the rapamycin binding domain of mTOR fused to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (FRB

  18. Thioamination of Alkenes with Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Mizar, Pushpak; Niebuhr, Rebecca; Hutchings, Matthew; Farooq, Umar; Wirth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An efficient thioamination of alkenes mediated by iodine(III) reagents is described. The use of different sulfur nucleophiles allows the flexible synthesis of 1,2-aminothiols from alkenes. By employing chiral iodine(III) reagents, a stereoselective version of the thioamination protocol has also been developed. PMID:26660291

  19. TREATMENT OF MTBE USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the removal of MTBE from water, using Fenton's Reagent. Although complete mineralization of MTBE by Fenton's Reagent was not achieved, greater than 99% destruction of MTBE was realized. This was accomplished at a Fe+2:H2O2 ratio of 1:1 and one hour of contact...

  20. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  5. From antenna to assay: lessons learned in lanthanide luminescence.

    PubMed

    Moore, Evan G; Samuel, Amanda P S; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-04-21

    Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multichromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single "antenna"). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to approximately 60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong circularly

  6. Pyridinophane platform for stable lanthanide(III) complexation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Goretti; Bastida, Rufina; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Valencia, Laura

    2013-05-20

    A detailed investigation of the solid state and solution structures of lanthanide(III) complexes with the macrocyclic ligand 2,11,20-triaza[3.3.3](2,6)pyridinophane (TPP) is reported. The solid state structures of 14 different Ln(3+) complexes have been determined using X-ray crystallography. The ligand is coordinating to the Ln(3+) ion by using its six nitrogen atoms, while nitrate or triflate anions and water molecules complete the metal coordination environments. The structure of the complexes in solution has been investigated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as by DFT calculations (TPSSh model) performed in aqueous solution. The structures obtained from these calculations for the complexes with the lightest Ln(3+) ions (La-Sm) are in very good agreement with those determined by the analysis of the Ln(3+)-induced paramagnetic shifts. A structural change occurs across the lanthanide series at Sm(3+); the complexes of the large Ln(3+) ions (La-Nd) are chiral due to the nonplanar conformation of the macrocycle, and present effective C3v symmetries in solution as a consequence of a fast interconversion of two enantiomeric forms with C3 symmetry. The activation free energy for this enantiomerization process, as estimated by using DFT calculations, amounts to 33.0 kJ·mol(-1). The TPP ligand in the complexes of the heaviest Ln(3+) ions (Eu-Lu) presents a half-chair conformation, which results in C(s) symmetries in solution. PMID:23627284

  7. Shifting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.P.; Welch, W.R.

    1984-03-13

    An improved shifting tool connectable in a well tool string and useful to engage and position a slidable sleeve in a sliding sleeve device in a well flow conductor. The selectively profiled shifting tool keys provide better fit with and more contact area between keys and slidable sleeves. When the engaged slidable sleeve cannot be moved up and the shifting tool is not automatically disengaged, emergency disengagement means may be utilized by applying upward force to the shifting tool sufficient to shear pins and cause all keys to be cammed inwardly at both ends to completely disengage for removal of the shifting tool from the sliding sleeve device.

  8. Shelf-stable electrophilic reagents for trifluoromethylthiolation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xinxin; Xu, Chunfa; Lu, Long; Shen, Qilong

    2015-05-19

    Fluorine, which is the most electronegative element and has a small atomic radius, plays a key role in pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials sciences. One of the fluoroalkyl groups, the trifluoromethylthio group (CF3S-), has been well-recognized as an important structural motif in the design of lead compounds for new drug discovery because of its high lipophilicity (Hansch lipophilicity parameter π = 1.44) and strong electron-withdrawing properties, which could improve the drug molecule's cell-membrane permeability and enhance its chemical and metabolic stability. While classic methods for the preparation of trifluoromethylthiolated compounds typically involve halogen-fluorine exchange reactions of polyhalogenomethyl thioethers or trifluoromethylation of sulfur-containing compounds under harsh reaction conditions, an alternative but more attractive strategy is direct trifluoromethylthiolation of the substrate at a late stage by employing an electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagent. Although several electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagents have been reported previously, these reagents either require a strong Lewis acid/Brønsted acid as an activator or suffer from a toxic nature or limited substrate scope. To address these problems, in late 2011 we initiated a project with the aim to develop new, shelf-stable, and highly reactive electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagents that could easily install the trifluoromethylthio group at the desired positions of the drug molecule at a late stage of drug development. Inspired by the broad reactivity of the hypervalent iodine reagent, we initially discovered a highly reactive trifluoromethylthiolating reagent, trifluoromethanesulfenate 1a. Structure-reactivity studies disclosed that the iodine atom of reagent 1a does not play an important role in this reagent's reactivity. Consequently, a simplified second-generation electrophilic reagent, trifluoromethanesulfenate 1b, was developed. In parallel

  9. Extraction equilibria of rare earths by a new reagent (2-ethylhexyl-3-pentadecylphenyl) phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, S; Rao, T P; Narayanan, C S; Damodaran, A D

    1994-03-01

    A new reagent (2-ethylhexyl-3-pentadecylphenyl) phosphoric acid (EPPA = HR) was synthesized from cardanol (I, 37300-39-5) and was used to investigate the extraction behaviour of lanthanum(III), europium(III) and lutetium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions. The species extracted were found to be Ln(HR(2))(3) (where Ln = La(III) or Eu(III) or Lu(III)). The extraction behaviour of the above lanthanides has also been compared with yttrium and other rare earths. It was observed that the extraction increases with increase in atomic number of rare earths. In addition, the extraction efficiency of EPPA has also been compared with well known acidic organophosphorus extractants like di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA), 2-ethylhexyl-mono-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (EHEHPA). PMID:18965945

  10. De Novo Designed Imaging Agents Based on Lanthanide Peptides Complexes.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A F A

    2016-01-01

    Herein are discussed a selection of lanthanide peptide/protein complexes in view of their potential applications as imaging agents, both in terms of luminescence detection and magnetic resonance imaging. Though this chapter covers a range of different peptides and protein, if focuses specifically on the opportunities afforded by the de novo design of coiled coils, miniature protein scaffolds, and the development on lanthanide-binding sites into these architectures. The requirements for lanthanide coordination and the challenges that need to be addressed when preparing lanthanide peptides with a view to their potential adoption as clinical imaging applications, will be highlighted. PMID:27586349

  11. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  12. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  13. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanoprobes: controlled synthesis, optical spectroscopy, and bioapplications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Tu, Datao; Zhu, Haomiao; Chen, Xueyuan

    2013-08-21

    Lanthanide-doped inorganic nanoparticles possess superior physicochemical features such as long-lived luminescence, large antenna-generated Stokes or anti-Stokes shifts, narrow emission bands, high resistance to photobleaching and low toxicity, and thus are regarded as a new generation of luminescent bioprobes as compared to conventional molecular probes like organic dyes and lanthanide chelates. These functional nanoparticles, although most of their bulk counterparts were well studied previously, have attracted renewed interest for their biomedical applications in areas as diverse as biodetection, bioimaging, and disease diagnosis and therapeutics. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the latest advances made in developing lanthanide-doped inorganic nanoparticles as potential luminescent bioprobes, which covers areas from their fundamental chemical and physical features to bioapplications including controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical spectroscopy, and their promising applications in diverse fields, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in vitro biodetection of tumor markers and multimodal bioimaging of various tumor tissues. Some future prospects and challenges in this rapidly growing field are also summarized. PMID:23775339

  14. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-04-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction.

  15. The Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Gelis, Artem V.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Smoot, Margaret R.

    2014-02-21

    The Actinide-Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) process is described. The process uses an extractant phase consisting of either N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]). The neutral TODGA or T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid media. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus resulting in separation of these two groups of elements.

  16. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction. PMID:27087470

  17. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-01-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction. PMID:27087470

  18. Coordination of lanthanides by two polyamino polycarboxylic macrocycles: formation of highly stable lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Loncin, M.F.; Desreux, J.F.; Merciny, E.

    1986-07-16

    The formation constants of a few lanthanide complexes with DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) and TETA (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) have been measured by potentiometric and competition methods. The ligand DOTA forms the most stable lanthanide chelates known so far (log K/sub ML/ = 28.2-29.2) while the stability of the TETA compounds at 80 /sup 0/C (log K/sub ML/ = 14.5-16.5) is comparable to the stability of the EDTA complexes. A competition method with the oxalate anion as a probe had to be used for determining the formation constants of the DOTA lanthanide chelates because of the high stability of these compounds. The relative stability of the DOTA and TETA complexes in accounted for by steric factors with reference to known solution- and solid-state structures. 20 references, 2 tables.

  19. Nanometrization of Lanthanide-Based Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Neaime, Chrystelle; Daiguebonne, Carole; Calvez, Guillaume; Freslon, Stéphane; Bernot, Kevin; Grasset, Fabien; Cordier, Stéphane; Guillou, Olivier

    2015-11-23

    Heteronuclear lanthanide-based coordination polymers are microcrystalline powders, the luminescence properties of which can be precisely tuned by judicious choice of the rare-earth ions. In this study, we demonstrate that such materials can also be obtained as stable solutions of nanoparticles in non-toxic polyols. Bulk powders of the formula [Ln2-2x Ln'2x (bdc)3 ⋅4 H2 O]∞ (where H2 bdc denotes 1,4-benzene-dicarboxylic acid, 0≤x≤1, and Ln and Ln' denote lanthanide ions of the series La to Tm plus Y) afford nanoparticles that have been characterized by dynamic light-scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Their luminescence properties are similar to those of the bulk materials. Stabilities versus time and versus dilution with another solvent have been studied. This study has revealed that it is possible to tune the size of the nanoparticles. This process offers a reliable means of synthesizing suspensions of nanoparticles with tunable luminescence properties and tunable size distributions in a green solvent (glycerol). The process is also extendable to other coordination polymers and other solvents (ethylene glycol, for example). It constitutes a new route for the facile solubilization of lanthanide-based coordination polymers. PMID:26471940

  20. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10−4 M, and then at concentrations higher than 10−3 M, the “aggregation-induced emission” (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable. PMID:25791467

  1. Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Guelis, Artem V.

    2013-01-15

    The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

  2. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  3. Spectral studies of heterocyclic β-diketonates of actinide, lanthanide, and transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nekimken, H.; Bartholdi, C. S.; Cunningham, P. T.

    The results of absorption spectral studies of the 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone chelates of thorium, uranyl, neodymium, gadolinium, gallium, and iron are presented. These neutral chelates exhibit u.v. spectra very similar to that of the ligand, with slight bathochromic or hypsochromic shifts. The solution stability of the complexes in acetonitrile, ethanol, and chloroform was also studied and the lanthanide complexes were found to be the least stable. Sinha's parameter is calculated for the neodymium chelate to determine the relative degree of covalency upon complexation.

  4. Lanthanide-cyclodextrin complexes as probes for elucidating optical purity by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, T.J.; Bogyo, M.S.; Lebeau, E.L. )

    1994-06-01

    A multidentate ligand is bonded to cyclodextrins by the reaction of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic dianhydride with 6-mono- and 2-mono(ethylenediamine) derivatives of cyclodextrin. Adding Dy(III) to the cyclodextrin derivatives enhances the enantiomeric resolution in the [sup 1]H NMR spectra of carbionoxamine maleate, doxylamine succinate, pheniramine maleate, propranolol hydrochloride, and tryptophan. The enhancement is more pronounced with the secondary derivative. The Dy(III)-induced shifts can be used to elucidate the geometry of cyclodextrin-substrate inclusion complexes. Lanthanide-induced shifts are reported for complexes of aspartame, tryptophan, propranolol, and 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate with cyclodextrins, and the relative magnitudes of the shifts agree with previously reported structures of the complexes. 37 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Luminescent lanthanide reporters: new concepts for use in bioanalytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuojola, Johanna; Soukka, Tero

    2014-03-01

    Lanthanides represent the chemical elements from lanthanum to lutetium. They intrinsically exhibit some very exciting photophysical properties, which can be further enhanced by incorporating the lanthanide ion into organic or inorganic sensitizing structures. A very popular approach is to conjugate the lanthanide ion to an organic chromophore structure forming lanthanide chelates. Another approach, which has quickly gained interest, is to incorporate the lanthanide ions into nanoparticle structures, thus attaining improved specific activity and a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. Lanthanide-based reporters, when properly shielded from the quenching effects of water, usually express strong luminescence emission, multiple narrow emission lines covering a wide wavelength range, and exceptionally long excited state lifetimes enabling time-gated luminescence detection. Because of these properties, lanthanide-based reporters have found widespread applications in various fields of life. This review focuses on the field of bioanalytical applications. Luminescent lanthanide reporters and assay formats utilizing these reporters pave the way for increasingly sensitive, simple, and easily automated bioanalytical applications.

  6. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-07-29

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  7. Phthalamide lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  8. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  9. One-dimensional simulation of lanthanide isotachophoresis using COMSOL.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Derek R; Clark, Sue B; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2012-03-01

    Electrokinetic separations can be used to quickly separate rare earth metals to determine their forensic signature. In this work, we simulate the concentration and separation of trivalent lanthanide cations by isotachophoresis. A one-dimensional simulation is developed using COMSOL v4.0a, a commercial finite element simulator, to represent the isotachophoretic separation of three lanthanides: lanthanum, terbium, and lutetium. The binding ligand chosen for complexation with the lanthanides is α-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA) and the buffer system includes acetate, which also complexes with the lanthanides. The complexes formed between the three lanthanides, HIBA, and acetate are all considered in the simulation. We observe that the presence of only lanthanide:HIBA complexes in a buffer system with 10 mM HIBA causes the slowest lanthanide peak (lutetium) to split from the other analytes. The addition of lanthanide:acetate complexes into the simulation of the same buffer system eliminates this splitting. Decreasing the concentration of HIBA in the buffer to 7 mM causes the analyte stack to migrate faster through the capillary. PMID:22522543

  10. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2006-03-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  11. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2005-03-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  12. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  13. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  14. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  15. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  16. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  17. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  18. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  19. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  20. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a) Identification. A Bothrops atrox reagent is...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a) Identification. A Bothrops atrox reagent is...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist...

  4. Unnatural Isotopic Composition of Lithium Reagents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.; Wang, Q. Zh; Wang, Y.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of 39 lithium reagents from several manufacturers indicates that seven were artificially depleted in 6Li significantly in excess of the variation found in terrestrial materials. The atomic weight of lithium in analyzed reagents ranged from 6.939 to 6.996, and ??7-Li, reported relative to L-SVEC lithium carbonate, ranged from -11 to +3013???. This investigation indicates that 6Li-depleted reagents are now found on chemists' shelves, and the labels of these 6Li-depleted reagents do not accurately reflect the atomic and (or) molecular weights of these reagents. In 1993, IUPAC issued the following statement: "Commercially available Li materials have atomic weights that range between 6.94 and 6.99; if a more accurate value is required, it must be determined for the specific material." This statement has been found to be incorrect In two of the 39 samples analyzed, the atomic weight of Li was in excess of 6.99.

  5. U.S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease control is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for ruminants, swine, poultry, equine and aquaculture species. Sets of reagents, i.e., monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies, that can identify the major leukocyt...

  6. Conductimetric and spectrophotometric investigation of lanthanide cyclohexaphosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Nasr, Chérif

    2000-06-01

    The preparation and properties of some lanthanide cyclohexaphosphates Ln 2P 6O 18· nH 2O (Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Er and Yb) are described. Conductivity measurements and IR spectra are presented. The comparison with properties of some other salts, Nd (BrO 3) 3·9H 2O, NdP 3O 9·3H 2O and Nd 4 (P 4O 12) 3·13H 2O, suggests that the coordination number of Nd 3+ in the cyclohexaphosphate is nine.

  7. Total Synthesis of Natural Products Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maertens, Gaetan; L'homme, Chloe; Canesi, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    We present a review of natural product syntheses accomplished in our laboratory during the last five years. Each synthetic route features a phenol dearomatization promoted by an environmentally benign hypervalent iodine reagent. The dearomatizations demonstrate the “aromatic ring umpolung” concept, and involve stereoselective remodeling of the inert unsaturations of a phenol into a highly functionalized key intermediate that may contain a quaternary carbon center and a prochiral dienone system. Several new oxidative strategies were employed, including transpositions (1,3-alkyl shift and Prins-pinacol), a polycyclization, an ipso rearrangement, and direct nucleophilic additions at the phenol para position. Several alkaloids, heterocyclic compounds, and a polycyclic core have been achieved, including sceletenone (a serotonin reuptake inhibitor), acetylaspidoalbidine (an antitumor agent), fortucine (antiviral and antitumor), erysotramidine (curare-like effect), platensimycin (an antibiotic), and the main core of a kaurane diterpene (immunosuppressive agent and stimulator of apoptosis). These concise and in some cases enantioselective syntheses effectively demonstrate the importance of hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of bioactive natural products.

  8. Total synthesis of natural products using hypervalent iodine reagents

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Gaëtan; L'Homme, Chloé; Canesi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of natural product syntheses accomplished in our laboratory during the last 5 years. Each synthetic route features a phenol dearomatization promoted by an environmentally benign hypervalent iodine reagent. The dearomatizations demonstrate the “aromatic ring umpolung” concept, and involve stereoselective remodeling of the inert unsaturations of a phenol into a highly functionalized key intermediate that may contain a quaternary carbon center and a prochiral dienone system. Several new oxidative strategies were employed, including transpositions (1,3-alkyl shift and Prins-pinacol), a polycyclization, an ipso rearrangement, and direct nucleophilic additions at the phenol para position. Several alkaloids, heterocyclic compounds, and a polycyclic core have been achieved, including sceletenone (a serotonin reuptake inhibitor), acetylaspidoalbidine (an antitumor agent), fortucine (antiviral and antitumor), erysotramidine (curare-like effect), platensimycin (an antibiotic), and the main core of a kaurane diterpene (immunosuppressive agent and stimulator of apoptosis). These concise and in some cases enantioselective syntheses effectively demonstrate the importance of hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of bioactive natural products. PMID:25601909

  9. New reagents, new reactions: Computers in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dessy, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    There is a new reagent in chemical reaction vessels-the computer. From data collection, through information processing, to knowledge creation the computer is an integral partner of today`s chemist. Despite its ability to be a Sorcerer`s Apprentice, it has become a leading weapon in overcoming some of the fiscal and technical demands placed upon research and development teams by global competition. In the process it is forcing changes in our work habits that arc, stressing both the Corporation and the individual, this article explores the uses, abuses, and possible future of the new reagent, and explores the meta-physics of the electronic web. 42 refs.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  11. Lanthanide Complexes as a Test for Evidence of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeannette

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research is to advance the understanding of the interaction of lanthanide metals with biological organic molecules and to develop a technique to detect these compounds in the solid state and in situ in Mars and other planetary bodies. The detection of these complexes should provide evidence of life past or present. In addition, detection of the metals alone will provide important information about the geological history of a planetary body. Lanthanides were chosen as our focus of interest because they form very stable complexes with organic molecules in solution and they produce intense luminescence in the ultraviolet and visible spectra. The rare earth complexes available are mostly synthetic for diverse applications in medicine. There is not much work done on the complexes that form in nature. Lanthanides have many applications and they are mined aR over the world, however, since the interest has been only in the elements, the analytical techniques employed destroy any organic ligands that may be present. In order to determine if and which lanthanide complexes form in nature and their concentration, soil samples have been collected from areas rich in soluble lanthanide compounds like phosphates and also rich in vegetation. The soil samples will be analyzed and the lanthanide complexes if present will be isolated and characterized. A spectrometer to detect the lanthanide complexes in situ and in the solid state will be designed. In this workshop, the research approach and its implications will be discussed.

  12. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y.

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xue-Qin Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-15

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis([(2′-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl)-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 6{sup 3}, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in Eu{sup III}, Tb{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand. - Graphical abstract: We present herein six lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand which not only display diverse structures but also possess strong luminescence properties. - Highlights: • We present lanthanide coordination polymers of a new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand. • The lanthanide coordination polymers exhibit diverse structures. • The luminescent properties of Tb{sup III}, Eu{sup III} and Dy{sup III} complexes are discussed in detail.

  14. The Crystal Structure of Lanthanide Zirconates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Richard; Kennedy, Brendan; Ling, Christopher; Stampfl, Anton P. J.

    2010-03-01

    The lanthanide zirconates of composition Ln2Zr2O7 (Ln = La-Gd) are of interest for use in inert matrix fuels and nuclear wasteforms. The series undergoes a pyrochlore to fluorite phase transition as a function of the Ln atomic radii. The phase transition has been attributed to disordering of both the cation and the anion [1]. We have undertaken a synthesis of the lanthanide zirconate series Ln2Zr2O7 (Ln = La-Gd), Ln0.2Zr0.8O1.9 (Ln = Tb-Yb) and NdxHo2-xZr2O7 (0

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  16. Some aspects of the geochemistry of yttrium and the lanthanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Michael

    1965-01-01

    Recent data on the relative abundances of the lanthanides and yttrium in meteorites, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks and sedimentary rocks are reviewed. It is shown that the data are inadequate to substantiate or to disprove Taylor's derivation from these data of a 1:1 abundance ratio of basaltic to granitic rocks in the continental crust. Graphs are given to illustrate the variation of lanthanides in minerals with paragenesis. Both the paragenesis and the crystal chemistry of minerals affect the composition of the lanthanides.

  17. AQUEOUS RELAXATION REAGENTS IN NITROGEN-15 NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times T(1)supe's for 15N and 13C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines in aqueous solution using Gd(III) complexes of a series of polyaminocarboxylate ligands as paramagnetic relaxation reagents (PARRs). The PARRs are classified by t...

  18. DEGRADATION OF MTBE INTERMEDIATES USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previous study, the chemical oxidation of MTBE at low concentrations in water using the Fenton's reagent (FR) was investigated. At certain reaction conditions the process achieved 99.99% degradation of MTBE but it did not result in complete MTBE mineralization. In the pres...

  19. USE OF FENTON'S REAGENT AS DISINFECTING AGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was conducted as an EPA in-house research, assisted by the on-site contractor, US Infrastructure, Inc. (USI) located in Edison, NJ. The Fenton's reagent (e.g., H2O2, ferrous iron Fe(aq)+2) is an alternative method of chemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals (OH ), gen...

  20. USE OF FENTON'S REAGENT AS A DISINFECTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewage samples obtained from a wastewater treatment facility were disinfected by the Fenton's Reagent of several different compositions. The pre-settled samples contained both suspended solids (SS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at concentrations of 28 and 290 mg/L,...

  1. Tritioacetylating reagents and processes for preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Saljoughian, Manoucher; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Than, Chit

    2000-01-01

    Novel acetylating and tritioacetylating reagents suitable for preparation of nonlabelled and radiolabelled organic compounds. N-acetoxynaphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxyphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxysuccinimide, N-tritioacetoxynaphthalimide and processes of their preparation. The invention also concerns synthesis of nonlabelled acetylated and tritioacetylated organic compounds from precursors containing a free --NH.sub.2, --SH or --OH group.

  2. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels–Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels–Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described. PMID:25961416

  3. Metal Nitrite: A Powerful Oxidizing Reagent

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Mahiuddin; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and simple source of nitroso reagents and their oxidation reactions are described. The combination of a Lewis acid and a metal nitrite is applied to the oxidation of silyl enol ethers. Amino acid and peptide derivatives were easily accessed through in situ C-C bond cleavage of fully substituted silyl enol ethers upon oxidation. PMID:21830770

  4. Chemistry Students' Erroneous Conceptions of Limiting Reagent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of 32 University of Transkei (South Africa) freshmen's conceptualization of "limiting reagent," a basic concept in chemistry, based on student responses to two written test questions and clinical interviews. Results indicated that a high percentage of students had misconceptions and could not apply the concept successfully. Makes…

  5. Remarks on preparation of indandione detection reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepan, J.; Kral, V.

    1985-01-01

    A modified Claisen condensation with sliced sodium at a higher temperature was recommended for the production of ungranulated charcoal. A new ninhydrin production method by oxidation of benzaldiketohydrinden using available reagents was tried and was unsuccessful. Triketohydrinden was obtained by boiling ninhydrin in acetic acid anhydrides.

  6. Separation of Minor Actinides from Lanthanides by Dithiophosphinic Acid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Peterman; M. R. Greenhalgh; R. D. Tillotson; J. R. Klaehn; M. K. Harrup; T. A. Luther; J. D. Law; L. M. Daniels

    2008-09-01

    The selective extraction of the minor actinides (Am(III) and Cm(III)) from the lanthanides is an important part of advanced reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This separation would allow the Am/Cm to be fabricated into targets and recycled to a reactor and the lanthanides to be dispositioned. This separation is difficult to accomplish due to the similarities in the chemical properties of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. Research efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory have identified an innovative synthetic pathway yielding new regiospecific dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants. The synthesis provides DPAH derivatives that can address the issues concerning minor actinide separation and extractant stability. For this work, two new symmetric DPAH extractants have been prepared. The use of these extractants for the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides will be discussed.

  7. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmett, D.L.; Fusselman, S.P.; Roy, J.J.; Gay, R.L.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1996-10-01

    TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.

  8. Lanthanide-promoted ethylation of Schiff bases by triethylaluminum.

    PubMed

    Tsvelikhovsky, Dmitry; Gelman, Dmitri; Molander, Gary A; Blum, Jochanan

    2004-06-10

    [reaction: see text] Schiff bases of aromatic aldehydes and anilines that fail to react with triethylaluminum are smoothly alkylated at room temperature in the presence of lanthanide catalysts. The alkylation takes place selectively at the vinylic carbon atom. PMID:15176802

  9. Submicrogram determination of lanthanides through quenching of calcein blue fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, H.G.

    1987-04-15

    It has been found that trace levels of lanthanide ions efficiently quench the fluorescence of calcein blue and that an analytical method based on this quenching is far more sensitive (0.01-0.02 ..mu..g/mL depending on the identity of the lanthanide ion) than existing methods based on absorption spectrophotometry. The sensitivity levels are comparable to those noted for fluorescence observation of the few lanthanides which luminesce directly, but the calcein blue method may be applied equally well to any lanthanide ion. Interference by divalent transition-metal ions has been noted, but the lower degrees of quenching efficiency by these ions ensure that significant interference will exist only at relatively high metal levels.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  11. Structure of Glass-Forming Melts - Lanthanide in Borosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hong; Li, Liyu; Qian, Morris; Strachan, Denis M.; Wang, Zheming

    2004-05-17

    Over the past few years, we studied several complex Na2O-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass systems to answer key questions: effects of melt chemistry on solubility of lanthanide oxides; lanthanide solution behavior, and intermediate-range ordering in the melts. This paper summarizes our currently understanding on rare earth elements in borosilicate glasses, covering solution behavior, solubility limits, crystalization and phase separation.

  12. Production of lanthanide molecular ion beams by fluorination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussière, B.; Deloncle, I.; Barré-Boscher, N.; Cardona, M. A.; Cheikh Mhamed, M.; Corbin, T.; Cottereau, E.; Croizet, H.; Dimitrov, B.; Essabaa, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Gottardo, A.; Goutev, N.; Guillot, J.; Hojman, D.; Lau, C.; Roccia, S.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.; Verney, D.; Yavahchova, M.; the ALTO collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Systematic off-line fluorination studies on all the stable lanthanide isotopes have been performed. The results are presented as a function of various parameters such as the target temperature, the type of ion source used (hot plasma or surface ionization) and the quantity of CF4 introduced. The first on-line measurements allowed us to determine the optimal experimental conditions for producing radioactive lanthanide isotopes.

  13. Lighting up cells with lanthanide self-assembled helicates

    PubMed Central

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide bioprobes and bioconjugates are ideal luminescent stains in view of their low propensity to photobleaching, sharp emission lines and long excited state lifetimes permitting time-resolved detection for enhanced sensitivity. We show here how the interplay between physical, chemical and biochemical properties allied to microfluidics engineering leads to self-assembled dinuclear lanthanide luminescent probes illuminating live cells and selectively detecting biomarkers expressed by cancerous human breast cells. PMID:24511387

  14. Non-classical divalent lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Nief, François

    2010-08-01

    The synthesis of non-classical divalent lanthanide complexes, i.e. those not containing the classical samarium(II), europium(II) or ytterbium(II), was once thought impossible. Since 1997, when the first stable complex of thulium(II) was discovered, there has been many more examples of stable coordination and organometallic complexes of lanthanum(II), neodymium(II) and dysprosium(II) in addition to thulium(II), and the influence of the ligand system on the stability of the complexes is beginning to be understood. These non-classical divalent compounds show exceptional reactivity as some of them have been shown to activate dinitrogen at room temperature, together with related reduced divalent-like systems, and to undergo spontaneous intramolecular carbon-hydrogen bond activation. Many more examples of non-classical divalent compounds together with new aspects of their exciting reactivity should be discovered in the near future. PMID:20631944

  15. Polymorphic Lanthanide Phosphonates Showing Distinct Magnetic Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dai; Ren, Min; Bao, Song-Song; Cai, Zhong-Sheng; Xu, Chang; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-06-01

    A series of layered lanthanide phosphonates α-Ln(2-qpH)(SO4)(H2O)2 (α-Ln; Ln = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er) and β-Ln(2-qpH)(SO4)(H2O)2 (β-Ln; Ln = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Yb) (2-qpH2 = 2-quinolinephosphonic acid) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds α-Ln crystallize in monoclinic space group P21/c, while compounds β-Ln crystallize in triclinic space group P1̅. Magnetic studies reveal that dominant ferromagnetic interactions are propagated between the magnetic centers in all cases. Field-induced magnetic relaxation is observed in compounds β-Er and β-Yb. PMID:27183034

  16. Lanthanide clusters with azide capping ligands.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian F; Emge, Thomas J; Brennan, John G

    2013-05-20

    Weakly binding azide ligands have been used as surface caps in the synthesis of lanthanide oxo and selenido clusters. Addition of NaN3 and Na2O to in situ prepared solutions of Ln(SePh)3 in pyridine results in the formation of (py)18Sm6Na2O2(N3)16 or (py)10Ln6O2(N3)12(SePh)2 (Ln = Ho, Er), with the Sm and Er compounds characterized by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Attempts to prepare chalcogenido derivatives by ligand-based redox reactions using elemental Se were successful in the preparation of (py)10Er6O2(SeSe)2(N3)10, a diselenido cluster having crystallographic disorder due to some site sharing of both SeSe and N3 ligands. These compounds all detonate when heated. PMID:23639142

  17. Lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, diverse structure and luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue-Qin; Lei, Yao-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Run; Zhao, Meng-Meng; Peng, Yun-Qiao; Cheng, Guo-Quan

    2014-10-01

    The new semirigid exo-bidentate ligand incorporating furfurysalicylamide terminal groups, namely, 1,4-bis{[(2‧-furfurylaminoformyl)phenoxyl]methyl}-2,5-bismethylbenzene (L) was synthesized and used as building blocks for constructing lanthanide coordination polymers with luminescent properties. The series of lanthanide nitrate complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The semirigid ligand L, as a bridging ligand, reacts with lanthanide nitrates forming three distinct structure types: chiral noninterpenetrated two-dimensional (2D) honeycomblike (6,3) (hcb, Schläfli symbol 63, vertex symbol 6 6 6) topological network as type I, 1D zigzag chain as type II and 1D trapezoid ladder-like chain as type III. The structural diversities indicate that lanthanide contraction effect played significant roles in the structural self-assembled process. The luminescent properties of EuIII, TbIII and DyIII complexes are discussed in detail. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, the lanthanide ions in EuIII, TbIII and DyIII complexes can be efficiently sensitized by the ligand.

  18. Macroscopic and spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide adsorption to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Mosselmans, J. Fred W.; Magennis, Marisa; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Tourney, Janette; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to combine surface complexation modelling of macroscopic adsorption data with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements to identify lanthanide sorption sites on the bacterial surface. The adsorption of selected representatives for light (La and Nd), middle (Sm and Gd) and heavy (Er and Yb) lanthanides was measured as a function of pH, and biomass samples exposed to 4 mg/L lanthanide at pH 3.5 and 6 were analysed using XAS. Surface complexation modelling was consistent with the light lanthanides adsorbing to phosphate sites, whereas the adsorption of middle and heavy lanthanides could be modelled equally well by carboxyl and phosphate sites. The existence of such mixed mode coordination was confirmed by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which was also consistent with adsorption to phosphate sites at low pH, with secondary involvement of carboxyl sites at high adsorption density (high pH). Thus, the two approaches yield broadly consistent information with regard to surface site identity and lanthanide coordination environment. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis suggests that coordination to phosphate sites is monodentate at the metal/biomass ratios used. Based on the best-fitting p Ka site, we infer that the phosphate sites are located on N-acetylglucosamine phosphate, the most likely polymer on gram-negative cells with potential phosphate sites that deprotonate around neutral pH.

  19. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Jin, Dayong; Piper, James; Vallarino, Lidia M.; Williams, John W.; Yang, Sean; Zucker, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including microscopes. Methods: 0.5, 3, and 5 micron (µm) beads containing a luminescent europium-complex were manufactured and the luminescence distribution of the 5 µm beads was measured with a time-delayed luminescence flow cytometer and a timedelayed digital microscope. The distribution of the luminescence intensity from the europium-complex in individual beads was determined on optical sections by confocal microscopy. The emission spectra of the beads under UV excitation were determined with a PARISS® spectrophotometer. The kinetics of the luminescence bleaching caused by UV irradiation were measured under LED excitation with a fluorescence microscope. Results: The kinetics of UV bleaching were very similar for the 0.5, 3, and 5 µm beads. Emission peaks were found at 592, 616, and 685 nanometers (nm). The width of the principal peak at half-maximum (616 nm) was 9.9 nm. The luminescence lifetimes in water and in air were 340 and 460 microseconds (µs), respectively. The distribution of the europium- complex in the beads was homogeneous. Conclusions: The 5 µm beads can be used for spectral calibration of microscopes equipped with a spectrograph, as test particles for time-delayed luminescence flow cytometers, and possibly as labels for macromolecules and cells.

  20. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  1. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  2. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  3. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  4. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  5. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles. PMID:27552942

  6. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  10. Swine Toolkit Progress for US Veterinary Immune Reagent Network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Veterinary Immune Reagent Network (http://www.umass.edu/vetimm/) was established to address the lack of immunological reagents for veterinary species. Within this context, plans are underway to produce sets of reagents needed to evaluate immune changes during disease and following vaccination...

  11. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identify human blood-group antibodies. (b) Source. Reagent Red Blood Cells shall be prepared from human... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells §...

  12. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  13. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  14. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  16. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  17. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  18. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  19. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  20. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  1. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  2. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  3. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human...

  9. Luminescence of Lanthanide-Dimethyl Sulfoxide Compound Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Mingzhen; Li, Yuebin; Hossu, Marius; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zhongxin; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2011-08-04

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has the ability to penetrate living tissues without causing significant damage. Of foremost importance to our understanding of the possible functions of DMSO in biological systems is its ability to replace some of the water molecules associated with the cellular constituents, or to affect the structure of the omnipresent water. Luminescence probes have been widely used for biological studies such as labeling, imaging and detection. Luminescence probes formed in DMSO may find new applications. Here, luminescence compounds formed by refluxing lanthanide nitrates of Ce, La, Tb, Yb, Nd, Gd and Eu in DMSO are reported and their luminescence properties investigated. Based on their luminescence spectral properties, the compounds can be classified into four classes. For compounds-I with Yb, Ce, and La, the excitation and emission spectra are very broad and their excitation or emission peaks are shifted to longer wavelengths when the monitored emission or excitation wavelength is longer . For compounds-II with Gd and Nd, both the excitation and emission spectra are very broad but their emission wavelengths change little at different excitation wavelengths. For Tb-DMSO as compound-III, both the typical emissions from the f - f transitions of Tb3+ and a broad emission at 445 nm are observed. At low temperatures of reaction, the f - f emissions are dominant, while at high temperatures such as 180 oC of reaction, the broad emission at 445 nm is dominant. For compound-IV with Eu-DMSO compounds, the dominant emissions are from the f - f transitions of Eu3+ and only a weak broad emission is observed, which is likely from the d - f transition of Eu2+ rather than from the metal to ligand charge transfer states.

  10. A High-Sensitivity Lanthanide Nanoparticle Reporter for Mass Cytometry: Tests on Microgels as a Proxy for Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether one can use lanthanide nanoparticles (e.g., NaHoF4) to detect surface biomarkers expressed at low levels by mass cytometry. To avoid many of the complications of experiments on live or fixed cells, we carried out proof-of-concept experiments using aqueous microgels with a diameter on the order of 700 nm as a proxy for cells. These microgels were used to test whether nanoparticle (NP) reagents would allow the detection of as few as 100 proteins per “cell” in cell-by-cell assays. Streptavidin (SAv), which served as the model biomarker, was attached to the microgel in two different ways. Covalent coupling to surface carboxyls of the microgel led to large numbers (>104) of proteins per microgel, whereas biotinylation of the microgel followed by exposure to SAv led to much smaller numbers of SAv per microgel. Using mass cytometry, we compared two biotin-containing reagents, which recognized and bound to the SAvs on the microgel. One was a metal chelating polymer (MCP), a biotin end-capped polyaspartamide containing 50 Tb3+ ions per probe. The other was a biotinylated NaHoF4 NP containing 15 000 Ho atoms per probe. Nonspecific binding was determined with bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated microgels. The MCP was effective at detecting and quantifying SAvs on the microgel with covalently bound SAv (20 000 SAvs per microgel) but was unable to give a meaningful signal above that of the BSA-coated microgel for the samples with low levels of SAv. Here the NP reagent gave a signal 2 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the MCP and allowed detection of NPs ranging from 100 to 500 per microgel. Sensitivity was limited by the level of nonspecific adsorption. This proof of concept experiment demonstrates the enhanced sensitivity possible with NP reagents in cell-by-cell assays by mass cytometry. PMID:24617504

  11. Dynamic imaging with lanthanide chelates in normal brain: contrast due to magnetic susceptibility effects.

    PubMed

    Villringer, A; Rosen, B R; Belliveau, J W; Ackerman, J L; Lauffer, R B; Buxton, R B; Chao, Y S; Wedeen, V J; Brady, T J

    1988-02-01

    Using a one-dimensional rapid imaging technique, we have found that injection of lanthanide chelates such as Gd(DTPA)2- leads to a significant decrease (50%) in rat brain signal intensity at 1.45 T using T2-weighted pulse sequences; however, no effect of comparable size is observed with T1-weighted pulse sequences. The transient effect and its kinetics were followed with a temporal resolution of between 1 and 8 s. Experiments with different lanthanide chelates show that the observed decrease in signal intensity correlates with the magnetic moment of each agent but not with their longitudinal relaxivity. Three-dimensional chemical-shift resolved experiments demonstrate significant line broadening in brain during infusion with Dy(DTPA)2-. Our results show that the cause of this effect is the difference in susceptibility between the capillaries, containing the contrast agent, and the surrounding tissue. As a result of these susceptibility differences, field gradients are produced in the tissue and diffusion of water through these gradients leads to a loss of spin phase coherence and thus a decrease in signal intensity. We propose this as a new type of contrast agent mechanism in NMR. The effect and its kinetics are likely to be related to important physiological parameters such as cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow, and do not depend on a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier as do conventional contrast agent techniques. PMID:3367774

  12. Supramolecular recognition of heteropairs of lanthanide ions: a step toward self-assembled bifunctional probes.

    PubMed

    André, Nicolas; Jensen, Thomas B; Scopelliti, Rosario; Imbert, Daniel; Elhabiri, Mourad; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Piguet, Claude; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2004-01-26

    Three unsymmetrical ditopic hexadentate ligands coded for the recognition of trivalent lanthanide ions have been synthesized, L(AB), L(AC), and L(BC), where A represents a benzimidazole-pyridine-benzimidazole coordination unit, B a benzimidazole-pyridine-carboxamide one, and C a benzimidazole-pyridine-carboxylic acid moiety. Under stoichiometric 2:3 (Ln:L) conditions, these ligands self-assemble with lanthanide ions to yield triple-stranded bimetallic helicates having a sizable stability in acetonitrile: log beta(23) values for Eu are equal to 23.9 +/- 0.5 (L(AB)), 23.3 +/- 0.7 (deprotonated L(AC)), and 29.8 +/- 0.5 (deprotonated L(BC)). The crystal structure of the EuEu helicate with L(AB) shows 9-coordinate metal ions and an HHH (H stands for head) configuration of the helically wrapped ligand strands. In the presence of equimolar quantities of Ln and Ln' ions, L(AB) displays a remarkable predisposition to form HHH-heterobimetallic edifices, as proved both in the solid state by the crystal structures of the LaEu, LaTb, PrEr, and PrLu helicates and in solution by NMR spectroscopy. In all cases, the benzimidazole-pyridine-carboxamide units of the three ligands are bound to the smaller lanthanide ion, a fact further ascertained by high-resolution luminescence data on LaEu and by (1)H NMR. Analysis of the lanthanide-induced (1)H NMR shifts and of the spin-lattice relaxation times of the [LnLu(L(AB))(3)](6+) series (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu) demonstrates the isostructural nature of the complexes in solution and that the crystal structure of LaTb is a good model for the solution structure. The selectivity of L(AB) for heteropairs of Ln(III) ions increases with increasing difference in ionic radius, resulting in 70% of the heterobimetallic species for deltar(i) = 0.1 A and up to 90% for LaLu (deltar(i) = 0.18 A), and corresponding to delta(deltaG) in the range 3-10 kJ.mol(-)(1). The origins of this stabilization are discussed in terms of the donor properties of the

  13. [DOTA-bis(amide)]lanthanide complexes: NMR evidence for differences in water-molecule exchange rates for coordination isomers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Kovacs, Z; Burgess, S; Aime, S; Terreno, E; Sherry, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two derivatives of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane with trans-acetate and trans-amide side-chain ligating groups have been prepared and their complexes with lanthanide cations examined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. These lanthanide complexes exist in aqueous solution as a mixture of slowly interconverting coordination isomers with 1H chemical shifts similar to those reported previously for the major (M) and minor (m) forms of the tetraacetate ([Ln(dota)]-) and tetraamide ([Ln(dtma)]3+) complexes. As in the [Ln(dota)]- and [Ln(dtma)]3+ complexes, the m/M ratio proved to be a sensitive function of lanthanide size and temperature. An analysis of 1H hyperfine shifts in spectra of the Yb3+ complexes revealed significant differences between the axial (D1) and non-axial (D2) components of the magnetic susceptibility tensor anisotropy in the m and M coordination isomers and the energetics of ring inversion and m <==> M isomerization as determined by two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). (17)O shift data for the Dy3+ complexes showed that both have one inner-sphere water molecule. A temperature-dependent (17)O NMR study of bulk water linewidths for solutions of the Gd3+ complexes provided direct evidence for differences in water exchange rates for the two coordination isomers. The bound-water lifetimes (tauM298) in the M and m isomers of the Gd3+ complexes ranged from 1.4-2.4 micros and 3-14 ns, respectively. This indicates that 1) the inner-sphere water lifetimes for the complexes with a single positive charge reported here are considerably shorter for both coordination isomers than the corresponding values for the [Gd(dtma)]3+ complex with three positive charges, and 2) the difference in water lifetimes for M and m isomers in these two series is magnified in the [Gd[dota-bis(amide)

  14. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  15. Strategies to enhance signal intensity with paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for 19F magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Botta, Mauro; Parker, David

    2011-01-28

    The synthesis and (19)F NMR spectroscopic properties are reported for three series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes, based on mono- and diamide cyclen ligands. Analyses of variable temperature, pH and field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments are reported and the merits of a triphosphinate mono-amide complex defined by virtue of its favourable isomer distribution and attractive relaxation properties. These lead to an enhanced sensitivity of detection in (19)F magnetic resonance experiments versus a diamagnetic Y(III) analogue, paving the way for future shift and imaging studies. PMID:21127807

  16. A Simple Empirical Analysis of the Enthalpies of Formation of Lanthanide Halides and Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes a simple and general method whereby the lattice energies of lanthanide(II) and (IV) compounds are derived directly from those found experimentally for the corresponding lanthanide(III) compounds. The method is applicable to all lanthanide halides and oxides and involves calculations which can be easily and quickly performed by students.…

  17. Luminescent chiral lanthanide(III) complexes as potential molecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    This perspective gives an introduction into the design of luminescent lanthanide(III)-containing complexes possessing chiral properties and used to probe biological materials. The first part briefly describes general principles, focusing on the optical aspect (i.e. lanthanide luminescence, sensitization processes) of the most emissive trivalent lanthanide ions, europium and terbium, incorporated into molecular luminescent edifices. This is followed by a short discussion on the importance of chirality in the biological and pharmaceutical fields. The second part is devoted to the assessment of the chiroptical spectroscopic tools available (typically circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence) and the strategies used to introduce a chiral feature into luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes (chiral structure resulting from a chiral arrangement of the ligand molecules surrounding the luminescent center or presence of chiral centers in the ligand molecules). Finally, the last part illustrates these fundamental principles with recent selected examples of such chiral luminescent lanthanide-based compounds used as potential probes of biomolecular substrates. PMID:19885510

  18. Development of the Actinide-Lanthanide Separation (ALSEP) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Gelis, Artem V.

    2014-09-30

    Separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from acidic high-level raffinates arising from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel is an important step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Most proposed approaches to this problem involve two solvent extraction steps: 1) co-extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, followed by 2) separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. The objective of our work is to develop a single solvent-extraction process for isolating the minor actinide elements. We report here a solvent containing N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) combined with 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]) that can be used to separate the minor actinides in a single solvent-extraction process. T2EHDGA serves to co-extract the trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions from nitric acid solution. Switching the aqueous phase chemistry to a citrate buffered solution of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid at pH 2.5 to 4 results in selective transfer of the actinides to the aqueous phase, thus affecting separation of the actinides from the lanthanides. Separation factors between the lanthanides and actinides are approximately 20 in the pH range of 3 to 4, and the distribution ratios are not highly dependent on the pH in this system.

  19. Lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Li, Chunxia; Cheng, Ziyong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The field of theranostics has sprung up to achieve personalized medicine. The theranostics fuses diagnostic and therapeutic functions, empowering early diagnosis, targeted drug delivery, and real-time monitoring of treatment effect into one step. One particularly attractive class of nanomaterials for theranostic application is lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials (LDHNs). Because of the existence of lanthanide ions, LDHNs show outstanding fluorescent and paramagnetic properties, enabling them to be used as multimodal bioimaging agents. Synchronously, the huge interior cavities of LDHNs are able to be applied as efficacious tools for storage and delivery of therapeutic agents. The LDHNs can be divided into two types based on difference of component: single-phase lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials and lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites. We describe the synthesis of first kind of nanomaterials by use of hard template, soft template, template-free, and self-sacrificing template method. For lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites, we divide the preparation strategies into three kinds (one-step, two-step, and multistep method) according to the synthetic procedures. Furthermore, we also illustrate the potential bioapplications of these LDHNs, including biodetection, imaging (fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging), drug/gene delivery, and other therapeutic applications. PMID:24227795

  20. From Antenna to Assay: Lessons Learned in Lanthanide Luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Evan; Samuel, Amanda; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-09-25

    Ligand-sensitized luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable current interest due to their unique photophysical properties (micro- to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts), which make them well suited to serve as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived Ln(III) emission can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence, resulting in vastly enhanced measurement sensitivity. One of the challenges in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive Ln(III) complexes that also possess sufficient stability and aqueous solubility required for practical applications. In this account we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology, the requirements and current use of which will be briefly discussed. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms as well as using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity compared to earlier examples that utilize a single pendant antenna chromophore. We have found that ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ca. 60%. Solution thermodynamic studies have indicated that these complexes are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM-chromophore, in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of

  1. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes: from fundamentals to biodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Tu, Datao; Zhu, Haomiao; Ma, En; Chen, Xueyuan

    2013-01-01

    Trivalent lanthanide (Ln3+)-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles (NPs), characterized by long-lived luminescence, large Stokes and/or anti-Stokes shifts, narrow emission bands and high photochemical stability, are considered to be promising candidates as luminescent bioprobes in biomedicine and biotechnology. In this feature article, we provide a brief overview of the most recent advances in Ln3+-doped luminescent inorganic NPs as sensors, which covers from their chemical and physical fundamentals to biodetection, such as controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in vitro biodetection. Finally, some of the most important emerging trends and future efforts toward this active research field are also proposed.

  2. Purificaiton of Lanthanides for Large Neutrino Detectors: Thorium Removal from Gadolinium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.; Cumming, J.B.; Hans, S.; Hahn, R.L.

    2010-06-01

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillators are the detectors of choice for various neutrino experiments. Procedures have been developed to transfer metals into organic liquids by solvent extraction or direct dissolution of a metallic compound. Traces of natural radioactivity introduced into the scintillator with the metal may produce undesirable backgrounds. Measurements using a {sup 229}Th tracer indicate that the inclusion of a pH-controlled partial hydrolysis and filtration prior to the preparation of a gadolinium-loading compound can reduce thorium by a factor of {approx}100. This 'self-scavenging' procedure has the advantage that it uses only reagents encountered in the production process. Addition of non-elemental scavengers such as iron, or the use of solvent extraction or ion exchange procedures can be avoided. It also improves the optical transmission in the blue region by removing traces of iron. This purification method has potential applications to the large-scale production of other metal-loaded liquid scintillators and for the removal of traces of thorium in the industrial production of lanthanides.

  3. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  4. Organometallic Palladium Reagents for Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal based reactions have found wide use in organic synthesis and are used frequently to functionalize small molecules.1,2 However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal based reactions to modify complex biomolecules3,4, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature, and mild pH) and the existence of multiple, reactive functional groups found in biopolymers. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation reactions. The bioconjugation reaction is rapid and robust under a range of biocompatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants, and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the new bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as a new set of benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  5. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  6. Electrodialytic reagent introduction in flow systems.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Santosh K; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-05-15

    We report on electrodialytic introduction of ionizable molecules of significant size (e.g., 4-(2-pyridyl(azo) resorcinol, PAR)) in capillary scale flow systems. Such reagent introduction can be conducted without volumetric dilution, easily programmed through current control and with excellent mixing characteristics. Electrodialytic transport of large hydrophobic aromatic ions through conventional aromatic ion exchangers is inefficient. Such ions are strongly retained by hydrophobic and pi-pi interactions. An external electric field cannot modulate this retention. We show that the electrodialytic introduction of aromatic dye anions is readily possible through both unmodified cellulose dialysis membranes and through cellulose membranes modified with methacrylate skeleton anion exchangers. The applied electrodialysis current conveniently controls the reagent flux. Although the applied voltage is sufficient to cause electrolytic production of hydrogen and oxygen; the gases are generated outside the flowstream of interest. The present device was constructed with a sub-microliter internal volume. We show capillary scale trace analysis of transition metals. A limit of detection of 0.5 fmol Zn (S/N = 3) is demonstrated with a capillary scale flow injection system with a simple light emitting diode based detector. PMID:20423104

  7. U. S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This poster will present a progress report on the CSREES-funded NRI grant to support a broad community approach to systematically address the immunological reagent gap for the US veterinary immunology research community including for the following groups: ruminants (concentrating on cattle but inclu...

  8. Photoacoustic Spectral Study of Lanthanide Complexes Doped in Silica Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. T.; Gao, B.; Zhang, S. Y.; Liu, X. J.

    2015-06-01

    Lanthanide phenanthroline (phen) complexes and were incorporated into a silica matrix by an ultrasonic assisted sol-gel method. In the region of ligand absorption, the photoacoustic (PA) intensity for a lanthanide complex is the same as in wet gels. Upon heat treatment at 120C, however, the PA intensity of a O-doped sample is much larger than that of a O-doped sample. The characteristic emissions of complex-doped samples were used to interpret the stability of the complex in silica matrices. The luminescence spectra are consistent with the PA results. The study indicates that phen can only coordinate with lanthanide ions in a silica matrix after a suitable heat treatment. Moreover, the covalency parameters and PA bands of f-f transionts of have been used to study the formation of the complex in a silica matrix.

  9. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as dual imaging agent in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenlong; Bony, Badrul Alam; Kim, Cho Rong; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that the molecular imaging is an extremely important technique in diagnosing diseases. Dual imaging is emerging as a step forward in molecular imaging technique because it can provide us with more information useful for diagnosing diseases than single imaging. Therefore, diverse dual imaging modalities should be developed. Molecular imaging generally relies on imaging agents. Mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles could be valuable materials for dual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-fluorescent imaging (FI) because they have both excellent and diverse magnetic and fluorescent properties useful for dual MRI-FI, depending on lanthanide ions used. Since they are mixed nanoparticles, they are compact, robust, and stable, which is extremely useful for biomedical applications. They can be also easily synthesized with facile composition control. In this study, we explored three systems of ultrasmall mixed lanthanide (Dy/Eu, Ho/Eu, and Ho/Tb) oxide nanoparticles to demonstrate their usefulness as dual T2 MRI–FI agents. PMID:24220641

  10. Laser ablation synthesis of lanthanide oxide clusters: Mechanisms and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.K.

    1995-07-15

    Excimer laser ablation into vacuum of hydrated lanthanide oxalates has produced new lanthanide (Ln) oxide cluster ions which were identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In addition to binary oxide clusters (Ln{sub {ital m}}O{sup +}{sub {ital n}}), mixed lanthanide oxide clusters [Ln{sub {ital m}1}Ln{sub {ital m}2}{sup {prime}}O{sup +}{sub {ital n}} with ({ital m}1+{ital m}2){le}9] were discerned for the following Ln-Ln{prime}: La-Tb, La-Ho, La-Lu, and Ho-Lu. The observed cluster ion stoichiometries, abundance distributions, and hydration systematics provide insights into cluster formation mechanisms and chemistries. Time-variable ion sampling revealed cluster enhancement in the tail of the ablation plume. The body of experimental results support cluster formation by aggregation of small ablated species. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. New quinolone-based thiol-reactive lanthanide luminescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Wirpsza, Laura; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide ion complexes are distinguished by unique light emitting properties that enable both highly sensitive detection of lanthanide labels attached to biomolecules and contrast imaging of various micro objects (cells, nanoparticles, etc.). Previously, we synthesized amine-reactive cs124-based luminescent lanthanide chelates with improved brightness and metal retention. Here we report the synthesis of new thiol-reactive derivatives of the same compounds including bromoacetamido-, and maleimido- forms of cs124 and cs124CF3 fluorophores. Maleimido-compounds displayed exceptional reactivity instantaneously coupling to thiols at physiological conditions at micromolar probes concentrations. Surprisingly, they displayed strong quenching by adjacent maleimido-group, which was completely eliminated after reaction with thiols, thereby enabling their simple detection by monitoring the light emission of the reaction mixture. This reaction can be used for hyper-sensitive determination of biologically important sulphydryl compounds (e.g. glutathione, co-enzyme A, etc.) in time-resolved mode. PMID:23833545

  12. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  13. Thermodynamical properties of liquid lanthanides-A variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P.; Thakor, P. B.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-06-24

    Thermodynamical properties like Entropy (S), Internal energy (E) and Helmholtz free energy (F) of liquid lanthanides using a variation principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubuv (GB) inequality with Percus Yevick hard sphere reference system have been reported in the present investigation. To describe electron-ion interaction we have used our newly constructed parameter free model potential along with Sarkar et al. local field correction function. Lastly, we conclude that our newly constructed model potential is capable to explain the thermodynamical properties of liquid lanthanides.

  14. Method for providing oxygen ion vacancies in lanthanide oxides

    DOEpatents

    Kay, D. Alan R.; Wilson, William G.

    1989-12-05

    A method for desulfurization of fuel gases resulting from the incomplete combustion of sulfur containing hydrocarbons whereby the gases are treated with lanthanide oxides containing large numbers of oxygen-ion vacancies providing ionic porosity which enhances the ability of the lanthanide oxides to react more rapidly and completely with the sulfur in the fuel gases whereby the sulfur in such gases is reduced to low levels suitable for fuels for firing into boilers of power plants generating electricity with steam turbine driven generators, gas turbines, fuel cells and precursors for liquid fuels such as methanol and the like.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  16. Extraction of lanthanides with halogen substituted 4-acyl-pyrazolones

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Freiser, H.

    1983-01-01

    Equilibrium extraction behavior for a series of representative tervalent lanthanide ions, La, Pr, Eu, and Yb, using chloroform solutions containing halogenated derivatives of 4-acyl-1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone have been studied. The results demonstrate that these lanthanides are extracted as simple chelates, LnL/sub 3/. The equilibrium constants of these extraction reactions have been calculated. The relationships between the acid dissociation constants, K/sub a/, determined by a two-phase titration method, distribution constants, K/sub DR/, and the extraction equilibrium constants, K/sub ex/, are discussed. 14 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  18. New reagents on the horizon for immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    St Clair, E William; Turka, Larry A; Saxon, Andrew; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Eisenbarth, George S; Bluestone, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in immunology and a growing arsenal of new drugs are bringing the focus of tolerance research from animal models into the clinical setting. The conceptual framework for therapeutic tolerance induction has shifted from a "sledgehammer" approach that relies solely on cellular depletion and cytokine targeting, to a strategy directed toward restoring a functional balance across the immune system, namely the different populations of naive cells, effector and memory cells, and regulatory cells. Unlocking the key to tolerance induction in the future will likely depend on our ability to harness the functions of T regulatory cells. Also, dendritic cells are strategically positioned at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity and may be subject to deliberate medical intervention in a way that can control a chronic inflammatory response. Many reagents with tolerance-inducing potential are currently undergoing clinical testing in transplantation, autoimmune diseases, and allergic diseases, and even more that are on the horizon promise to offer enormous benefits to human health. PMID:16987079

  19. The Reagent-sorption Technology of Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchatov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Neschimenko, Y. P.; Feklistov, D. Y.

    The main purpose of this work is to intensify and to improve the efficiency of water treatment processes as well as to combine optimally modern techniques and technological devices in water treatment processes. Offered comprehensive hybrid water treatment developing technology of different origin is based on the combination of the treatment by reagent and membrane electro dialysis. In offered technology, of water treatment as a reagent is proposed to use alumino-silicic reagent, which simultaneously is coagulant, flocculant and adsorbent.

  20. RNA SHAPE chemistry with aromatic acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Nodin, Laura; Noël, Olivier; Chaminade, Françoise; Maskri, Ouerdia; Barbier, Vincent; David, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Xie, Juan

    2015-02-01

    As chemical methods for RNA secondary structure determination, SHAPE chemistry (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) has been developed to specifically target flexible nucleotides (often unpaired nucleotides) independently to their purine or pyrimidine nature. In order to improve the specificity of acylating reagents towards unpaired nucleotides, we have explored the reactivity of symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides, active esters like succinimidyl ester and cyanomethyl esters for 2'-O-acylation reaction. Among the tested compounds, only the acyl fluoride 4 showed a low reactivity (compared to NMIA). However, this study is the first to show that nucleophilic catalysts like DMAP greatly improved the selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation by symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides and succinimidyl ester, with the 2-fluorobenzoic anhydride 5 being the most reactive. PMID:25557357

  1. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  2. Prussian Blue as a Prebiotic Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Bermejo, M.; Menor-Salván, C.; Osuna-Esteban, S.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2009-12-01

    Ferrocyanide has been proposed as a potential prebiotic reagent and the complex salt Prussian Blue, Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3, might be an important reservoir of HCN, in the early Earth. HCN is considered the main precursor of amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases under prebiotic conditions. Recently, we observed the formation of Prussian Blue in spark discharge experiments using saline solutions of ferrous chloride, FeCl2. Using Prussian Blue as starting material in ammonium suspensions, we obtained organic compounds containing nitrogen. These results seem to indicate that Prussian Blue could have been first, a sink of HCN, and then in subsequent reactions, triggered by pH fluctuations, it might have lead to organic life precursors.

  3. Aminoazoles as Key Reagents in Multicomponent Heterocyclizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebanov, Valentin A.; Gura, Katerina A.; Desenko, Sergey M.

    Because of the significant role in biological processes in living cells and the diverse types of physiological activities, heterocyclic compounds are in focus of intense investigations by academic and applied-oriented chemists. Considerably, a scientific renaissance of heterocycles during the last decades is closely related to the development of multicomponent approaches to their synthesis. Multicomponent methodology fundamentally different from two-component or sequential processes together with other innovative synthetic methods like microwave- and ultrasonic-assisted reactions offer some new possibilities in constructing heterocyclic systems with high level of molecular diversity and complexity. An overview of known multicomponent heterocyclizations using aminoazoles as a key reagent and their rich synthetic potential for obtaining five-, six-, and seven-membered heterocycles is presented. A special attention is paid to the tuning of chemo- and regio- and positional selectivity of some reactions as well as to the application of nonclassical activation methods based on microwave and ultrasonic irradiation.

  4. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  5. Highly Luminescent, Water-Soluble Lanthanide Fluorobenzoates: Syntheses, Structures and Photophysics, Part I: Lanthanide Pentafluorobenzoates.

    PubMed

    Kalyakina, Alena S; Utochnikova, Valentina V; Bushmarinov, Ivan S; Ananyev, Ivan V; Eremenko, Igor L; Volz, Daniel; Rönicke, Franziska; Schepers, Ute; Van Deun, Rik; Trigub, Alexander L; Zubavichus, Yan V; Kuzmina, Natalia P; Bräse, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Highly luminescent, photostable, and soluble lanthanide pentafluorobenzoates have been synthesized and thoroughly characterized, with a focus on Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes as visible emitters and Nd(III) , Er(III) , and Yb(III) complexes as infrared emitters. Investigation of the crystal structures of the complexes in powder form and as single crystals by using X-ray diffraction revealed five different structural types, including monomeric, dimeric, and polymeric. The local structure in different solutions was studied by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQYs) of terbium and europium complexes were 39 and 15 %, respectively; the latter value was increased almost twice by using the heterometallic complex [Tb0.5 Eu0.5 (pfb)3 (H2 O)] (Hpfb=pentafluorobenzoic acid). Due to the effectively utilized sensitization strategy (pfb)(-) →Tb→Eu, a pure europium luminescence with a PLQY of 29 % was achieved. PMID:26489887

  6. Lanthanide humic substances complexation. I. Experimental evidence for a lanthanide contraction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of the lanthanides (Ln) with humic substances (HS) was investigated with a novel chemical speciation tool, Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS). By using an EDTA-ligand competition method, a bi-modal species distribution of LnEDTA and LnHS is attained, separated by CE, and detected online by sector field ICP-MS. We quantified the binding of all 14 rare earth elements (REEs), Sc and Y with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid under environmental conditions (pH 6-9, 0.001-0.1 mol L -1 NaNO 3, 1-1000 nmol L -1 Ln, 10-20 mg L -1 HS). Conditional binding constants for REE-HS interaction ( Kc) ranged from 8.9 < log Kc < 16.5 under all experimental conditions, and display a lanthanide contraction effect, ΔLKc: a gradual increase in Kc from La to Lu by 2-3 orders of magnitude as a function of decreasing ionic radius. HS polyelectrolyte effects cause Kc to increase with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. ΔLKc increases significantly with increasing pH, and likely with decreasing ionic strength. Based on a strong correlation between ΔLKc values and denticity for organic acids, we suggest that HS form a range of tri- to tetra-dentate complexes under environmental conditions. These results confirm HS to be a strong complexing agent for Ln, and show rigorous experimental evidence for potential REE fractionation by HS complexation.

  7. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  8. On the suitability of lanthanides as actinide analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza

    2008-07-01

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries. (authors)

  9. On the Suitability of Lanthanides as Actinide Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-11

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries.

  10. Towards multifunctional lanthanide-based metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Gerard; Comby, Steve; Zhu, Nianyong; Clérac, Rodolphe; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Schmitt, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    We report the synthesis, structure and physicochemical attributes of a new holmium(III)-based metal-organic framework whose 3D network structure gives rise to porosity; the reported structure-type can be varied using a range of different lanthanide ions to tune the photophysical properties and produce ligand-sensitised near-infrared (NIR) and visible light emitters. PMID:26207535